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Sample records for progeria mutation reveals

  1. An inherited LMNA gene mutation in atypical Progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doubaj, Yassamine; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Vera, Esteves-Vieira; Navarro, Claire Laure; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Tajir, Mariam; Lévy, Nicolas; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2012-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by several clinical features that begin in early childhood, recalling an accelerated aging process. The diagnosis of HGPS is based on the recognition of common clinical features and detection of the recurrent heterozygous c.1824C>T (p.Gly608Gly) mutation within exon 11 in the Lamin A/C encoding gene (LMNA). Besides "typical HGPS," several "atypical progeria" syndromes (APS) have been described, in a clinical spectrum ranging from mandibuloacral dysplasia to atypical Werner syndrome. These patients's clinical features include progeroid manifestations, such as short stature, prominent nose, premature graying of hair, partial alopecia, skin atrophy, lipodystrophy, skeletal anomalies, such as mandibular hypoplasia and acroosteolyses, and in some cases severe atherosclerosis with metabolic complications. APS are due in several cases to de novo heterozygous LMNA mutations other than the p.Gly608Gly, or due to homozygous BAFN1 mutations in Nestor-Guillermo Progeria syndrome (NGPS). We report here and discuss the observation of a non-consanguineous Moroccan patient presenting with atypical progeria. The molecular studies showed the heterozygous mutation c.412G>A (p.Glu138Lys) of the LMNA gene. This mutation, previously reported as a de novo mutation, was inherited from the apparently healthy father who showed a somatic cell mosaicism.

  2. Progeria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Progeria is a rare condition. It is remarkable because its symptoms strongly resemble normal human aging, ... this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial ...

  3. A novel somatic mutation achieves partial rescue in a child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Daniel Z; Arlt, Martin F; Brazier, Joan F; Norris, Wendy E; Campbell, Susan E; Chines, Peter; Larrieu, Delphine; Jackson, Stephen P; Collins, Francis S; Glover, Thomas W; Gordon, Leslie B

    2017-01-01

    Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a fatal sporadic autosomal dominant premature ageing disease caused by single base mutations that optimise a cryptic splice site within exon 11 of the LMNA gene. The resultant disease-causing protein, progerin, acts as a dominant negative. Disease severity relies partly on progerin levels. Methods and results We report a novel form of somatic mosaicism, where a child possessed two cell populations with different HGPS disease-producing mutations of the same nucleotide—one producing severe HGPS and one mild HGPS. The proband possessed an intermediate phenotype. The mosaicism was initially discovered when Sanger sequencing showed a c.1968+2T>A mutation in blood DNA and a c.1968+2T>C in DNA from cultured fibroblasts. Deep sequencing of DNA from the proband's blood revealed 4.7% c.1968+2T>C mutation, and 41.3% c.1968+2T>A mutation. Conclusions We hypothesise that the germline mutation was c.1968+2T>A, but a rescue event occurred during early development, where the somatic mutation from A to C at 1968+2 provided a selective advantage. This type of mosaicism where a partial phenotypic rescue event results from a second but milder disease-causing mutation in the same nucleotide has not been previously characterised for any disease. PMID:27920058

  4. Induced pluripotent stem cells reveal functional differences between drugs currently investigated in patients with hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blondel, Sophie; Jaskowiak, Anne-Laure; Egesipe, Anne-Laure; Le Corf, Amelie; Navarro, Claire; Cordette, Véronique; Martinat, Cécile; Laabi, Yacine; Djabali, Karima; de Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Levy, Nicolas; Peschanski, Marc; Nissan, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare congenital disease characterized by premature aging in children. Identification of the mutation and related molecular mechanisms has rapidly led to independent clinical trials testing different marketed drugs with a preclinically documented impact on those mechanisms. However, the extensive functional effects of those drugs remain essentially unexplored. We have undertaken a systematic comparative study of the three main treatments currently administered or proposed to progeria-affected children, namely, a farnesyltransferase inhibitor, the combination of an aminobisphosphonate and a statin (zoledronate and pravastatin), and the macrolide antibiotic rapamycin. This work was based on the assumption that mesodermal stem cells, which are derived from Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome-induced pluripotent stem cells expressing major defects associated with the disease, may be instrumental to revealing such effects. Whereas all three treatments significantly improved misshapen cell nuclei typically associated with progeria, differences were observed in terms of functional improvement in prelamin A farnesylation, progerin expression, defective cell proliferation, premature osteogenic differentiation, and ATP production. Finally, we have evaluated the effect of the different drug combinations on this cellular model. This study revealed no additional benefit compared with single-drug treatments, whereas a cytostatic effect equivalent to that of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor alone was systematically observed. Altogether, these results reveal the complexity of the modes of action of different drugs, even when they have been selected on the basis of a similar mechanistic hypothesis, and underscore the use of induced pluripotent stem cell derivatives as a critical and powerful tool for standardized, comparative pharmacological studies.

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with G608G LMNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui Kwon; Lee, Jong Yoon; Bae, Eun Ju; Oh, Phil Soo; Park, Won Il; Lee, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Il; Lee, Hong Jin

    2011-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare condition originally described by Hutchinson in 1886. Death result from cardiac complications in the majority of cases and usually occurs at average age of thirteen years. A 4-yr old boy had typical clinical findings such as short stature, craniofacial disproportion, alopecia, prominent scalp veins and sclerodermatous skin. This abnormal appearance began at age of 1 yr. On serological and hormonal evaluation, all values are within normal range. He was neurologically intact with motor and mental development. An echocardiogram showed calcification of aortic and mitral valves. Hypertrophy of internal layer at internal carotid artery suggesting atherosclerosis was found by carotid doppler sonography. He is on low dose aspirin to prevent thromboembolic episodes and on regular follow up. Gene study showed typical G608G (GGC- > GGT) point mutation at exon 11 in LMNA gene. This is a rare case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome confirmed by genetic analysis in Korea.

  6. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome caused by an LMNA mutation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yan; Xu, Zi-Gang; Xu, Zhe; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging of the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a 6-year-old boy who was born at full term but presented with scleroderma-like appearance at 1 month of age and gradually developed clinical manifestations of progeria. He had characteristic facial features of prominent eyes, scalp, and leg veins; loss of scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes; stunted growth; scleroderma-like changes of the skin; and a premature aged appearance. Metabolic investigations showed transient methylmalonic aciduria, and genetic testing of the peripheral blood identified the c.1824C>T heterozygous LMNA mutation. The present case is reported because of its rarity.

  7. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: A premature aging disease caused by LMNA gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray; Askjaer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Products of the LMNA gene, primarily lamin A and C, are key components of the nuclear lamina, a proteinaceous meshwork that underlies the inner nuclear membrane and is essential for proper nuclear architecture. Alterations in lamin A and C that disrupt the integrity of the nuclear lamina affect a whole repertoire of nuclear functions, causing cellular decline. In humans, hundreds of mutations in the LMNA gene have been identified and correlated with over a dozen degenerative disorders, referred to as laminopathies. These diseases include neuropathies, muscular dystrophies, lipodystrophies, and premature aging diseases. This review focuses on one of the most severe laminopathies, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), which is caused by aberrant splicing of the LMNA gene and expression of a mutant product called progerin. Here, we discuss current views about the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the pathophysiology of this devastating disease, as well as the strategies being tested in vitro and in vivo to counteract progerin toxicity. In particular, progerin accumulation elicits nuclear morphological abnormalities, misregulated gene expression, defects in DNA repair, telomere shortening, and genomic instability, all of which limit cellular proliferative capacity. In patients harboring this mutation, a severe premature aging disease develops during childhood. Interestingly, progerin is also produced in senescent cells and cells from old individuals, suggesting that progerin accumulation might be a factor in physiological aging. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms whereby progerin expression leads to HGPS is an emergent area of research, which could bring us closer to understanding the pathology of aging.

  8. Expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria mutation during osteoblast development results in loss of osteocytes, irregular mineralization, and poor biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eva; Nilsson, Ola; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2012-09-28

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a very rare genetic disorder that is characterized by multiple features of premature aging and largely affects tissues of mesenchymal origin. In this study, we describe the development of a tissue-specific mouse model that overexpresses the most common HGPS mutation (LMNA, c.1824C>T, p.G608G) in osteoblasts. Already at the age of 5 weeks, HGPS mutant mice show growth retardation, imbalanced gait and spontaneous fractures. Histopathological examination revealed an irregular bone structure, characterized by widespread loss of osteocytes, defects in mineralization, and a hypocellular red bone marrow. Computerized tomography analysis demonstrated impaired skeletal geometry and altered bone structure. The skeletal defects, which resemble the clinical features reported for bone disease in HGPS patients, was associated with an abnormal osteoblast differentiation. The osteoblast-specific expression of the HGPS mutation increased DNA damage and affected Wnt signaling. In the teeth, irregular dentin formation, as was previously demonstrated in human progeria cases, caused severe dental abnormalities affecting the incisors. The observed phenotype also shows similarities to reported bone abnormalities in aging mice and may therefore help to uncover general principles of the aging process.

  9. Expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Mutation during Osteoblast Development Results in Loss of Osteocytes, Irregular Mineralization, and Poor Biomechanical Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eva; Nilsson, Ola; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a very rare genetic disorder that is characterized by multiple features of premature aging and largely affects tissues of mesenchymal origin. In this study, we describe the development of a tissue-specific mouse model that overexpresses the most common HGPS mutation (LMNA, c.1824C>T, p.G608G) in osteoblasts. Already at the age of 5 weeks, HGPS mutant mice show growth retardation, imbalanced gait and spontaneous fractures. Histopathological examination revealed an irregular bone structure, characterized by widespread loss of osteocytes, defects in mineralization, and a hypocellular red bone marrow. Computerized tomography analysis demonstrated impaired skeletal geometry and altered bone structure. The skeletal defects, which resemble the clinical features reported for bone disease in HGPS patients, was associated with an abnormal osteoblast differentiation. The osteoblast-specific expression of the HGPS mutation increased DNA damage and affected Wnt signaling. In the teeth, irregular dentin formation, as was previously demonstrated in human progeria cases, caused severe dental abnormalities affecting the incisors. The observed phenotype also shows similarities to reported bone abnormalities in aging mice and may therefore help to uncover general principles of the aging process. PMID:22893709

  10. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors and progeria.

    PubMed

    Meta, Margarita; Yang, Shao H; Bergo, Martin O; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G

    2006-10-01

    Genetic mutations that lead to an accumulation of farnesyl-prelamin A cause progeroid syndromes, including Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. It seemed possible that the farnesylated form of prelamin A might be toxic to mammalian cells, accounting for all the disease phenotypes that are characteristic of progeria. This concept led to the hypothesis that protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) might ameliorate the disease phenotypes of progeria in mouse models. Thus far, two different mouse models of progeria have been examined. In both models, FTIs improved progeria-like disease phenotypes. Here, prelamin A post-translational processing is discussed and several mutations underlying human progeroid syndromes are described. In addition, recent data showing that FTIs ameliorate disease phenotypes in a pair of mouse models of progeria are discussed.

  11. Mechanics in human fibroblasts and progeria: Lamin A mutation E145K results in stiffening of nuclei.

    PubMed

    Apte, Ketaki; Stick, Reimer; Radmacher, Manfred

    2017-02-01

    The lamina is a filamentous meshwork beneath the inner nuclear membrane that confers mechanical stability to nuclei. The E145K mutation in lamin A causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). It affects lamin filament assembly and induces profound changes in the nuclear architecture. Expression of wild-type and E145K lamin A in Xenopus oocytes followed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) probing of isolated oocyte nuclei has shown significant changes in the mechanical properties of the lamina. Nuclei of oocytes expressing E145K lamin A are stiffer than those expressing wild-type lamin A. Here we present mechanical measurements by AFM on dermal fibroblasts obtained from a 4-year-old progeria patient bearing the E145K lamin A mutation and compared it to fibroblasts obtained from 2 healthy donors of 10 and 61 years of age, respectively. The abnormal shape of nuclei expressing E145K lamin A was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. Lamina thickness was measured using electron micrographs. Fluorescence microscopy showed alterations in the actin network of progeria cells. AFM probing of whole dermal fibroblasts did not demonstrate significant differences in the elastic moduli of nuclear and cytoplasmic cell regions. In contrast, AFM measurements of isolated nuclei showed that nuclei of progeria and old person's cells are significantly stiffer than those of the young person, indicating that the process of aging, be it natural or abnormal, increases nuclear stiffness. Our results corroborate AFM data obtained using Xenopus oocyte nuclei and prove that the presence of E145K lamin A abnormally increases nuclear stiffness.

  12. A farnesyltransferase inhibitor improves disease phenotypes in mice with a Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shao H.; Meta, Margarita; Qiao, Xin; Frost, David; Bauch, Joy; Coffinier, Catherine; Majumdar, Sharmila; Bergo, Martin O.; Young, Stephen G.; Fong, Loren G.

    2006-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by the production of a truncated prelamin A, called progerin, which is farnesylated at its carboxyl terminus. Progerin is targeted to the nuclear envelope and causes misshapen nuclei. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) mislocalize progerin away from the nuclear envelope and reduce the frequency of misshapen nuclei. To determine whether an FTI would ameliorate disease phenotypes in vivo, we created gene-targeted mice with an HGPS mutation (LmnaHG/+) and then examined the effect of an FTI on disease phenotypes. LmnaHG/+ mice exhibited phenotypes similar to those in human HGPS patients, including retarded growth, reduced amounts of adipose tissue, micrognathia, osteoporosis, and osteolytic lesions in bone. Osteolytic lesions in the ribs led to spontaneous bone fractures. Treatment with an FTI increased adipose tissue mass, improved body weight curves, reduced the number of rib fractures, and improved bone mineralization and bone cortical thickness. These studies suggest that FTIs could be useful for treating humans with HGPS. PMID:16862216

  13. Néstor-Guillermo progeria syndrome: a novel premature aging condition with early onset and chronic development caused by BANF1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Rubén; Cadiñanos, Juan; Villameytide, José A F; Pérez, Mercedes; Longo, Jesús; Richard, José M; Alvarez, Rebeca; Durán, Noelia S; Illán, Rafael; González, Daniel J; López-Otín, Carlos

    2011-11-01

    Progeria syndromes are rare disorders that involve premature aging. Mutations in BANF1 have been recently reported to cause a new hereditary progeroid syndrome that we now propose to call the Néstor-Guillermo progeria syndrome (NGPS). We describe herein the clinical features of the first two NGPS patients, who phenocopy features of classic progerias (i.e., Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome or mandibuloacral dysplasia), such as aged appearance, growth retardation, decreased subcutaneous fat, thin limbs, and stiff joints. However, these NGPS patients have a distinctive phenotype. In their early adulthood (32 and 24 years of age), they have no signs of cardiovascular impairment, diabetes mellitus, or hypertriglyceridemia. In contrast, they suffer profound skeletal abnormalities that affect their quality of life. The observed differences are of utmost importance to patients and their families and palliation of osseous manifestations is a priority, given their relatively long lifespan. We define NGPS as a chronic progeria because of its slow clinical course and relatively long survival, despite its early onset. Understanding the differences between progeria syndromes might contribute to the development of treatment strategies for common skeletal conditions, as well as aging itself.

  14. p.Pro4Arg mutation in LMNA gene: a new atypical progeria phenotype without metabolism abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Luo, Na; Hao, Fei; Bai, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a typical presenile disorder, with mutation in the LMNA gene. Besides HGPS, mutations in LMNA gene have also been reported in atypical progeroid syndrome (APS). The objective of the study was to investigate the phenotype and molecular basis of APS in a Chinese family. LMNA gene mutations were also reviewed to identify the phenotypic and pathogenic differences among APS. Two siblings in a non-consanguineous Chinese family with atypical progeria were reported. The clinical features were observed, including presenile manifestations such as bird-like facial appearance, generalized lipodystrophy involving the extremities and mottled hyperpigmentation on the trunk and extremities. A heterozygous mutation c.11C>G (p.Pro4Arg) of the LMNA gene was detected in the two patients. 28 different variants of the LMNA gene have been reported in APS families, spreading over almost all the 12 exons of the LMNA gene with some hot-spot regions. This is the first detailed description of an APS family without metabolism abnormalities. APS patients share most of the clinical features, but there may be some distinct features in different ethnic groups.

  15. Drug screening on Hutchinson Gilford progeria pluripotent stem cells reveals aminopyrimidines as new modulators of farnesylation.

    PubMed

    Blondel, S; Egesipe, A-L; Picardi, P; Jaskowiak, A-L; Notarnicola, M; Ragot, J; Tournois, J; Le Corf, A; Brinon, B; Poydenot, P; Georges, P; Navarro, C; Pitrez, P R; Ferreira, L; Bollot, G; Bauvais, C; Laustriat, D; Mejat, A; De Sandre-Giovannoli, A; Levy, N; Bifulco, M; Peschanski, M; Nissan, X

    2016-02-18

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by a dramatic appearance of premature aging. HGPS is due to a single-base substitution in exon 11 of the LMNA gene (c.1824C>T) leading to the production of a toxic form of the prelamin A protein called progerin. Because farnesylation process had been shown to control progerin toxicity, in this study we have developed a screening method permitting to identify new pharmacological inhibitors of farnesylation. For this, we have used the unique potential of pluripotent stem cells to have access to an unlimited and relevant biological resource and test 21,608 small molecules. This study identified several compounds, called monoaminopyrimidines, which target two key enzymes of the farnesylation process, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase and farnesyl transferase, and rescue in vitro phenotypes associated with HGPS. Our results opens up new therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of HGPS by identifying a new family of protein farnesylation inhibitors, and which may also be applicable to cancers and diseases associated with mutations that involve farnesylated proteins.

  16. Progeria 101/FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close About Progeria What’s New Progeria FAQ For School Reports Science Behind Progeria Connection to Other Diseases The FTI Drug Scientific Publications Grand Rounds Close Parents & Doctors International Progeria Registry Patient Care ...

  17. Progeria Research Foundation, Inc.

    MedlinePlus

    About Progeria Progeria 101/FAQ The Connection to Other Diseases The Science Behind Progeria The FTI Drug Lonafarnib For School Reports About ... Profile Our Brochure and Logo Quick Facts Chapters Progeria en espanol Meet the Kids Life According to ...

  18. Progeria: a rare genetic premature ageing disorder.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Ghosh, Shampa; Raghunath, Manchala

    2014-05-01

    Progeria is characterized by clinical features that mimic premature ageing. Although the mutation responsible for this syndrome has been deciphered, the mechanism of its action remains elusive. Progeria research has gained momentum particularly in the last two decades because of the possibility of revealing evidences about the ageing process in normal and other pathophysiological conditions. Various experimental models, both in vivo and in vitro, have been developed in an effort to understand the cellular and molecular basis of a number of clinically heterogeneous rare genetic disorders that come under the umbrella of progeroid syndromes (PSs). As per the latest clinical trial reports, Lonafarnib, a farnesyltranferase inhibitor, is a potent 'drug of hope' for Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and has been successful in facilitating weight gain and improving cardiovascular and skeletal pathologies in progeroid children. This can be considered as the dawn of a new era in progeria research and thus, an apt time to review the research developments in this area highlighting the molecular aspects, experimental models, promising drugs in trial and their implications to gain a better understanding of PSs.

  19. Aging: progeria and the lamin connection.

    PubMed

    Kudlow, Brian A; Kennedy, Brian K

    2006-08-22

    The relationship between progerias--diseases that resemble premature aging--and the normal aging process has been a source of debate in the aging research community. A recent study finds that LMNA, a gene targeted for mutation in Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome, may control the onset of aging-associated decline in normal fibroblasts.

  20. Progeria, rapamycin and normal aging: recent breakthrough.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2011-07-01

    A recent discovery that rapamycin suppresses a pro-senescent phenotype in progeric cells not only suggests a non-toxic therapy for progeria but also implies its similarity with normal aging. For one, rapamycin is also known to suppress aging of regular human cells. Here I discuss four potential scenarios, comparing progeria with both normal and accelerated aging. This reveals further indications of rapamycin both for accelerated aging in obese and for progeria.

  1. Targeting protein prenylation in progeria.

    PubMed

    Young, Stephen G; Yang, Shao H; Davies, Brandon S J; Jung, Hea-Jin; Fong, Loren G

    2013-02-06

    A clinical trial of a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor (lonafarnib) for the treatment of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) was recently completed. Here, we discuss the mutation that causes HGPS, the rationale for inhibiting protein farnesyltransferase, the potential limitations of this therapeutic approach, and new potential strategies for treating the disease.

  2. Prelamin A causes progeria through cell-extrinsic mechanisms and prevents cancer invasion.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Jorge; Freije, José M P; Cabanillas, Rubén; Osorio, Fernando G; Fraga, Mario F; Fernández-García, M Soledad; Rad, Roland; Fanjul, Víctor; Ugalde, Alejandro P; Liang, Qi; Prosser, Haydn M; Bradley, Allan; Cadiñanos, Juan; López-Otín, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Defining the relationship between ageing and cancer is a crucial but challenging task. Mice deficient in Zmpste24, a metalloproteinase mutated in human progeria and involved in nuclear prelamin A maturation, recapitulate multiple features of ageing. However, their short lifespan and serious cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic alterations restrict the application and interpretation of carcinogenesis protocols. Here we present Zmpste24 mosaic mice that lack these limitations. Zmpste24 mosaic mice develop normally and keep similar proportions of Zmpste24-deficient (prelamin A-accumulating) and Zmpste24-proficient (mature lamin A-containing) cells throughout life, revealing that cell-extrinsic mechanisms are preeminent for progeria development. Moreover, prelamin A accumulation does not impair tumour initiation and growth, but it decreases the incidence of infiltrating oral carcinomas. Accordingly, silencing of ZMPSTE24 reduces human cancer cell invasiveness. Our results support the potential of cell-based and systemic therapies for progeria and highlight ZMPSTE24 as a new anticancer target.

  3. Prelamin A causes progeria through cell-extrinsic mechanisms and prevents cancer invasion

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Jorge; Freije, José M. P.; Cabanillas, Rubén; Osorio, Fernando G.; Fraga, Mario F.; Fernández-García, M. Soledad; Rad, Roland; Fanjul, Víctor; Ugalde, Alejandro P.; Liang, Qi; Prosser, Haydn M.; Bradley, Allan; Cadiñanos, Juan; López-Otín, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Defining the relationship between ageing and cancer is a crucial but challenging task. Mice deficient in Zmpste24, a metalloproteinase mutated in human progeria and involved in nuclear prelamin A maturation, recapitulate multiple features of ageing. However, their short lifespan and serious cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic alterations restrict the application and interpretation of carcinogenesis protocols. Here we present Zmpste24 mosaic mice that lack these limitations. Zmpste24 mosaic mice develop normally and keep similar proportions of Zmpste24-deficient (prelamin A accumulating) and Zmpste24-proficient (mature lamin A containing) cells throughout life, revealing that cell-extrinsic mechanisms are preeminent for progeria development. Moreover, prelamin A accumulation does not impair tumour initiation and growth, but it decreases the incidence of infiltrating oral carcinomas. Accordingly, silencing of ZMPSTE24 reduces human cancer cell invasiveness. Our results support the potential of cell-based and systemic therapies for progeria and highlight ZMPSTE24 as a new anticancer target. PMID:23917225

  4. Reprogramming aging and progeria.

    PubMed

    Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    The aging rate of an organism depends on the ratio of tissue degeneration to tissue repair. As a consequence, molecular alterations that tip this balance toward degeneration cause accelerated aging. Conversely, interventions can be pursued to reduce tissue degeneration or to increase tissue repair with the aim of delaying the onset of age-associated manifestations. Recent studies on the biology of stem cells in aging have revealed the influence of systemic factors on their functionality and demonstrated the feasibility of reprogramming aged and progeroid cells. These results illustrate the reversibility of some aspects of the aging process and encourage the search for new anti-aging and anti-progeria interventions.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... important role in determining the shape of the nucleus within cells. It is an essential scaffolding (supporting) ... envelope, which is the membrane that surrounds the nucleus . Mutations that cause Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome result ...

  6. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects.

    PubMed

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7 weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.

  7. Progeria Research Foundation Diagnostic Testing Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close About Progeria What’s New Progeria FAQ For School Reports Science Behind Progeria Connection to Other Diseases The FTI Drug Scientific Publications Grand Rounds Close Parents & Doctors International Progeria Registry Patient Care ...

  8. A human iPSC model of Hutchinson Gilford Progeria reveals vascular smooth muscle and mesenchymal stem cell defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinqiu; Lian, Qizhou; Zhu, Guili; Zhou, Fan; Sui, Lin; Tan, Cindy; Mutalif, Rafidah Abdul; Navasankari, Raju; Zhang, Yuelin; Tse, Hung-Fat; Stewart, Colin L; Colman, Alan

    2011-01-07

    The segmental premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a truncated and farnesylated form of Lamin A called progerin. HGPS affects mesenchymal lineages, including the skeletal system, dermis, and vascular smooth muscle (VSMC). To understand the underlying molecular pathology of HGPS, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from HGPS dermal fibroblasts. The iPSCs were differentiated into neural progenitors, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, VSMCs, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Progerin levels were highest in MSCs, VSMCs, and fibroblasts, in that order, with these lineages displaying increased DNA damage, nuclear abnormalities, and HGPS-VSMC accumulating numerous calponin-staining inclusion bodies. Both HGPS-MSC and -VSMC viability was compromised by stress and hypoxia in vitro and in vivo (MSC). Because MSCs reside in low oxygen niches in vivo, we propose that, in HGPS, this causes additional depletion of the MSC pool responsible for replacing differentiated cells lost to progerin toxicity.

  9. Genome-scale expression profiling of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome reveals widespread transcriptional misregulation leading to mesodermal/mesenchymal defects and accelerated atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Csoka, Antonei B; English, Sangeeta B; Simkevich, Carl P; Ginzinger, David G; Butte, Atul J; Schatten, Gerald P; Rothman, Frank G; Sedivy, John M

    2004-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disease with widespread phenotypic features resembling premature aging. HGPS was recently shown to be caused by dominant mutations in the LMNA gene, resulting in the in-frame deletion of 50 amino acids near the carboxyl terminus of the encoded lamin A protein. Children with this disease typically succumb to myocardial infarction or stroke caused by severe atherosclerosis at an average age of 13 years. To elucidate further the molecular pathogenesis of this disease, we compared the gene expression patterns of three HGPS fibroblast cell strains heterozygous for the LMNA mutation with three normal, age-matched cell strains. We defined a set of 361 genes (1.1% of the approximately 33,000 genes analysed) that showed at least a 2-fold, statistically significant change. The most prominent categories encode transcription factors and extracellular matrix proteins, many of which are known to function in the tissues severely affected in HGPS. The most affected gene, MEOX2/GAX, is a homeobox transcription factor implicated as a negative regulator of mesodermal tissue proliferation. Thus, at the gene expression level, HGPS shows the hallmarks of a developmental disorder affecting mesodermal and mesenchymal cell lineages. The identification of a large number of genes implicated in atherosclerosis is especially valuable, because it provides clues to pathological processes that can now be investigated in HGPS patients or animal models.

  10. A homozygous ZMPSTE24 null mutation in combination with a heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS): insights into the pathophysiology of HGPS.

    PubMed

    Denecke, Jonas; Brune, Thomas; Feldhaus, Tobias; Robenek, Horst; Kranz, Christian; Auchus, Richard J; Agarwal, Anil K; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2006-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder normally caused by a spontaneous heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene that codes for the nuclear lamina protein lamin A. Several enzymes are involved in the processing of its precursor, prelamin A, to the mature lamin A. A functional knockout of one of the enzymes involved in prelamin A processing, the zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24, causes an even more severe disorder with early neonatal death described as restrictive dermatopathy (RD). This work describes a HGPS patient with a combined defect of a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in the ZMPSTE24 gene and a heterozygous mutation in the LMNA gene that results in a C-terminal elongation of the final lamin A. Whereas the loss of function mutation of ZMPSTE24 normally results in lethal RD, the truncation of LMNA seems to be a salvage alteration alleviating the clinical picture to the HGPS phenotype. The mutations of our patient indicate that farnesylated prelamin A is the deleterious agent leading to the HGPS phenotype, which gives further insights into the pathophysiology of the disorder.

  11. Learning about Progeria

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008 Inhibiting farnesylation of progerin prevents the characteristic nuclear blebbing of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome Proceedings of ... That abnormal protein appears to destabilize the cell's nuclear membrane in a way that may be particularly ...

  12. Progeria Research Foundation, Inc.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Lines Ordering Information Lymphoblast Cell Culture Protocols Fibroblast Cell Culture Protocols Immortalized Cell Culture Protocols Induced ... cure for Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and its aging-related disorders, including heart disease. Get Involved Today, ...

  13. Progeria 101/FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interview with John Tacket Find the Other 150 Medical Research NEW! Lonafarnib Pre-clinical Drug Supply Program What's ... Progeria gene is a major achievement for the medical research community,” said Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the ...

  14. Aging of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts is characterised by hyperproliferation and increased apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Joanna M; Kill, Ian R

    2004-05-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that mimics certain aspects of aging prematurely. Recent work has revealed that mutations in the lamin A gene are a cause of the disease. We show here that cellular aging of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts is characterised by a period of hyperproliferation and terminates with a large increase in the rate of apoptosis. The occurrence of cells with abnormal nuclear morphology reported by others is shown to be a result of cell division since the fraction of these abnormalities increases with cellular age. Similarly, the proportion of cells with an abnormal or absent A-type lamina increases with age. These data provide clues as to the cellular basis for premature aging in HGPS and support the view that cellular senescence and tissue homeostasis are important factors in the normal aging process.

  15. Neonatal progeria: increased ratio of progerin to lamin A leads to progeria of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Reunert, Janine; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Walter, Michael; Jakubiczka, Sibylle; Zenker, Martin; Brune, Thomas; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2012-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an important model disease for premature ageing. Affected children appear healthy at birth, but develop the first symptoms during their first year of life. They die at an average age of 13 years, mostly because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Classical progeria is caused by the heterozygous point mutation c.1824C>T in the LMNA gene, which activates a cryptic splice site. The affected protein cannot be processed correctly to mature lamin A, but is modified into a farnesylated protein truncated by 50 amino acids (progerin). Three more variations in LMNA result in the same mutant protein, but different grades of disease severity. We describe a patient with the heterozygous LMNA mutation c.1821G>A, leading to neonatal progeria with death in the first year of life. Intracellular lamin A was downregulated in the patient's fibroblasts and the ratio of progerin to lamin A was increased when compared with HGPS. It is suggestive that the ratio of farnesylated protein to mature lamin A determines the disease severity in progeria.

  16. Neonatal progeria: increased ratio of progerin to lamin A leads to progeria of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Reunert, Janine; Wentzell, Rüdiger; Walter, Michael; Jakubiczka, Sibylle; Zenker, Martin; Brune, Thomas; Rust, Stephan; Marquardt, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an important model disease for premature ageing. Affected children appear healthy at birth, but develop the first symptoms during their first year of life. They die at an average age of 13 years, mostly because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Classical progeria is caused by the heterozygous point mutation c.1824C>T in the LMNA gene, which activates a cryptic splice site. The affected protein cannot be processed correctly to mature lamin A, but is modified into a farnesylated protein truncated by 50 amino acids (progerin). Three more variations in LMNA result in the same mutant protein, but different grades of disease severity. We describe a patient with the heterozygous LMNA mutation c.1821G>A, leading to neonatal progeria with death in the first year of life. Intracellular lamin A was downregulated in the patient's fibroblasts and the ratio of progerin to lamin A was increased when compared with HGPS. It is suggestive that the ratio of farnesylated protein to mature lamin A determines the disease severity in progeria. PMID:22419169

  17. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    MedlinePlus

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation Written ... accelerated aging in children. Children with Progeria need Physical Therapy (PT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) as often as ...

  18. Effect of progerin on the accumulation of oxidized proteins in fibroblasts from Hutchinson Gilford progeria patients.

    PubMed

    Viteri, Gabriela; Chung, Youn Wook; Stadtman, Earl R

    2010-01-01

    The mutation responsible for Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) causes abnormal nuclear morphology. Previous studies show that free radicals and reactive oxygen species play major roles in the etiology and/or progression of neurodegenerative diseases and aging. This study compares oxidative stress responses between progeric and normal fibroblasts. Our data revealed higher ROS levels in HGPS cells compared to age-matched controls. In response to oxidative challenge, progeric cells showed increased mRNA levels for mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD) and SOD protein content. However, this did not prevent a drop in the ATP content of progeria fibroblasts. Previous studies have shown that declines in human fibroblast ATP levels interfere with programmed cell death and promote necrotic inflammation. Notably, in our investigations the ATP content of progeria fibroblasts was only approximately 50% of that found in healthy controls. Furthermore, HGPS fibroblast analysis revealed a decrease in total caspase-like proteasome activity and in the levels of two active proteolytic complex subunits (beta(5) and beta(7)). A number of studies indicate that the molecular mechanisms causing accelerated aging in progeric patients also occur in healthy cells of older individuals. Thus, the results of this study may also help explain some of the cellular changes that accompany normal aging.

  19. Progeria in twins

    PubMed Central

    Viégas, Judith; Souza, P. L. R.; Salzano, F. M.

    1974-01-01

    A pair of male monozygotic twins, both affected by progeria is described. The concordance in this manifestation suggests a genetic aetiology and other evidence indicates the implication of autosomal recessive factors; the chromosomes of these patients show no detectable abnormalities. Images PMID:4443987

  20. Labor Market Progeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodeheaver, Dean

    1990-01-01

    Social ambivalence toward women's roles, sexuality, appearance, and aging combine with social standards of attractiveness to create both age and sex discrimination in the workplace. The life expectancy of presentability is shorter among women than men, thus creating an accelerated aging process termed labor market progeria. (SK)

  1. Labor Market Progeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodeheaver, Dean

    1990-01-01

    Social ambivalence toward women's roles, sexuality, appearance, and aging combine with social standards of attractiveness to create both age and sex discrimination in the workplace. The life expectancy of presentability is shorter among women than men, thus creating an accelerated aging process termed labor market progeria. (SK)

  2. LMNA-associated cardiocutaneous progeria: an inherited autosomal dominant premature aging syndrome with late onset.

    PubMed

    Kane, Megan S; Lindsay, Mark E; Judge, Daniel P; Barrowman, Jemima; Ap Rhys, Colette; Simonson, Lisa; Dietz, Harry C; Michaelis, Susan

    2013-07-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA, which encodes the nuclear scaffold proteins lamin A and C. In HGPS and related progerias, processing of prelamin A is blocked at a critical step mediated by the zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24. LMNA-linked progerias can be grouped into two classes: (1) the processing-deficient, early onset "typical" progerias (e.g., HGPS), and (2) the processing-proficient "atypical" progeria syndromes (APS) that are later in onset. Here we describe a previously unrecognized progeria syndrome with prominent cutaneous and cardiovascular manifestations belonging to the second class. We suggest the name LMNA-associated cardiocutaneous progeria syndrome (LCPS) for this disorder. Affected patients are normal at birth but undergo progressive cutaneous changes in childhood and die in middle age of cardiovascular complications, including accelerated atherosclerosis, calcific valve disease, and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the proband demonstrated cancer susceptibility, a phenotype rarely described for LMNA-based progeria disorders. The LMNA mutation that caused LCPS in this family is a heterozygous c.899A>G (p.D300G) mutation predicted to alter the coiled-coil domain of lamin A/C. In skin fibroblasts isolated from the proband, the processing and levels of lamin A and C are normal. However, nuclear morphology is aberrant and rescued by treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors, as is also the case for HGPS and other laminopathies. Our findings advance knowledge of human LMNA progeria syndromes, and raise the possibility that typical and atypical progerias may converge upon a common mechanism to cause premature aging disease.

  3. Progeria Research Day at Brunel University.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Joanna M; Eskiw, Christopher H; Makarov, Evgeny M; Tree, David; Kill, Ian R

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a severe premature aging syndrome that affects children. These children display characteristics associated with normal aging and die young usually from cardiovascular problems or stroke. Classical HGPS is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear structural protein lamin A. This mutation leads to a novel version of lamin A that retains a farnesyl group from its processing. This protein is called Progerin and is toxic to cellular function. Pre-lamin A is an immature version of lamin A and also has a farnesylation modification, which is cleaved in the maturation process to create lamin A.

  4. Progeria Research Day at Brunel University

    PubMed Central

    Eskiw, Christopher H.; Makarov, Evgeny M.; Tree, David; Kill, Ian R.

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a severe premature aging syndrome that affects children. These children display characteristics associated with normal aging and die young usually from cardiovascular problems or stroke. Classical HGPS is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear structural protein lamin A. This mutation leads to a novel version of lamin A that retains a farnesyl group from its processing. This protein is called Progerin and is toxic to cellular function. Pre-lamin A is an immature version of lamin A and also has a farnesylation modification, which is cleaved in the maturation process to create lamin A. PMID:22064469

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Nicole J; Gordon, Leslie B

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare, uniformly fatal, segmental "premature aging" disease in which children exhibit phenotypes that may give us insights into the aging process at both the cellular and organismal levels. Initial presentation in early childhood is primarily based on growth and dermatologic findings. Primary morbidity and mortality for children with HGPS is from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and strokes with death occurring at an average age of 14.6 years. There is increasing data to support a unique phenotype of the craniofacial and cerebrovascular anatomy that accompanies the premature aging process. Strokes in HGPS can occur downstream of carotid artery and/or vertebral artery occlusion, stenosis, and calcification, with prominent collateral vessel formation. Both large and small vessel disease are present, and strokes are often clinically silent. Despite the presence of multisystem premature aging, children with HGPS do not appear to have cognitive deterioration, suggesting that some aspects of brain function may be protected from the deleterious effects of progerin, the disease-causing protein. Based on limited autopsy material, there is no pathologic evidence of dementia or Alzheimer-type changes. In a transgenic mouse model of progeria with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone, and heart, there are distortions of neuronal nuclei at the ultrastructural level with irregular shape and severe invaginations, but no evidence of inclusions or aberrant tau in brain sections. Importantly, the nuclear distortions did not result in significant changes in gene expression in hippocampal neurons. This chapter will discuss both preclinical and clinical aspects of the genetics, pathobiology, clinical phenotype, clinical care, and treatment of HGPS, with special attention toward neurologic and cutaneous findings.

  6. Progeria, the nucleolus and farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ishita S; Bridger, Joanna M; Kill, Ian R

    2010-02-01

    HGPS (Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome) is a rare genetic disease affecting children causing them to age and die prematurely. The disease is typically due to a point mutation in the coding sequence for the nuclear intermediate-type filament protein lamin A and gives rise to a dominant-negative splice variant named progerin. Accumulation of progerin within nuclei causes disruption to nuclear structure, causes and premature replicative senescence and increases apoptosis. Now it appears that accumulation of progerin may have more widespread effects than previously thought since the demonstration that the presence and distribution of some nucleolar proteins are also adversely affected in progeria cells. One of the major breakthroughs both in the lamin field and for this syndrome is that many of the cellular defects observed in HGPS patient cells and model systems can be restored after treatment with a class of compounds known as FTIs (farnesyltransferase inhibitors). Indeed, it is demonstrated that FTI-277 is able to completely restore nucleolar antigen localization in treated progeria cells. This is encouraging news for the HGPS patients who are currently undergoing clinical trials with FTI treatment.

  7. Stem cell depletion in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rosengardten, Ylva; McKenna, Tomás; Grochová, Diana; Eriksson, Maria

    2011-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS or progeria) is a very rare genetic disorder with clinical features suggestive of premature aging. Here, we show that induced expression of the most common HGPS mutation (LMNA c.1824C>T, p.G608G) results in a decreased epidermal population of adult stem cells and impaired wound healing in mice. Isolation and growth of primary keratinocytes from these mice demonstrated a reduced proliferative potential and ability to form colonies. Downregulation of the epidermal stem cell maintenance protein p63 with accompanying activation of DNA repair and premature senescence was the probable cause of this loss of adult stem cells. Additionally, upregulation of multiple genes in major inflammatory pathways indicated an activated inflammatory response. This response has also been associated with normal aging, emphasizing the importance of studying progeria to increase the understanding of the normal aging process.

  8. Progeria and the early aging in children: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Vania O; Celli, Adriane; Bancke Laverde, Bruno Leonardo; Cunico, Caroline; Santos Piedade, Guilherme; Lucas de Mello, Manuela; Beirao Junior, Paulo Sergio

    2016-02-17

    The Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome or progeria is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by premature aging and involvement of internal systems, such as the circulatory and locomotor. The diagnosis is essentially clinical and the manifestations become more evident from the first year of life. Long term outcome data from Progeria Research Foundation clinical trials have demonstrated an increase in survival in recent years. Even though new trials are ongoing, the recognition of this syndrome is essential to prevent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. A patient, initially asymptomatic, who developed characteristic signs of the syndrome at the age of 6 months is reported. She was referred for evaluation only when she was two years and eleven months old. The diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome was suspected owing to clinical characteristics. The diagnosis was confirmed by genetic testing. A mutation c.1824C> T in exon 11 of the LMNA gene was detected. She was registered in the Progeria Research Foundation and was invited to participate in the weighing and supplementation program. She was included in the lonafarnib protocol study. This medication is a farnesyl transferase inhibitor that prevents the production of progerina and slows cardiovascular and neurological complications of the syndrome. This case highlights the importance of diagnosing progeria patients because they may be referred to the Progeria Research Foundation, which offers genetic screening and inclusion in clinical and therapeutic follow-up protocols without any costs. Progeria trials and research may also contribute to new drug developments related to prevention of aging and atherosclerosis in the near future.

  9. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC), which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%). KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13%) intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33%) perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors. PMID:21303542

  10. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Uma Shankar; Sitaraman, S; Mehta, Sharad; Panse, Gauri

    2010-01-01

    Progeria is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging, involving the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a 4-year-old boy who presented with clinical manifestations of progeria. He had characteristic facies, prominent eyes, scalp and leg veins, senile look, loss of scalp hair, eyebrows and eyelashes, stunted growth, and sclerodermatous changes. The present case is reported due to its rarity.

  11. Growth hormone therapy in progeria.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Nejad, Ab; Demmer, Laurie

    2007-05-01

    Catabolic processes seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria resemble those of normal aging and, in the affected children, usually result in death at an early age. In addition to its growth promoting effects, growth hormone (GH) has potent anabolic properties. Administration of GH ameliorates some of the catabolic effects of normal aging. We report the results of GH treatment in a young child with progeria.

  12. Cell autonomous and systemic factors in progeria development.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Fernando G; Ugalde, Alejandro P; Mariño, Guillermo; Puente, Xose S; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    Progeroid laminopathies are accelerated aging syndromes caused by defects in nuclear envelope proteins. Accordingly, mutations in the LMNA gene and functionally related genes have been described to cause HGPS (Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome), MAD (mandibuloacral dysplasia) or RD (restrictive dermopathy). Functional studies with animal and cellular models of these syndromes have facilitated the identification of the molecular alterations and regulatory pathways involved in progeria development. We have recently described a novel regulatory pathway involving miR-29 and p53 tumour suppressor which has provided valuable information on the molecular components orchestrating the response to nuclear damage stress. Furthermore, by using progeroid mice deficient in ZMPSTE24 (zinc metalloprotease STE24 homologue) involved in lamin A maturation, we have demonstrated that, besides these abnormal cellular responses to stress, dysregulation of the somatotropic axis is responsible for some of the alterations associated with progeria. Consistent with these observations, pharmacological restoration of the somatotroph axis in these mice delays the onset of their progeroid features, significantly extending their lifespan and supporting the importance of systemic alterations in progeria progression. Finally, we have very recently identified a novel progeroid syndrome with distinctive features from HGPS and MAD, which we have designated NGPS (Néstor-Guillermo progeria syndrome) (OMIM #614008). This disorder is caused by a mutation in BANF1, a gene encoding a protein with essential functions in the assembly of the nuclear envelope, further illustrating the importance of the nuclear lamina integrity for human health and providing additional support to the study of progeroid syndromes as a valuable source of information on human aging.

  13. Genetics of aging, progeria and lamin disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shrestha; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2014-06-01

    Premature aging disorders, like Werner syndrome, Bloom's syndrome, and Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), have been the subjects of immense interest as they recapitulate many of the phenotypes observed in physiological aging. They, therefore, not only provide model systems to study normal aging processes but also give valuable insights into the intricate mechanisms underlying senescence. Recent works on HGPS have revealed alterations in a spectrum of cellular and molecular pathways involved in the maintenance of genomic integrity, thus suggesting a profound impact of the nuclear lamina in nuclear organization, chromatin dynamics, regulation of gene expression and epigenetics.

  14. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chandravanshi, Shivcharan L; Rawat, Ashok Kumar; Dwivedi, Prem Chand; Choudhary, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP) syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning 'prematurely old'. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2) and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described.

  15. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chandravanshi, Shivcharan L; Rawat, Ashok Kumar; Dwivedi, Prem Chand; Choudhary, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP) syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning ‘prematurely old’. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2) and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described. PMID:22011502

  16. [Three cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome].

    PubMed

    Doubaj, Y; Lamzouri, A; Elalaoui, S-C; Laarabi, F-Z; Sefiani, A

    2011-02-01

    Progeria, or Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, is a rare genetic disease, characterized by several clinical features that develop in childhood, in particular, an accelerated aging aspect. Its incidence is 1-4 per 8 million newborns. Children with progeria syndrome usually appear normal at birth and in early infancy. Profound failure to thrive occurs during the 1st year. Characteristic facies, partial alopecia progressing to total alopecia, loss of subcutaneous fat, stiffness of joints, bone changes, and abnormal tightness of the skin over the abdomen and upper thighs usually become apparent during the 2nd to 3rd years. Motor and mental development is normal. Patients develop severe atherosclerosis. Death occurs as a result of complications of cardiac or cerebrovascular disease (heart attack or stroke) generally between ages 6 and 20 years. The diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is based on recognition of common clinical features and the detection of the recurrent p.Gly608Gly mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, which is present in almost all individuals with HGPS. We present here 3 patients aged 5, 11, and 12 years referred to genetic consultation for dysmorphic facies and failure to thrive. After careful clinical examination and paraclinical assessment, the diagnosis of progeria syndrome was raised. We performed molecular analysis for the 3 patients by searching for the recurrent mutation c.1824C>T (p.Gly608Gly) of the LMNA gene, which was found only in 1 patient. We discuss the geneticist's role in the diagnosis of rare dysmorphic syndromes and their genetic counseling. We also analyze the clinical spectrum of HGPS by comparing the 3 patients.

  17. Aberrant DNA methylation profiles in the premature aging disorders Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria and Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Esteller, Manel

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation gradiently changes with age and is likely to be involved in aging-related processes with subsequent phenotype changes and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. The Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGP) and Werner Syndrome (WS) are two premature aging diseases showing features of common natural aging early in life. Mutations in the LMNA and WRN genes were associated to disease onset; however, for a subset of patients the underlying causative mechanisms remain elusive. We aimed to evaluate the role of epigenetic alteration on premature aging diseases by performing comprehensive DNA methylation profiling of HGP and WS patients. We observed profound changes in the DNA methylation landscapes of WRN and LMNA mutant patients, which were narrowed down to a set of aging related genes and processes. Although of low overall variance, non-mutant patients revealed differential DNA methylation at distinct loci. Hence, we propose DNA methylation to have an impact on premature aging diseases.

  18. A novel homozygous p.Arg527Leu LMNA mutation in two unrelated Egyptian families causes overlapping mandibuloacral dysplasia and progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Haggar, Mohammad; Madej-Pilarczyk, Agnieszka; Kozlowski, Lukasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Yahia, Sohier; Abdel-Hadi, Dina; Shams, Amany; Ahmad, Nermin; Hamed, Sahar; Puzianowska-Kuznicka, Monika

    2012-11-01

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD) is a rare disease resulting from a mutation of LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C. The most common mutation associated with this disease is a homozygous arginine 527 replacement by histidine. Three female patients originating from two unrelated families from Northeast Egypt were examined. Their growth was retarded; they had microcephaly, widened cranial sutures, prominent eyes and cheeks, micrognathia, dental crowding, hypoplastic mandible, acro-osteolysis of distal phalanges, and joint contractures. In addition, they presented some progeroid features, such as pinched nose, premature loss of teeth, loss of hair, scleroderma-like skin atrophy, spine rigidity, and waddling gait. The clinical presentation of the disease varied between the patient originating from Family 1 and patients from Family 2, suggesting that unknown, possibly epigenetic factors, modify the course of the disease. The first symptoms of the disease appeared at the age of 2.5 (a girl from Family 1), 5, and 3 years (girls from Family 2). All patients had the same, novel homozygous c.1580G>T LMNA mutation, resulting in the replacement of arginine 527 by leucine. Computational predictions of such substitution effects suggested that it might alter protein stability and increase the tendency for protein aggregation, and as a result, might influence its interaction with other proteins. In addition, restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis performed in 178 unrelated individuals showed that up to 1.12% of inhabitants of Northeast Egypt might be heterozygous carriers of this mutation, suggesting the presence of a founder effect in this area.

  19. A novel homozygous p.Arg527Leu LMNA mutation in two unrelated Egyptian families causes overlapping mandibuloacral dysplasia and progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Haggar, Mohammad; Madej-Pilarczyk, Agnieszka; Kozlowski, Lukasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Yahia, Sohier; Abdel-Hadi, Dina; Shams, Amany; Ahmad, Nermin; Hamed, Sahar; Puzianowska-Kuznicka, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD) is a rare disease resulting from a mutation of LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C. The most common mutation associated with this disease is a homozygous arginine 527 replacement by histidine. Three female patients originating from two unrelated families from Northeast Egypt were examined. Their growth was retarded; they had microcephaly, widened cranial sutures, prominent eyes and cheeks, micrognathia, dental crowding, hypoplastic mandible, acro-osteolysis of distal phalanges, and joint contractures. In addition, they presented some progeroid features, such as pinched nose, premature loss of teeth, loss of hair, scleroderma-like skin atrophy, spine rigidity, and waddling gait. The clinical presentation of the disease varied between the patient originating from Family 1 and patients from Family 2, suggesting that unknown, possibly epigenetic factors, modify the course of the disease. The first symptoms of the disease appeared at the age of 2.5 (a girl from Family 1), 5, and 3 years (girls from Family 2). All patients had the same, novel homozygous c.1580G>T LMNA mutation, resulting in the replacement of arginine 527 by leucine. Computational predictions of such substitution effects suggested that it might alter protein stability and increase the tendency for protein aggregation, and as a result, might influence its interaction with other proteins. In addition, restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis performed in 178 unrelated individuals showed that up to 1.12% of inhabitants of Northeast Egypt might be heterozygous carriers of this mutation, suggesting the presence of a founder effect in this area. PMID:22549407

  20. Progeria with post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis: a rare case report with differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Alphy A; Ahsan, Auswaf K

    2013-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by craniofacial disproportion, delayed dentition, micrognathia, and plucked bird appearance. The genetic defect is mainly de nova mutation in the lamin A gene. This report describes a 16-year-old patient with classical features of progeria along with post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. The symptoms of hepatomegaly were also present in the patient. The differential diagnoses of this lesion are also discussed in detail in this literature.

  1. Gene-rich chromosomal regions are preferentially localized in the lamin B deficient nuclear blebs of atypical progeria cells.

    PubMed

    Bercht Pfleghaar, Katrin; Taimen, Pekka; Butin-Israeli, Veronika; Shimi, Takeshi; Langer-Freitag, Sabine; Markaki, Yolanda; Goldman, Anne E; Wehnert, Manfred; Goldman, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    More than 20 mutations in the gene encoding A-type lamins (LMNA) cause progeria, a rare premature aging disorder. The major pathognomonic hallmarks of progeria cells are seen as nuclear deformations or blebs that are related to the redistribution of A- and B-type lamins within the nuclear lamina. However, the functional significance of these progeria-associated blebs remains unknown. We have carried out an analysis of the structural and functional consequences of progeria-associated nuclear blebs in dermal fibroblasts from a progeria patient carrying a rare point mutation p.S143F (C428T) in lamin A/C. These blebs form microdomains that are devoid of major structural components of the nuclear envelope (NE)/lamina including B-type lamins and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and are enriched in A-type lamins. Using laser capture microdissection and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses, we show that, while these domains are devoid of centromeric heterochromatin and gene-poor regions of chromosomes, they are enriched in gene-rich chromosomal regions. The active form of RNA polymerase II is also greatly enriched in blebs as well as nascent RNA but the nuclear co-activator SKIP is significantly reduced in blebs compared to other transcription factors. Our results suggest that the p.S143F progeria mutation has a severe impact not only on the structure of the lamina but also on the organization of interphase chromatin domains and transcription. These structural defects are likely to contribute to gene expression changes reported in progeria and other types of laminopathies.

  2. Gene-rich chromosomal regions are preferentially localized in the lamin B deficient nuclear blebs of atypical progeria cells

    PubMed Central

    Bercht Pfleghaar, Katrin; Taimen, Pekka; Butin-Israeli, Veronika; Shimi, Takeshi; Langer-Freitag, Sabine; Markaki, Yolanda; Goldman, Anne E; Wehnert, Manfred; Goldman, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    More than 20 mutations in the gene encoding A-type lamins (LMNA) cause progeria, a rare premature aging disorder. The major pathognomonic hallmarks of progeria cells are seen as nuclear deformations or blebs that are related to the redistribution of A- and B-type lamins within the nuclear lamina. However, the functional significance of these progeria-associated blebs remains unknown. We have carried out an analysis of the structural and functional consequences of progeria-associated nuclear blebs in dermal fibroblasts from a progeria patient carrying a rare point mutation p.S143F (C428T) in lamin A/C. These blebs form microdomains that are devoid of major structural components of the nuclear envelope (NE)/lamina including B-type lamins and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and are enriched in A-type lamins. Using laser capture microdissection and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses, we show that, while these domains are devoid of centromeric heterochromatin and gene-poor regions of chromosomes, they are enriched in gene-rich chromosomal regions. The active form of RNA polymerase II is also greatly enriched in blebs as well as nascent RNA but the nuclear co-activator SKIP is significantly reduced in blebs compared to other transcription factors. Our results suggest that the p.S143F progeria mutation has a severe impact not only on the structure of the lamina but also on the organization of interphase chromatin domains and transcription. These structural defects are likely to contribute to gene expression changes reported in progeria and other types of laminopathies. PMID:25738644

  3. Radiographic presentation of musculoskeletal involvement in Werner syndrome (adult progeria).

    PubMed

    David, A; Vincent, M; Arrigoni, P P; Barbarot, S; Pistorius, M A; Isidor, B; Frampas, E

    2016-12-05

    Werner syndrome (i.e., adult progeria) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the WRN gene, which is characterized by the premature appearance of features associated with normal aging and cancer predisposition. Patients with Werner syndrome can present with musculoskeletal complaints, associated with suggestive radiographic features with a potential prognostic or therapeutic impact. This review illustrates the main radiographic features of Werner syndrome, focusing on the musculoskeletal system, such as soft-tissue calcification, muscular atrophy, osteoporosis, foot deformities, osteitis and osteomyelitis, and bone or soft-tissues malignancies. The identification of these features by radiologists can therefore be useful in the clinical screening of Werner syndrome.

  4. Altered levels of primary antioxidant enzymes in progeria skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yan, T; Li, S; Jiang, X; Oberley, L W

    1999-04-02

    Free radicals are involved in the aging process. In this study, the profile of primary antioxidant enzymes that scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) was examined for the first time in human skin fibroblasts from progeria, a premature aging disease. Altered levels of antioxidant enzymes were found in progeria cells. Basal levels of MnSOD were decreased in progeria cells as well as a blunted induction in response to chronic stress. This change may contribute to the accelerated aging process in progeria cells. In contrast, the levels of CuZnSOD showed no progeria-related change. Two H2O2 removing enzymes demonstrated a significant reduction in progeria cells: only 50% of normal CAT activity and 30% of normal GPX activity can be detected in progeria cells. This diminished H2O2 removing capacity in progeria cells may lead to an imbalance of intracellular ROS and therefore may play an important role in the development of progeria.

  5. Molecular ageing in progeroid syndromes: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a model

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Henrique Douglas M; Falcão-Silva, Vivyanne S; Gonçalves, Gregório Fernandes; da Nóbrega, Raphael Batista

    2009-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that belongs to a group of conditions called laminopathies which affect nuclear lamins. Mutations in two genes, LMNA and ZMPSTE24, have been found in patients with HGPS. The p.G608G LMNA mutation is the most commonly reported mutation. The aim of this work was to compile a comprehensive literature review of the clinical features and genetic mutations and mechanisms of this syndrome as a contribution to health care workers. This review shows the necessity of a more detailed clinical identification of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and the need for more studies on the pharmacologic and pharmacogenomic approach to this syndrome. PMID:19379495

  6. Pluripotent stem cells to model Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS): Current trends and future perspectives for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Nissan, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Progeria, or Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), is a rare, fatal genetic disease characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. This syndrome is typically caused by mutations in codon 608 (p.G608G) of the LMNA, leading to the production of a mutated form of lamin A precursor called progerin. In HGPS, progerin accumulates in cells causing progressive molecular defects, including nuclear shape abnormalities, chromatin disorganization, damage to DNA and delays in cell proliferation. Here we report how, over the past five years, pluripotent stem cells have provided new insights into the study of HGPS and opened new original therapeutic perspectives to treat the disease.

  7. Biomedical Impact of Splicing Mutations Revealed through Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Taneri, Bahar; Asilmaz, Esra; Gaasterland, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Splicing is a cellular mechanism, which dictates eukaryotic gene expression by removing the noncoding introns and ligating the coding exons in the form of a messenger RNA molecule. Alternative splicing (AS) adds a major level of complexity to this mechanism and thus to the regulation of gene expression. This widespread cellular phenomenon generates multiple messenger RNA isoforms from a single gene, by utilizing alternative splice sites and promoting different exon–intron inclusions and exclusions. AS greatly increases the coding potential of eukaryotic genomes and hence contributes to the diversity of eukaryotic proteomes. Mutations that lead to disruptions of either constitutive splicing or AS cause several diseases, among which are myotonic dystrophy and cystic fibrosis. Aberrant splicing is also well established in cancer states. Identification of rare novel mutations associated with splice-site recognition, and splicing regulation in general, could provide further insight into genetic mechanisms of rare diseases. Here, disease relevance of aberrant splicing is reviewed, and the new methodological approach of starting from disease phenotype, employing exome sequencing and identifying rare mutations affecting splicing regulation is described. Exome sequencing has emerged as a reliable method for finding sequence variations associated with various disease states. To date, genetic studies using exome sequencing to find disease-causing mutations have focused on the discovery of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms that alter amino acids or introduce early stop codons, or on the use of exome sequencing as a means to genotype known single nucleotide polymorphisms. The involvement of splicing mutations in inherited diseases has received little attention and thus likely occurs more frequently than currently estimated. Studies of exome sequencing followed by molecular and bioinformatic analyses have great potential to reveal the high impact of splicing

  8. Genomic profiling reveals mutational landscape in parathyroid carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Bellizzi, Justin; Lau, Chun Yee; Moe, Aye S.; Strahl, Maya; Newman, Leah C.; Fink, Marc Y.; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Yu, Willie; Stevenson, Mark; Cavaco, Branca M.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Morreau, Hans; Schadt, Eric E.; Sebra, Robert; Li, Shuyu D.

    2017-01-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma (PC) is an extremely rare malignancy lacking effective therapeutic intervention. We generated and analyzed whole-exome sequencing data from 17 patients to identify somatic and germline genetic alterations. A panel of selected genes was sequenced in a 7-tumor expansion cohort. We show that 47% (8 of 17) of the tumors harbor somatic mutations in the CDC73 tumor suppressor, with germline inactivating variants in 4 of the 8 patients. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway was altered in 21% of the 24 cases, revealing a major oncogenic pathway in PC. We observed CCND1 amplification in 29% of the 17 patients, and a previously unreported recurrent mutation in putative kinase ADCK1. We identified the first sporadic PCs with somatic mutations in the Wnt canonical pathway, complementing previously described epigenetic mechanisms mediating Wnt activation. This is the largest genomic sequencing study of PC, and represents major progress toward a full molecular characterization of this rare malignancy to inform improved and individualized treatments. PMID:28352668

  9. Progeria syndrome with cardiac complications.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Saadia; Ilyas, Hajira; Hameed, Abdul; Ilyas, Muhammad

    2013-09-01

    A case report of 6-year-old boy with progeria syndrome, with marked cardiac complications is presented. The boy had cardiorespiratory failure. Discoloured purpuric skin patches, alopecia, prominent forehead, protuberant eyes, flattened nasal cartilage, malformed mandible, hypodentition, and deformed rigid fingers and toes were observed on examination. The boy was unable to speak. A sclerotic systolic murmur was audible over the mitral and aortic areas. Chest x-rays showed cardiac enlargement and the electrocardiogram (ECG) showed giant peaked P waves (right atrial hypertrophy) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Atherosclerotic dilated ascending aorta, thickened sclerotic aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves with increased echo texture, left and right atrial and right ventricular dilatation, reduced left ventricular cavity, and thickened speckled atrial and ventricular septa were observed on echocardiography.

  10. Progeria of stem cells: stem cell exhaustion in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Halaschek-Wiener, Julius; Brooks-Wilson, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, fatal genetic disorder that is characterized by segmental accelerated aging. The major causal mutation associated with HGPS triggers abnormal messenger RNA splicing of the lamin A gene leading to changes in the nuclear architecture. To date, two models have been proposed to explain how mutations in the lamin A gene could lead to HGPS, structural fragility and altered gene expression. We favor a compatible model that links HGPS to stem cell-driven tissue regeneration. In this model, nuclear fragility of lamin A-deficient cells increases apoptotic cell death to levels that exhaust tissues' ability for stem cell-driven regeneration. Tissue-specific differences in cell death or regenerative potential, or both, result in the tissue-specific segmental aging pattern seen in HGPS. We propose that the pattern of aging-related conditions present or absent in HGPS can provide insight into the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to normal aging.

  11. Clinical and radiographic features of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alves, Daniel Berretta; Silva, Juliana Melo; Menezes, Tatiany Oliveira; Cavaleiro, Rosely Santos; Tuji, Fabrício Mesquita; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Coletta, Ricardo Della

    2014-03-16

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare dysmorphic syndrome characterized by several features of premature aging with clinical involvement of the skin, bones, and cardiovascular system. HGPS has an estimated incidence of one in four million to one in eight million births. The main clinical features of HGPS include short stature, craniofacial dimorphism, alopecia, bone fragility, and cardiovascular disorders. The most frequent cause of death is myocardial infarction at a mean age of 13 years old. Dental manifestations include delayed development and eruption of teeth, discoloration, crowding and rotation of teeth, and displaced teeth. Cone beam computed tomography images revealed the absence of the sphenoid, frontal, and maxillary sinus, flattening of the condyles and glenoid fossa, and bilateral hypoplasia of the mandibular condyles. The disease is caused by mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA). Here, we present a case report of an 11-year-old boy with classical features of HGPS, which was caused by a de novo germ-line mutation (C1824T, G608G) in exon 11 of the LMNA gene. Some uncommon HGPS-associated features in our patient, such as alterations in the facial sinuses and hypoplasia of the condyles, contributed to the expansion of the phenotypic spectrum of this syndrome from a dentomaxillofacial perspective.

  12. Replication Study: Melanoma genome sequencing reveals frequent PREX2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Stephen K; Courville, Pascal; Sampey, Darryl; Zhou, Faren; Cai, Steve

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, as part of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, we published a Registered Report (Chroscinski et al., 2014) that described how we intended to replicate selected experiments from the paper "Melanoma genome sequencing reveals frequent PREX2 mutations" (Berger et al., 2012). Here we report the results of those experiments. We regenerated cells stably expressing ectopic wild-type and mutant phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchange factor 2 (PREX2) using the same immortalized human NRASG12D melanocytes as the original study. Evaluation of PREX2 expression in these newly generated stable cells revealed varying levels of expression among the PREX2 isoforms, which was also observed in the stable cells made in the original study (Figure S6A; Berger et al., 2012). Additionally, ectopically expressed PREX2 was found to be at least 5 times above endogenous PREX2 expression. The monitoring of tumor formation of these stable cells in vivo resulted in no statistically significant difference in tumor-free survival driven by PREX2 variants, whereas the original study reported that these PREX2 mutations increased the rate of tumor incidence compared to controls (Figure 3B and S6B; Berger et al., 2012). Surprisingly, the median tumor-free survival was 1 week in this replication attempt, while 70% of the control mice were reported to be tumor-free after 9 weeks in the original study. The rapid tumor onset observed in this replication attempt, compared to the original study, makes the detection of accelerated tumor growth in PREX2 expressing NRASG12D melanocytes extremely difficult. Finally, we report meta-analyses for each result. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21634.001 PMID:28100394

  13. Werner and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes: mechanistic basis of human progeroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Kudlow, Brian A; Kennedy, Brian K; Monnat, Raymond J

    2007-05-01

    Progeroid syndromes have been the focus of intense research in part because they might provide a window into the pathology of normal ageing. Werner syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are two of the best characterized human progeroid diseases. Mutated genes that are associated with these syndromes have been identified, mouse models of disease have been developed, and molecular studies have implicated decreased cell proliferation and altered DNA-damage responses as common causal mechanisms in the pathogenesis of both diseases.

  14. Immortalization of Werner syndrome and progeria fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.; Moses, R.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Human fibroblast cells from two different progeroid syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS) and progeria, were established as immortalized cell lines by transfection with plasmid DNA containing the SV40 early region. The lineage of each immortalized cell line was confirmed by VNTR analysis. Each of the immortalized cell lines maintained its original phenotype of slow growth. DNA repair ability of these cells was also studied by measuring sensitivity to killing by uv or the DNA-damaging drugs methyl methansulfonate, bleomycin, and cis-dichlorodiamine platinum. The results showed that both WS and progeria cells have normal sensitivity to these agents.

  15. Dedifferentiation rescues senescence of progeria cells but only while pluripotent.

    PubMed

    Niedernhofer, Laura J; Glorioso, Joseph C; Robbins, Paul D

    2011-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a genetic disease in which children develop pathologies associated with old age. HGPS is caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, resulting in the formation of a dominant negative form of the intermediate filament, nuclear structural protein lamin A, termed progerin. Expression of progerin alters the nuclear architecture and heterochromatin, affecting cell cycle progression and genomic stability. Two groups recently reported the successful generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from HGPS fibroblasts. Remarkably, progerin expression and senescence phenotypes are lost in iPSCs but not in differentiated progeny. These new HGPS iPSCs are valuable for characterizing the role of progerin in driving HGPS and aging and for screening therapeutic strategies to prevent or delay cell senescence.

  16. Progeria: a paradigm for translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Leslie B; Rothman, Frank G; López-Otín, Carlos; Misteli, Tom

    2014-01-30

    Rare diseases are powerful windows into biological processes and can serve as models for the development of therapeutic strategies. The progress made on the premature aging disorder Progeria is a shining example of the impact that studies of rare diseases can have.

  17. Clinical Trial of the Protein Farnesylation Inhibitors Lonafarnib, Pravastatin, and Zoledronic Acid in Children With Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Leslie B; Kleinman, Monica E; Massaro, Joe; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Shappell, Heather; Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Smoot, Leslie B; Gordon, Catherine M; Cleveland, Robert H; Nazarian, Ara; Snyder, Brian D; Ullrich, Nicole J; Silvera, V Michelle; Liang, Marilyn G; Quinn, Nicolle; Miller, David T; Huh, Susanna Y; Dowton, Anne A; Littlefield, Kelly; Greer, Maya M; Kieran, Mark W

    2016-07-12

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is an extremely rare, fatal, segmental premature aging syndrome caused by a mutation in LMNA yielding the farnesylated aberrant protein progerin. Without progerin-specific treatment, death occurs at an average age of 14.6 years from an accelerated atherosclerosis. A previous single-arm clinical trial demonstrated that the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor lonafarnib ameliorates some aspects of cardiovascular and bone disease. This present trial sought to further improve disease by additionally inhibiting progerin prenylation. Thirty-seven participants with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome received pravastatin, zoledronic acid, and lonafarnib. This combination therapy was evaluated, in addition to descriptive comparisons with the prior lonafarnib monotherapy trial. No participants withdrew because of side effects. Primary outcome success was predefined by improved per-patient rate of weight gain or carotid artery echodensity; 71.0% of participants succeeded (P<0.0001). Key cardiovascular and skeletal secondary variables were predefined. Secondary improvements included increased areal (P=0.001) and volumetric (P<0.001-0.006) bone mineral density and 1.5- to 1.8-fold increases in radial bone structure (P<0.001). Median carotid artery wall echodensity and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity demonstrated no significant changes. Percentages of participants with carotid (5% to 50%; P=0.001) and femoral (0% to 12%; P=0.13) artery plaques and extraskeletal calcifications (34.4% to 65.6%; P=0.006) increased. Other than increased bone mineral density, no improvement rates exceeded those of the prior lonafarnib monotherapy treatment trial. Comparisons with lonafarnib monotherapy treatment reveal additional bone mineral density benefit but likely no added cardiovascular benefit with the addition of pravastatin and zoledronic acid. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00879034 and NCT00916747. © 2016 American

  18. Sporadic Premature Aging in a Japanese Monkey: A Primate Model for Progeria

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Takao; Imai, Hiroo; Go, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Masanori; Hirai, Hirohisa; Takada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    In our institute, we have recently found a child Japanese monkey who is characterized by deep wrinkles of the skin and cataract of bilateral eyes. Numbers of analyses were performed to identify symptoms representing different aspects of aging. In this monkey, the cell cycle of fibroblasts at early passage was significantly extended as compared to a normal control. Moreover, both the appearance of senescent cells and the deficiency in DNA repair were observed. Also, pathological examination showed that this monkey has poikiloderma with superficial telangiectasia, and biochemical assay confirmed that levels of HbA1c and urinary hyaluronan were higher than those of other (child, adult, and aged) monkey groups. Of particular interest was that our MRI analysis revealed expansion of the cerebral sulci and lateral ventricles probably due to shrinkage of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, the conduction velocity of a peripheral sensory but not motor nerve was lower than in adult and child monkeys, and as low as in aged monkeys. However, we could not detect any individual-unique mutations of known genes responsible for major progeroid syndromes. The present results indicate that the monkey suffers from a kind of progeria that is not necessarily typical to human progeroid syndromes. PMID:25365557

  19. Progerin reduces LAP2α-telomere association in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Alexandre; Ong, Peh Fern; Wong, Esther S M; Lim, John S Y; Mutalif, Rafidah A; Navasankari, Raju; Dutta, Bamaprasad; Yang, Henry; Liow, Yi Y; Sze, Siu K; Boudier, Thomas; Wright, Graham D; Colman, Alan; Burke, Brian; Stewart, Colin L; Dreesen, Oliver

    2015-08-27

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGPS) is a premature ageing syndrome caused by a mutation in LMNA, resulting in a truncated form of lamin A called progerin. Progerin triggers loss of the heterochromatic marker H3K27me3, and premature senescence, which is prevented by telomerase. However, the mechanism how progerin causes disease remains unclear. Here, we describe an inducible cellular system to model HGPS and find that LAP2α (lamina-associated polypeptide-α) interacts with lamin A, while its interaction with progerin is significantly reduced. Super-resolution microscopy revealed that over 50% of telomeres localize to the lamina and that LAP2α association with telomeres is impaired in HGPS. This impaired interaction is central to HGPS since increasing LAP2α levels rescues progerin-induced proliferation defects and loss of H3K27me3, whereas lowering LAP2 levels exacerbates progerin-induced defects. These findings provide novel insights into the pathophysiology underlying HGPS, and how the nuclear lamina regulates proliferation and chromatin organization.

  20. Sporadic premature aging in a Japanese monkey: a primate model for progeria.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Takao; Imai, Hiroo; Go, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Masanori; Hirai, Hirohisa; Takada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    In our institute, we have recently found a child Japanese monkey who is characterized by deep wrinkles of the skin and cataract of bilateral eyes. Numbers of analyses were performed to identify symptoms representing different aspects of aging. In this monkey, the cell cycle of fibroblasts at early passage was significantly extended as compared to a normal control. Moreover, both the appearance of senescent cells and the deficiency in DNA repair were observed. Also, pathological examination showed that this monkey has poikiloderma with superficial telangiectasia, and biochemical assay confirmed that levels of HbA1c and urinary hyaluronan were higher than those of other (child, adult, and aged) monkey groups. Of particular interest was that our MRI analysis revealed expansion of the cerebral sulci and lateral ventricles probably due to shrinkage of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, the conduction velocity of a peripheral sensory but not motor nerve was lower than in adult and child monkeys, and as low as in aged monkeys. However, we could not detect any individual-unique mutations of known genes responsible for major progeroid syndromes. The present results indicate that the monkey suffers from a kind of progeria that is not necessarily typical to human progeroid syndromes.

  1. Progerin reduces LAP2α-telomere association in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria

    PubMed Central

    Chojnowski, Alexandre; Ong, Peh Fern; Wong, Esther SM; Lim, John SY; Mutalif, Rafidah A; Navasankari, Raju; Dutta, Bamaprasad; Yang, Henry; Liow, Yi Y; Sze, Siu K; Boudier, Thomas; Wright, Graham D; Colman, Alan; Burke, Brian; Stewart, Colin L; Dreesen, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGPS) is a premature ageing syndrome caused by a mutation in LMNA, resulting in a truncated form of lamin A called progerin. Progerin triggers loss of the heterochromatic marker H3K27me3, and premature senescence, which is prevented by telomerase. However, the mechanism how progerin causes disease remains unclear. Here, we describe an inducible cellular system to model HGPS and find that LAP2α (lamina-associated polypeptide-α) interacts with lamin A, while its interaction with progerin is significantly reduced. Super-resolution microscopy revealed that over 50% of telomeres localize to the lamina and that LAP2α association with telomeres is impaired in HGPS. This impaired interaction is central to HGPS since increasing LAP2α levels rescues progerin-induced proliferation defects and loss of H3K27me3, whereas lowering LAP2 levels exacerbates progerin-induced defects. These findings provide novel insights into the pathophysiology underlying HGPS, and how the nuclear lamina regulates proliferation and chromatin organization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07759.001 PMID:26312502

  2. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  3. Progenitor genotyping reveals a complex clonal architecture in a subset of CALR-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah; Wright, Casey M; Scott, Linda M

    2017-04-01

    The identification of acquired CALR mutations in patients with essential thrombocythaemia (ET) or myelofibrosis (MF) has meant that disease-initiating mutations can now be detected in about 90% of all patients with a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Here, we show that only those CALR mutations that cause a +1 frameshift, thereby altering the carboxy-terminus of calreticulin, promote cytokine independence in vitro; in-frame deletions were not functional, and are unlikely to be the pathogenetic mutation underlying some MPN cases. Expression of the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, was also necessary for factor-independence. Although the CALR mutations are considered to occur only in JAK2 V617F-negative cases and in a heterozygous state, progenitor genotyping revealed that this is not always true. Notably, CALR mutation-positive MPNs can be polyclonal: in one case, two distinct CALR mutation-positive subpopulations could be identified; in another, separate populations of JAK2 V617F-positive and CALR-mutated cells were present. Mitotic recombination involving chromosome 19 in a third instance resulted in the emergence of a CALR mutation-homozygous subclone. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that occasional patients with CALR mutation-positive ET or MF carry other MPN-initiating genetic mutations (including JAK2 V617F), acquire "secondary mutations" before or after the CALR mutation, or evolve over time to being CALR mutation-homozygous.

  4. Partial lipodystrophy with severe insulin resistance and adult progeria Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donadille, Bruno; D'Anella, Pascal; Auclair, Martine; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Sorel, Marc; Grigorescu, Romulus; Ouzounian, Sophie; Cambonie, Gilles; Boulot, Pierre; Laforêt, Pascal; Carbonne, Bruno; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2013-07-12

    Laminopathies, due to mutations in LMNA, encoding A type-lamins, can lead to premature ageing and/or lipodystrophic syndromes, showing that these diseases could have close physiopathological relationships. We show here that lipodystrophy and extreme insulin resistance can also reveal the adult progeria Werner syndrome linked to mutations in WRN, encoding a RecQ DNA helicase. We analysed the clinical and biological features of two women, aged 32 and 36, referred for partial lipodystrophic syndrome which led to the molecular diagnosis of Werner syndrome. Cultured skin fibroblasts from one patient were studied. Two normal-weighted women presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome with hypertriglyceridemia and liver steatosis. One of them had also diabetes. Both patients showed a peculiar, striking lipodystrophic phenotype with subcutaneous lipoatrophy of the four limbs contrasting with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation. Their oral glucose tolerance tests showed extremely high levels of insulinemia, revealing major insulin resistance. Low serum levels of sex-hormone binding globulin and adiponectin suggested a post-receptor insulin signalling defect. Other clinical features included bilateral cataracts, greying hair and distal skin atrophy. We observed biallelic WRN null mutations in both women (p.Q748X homozygous, and compound heterozygous p.Q1257X/p.M1329fs). Their fertility was decreased, with preserved menstrual cycles and normal follicle-stimulating hormone levels ruling out premature ovarian failure. However undetectable anti-müllerian hormone and inhibin B indicated diminished follicular ovarian reserve. Insulin-resistance linked ovarian hyperandrogenism could also contribute to decreased fertility, and the two patients became pregnant after initiation of insulin-sensitizers (metformin). Both pregnancies were complicated by severe cervical incompetence, leading to the preterm birth of a healthy newborn in one case, but to a second trimester

  5. The complete genome sequences, unique mutational spectra and developmental potency of adult neurons revealed by cloning

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alberto R.; Ferguson, William C.; Shumilina, Svetlana; Clark, Royden A.; Boland, Michael J.; Martin, Greg; Chubukov, Pavel; Tsunemoto, Rachel K.; Torkamani, Ali; Kupriyanov, Sergey; Hall, Ira M.; Baldwin, Kristin K.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutation in neurons is linked to neurologic disease and implicated in cell type diversification. However, the origin, extent and patterns of genomic mutation in neurons remain unknown. We established a nuclear transfer method to clonally amplify the genomes of neurons from adult mice for whole genome sequencing. Comprehensive mutation detection and independent validation revealed that individual neurons harbor ~100 unique mutations from all classes, but lack recurrent rearrangements. Most neurons contain at least one gene disrupting mutation and rare (0-2) mobile element insertions. The frequency and gene bias of neuronal mutations differs from other lineages, potentially due to novel mechanisms governing post-mitotic mutation. Fertile mice were cloned from several neurons, establishing the compatibility of mutated adult neuronal genomes with reprogramming to pluripotency and development. PMID:26948891

  6. The Complete Genome Sequences, Unique Mutational Spectra, and Developmental Potency of Adult Neurons Revealed by Cloning.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Jennifer L; Faust, Gregory G; Rodriguez, Alberto R; Ferguson, William C; Shumilina, Svetlana; Clark, Royden A; Boland, Michael J; Martin, Greg; Chubukov, Pavel; Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Torkamani, Ali; Kupriyanov, Sergey; Hall, Ira M; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2016-03-16

    Somatic mutation in neurons is linked to neurologic disease and implicated in cell-type diversification. However, the origin, extent, and patterns of genomic mutation in neurons remain unknown. We established a nuclear transfer method to clonally amplify the genomes of neurons from adult mice for whole-genome sequencing. Comprehensive mutation detection and independent validation revealed that individual neurons harbor ∼100 unique mutations from all classes but lack recurrent rearrangements. Most neurons contain at least one gene-disrupting mutation and rare (0-2) mobile element insertions. The frequency and gene bias of neuronal mutations differ from other lineages, potentially due to novel mechanisms governing postmitotic mutation. Fertile mice were cloned from several neurons, establishing the compatibility of mutated adult neuronal genomes with reprogramming to pluripotency and development.

  7. All-trans retinoic acid and rapamycin normalize Hutchinson Gilford progeria fibroblast phenotype.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Camilla; Columbaro, Marta; Capanni, Cristina; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Cavallo, Carola; Murdocca, Michela; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Squarzoni, Stefano

    2015-10-06

    Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome is a fatal disorder characterized by accelerated aging, bone resorption and atherosclerosis, caused by a LMNA mutation which produces progerin, a mutant lamin A precursor. Progeria cells display progerin and prelamin A nuclear accumulation, altered histone methylation pattern, heterochromatin loss, increased DNA damage and cell cycle alterations. Since the LMNA promoter contains a retinoic acid responsive element, we investigated if all-trans retinoic acid administration could lower progerin levels in cultured fibroblasts. We also evaluated the effect of associating rapamycin, which induces autophagic degradation of progerin and prelamin A. We demonstrate that all-trans retinoic acid acts synergistically with low-dosage rapamycin reducing progerin and prelamin A, via transcriptional downregulation associated with protein degradation, and increasing the lamin A to progerin ratio. These effects rescue cell dynamics and cellular proliferation through recovery of DNA damage response factor PARP1 and chromatin-associated nuclear envelope proteins LAP2α and BAF. The combined all-trans retinoic acid-rapamycin treatment is dramatically efficient, highly reproducible, represents a promising new approach in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria therapy and deserves investigation in ageing-associated disorders.

  8. DNA-damage accumulation and replicative arrest in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Musich, Phillip R; Zou, Yue

    2011-12-01

    A common feature of progeria syndromes is a premature aging phenotype and an enhanced accumulation of DNA damage arising from a compromised repair system. HGPS (Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome) is a severe form of progeria in which patients accumulate progerin, a mutant lamin A protein derived from a splicing variant of the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). Progerin causes chromatin perturbations which result in the formation of DSBs (double-strand breaks) and abnormal DDR (DNA-damage response). In the present article, we review recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how progerin may disrupt DDR pathways in HGPS cells. We propose that progerin accumulation results in disruption of functions of some replication and repair factors, causing the mislocalization of XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum group A) protein to the replication forks, replication fork stalling and, subsequently, DNA DSBs. The binding of XPA to the stalled forks excludes normal binding by repair proteins, leading to DSB accumulation, which activates ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related) checkpoints, and arresting cell-cycle progression.

  9. All-trans retinoic acid and rapamycin normalize Hutchinson Gilford progeria fibroblast phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Camilla; Columbaro, Marta; Capanni, Cristina; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Cavallo, Carola; Murdocca, Michela; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Squarzoni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome is a fatal disorder characterized by accelerated aging, bone resorption and atherosclerosis, caused by a LMNA mutation which produces progerin, a mutant lamin A precursor. Progeria cells display progerin and prelamin A nuclear accumulation, altered histone methylation pattern, heterochromatin loss, increased DNA damage and cell cycle alterations. Since the LMNA promoter contains a retinoic acid responsive element, we investigated if all-trans retinoic acid administration could lower progerin levels in cultured fibroblasts. We also evaluated the effect of associating rapamycin, which induces autophagic degradation of progerin and prelamin A. We demonstrate that all-trans retinoic acid acts synergistically with low-dosage rapamycin reducing progerin and prelamin A, via transcriptional downregulation associated with protein degradation, and increasing the lamin A to progerin ratio. These effects rescue cell dynamics and cellular proliferation through recovery of DNA damage response factor PARP1 and chromatin-associated nuclear envelope proteins LAP2α and BAF. The combined all-trans retinoic acid-rapamycin treatment is dramatically efficient, highly reproducible, represents a promising new approach in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria therapy and deserves investigation in ageing-associated disorders. PMID:26359359

  10. Sulforaphane enhances progerin clearance in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Diana; Roedl, Daniela; Gordon, Leslie B; Djabali, Karima

    2015-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare multisystem childhood premature aging disorder linked to mutations in the LMNA gene. The most common HGPS mutation is found at position G608G within exon 11 of the LMNA gene. This mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids at the carboxyl-terminal tail of prelamin A, and the truncated protein is called progerin. Progerin only undergoes a subset of the normal post-translational modifications and remains permanently farnesylated. Several attempts to rescue the normal cellular phenotype with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) and other compounds have resulted in partial cellular recovery. Using proteomics, we report here that progerin induces changes in the composition of the HGPS nuclear proteome, including alterations to several components of the protein degradation pathways. Consequently, proteasome activity and autophagy are impaired in HGPS cells. To restore protein clearance in HGPS cells, we treated HGPS cultures with sulforaphane (SFN), an antioxidant derived from cruciferous vegetables. We determined that SFN stimulates proteasome activity and autophagy in normal and HGPS fibroblast cultures. Specifically, SFN enhances progerin clearance by autophagy and reverses the phenotypic changes that are the hallmarks of HGPS. Therefore, SFN is a promising therapeutic avenue for children with HGPS.

  11. Whole-genome sequencing reveals oncogenic mutations in mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    McGirt, Laura Y.; Jia, Peilin; Baerenwald, Devin A.; Duszynski, Robert J.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Zic, John A.; Zwerner, Jeffrey P.; Hucks, Donald; Dave, Utpal; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), is unknown. Although genetic alterations have been identified, none are considered consistently causative in MF. To identify potential drivers of MF, we performed whole-genome sequencing of MF tumors and matched normal skin. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing of MF samples and exome sequencing of CTCL cell lines were also performed. Multiple mutations were identified that affected the same pathways, including epigenetic, cell-fate regulation, and cytokine signaling, in MF tumors and CTCL cell lines. Specifically, interleukin-2 signaling pathway mutations, including activating Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) mutations, were detected. Treatment with a JAK3 inhibitor significantly reduced CTCL cell survival. Additionally, the mutation data identified 2 other potential contributing factors to MF, ultraviolet light, and a polymorphism in the tumor suppressor p53 (TP53). Therefore, genetic alterations in specific pathways in MF were identified that may be viable, effective new targets for treatment. PMID:26082451

  12. Sequence survey of receptor tyrosine kinases reveals mutations in glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Vikki; Huang, Jiaqi; Stockwell, Tim; Ferriera, Steve; Buzko, Oleksandr; Levy, Samuel; Busam, Dana; Li, Kelvin; Edwards, Jennifer B.; Eberhart, Charles; Murphy, Kathleen M.; Tsiamouri, Alexia; Beeson, Karen; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; Venter, J. Craig; Riggins, Gregory J.; Strausberg, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    It is now clear that tyrosine kinases represent attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology now provide the opportunity to survey mutational changes in cancer in a high-throughput and comprehensive manner. Here we report on the sequence analysis of members of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) gene family in the genomes of glioblastoma brain tumors. Previous studies have identified a number of molecular alterations in glioblastoma, including amplification of the RTK epidermal growth factor receptor. We have identified mutations in two other RTKs: (i) fibroblast growth receptor 1, including the first mutations in the kinase domain in this gene observed in any cancer, and (ii) a frameshift mutation in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α gene. Fibroblast growth receptor 1, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α, and epidermal growth factor receptor are all potential entry points to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase intracellular signaling pathways already known to be important for neoplasia. Our results demonstrate the utility of applying DNA sequencing technology to systematically assess the coding sequence of genes within cancer genomes. PMID:16186508

  13. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis.

  14. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis. PMID:27625789

  15. Progeria: Medical Aspects, Psychosocial Perspectives, and Intervention Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses progeria (or Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome), a rare childhood disorder that invariably results in death during adolescence. Describes the major medical aspects of progeria, and discusses the psychosocial implications of the disorder with particular emphasis on grief-triggered reactions. Presents an overview of psychosocial intervention…

  16. Progeria: Medical Aspects, Psychosocial Perspectives, and Intervention Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses progeria (or Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome), a rare childhood disorder that invariably results in death during adolescence. Describes the major medical aspects of progeria, and discusses the psychosocial implications of the disorder with particular emphasis on grief-triggered reactions. Presents an overview of psychosocial intervention…

  17. Functional analysis reveals that RBM10 mutations contribute to lung adenocarcinoma pathogenesis by deregulating splicing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiawei; Sun, Yue; Huang, Yin; Song, Fan; Huang, Zengshu; Bao, Yufang; Zuo, Ji; Saffen, David; Shao, Zhen; Liu, Wen; Wang, Yongbo

    2017-01-01

    RBM10 is an RNA splicing regulator that is frequently mutated in lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) and has recently been proposed to be a cancer gene. How RBM10 mutations observed in LUAD affect its normal functions, however, remains largely unknown. Here integrative analysis of RBM10 mutation and RNA expression data revealed that LUAD-associated RBM10 mutations exhibit a mutational spectrum similar to that of tumor suppressor genes. In addition, this analysis showed that RBM10 mutations identified in LUAD patients lacking canonical oncogenes are associated with significantly reduced RBM10 expression. To systematically investigate RBM10 mutations, we developed an experimental pipeline for elucidating their functional effects. Among six representative LUAD-associated RBM10 mutations, one nonsense and one frameshift mutation caused loss-of-function as expected, whereas four missense mutations differentially affected RBM10-mediated splicing. Importantly, changes in proliferation rates of LUAD-derived cells caused by these RBM10 missense mutants correlated with alterations in RNA splicing of RBM10 target genes. Together, our data implies that RBM10 mutations contribute to LUAD pathogenesis, at least in large part, by deregulating splicing. The methods described in this study should be useful for analyzing mutations in additional cancer-associated RNA splicing regulators. PMID:28091594

  18. Identifying recurrent mutations in cancer reveals widespread lineage diversity and mutational specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Matthew T.; Asthana, Saurabh; Gao, Sizhi Paul; Lee, Byron H.; Chapman, Jocelyn S.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Gao, JianJiong; Socci, Nicholas D.; Solit, David B.; Olshen, Adam B.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Taylor, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutational hotspots indicate selective pressure across a population of tumor samples, but their prevalence within and across cancer types is incompletely characterized. An approach to detect significantly mutated residues, rather than methods that identify recurrently mutated genes, may uncover new biologically and therapeutically relevant driver mutations. Here we developed a statistical algorithm to identify recurrently mutated residues in tumour samples. We applied the algorithm to 11,119 human tumors, spanning 41 cancer types, and identified 470 hotspot somatic substitutions in 275 genes. We find that half of all human tumors possess one or more mutational hotspots with widespread lineage-, position-, and mutant allele-specific differences, many of which are likely functional. In total, 243 hotspots were novel and appeared to affect a broad spectrum of molecular function, including hotspots at paralogous residues of Ras-related small GTPases RAC1 and RRAS2. Redefining hotspots at mutant amino acid resolution will help elucidate the allele-specific differences in their function and could have important therapeutic implications. PMID:26619011

  19. Exome sequencing reveals novel IRXI mutation in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changlong; Wang, Qidi; Wang, Yuting; Yang, Liping; Luo, Haiyan; Cao, Xiao Fang; An, Lisha; Qiu, Yue; Du, Meng; Ma, Xu; Li, Hui; Lu, Cailing

    2017-03-30

    Genetic variation in specific transcription factors during heart formation may lead to congenital heart disease (CHD) or even miscarriage. The aim of the present study was to identify CHD‑associated genes using next generation sequencing (NGS). The whole exome DNA sequence was obtained from a stillborn fetus diagnosed with tricuspid atresia and complete transposition of the great arteries using high‑throughput sequencing methods. Subsequently, genetic variants of CHD‑associated genes were selected and verified in 215 non‑syndromic CHD patients and 249 healthy control subjects using polymerase chain reaction combined with Sanger sequencing. Genetic variants of previously reported CHD‑inducing genes, such as cysteine rich with EGF like domains 1 and cbp/p300‑interacting transactivator with Glu/Asp rich carboxy‑terminal domain 2, were discovered through the NGS analysis. In addition, a novel non‑synonymous mutation of the iroquois homeobox 1 (IRX1) gene (p.Gln240Glu) was identified. A total of three non‑synonymous mutations (p.Gln240Glu, p.Ser298Asn and p.Ala381Glu) of the IRX1 gene were verified in 215 non‑syndromic CHD patients, but not in 249 healthy volunteers. The results demonstrated that NGS is a powerful tool to study the etiology of CHD. In addition, the results suggest that genetic variants of the IRX1 gene may contribute to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  20. Exome sequencing reveals AMER1 as a frequently mutated gene in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Paré-Brunet, Laia; Lázaro, Kira; Bellido, Fernando; Alonso, M. Henar; Aussó, Susanna; Guinó, Elisabet; Beltrán, Sergi; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Gut, Marta; Sanjuan, Xavier; Closa, Adria; Cordero, David; Morón-Duran, Francisco D.; Soriano, Antonio; Salazar, Ramón; Valle, Laura; Moreno, Victor

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Somatic mutations occur at early stages of adenoma and accumulate throughout colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutational landscape of stage II tumors and to search for novel recurrent mutations likely implicated in CRC tumorigenesis. DESIGN The exomic DNA of 42 stage II, microsatellite stable, colon tumors and their paired mucosae were sequenced. Other molecular data available in the discovery dataset (gene expression, methylation, and CNV) was used to further characterize these tumors. Additional datasets comprising 553 CRC samples were used to validate the discovered mutations. RESULTS As a result, 4,886 somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were found. Almost all SNVs were private changes, with few mutations shared by more than one tumor, thus revealing tumor-specific mutational landscapes. Nevertheless, these diverse mutations converged into common cellular pathways such as cell cycle or apoptosis. Among this mutational heterogeneity, variants resulting in early stop-codons in the AMER1 (also known as FAM123B or WTX) gene emerged as recurrent mutations in CRC. Loses of AMER1 by other mechanisms apart from mutations such as methylation and copy number aberrations were also found. Tumors lacking this tumor suppressor gene exhibited a mesenchymal phenotype characterized by inhibition of the canonical Wnt pathway. CONCLUSION In silico and experimental validation in independent datasets confirmed the existence of functional mutations in AMER1 in approximately 10% of analyzed CRC tumors. Moreover, these tumors exhibited a characteristic phenotype. PMID:26071483

  1. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome through the lens of transcription.

    PubMed

    Prokocimer, Miron; Barkan, Rachel; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2013-08-01

    Lamins are nuclear intermediate filaments. In addition to their structural roles, they are implicated in basic nuclear functions such as chromatin organization, DNA replication, transcription, DNA repair, and cell-cycle progression. Mutations in human LMNA gene cause several diseases termed laminopathies. One of the laminopathic diseases is Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), which is caused by a spontaneous mutation and characterized by premature aging. HGPS phenotypes share certain similarities with several apparently comparable medical conditions, such as aging and atherosclerosis, with the conspicuous absence of neuronal degeneration and cancer rarity during the short lifespan of the patients. Cell lines from HGPS patients are characterized by multiple nuclear defects, which include abnormal morphology, altered histone modification patterns, and increased DNA damage. These cell lines provide insight into the molecular pathways including senescence that require lamins A and B1. Here, we review recent data on HGPS phenotypes through the lens of transcriptional deregulation caused by lack of functional lamin A, progerin accumulation, and lamin B1 silencing.

  2. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: Oral and craniofacial phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, D.L.; Trujillo, M.I.; Council, S.E.; Merideth, M.A.; Gordon, L.B.; Wu, T.; Introne, W.J.; Gahl, W.A.; Hart, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare early-onset accelerated senescence syndrome. In HGPS, a recently identified de novo dominant mutation of the lamin A gene (LMNA) produces abnormal lamin A, resulting in compromised nuclear membrane integrity. Clinical features include sclerotic skin, cardiovascular and bone abnormalities, and marked growth retardation. Craniofacial features include “bird-like” facies, alopecia, craniofacial disproportion and dental crowding. Our prospective study describes dental, oral soft tissue, and craniofacial bone features in HGPS. METHODS Fifteen patients with confirmed p.G608G LMNA mutation (1–17 years, 7 males, 8 females) received comprehensive oral evaluations. Anomalies of oral soft tissue, gnathic bones and dentition were identified. RESULTS Radiographic findings included hypodontia (n=7), dysmorphic teeth (n=5), steep mandibular angles (n=11), and thin basal bone (n=11). Soft tissue findings included ogival palatal arch (n=8), median sagittal palatal fissure (n=7), and ankyloglossia (n=7). Calculated dental ages (9months–11y2m) were significantly lower than chronological ages (1y6m–17y8m) (p=0.002). Eleven children manifested a shorter mandibular body, anterior/posterior cranial base and ramus, but a larger gonial angle, compared to age/gender/race norms. CONCLUSION Novel oral-craniofacial phenotypes and quantification of previously reported features are presented. Our findings expand the HGPS phenotype and provide additional insight into the complex pathogenesis of HGPS. PMID:19236595

  3. Progeria: pathogenesis and oral manifestation--a review.

    PubMed

    Saigal, S; Bhargava, A

    2012-01-01

    Our life span is genetically programmed and it is possible that a defect in produced proteins encoded by the longevity gene is a cause of aging. Progeria which is a rare, fatal genetic condition which affects between one in four million and one in eight million children of both sexes equally and characterized by premature and accelerated aging. The appearance and physiology of these children resembles to elderly people but they typically have life span to their mid teens. It is also known as the Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, which was initially reported by Johnathan Hutchinson in 1886 and further described by Hastings Gilford in 1904. It is an autosomal recessive disorder, which means an individual has inherited a mutated gene from both parents. It is added to the expanding catalogue of laminopathies, diseases caused by mutations affecting nuclear lamina proteins known as lamin A (LMNA). In oral manifestation primary finding is micrognathia with delayed tooth eruption and incomplete formation of root of permanent tooth. Presently there are no known cures for this abnormality.

  4. Telomere length in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Decker, Michelle L; Chavez, Elizabeth; Vulto, Irma; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2009-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder caused by mutations in the gene LMNA, which encodes the nuclear matrix protein lamin A. Previous research has shown that the average telomere length in fibroblasts from HGPS patients is shorter than in age-matched controls. How mutations in lamin A lead to shortened telomere lengths is not known nor is the contribution of individual chromosome ends to the low average length understood. To measure the telomere length of individual chromosomes, we used quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH). In agreement with previous studies, we found that the average telomere length in HPGS fibroblasts is greatly reduced; however, the telomere length at chromosome ends was variable. In contrast, the telomere length in hematopoietic cells which typically do not express lamin A, was within the normal range for three out of four HGPS patient samples. Our results suggest that mutant lamin A decreases telomere length via a direct effect and that expression of mutant LMNA is necessary for telomere loss in HGPS.

  5. Molecular insights into the premature aging disease progeria.

    PubMed

    Vidak, Sandra; Foisner, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare premature aging disease presenting many features resembling the normal aging process. HGPS patients die before the age of 20 years due to cardiovascular problems and heart failure. HGPS is linked to mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the intermediate filament protein lamin A. Lamin A is a major component of the nuclear lamina, a scaffold structure at the nuclear envelope that defines mechanochemical properties of the nucleus and is involved in chromatin organization and epigenetic regulation. Lamin A is also present in the nuclear interior where it fulfills lamina-independent functions in cell signaling and gene regulation. The most common LMNA mutation linked to HGPS leads to mis-splicing of the LMNA mRNA and produces a mutant lamin A protein called progerin that tightly associates with the inner nuclear membrane and affects the dynamic properties of lamins. Progerin expression impairs many important cellular processes providing insight into potential disease mechanisms. These include changes in mechanosignaling, altered chromatin organization and impaired genome stability, and changes in signaling pathways, leading to impaired regulation of adult stem cells, defective extracellular matrix production and premature cell senescence. In this review, we discuss these pathways and their potential contribution to the disease pathologies as well as therapeutic approaches used in preclinical and clinical tests.

  6. Genomic instability and DNA damage responses in progeria arising from defective maturation of prelamin A.

    PubMed

    Musich, Phillip R; Zou, Yue

    2009-01-01

    Progeria syndromes have in common a premature aging phenotype and increased genome instability. The susceptibility to DNA damage arises from a compromised repair system, either in the repair proteins themselves or in the DNA damage response pathways. The most severe progerias stem from mutations affecting lamin A production, a filamentous protein of the nuclear lamina. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) patients are heterozygous for aLMNA gene mutation while Restrictive Dermopathy (RD) individuals have a homozygous deficiency in the processing protease Zmpste24. These mutations generate the mutant lamin A proteins progerin and FC-lamina A, respectively, which cause nuclear deformations and chromatin perturbations. Genome instability is observed even though genome maintenance and repair genes appear normal. The unresolved question is what features of the DNA damage response pathways are deficient in HGPS and RD cells. Here we review and discuss recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how the accumulation of progerin/FC-lamin A proteins may disrupt DNA damage response pathways in HGPS and RD cells. As the mutant lamin proteins accumulate they sequester replication and repair factors, leading to stalled replication forks which collapse into DNA double-strand beaks (DSBs). In a reaction unique to HGPS and RD cells these accessible DSB termini bind Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein which excludes normal binding by DNA DSB repair proteins. The bound XPA also signals activation of ATM and ATR, arresting cell cycle progression, leading to arrested growth. In addition, the effective sequestration of XPA at these DSB damage sites makes HGPS and RD cells more sensitive to ultraviolet light and other mutagens normally repaired by the nucleotide excision repair pathway of which XPA is a necessary and specific component.

  7. Dental and craniofacial characteristics in a patient with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Christoph; Gölz, Lina; Götz, Werner; Wolf, Michael; Deschner, James; Jäger, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an exceptionally rare medical disorder caused by mutations in the lamin A/C gene. Affected patients display typical features of premature aging. Beside general medical disorders, these patients have several specific features related to the craniofacial phenotype and the oral cavity. In this article, the dental and craniofacial characteristics of a 9-year-old girl with HGPS are presented. It is the first report addressing orthodontic tooth movement and microbiological features in a HGPS patient. We describe and discuss pathologic findings and provide a detailed histology of the teeth which had to be extracted during initial treatment.

  8. Clinical imaging findings in a girl with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lin, S P; Lin, D S; Liu, Y P; Hsu, L J; Wang, W

    2012-01-01

    We report an 82-year-old girl with premature aging, a karyotype of 46,XX and a de novo c.1824C>T mutation encoding p.G608G in the lamin A gene. The clinical features of accelerated aging and the molecular finding were consistent with the diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). In this presentation, we demonstrate the radiological imaging findings of skeletal, oral and craniofacial phenotypes of abnormalities associated with HGPS. The oral and craniofacial abnormalities caused dental caries, severe malocclusion, and swallowing, feeding and speech problems. Dural calcification, and granulation in the ear drum and external ear canal were additionally observed.

  9. Whole-exome sequencing reveals the mutational spectrum of testicular germ cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Summersgill, Brenda; Yost, Shawn; Sultana, Razvan; Labreche, Karim; Dudakia, Darshna; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Al-Saadi, Reem; Broderick, Peter; Turner, Nicholas C.; Houlston, Richard S.; Huddart, Robert; Shipley, Janet; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) are the most common cancer in young men. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 42 TGCTs to comprehensively study the cancer's mutational profile. The mutation rate is uniformly low in all of the tumours (mean 0.5 mutations per Mb) as compared with common cancers, consistent with the embryological origin of TGCT. In addition to expected copy number gain of chromosome 12p and mutation of KIT, we identify recurrent mutations in the tumour suppressor gene CDC27 (11.9%). Copy number analysis reveals recurring amplification of the spermatocyte development gene FSIP2 (15.3%) and a 0.4 Mb region at Xq28 (15.3%). Two treatment-refractory patients are shown to harbour XRCC2 mutations, a gene strongly implicated in defining cisplatin resistance. Our findings provide further insights into genes involved in the development and progression of TGCT. PMID:25609015

  10. Whole-exome sequencing reveals the mutational spectrum of testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Kevin; Summersgill, Brenda; Yost, Shawn; Sultana, Razvan; Labreche, Karim; Dudakia, Darshna; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Al-Saadi, Reem; Broderick, Peter; Turner, Nicholas C; Houlston, Richard S; Huddart, Robert; Shipley, Janet; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-22

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) are the most common cancer in young men. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 42 TGCTs to comprehensively study the cancer's mutational profile. The mutation rate is uniformly low in all of the tumours (mean 0.5 mutations per Mb) as compared with common cancers, consistent with the embryological origin of TGCT. In addition to expected copy number gain of chromosome 12p and mutation of KIT, we identify recurrent mutations in the tumour suppressor gene CDC27 (11.9%). Copy number analysis reveals recurring amplification of the spermatocyte development gene FSIP2 (15.3%) and a 0.4 Mb region at Xq28 (15.3%). Two treatment-refractory patients are shown to harbour XRCC2 mutations, a gene strongly implicated in defining cisplatin resistance. Our findings provide further insights into genes involved in the development and progression of TGCT.

  11. Progressive vascular smooth muscle cell defects in a mouse model of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Varga, Renee; Eriksson, Maria; Erdos, Michael R; Olive, Michelle; Harten, Ingrid; Kolodgie, Frank; Capell, Brian C; Cheng, Jun; Faddah, Dina; Perkins, Stacie; Avallone, Hedwig; San, Hong; Qu, Xuan; Ganesh, Santhi; Gordon, Leslie B; Virmani, Renu; Wight, Thomas N; Nabel, Elizabeth G; Collins, Francis S

    2006-02-28

    Children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) suffer from dramatic acceleration of some symptoms associated with normal aging, most notably cardiovascular disease that eventually leads to death from myocardial infarction and/or stroke usually in their second decade of life. For the vast majority of cases, a de novo point mutation in the lamin A (LMNA) gene is the cause of HGPS. This missense mutation creates a cryptic splice donor site that produces a mutant lamin A protein, termed "progerin," which carries a 50-aa deletion near its C terminus. We have created a mouse model for progeria by generating transgenics carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome that harbors the common HGPS mutation. These mice develop progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells in the medial layer of large arteries, in a pattern very similar to that seen in children with HGPS. This mouse model should prove valuable for testing experimental therapies for this devastating disorder and for exploring cardiovascular disease in general.

  12. Progeria syndromes and ageing: what is the connection?

    PubMed

    Burtner, Christopher R; Kennedy, Brian K

    2010-08-01

    One of the many debated topics in ageing research is whether progeroid syndromes are really accelerated forms of human ageing. The answer requires a better understanding of the normal ageing process and the molecular pathology underlying these rare diseases. Exciting recent findings regarding a severe human progeria, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, have implicated molecular changes that are also linked to normal ageing, such as genome instability, telomere attrition, premature senescence and defective stem cell homeostasis in disease development. These observations, coupled with genetic studies of longevity, lead to a hypothesis whereby progeria syndromes accelerate a subset of the pathological changes that together drive the normal ageing process.

  13. Progeria: translational insights from cell biology.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Leslie B; Cao, Kan; Collins, Francis S

    2012-10-01

    Cell biologists love to think outside the box, pursuing many surprising twists and unexpected turns in their quest to unravel the mysteries of how cells work. But can cell biologists think outside the bench? We are certain that they can, and clearly some already do. To encourage more cell biologists to venture into the realm of translational research on a regular basis, we would like to share a handful of the many lessons that we have learned in our effort to develop experimental treatments for Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), an endeavor that many view as a "poster child" for how basic cell biology can be translated to the clinic.

  14. A ceRNA analysis on LMNA gene focusing on the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare dominant human disease of genetic origin. The average life expectancy is about 20 years, patients’ life quality is still very poor and no efficient therapy has yet been developed. It is caused by mutation of the LMNA gene, which results in accumulation in the nuclear membrane of a particular splicing form of Lamin-A called progerin. The mechanism by which progerin perturbs cellular homeostasis and leads to the symptoms is still under debate. Micro-RNAs are able to negatively regulate transcription by coupling with the 3’ UnTranslated Region of messenger RNAs. Several Micro-RNAs recognize the same 3’ UnTranslated Region and each Micro-RNA can recognize multiple 3’ UnTranslated Regions of different messenger RNAs. When different messenger RNAs are co-regulated via a similar panel of micro-RNAs, these messengers are called Competing Endogenous RNAs, or ceRNAs. The 3’ UnTranslated Region of the longest LMNA transcript was analysed looking for its ceRNAs. The aim of this study was to search for candidate genes and gene ontology functions possibly influenced by LMNA mutations that may exert a role in progeria development. Results 11 miRNAs were isolated as potential LMNA regulators. By computational analysis, the miRNAs pointed to 17 putative LMNA ceRNAs. Gene ontology analysis of isolated ceRNAs showed an enrichment in RNA interference and control of cell cycle functions. Conclusion This study isolated novel genes and functions potentially involved in LMNA network of regulation that could be involved in laminopathies such as the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. PMID:23317481

  15. Mutational landscape of gingivo-buccal oral squamous cell carcinoma reveals new recurrently-mutated genes and molecular subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arindam; Biswas, Nidhan K.; Amin, Kishore; Kowtal, Pradnya; Kumar, Shantanu; Das, Subrata; Sarin, Rajiv; Majumder, Partha P.; Bagchi, I; Bairagya, B. B.; Basu, A.; Bhan, M. K.; Chaturvedi, P.; Das, D.; D'Cruz, A.; Dhar, R.; Dutta, D.; Ganguli, D.; Gera, P.; Gupta, T.; Mahapatra, S.; Mujawar, M. H. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Nair, S.; Nikam, S.; Nobre, M.; Patil, A.; Patra, S.; Rama-Gowtham, M.; Rao, T. S.; Roy, B.; Roychowdhury, B.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar-Roy, N.; Sutradhar, D.

    2013-01-01

    Gingivo-buccal oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC-GB), an anatomical and clinical subtype of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is prevalent in regions where tobacco-chewing is common. Exome sequencing (n=50) and recurrence testing (n=60) reveals that some significantly and frequently altered genes are specific to OSCC-GB (USP9X, MLL4, ARID2, UNC13C and TRPM3), while some others are shared with HNSCC (for example, TP53, FAT1, CASP8, HRAS and NOTCH1). We also find new genes with recurrent amplifications (for example, DROSHA, YAP1) or homozygous deletions (for example, DDX3X) in OSCC-GB. We find a high proportion of C>G transversions among tobacco users with high numbers of mutations. Many pathways that are enriched for genomic alterations are specific to OSCC-GB. Our work reveals molecular subtypes with distinctive mutational profiles such as patients predominantly harbouring mutations in CASP8 with or without mutations in FAT1. Mean duration of disease-free survival is significantly elevated in some molecular subgroups. These findings open new avenues for biological characterization and exploration of therapies. PMID:24292195

  16. Permanent farnesylation of lamin A mutants linked to progeria impairs its phosphorylation at serine 22 during interphase.

    PubMed

    Moiseeva, Olga; Lopes-Paciencia, Stéphane; Huot, Geneviève; Lessard, Frédéric; Ferbeyre, Gerardo

    2016-02-01

    Mutants of lamin A cause diseases including the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) characterized by premature aging. Lamin A undergoes a series of processing reactions, including farnesylation and proteolytic cleavage of the farnesylated C-terminal domain. The role of cleavage is unknown but mutations that affect this reaction lead to progeria. Here we show that interphase serine 22 phosphorylation of endogenous mutant lamin A (progerin) is defective in cells from HGPS patients. This defect can be mimicked by expressing progerin in human cells and prevented by inhibition of farnesylation. Furthermore, serine 22 phosphorylation of non-farnesylated progerin was enhanced by a mutation that disrupts lamin A head to tail interactions. The phosphorylation of lamin A or non-farnesylated progerin was associated to the formation of spherical intranuclear lamin A droplets that accumulate protein kinases of the CDK family capable of phosphorylating lamin A at serine 22. CDK inhibitors compromised the turnover of progerin, accelerated senescence of HGPS cells and reversed the effects of FTI on progerin levels. We discuss a model of progeria where faulty serine 22 phosphorylation compromises phase separation of lamin A polymers, leading to accumulation of functionally impaired lamin A structures.

  17. Permanent farnesylation of lamin A mutants linked to progeria impairs its phosphorylation at serine 22 during interphase

    PubMed Central

    Moiseeva, Olga; Lopes-Paciencia, Stéphane; Huot, Geneviève; Lessard, Frédéric; Ferbeyre, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Mutants of lamin A cause diseases including the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) characterized by premature aging. Lamin A undergoes a series of processing reactions, including farnesylation and proteolytic cleavage of the farnesylated C-terminal domain. The role of cleavage is unknown but mutations that affect this reaction lead to progeria. Here we show that interphase serine 22 phosphorylation of endogenous mutant lamin A (progerin) is defective in cells from HGPS patients. This defect can be mimicked by expressing progerin in human cells and prevented by inhibition of farnesylation. Furthermore, serine 22 phosphorylation of non-farnesylated progerin was enhanced by a mutation that disrupts lamin A head to tail interactions. The phosphorylation of lamin A or non-farnesylated progerin was associated to the formation of spherical intranuclear lamin A droplets that accumulate protein kinases of the CDK family capable of phosphorylating lamin A at serine 22. CDK inhibitors compromised the turnover of progerin, accelerated senescence of HGPS cells and reversed the effects of FTI on progerin levels. We discuss a model of progeria where faulty serine 22 phosphorylation compromises phase separation of lamin A polymers, leading to accumulation of functionally impaired lamin A structures. PMID:26922519

  18. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    PubMed

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; de Wit, Jan; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolph B; van Steeg, Harry; Jans, Judith; de Zeeuw, Chris I; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J

    2006-08-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the combined disorder XPCS with a G602D-encoding mutation in the Xpd helicase gene. XPCS mice are the most skin cancer-prone NER model to date, and we postulate an unusual NER dysfunction that is likely responsible for this susceptibility. XPCS mice also displayed symptoms of segmental progeria, including cachexia and progressive loss of germinal epithelium. Like CS fibroblasts, XPCS and TTD fibroblasts from human and mouse showed evidence of defective repair of oxidative DNA lesions that may underlie these segmental progeroid symptoms.

  19. Mutational strand asymmetries in cancer genomes reveal mechanisms of DNA damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Haradhvala, Nicholas J.; Polak, Paz; Stojanov, Petar; Covington, Kyle R.; Shinbrot, Eve; Hess, Julian; Rheinbay, Esther; Kim, Jaegil; Maruvka, Yosef; Braunstein, Lior Z.; Kamburov, Atanas; Hanawalt, Philip C.; Wheeler, David A.; Koren, Amnon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Mutational processes constantly shape the somatic genome, leading to immunity, aging, and other diseases. When cancer is the outcome, we are afforded a glimpse into these processes by the clonal expansion of the malignant cell. Here, we characterize a less explored layer of the mutational landscape of cancer: mutational asymmetries between the two DNA strands. Analyzing whole genome sequences of 590 tumors from 14 different cancer types, we reveal widespread asymmetries across mutagenic processes, with transcriptional (“T-class”) asymmetry dominating UV-, smoking-, and liver-cancer-associated mutations, and replicative (“R-class”) asymmetry dominating POLE-, APOBEC-, and MSI-associated mutations. We report a striking phenomenon of Transcription-Coupled Damage (TCD) on the non-transcribed DNA strand, and provide evidence that APOBEC mutagenesis occurs on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication. As more genomes are sequenced, studying and classifying their asymmetries will illuminate the underlying biological mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. PMID:26806129

  20. Methylene blue alleviates nuclear and mitochondrial abnormalities in progeria.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zheng-Mei; Choi, Ji Young; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Haoyue; Tariq, Zeshan; Wu, Di; Ko, Eunae; LaDana, Christina; Sesaki, Hiromi; Cao, Kan

    2016-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a fatal premature aging disease, is caused by a single-nucleotide mutation in the LMNA gene. Previous reports have focused on nuclear phenotypes in HGPS cells, yet the potential contribution of the mitochondria, a key player in normal aging, remains unclear. Using high-resolution microscopy analysis, we demonstrated a significantly increased fraction of swollen and fragmented mitochondria and a marked reduction in mitochondrial mobility in HGPS fibroblast cells. Notably, the expression of PGC-1α, a central regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, was inhibited by progerin. To rescue mitochondrial defects, we treated HGPS cells with a mitochondrial-targeting antioxidant methylene blue (MB). Our analysis indicated that MB treatment not only alleviated the mitochondrial defects but also rescued the hallmark nuclear abnormalities in HGPS cells. Additional analysis suggested that MB treatment released progerin from the nuclear membrane, rescued perinuclear heterochromatin loss and corrected misregulated gene expression in HGPS cells. Together, these results demonstrate a role of mitochondrial dysfunction in developing the premature aging phenotypes in HGPS cells and suggest MB as a promising therapeutic approach for HGPS.

  1. Study of Alzheimer family case reveals hemochromotosis-associated HFE mutation

    PubMed Central

    Artemov, Artem V; Boulygina, Eugenia S; Tsygankova, Svetlana V; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Chekanov, Nikolay N; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Selezneva, Natalia D; Roshchina, Irina F; Gavrilova, Svetlana I; Velichkovsky, Boris B; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2014-01-01

    We report a family case of type II early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) inherited over three generations. None of the patients in the family had mutations in the genes believed to be the major risk factors for AD, such as APP, presenilin 1 or 2. Targeted exome sequencing of 249 genes that were previously reported to be associated with AD revealed a rare mutation in hemochromatosis (HFE) gene known to be associated with hemochromotosis. Compared to previous studies, we show that HFE mutation can possess the risk of AD in transferrin-, APOE- and APP-normal patients. PMID:27081498

  2. Study of Alzheimer family case reveals hemochromotosis-associated HFE mutation.

    PubMed

    Artemov, Artem V; Boulygina, Eugenia S; Tsygankova, Svetlana V; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Chekanov, Nikolay N; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Selezneva, Natalia D; Roshchina, Irina F; Gavrilova, Svetlana I; Velichkovsky, Boris B; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2014-01-01

    We report a family case of type II early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) inherited over three generations. None of the patients in the family had mutations in the genes believed to be the major risk factors for AD, such as APP, presenilin 1 or 2. Targeted exome sequencing of 249 genes that were previously reported to be associated with AD revealed a rare mutation in hemochromatosis (HFE) gene known to be associated with hemochromotosis. Compared to previous studies, we show that HFE mutation can possess the risk of AD in transferrin-, APOE- and APP-normal patients.

  3. Unraveling the Mysteries of Progeria | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare and devastating genetic disorder in which patients appear normal at birth, but by 12 to 18 months display signs of premature aging such as hair loss, slowed growth, weakening of bone and joint integrity, and cardiovascular disease. Because no treatments currently exist, most patients with progeria die in their mid-teens from heart disease or stroke.

  4. Determinants of spontaneous mutation in the bacterium Escherichia coli as revealed by whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Patricia L.; Lee, Heewook; Popodi, Ellen; Townes, Jesse P.; Tang, Haixu

    2015-01-01

    A complete understanding of evolutionary processes requires that factors determining spontaneous mutation rates and spectra be identified and characterized. Using mutation accumulation followed by whole-genome sequencing, we found that the mutation rates of three widely diverged commensal Escherichia coli strains differ only by about 50%, suggesting that a rate of 1–2 × 10−3 mutations per generation per genome is common for this bacterium. Four major forces are postulated to contribute to spontaneous mutations: intrinsic DNA polymerase errors, endogenously induced DNA damage, DNA damage caused by exogenous agents, and the activities of error-prone polymerases. To determine the relative importance of these factors, we studied 11 strains, each defective for a major DNA repair pathway. The striking result was that only loss of the ability to prevent or repair oxidative DNA damage significantly impacted mutation rates or spectra. These results suggest that, with the exception of oxidative damage, endogenously induced DNA damage does not perturb the overall accuracy of DNA replication in normally growing cells and that repair pathways may exist primarily to defend against exogenously induced DNA damage. The thousands of mutations caused by oxidative damage recovered across the entire genome revealed strong local-sequence biases of these mutations. Specifically, we found that the identity of the 3′ base can affect the mutability of a purine by oxidative damage by as much as eightfold. PMID:26460006

  5. A lamin A protein isoform overexpressed in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome interferes with mitosis in progeria and normal cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kan; Capell, Brian C; Erdos, Michael R; Djabali, Karima; Collins, Francis S

    2007-03-20

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by dramatic premature aging. Classic HGPS is caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 (residue 1824, C --> T) of the LMNA gene, activating a cryptic splice donor and resulting in a mutant lamin A (LA) protein termed "progerin/LADelta50" that lacks the normal cleavage site to remove a C-terminal farnesyl group. During interphase, irreversibly farnesylated progerin/LADelta50 anchors to the nuclear membrane and causes characteristic nuclear blebbing. Progerin/LADelta50's localization and behavior during mitosis, however, are completely unknown. Here, we report that progerin/LADelta50 mislocalizes into insoluble cytoplasmic aggregates and membranes during mitosis and causes abnormal chromosome segregation and binucleation. These phenotypes are largely rescued with either farnesyltransferase inhibitors or a farnesylation-incompetent mutant progerin/LADelta50. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small amounts of progerin/LADelta50 exist in normal fibroblasts, and a significant percentage of these progerin/LADelta50-expressing normal cells are binucleated, implicating progerin/LADelta50 as causing similar mitotic defects in the normal aging process. Our findings present evidence of mitotic abnormality in HGPS and may shed light on the general phenomenon of aging.

  6. Interruption of progerin–lamin A/C binding ameliorates Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Jin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Yoon, Min-Ho; Kang, So-mi; Oh, Ah-Young; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Jun, So-Young; Woo, Tae-Gyun; Chun, Ho-Young; Kim, Sang Kyum; Chung, Kyu Jin; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Kyeong; Jin, Guanghai; Na, Min-Kyun; Ha, Nam Chul; Bárcena, Clea; Freije, José M.P.; López-Otín, Carlos; Song, Gyu Yong

    2016-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disease that is caused by a silent mutation of the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C (lamin A/C). The G608G mutation generates a more accessible splicing donor site than does WT and produces an alternatively spliced product of LMNA called progerin, which is also expressed in normal aged cells. In this study, we determined that progerin binds directly to lamin A/C and induces profound nuclear aberrations. Given this observation, we performed a random screening of a chemical library and identified 3 compounds (JH1, JH4, and JH13) that efficiently block progerin–lamin A/C binding. These 3 chemicals, particularly JH4, alleviated nuclear deformation and reversed senescence markers characteristic of HGPS cells, including growth arrest and senescence-associated β-gal (SA–β-gal) activity. We then used microarray-based analysis to demonstrate that JH4 is able to rescue defects of cell-cycle progression in both HGPS and aged cells. Furthermore, administration of JH4 to LmnaG609G/G609G-mutant mice, which phenocopy human HGPS, resulted in a marked improvement of several progeria phenotypes and an extended lifespan. Together, these findings indicate that specific inhibitors with the ability to block pathological progerin–lamin A/C binding may represent a promising strategy for improving lifespan and health in both HGPS and normal aging. PMID:27617860

  7. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphon in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narazaki, Ryo; Makimura, Mika; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Fukamachi, Shigeru; Akiyoshi, Hidetaka; So, Hidenori; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Doisaki, Sayoko; Kojima, Seiji; Ihara, Kenji; Hara, Toshiro; Ohga, Shouichi

    2013-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disease, caused by a de novo mutation of lamin-A gene, LMNA G608G. Accumulation of abnormal lamin-A (progerin) compromises nuclear membrane integrity and results in the accelerated senescence. Affected patients show a typical feature of birdlike face, alopecia, sclerotic skin, loss of subcutaneous fat, and short stature with advancing years. Neonatal scleroderma is the first presentation, although early diagnosis is challenging. The leading cause of death is cardio-/cerebro-vascular accidents associated with atherosclerosis. However, not all findings may recapitulate the aging process. We herein report a 9-year-old Japanese male with HGPS who developed cerebral infarction. The genetic study of peripheral blood-derived DNA determined a heterozygous c.1824C>T mutation, p.G608G. Telomere length of lymphocytes was normal. Bilateral stenosis of carotid siphons was prominent, while systemic arteriosclerosis was unremarkable assessed by the ankle-brachial index, carotid ultrasound imaging and funduscopic study. HGPS patients have marked loss and functional defects in vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to the vulnerability to circulatory stress. Symmetrical stenosis of siphons might occur as a distinctive cerebral vasculopathy of HGPS, rather than simple vascular senescence. Peripheral blood study on LMNA G608G and telomere length could screen progerias in infancy for early therapeutic intervention.

  8. Interruption of progerin-lamin A/C binding ameliorates Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Jin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Yoon, Min-Ho; Kang, So-Mi; Oh, Ah-Young; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Jun, So-Young; Woo, Tae-Gyun; Chun, Ho-Young; Kim, Sang Kyum; Chung, Kyu Jin; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Kyeong; Jin, Guanghai; Na, Min-Kyun; Ha, Nam Chul; Bárcena, Clea; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos; Song, Gyu Yong; Park, Bum-Joon

    2016-10-03

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disease that is caused by a silent mutation of the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C (lamin A/C). The G608G mutation generates a more accessible splicing donor site than does WT and produces an alternatively spliced product of LMNA called progerin, which is also expressed in normal aged cells. In this study, we determined that progerin binds directly to lamin A/C and induces profound nuclear aberrations. Given this observation, we performed a random screening of a chemical library and identified 3 compounds (JH1, JH4, and JH13) that efficiently block progerin-lamin A/C binding. These 3 chemicals, particularly JH4, alleviated nuclear deformation and reversed senescence markers characteristic of HGPS cells, including growth arrest and senescence-associated β-gal (SA-β-gal) activity. We then used microarray-based analysis to demonstrate that JH4 is able to rescue defects of cell-cycle progression in both HGPS and aged cells. Furthermore, administration of JH4 to LmnaG609G/G609G-mutant mice, which phenocopy human HGPS, resulted in a marked improvement of several progeria phenotypes and an extended lifespan. Together, these findings indicate that specific inhibitors with the ability to block pathological progerin-lamin A/C binding may represent a promising strategy for improving lifespan and health in both HGPS and normal aging.

  9. Mutational Profiles Reveal an Aberrant TGF-β-CEA Regulated Pathway in Colon Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Jogunoori, Wilma; Menon, Vipin; Majumdar, Avijit; Chen, Jiun-Sheng; Gi, Young Jin; Jeong, Yun Seong; Phan, Liem; Belkin, Mitchell; Gu, Shoujun; Kundra, Suchin; Mistry, Nipun A.; Zhang, Jianping; Su, Xiaoping; Li, Shulin; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Javle, Milind; McMurray, John S.; Rahlfs, Thomas F.; Mishra, Bibhuti; White, Jon; Rashid, Asif; Beauchemin, Nicole; Weston, Brian R.; Shafi, Mehnaz A.; Stroehlein, John R.; Davila, Marta; Akbani, Rehan; Weinstein, John N.; Wu, Xifeng; Mishra, Lopa

    2016-01-01

    Mutational processes and signatures that drive early tumorigenesis are centrally important for early cancer prevention. Yet, to date, biomarkers and risk factors for polyps (adenomas) that inordinately and rapidly develop into colon cancer remain poorly defined. Here, we describe surprisingly high mutational profiles through whole-genome sequence (WGS) analysis in 2 of 4 pairs of benign colorectal adenoma tissue samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustered transcriptomic analysis of a further 7 pairs of adenomas reveals distinct mutational signatures regardless of adenoma size. Transitional single nucleotide substitutions of C:G>T:A predominate in the adenoma mutational spectrum. Strikingly, we observe mutations in the TGF-β pathway and CEA-associated genes in 4 out of 11 adenomas, overlapping with the Wnt pathway. Immunohistochemical labeling reveals a nearly 5-fold increase in CEA levels in 23% of adenoma samples with a concomitant loss of TGF-β signaling. We also define a functional role by which the CEA B3 domain interacts with TGFBR1, potentially inactivating the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β signaling. Our study uncovers diverse mutational processes underlying the transition from early adenoma to cancer. This has broad implications for biomarker-driven targeting of CEA/TGF-β in high-risk adenomas and may lead to early detection of aggressive adenoma to CRC progression. PMID:27100181

  10. Disease Model of GATA4 Mutation Reveals Transcription Factor Cooperativity in Human Cardiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ang, Yen-Sin; Rivas, Renee N; Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Srivas, Rohith; Rivera, Janell; Stone, Nicole R; Pratt, Karishma; Mohamed, Tamer M A; Fu, Ji-Dong; Spencer, C Ian; Tippens, Nathaniel D; Li, Molong; Narasimha, Anil; Radzinsky, Ethan; Moon-Grady, Anita J; Yu, Haiyuan; Pruitt, Beth L; Snyder, Michael P; Srivastava, Deepak

    2016-12-15

    Mutation of highly conserved residues in transcription factors may affect protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions, leading to gene network dysregulation and human disease. Human mutations in GATA4, a cardiogenic transcription factor, cause cardiac septal defects and cardiomyopathy. Here, iPS-derived cardiomyocytes from subjects with a heterozygous GATA4-G296S missense mutation showed impaired contractility, calcium handling, and metabolic activity. In human cardiomyocytes, GATA4 broadly co-occupied cardiac enhancers with TBX5, another transcription factor that causes septal defects when mutated. The GATA4-G296S mutation disrupted TBX5 recruitment, particularly to cardiac super-enhancers, concomitant with dysregulation of genes related to the phenotypic abnormalities, including cardiac septation. Conversely, the GATA4-G296S mutation led to failure of GATA4 and TBX5-mediated repression at non-cardiac genes and enhanced open chromatin states at endothelial/endocardial promoters. These results reveal how disease-causing missense mutations can disrupt transcriptional cooperativity, leading to aberrant chromatin states and cellular dysfunction, including those related to morphogenetic defects.

  11. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10−4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10−3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10−8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  12. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Engin, H Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10(-4)) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10(-3)). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10(-8)). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  13. Progeria: Translational insights from cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Leslie B.; Cao, Kan

    2012-01-01

    Cell biologists love to think outside the box, pursuing many surprising twists and unexpected turns in their quest to unravel the mysteries of how cells work. But can cell biologists think outside the bench? We are certain that they can, and clearly some already do. To encourage more cell biologists to venture into the realm of translational research on a regular basis, we would like to share a handful of the many lessons that we have learned in our effort to develop experimental treatments for Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), an endeavor that many view as a “poster child” for how basic cell biology can be translated to the clinic. PMID:23027899

  14. Targeted next-generation sequencing of candidate genes reveals novel mutations in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUE; FENG, YUE; ZHANG, YUN-MEI; DING, XIAO-XUE; SONG, YU-ZHU; ZHANG, A-MEI; LIU, LI; ZHANG, HONG; DING, JIA-HUAN; XIA, XUE-SHAN

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a major cause of sudden cardiac death and heart failure, and it is characterized by genetic and clinical heterogeneity, even for some patients with a very poor clinical prognosis; in the majority of cases, DCM necessitates a heart transplant. Genetic mutations have long been considered to be associated with this disease. At present, mutations in over 50 genes related to DCM have been documented. This study was carried out to elucidate the characteristics of gene mutations in patients with DCM. The candidate genes that may cause DCM include MYBPC3, MYH6, MYH7, LMNA, TNNT2, TNNI3, MYPN, MYL3, TPM1, SCN5A, DES, ACTC1 and RBM20. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and subsequent mutation confirmation with traditional capillary Sanger sequencing analysis, possible causative non-synonymous mutations were identified in ~57% (12/21) of patients with DCM. As a result, 7 novel mutations (MYPN, p.E630K; TNNT2, p.G180A; MYH6, p.R1047C; TNNC1, p.D3V; DES, p.R386H; MYBPC3, p.C1124F; and MYL3, p.D126G), 3 variants of uncertain significance (RBM20, p.R1182H; MYH6, p.T1253M; and VCL, p.M209L), and 2 known mutations (MYH7, p.A26V and MYBPC3, p.R160W) were revealed to be associated with DCM. The mutations were most frequently found in the sarcomere (MYH6, MYBPC3, MYH7, TNNC1, TNNT2 and MYL3) and cytoskeletal (MYPN, DES and VCL) genes. As genetic testing is a useful tool in the clinical management of disease, testing for pathogenic mutations is beneficial to the treatment of patients with DCM and may assist in predicting disease risk for their family members before the onset of symptoms. PMID:26458567

  15. Depleting the methyltransferase Suv39h1 improves DNA repair and extends lifespan in a progeria mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohua; Wang, Zimei; Zhang, Le; Ghosh, Shrestha; Zheng, Huiling; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2013-01-01

    A de novo G608G mutation in LMNA gene leads to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Mice lacking the prelamin A-processing metalloprotease, Zmpste24, recapitulate many of the progeroid features of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Here we show that A-type lamins interact with SUV39H1, and prelamin A/progerin exhibits enhanced binding capacity to SUV39H1, protecting it from proteasomal degradation and, consequently, increasing H3K9me3 levels. Depletion of Suv39h1 reduces H3K9me3 levels, restores DNA repair capacity and delays senescence in progeroid cells. Remarkably, loss of Suv39h1 in Zmpste24(-/-) mice delays body weight loss, increases bone mineral density and extends lifespan by ∼60%. Thus, increased H3K9me3 levels, possibly mediated by enhanced Suv39h1 stability in the presence of prelamin A/progerin, compromise genome maintenance, which in turn contributes to accelerated senescence in laminopathy-based premature aging. Our study provides an explanation for epigenetic alterations in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and a potential strategy for intervention by targeting SUV39H1-mediated heterochromatin remodelling.

  16. Absence of progeria-like disease phenotypes in knock-in mice expressing a non-farnesylated version of progerin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao H; Chang, Sandy Y; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G

    2011-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutant prelamin A, progerin, that terminates with a farnesylcysteine. HGPS knock-in mice (Lmna(HG/+)) develop severe progeria-like disease phenotypes. These phenotypes can be ameliorated with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI), suggesting that progerin's farnesyl lipid is important for disease pathogenesis and raising the possibility that FTIs could be useful for treating humans with HGPS. Subsequent studies showed that mice expressing non-farnesylated progerin (Lmna(nHG/+) mice, in which progerin's carboxyl-terminal -CSIM motif was changed to -SSIM) also develop severe progeria, raising doubts about whether any treatment targeting protein prenylation would be particularly effective. We suspected that those doubts might be premature and hypothesized that the persistent disease in Lmna(nHG/+) mice could be an unanticipated consequence of the cysteine-to-serine substitution that was used to eliminate farnesylation. To test this hypothesis, we generated a second knock-in allele yielding non-farnesylated progerin (Lmna(csmHG)) in which the carboxyl-terminal -CSIM motif was changed to -CSM. We then compared disease phenotypes in mice harboring the Lmna(nHG) or Lmna(csmHG) allele. As expected, Lmna(nHG/+) and Lmna(nHG/nHG) mice developed severe progeria-like disease phenotypes, including osteolytic lesions and rib fractures, osteoporosis, slow growth and reduced survival. In contrast, Lmna(csmHG/+) and Lmna(csmHG/csmHG) mice exhibited no bone disease and displayed entirely normal body weights and survival. The frequencies of misshapen cell nuclei were lower in Lmna(csmHG/+) and Lmna(csmHG/csmHG) fibroblasts. These studies show that the ability of non-farnesylated progerin to elicit disease depends on the carboxyl-terminal mutation used to eliminate protein prenylation.

  17. DNA repair defects and genome instability in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray

    2015-06-01

    The integrity of the nuclear lamina has emerged as an important factor in the maintenance of genome stability. In particular, mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins (lamin A/C), alter nuclear morphology and function, and cause genomic instability. LMNA gene mutations are associated with a variety of degenerative diseases and devastating premature aging syndromes such as Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) and Restrictive Dermopathy (RD). HGPS is a severe laminopathy, with patients dying in their teens from myocardial infarction or stroke. HGPS patient-derived cells exhibit nuclear shape abnormalities, changes in epigenetic regulation and gene expression, telomere shortening, genome instability, and premature senescence. This review highlights recent advances in identifying molecular mechanisms that contribute to the pathophysiology of HGPS, with a special emphasis on DNA repair defects and genome instability.

  18. DNA repair defects and genome instability in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of the nuclear lamina has emerged as an important factor in the maintenance of genome stability. In particular, mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins (lamin A/C), alter nuclear morphology and function, and cause genomic instability. LMNA gene mutations are associated with a variety of degenerative diseases and devastating premature aging syndromes such as Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) and Restrictive Dermopathy (RD). HGPS is a severe laminopathy, with patients dying in their teens from myocardial infarction or stroke. HGPS patient-derived cells exhibit nuclear shape abnormalities, changes in epigenetic regulation and gene expression, telomere shortening, genome instability, and premature senescence. This review highlights recent advances in identifying molecular mechanisms that contribute to the pathophysiology of HGPS, with a special emphasis on DNA repair defects and genome instability. PMID:26079711

  19. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Novel PHEX Splice Site Mutations in Patients with Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Christopher; Sampson, Matthew G.; Kher, Vijay; Sethi, Sidharth K.; Otto, Edgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is a heterogeneous genetic phosphate wasting disorder. The disease is most commonly caused by mutations in the PHEX gene located on the X-chromosome or by mutations in CLCN5, DMP1, ENPP1, FGF23, and SLC34A3. The aims of this study were to perform molecular diagnostics for four patients with HR of Indian origin (two independent families) and to describe their clinical features. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the affected mother of two boys who also displayed the typical features of HR, including bone malformations and phosphate wasting. B-lymphoblast cell lines were established by EBV transformation and subsequent RT-PCR to investigate an uncommon splice site variant found by WES. An in silico analysis was done to obtain accurate nucleotide frequency occurrences of consensus splice positions other than the canonical sites of all human exons. Additionally, we applied direct Sanger sequencing for all exons and exon/intron boundaries of the PHEX gene for an affected girl from an independent second Indian family. Results WES revealed a novel PHEX splice acceptor mutation in intron 9 (c.1080-3C>A) in a family with 3 affected individuals with HR. The effect on splicing of this mutation was further investigated by RT-PCR using RNA obtained from a patient’s EBV-transformed lymphoblast cell line. RT-PCR revealed an aberrant splice transcript skipping exons 10-14 which was not observed in control samples, confirming the diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemia (XLH). The in silico analysis of all human splice sites adjacent to all 327,293 exons across 81,814 transcripts among 20,345 human genes revealed that cytosine is, with 64.3%, the most frequent nucleobase at the minus 3 splice acceptor position, followed by thymidine with 28.7%, adenine with 6.3%, and guanine with 0.8%. We generated frequency tables and pictograms for the extended donor and acceptor splice consensus regions by analyzing all human

  20. Clinical and genetic analyses reveal novel pathogenic ABCA4 mutations in Stargardt disease families

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bing; Cai, Xue-Bi; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Qu, Jia; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) is a juvenile macular degeneration predominantly inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, characterized by decreased central vision in the first 2 decades of life. The condition has a genetic basis due to mutation in the ABCA4 gene, and arises from the deposition of lipofuscin-like substance in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) with secondary photoreceptor cell death. In this study, we describe the clinical and genetic features of Stargardt patients from four unrelated Chinese cohorts. The targeted exome sequencing (TES) was carried out in four clinically confirmed patients and their family members using a gene panel comprising 164 known causative inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) genes. Genetic analysis revealed eight ABCA4 mutations in all of the four pedigrees, including six mutations in coding exons and two mutations in adjacent intronic areas. All the affected individuals showed typical manifestations consistent with the disease phenotype. We disclose two novel ABCA4 mutations in Chinese patients with STGD disease, which will expand the existing spectrum of disease-causing variants and will further aid in the future mutation screening and genetic counseling, as well as in the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic correlations. PMID:27739528

  1. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria is a skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Catherine M; Gordon, Leslie B; Snyder, Brian D; Nazarian, Ara; Quinn, Nicolle; Huh, Susanna; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Neuberg, Donna; Cleveland, Robert; Kleinman, Monica; Miller, David T; Kieran, Mark W

    2011-07-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare segmental premature aging disorder that affects bone and body composition, among other tissues. We sought to determine whether bone density and structural geometry are altered in children with HGPS and whether relationships exist among these parameters and measures of skeletal anthropometry, body composition, and nutrition. We prospectively enrolled 26 children with HGPS (ages 3.1 to 16.2 years). Outcomes included anthropometric data; bone age; areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA); volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), strength-strain index (SSI), and bone structural rigidity calculated from radial transaxial peripheral quantitative computed tomographic (pQCT) images; serum bone biomarkers and hormonal measures; and nutrition assessments. Children with HGPS had low axial aBMD Z-scores by DXA, which improved after adjustment for height age, whereas differences in radial vBMD by pQCT were less striking. However, pQCT revealed distinct abnormalities in both novel measures of bone structural geometry and skeletal strength at the radius compared with healthy controls. Dietary intake was adequate, confirming that HGPS does not represent a model of malnutrition-induced bone loss. Taken together, these findings suggest that the phenotype of HGPS represents a unique skeletal dysplasia.

  2. Whole-Genome Analysis Reveals that Mutations in Inositol Polyphosphate Phosphatase-like 1 Cause Opsismodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Below, Jennifer E.; Earl, Dawn L.; Shively, Kathryn M.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Smith, Joshua D.; Turner, Emily H.; Stephan, Mark J.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh I.; Hertecant, Jozef L.; Chitayat, David; Unger, Sheila; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah; Swanson, James M.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Opsismodysplasia is a rare, autosomal-recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, characteristic facial features, and in some cases severe renal phosphate wasting. We used linkage analysis and whole-genome sequencing of a consanguineous trio to discover that mutations in inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1 (INPPL1) cause opsismodysplasia with or without renal phosphate wasting. Evaluation of 12 families with opsismodysplasia revealed that INPPL1 mutations explain ∼60% of cases overall, including both of the families in our cohort with more than one affected child and 50% of the simplex cases. PMID:23273567

  3. In vitro pathological modelling using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells: the case of progeria.

    PubMed

    Nissan, Xavier; Blondel, Sophie; Peschanski, Marc

    2011-12-01

    Progeria, also known as HGPS (Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome), is a rare fatal genetic disease characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. This syndrome is typically caused by mutations in codon 608 (C1804T) of the gene encoding lamins A and C, LMNA, leading to the production of a truncated form of the protein called progerin. Owing to their unique potential to self-renew and to differentiate into any cell types of the organism, pluripotent stem cells offer a unique tool to study molecular and cellular mechanisms related to this global and systemic disease. Recent studies have exploited this potential by generating human induced pluripotent stem cells from HGPS patients' fibroblasts displaying several phenotypic defects characteristic of HGPS such as nuclear abnormalities, progerin expression, altered DNA-repair mechanisms and premature senescence. Altogether, these findings provide new insights on the use of pluripotent stem cells for pathological modelling and may open original therapeutic perspectives for diseases that lack pre-clinical in vitro human models, such as HGPS.

  4. Exome analysis reveals differentially mutated gene signatures of stage, grade and subtype in breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Wang, Xiaosheng; Vural, Suleyman; Mishra, Nitish K; Cowan, Kenneth H; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers exhibit highly heterogeneous molecular profiles. Although gene expression profiles have been used to predict the risks and prognostic outcomes of breast cancers, the high variability of gene expression limits its clinical application. In contrast, genetic mutation profiles would be more advantageous than gene expression profiles because genetic mutations can be stably detected and the mutational heterogeneity widely exists in breast cancer genomes. We analyzed 98 breast cancer whole exome samples that were sorted into three subtypes, two grades and two stages. The sum deleterious effect of all mutations in each gene was scored to identify differentially mutated genes (DMGs) for this case-control study. DMGs were corroborated using extensive published knowledge. Functional consequences of deleterious SNVs on protein structure and function were also investigated. Genes such as ERBB2, ESP8, PPP2R4, KIAA0922, SP4, CENPJ, PRCP and SELP that have been experimentally or clinically verified to be tightly associated with breast cancer prognosis are among the DMGs identified in this study. We also identified some genes such as ARL6IP5, RAET1E, and ANO7 that could be crucial for breast cancer development and prognosis. Further, SNVs such as rs1058808, rs2480452, rs61751507, rs79167802, rs11540666, and rs2229437 that potentially influence protein functions are observed at significantly different frequencies in different comparison groups. Protein structure modeling revealed that many non-synonymous SNVs have a deleterious effect on protein stability, structure and function. Mutational profiling at gene- and SNV-level revealed differential patterns within each breast cancer comparison group, and the gene signatures correlate with expected prognostic characteristics of breast cancer classes. Some of the genes and SNVs identified in this study show high promise and are worthy of further investigation by experimental studies.

  5. Exome Analysis Reveals Differentially Mutated Gene Signatures of Stage, Grade and Subtype in Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, You; Wang, Xiaosheng; Vural, Suleyman; Mishra, Nitish K.; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers exhibit highly heterogeneous molecular profiles. Although gene expression profiles have been used to predict the risks and prognostic outcomes of breast cancers, the high variability of gene expression limits its clinical application. In contrast, genetic mutation profiles would be more advantageous than gene expression profiles because genetic mutations can be stably detected and the mutational heterogeneity widely exists in breast cancer genomes. We analyzed 98 breast cancer whole exome samples that were sorted into three subtypes, two grades and two stages. The sum deleterious effect of all mutations in each gene was scored to identify differentially mutated genes (DMGs) for this case-control study. DMGs were corroborated using extensive published knowledge. Functional consequences of deleterious SNVs on protein structure and function were also investigated. Genes such as ERBB2, ESP8, PPP2R4, KIAA0922, SP4, CENPJ, PRCP and SELP that have been experimentally or clinically verified to be tightly associated with breast cancer prognosis are among the DMGs identified in this study. We also identified some genes such as ARL6IP5, RAET1E, and ANO7 that could be crucial for breast cancer development and prognosis. Further, SNVs such as rs1058808, rs2480452, rs61751507, rs79167802, rs11540666, and rs2229437 that potentially influence protein functions are observed at significantly different frequencies in different comparison groups. Protein structure modeling revealed that many non-synonymous SNVs have a deleterious effect on protein stability, structure and function. Mutational profiling at gene- and SNV-level revealed differential patterns within each breast cancer comparison group, and the gene signatures correlate with expected prognostic characteristics of breast cancer classes. Some of the genes and SNVs identified in this study show high promise and are worthy of further investigation by experimental studies. PMID:25803781

  6. DNA fingerprinting reveals elevated mutation rates in herring gulls inhabiting a genotoxically contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Yauk, C.L.; Quinn, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The authors used multi-locus DNA fingerprinting to examine families of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) from a genotoxically contaminated site (Hamilton Harbour) and from a pristine location (Kent Island, Bay of Fundy) to show significant differences in mutation rates between the locations. Overall the authors identified 17 mutant bands from 15 individuals of the 35 examined from Hamilton Harbour, and 7 mutant fragments from 7 individuals, of the 43 examined from Kent Island; a mutation frequency of 0.429 per nestling for Hamilton Harbour and 0.163 for Kent Island. The total number of individuals with mutant bands was significantly higher at Hamilton Harbour than at Kent Island (X{sup 2}=6.734; df = 1; P < 0.01). Ongoing analysis of other less contaminated sites also reveals lower mutation rates than those seen in Hamilton Harbour. With multi-locus DNA fingerprinting many regions of the genome can be surveyed simultaneously. The tandemly repeated arrays of nucleotides examined with DNA fingerprinting are known to have elevated rates of mutation. Furthermore, the mutations seen with DNA fingerprinting are predominantly heritable. Other biomarkers currently used in situ are not able to monitor direct and heritable DNA mutation, or measure biological endpoints that frequently result in spontaneous abortion creating difficulty in observing significantly elevated levels in viable offspring. The authors suggest that multilocus DNA fingerprinting can be used as a biomarker to identify potentially heritable risks before the onset of other types of ecological damage. This approach provides a direct measure of mutation in situ and in vivo in a vertebrate species under ambient conditions.

  7. Inherited cobalamin malabsorption. Mutations in three genes reveal functional and ethnic patterns.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Stephan M; Sturm, Amy C; Baack, Elizabeth C; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2012-08-28

    Inherited malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl) causes hematological and neurological abnormalities that can be fatal. Three genes have been implicated in Cbl malabsorption; yet, only about 10% of ~400-500 reported cases have been molecularly studied to date. Recessive mutations in CUBN or AMN cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (IGS), while recessive mutations in GIF cause Intrinsic Factor Deficiency (IFD). IGS and IFD differ in that IGS usually presents with proteinuria, which is not observed in IFD. The genetic heterogeneity and numerous differential diagnoses make clinical assessment difficult. We present a large genetic screening study of 154 families or patients with suspected hereditary Cbl malabsorption. Patients and their families have been accrued over a period spanning >12  years. Systematic genetic testing of the three genes CUBN, AMN, and GIF was accomplished using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA and RNA sequencing. In addition, six genes that were contenders for a role in inherited Cbl malabsorption were studied in a subset of these patients. Our results revealed population-specific mutations, mutational hotspots, and functionally distinct regions in the three causal genes. We identified mutations in 126/154 unrelated cases (82%). Fifty-three of 126 cases (42%) were mutated in CUBN, 45/126 (36%) were mutated in AMN, and 28/126 (22%) had mutations in GIF. We found 26 undescribed mutations in CUBN, 19 in AMN, and 7 in GIF for a total of 52 novel defects described herein. We excluded six other candidate genes as culprits and concluded that additional genes might be involved. Cbl malabsorption is found worldwide and genetically complex. However, our results indicate that population-specific founder mutations are quite common. Consequently, targeted genetic testing has become feasible if ethnic ancestry is considered. These results will facilitate clinical and molecular genetic testing of Cbl malabsorption. Early diagnosis

  8. Inherited cobalamin malabsorption. Mutations in three genes reveal functional and ethnic patterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inherited malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl) causes hematological and neurological abnormalities that can be fatal. Three genes have been implicated in Cbl malabsorption; yet, only about 10% of ~400-500 reported cases have been molecularly studied to date. Recessive mutations in CUBN or AMN cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (IGS), while recessive mutations in GIF cause Intrinsic Factor Deficiency (IFD). IGS and IFD differ in that IGS usually presents with proteinuria, which is not observed in IFD. The genetic heterogeneity and numerous differential diagnoses make clinical assessment difficult. Methods We present a large genetic screening study of 154 families or patients with suspected hereditary Cbl malabsorption. Patients and their families have been accrued over a period spanning >12 years. Systematic genetic testing of the three genes CUBN, AMN, and GIF was accomplished using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA and RNA sequencing. In addition, six genes that were contenders for a role in inherited Cbl malabsorption were studied in a subset of these patients. Results Our results revealed population-specific mutations, mutational hotspots, and functionally distinct regions in the three causal genes. We identified mutations in 126/154 unrelated cases (82%). Fifty-three of 126 cases (42%) were mutated in CUBN, 45/126 (36%) were mutated in AMN, and 28/126 (22%) had mutations in GIF. We found 26 undescribed mutations in CUBN, 19 in AMN, and 7 in GIF for a total of 52 novel defects described herein. We excluded six other candidate genes as culprits and concluded that additional genes might be involved. Conclusions Cbl malabsorption is found worldwide and genetically complex. However, our results indicate that population-specific founder mutations are quite common. Consequently, targeted genetic testing has become feasible if ethnic ancestry is considered. These results will facilitate clinical and molecular genetic testing of

  9. Sequencing of the Reannotated LMNB2 Gene Reveals Novel Mutations in Patients with Acquired Partial Lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hegele, Robert A.; Cao, Henian; Liu, Dora M.; Costain, Gary A.; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Rodger, N. Wilson; Durrington, Paul N.

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of acquired partial lipodystrophy (APL, also called “Barraquer-Simons syndrome”) is unknown. Genomic DNA mutations affecting the nuclear lamina protein lamin A cause inherited partial lipodystrophy but are not found in patients with APL. Because it also encodes a nuclear lamina protein (lamin B2) and its genomic structure was recently reannotated, we sequenced LMNB2 as a candidate gene in nine white patients with APL. In four patients, we found three new rare mutations in LMNB2: intron 1 −6G→T, exon 5 c.643G→A (p.R215Q; in two patients), and exon 8 c.1218G→A (p.A407T). The combined frequency of these mutations was 0.222 in the patients with APL, compared with 0.0018 in a multiethnic control sample of 1,100 subjects (P=2.1×10-7) and 0.0045 in a sample of 330 white controls (P=1.2×10-5). These novel heterozygous mutations are the first reported for LMNB2, are the first reported among patients with APL, and indicate how sequencing of a reannotated candidate gene can reveal new disease-associated mutations. PMID:16826530

  10. Sequencing of the reannotated LMNB2 gene reveals novel mutations in patients with acquired partial lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hegele, Robert A; Cao, Henian; Liu, Dora M; Costain, Gary A; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Rodger, N Wilson; Durrington, Paul N

    2006-08-01

    The etiology of acquired partial lipodystrophy (APL, also called "Barraquer-Simons syndrome") is unknown. Genomic DNA mutations affecting the nuclear lamina protein lamin A cause inherited partial lipodystrophy but are not found in patients with APL. Because it also encodes a nuclear lamina protein (lamin B2) and its genomic structure was recently reannotated, we sequenced LMNB2 as a candidate gene in nine white patients with APL. In four patients, we found three new rare mutations in LMNB2: intron 1 -6G-->T, exon 5 c.643G-->A (p.R215Q; in two patients), and exon 8 c.1218G-->A (p.A407T). The combined frequency of these mutations was 0.222 in the patients with APL, compared with 0.0018 in a multiethnic control sample of 1,100 subjects (P = 2.1 x 10-7) and 0.0045 in a sample of 330 white controls (P = 1.2 x 10-5). These novel heterozygous mutations are the first reported for LMNB2, are the first reported among patients with APL, and indicate how sequencing of a reannotated candidate gene can reveal new disease-associated mutations.

  11. Analysis of TP53 mutation spectra reveals the fingerprint of the potent environmental carcinogen, aristolochic acid.

    PubMed

    Hollstein, M; Moriya, M; Grollman, A P; Olivier, M

    2013-01-01

    Genetic alterations in cancer tissues may reflect the mutational fingerprint of environmental carcinogens. Here we review the pieces of evidence that support the role of aristolochic acid (AA) in inducing a mutational fingerprint in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 in urothelial carcinomas of the upper urinary tract (UUT). Exposure to AA, a nitrophenathrene carboxylic acid present in certain herbal remedies and in flour prepared from wheat grain contaminated with seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, has been linked to chronic nephropathy and UUT. TP53 mutations in UUT of individuals exposed to AA reveal a unique pattern of mutations characterized by A to T transversions on the non-transcribed strand, which cluster at hotspots rarely mutated in other cancers. This unusual pattern, originally discovered in UUTs from two different populations, one in Taiwan, and one in the Balkans, has been reproduced experimentally by treating mouse cells that harbor human TP53 sequences with AA. The convergence of molecular epidemiological and experimental data establishes a clear causal association between exposure to the human carcinogen AA and UUT. Despite bans on the sale of herbs containing AA, their use continues, raising global public health concern and an urgent need to identify populations at risk.

  12. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E.; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R.; Göksenin, A. Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication. PMID:25228659

  13. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication.

    PubMed

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R; Göksenin, A Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F; Wheeler, David A

    2014-11-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication.

  14. Novel MYH11 and ACTA2 mutations reveal a role for enhanced TGFβ signaling in FTAAD

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Marjolijn; Callewaert, Bert; Baetens, Machteld; Campens, Laurence; MacDermot, Kay; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Bonduelle, Maryse; Dietz, Hal; Gaspar, Isabel Mendes; Cavaco, Diogo; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance; Coucke, Paul; Loeys, Bart; De Paepe, Anne; De Backer, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Background Thoracic aortic aneurysm / dissection (TAAD) is a common phenotype that may occur as an isolated manifestation or within the constellation of a defined syndrome. In contrast to syndromic TAAD, the elucidation of the genetic basis of isolated TAAD has only recently started. To date, defects have been found in genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins (fibrillin-1, FBN1; collagen type III alpha 1, COL3A1), proteins involved in transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling (TGFβ receptor 1 and 2, TGFBR1/2; and SMAD3) or proteins that build up the contractile apparatus of aortic smooth muscle cells (myosin heavy chain 11, MYH11; smooth muscle actin alpha 2, ACTA2; and MYLK). Methods and results In 110 non-syndromic TAAD patients that previously tested negative for FBN1 or TGFBR1/2 mutations, we identified 7 ACTA2 mutations in a cohort of 43 familial TAAD patients, including 2 premature truncating mutations. Sequencing of MYH11 revealed an in frame splice-site alteration in one out of two probands with TAA(D) associated with PDA but none in the series of 22 probands from the cohort of 110 patients with non-syndromic TAAD. Interestingly, immunohistochemical staining of aortic biopsies of a patient and a family member with MYH11 and patients with ACTA2 missense mutations showed upregulation of the TGFβ signaling pathway. Conclusions MYH11 mutations are rare and typically identified in patients with TAAD associated with PDA. ACTA2 mutations were identified in 16% of a cohort presenting familial TAAD. Different molecular defects in TAAD may account for a different pathogenic mechanism of enhanced TGFβ signaling. PMID:21937134

  15. Exome Sequencing Reveals Mutations in AIRE as a Cause of Isolated Hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Chan, Alice; Lwin, Wint; Tian, Lifeng; Pellegrino da Silva, Renata; Kim, Cecilia E; Anderson, Mark S; Hakonarson, Hakon; Levine, Michael A

    2017-05-01

    Most cases of autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism (HYPO) are caused by loss-of-function mutations in GCM2 or PTH. The objective of this study was to identify the underlying genetic basis for isolated HYPO in a kindred in which 3 of 10 siblings were affected. We studied the parents and the three adult affected subjects, each of whom was diagnosed with HYPO in the first decade of life. We collected clinical and biochemical data and performed whole exome sequencing analysis on DNA from the three affected subjects after negative genetic testing for known causes of HYPO. Whole exome sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing revealed that all three affected subjects were compound heterozygous for two previously reported mutations, c.967_979delCTGTCCCCTCCGC:p.(L323SfsX51) and c.995+(3_5)delGAGinsTAT, in AIRE, which encodes the autoimmune regulator protein that is defective in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1). Each parent carries one mutation, and all of the children of the patients are either heterozygous for one mutation or wild type. The affected sister developed premature ovarian failure, but the two affected brothers have no other features of APS-1 despite elevated serum levels of anti-interferon-α antibodies. Our findings indicate that biallelic mutations in AIRE can cause isolated HYPO as well as syndromic APS-1. The presence of antibodies to interferon-α provides a highly sensitive indicator for loss of AIRE function and represents a useful marker for isolated HYPO due to AIRE mutations.

  16. Comparative analysis and functional mapping of SACS mutations reveal novel insights into sacsin repeated architecture.

    PubMed

    Romano, Alessandro; Tessa, Alessandra; Barca, Amilcare; Fattori, Fabiana; de Leva, Maria Fulvia; Terracciano, Alessandra; Storelli, Carlo; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Verri, Tiziano

    2013-03-01

    Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is a neurological disease with mutations in SACS, encoding sacsin, a multidomain protein of 4,579 amino acids. The large size of SACS and its translated protein has hindered biochemical analysis of ARSACS, and how mutant sacsins lead to disease remains largely unknown. Three repeated sequences, called sacsin repeating region (SRR) supradomains, have been recognized, which contribute to sacsin chaperone-like activity. We found that the three SRRs are much larger (≥1,100 residues) than previously described, and organized in discrete subrepeats. We named the large repeated regions Sacsin Internal RePeaTs (SIRPT1, SIRPT2, and SIRPT3) and the subrepeats sr1, sr2, sr3, and srX. Comparative analysis of vertebrate sacsins in combination with fine positional mapping of a set of human mutations revealed that sr1, sr2, sr3, and srX are functional. Notably, the position of the pathogenic mutations in sr1, sr2, sr3, and srX appeared to be related to the severity of the clinical phenotype, as assessed by defining a severity scoring system. Our results suggest that the relative position of mutations in subrepeats will variably influence sacsin dysfunction. The characterization of the specific role of each repeated region will help in developing a comprehensive and integrated pathophysiological model of function for sacsin.

  17. Vascular disease modeling using induced pluripotent stem cells: Focus in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pitrez, P R; Rosa, S C; Praça, C; Ferreira, L

    2016-05-06

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent today an invaluable tool to create disease cell models for modeling and drug screening. Several lines of iPSCs have been generated in the last 7 years that changed the paradigm for studying diseases and the discovery of new drugs to treat them. In this article we focus our attention to vascular diseases in particular Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a devastating premature aging disease caused by a mutation in the lamin A gene. In general, patients die because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Because the patients are fragile the isolation of a particular type of cells is very difficult. Therefore in the last 5 years, researchers have used cells derived from iPSCs to model aspects of the HGPS and to screen libraries of chemicals to retard or treat the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MonoSeq Variant Caller Reveals Novel Mononucleotide Run Indel Mutations in Tumors with Defective DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher J.; Miranda, Mario A.; O’Hern, Matthew J.; Blachly, James S.; Moyer, Cassandra L.; Ivanovich, Jennifer; Kroll, Karl W.; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Sapp, Caroline E.; Mutch, David G.; Cohn, David E.; Bundschuh, Ralf; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized cancer genetics, but accurately detecting mutations in repetitive DNA sequences, especially mononucleotide runs, remains a challenge. This is a particular concern for tumors with defective mismatch repair (MMR) that accumulate strand-slippage mutations. We developed MonoSeq to improve indel mutation detection in mononucleotide runs, and used MonoSeq to investigate strand-slippage mutations in endometrial cancers, a tumor type that has frequent loss of MMR. We performed extensive Sanger sequencing to validate both clonal and sub-clonal MonoSeq mutation calls. Eighty-one regions containing mononucleotide runs were sequenced in 542 primary endometrial cancers (223 with defective MMR). Our analyses revealed that the overall mutation rate in MMR-deficient tumors was 20–30-fold higher than in MMR normal tumors. MonoSeq analysis identified several previously unreported mutations, including a novel hotspot in an A7 run in the terminal exon of ARID5B.The ARID5B indel mutations were seen in both MMR-deficient and MMR normal tumors, suggesting biologic selection. Analysis of tumor mRNAs revealed the presence of mutant transcripts that could result in translation of neopeptides. Improved detection of mononucleotide run strand-slippage mutations has clear implications for comprehensive mutation detection in tumors with defective MMR. Indel frameshift mutations and the resultant antigenic peptides could help guide immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27346418

  19. MonoSeq Variant Caller Reveals Novel Mononucleotide Run Indel Mutations in Tumors with Defective DNA Mismatch Repair.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher J; Miranda, Mario A; O'Hern, Matthew J; Blachly, James S; Moyer, Cassandra L; Ivanovich, Jennifer; Kroll, Karl W; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Sapp, Caroline E; Mutch, David G; Cohn, David E; Bundschuh, Ralf; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized cancer genetics, but accurately detecting mutations in repetitive DNA sequences, especially mononucleotide runs, remains a challenge. This is a particular concern for tumors with defective mismatch repair (MMR) that accumulate strand-slippage mutations. We developed MonoSeq to improve indel mutation detection in mononucleotide runs, and used MonoSeq to investigate strand-slippage mutations in endometrial cancers, a tumor type that has frequent loss of MMR. We performed extensive Sanger sequencing to validate both clonal and subclonal MonoSeq mutation calls. Eighty-one regions containing mononucleotide runs were sequenced in 540 primary endometrial cancers (223 with defective MMR). Our analyses revealed that the overall mutation rate in MMR-deficient tumors was 20-30-fold higher than in MMR-normal tumors. MonoSeq analysis identified several previously unreported mutations, including a novel hotspot in an A7 run in the terminal exon of ARID5B.The ARID5B indel mutations were seen in both MMR-deficient and MMR-normal tumors, suggesting biologic selection. The analysis of tumor mRNAs revealed the presence of mutant transcripts that could result in translation of neopeptides. Improved detection of mononucleotide run strand-slippage mutations has clear implications for comprehensive mutation detection in tumors with defective MMR. Indel frameshift mutations and the resultant antigenic peptides could help guide immunotherapy strategies.

  20. Mutational scanning reveals the determinants of protein insertion and association energetics in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan; Biran, Ido; Fridman, Yearit; Bibi, Eitan; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Insertion of helix-forming segments into the membrane and their association determines the structure, function, and expression levels of all plasma membrane proteins. However, systematic and reliable quantification of membrane-protein energetics has been challenging. We developed a deep mutational scanning method to monitor the effects of hundreds of point mutations on helix insertion and self-association within the bacterial inner membrane. The assay quantifies insertion energetics for all natural amino acids at 27 positions across the membrane, revealing that the hydrophobicity of biological membranes is significantly higher than appreciated. We further quantitate the contributions to membrane-protein insertion from positively charged residues at the cytoplasm-membrane interface and reveal large and unanticipated differences among these residues. Finally, we derive comprehensive mutational landscapes in the membrane domains of Glycophorin A and the ErbB2 oncogene, and find that insertion and self-association are strongly coupled in receptor homodimers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12125.001 PMID:26824389

  1. Whole-genome sequencing reveals a potential causal mutation for dwarfism in the Miniature Shetland pony.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Julia; Gast, Alana Christina; Schrimpf, Rahel; Rau, Janina; Eikelberg, Deborah; Beineke, Andreas; Hellige, Maren; Distl, Ottmar

    2017-04-01

    The Miniature Shetland pony represents a horse breed with an extremely small body size. Clinical examination of a dwarf Miniature Shetland pony revealed a lowered size at the withers, malformed skull and brachygnathia superior. Computed tomography (CT) showed a shortened maxilla and a cleft of the hard and soft palate which protruded into the nasal passage leading to breathing difficulties. Pathological examination confirmed these findings but did not reveal histopathological signs of premature ossification in limbs or cranial sutures. Whole-genome sequencing of this dwarf Miniature Shetland pony and comparative sequence analysis using 26 reference equids from NCBI Sequence Read Archive revealed three probably damaging missense variants which could be exclusively found in the affected foal. Validation of these three missense mutations in 159 control horses from different horse breeds and five donkeys revealed only the aggrecan (ACAN)-associated g.94370258G>C variant as homozygous wild-type in all control samples. The dwarf Miniature Shetland pony had the homozygous mutant genotype C/C of the ACAN:g.94370258G>C variant and the normal parents were heterozygous G/C. An unaffected full sib and 3/5 unaffected half-sibs were heterozygous G/C for the ACAN:g.94370258G>C variant. In summary, we could demonstrate a dwarf phenotype in a miniature pony breed perfectly associated with a missense mutation within the ACAN gene.

  2. Distinct evolutionary trajectories of primary high-grade serous ovarian cancers revealed through spatial mutational profiling

    PubMed Central

    Bashashati, Ali; Ha, Gavin; Tone, Alicia; Ding, Jiarui; Prentice, Leah M; Roth, Andrew; Rosner, Jamie; Shumansky, Karey; Kalloger, Steve; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; McConechy, Melissa; Melnyk, Nataliya; Anglesio, Michael; Luk, Margaret TY; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Moore, Richard; Zhao, Yongjun; Marra, Marco A; Gilks, Blake; Yip, Stephen; Huntsman, David G; McAlpine, Jessica N; Shah, Sohrab P

    2013-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) is characterized by poor outcome, often attributed to the emergence of treatment-resistant subclones. We sought to measure the degree of genomic diversity within primary, untreated HGSCs to examine the natural state of tumour evolution prior to therapy. We performed exome sequencing, copy number analysis, targeted amplicon deep sequencing and gene expression profiling on 31 spatially and temporally separated HGSC tumour specimens (six patients), including ovarian masses, distant metastases and fallopian tube lesions. We found widespread intratumoural variation in mutation, copy number and gene expression profiles, with key driver alterations in genes present in only a subset of samples (eg PIK3CA, CTNNB1, NF1). On average, only 51.5% of mutations were present in every sample of a given case (range 10.2–91.4%), with TP53 as the only somatic mutation consistently present in all samples. Complex segmental aneuploidies, such as whole-genome doubling, were present in a subset of samples from the same individual, with divergent copy number changes segregating independently of point mutation acquisition. Reconstruction of evolutionary histories showed one patient with mixed HGSC and endometrioid histology, with common aetiologic origin in the fallopian tube and subsequent selection of different driver mutations in the histologically distinct samples. In this patient, we observed mixed cell populations in the early fallopian tube lesion, indicating that diversity arises at early stages of tumourigenesis. Our results revealed that HGSCs exhibit highly individual evolutionary trajectories and diverse genomic tapestries prior to therapy, exposing an essential biological characteristic to inform future design of personalized therapeutic solutions and investigation of drug-resistance mechanisms. PMID:23780408

  3. Defective nuclear import of Tpr in Progeria reflects the Ran sensitivity of large cargo transport

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Chelsi J.; Dar, Ashraf; Dutta, Anindya; Kehlenbach, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    The RanGTPase acts as a master regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport by controlling assembly and disassembly of nuclear transport complexes. RanGTP is required in the nucleus to release nuclear localization signal (NLS)–containing cargo from import receptors, and, under steady-state conditions, Ran is highly concentrated in the nucleus. We previously showed the nuclear/cytoplasmic Ran distribution is disrupted in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) fibroblasts that express the Progerin form of lamin A, causing a major defect in nuclear import of the protein, translocated promoter region (Tpr). In this paper, we show that Tpr import was mediated by the most abundant import receptor, KPNA2, which binds the bipartite NLS in Tpr with nanomolar affinity. Analyses including NLS swapping revealed Progerin did not cause global inhibition of nuclear import. Rather, Progerin inhibited Tpr import because transport of large protein cargoes was sensitive to changes in the Ran nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution that occurred in HGPS. We propose that defective import of large protein complexes with important roles in nuclear function may contribute to disease-associated phenotypes in Progeria. PMID:23649804

  4. Defective nuclear import of Tpr in Progeria reflects the Ran sensitivity of large cargo transport.

    PubMed

    Snow, Chelsi J; Dar, Ashraf; Dutta, Anindya; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Paschal, Bryce M

    2013-05-13

    The RanGTPase acts as a master regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport by controlling assembly and disassembly of nuclear transport complexes. RanGTP is required in the nucleus to release nuclear localization signal (NLS)-containing cargo from import receptors, and, under steady-state conditions, Ran is highly concentrated in the nucleus. We previously showed the nuclear/cytoplasmic Ran distribution is disrupted in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) fibroblasts that express the Progerin form of lamin A, causing a major defect in nuclear import of the protein, translocated promoter region (Tpr). In this paper, we show that Tpr import was mediated by the most abundant import receptor, KPNA2, which binds the bipartite NLS in Tpr with nanomolar affinity. Analyses including NLS swapping revealed Progerin did not cause global inhibition of nuclear import. Rather, Progerin inhibited Tpr import because transport of large protein cargoes was sensitive to changes in the Ran nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution that occurred in HGPS. We propose that defective import of large protein complexes with important roles in nuclear function may contribute to disease-associated phenotypes in Progeria.

  5. A vital region for human glycoprotein hormone trafficking revealed by an LHB mutation.

    PubMed

    Potorac, Iulia; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo; Trehan, Ashutosh; Kiełbus, Michał; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Pralong, Francois; Hafidi, Aicha; Thiry, Albert; Ménagé, Jean-Jacques; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Beckers, Albert; Daly, Adrian F

    2016-12-01

    Glycoprotein hormones are complex hormonally active macromolecules. Luteinizing hormone (LH) is essential for the postnatal development and maturation of the male gonad. Inactivating Luteinizing hormone beta (LHB) gene mutations are exceptionally rare and lead to hypogonadism that is particularly severe in males. We describe a family with selective LH deficiency and hypogonadism in two brothers. DNA sequencing of LHB was performed and the effects of genetic variants on hormone function and secretion were characterized by mutagenesis studies, confocal microscopy and functional assays. A 20-year-old male from a consanguineous family had pubertal delay, hypogonadism and undetectable LH. A homozygous c.118_120del (p.Lys40del) mutation was identified in the patient and his brother, who subsequently had the same phenotype. Treatment with hCG led to pubertal development, increased circulating testosterone and spermatogenesis. Experiments in HeLa cells revealed that the mutant LH is retained intracellularly and showed diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. The mutated LHB heterodimerizes with the common alpha-subunit and can activate its receptor. Deletion of flanking glutamic acid residues at positions 39 and 41 impair LH to a similar extent as deletion of Lys40. This region is functionally important across all heterodimeric glycoprotein hormones, because deletion of the corresponding residues in hCG, follicle-stimulating hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone beta-subunits also led to intracellular hormone retention. This novel LHB mutation results in hypogonadism due to intracellular sequestration of the hormone and reveals a discrete region in the protein that is crucial for normal secretion of all human glycoprotein hormones.

  6. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza; Strandgren, Charlotte; Pernold, Karin; Richard, Thibaud J C; Van Leeuwen, Fred W; Dantuma, Nico P; Damberg, Peter; Hultenby, Kjell; Ulfhake, Brun; Mugnaini, Enrico; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells, the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have also been found in several tissues from normal individuals, but it is not clear if low levels of progerin contribute to the aging of the brain. In an attempt to clarify the origin of this phenomenon, we have developed an inducible transgenic mouse model with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone and heart to investigate how the mutation affects these organs. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal nuclei after 70 weeks of expression of the LMNA c.1824C>T mutation showed severe distortion with multiple lobulations and irregular extensions. Despite severe distortions in the nuclei of hippocampal neurons of HGPS animals, there were only negligible changes in gene expression after 63 weeks of transgenic expression. Behavioral analysis and neurogenesis assays, following long-term expression of the HGPS mutation, did not reveal significant pathology. Our results suggest that certain tissues are protected from functional deleterious effects of progerin.

  7. Expression of progerin in aging mouse brains reveals structural nuclear abnormalities without detectible significant alterations in gene expression, hippocampal stem cells or behavior

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jean-Ha; Schmidt, Eva; Viceconte, Nikenza; Strandgren, Charlotte; Pernold, Karin; Richard, Thibaud J. C.; Van Leeuwen, Fred W.; Dantuma, Nico P.; Damberg, Peter; Hultenby, Kjell; Ulfhake, Brun; Mugnaini, Enrico; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a segmental progeroid syndrome with multiple features suggestive of premature accelerated aging. Accumulation of progerin is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of HGPS. However, despite ubiquitous expression of lamin A in all differentiated cells, the HGPS mutation results in organ-specific defects. For example, bone and skin are strongly affected by HGPS, while the brain appears to be unaffected. There are no definite explanations as to the variable sensitivity to progeria disease among different organs. In addition, low levels of progerin have also been found in several tissues from normal individuals, but it is not clear if low levels of progerin contribute to the aging of the brain. In an attempt to clarify the origin of this phenomenon, we have developed an inducible transgenic mouse model with expression of the most common HGPS mutation in brain, skin, bone and heart to investigate how the mutation affects these organs. Ultrastructural analysis of neuronal nuclei after 70 weeks of expression of the LMNA c.1824C>T mutation showed severe distortion with multiple lobulations and irregular extensions. Despite severe distortions in the nuclei of hippocampal neurons of HGPS animals, there were only negligible changes in gene expression after 63 weeks of transgenic expression. Behavioral analysis and neurogenesis assays, following long-term expression of the HGPS mutation, did not reveal significant pathology. Our results suggest that certain tissues are protected from functional deleterious effects of progerin. PMID:25343989

  8. The mutational spectrum in Treacher Collins syndrome reveals a predominance of mutations that create a premature-termination codon

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, S.J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, M.J.

    1997-03-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS locus has been mapped to human chromosome 5q31.3-32 and the mutated gene identified. In the current investigation, 25 previously undescribed mutations, which are spread throughout the gene, are presented. This brings the total reported to date to 35, which represents a detection rate of 60%. Of the mutations that have been reported to date, all but one result in the introduction of a premature-termination codon into the predicted protein, treacle. Moreover, the mutations are largely family specific, although a common 5-bp deletion in exon 24 (seven different families) and a recurrent splicing mutation in intron 3 (two different families) have been identified. This mutational spectrum supports the hypothesis that TCS results from haploin-sufficiency. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Unique preservation of neural cells in Hutchinson- Gilford progeria syndrome is due to the expression of the neural-specific miR-9 microRNA.

    PubMed

    Nissan, Xavier; Blondel, Sophie; Navarro, Claire; Maury, Yves; Denis, Cécile; Girard, Mathilde; Martinat, Cécile; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Levy, Nicolas; Peschanski, Marc

    2012-07-26

    One puzzling observation in patients affected with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), who overall exhibit systemic and dramatic premature aging, is the absence of any conspicuous cognitive impairment. Recent studies based on induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patient cells have revealed a lack of expression in neural derivatives of lamin A, a major isoform of LMNA that is initially produced as a precursor called prelamin A. In HGPS, defective maturation of a mutated prelamin A induces the accumulation of toxic progerin in patient cells. Here, we show that a microRNA, miR-9, negatively controls lamin A and progerin expression in neural cells. This may bear major functional correlates, as alleviation of nuclear blebbing is observed in nonneural cells after miR-9 overexpression. Our results support the hypothesis, recently proposed from analyses in mice, that protection of neural cells from progerin accumulation in HGPS is due to the physiologically restricted expression of miR-9 to that cell lineage.

  10. Whole Genome Sequencing of Mutation Accumulation Lines Reveals a Low Mutation Rate in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Saxer, Gerda; Havlak, Paul; Fox, Sara A.; Quance, Michael A.; Gupta, Sharu; Fofanov, Yuriy; Strassmann, Joan E.; Queller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA) experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10−9, with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10−9 − 9.5×10−9, per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10−11, with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10−13 to 1.6×10−10, is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:23056439

  11. History of plastid DNA insertions reveals weak deletion and at mutation biases in angiosperm mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Daniel B; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2014-11-21

    Angiosperm mitochondrial genomes exhibit many unusual properties, including heterogeneous nucleotide composition and exceptionally large and variable genome sizes. Determining the role of nonadaptive mechanisms such as mutation bias in shaping the molecular evolution of these unique genomes has proven challenging because their dynamic structures generally prevent identification of homologous intergenic sequences for comparative analyses. Here, we report an analysis of angiosperm mitochondrial DNA sequences that are derived from inserted plastid DNA (mtpts). The availability of numerous completely sequenced plastid genomes allows us to infer the evolutionary history of these insertions, including the specific nucleotide substitutions and indels that have occurred because their incorporation into the mitochondrial genome. Our analysis confirmed that many mtpts have a complex history, including frequent gene conversion and multiple examples of horizontal transfer between divergent angiosperm lineages. Nevertheless, it is clear that the majority of extant mtpt sequence in angiosperms is the product of recent transfer (or gene conversion) and is subject to rapid loss/deterioration, suggesting that most mtpts are evolving relatively free from functional constraint. The evolution of mtpt sequences reveals a pattern of biased mutational input in angiosperm mitochondrial genomes, including an excess of small deletions over insertions and a skew toward nucleotide substitutions that increase AT content. However, these mutation biases are far weaker than have been observed in many other cellular genomes, providing insight into some of the notable features of angiosperm mitochondrial architecture, including the retention of large intergenic regions and the relatively neutral GC content found in these regions.

  12. Whole exome sequencing of urachal adenocarcinoma reveals recurrent NF1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harshabad; Liu, Yang; Xiao, Xiuli; Lin, Ling; Kim, Jaegil; Van Hummelen, Paul; Wu, Chin-Lee; Bass, Adam J; Saylor, Philip J

    2016-05-17

    Urachal adenocarcinoma is a rare bladder malignancy arising from the urachal remnant. Given its rarity and the lack of knowledge about its genetic characteristics, optimal management of this cancer is not well defined. Practice patterns vary and outcomes remain poor. In order to identify the genomic underpinnings of this malignancy, we performed whole exome sequencing using seven tumor/normal pairs of formalin fixed archival specimens. We identified recurrent evidence of MAP-kinase pathway activation as three patients had neurofibromin 1 (NF1) mutations, with one of these patients also harboring an oncogenic KRAS G13D mutation. We also observed recurrent evidence of Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation as three patients had oncogenic mutations in APC or RNF43. In addition, somatic copy number analysis revealed focal chromosome 12p amplifications in three samples, resembling findings from testicular germ cell tumors. We describe the genomic landscape of this malignancy in our institutional cohort and propose investigation of the therapeutic potential for MAP-K pathway inhibition in the subset of patients who show evidence of its activation.

  13. Mutational activation of ErbB2 reveals a new protein kinase autoinhibition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying-Xin; Wong, Lily; Ding, Jinhui; Spiridonov, Nikolay A; Johnson, Richard C; Johnson, Gibbes R

    2008-01-18

    Autoinhibition plays a key role in the control of protein kinase activity. ErbB2 is a unique receptor-tyrosine kinase that does not bind ligand but possesses an extracellular domain poised to engage other ErbBs. Little is known about the molecular mechanism for ErbB2 catalytic regulation. Here we show that ErbB2 kinase is strongly autoinhibited, and a loop connecting the alphaC helix and beta4 sheet within the kinase domain plays a major role in the control of kinase activity. Mutations of two Gly residues at positions 776 and 778 in this loop dramatically increase ErbB2 catalytic activity. Kinetic analysis demonstrates that mutational activation is due to approximately 10- and approximately 7-fold increases in ATP binding affinity and turnover number, respectively. Expression of the activated ErbB2 mutants in cells resulted in elevated ligand-independent ErbB2 autophosphorylation, ErbB3 phosphorylation, and stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. Molecular modeling suggests that the ErbB2 kinase domain is stabilized in an inactive state via a hydrophobic interaction between the alphaC-beta4 and activation loops. Importantly, many ErbB2 human cancer mutations have been identified in the alphaC-beta4 loop, including the activating G776S mutation studied here. Our findings reveal a new kinase regulatory mechanism in which the alphaC-beta4 loop functions as an intramolecular switch that controls ErbB2 activity and suggests that loss of alphaC-beta4 loop-mediated autoinhibition is involved in oncogenic activation of ErbB2.

  14. Mutational profiling of familial male breast cancers reveals similarities with luminal A female breast cancer with rare TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Deb, S; Wong, S Q; Li, J; Do, H; Weiss, J; Byrne, D; Chakrabarti, A; Bosma, T; Fellowes, A; Dobrovic, A; Fox, S B

    2014-12-09

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is still poorly understood with a large proportion arising in families with a history of breast cancer. Genomic studies have focused on germline determinants of MBC risk, with minimal knowledge of somatic changes in these cancers. Using a TruSeq amplicon cancer panel, this study evaluated 48 familial MBCs (3 BRCA1 germline mutant, 17 BRCA2 germline mutant and 28 BRCAX) for hotspot somatic mutations and copy number changes in 48 common cancer genes. Twelve missense mutations included nine PIK3CA mutations (seven in BRCAX patients), two TP53 mutations (both in BRCA2 patients) and one PTEN mutation. Common gains were seen in GNAS (34.1%) and losses were seen in GNAQ (36.4%), ABL1 (47.7%) and ATM (34.1%). Gains of HRAS (37.5% vs 3%, P=0.006), STK11 (25.0% vs 0%, P=0.01) and SMARCB1 (18.8% vs 0%, P=0.04) and the loss of RB1 (43.8% vs 13%, P=0.03) were specific to BRCA2 tumours. This study is the first to perform high-throughput somatic sequencing on familial MBCs. Overall, PIK3CA mutations are most commonly seen, with fewer TP53 and PTEN mutations, similar to the profile seen in luminal A female breast cancers. Differences in mutation profiles and patterns of gene gains/losses are seen between BRCA2 (associated with TP53/PTEN mutations, loss of RB1 and gain of HRAS, STK11 and SMARCB1) and BRCAX (associated with PIK3CA mutations) tumours, suggesting that BRCA2 and BRCAX MBCs may be distinct and arise from different tumour pathways. This has implications on potential therapies, depending on the BRCA status of MBC patients.

  15. Novel Dominant Mutation in BIN1 Gene Causing Mild Centronuclear Myopathy Revealed by Myalgias and CK Elevation.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Matteo; Böhm, Johann; Fattori, Fabiana; Koch, Catherine; Surace, Cecilia; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Laschena, Francesco; Laporte, Jocelyn; Bertini, Enrico; Antonini, Giovanni; Romero, Norma B

    2016-03-03

    We present the clinical, morphological and molecular data of an Italian family with centronuclear myopathy, carrying a novel pathogenic mutation of BIN1 gene in heterozygous state, consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance. The proband, a 56-years-old man suffered of lower limbs myalgia and slight CK elevation. Clinical examination revealed no muscle weakness, short stature, mild symmetric eyelid ptosis, scapular winging, ankle retraction and well-developed muscles. Muscle biopsy showed nuclear centralization and clustering, deep sarcolemmal invaginations and type 1 fibers hypotrophy. Muscle MRI revealed fatty infiltration of posterior legs compartments, lumbar paraspinal and serratus muscles. By sequencing BIN1, we identified a heterozygous pathogenic mutation [c.107C>A (p.A36E)], and we demonstrate that the mutation strongly impairs the membrane tubulation property of the protein. One affected sister with similar phenotype carried the same mutation. Our findings expand the clinical, morphological and genetic spectrum of the autosomal dominant CNM associated with BIN1 mutations.

  16. Prematurely aged children: molecular alterations leading to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and Werner syndromes.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Gerpe, Lourdes; Araújo-Vilar, David

    2008-12-01

    Ageing is thought to be a polygenic and stochastic process in which multiple mechanisms operate at the same time. At the level of the individual organism ageing is associated with a progressive deterioration of health and quality of life, sharing common features such as: alopecia and grey hair, loss of audition, macular degeneration, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, cataract formation, type-2 diabetes, lipodystrophies; a generally increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmune disorders and diseases such as cancer; and an impaired ability to cope with stress. Recent studies of mechanisms involved in the ageing process are contributing to the identification of genes involved in longevity. Monogenic heritable disorders causing premature ageing, and animal models have contributed to the understanding of some of the characteristic organism-level features associated with human ageing. Werner syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are the best characterized human disorders. Werner syndrome patients have a median life expectancy of 47 years with clinical conditions from the second decade of life. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patients die at a median age of 11-13 years with clinical conditions appearing soon after birth. In both syndromes, alterations in specific genes have been identified, with mutations in the WRN and LMNA genes respectively being the most closely associated with each syndrome. Results from molecular studies strongly suggest an increase in DNA damage and cell senescence as the underlying mechanism of pathological premature ageing in these two human syndromes. The same general mechanism has also been observed in human cells undergoing the normal ageing process. In the present article the molecular mechanisms currently proposed for explaining these two syndromes, which may also partly explain the normal ageing process, are reviewed.

  17. Whole-genome sequencing of bladder cancers reveals somatic CDKN1A mutations and clinicopathological associations with mutation burden.

    PubMed

    Cazier, J-B; Rao, S R; McLean, C M; Walker, A K; Walker, A L; Wright, B J; Jaeger, E E M; Kartsonaki, C; Marsden, L; Yau, C; Camps, C; Kaisaki, P; Taylor, J; Catto, J W; Tomlinson, I P M; Kiltie, A E; Hamdy, F C

    2014-04-29

    Bladder cancers are a leading cause of death from malignancy. Molecular markers might predict disease progression and behaviour more accurately than the available prognostic factors. Here we use whole-genome sequencing to identify somatic mutations and chromosomal changes in 14 bladder cancers of different grades and stages. As well as detecting the known bladder cancer driver mutations, we report the identification of recurrent protein-inactivating mutations in CDKN1A and FAT1. The former are not mutually exclusive with TP53 mutations or MDM2 amplification, showing that CDKN1A dysfunction is not simply an alternative mechanism for p53 pathway inactivation. We find strong positive associations between higher tumour stage/grade and greater clonal diversity, the number of somatic mutations and the burden of copy number changes. In principle, the identification of sub-clones with greater diversity and/or mutation burden within early-stage or low-grade tumours could identify lesions with a high risk of invasive progression.

  18. The Mutational Landscape of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Reveals an Interacting Network of Co-Occurrences and Recurrent Mutations

    PubMed Central

    García-Alonso, Luz; Such, Esperanza; Jiménez-Almazán, Jorge; Vidal, Enrique; Barragán, Eva; López-Pavía, María; LLop, Marta; Martín, Iván; Gómez-Seguí, Inés; Montesinos, Pau; Sanz, Miguel A.; Dopazo, Joaquín; Cervera, José

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) whole exome sequencing (WES) studies have identified a huge number of somatic mutations affecting more than a hundred different genes mainly in a non-recurrent manner, suggesting that APL is a heterogeneous disease with secondary relevant changes not yet defined. To extend our knowledge of subtle genetic alterations involved in APL that might cooperate with PML/RARA in the leukemogenic process, we performed a comprehensive analysis of somatic mutations in APL combining WES with sequencing of a custom panel of targeted genes by next-generation sequencing. To select a reduced subset of high confidence candidate driver genes, further in silico analysis were carried out. After prioritization and network analysis we found recurrent deleterious mutations in 8 individual genes (STAG2, U2AF1, SMC1A, USP9X, IKZF1, LYN, MYCBP2 and PTPN11) with a strong potential of being involved in APL pathogenesis. Our network analysis of multiple mutations provides a reliable approach to prioritize genes for additional analysis, improving our knowledge of the leukemogenesis interactome. Additionally, we have defined a functional module in the interactome of APL. The hypothesis is that the number, or the specific combinations, of mutations harbored in each patient might not be as important as the disturbance caused in biological key functions, triggered by several not necessarily recurrent mutations. PMID:26886259

  19. The Mutational Landscape of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Reveals an Interacting Network of Co-Occurrences and Recurrent Mutations.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Mariam; Carbonell-Caballero, José; García-Alonso, Luz; Such, Esperanza; Jiménez-Almazán, Jorge; Vidal, Enrique; Barragán, Eva; López-Pavía, María; LLop, Marta; Martín, Iván; Gómez-Seguí, Inés; Montesinos, Pau; Sanz, Miguel A; Dopazo, Joaquín; Cervera, José

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) whole exome sequencing (WES) studies have identified a huge number of somatic mutations affecting more than a hundred different genes mainly in a non-recurrent manner, suggesting that APL is a heterogeneous disease with secondary relevant changes not yet defined. To extend our knowledge of subtle genetic alterations involved in APL that might cooperate with PML/RARA in the leukemogenic process, we performed a comprehensive analysis of somatic mutations in APL combining WES with sequencing of a custom panel of targeted genes by next-generation sequencing. To select a reduced subset of high confidence candidate driver genes, further in silico analysis were carried out. After prioritization and network analysis we found recurrent deleterious mutations in 8 individual genes (STAG2, U2AF1, SMC1A, USP9X, IKZF1, LYN, MYCBP2 and PTPN11) with a strong potential of being involved in APL pathogenesis. Our network analysis of multiple mutations provides a reliable approach to prioritize genes for additional analysis, improving our knowledge of the leukemogenesis interactome. Additionally, we have defined a functional module in the interactome of APL. The hypothesis is that the number, or the specific combinations, of mutations harbored in each patient might not be as important as the disturbance caused in biological key functions, triggered by several not necessarily recurrent mutations.

  20. Mutational screening of the USH2A gene in Spanish USH patients reveals 23 novel pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Usher Syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Among the three genes implicated, mutations in the USH2A gene account for 74-90% of the USH2 cases. Methods To identify the genetic cause of the disease and determine the frequency of USH2A mutations in a cohort of 88 unrelated USH Spanish patients, we carried out a mutation screening of the 72 coding exons of this gene by direct sequencing. Moreover, we performed functional minigene studies for those changes that were predicted to affect splicing. Results As a result, a total of 144 DNA sequence variants were identified. Based upon previous studies, allele frequencies, segregation analysis, bioinformatics' predictions and in vitro experiments, 37 variants (23 of them novel) were classified as pathogenic mutations. Conclusions This report provide a wide spectrum of USH2A mutations and clinical features, including atypical Usher syndrome phenotypes resembling Usher syndrome type I. Considering only the patients clearly diagnosed with Usher syndrome type II, and results obtained in this and previous studies, we can state that mutations in USH2A are responsible for 76.1% of USH2 disease in patients of Spanish origin. PMID:22004887

  1. Mutations of PKA cyclic nucleotide-binding domains reveal novel aspects of cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Robin; Moon, Eui-Whan; Kim, Jeong Joo; Schmidt, Sven H; Sankaran, Banumathi; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Kim, Choel; Herberg, Friedrich W

    2017-07-06

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP are ubiquitous second messengers that regulate the activity of effector proteins in all forms of life. The main effector proteins, the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), are preferentially activated by cAMP and cGMP, respectively. However, the molecular basis of this cyclic nucleotide selectivity is still not fully understood. Analysis of isolated cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB) domains of PKA regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) reveals that the C-terminal CNB-B has a higher cAMP affinity and selectivity than the N-terminal CNB-A. Here, we show that introducing cGMP-specific residues using site-directed mutagenesis reduces the selectivity of CNB-B, while the combination of two mutations (G316R/A336T) results in a cGMP-selective binding domain. Furthermore, introducing the corresponding mutations (T192R/A212T) into the PKA RIα CNB-A turns this domain into a highly cGMP-selective domain, underlining the importance of these contacts for achieving cGMP specificity. Binding data with the generic purine nucleotide 3',5'-cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP) reveal that introduced arginine residues interact with the position 6 oxygen of the nucleobase. Co-crystal structures of an isolated CNB-B G316R/A336T double mutant with either cAMP or cGMP reveal that the introduced threonine and arginine residues maintain their conserved contacts as seen in PKG I CNB-B. These results improve our understanding of cyclic nucleotide binding and the molecular basis of cyclic nucleotide specificity. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruna R.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C.; Navarro, Fabio C.P.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Jardim, Denis L.F.; Reis, Luiz Fernando L.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of “general” immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients. PMID:25193853

  3. Exome sequencing reveals a nebulin nonsense mutation in a dog model of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jacquelyn M; Cox, Melissa L; Huska, Jonathan; Li, Frank; Gaitero, Luis; Guo, Ling T; Casal, Margaret L; Granzier, Henk L; Shelton, G Diane; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2016-10-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a congenital muscle disorder associated with muscle weakness, hypotonia, and rod bodies in the skeletal muscle fibers. Mutations in 10 genes have been implicated in human NM, but spontaneous cases in dogs have not been genetically characterized. We identified a novel recessive myopathy in a family of line-bred American bulldogs (ABDs); rod bodies in muscle biopsies established this as NM. Using SNP profiles from the nuclear family, we evaluated inheritance patterns at candidate loci and prioritized TNNT1 and NEB for further investigation. Whole exome sequencing of the dam, two affected littermates, and an unaffected littermate revealed a nonsense mutation in NEB (g.52734272 C>A, S8042X). Whole tissue gel electrophoresis and western blots confirmed a lack of full-length NEB in affected tissues, suggesting nonsense-mediated decay. The pathogenic variant was absent from 120 dogs of 24 other breeds and 100 unrelated ABDs, suggesting that it occurred recently and may be private to the family. This study presents the first molecularly characterized large animal model of NM, which could provide new opportunities for therapeutic approaches.

  4. Exome sequencing reveals a nebulin nonsense mutation in a dog model of nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jacquelyn M.; Cox, Melissa L.; Huska, Jonathan; Li, Frank; Gaitero, Luis; Guo, Ling T.; Casal, Margaret L.; Granzier, Henk L.

    2016-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a congenital muscle disorder associated with muscle weakness, hypotonia, and rod bodies in the skeletal muscle fibers. Mutations in 10 genes have been implicated in human NM, but spontaneous cases in dogs have not been genetically characterized. We identified a novel recessive myopathy in a family of line-bred American bulldogs (ABDs); rod bodies in muscle biopsies established this as NM. Using SNP profiles from the nuclear family, we evaluated inheritance patterns at candidate loci and prioritized TNNT1 and NEB for further investigation. Whole exome sequencing of the dam, two affected littermates, and an unaffected littermate revealed a nonsense mutation in NEB (g.52734272 C>A, S8042X). Whole tissue gel electrophoresis and western blots confirmed a lack of full-length NEB in affected tissues, suggesting nonsense-mediated decay. The pathogenic variant was absent from 120 dogs of 24 other breeds and 100 unrelated ABDs, suggesting that it occurred recently and may be private to the family. This study presents the first molecularly characterized large animal model of NM, which could provide new opportunities for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27215641

  5. Biochemical and Mutational Characterization of the Heme Chaperone CcmE Reveals a Heme Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Enggist, Elisabeth; Schneider, Michael J.; Schulz, Henk; Thöny-Meyer, Linda

    2003-01-01

    CcmE is a heme chaperone that binds heme transiently in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and delivers it to newly synthesized and exported c-type cytochromes. The chemical nature of the covalent bond between heme and H130 is not known. We have purified soluble histidine-tagged CcmE and present its spectroscopic characteristics in the visible range. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of conserved amino acids revealed that H130 is the only residue found to be strictly required for heme binding and delivery. Mutation of the hydrophobic amino acids F37, F103, L127, and Y134 to alanine affected CcmE more than mutation of charged and polar residues. Our data are in agreement with the recently solved nuclear magnetic resonance structure of apo-CcmE (PDB code 1LIZ) and suggest that heme is bound to a hydrophobic platform at the surface of the protein and then attached to H130 by a covalent bond. Replacement of H130 with cysteine led to the formation of a covalent bond between heme and C130 at a low level. However, the H130C mutant CcmE was not active in cytochrome c maturation. Isolation and characterization of the heme-binding peptides obtained after a tryptic digest of wild-type and H130C CcmE support the hypothesis that heme is bound covalently at a vinyl group. PMID:12486054

  6. Defective lamin A-Rb signaling in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and reversal by farnesyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Marji, Jackleen; O'Donoghue, Seán I; McClintock, Dayle; Satagopam, Venkata P; Schneider, Reinhard; Ratner, Desiree; Worman, Howard J; Gordon, Leslie B; Djabali, Karima

    2010-06-15

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder caused by a de novo heterozygous point mutation G608G (GGC>GGT) within exon 11 of LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins. This mutation elicits an internal deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A. The truncated protein, progerin, retains a farnesylated cysteine at its carboxyl terminus, a modification involved in HGPS pathogenesis. Inhibition of protein farnesylation has been shown to improve abnormal nuclear morphology and phenotype in cellular and animal models of HGPS. We analyzed global gene expression changes in fibroblasts from human subjects with HGPS and found that a lamin A-Rb signaling network is a major defective regulatory axis. Treatment of fibroblasts with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor reversed the gene expression defects. Our study identifies Rb as a key factor in HGPS pathogenesis and suggests that its modulation could ameliorate premature aging and possibly complications of physiological aging.

  7. Feedback Control of Sex Determination by Dosage Compensation Revealed through Caenorhabditis Elegans Sdc-3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, L.; Plenefisch, J. D.; Klein, R. D.; Meyer, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, sex determination and dosage compensation are coordinately controlled through a group of genes that respond to the primary sex determination signal. Here we describe a new gene, sdc-3, that also controls these processes. In contrast to previously described genes, the sex determination and dosage compensation activities of sdc-3 are separately mutable, indicating that they function independently. Paradoxically, the sdc-3 null phenotype fails to reveal the role of sdc-3 in sex determination: sdc-3 null mutations that lack both activities disrupt dosage compensation but cause no overt sexual transformation. We demonstrate that the dosage compensation defect of sdc-3 null alleles suppresses their sex determination defect. This self-suppression phenomenon provides a striking example of how a disruption in dosage compensation can affect sexual fate. We propose that the suppression occurs via a feedback mechanism that acts at an early regulatory step in the sex determination pathway to promote proper sexual identity. PMID:8462848

  8. Implant supported prosthesis in a patient with progeria: case report.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Gözlem; Yilmaz, Nergiz; Senyurt, Ozgün; Ergün Kunt, Göknil

    2009-08-01

    Prosthodontic rehabilitation can be accomplished with fixed, overdenture, complete, or implant-retained prostheses. Dental treatment overcomes the patient's functional, psychological, esthetic and phonation problems. Remaining healthy teeth may allow the dentist to fabricate a removable partial overdenture, fixed partial prosthesis or implant - supported prosthesis. The retention of a number of abutments helps maintain a positive ridge form with greater height and volume of the alveolar bone, improving masticatory performance, as well as providing a more stable prostheses. Dental patients who have medical problems need many treatment procedures. Multidisciplinary treatment planning is invaluable for patient's dental health. Progeria is a rare genetic condition where symptoms resembling aspects of aging are manifested at an early age. characteristic clinical findings of Progeria disease include abnormalities of the skin and hair in conjunction with characteristic facial features and skeletal abnormalities. The characteristic facies show protruding ears, beaked nose, thin lips with centrofacial cyanosis, prominent eyes, frontal and parietal bossing with pseudohydrocephaly, midface hypoplasia with micrognathia and large anterior fontanel. The other reported anomalies are dystrophic nails, hypertrophic scars and hypoplastic nipples. The findings that are nearly interested in dentistry are delayed dentition, anodontia, hypodontia, or crowding of teeth. This article presents the multidisciplinary dental treatment planning includes surgical, endodontic and prosthetic treatment of a patient with a history of progeria. In this case complete-arch fixed prostheses in both maxilla and mandible, supported by a combination of implants and teeth are reported.

  9. Replication Factor C1, the Large Subunit of Replication Factor C, Is Proteolytically Truncated in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hui; Hilton, Benjamin; Musich, Phillip R.; Fang, Ding Zhi; Zou, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder due to a LMNA gene mutation which produces a mutant lamin A protein (progerin). Progerin also has been correlated to physiological aging and related diseases. However, how progerin causes the progeria remains unknown. Here we report that the large subunit (RFC1) of replication factor C is cleaved in HGPS cells, leading to the production of a truncated RFC1 of ~75 kDa which appears to be defective in loading PCNA and pol δ onto DNA for replication. Interestingly, the cleavage can be inhibited by a serine protease inhibitor, suggesting that RFC1 is cleaved by a serine protease. Due to the crucial role of RFC in DNA replication our findings provide a mechanistic interpretation for the observed replicative arrest and premature aging phenotypes of HPGS, and may lead to novel strategies in HGPS treatment. Furthermore, this unique truncated form of RFC1 may serve as a potential marker for HGPS. PMID:22168243

  10. Experimental evolution reveals genome-wide spectrum and dynamics of mutations in the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Junhyun; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Gir-Won; Dean, Ralph A; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge on mutation processes is central to interpreting genetic analysis data as well as understanding the underlying nature of almost all evolutionary phenomena. However, studies on genome-wide mutational spectrum and dynamics in fungal pathogens are scarce, hindering our understanding of their evolution and biology. Here, we explored changes in the phenotypes and genome sequences of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae during the forced in vitro evolution by weekly transfer of cultures on artificial media. Through combination of experimental evolution with high throughput sequencing technology, we found that mutations accumulate rapidly prior to visible phenotypic changes and that both genetic drift and selection seem to contribute to shaping mutational landscape, suggesting the buffering capacity of fungal genome against mutations. Inference of mutational effects on phenotypes through the use of T-DNA insertion mutants suggested that at least some of the DNA sequence mutations are likely associated with the observed phenotypic changes. Furthermore, our data suggest oxidative damages and UV as major sources of mutation during subcultures. Taken together, our work revealed important properties of original source of variation in the genome of the rice blast fungus. We believe that these results provide not only insights into stability of pathogenicity and genome evolution in plant pathogenic fungi but also a model in which evolution of fungal pathogens in natura can be comparatively investigated.

  11. Genome evolution in yeast reveals connections between rare mutations in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xinchen; Hardwick, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells are riddled with mutations. Less than one percent of these are thought to be mutations that drive cancer phenotypes. However, a recent study conducted on the yeast knockout collections by Teng et al. [Mol. Cell (2013) 52: 485-494] provides hard evidence that single gene deletions/mutations in most non-essential genes can drive the selection for cancer-like mutations. PMID:28357245

  12. Genetic Code Evolution Reveals the Neutral Emergence of Mutational Robustness, and Information as an Evolutionary Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    The standard genetic code (SGC) is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of “neutral emergence”. The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these “pseudaptations”, and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments) reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P), and that its reduction in size leads to an “unfreezing” of the codon – amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick’s Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome GC content

  13. Genetic code evolution reveals the neutral emergence of mutational robustness, and information as an evolutionary constraint.

    PubMed

    Massey, Steven E

    2015-04-24

    The standard genetic code (SGC) is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of "neutral emergence". The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these "pseudaptations", and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments) reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P), and that its reduction in size leads to an "unfreezing" of the codon - amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick's Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome GC content between organisms, a

  14. A case of homocystinuria due to CBS gene mutations revealed by cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Sarov, Mariana; Not, Adeline; de Baulny, Hélène Ogier; Masnou, Pascal; Vahedi, Katayoun; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Denier, Christian

    2014-01-15

    Homocystinuria caused by cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) deficiency is most often diagnosed in childhood and has a variable expressivity. The most frequent abnormalities include intellectual disability, ectopia lentis, myopia, skeletal abnormalities or thromboembolism. To report a case of homocystinuria unraveled by cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). A 17 year old female was admitted in our department of neurology for subacute headache and presented seizures in the emergency room. Cerebral imaging revealed CVT. Severe hyperhomocysteinemia was found and led to the diagnosis of homocystinuria due to composite heterozygous mutations in the CBS gene. Further investigations disclosed lens subluxation in association with myopia, mild scoliosis and osteopenia. The patient was treated by heparin followed by warfarin, vitamin therapy and dietary methionine restriction. Total homocysteine and methionine levels became normal in a few weeks and the patient had a complete recovery. In patients with CVT, plasma total homocysteine measurement as part of the etiologic work up may reveal severe hyperhomocysteinemia due to CBS or remethylation defects that require specific treatment and management including perhaps protein-restricted diet and/or vitamin therapy for life. © 2013.

  15. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Wesley R.; Malarkey, Erik B.; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Pasek, Raymond C.; Porath, Jonathan D.; Birket, Susan E.; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Leigh, Margaret W.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Drummond, Iain A.; Parant, John M.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or ‘primary’ cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400). While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8). GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC) protein 4 (DRC4) where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR) to generate one of these human missense variants

  16. Somatic mutations reveal asymmetric cellular dynamics in the early human embryo

    DOE PAGES

    Ju, Young Seok; Martincorena, Inigo; Gerstung, Moritz; ...

    2017-03-22

    Somatic cells acquire mutations throughout the course of an individual’s life. Mutations occurring early in embryogenesis are often present in a substantial proportion of, but not all, cells in postnatal humans and thus have particular characteristics and effects. Depending on their location in the genome and the proportion of cells they are present in, these mosaic mutations can cause a wide range of genetic disease syndromes and predispose carriers to cancer. They have a high chance of being transmitted to offspring as de novo germline mutations and, in principle, can provide insights into early human embryonic cell lineages and theirmore » contributions to adult tissues. Although it is known that gross chromosomal abnormalities are remarkably common in early human embryos, our understanding of early embryonic somatic mutations is very limited. Here we use whole-genome sequences of normal blood from 241 adults to identify 163 early embryonic mutations. We estimate that approximately three base substitution mutations occur per cell per cell-doubling event in early human embryogenesis and these are mainly attributable to two known mutational signatures. We used the mutations to reconstruct developmental lineages of adult cells and demonstrate that the two daughter cells of many early embryonic cell-doubling events contribute asymmetrically to adult blood at an approximately 2:1 ratio. As a result, this study therefore provides insights into the mutation rates, mutational processes and developmental outcomes of cell dynamics that operate during early human embryogenesis.« less

  17. Somatic mutations reveal asymmetric cellular dynamics in the early human embryo.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Martincorena, Inigo; Gerstung, Moritz; Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Rahbari, Raheleh; Wedge, David C; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Fullam, Anthony; Martin, Sancha; Alder, Christopher; Patel, Nikita; Gamble, Steve; O'Meara, Sarah; Giri, Dilip D; Sauer, Torril; Pinder, Sarah E; Purdie, Colin A; Borg, Åke; Stunnenberg, Henk; van de Vijver, Marc; Tan, Benita K T; Caldas, Carlos; Tutt, Andrew; Ueno, Naoto T; van 't Veer, Laura J; Martens, John W M; Sotiriou, Christos; Knappskog, Stian; Span, Paul N; Lakhani, Sunil R; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea; Thompson, Alastair M; Viari, Alain; Hurles, Matthew E; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2017-03-30

    Somatic cells acquire mutations throughout the course of an individual's life. Mutations occurring early in embryogenesis are often present in a substantial proportion of, but not all, cells in postnatal humans and thus have particular characteristics and effects. Depending on their location in the genome and the proportion of cells they are present in, these mosaic mutations can cause a wide range of genetic disease syndromes and predispose carriers to cancer. They have a high chance of being transmitted to offspring as de novo germline mutations and, in principle, can provide insights into early human embryonic cell lineages and their contributions to adult tissues. Although it is known that gross chromosomal abnormalities are remarkably common in early human embryos, our understanding of early embryonic somatic mutations is very limited. Here we use whole-genome sequences of normal blood from 241 adults to identify 163 early embryonic mutations. We estimate that approximately three base substitution mutations occur per cell per cell-doubling event in early human embryogenesis and these are mainly attributable to two known mutational signatures. We used the mutations to reconstruct developmental lineages of adult cells and demonstrate that the two daughter cells of many early embryonic cell-doubling events contribute asymmetrically to adult blood at an approximately 2:1 ratio. This study therefore provides insights into the mutation rates, mutational processes and developmental outcomes of cell dynamics that operate during early human embryogenesis.

  18. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a model for vascular aging.

    PubMed

    Brassard, Jonathan A; Fekete, Natalie; Garnier, Alain; Hoesli, Corinne A

    2016-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disorder caused by a de novo genetic mutation that leads to the accumulation of a splicing isoform of lamin A termed progerin. Progerin expression alters the organization of the nuclear lamina and chromatin. The life expectancy of HGPS patients is severely reduced due to critical cardiovascular defects. Progerin also accumulates in an age-dependent manner in the vascular cells of adults that do not carry genetic mutations associated with HGPS. The molecular mechanisms that lead to vascular dysfunction in HGPS may therefore also play a role in vascular aging. The vascular phenotypic and molecular changes observed in HGPS are strikingly similar to those seen with age, including increased senescence, altered mechanotransduction and stem cell exhaustion. This article discusses the similarities and differences between age-dependent and HGPS-related vascular aging to highlight the relevance of HGPS as a model for vascular aging. Induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patients are suggested as an attractive model to study vascular aging in order to develop novel approaches to treat cardiovascular disease.

  19. Molecular cytogenetic insights into the ageing syndrome Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS).

    PubMed

    Corso, C; Parry, E M; Faragher, R G A; Seager, A; Green, M H L; Parry, J M

    2005-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare genetic disorder characterized by premature ageing in childhood and serves as a valuable model for the human ageing process in general. Most recently, point mutations in the lamin A (LMNA) gene on chromosome 1q have been associated with the disease, however how these mutations relate to the complex phenotype of HGPS remains to be established. It has been shown that fibroblasts from HGPS patients are frequently resistant to immortalization with telomerase (hTERT), consistent with the idea that the loss of a dominant acting HGPS gene is a pre-requisite for immortalization. In this study we report the first detailed cytogenetic analysis of hTERT-immortalised HGPS cell lines from three patients and one corresponding primary fibroblast culture. Our results provide evidence for a cytogenetic mosaicism in HGPS with a distinctive pattern of chromosome aberrations in all the HGP clones. Chromosome 11 alterations were observed at a high frequency in each immortalised HGPS cell line but were also present at a lower frequency in the corresponding primary cells. Moreover, we were able to identify the 11q13-->q23 region as a potential site of breakage. Our results are therefore consistent with a role of chromosome 11 alterations in the escape from senescence observed in HGPS cells. In addition to this defined rearrangement, we consistently observed complex chromosomal rearrangements, suggesting that HGPS displays features of chromosomal instability.

  20. Increased expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome truncated lamin A transcript during cell aging.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Sofia; Coppedè, Fabio; Sagelius, Hanna; Eriksson, Maria

    2009-07-01

    Most cases of the segmental progeroid syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are caused by a de novo dominant mutation within a single codon of the LMNA gene. This mutation leads to the increased usage of an internal splice site that generates an alternative lamin A transcript with an internal deletion of 150 nucleotides, called lamin A Delta 150. The LMNA gene encodes two major proteins of the inner nuclear lamina, lamins A and C, but not much is known about their expression levels. Determination of the overall expression levels of the LMNA gene transcripts is an important step to further the understanding of the HGPS. In this study, we have performed absolute quantification of the lamins A, C and A Delta 150 transcripts in primary dermal fibroblasts from HGPS patients and unaffected age-matched and parent controls. We show that the lamin A Delta 150 transcript is present in unaffected controls but its expression is >160-fold lower than that in samples from HGPS patients. Analysis of transcript expression during in vitro aging shows that although the levels of lamin A and lamin C transcripts remain unchanged, the lamin A Delta 150 transcript increases in late passage cells from HGPS patients and parental controls. This study provides a new method for LMNA transcript analysis and insights into the expression of the LMNA gene in HGPS and normal cells.

  1. Inhibiting farnesylation of progerin prevents the characteristic nuclear blebbing of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Capell, Brian C; Erdos, Michael R; Madigan, James P; Fiordalisi, James J; Varga, Renee; Conneely, Karen N; Gordon, Leslie B; Der, Channing J; Cox, Adrienne D; Collins, Francis S

    2005-09-06

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder that is characterized by dramatic premature aging and accelerated cardiovascular disease. HGPS is almost always caused by a de novo point mutation in the lamin A gene (LMNA) that activates a cryptic splice donor site, producing a truncated mutant protein termed "progerin." WT prelamin A is anchored to the nuclear envelope by a farnesyl isoprenoid lipid. Cleavage of the terminal 15 aa and the farnesyl group releases mature lamin A from this tether. In contrast, this cleavage site is deleted in progerin. We hypothesized that retention of the farnesyl group causes progerin to become permanently anchored in the nuclear membrane, disrupting proper nuclear scaffolding and causing the characteristic nuclear blebbing seen in HGPS cells. Also, we hypothesized that blocking farnesylation would decrease progerin toxicity. To test this hypothesis, the terminal CSIM sequence in progerin was mutated to SSIM, a sequence that cannot be farnesylated. SSIM progerin relocalized from the nuclear periphery into nucleoplasmic aggregates and produced no nuclear blebbing. Also, blocking farnesylation of authentic progerin in transiently transfected HeLa, HEK 293, and NIH 3T3 cells with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) restored normal nuclear architecture. Last, treatment of both early- and late-passage human HGPS fibroblasts with FTIs resulted in significant reductions in nuclear blebbing. Our results suggest that treatment with FTIs represents a potential therapy for patients with HGPS.

  2. Reversal of the cellular phenotype in the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scaffidi, Paola; Misteli, Tom

    2005-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a childhood premature aging disease caused by a spontaneous point mutation in lamin A (encoded by LMNA), one of the major architectural elements of the mammalian cell nucleus. The HGPS mutation activates an aberrant cryptic splice site in LMNA pre-mRNA, leading to synthesis of a truncated lamin A protein and concomitant reduction in wild-type lamin A. Fibroblasts from individuals with HGPS have severe morphological abnormalities in nuclear envelope structure. Here we show that the cellular disease phenotype is reversible in cells from individuals with HGPS. Introduction of wild-type lamin A protein does not rescue the cellular disease symptoms. The mutant LMNA mRNA and lamin A protein can be efficiently eliminated by correction of the aberrant splicing event using a modified oligonucleotide targeted to the activated cryptic splice site. Upon splicing correction, HGPS fibroblasts assume normal nuclear morphology, the aberrant nuclear distribution and cellular levels of lamina-associated proteins are rescued, defects in heterochromatin-specific histone modifications are corrected and proper expression of several misregulated genes is reestablished. Our results establish proof of principle for the correction of the premature aging phenotype in individuals with HGPS.

  3. Coevolved Mutations Reveal Distinct Architectures for Two Core Proteins in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Rasool, Shafqat; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Switching of bacterial flagellar rotation is caused by large domain movements of the FliG protein triggered by binding of the signal protein CheY to FliM. FliG and FliM form adjacent multi-subunit arrays within the basal body C-ring. The movements alter the interaction of the FliG C-terminal (FliGC) “torque” helix with the stator complexes. Atomic models based on the Salmonella entrovar C-ring electron microscopy reconstruction have implications for switching, but lack consensus on the relative locations of the FliG armadillo (ARM) domains (amino-terminal (FliGN), middle (FliGM) and FliGC) as well as changes during chemotaxis. The generality of the Salmonella model is challenged by the variation in motor morphology and response between species. We studied coevolved residue mutations to determine the unifying elements of switch architecture. Residue interactions, measured by their coevolution, were formalized as a network, guided by structural data. Our measurements reveal a common design with dedicated switch and motor modules. The FliM middle domain (FliMM) has extensive connectivity most simply explained by conserved intra and inter-subunit contacts. In contrast, FliG has patchy, complex architecture. Conserved structural motifs form interacting nodes in the coevolution network that wire FliMM to the FliGC C-terminal, four-helix motor module (C3-6). FliG C3-6 coevolution is organized around the torque helix, differently from other ARM domains. The nodes form separated, surface-proximal patches that are targeted by deleterious mutations as in other allosteric systems. The dominant node is formed by the EHPQ motif at the FliMMFliGM contact interface and adjacent helix residues at a central location within FliGM. The node interacts with nodes in the N-terminal FliGc α-helix triad (ARM-C) and FliGN. ARM-C, separated from C3-6 by the MFVF motif, has poor intra-network connectivity consistent with its variable orientation revealed by structural data. ARM-C could

  4. Preliminary whole-exome sequencing reveals mutations that imply common tumorigenicity pathways in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 patients

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Minerva Angélica Romero; Fowler, Richard G.; Lucas, F. Anthony San; Shen, Jie; Rich, Thereasa A.; Grubbs, Elizabeth G.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Scheet, Paul; Perrier, Nancy D.; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Whole-exome sequencing studies have not established definitive somatic mutation patterns among patients with sporadic hyperparathyroidism (HPT). No sequencing has evaluated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)-related HPT. We sought to perform whole-exome sequencing in HPT patients to identify somatic mutations and associated biological pathways and tumorigenic networks. Methods Whole-exome sequencing was performed on blood and tissue from HPT patients (MEN1 and sporadic) and somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were identified. Stop-gain and stop-loss SNVs were analyzed with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was also assessed. Results Sequencing was performed on 4 MEN1 and 10 sporadic cases. Eighteen stop-gain/stop-loss SNV mutations were identified in 3 MEN1 patients. One complex network was identified on IPA: Cellular function and maintenance, tumor morphology, and cardiovascular disease (IPA score = 49). A nonsynonymous SNV of TP53 (lysine-to-glutamic acid change at codon 81) identified in a MEN1 patient was suggested to be a driver mutation (Cancer-specific High-throughput Annotation of Somatic Mutations; P = .002). All MEN1 and 3/10 sporadic specimens demonstrated LOH of chromosome 11. Conclusion Whole-exome sequencing revealed somatic mutations in MEN1 associated with a single tumorigenic network, whereas sporadic pathogenesis seemed to be more diverse. A somatic TP53 mutation was also identified. LOH of chromosome 11 was seen in all MEN1 and 3 of 10 sporadic patients. PMID:25456907

  5. Modeling human Coenzyme A synthase mutation in yeast reveals altered mitochondrial function, lipid content and iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Camilla C.; Dallabona, Cristina; Lazzaretti, Mirca; Dusi, Sabrina; Tosi, Elena; Tiranti, Valeria; Goffrini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes associated with defective coenzyme A biosynthesis have been identified as responsible for some forms of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA), namely PKAN and CoPAN. PKAN are defined by mutations in PANK2, encoding the pantothenate kinase 2 enzyme, that account for about 50% of cases of NBIA, whereas mutations in CoA synthase COASY have been recently reported as the second inborn error of CoA synthesis leading to CoPAN. As reported previously, yeast cells expressing the pathogenic mutation exhibited a temperature-sensitive growth defect in the absence of pantothenate and a reduced CoA content. Additional characterization revealed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, higher iron content, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced amount of lipid droplets, thus partially recapitulating the phenotypes found in patients and establishing yeast as a potential model to clarify the pathogenesis underlying PKAN and CoPAN diseases. PMID:28357284

  6. Genome sequencing of normal cells reveals developmental lineages and mutational processes

    PubMed Central

    Behjati, Sam; Wedge, David C; Tamuri, Asif U; Martincorena, Inigo; Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Roerink, Sophie; Blokker, Joyce; Maddison, Mark; Mudie, Laura; Robinson, Ben; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter; Goldman, Nick; van de Wetering, Marc; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans; Stratton, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The somatic mutations present in the genome of a cell have been accumulated over the lifetime of a multicellular organism. These mutations can provide insights into the developmental lineage tree1, the number of divisions each cell has undergone and the mutational processes that have been operative2. Here, we conducted whole genome sequencing of clonal lines3 derived from multiple tissues of healthy mice. Using somatic base substitutions, we reconstructed the early cell divisions of each animal demonstrating the contributions of embryonic cells to adult tissues. Differences were observed between tissues in the numbers and types of mutations accumulated by each cell, which likely reflect differences in the number of cell divisions they have undergone and varying contributions of different mutational processes. If somatic mutation rates are similar to those in mice, the results indicate that precise insights into development and mutagenesis of normal human cells will be possible. PMID:25043003

  7. Exome Sequencing of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Reveals Inactivating Mutations in NOTCH1

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Nishant; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Pickering, Curtis R.; Bettegowda, Chetan; Chang, Kyle; Li, Ryan J.; Fakhry, Carole; Xie, Tong-Xin; Zhang, Jiexin; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Nianxiang; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Jasser, Samar A.; Weinstein, John N.; Treviño, Lisa; Drummond, Jennifer A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Wu, Yuanqing; Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Westra, William H.; Koch, Wayne M.; Califano, Joseph A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Sidransky, David; Vogelstein, Bert; Velculescu, Victor E.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Wheeler, David A.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. To explore the genetic origins of this cancer, we used whole exome sequencing and gene copy number analyses to study 32 primary tumors. Tumors from patients with a history of tobacco use had more mutations than did tumors from patients who did not use tobacco, and tumors that were negative for human papilloma virus (HPV) had more mutations than did HPV-positive tumors. Six of the genes that were mutated in multiple tumors were assessed in up to 88 additional HNSCCs. In addition to previously described mutations in TP53, CDKN2A, PIK3CA and HRAS, we identified mutations in FBXW7 and NOTCH1. Interestingly, nearly 40% of the 28 mutations identified in NOTCH1 were predicted to truncate the gene product, suggesting that NOTCH1 may function as a tumor suppressor gene rather than an oncogene in this tumor type. PMID:21798897

  8. Asymmetric Context-Dependent Mutation Patterns Revealed through Mutation–Accumulation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Way; Ackerman, Matthew S.; Gout, Jean-François; Miller, Samuel F.; Williams, Emily; Foster, Patricia L.; Lynch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Despite the general assumption that site-specific mutation rates are independent of the local sequence context, a growing body of evidence suggests otherwise. To further examine context-dependent patterns of mutation, we amassed 5,645 spontaneous mutations in wild- type (WT) and mismatch-repair deficient (MMR–) mutation–accumulation (MA) lines of the gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis. We then analyzed>7,500 spontaneous base-substitution mutations across B. subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Mesoplasma florum WT and MMR– MA lines, finding a context-dependent mutation pattern that is asymmetric around the origin of replication. Different neighboring nucleotides can alter site-specific mutation rates by as much as 75-fold, with sites neighboring G:C base pairs or dimers involving alternating pyrimidine–purine and purine–pyrimidine nucleotides having significantly elevated mutation rates. The influence of context-dependent mutation on genome architecture is strongest in M. florum, consistent with the reduced efficiency of selection in organisms with low effective population size. If not properly accounted for, the disparities arising from patterns of context-dependent mutation can significantly influence interpretations of positive and purifying selection. PMID:25750180

  9. Excess of Deleterious Mutations around HLA Genes Reveals Evolutionary Cost of Balancing Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Spirin, Victor; Jordan, Daniel M.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2016-01-01

    Deleterious mutations are expected to evolve under negative selection and are usually purged from the population. However, deleterious alleles segregate in the human population and some disease-associated variants are maintained at considerable frequencies. Here, we test the hypothesis that balancing selection may counteract purifying selection in neighboring regions and thus maintain deleterious variants at higher frequency than expected from their detrimental fitness effect. We first show in realistic simulations that balancing selection reduces the density of polymorphic sites surrounding a locus under balancing selection, but at the same time markedly increases the population frequency of the remaining variants, including even substantially deleterious alleles. To test the predictions of our simulations empirically, we then use whole-exome sequencing data from 6,500 human individuals and focus on the most established example for balancing selection in the human genome, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Our analysis shows an elevated frequency of putatively deleterious coding variants in nonhuman leukocyte antigen (non-HLA) genes localized in the MHC region. The mean frequency of these variants declined with physical distance from the classical HLA genes, indicating dependency on genetic linkage. These results reveal an indirect cost of the genetic diversity maintained by balancing selection, which has hitherto been perceived as mostly advantageous, and have implications both for the evolution of recombination and also for the epidemiology of various MHC-associated diseases. PMID:27436009

  10. Mutation screen reveals novel variants and expands the phenotypes associated with DYNC1H1

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Alleene V.; Schabhüttl, Maria; Offenbacher, Hans; Synofzik, Matthis; Hauser, Natalie S.; Brunner-Krainz, Michaela; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Moore, Steven A.; Windhager, Reinhard; Bender, Benjamin; Harms, Matthew; Klebe, Stephan; Young, Peter; Kennerson, Marina; Garcia, Avencia Sanchez Mejias; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Züchner, Stephan; Schule, Rebecca; Shy, Michael E.; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) encodes a necessary subunit of the cytoplasmic dynein complex, which traffics cargo along microtubules. Dominant DYNC1H1 mutations are implicated in neural diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity dominance (SMA-LED), intellectual disability with neuronal migration defects, malformations of cortical development (MCD), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2O (CMT2O). We hypothesized that additional variants could be found in these and novel motoneuron and related diseases. Therefore we analysed our database of 1,024 whole exome sequencing samples of motoneuron and related diseases for novel single nucleotide variations. We filtered these results for significant variants, which were further screened using segregation analysis in available family members. Analysis revealed six novel, rare, and highly conserved variants. Three of these are likely pathogenic and encompass a broad phenotypic spectrum with distinct disease clusters. Our findings suggest that DYNC1H1 variants can cause not only lower, but also upper motor neuron disease. It thus adds DYNC1H1 to the growing list of spastic paraplegia related genes in microtubule-dependent motor protein pathways. PMID:26100331

  11. PTT analysis of polyps from FAP patients reveals a great majority of APC truncating mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Luijt, R.B. van der; Khan, P.M.; Tops, C.M.J.

    1994-09-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Germline APC mutations are associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an autosomal dominantly inherited predisposition to colorectal cancer, characterized by the development of numerous adenomatous polyps in the large intestine. In order to investigate whether somatic inactivation of the remaining APC allele is necessary for adenoma formation, we collected multiple adenomatous polyps from individual FAP patients and investigated the presence of somatic mutations in the APC gene. The analysis of somatic APC mutations in these tumor samples was performed using a rapid and sensitive assay, called the protein truncation test (PTT). Chain-terminating somatic APC mutations were detected in the great majority of the tumor samples investigated. As expected, these mutations were mainly located in the mutation cluster region (MCR) in exon 15. Our results confirm that somatic mutation of the second APC allele is required for adenoma formation in FAP. Interestingly, in the polyps investigated in our study, the second APC allele is somatically inactivated through point mutation leading to a stop codon rather than by loss of heterozygosity. The observation that somatic second hits in APC are required for tumor development in FAP is in apparent accordance with the Knudson hypothesis for classical tumor suppressor genes. However, it is yet unknown whether chain-terminating APC mutations lead to a truncated protein exerting a dominant-negative effect or whether these mutations result in a null allele. Further investigation of this important issue will hopefully provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of the mutated APC alleles in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  12. Retrospective review using targeted deep sequencing reveals mutational differences between gastroesophageal junction and gastric carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Li-Chang, Hector H; Kasaian, Katayoon; Ng, Ying; Lum, Amy; Kong, Esther; Lim, Howard; Jones, Steven Jm; Huntsman, David G; Schaeffer, David F; Yip, Stephen

    2015-02-06

    Adenocarcinomas of both the gastroesophageal junction and stomach are molecularly complex, but differ with respect to epidemiology, etiology and survival. There are few data directly comparing the frequencies of single nucleotide mutations in cancer-related genes between the two sites. Sequencing of targeted gene panels may be useful in uncovering multiple genomic aberrations using a single test. DNA from 92 gastroesophageal junction and 75 gastric adenocarcinoma resection specimens was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Targeted deep sequencing of 46 cancer-related genes was performed through emulsion PCR followed by semiconductor-based sequencing. Gastroesophageal junction and gastric carcinomas were contrasted with respect to mutational profiles, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, as well as corresponding clinicopathologic data. Gastroesophageal junction carcinomas were associated with younger age, more frequent intestinal-type histology, more frequent p53 overexpression, and worse disease-free survival on multivariable analysis. Among all cases, 145 mutations were detected in 31 genes. TP53 mutations were the most common abnormality detected, and were more common in gastroesophageal junction carcinomas (42% vs. 27%, p = 0.036). Mutations in the Wnt pathway components APC and CTNNB1 were more common among gastric carcinomas (16% vs. 3%, p = 0.006), and gastric carcinomas were more likely to have ≥3 driver mutations detected (11% vs. 2%, p = 0.044). Twenty percent of cases had potentially actionable mutations identified. R132H and R132C missense mutations in the IDH1 gene were observed, and are the first reported mutations of their kind in gastric carcinoma. Panel sequencing of routine pathology material can yield mutational information on several driver genes, including some for which targeted therapies are available. Differing rates of mutations and clinicopathologic differences support a distinction between

  13. Whole-exome sequencing studies of parathyroid carcinomas reveal novel PRUNE2 mutations, distinctive mutational spectra related to APOBEC-catalyzed DNA mutagenesis and mutational enrichment in kinases associated with cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Willie; McPherson, John R; Stevenson, Mark; van Eijk, Ronald; Heng, Hong Lee; Newey, Paul; Gan, Anna; Ruano, Dina; Huang, Dachuan; Poon, Song Ling; Ong, Choon Kiat; van Wezel, Tom; Cavaco, Branca; Rozen, Steven G; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin T; Thakker, Rajesh V; Morreau, Hans

    2015-02-01

    Cell division cycle 73 (CDC73), encoding the protein parafibromin, is the most prevalent mutated gene in familial and sporadic parathyroid carcinoma (PC). To identify additional genetic abnormalities in PCs. Whole-exome sequencing was performed using DNA from seven pairs of matched PCs and one triplet containing double primary tumor and normal leukocyte. Somatic variants were confirmed using Sanger sequencing and recurrently mutated genes were assessed in 13 additional PCs as well as 40 parathyroid adenomas (PA). PC had an average of 51 somatic variants/tumor (range 3-176) with approximately 58% of variants occurring as nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants. The importance of CDC73 in PC is reinforced with a remarkable preferential amplification of the mutant CDC73 allele. Furthermore, recurrent germ line and somatic mutations in prune homolog 2 [Drosophila] (PRUNE2) were found in PC and computationally predicted to be deleterious; in addition, recurrent mutations in kinase genes related to cell migration and invasion were found. PRUNE2 showed recurrent mutations in 18% (4/22) of PCs with additional screening in 40 PAs revealing only one rare missense polymorphism (Asp1677Asn). For the first time, the mutational signature associated with apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC)-catalyzed cytosine-to-uracil deamination is found in a subset of PC. This study outlines the genetic landscape of PC and attempts to characterize the mutational processes shaping the PC genome.

  14. Empirical evaluation reveals best fit of a logistic mutation model for human Y-chromosomal microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Jochens, Arne; Caliebe, Amke; Rösler, Uwe; Krawczak, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The rate of microsatellite mutation is dependent upon both the allele length and the repeat motif, but the exact nature of this relationship is still unknown. We analyzed data on the inheritance of human Y-chromosomal microsatellites in father-son duos, taken from 24 published reports and comprising 15,285 directly observable meioses. At the six microsatellites analyzed (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, and DYS393), a total of 162 mutations were observed. For each locus, we employed a maximum-likelihood approach to evaluate one of several single-step mutation models on the basis of the data. For five of the six loci considered, a novel logistic mutation model was found to provide the best fit according to Akaike's information criterion. This implies that the mutation probability at the loci increases (nonlinearly) with allele length at a rate that differs between upward and downward mutations. For DYS392, the best fit was provided by a linear model in which upward and downward mutation probabilities increase equally with allele length. This is the first study to empirically compare different microsatellite mutation models in a locus-specific fashion.

  15. Tumor-Derived Suppressor of Fused Mutations Reveal Hedgehog Pathway Interactions.

    PubMed

    Urman, Nicole M; Mirza, Amar; Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Sarin, Kavita Y; Tang, Jean Y; Oro, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a potent regulator of cellular growth and plays a central role in the development of many cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The majority of BCCs arise from mutations in the Patched receptor resulting in constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Secondary driver mutations promote BCC oncogenesis and occur frequently due to the high mutational burden resulting from sun exposure of the skin. Here, we uncover novel secondary mutations in Suppressor of Fused (SUFU), the major negative regulator of the Hedgehog pathway. SUFU normally binds to a Hedgehog transcriptional activator, GLI1, in order to prevent it from initiating transcription of Hedgehog target genes. We sequenced tumor-normal pairs from patients with early sporadic BCCs. This resulted in the discovery of nine mutations in SUFU, which were functionally investigated to determine whether they help drive BCC formation. Our results show that four of the SUFU mutations inappropriately activate the Hedgehog pathway, suggesting they may act as driver mutations for BCC development. Indeed, all four of the loss of function SUFU variants were found to disrupt its binding to GLI, leading to constitutive pathway activation. Our results from functional characterization of these mutations shed light on SUFU's role in Hedgehog signaling, tumor progression, and highlight a way in which BCCs can arise.

  16. Empirical Evaluation Reveals Best Fit of a Logistic Mutation Model for Human Y-Chromosomal Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Jochens, Arne; Caliebe, Amke; Rösler, Uwe; Krawczak, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The rate of microsatellite mutation is dependent upon both the allele length and the repeat motif, but the exact nature of this relationship is still unknown. We analyzed data on the inheritance of human Y-chromosomal microsatellites in father–son duos, taken from 24 published reports and comprising 15,285 directly observable meioses. At the six microsatellites analyzed (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, and DYS393), a total of 162 mutations were observed. For each locus, we employed a maximum-likelihood approach to evaluate one of several single-step mutation models on the basis of the data. For five of the six loci considered, a novel logistic mutation model was found to provide the best fit according to Akaike’s information criterion. This implies that the mutation probability at the loci increases (nonlinearly) with allele length at a rate that differs between upward and downward mutations. For DYS392, the best fit was provided by a linear model in which upward and downward mutation probabilities increase equally with allele length. This is the first study to empirically compare different microsatellite mutation models in a locus-specific fashion. PMID:21968190

  17. A novel twelve class fluctuation test reveals higher than expected mutation rates for influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Matthew D; Procario, Megan C; Lauring, Adam S

    2017-01-01

    Influenza virus’ low replicative fidelity contributes to its capacity for rapid evolution. Clonal sequencing and fluctuation tests have suggested that the influenza virus mutation rate is 2.7 × 10–6 - 3.0 × 10–5 substitutions per nucleotide per strand copied (s/n/r). However, sequencing assays are biased toward mutations with minimal fitness impacts and fluctuation tests typically investigate only a subset of all possible single nucleotide mutations. We developed a fluctuation test based on reversion to fluorescence in a set of virally encoded mutant green fluorescent proteins, which allowed us to measure the rates of selectively neutral mutations representative of the twelve different mutation types. We measured an overall mutation rate of 1.8 × 10–4 s/n/r for PR8 (H1N1) and 2.5 × 10–4 s/n/r for Hong Kong 2014 (H3N2) and a transitional bias of 2.7–3.6. Our data suggest that each replicated genome will have an average of 2–3 mutations and highlight the importance of mutational load in influenza virus evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26437.001 PMID:28598328

  18. Tumor-Derived Suppressor of Fused Mutations Reveal Hedgehog Pathway Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Urman, Nicole M.; Mirza, Amar; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Sarin, Kavita Y.; Tang, Jean Y.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a potent regulator of cellular growth and plays a central role in the development of many cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The majority of BCCs arise from mutations in the Patched receptor resulting in constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Secondary driver mutations promote BCC oncogenesis and occur frequently due to the high mutational burden resulting from sun exposure of the skin. Here, we uncover novel secondary mutations in Suppressor of Fused (SUFU), the major negative regulator of the Hedgehog pathway. SUFU normally binds to a Hedgehog transcriptional activator, GLI1, in order to prevent it from initiating transcription of Hedgehog target genes. We sequenced tumor-normal pairs from patients with early sporadic BCCs. This resulted in the discovery of nine mutations in SUFU, which were functionally investigated to determine whether they help drive BCC formation. Our results show that four of the SUFU mutations inappropriately activate the Hedgehog pathway, suggesting they may act as driver mutations for BCC development. Indeed, all four of the loss of function SUFU variants were found to disrupt its binding to GLI, leading to constitutive pathway activation. Our results from functional characterization of these mutations shed light on SUFU’s role in Hedgehog signaling, tumor progression, and highlight a way in which BCCs can arise. PMID:28030567

  19. Unusual multisystemic involvement and a novel BAG3 mutation revealed by NGS screening in a large cohort of myofibrillar myopathies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are a group of phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders, which are characterized by protein aggregations in muscle fibres and can be associated with multisystemic involvement. Methods We screened a large cohort of 38 index patients with MFM for mutations in the nine thus far known causative genes using Sanger and next generation sequencing (NGS). We studied the clinical and histopathological characteristics in 38 index patients and five additional relatives (n = 43) and particularly focused on the associated multisystemic symptoms. Results We identified 14 heterozygous mutations (diagnostic yield of 37%), among them the novel p.Pro209Gln mutation in the BAG3 gene, which was associated with onset in adulthood, a mild phenotype and an axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy, in the absence of giant axons at the nerve biopsy. We revealed several novel clinical phenotypes and unusual multisystemic presentations with previously described mutations: hearing impairment with a FLNC mutation, dysphonia with a mutation in DES and the first patient with a FLNC mutation presenting respiratory insufficiency as the initial symptom. Moreover, we described for the first time respiratory insufficiency occurring in a patient with the p.Gly154Ser mutation in CRYAB. Interestingly, we detected a polyneuropathy in 28% of the MFM patients, including a BAG3 and a MYOT case, and hearing impairment in 13%, including one patient with a FLNC mutation and two with mutations in the DES gene. In four index patients with a mutation in one of the MFM genes, typical histological findings were only identified at the ultrastructural level (29%). Conclusions We conclude that extraskeletal symptoms frequently occur in MFM, particularly cardiac and respiratory involvement, polyneuropathy and/or deafness. BAG3 mutations should be considered even in cases with a mild phenotype or an adult onset. We identified a genetic defect in one of

  20. Unusual multisystemic involvement and a novel BAG3 mutation revealed by NGS screening in a large cohort of myofibrillar myopathies.

    PubMed

    Semmler, Anna-Lena; Sacconi, Sabrina; Bach, J Elisa; Liebe, Claus; Bürmann, Jan; Kley, Rudolf A; Ferbert, Andreas; Anderheiden, Roland; Van den Bergh, Peter; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Jonghe, Peter; Neuen-Jacob, Eva; Müller, Oliver; Deschauer, Marcus; Bergmann, Markus; Schröder, J Michael; Vorgerd, Matthias; Schulz, Jörg B; Weis, Joachim; Kress, Wolfram; Claeys, Kristl G

    2014-08-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are a group of phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders, which are characterized by protein aggregations in muscle fibres and can be associated with multisystemic involvement. We screened a large cohort of 38 index patients with MFM for mutations in the nine thus far known causative genes using Sanger and next generation sequencing (NGS). We studied the clinical and histopathological characteristics in 38 index patients and five additional relatives (n = 43) and particularly focused on the associated multisystemic symptoms. We identified 14 heterozygous mutations (diagnostic yield of 37%), among them the novel p.Pro209Gln mutation in the BAG3 gene, which was associated with onset in adulthood, a mild phenotype and an axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy, in the absence of giant axons at the nerve biopsy. We revealed several novel clinical phenotypes and unusual multisystemic presentations with previously described mutations: hearing impairment with a FLNC mutation, dysphonia with a mutation in DES and the first patient with a FLNC mutation presenting respiratory insufficiency as the initial symptom. Moreover, we described for the first time respiratory insufficiency occurring in a patient with the p.Gly154Ser mutation in CRYAB. Interestingly, we detected a polyneuropathy in 28% of the MFM patients, including a BAG3 and a MYOT case, and hearing impairment in 13%, including one patient with a FLNC mutation and two with mutations in the DES gene. In four index patients with a mutation in one of the MFM genes, typical histological findings were only identified at the ultrastructural level (29%). We conclude that extraskeletal symptoms frequently occur in MFM, particularly cardiac and respiratory involvement, polyneuropathy and/or deafness. BAG3 mutations should be considered even in cases with a mild phenotype or an adult onset. We identified a genetic defect in one of the known genes in less than half of the

  1. Transcriptomic Characterization of SF3B1 Mutation Reveals Its Pleiotropic Effects in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Brooks, Angela N; Fan, Jean; Wan, Youzhong; Gambe, Rutendo; Li, Shuqiang; Hergert, Sarah; Yin, Shanye; Freeman, Samuel S; Levin, Joshua Z; Fan, Lin; Seiler, Michael; Buonamici, Silvia; Smith, Peter G; Chau, Kevin F; Cibulskis, Carrie L; Zhang, Wandi; Rassenti, Laura Z; Ghia, Emanuela M; Kipps, Thomas J; Fernandes, Stacey; Bloch, Donald B; Kotliar, Dylan; Landau, Dan A; Shukla, Sachet A; Aster, Jon C; Reed, Robin; DeLuca, David S; Brown, Jennifer R; Neuberg, Donna; Getz, Gad; Livak, Kenneth J; Meyerson, Matthew M; Kharchenko, Peter V; Wu, Catherine J

    2016-11-14

    Mutations in SF3B1, which encodes a spliceosome component, are associated with poor outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but how these contribute to CLL progression remains poorly understood. We undertook a transcriptomic characterization of primary human CLL cells to identify transcripts and pathways affected by SF3B1 mutation. Splicing alterations, identified in the analysis of bulk cells, were confirmed in single SF3B1-mutated CLL cells and also found in cell lines ectopically expressing mutant SF3B1. SF3B1 mutation was found to dysregulate multiple cellular functions including DNA damage response, telomere maintenance, and Notch signaling (mediated through KLF8 upregulation, increased TERC and TERT expression, or altered splicing of DVL2 transcript, respectively). SF3B1 mutation leads to diverse changes in CLL-related pathways.

  2. The Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Russo-Menna, I; Arancibias, C

    2010-02-01

    The HGPS (Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome) is a rare genetic disorder with an incidence of 1 per 8 million live births. Originally described in 1886, less than 100 cases have been reported. The syndrome is characterized by premature aging with changes in many organs. The diagnosis is usually made by age 2, the mean survival age is 13.4 years and the most common cause of death is myocardial infarction. Recent genetic advances have identified the cause as a defect in the LMNA gene of chromosome 1.

  3. Towards a Drosophila model of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beard, Gemma S; Bridger, Joanna M; Kill, Ian R; Tree, David R P

    2008-12-01

    The laminopathy Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by the mutant lamin A protein progerin and leads to premature aging of affected children. Despite numerous cell biological and biochemical insights into the basis for the cellular abnormalities seen in HGPS, the mechanism linking progerin to the organismal phenotype is not fully understood. To begin to address the mechanism behind HGPS using Drosophila melanogaster, we have ectopically expressed progerin and lamin A. We found that ectopic progerin and lamin A phenocopy several effects of laminopathies in developing and adult Drosophila, but that progerin causes a stronger phenotype than wild-type lamin A.

  4. In-depth analysis of hyaline fibromatosis syndrome frameshift mutations at the same site reveal the necessity of personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shixu E; Lemmin, Thomas; Salvi, Suzanne; Lausch, Ekkehart; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Rokicki, Dariusz; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2013-07-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in ANTXR2, a gene involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis. Sixty percent of patients carry frameshift mutations at a mutational hotspot in exon 13. We show in patient cells that these mutations lead to low ANTXR2 mRNA and undetectable protein levels. Ectopic expression of the proteins encoded by the mutated genes reveals that a two base insertion leads to the synthesis of a protein that is rapidly targeted to the ER-associated degradation pathway due to the modified structure of the cytosolic tail, which instead of being hydrophilic and highly disordered as in wild type ANTXR2, is folded and exposes hydrophobic patches. In contrast, one base insertion leads to a truncated protein that properly localizes to the plasma membrane and retains partial function. We next show that targeting the nonsense mediated mRNA decay pathway in patient cells leads to a rescue of ANTXR2 protein in patients carrying one base insertion but not in those carrying two base insertions. This study highlights the importance of in-depth analysis of the molecular consequences of specific patient mutations, which even when they occur at the same site can have drastically different consequences. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. Exome sequencing reveals novel mutation targets in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas derived from Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda, Noel F. C. C.; Georgiou, Konstantinos; Chen, Longyun; Wu, Chenglin; Gao, Zhibo; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Lisboa, Susana; Enblad, Gunilla; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Zeng, Yixin

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing studies on diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) have revealed novel targets of genetic aberrations but also high intercohort heterogeneity. Previous studies have suggested that the prevalence of disease subgroups and cytogenetic profiles differ between Western and Asian patients. To characterize the coding genome of Chinese DLBCL, we performed whole-exome sequencing of DNA derived from 31 tumors and respective peripheral blood samples. The mutation prevalence of B2M, CD70, DTX1, LYN, TMSB4X, and UBE2A was investigated in an additional 105 tumor samples. We discovered 11 novel targets of recurrent mutations in DLBCL that included functionally relevant genes such as LYN and TMSB4X. Additional genes were found mutated at high frequency (≥10%) in the Chinese cohort including DTX1, which was the most prevalent mutation target in the Notch pathway. We furthermore demonstrated that mutations in DTX1 impair its function as a negative regulator of Notch. Novel and previous unappreciated targets of somatic mutations in DLBCL identified in this study support the existence of additional/alternative tumorigenic pathways in these tumors. The observed differences with previous reports might be explained by the genetic heterogeneity of DLBCL, the germline genetic makeup of Chinese individuals, and/or exposure to distinct etiological agents. PMID:25171927

  6. Importance of molecular cell biology investigations in human medicine in the story of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raška, Ivan

    2010-09-01

    Ranged among laminopathies, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a syndrome that involves premature aging, leading usually to death at the age between 10 to 14 years predominatly due to a myocardial infarction or a stroke. In the lecture I shall overview the importance of molecular cell biology investigations that led to the discovery of the basic mechanism standing behind this rare syndrome. The genetic basis in most cases is a mutation at the nucleotide position 1824 of the lamin A gene. At this position, cytosine is substituted for thymine so that a cryptic splice site within the precursor mRNA for lamin A is generated. This results in a production of abnormal lamin A, termed progerin, its presence in cells having a deleterious dominant effect. Depending on the cell type and tissue, progerin induces a pleiotropy of defects that vary in different tissues. The present endeavour how to challenge this terrible disease will be also mentioned.

  7. Accumulation of mutant lamin A causes progressive changes in nuclear architecture in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Robert D; Shumaker, Dale K; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Maria; Goldman, Anne E; Gordon, Leslie B; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Khuon, Satya; Mendez, Melissa; Varga, Renée; Collins, Francis S

    2004-06-15

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disorder, commonly caused by a point mutation in the lamin A gene that results in a protein lacking 50 aa near the C terminus, denoted LADelta50. Here we show by light and electron microscopy that HGPS is associated with significant changes in nuclear shape, including lobulation of the nuclear envelope, thickening of the nuclear lamina, loss of peripheral heterochromatin, and clustering of nuclear pores. These structural defects worsen as HGPS cells age in culture, and their severity correlates with an apparent increase in LADelta50. Introduction of LADelta50 into normal cells by transfection or protein injection induces the same changes. We hypothesize that these alterations in nuclear structure are due to a concentration-dependent dominant-negative effect of LADelta50, leading to the disruption of lamin-related functions ranging from the maintenance of nuclear shape to regulation of gene expression and DNA replication.

  8. PMD patient mutations reveal a long-distance intronic interaction that regulates PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Taube, Jennifer R.; Sperle, Karen; Banser, Linda; Seeman, Pavel; Cavan, Barbra Charina V.; Garbern, James Y.; Hobson, Grace M.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the proteolipid protein 1 gene (PLP1) produces two forms, PLP1 and DM20, due to alternative use of 5′ splice sites with the same acceptor site in intron 3. The PLP1 form predominates in central nervous system RNA. Mutations that reduce the ratio of PLP1 to DM20, whether mutant or normal protein is formed, result in the X-linked leukodystrophy Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). We investigated the ability of sequences throughout PLP1 intron 3 to regulate alternative splicing using a splicing minigene construct transfected into the oligodendrocyte cell line, Oli-neu. Our data reveal that the alternative splice of PLP1 is regulated by a long-distance interaction between two highly conserved elements that are separated by 581 bases within the 1071-base intron 3. Further, our data suggest that a base-pairing secondary structure forms between these two elements, and we demonstrate that mutations of either element designed to destabilize the secondary structure decreased the PLP1/DM20 ratio, while swap mutations designed to restore the structure brought the PLP1/DM20 ratio to near normal levels. Sequence analysis of intron 3 in families with clinical symptoms of PMD who did not have coding-region mutations revealed mutations that segregated with disease in three families. We showed that these patient mutations, which potentially destabilize the secondary structure, also reduced the PLP1/DM20 ratio. This is the first report of patient mutations causing disease by disruption of a long-distance intronic interaction controlling alternative splicing. This finding has important implications for molecular diagnostics of PMD. PMID:24890387

  9. Clonal composition of human ovarian cancer based on copy number analysis reveals a reciprocal relation with oncogenic mutation status.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kazuko; Ukita, Masayo; Schmidt, Jeanette; Wu, Longyang; De Velasco, Marco A; Roter, Alan; Jevons, Luis; Nishio, Kazuto; Mandai, Masaki

    2017-10-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity of cancer cells remains largely unexplored. Here we investigated the composition of ovarian cancer and its biological relevance. A whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism array was applied to detect the clonal composition of 24 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of human ovarian cancer. Genome-wide segmentation data consisting of the log2 ratio (log2R) and B allele frequency (BAF) were used to calculate an estimate of the clonal composition number (CC number) for each tumor. Somatic mutation profiles of cancer-related genes were also determined for the same 24 samples by next-generation sequencing. The CC number was estimated successfully for 23 of the 24 cancer samples. The mean ± SD value for the CC number was 1.7 ± 1.1 (range of 0-4). A somatic mutation in at least one gene was identified in 22 of the 24 ovarian cancer samples, with the mutations including those in the oncogenes KRAS (29.2%), PIK3CA (12.5%), BRAF (8.3%), FGFR2 (4.2%), and JAK2 (4.2%) as well as those in the tumor suppressor genes TP53 (54.2%), FBXW7 (8.3%), PTEN (4.2%), and RB1 (4.2%). Tumors with one or more oncogenic mutations had a significantly lower CC number than did those without such a mutation (1.0 ± 0.8 versus 2.3 ± 0.9, P = 0.0027), suggesting that cancers with driver oncogene mutations are less heterogeneous than those with other mutations. Our results thus reveal a reciprocal relation between oncogenic mutation status and clonal composition in ovarian cancer using the established method for the estimation of the CC number. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Distinct phenotype of a Wilson disease mutation reveals a novel trafficking determinant in the copper transporter ATP7B

    PubMed Central

    Braiterman, Lelita T.; Murthy, Amrutha; Jayakanthan, Samuel; Nyasae, Lydia; Tzeng, Eric; Gromadzka, Grazyna; Woolf, Thomas B.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Hubbard, Ann L.

    2014-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a monogenic autosomal-recessive disorder of copper accumulation that leads to liver failure and/or neurological deficits. WD is caused by mutations in ATP7B, a transporter that loads Cu(I) onto newly synthesized cupro-enzymes in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and exports excess copper out of cells by trafficking from the TGN to the plasma membrane. To date, most WD mutations have been shown to disrupt ATP7B activity and/or stability. Using a multidisciplinary approach, including clinical analysis of patients, cell-based assays, and computational studies, we characterized a patient mutation, ATP7BS653Y, which is stable, does not disrupt Cu(I) transport, yet renders the protein unable to exit the TGN. Bulky or charged substitutions at position 653 mimic the phenotype of the patient mutation. Molecular modeling and dynamic simulation suggest that the S653Y mutation induces local distortions within the transmembrane (TM) domain 1 and alter TM1 interaction with TM2. S653Y abolishes the trafficking-stimulating effects of a secondary mutation in the N-terminal apical targeting domain. This result indicates a role for TM1/TM2 in regulating conformations of cytosolic domains involved in ATP7B trafficking. Taken together, our experiments revealed an unexpected role for TM1/TM2 in copper-regulated trafficking of ATP7B and defined a unique class of WD mutants that are transport-competent but trafficking-defective. Understanding the precise consequences of WD-causing mutations will facilitate the development of advanced mutation-specific therapies. PMID:24706876

  11. Mouse models and aging: longevity and progeria.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Yu; Kennedy, Brian K

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex, multifactorial process that is likely influenced by the activities of a range of biological pathways. Genetic approaches to identify genes modulating longevity have been highly successful and recent efforts have extended these studies to mammalian aging. A variety of genetic models have been reported to have enhanced lifespan and, similarly, many genetic interventions lead to progeroid phenotypes. Here, we detail and evaluate both sets of models, focusing on the insights they provide about the molecular processes modulating aging and the extent to which mutations conferring progeroid pathologies really phenocopy accelerated aging.

  12. C. elegans whole-genome sequencing reveals mutational signatures related to carcinogens and DNA repair deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Cooke, Susanna L.; Weiss, Joerg; Bailly, Aymeric P.; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Marshall, John; Raine, Keiran; Maddison, Mark; Anderson, Elizabeth; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is associated with developmental and hereditary disorders, aging, and cancer. While we understand some mutational processes operative in human disease, most remain mysterious. We used Caenorhabditis elegans whole-genome sequencing to model mutational signatures, analyzing 183 worm populations across 17 DNA repair-deficient backgrounds propagated for 20 generations or exposed to carcinogens. The baseline mutation rate in C. elegans was approximately one per genome per generation, not overtly altered across several DNA repair deficiencies over 20 generations. Telomere erosion led to complex chromosomal rearrangements initiated by breakage–fusion–bridge cycles and completed by simultaneously acquired, localized clusters of breakpoints. Aflatoxin B1 induced substitutions of guanines in a GpC context, as observed in aflatoxin-induced liver cancers. Mutational burden increased with impaired nucleotide excision repair. Cisplatin and mechlorethamine, DNA crosslinking agents, caused dose- and genotype-dependent signatures among indels, substitutions, and rearrangements. Strikingly, both agents induced clustered rearrangements resembling “chromoanasynthesis,” a replication-based mutational signature seen in constitutional genomic disorders, suggesting that interstrand crosslinks may play a pathogenic role in such events. Cisplatin mutagenicity was most pronounced in xpf-1 mutants, suggesting that this gene critically protects cells against platinum chemotherapy. Thus, experimental model systems combined with genome sequencing can recapture and mechanistically explain mutational signatures associated with human disease. PMID:25030888

  13. Exome sequencing reveals riboflavin transporter mutations as a cause of motor neuron disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Janel O.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Megarbane, Andre; Urtizberea, J. Andoni; Hernandez, Dena G.; Foley, A. Reghan; Arepalli, Sampath; Pandraud, Amelie; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Clayton, Peter; Reilly, Mary M.; Muntoni, Francesco; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Houlden, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Brown–Vialetto–Van Laere syndrome was first described in 1894 as a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive sensorineural deafness in combination with childhood amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Mutations in the gene, SLC52A3 (formerly C20orf54), one of three known riboflavin transporter genes, have recently been shown to underlie a number of severe cases of Brown–Vialetto–Van Laere syndrome; however, cases and families with this disease exist that do not appear to be caused by SLC52A3 mutations. We used a combination of linkage and exome sequencing to identify the disease causing mutation in an extended Lebanese Brown–Vialetto–Van Laere kindred, whose affected members were negative for SLC52A3 mutations. We identified a novel mutation in a second member of the riboflavin transporter gene family (gene symbol: SLC52A2) as the cause of disease in this family. The same mutation was identified in one additional subject, from 44 screened. Within this group of 44 patients, we also identified two additional cases with SLC52A3 mutations, but none with mutations in the remaining member of this gene family, SLC52A1. We believe this strongly supports the notion that defective riboflavin transport plays an important role in Brown–Vialetto–Van Laere syndrome. Initial work has indicated that patients with SLC52A3 defects respond to riboflavin treatment clinically and biochemically. Clearly, this makes an excellent candidate therapy for the SLC52A2 mutation-positive patients identified here. Initial riboflavin treatment of one of these patients shows promising results. PMID:22740598

  14. Profiling of Oncogenic Driver Events in Lung Adenocarcinoma Revealed MET Mutation as Independent Prognostic Factor.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Sai F; Tong, Joanna H M; Law, Peggy P W; Chung, Lau Y; Lung, Raymond W M; Tong, Carol Y K; Chow, Chit; Chan, Anthony W H; Wan, Innes Y P; Mok, Tony S K; To, Ka F

    2015-09-01

    Oncogenic driver mutations activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways are promising predictive markers for targeted treatment. We investigated the mutation profile of an updated driver events list on receptor tyrosine kinase/RAS/PI3K axis and the clinicopathologic implications in a cohort of never-smoker predominated Chinese lung adenocarcinoma. We tested 154 lung adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas for EGFR, KRAS, HER2, BRAF, PIK3CA, MET, NRAS, MAP2K1, and RIT1 mutations by polymerase chain reaction-direct sequencing. MET amplification and ALK and ROS1 translocations were assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridizations. MET and thyroid transcription factor-1 protein expressions were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Seventy percent of lung adenocarcinomas carried actionable driver events. Alterations on EGFR (43%), KRAS (11.4%), ALK (6%), and MET (5.4%) were frequently found. ROS1 translocation and mutations involving BRAF, HER2, NRAS, and PIK3CA were also detected. No mutation was observed in RIT1 and MAP2K1. Patients with EGFR mutations had a favorable prognosis, whereas those with MET mutations had poorer overall survival. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that MET mutation was an independent prognostic factor. Although MET protein expression was detected in 65% of lung adenocarcinoma, only 10% of the MET-immunohistochemistry positive tumors harbor MET DNA alterations that drove protein overexpression. Appropriate predictive biomarker is essential for selecting patients who might benefit from specific targeted therapy. Actionable driver events can be detected in two thirds of lung adenocarcinoma. MET DNA alterations define a subset of patients with aggressive diseases that might potentially benefit from anti-MET targeted therapy. High negative predictive values of thyroid transcription factor-1 and MET expression suggest potential roles as surrogate markers for EGFR and/or MET mutations.

  15. Multihost experimental evolution of a plant RNA virus reveals local adaptation and host-specific mutations.

    PubMed

    Bedhomme, Stéphanie; Lafforgue, Guillaume; Elena, Santiago F

    2012-05-01

    For multihost pathogens, adaptation to multiple hosts has important implications for both applied and basic research. At the applied level, it is one of the main factors determining the probability and the severity of emerging disease outbreaks. At the basic level, it is thought to be a key mechanism for the maintenance of genetic diversity both in host and pathogen species. Using Tobacco etch potyvirus (TEV) and four natural hosts, we have designed an evolution experiment whose strength and novelty are the use of complex multicellular host organism as hosts and a high level of replication of different evolutionary histories and lineages. A pattern of local adaptation, characterized by a higher infectivity and virulence on host(s) encountered during the experimental evolution was found. Local adaptation only had a cost in terms of performance on other hosts in some cases. We could not verify the existence of a cost for generalists, as expected to arise from antagonistic pleiotropy and other genetic mechanisms generating a fitness trade-off between hosts. This observation confirms that this classical theoretical prediction lacks empirical support. We discuss the reasons for this discrepancy between theory and experiment in the light of our results. The analysis of full genome consensus sequences of the evolved lineages established that all mutations shared between lineages were host specific. A low degree of parallel evolution was observed, possibly reflecting the various adaptive pathways available for TEV in each host. Altogether, these results reveal a strong adaptive potential of TEV to new hosts without severe evolutionary constraints.

  16. Exome sequencing reveals germline gain-of-function EGFR mutation in an adult with Lhermitte–Duclos disease

    PubMed Central

    Colby, Samantha; Yehia, Lamis; Niazi, Farshad; Chen, JinLian; Ni, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lhermitte–Duclos disease (LDD) is a rare cerebellar disorder believed to be pathognomonic for Cowden syndrome. Presently, the only known etiology is germline PTEN mutation. We report a 41-yr-old white female diagnosed with LDD and wild-type for PTEN. Exome sequencing revealed a germline heterozygous EGFR mutation that breaks a disulfide bond in the receptor's extracellular domain, resulting in constitutive activation. Functional studies demonstrate activation of ERK/AKT signaling pathways, mimicking PTEN loss-of-function downstream effects. The identification of EGFR as a candidate LDD susceptibility gene contributes to advancement of molecular diagnosis and targeted therapy for this rare condition with limited treatment options. PMID:27900366

  17. Mechanisms controlling the smooth muscle cell death in progeria via down-regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoyue; Xiong, Zheng-Mei; Cao, Kan

    2014-06-03

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a severe human premature aging disorder caused by a lamin A mutant named progerin. Death occurs at a mean age of 13 y from cardiovascular problems. Previous studies revealed loss of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media of large arteries in a patient with HGPS and two mouse models, suggesting a causal connection between the SMC loss and cardiovascular malfunction. However, the mechanisms of how progerin leads to massive SMC loss are unknown. In this study, using SMCs differentiated from HGPS induced pluripotent stem cells, we show that HGPS SMCs exhibit a profound proliferative defect, which is primarily caused by caspase-independent cell death. Importantly, progerin accumulation stimulates a powerful suppression of PARP1 and consequently triggers an activation of the error-prone nonhomologous end joining response. As a result, most HGPS SMCs exhibit prolonged mitosis and die of mitotic catastrophe. This study demonstrates a critical role of PARP1 in mediating SMC loss in patients with HGPS and elucidates a molecular pathway underlying the progressive SMC loss in progeria.

  18. Bone metastasis in prostate cancer: Recurring mitochondrial DNA mutation reveals selective pressure exerted by the bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Rebecca S; Fedewa, Stacey A; Goodman, Michael; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Kissick, Haydn T; Morrissey, Colm; True, Lawrence D; Petros, John A

    2015-09-01

    include a tRNA Arg mutation at n.p. 10436 and a tRNA Thr mutation at n.p. 15928. The tRNA Arg mutation was restricted to bone metastases and occurred in three of 10 patients (30%). Somatic mutation at 15928 was not restricted to the bone and also occurred in three patients. Mitochondrial genomic variation was greater in metastatic sites than in the primary tumor and bone metastases had statistically significantly greater numbers of somatic mutations than either the primary or the soft tissue metastases. The genome was not mutated randomly. At least one mutational "hot-spot" was identified at the individual base level (nucleotide position 10398 in bone metastases) indicating a pervasive selective pressure for bone metastatic cells that had acquired the 10398 mtDNA mutation. Two additional recurrent mutations (tRNA Arg and tRNA Thr) support the concept of bone site-specific "survival of the fittest" as revealed by variation in the mitochondrial genome and selective pressure exerted by the metastatic site. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Exome sequencing reveals cubilin mutation as a single-gene cause of proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H; Yilmaz, Engin; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2011-10-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B(12) deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B(12)-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy.

  20. Exome Sequencing Reveals Cubilin Mutation as a Single-Gene Cause of Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M.; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H.; Yilmaz, Engin

    2011-01-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy. PMID:21903995

  1. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Junager, Nina P. L.; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  2. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency.

  3. A multigene mutation classification of 468 colorectal cancers reveals a prognostic role for APC

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Michael J.; Yang, Mingli; Teer, Jamie K.; Lo, Fang Yin; Madan, Anup; Coppola, Domenico; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Nebozhyn, Michael V.; Yue, Binglin; Loboda, Andrey; Bien-Willner, Gabriel A.; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Yeatman, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a highly heterogeneous disease, for which prognosis has been relegated to clinicopathologic staging for decades. There is a need to stratify subpopulations of CRC on a molecular basis to better predict outcome and assign therapies. Here we report targeted exome-sequencing of 1,321 cancer-related genes on 468 tumour specimens, which identified a subset of 17 genes that best classify CRC, with APC playing a central role in predicting overall survival. APC may assume 0, 1 or 2 truncating mutations, each with a striking differential impact on survival. Tumours lacking any APC mutation carry a worse prognosis than single APC mutation tumours; however, two APC mutation tumours with mutant KRAS and TP53 confer the poorest survival among all the subgroups examined. Our study demonstrates a prognostic role for APC and suggests that sequencing of APC may have clinical utility in the routine staging and potential therapeutic assignment for CRC. PMID:27302369

  4. Somatic mutation profiles of clear cell endometrial tumors revealed by whole exome and targeted gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Le Gallo, Matthieu; Rudd, Meghan L; Urick, Mary Ellen; Hansen, Nancy F; Zhang, Suiyuan; Lozy, Fred; Sgroi, Dennis C; Vidal Bel, August; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Broaddus, Russell R; Lu, Karen H; Levine, Douglas A; Mutch, David G; Goodfellow, Paul J; Salvesen, Helga B; Mullikin, James C; Bell, Daphne W

    2017-09-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of clear cell endometrial cancer (CCEC), a tumor type with a relatively unfavorable prognosis, is not well defined. We searched exome-wide for novel somatically mutated genes in CCEC and assessed the mutational spectrum of known and candidate driver genes in a large cohort of cases. We conducted whole exome sequencing of paired tumor-normal DNAs from 16 cases of CCEC (12 CCECs and the CCEC components of 4 mixed histology tumors). Twenty-two genes-of-interest were Sanger-sequenced from another 47 cases of CCEC. Microsatellite instability (MSI) and microsatellite stability (MSS) were determined by genotyping 5 mononucleotide repeats. Two tumor exomes had relatively high mutational loads and MSI. The other 14 tumor exomes were MSS and had 236 validated nonsynonymous or splice junction somatic mutations among 222 protein-encoding genes. Among the 63 cases of CCEC in this study, we identified frequent somatic mutations in TP53 (39.7%), PIK3CA (23.8%), PIK3R1 (15.9%), ARID1A (15.9%), PPP2R1A (15.9%), SPOP (14.3%), and TAF1 (9.5%), as well as MSI (11.3%). Five of 8 mutations in TAF1, a gene with no known role in CCEC, localized to the putative histone acetyltransferase domain and included 2 recurrently mutated residues. Based on patterns of MSI and mutations in 7 genes, CCEC subsets molecularly resembled serous endometrial cancer (SEC) or endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC). Our findings demonstrate molecular similarities between CCEC and SEC and EEC and implicate TAF1 as a novel candidate CCEC driver gene. Cancer 2017;123:3261-8. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  5. Interpatient mutational spectrum of human coronavirus-OC43 revealed by illumina sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gorse, Geoffrey J; Patel, Gira B; Fan, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-12

    Human coronaviruses (HCoV) are RNA viruses that cause respiratory tract infections with viral replication of limited duration. The host and viral population heterogeneity could influence clinical phenotypes. Employing long RT-PCR with Illumina sequencing, we quantified the gene mutation load at 0.5% mutation frequency for the 4,529 bp-domain spanning the Spike gene (4,086 bp) of HCoV-OC43 in four upper respiratory clinical specimens obtained during acute illness. There were a total of 121 mutations for all four HCoV samples with the average number of mutations at 30.3 ± 10.2, which is significantly higher than that expected from the Illumina sequencing error rate. There were two mutation peaks, one at the 5' end and the other near position 1550 in the S1 subunit. Two coronavirus samples were genotype B and two were genotype D, clustering with HCoV-OC43 strain AY391777 in neighbor - joining tree phylogenetic analysis. Nonsynonymous mutations were 76.1 ± 14% of mutation load. Although lower than other RNA viruses such as hepatitis C virus, HCoV-OC43 did exhibit quasi-species. The rate of nonsynonymous mutations was higher in the HCoV-OC43 isolates than in hepatitis C virus genotype 1a isolates analyzed for comparison in this study. These characteristics of HCoV-OC43 may affect viral replication dynamics, receptor binding, antigenicity, evolution, transmission, and clinical illness. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Whole exome sequencing reveals concomitant mutations of multiple FA genes in individual Fanconi anemia patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited genetic syndrome with highly variable clinical manifestations. Fifteen genetic subtypes of FA have been identified. Traditional complementation tests for grouping studies have been used generally in FA patients and in stepwise methods to identify the FA type, which can result in incomplete genetic information from FA patients. Methods We diagnosed five pediatric patients with FA based on clinical manifestations, and we performed exome sequencing of peripheral blood specimens from these patients and their family members. The related sequencing data were then analyzed by bioinformatics, and the FANC gene mutations identified by exome sequencing were confirmed by PCR re-sequencing. Results Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations of FANC genes were identified in all of the patients. The FA subtypes of the patients included FANCA, FANCM and FANCD2. Interestingly, four FA patients harbored multiple mutations in at least two FA genes, and some of these mutations have not been previously reported. These patients’ clinical manifestations were vastly different from each other, as were their treatment responses to androstanazol and prednisone. This finding suggests that heterozygous mutation(s) in FA genes could also have diverse biological and/or pathophysiological effects on FA patients or FA gene carriers. Interestingly, we were not able to identify de novo mutations in the genes implicated in DNA repair pathways when the sequencing data of patients were compared with those of their parents. Conclusions Our results indicate that Chinese FA patients and carriers might have higher and more complex mutation rates in FANC genes than have been conventionally recognized. Testing of the fifteen FANC genes in FA patients and their family members should be a regular clinical practice to determine the optimal care for the individual patient, to counsel the family and to obtain a better understanding of FA pathophysiology

  7. Genomic Analyses Reveal Mutational Signatures and Frequently Altered Genes in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Yong; Cheng, Caixia; Cui, Heyang; Cheng, Le; Kong, Pengzhou; Wang, Jiaqian; Li, Yin; Chen, Wenliang; Song, Bin; Wang, Fang; Jia, Zhiwu; Li, Lin; Li, Yaoping; Yang, Bin; Liu, Jing; Shi, Ruyi; Bi, Yanghui; Zhang, Yanyan; Wang, Juan; Zhao, Zhenxiang; Hu, Xiaoling; Yang, Jie; Li, Hongyi; Gao, Zhibo; Chen, Gang; Huang, Xuanlin; Yang, Xukui; Wan, Shengqing; Chen, Chao; Li, Bin; Tan, Yongkai; Chen, Longyun; He, Minghui; Xie, Sha; Li, Xiangchun; Zhuang, Xuehan; Wang, Mengyao; Xia, Zhi; Luo, Longhai; Ma, Jie; Dong, Bing; Zhao, Jiuzhou; Song, Yongmei; Ou, Yunwei; Li, Enming; Xu, Liyan; Wang, Jinfen; Xi, Yanfeng; Li, Guodong; Xu, Enwei; Liang, Jianfang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Guo, Jiansheng; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Yanbo; Li, Qingshan; Liu, Lixin; Li, Yingrui; Zhang, Xiuqing; Yang, Huanming; Lin, Dongxin; Cheng, Xiaolong; Guo, Yongjun; Wang, Jun; Zhan, Qimin; Cui, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and the fourth most lethal cancer in China. However, although genomic studies have identified some mutations associated with ESCC, we know little of the mutational processes responsible. To identify genome-wide mutational signatures, we performed either whole-genome sequencing (WGS) or whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 104 ESCC individuals and combined our data with those of 88 previously reported samples. An APOBEC-mediated mutational signature in 47% of 192 tumors suggests that APOBEC-catalyzed deamination provides a source of DNA damage in ESCC. Moreover, PIK3CA hotspot mutations (c.1624G>A [p.Glu542Lys] and c.1633G>A [p.Glu545Lys]) were enriched in APOBEC-signature tumors, and no smoking-associated signature was observed in ESCC. In the samples analyzed by WGS, we identified focal (<100 kb) amplifications of CBX4 and CBX8. In our combined cohort, we identified frequent inactivating mutations in AJUBA, ZNF750, and PTCH1 and the chromatin-remodeling genes CREBBP and BAP1, in addition to known mutations. Functional analyses suggest roles for several genes (CBX4, CBX8, AJUBA, and ZNF750) in ESCC. Notably, high activity of hedgehog signaling and the PI3K pathway in approximately 60% of 104 ESCC tumors indicates that therapies targeting these pathways might be particularly promising strategies for ESCC. Collectively, our data provide comprehensive insights into the mutational signatures of ESCC and identify markers for early diagnosis and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25839328

  8. Initial cutaneous manifestations of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rork, Jillian F; Huang, Jennifer T; Gordon, Leslie B; Kleinman, Monica; Kieran, Mark W; Liang, Marilyn G

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, uniformly fatal, premature aging disease with distinct dermatologic features. We sought to identify and describe the initial skin and hair findings as potential diagnostic signs of the disease. We performed a chart review of the structured initial intake histories of 39 individuals with HGPS enrolled in clinical trials from 2007 to 2010 at Boston Children's Hospital, limited to cutaneous history from birth to 24 months. Medical photographs were provided through the clinical trials and the Progeria Research Foundation Medical and Research Database at Brown University Center for Gerontology and Healthcare Research. All 39 patients reported skin and hair abnormalities within the first 24 months of life. Pathologies included sclerodermoid change, prominent superficial veins, dyspigmentation, and alopecia. The mean age of presentation for each finding was <12 months. The most frequently reported skin feature was sclerodermoid change, which commonly involved the abdomen and bilateral lower extremities. Prominent superficial vasculature manifested as circumoral cyanosis and pronounced veins on the scalp and body. Hypo- and hyperpigmentation were observed over areas of sclerodermoid change. Scalp alopecia progressed in a distinct pattern, with preservation of the hair over the midscalp and vertex areas for the longest period of time. HGPS has distinct cutaneous manifestations during the first 2 years of life that may be the first signs of disease. Awareness of these findings could expedite diagnosis.

  9. Molecular analysis in Brazilian cystic fibrosis patients reveals five novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, A L; Ferri, A; Passos-Bueno, M R; Kim, C E; Nakaie, C M; Gomes, C E; Damaceno, N; Zatz, M

    2000-01-01

    We have performed molecular genetic analyses on 160 Brazilian patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF). Screening of mutations in 320 CF chromosomes was performed through single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analyses assay followed by DNA sequencing of the 27 exons and exon/intron boundaries of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The frequency of CFTR variants of T-tract length of intron 8 (IVS8 Tn) was also investigated. This analysis enabled the detection of 232/320 CF mutations (72.2%) and complete genotyping of 61% of the patients. The deltaF508 mutation was found in 48.4% of the alleles. Another fifteen mutations (previously reported) were detected: G542X, R1162X, N1303K, R334W, W1282X, G58E, L206W, R553X, 621+1G-->T, V232D, 1717-1G-->A, 2347 delG, R851L, 2789+5G-->A, and W1089X. Five novel mutations were identified, V201M (exon 6a), Y275X (exon 6b), 2686 insT (exon 14a), 3171 delC (exon 17a), and 3617 delGA (exon 19). These results contribute to the molecular characterization of CF in the Brazilian population. In addition, the identification of the novel mutation Y275X allowed prenatal diagnosis in a high-risk fetus.

  10. Genome and transcriptome sequencing of lung cancers reveal diverse mutational and splicing events

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; Lee, William; Jiang, Zhaoshi; Chen, Zhongqiang; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Haverty, Peter M.; Gnad, Florian; Guan, Yinghui; Gilbert, Houston N.; Stinson, Jeremy; Klijn, Christiaan; Guillory, Joseph; Bhatt, Deepali; Vartanian, Steffan; Walter, Kimberly; Chan, Jocelyn; Holcomb, Thomas; Dijkgraaf, Peter; Johnson, Stephanie; Koeman, Julie; Minna, John D.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Stern, Howard M.; Hoeflich, Klaus P.; Wu, Thomas D.; Settleman, Jeff; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Gentleman, Robert C.; Neve, Richard M.; Stokoe, David; Modrusan, Zora; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Shames, David S.; Zhang, Zemin

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease in terms of both underlying genetic lesions and response to therapeutic treatments. We performed deep whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing on 19 lung cancer cell lines and three lung tumor/normal pairs. Overall, our data show that cell line models exhibit similar mutation spectra to human tumor samples. Smoker and never-smoker cancer samples exhibit distinguishable patterns of mutations. A number of epigenetic regulators, including KDM6A, ASH1L, SMARCA4, and ATAD2, are frequently altered by mutations or copy number changes. A systematic survey of splice-site mutations identified 106 splice site mutations associated with cancer specific aberrant splicing, including mutations in several known cancer-related genes. RAC1b, an isoform of the RAC1 GTPase that includes one additional exon, was found to be preferentially up-regulated in lung cancer. We further show that its expression is significantly associated with sensitivity to a MAP2K (MEK) inhibitor PD-0325901. Taken together, these data present a comprehensive genomic landscape of a large number of lung cancer samples and further demonstrate that cancer-specific alternative splicing is a widespread phenomenon that has potential utility as therapeutic biomarkers. The detailed characterizations of the lung cancer cell lines also provide genomic context to the vast amount of experimental data gathered for these lines over the decades, and represent highly valuable resources for cancer biology. PMID:23033341

  11. CRISPR Repair Reveals Causative Mutation in a Preclinical Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Justus, Sally; Lee, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Lijuan; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Bassuk, Alexander G; Mahajan, Vinit B; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-08-01

    Massive parallel sequencing enables identification of numerous genetic variants in mutant organisms, but determining pathogenicity of any one mutation can be daunting. The most commonly studied preclinical model of retinitis pigmentosa called the "rodless" (rd1) mouse is homozygous for two mutations: a nonsense point mutation (Y347X) and an intronic insertion of a leukemia virus (Xmv-28). Distinguishing which mutation causes retinal degeneration is still under debate nearly a century after the discovery of this model organism. Here, we performed gene editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and demonstrated that the Y347X mutation is the causative variant of disease. Genome editing in the first generation produced animals that were mosaic for the corrected allele but still showed neurofunction preservation despite low repair frequencies. Furthermore, second-generation CRISPR-repaired mice showed an even more robust rescue and amelioration of the disease. This predicts excellent outcomes for gene editing in diseased human tissue, as Pde6b, the mutated gene in rd1 mice, has an orthologous intron-exon relationship comparable with the human PDE6B gene. Not only do these findings resolve the debate surrounding the source of neurodegeneration in the rd1 model, but they also provide the first example of homology-directed recombination-mediated gene correction in the visual system.

  12. Clinical trial of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor in children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Leslie B; Kleinman, Monica E; Miller, David T; Neuberg, Donna S; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Smoot, Leslie B; Gordon, Catherine M; Cleveland, Robert; Snyder, Brian D; Fligor, Brian; Bishop, W Robert; Statkevich, Paul; Regen, Amy; Sonis, Andrew; Riley, Susan; Ploski, Christine; Correia, Annette; Quinn, Nicolle; Ullrich, Nicole J; Nazarian, Ara; Liang, Marilyn G; Huh, Susanna Y; Schwartzman, Armin; Kieran, Mark W

    2012-10-09

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare, fatal, segmental premature aging syndrome caused by a mutation in LMNA that produces the farnesylated aberrant lamin A protein, progerin. This multisystem disorder causes failure to thrive and accelerated atherosclerosis leading to early death. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors have ameliorated disease phenotypes in preclinical studies. Twenty-five patients with HGPS received the farnesyltransferase inhibitor lonafarnib for a minimum of 2 y. Primary outcome success was predefined as a 50% increase over pretherapy in estimated annual rate of weight gain, or change from pretherapy weight loss to statistically significant on-study weight gain. Nine patients experienced a ≥50% increase, six experienced a ≥50% decrease, and 10 remained stable with respect to rate of weight gain. Secondary outcomes included decreases in arterial pulse wave velocity and carotid artery echodensity and increases in skeletal rigidity and sensorineural hearing within patient subgroups. All patients improved in one or more of these outcomes. Results from this clinical treatment trial for children with HGPS provide preliminary evidence that lonafarnib may improve vascular stiffness, bone structure, and audiological status.

  13. Recapitulation of premature ageing with iPSCs from Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-Hui; Barkho, Basam Z; Ruiz, Sergio; Diep, Dinh; Qu, Jing; Yang, Sheng-Lian; Panopoulos, Athanasia D; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Kurian, Leo; Walsh, Christopher; Thompson, James; Boue, Stephanie; Fung, Ho Lim; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Zhang, Kun; Yates, John; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2011-04-14

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare and fatal human premature ageing disease, characterized by premature arteriosclerosis and degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). HGPS is caused by a single point mutation in the lamin A (LMNA) gene, resulting in the generation of progerin, a truncated splicing mutant of lamin A. Accumulation of progerin leads to various ageing-associated nuclear defects including disorganization of nuclear lamina and loss of heterochromatin. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts obtained from patients with HGPS. HGPS-iPSCs show absence of progerin, and more importantly, lack the nuclear envelope and epigenetic alterations normally associated with premature ageing. Upon differentiation of HGPS-iPSCs, progerin and its ageing-associated phenotypic consequences are restored. Specifically, directed differentiation of HGPS-iPSCs to SMCs leads to the appearance of premature senescence phenotypes associated with vascular ageing. Additionally, our studies identify DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNAPKcs, also known as PRKDC) as a downstream target of progerin. The absence of nuclear DNAPK holoenzyme correlates with premature as well as physiological ageing. Because progerin also accumulates during physiological ageing, our results provide an in vitro iPSC-based model to study the pathogenesis of human premature and physiological vascular ageing.

  14. Distinct structural and mechanical properties of the nuclear lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Kris Noel; Scaffidi, Paola; Islam, Mohammad F; Yodh, Arjun G; Wilson, Katherine L; Misteli, Tom

    2006-07-05

    The nuclear lamina is a network of structural filaments, the A and B type lamins, located at the nuclear envelope and throughout the nucleus. Lamin filaments provide the nucleus with mechanical stability and support many basic activities, including gene regulation. Mutations in LMNA, the gene encoding A type lamins, cause numerous human diseases, including the segmental premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Here we show that structural and mechanical properties of the lamina are altered in HGPS cells. We demonstrate by live-cell imaging and biochemical analysis that lamins A and C become trapped at the nuclear periphery in HGPS patient cells. Using micropipette aspiration, we show that the lamina in HGPS cells has a significantly reduced ability to rearrange under mechanical stress. Based on polarization microscopy results, we suggest that the lamins are disordered in the healthy nuclei, whereas the lamins in HGPS nuclei form orientationally ordered microdomains. The reduced deformability of the HGPS nuclear lamina possibly could be due to the inability of these orientationally ordered microdomains to dissipate mechanical stress. Surprisingly, intact HGPS cells exhibited a degree of resistance to acute mechanical stress similar to that of cells from healthy individuals. Thus, in contrast to the nuclear fragility seen in lmna null cells, the lamina network in HGPS cells has unique mechanical properties that might contribute to disease phenotypes by affecting responses to mechanical force and misregulation of mechanosensitive gene expression.

  15. Distinct structural and mechanical properties of the nuclear lamina in Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Kris Noel; Scaffidi, Paola; Islam, Mohammad F.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Wilson, Katherine L.; Misteli, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a network of structural filaments, the A and B type lamins, located at the nuclear envelope and throughout the nucleus. Lamin filaments provide the nucleus with mechanical stability and support many basic activities, including gene regulation. Mutations in LMNA, the gene encoding A type lamins, cause numerous human diseases, including the segmental premature aging disease Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Here we show that structural and mechanical properties of the lamina are altered in HGPS cells. We demonstrate by live-cell imaging and biochemical analysis that lamins A and C become trapped at the nuclear periphery in HGPS patient cells. Using micropipette aspiration, we show that the lamina in HGPS cells has a significantly reduced ability to rearrange under mechanical stress. Based on polarization microscopy results, we suggest that the lamins are disordered in the healthy nuclei, whereas the lamins in HGPS nuclei form orientationally ordered microdomains. The reduced deformability of the HGPS nuclear lamina possibly could be due to the inability of these orientationally ordered microdomains to dissipate mechanical stress. Surprisingly, intact HGPS cells exhibited a degree of resistance to acute mechanical stress similar to that of cells from healthy individuals. Thus, in contrast to the nuclear fragility seen in lmna null cells, the lamina network in HGPS cells has unique mechanical properties that might contribute to disease phenotypes by affecting responses to mechanical force and misregulation of mechanosensitive gene expression. PMID:16801550

  16. Increased mechanosensitivity and nuclear stiffness in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria cells: effects of farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Valerie L R M; Ji, Julie Y; Cummings, Kiersten S; Lee, Richard T; Lammerding, Jan

    2008-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), reportedly a model for normal aging, is a genetic disorder in children marked by dramatic signs suggestive for premature aging. It is usually caused by de novo mutations in the nuclear envelope protein lamin A. Lamins are essential to maintaining nuclear integrity, and loss of lamin A/C results in increased cellular sensitivity to mechanical strain and defective mechanotransduction signaling. Since increased mechanical sensitivity in vascular cells could contribute to loss of smooth muscle cells and the development of arteriosclerosis--the leading cause of death in HGPS patients--we investigated the effect of mechanical stress on cells from HGPS patients. We found that skin fibroblasts from HGPS patients developed progressively stiffer nuclei with increasing passage number. Importantly, fibroblasts from HGPS patients had decreased viability and increased apoptosis under repetitive mechanical strain, as well as attenuated wound healing, and these defects preceded changes in nuclear stiffness. Treating fibroblasts with farnesyltransferase inhibitors restored nuclear stiffness in HGPS cells and accelerated the wound healing response in HGPS and healthy control cells by increasing the directional persistence of migrating cells. However, farnesyltransferase inhibitors did not improve cellular sensitivity to mechanical strain. These data suggest that increased mechanical sensitivity in HGPS cells is unrelated to changes in nuclear stiffness and that increased biomechanical sensitivity could provide a potential mechanism for the progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells under physiological strain in HGPS patients.

  17. Clinical trial of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor in children with Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Leslie B.; Kleinman, Monica E.; Miller, David T.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Smoot, Leslie B.; Gordon, Catherine M.; Cleveland, Robert; Snyder, Brian D.; Fligor, Brian; Bishop, W. Robert; Statkevich, Paul; Regen, Amy; Sonis, Andrew; Riley, Susan; Ploski, Christine; Correia, Annette; Quinn, Nicolle; Ullrich, Nicole J.; Nazarian, Ara; Liang, Marilyn G.; Huh, Susanna Y.; Schwartzman, Armin; Kieran, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare, fatal, segmental premature aging syndrome caused by a mutation in LMNA that produces the farnesylated aberrant lamin A protein, progerin. This multisystem disorder causes failure to thrive and accelerated atherosclerosis leading to early death. Farnesyltransferase inhibitors have ameliorated disease phenotypes in preclinical studies. Twenty-five patients with HGPS received the farnesyltransferase inhibitor lonafarnib for a minimum of 2 y. Primary outcome success was predefined as a 50% increase over pretherapy in estimated annual rate of weight gain, or change from pretherapy weight loss to statistically significant on-study weight gain. Nine patients experienced a ≥50% increase, six experienced a ≥50% decrease, and 10 remained stable with respect to rate of weight gain. Secondary outcomes included decreases in arterial pulse wave velocity and carotid artery echodensity and increases in skeletal rigidity and sensorineural hearing within patient subgroups. All patients improved in one or more of these outcomes. Results from this clinical treatment trial for children with HGPS provide preliminary evidence that lonafarnib may improve vascular stiffness, bone structure, and audiological status. PMID:23012407

  18. Integrated genomic sequencing reveals mutational landscape of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Mark J.; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Rolland, Delphine; Sahasrabuddhe, Anagh A.; Chung, Fuzon; Bailey, Nathanael G.; Schrader, Alexandra; Li, Bo; Li, Jun Z.; Ozel, Ayse B.; Betz, Bryan L.; Miranda, Roberto N.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Zhao, Lili; Herling, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The comprehensive genetic alterations underlying the pathogenesis of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) are unknown. To address this, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS), whole-exome sequencing (WES), high-resolution copy-number analysis, and Sanger resequencing of a large cohort of T-PLL. WGS and WES identified novel mutations in recurrently altered genes not previously implicated in T-PLL including EZH2, FBXW10, and CHEK2. Strikingly, WGS and/or WES showed largely mutually exclusive mutations affecting IL2RG, JAK1, JAK3, or STAT5B in 38 of 50 T-PLL genomes (76.0%). Notably, gain-of-function IL2RG mutations are novel and have not been reported in any form of cancer. Further, high-frequency mutations in STAT5B have not been previously reported in T-PLL. Functionally, IL2RG-JAK1-JAK3-STAT5B mutations led to signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) hyperactivation, transformed Ba/F3 cells resulting in cytokine-independent growth, and/or enhanced colony formation in Jurkat T cells. Importantly, primary T-PLL cells exhibited constitutive activation of STAT5, and targeted pharmacologic inhibition of STAT5 with pimozide induced apoptosis in primary T-PLL cells. These results for the first time provide a portrait of the mutational landscape of T-PLL and implicate deregulation of DNA repair and epigenetic modulators as well as high-frequency mutational activation of the IL2RG-JAK1-JAK3-STAT5B axis in the pathogenesis of T-PLL. These findings offer opportunities for novel targeted therapies in this aggressive leukemia. PMID:24825865

  19. Genomic characterization of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals novel recurrent driver mutations

    PubMed Central

    Spinella, Jean-François; Cassart, Pauline; Richer, Chantal; Saillour, Virginie; Ouimet, Manon; Langlois, Sylvie; St-Onge, Pascal; Sontag, Thomas; Healy, Jasmine; Minden, Mark D.; Sinnett, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with variable prognosis. It represents 15% of diagnosed pediatric ALL cases and has a threefold higher incidence among males. Many recurrent alterations have been identified and help define molecular subgroups of T-ALL, however the full range of events involved in driving transformation remain to be defined. Using an integrative approach combining genomic and transcriptomic data, we molecularly characterized 30 pediatric T-ALLs and identified common recurrent T-ALL targets such as FBXW7, JAK1, JAK3, PHF6, KDM6A and NOTCH1 as well as novel candidate T-ALL driver mutations including the p.R35L missense mutation in splicesome factor U2AF1 found in 3 patients and loss of function mutations in the X-linked tumor suppressor genes MED12 (frameshit mutation p.V167fs, splice site mutation g.chrX:70339329T>C, missense mutation p.R1989H) and USP9X (nonsense mutation p.Q117*). In vitro functional studies further supported the putative role of these novel T-ALL genes in driving transformation. U2AF1 p.R35L was shown to induce aberrant splicing of downstream target genes, and shRNA knockdown of MED12 and USP9X was shown to confer resistance to apoptosis following T-ALL relevant chemotherapy drug treatment in Jurkat leukemia cells. Interestingly, nearly 60% of novel candidate driver events were identified among immature T-ALL cases, highlighting the underlying genomic complexity of pediatric T-ALL, and the need for larger integrative studies to decipher the mechanisms that contribute to its various subtypes and provide opportunities to refine patient stratification and treatment. PMID:27602765

  20. Novel POC1A mutation in primordial dwarfism reveals new insights for centriole biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Koparir, Asuman; Karatas, Omer F; Yuceturk, Betul; Yuksel, Bayram; Bayrak, Ali O; Gerdan, Omer F; Sagiroglu, Mahmut S; Gezdirici, Alper; Kirimtay, Koray; Selcuk, Ece; Karabay, Arzu; Creighton, Chad J; Yuksel, Adnan; Ozen, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    POC1A encodes a WD repeat protein localizing to centrioles and spindle poles and is associated with short stature, onychodysplasia, facial dysmorphism and hypotrichosis (SOFT) syndrome. These main features are related to the defect in cell proliferation of chondrocytes in growth plate. In the current study, we aimed at identifying the molecular basis of two patients with primordial dwarfism (PD) in a single family through utilization of whole-exome sequencing. A novel homozygous p.T120A missense mutation was detected in POC1A in both patients, a known causative gene of SOFT syndrome, and confirmed using Sanger sequencing. To test the pathogenicity of the detected mutation, primary fibroblast cultures obtained from the patients and a control individual were used. For evaluating the global gene expression profile of cells carrying p.T120A mutation in POC1A, we performed the gene expression array and compared their expression profiles to those of control fibroblast cells. The gene expression array analysis showed that 4800 transcript probes were significantly deregulated in cells with p.T120A mutation in comparison to the control. GO term association results showed that deregulated genes are mostly involved in the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. Furthermore, the p.T120A missense mutation in POC1A caused the formation of abnormal mitotic spindle structure, including supernumerary centrosomes, and changes in POC1A were accompanied by alterations in another centrosome-associated WD repeat protein p80-katanin. As a result, we identified a novel mutation in POC1A of patients with PD and showed that this mutation causes the formation of multiple numbers of centrioles and multipolar spindles with abnormal chromosome arrangement.

  1. Integrated genomic sequencing reveals mutational landscape of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Mark J; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Rolland, Delphine; Sahasrabuddhe, Anagh A; Chung, Fuzon; Bailey, Nathanael G; Schrader, Alexandra; Li, Bo; Li, Jun Z; Ozel, Ayse B; Betz, Bryan L; Miranda, Roberto N; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Zhao, Lili; Herling, Marco; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J

    2014-08-28

    The comprehensive genetic alterations underlying the pathogenesis of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) are unknown. To address this, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS), whole-exome sequencing (WES), high-resolution copy-number analysis, and Sanger resequencing of a large cohort of T-PLL. WGS and WES identified novel mutations in recurrently altered genes not previously implicated in T-PLL including EZH2, FBXW10, and CHEK2. Strikingly, WGS and/or WES showed largely mutually exclusive mutations affecting IL2RG, JAK1, JAK3, or STAT5B in 38 of 50 T-PLL genomes (76.0%). Notably, gain-of-function IL2RG mutations are novel and have not been reported in any form of cancer. Further, high-frequency mutations in STAT5B have not been previously reported in T-PLL. Functionally, IL2RG-JAK1-JAK3-STAT5B mutations led to signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) hyperactivation, transformed Ba/F3 cells resulting in cytokine-independent growth, and/or enhanced colony formation in Jurkat T cells. Importantly, primary T-PLL cells exhibited constitutive activation of STAT5, and targeted pharmacologic inhibition of STAT5 with pimozide induced apoptosis in primary T-PLL cells. These results for the first time provide a portrait of the mutational landscape of T-PLL and implicate deregulation of DNA repair and epigenetic modulators as well as high-frequency mutational activation of the IL2RG-JAK1-JAK3-STAT5B axis in the pathogenesis of T-PLL. These findings offer opportunities for novel targeted therapies in this aggressive leukemia.

  2. Structural analysis of mitochondrial mutations reveals a role for bigenomic protein interactions in human disease.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Rhiannon E; McGeehan, John E

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are the energy producing organelles of the cell, and mutations within their genome can cause numerous and often severe human diseases. At the heart of every mitochondrion is a set of five large multi-protein machines collectively known as the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). This cellular machinery is central to several processes important for maintaining homeostasis within cells, including the production of ATP. The MRC is unique due to the bigenomic origin of its interacting proteins, which are encoded in the nucleus and mitochondria. It is this, in combination with the sheer number of protein-protein interactions that occur both within and between the MRC complexes, which makes the prediction of function and pathological outcome from primary sequence mutation data extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate how 3D structural analysis can be employed to predict the functional importance of mutations in mtDNA protein-coding genes. We mined the MITOMAP database and, utilizing the latest structural data, classified mutation sites based on their location within the MRC complexes III and IV. Using this approach, four structural classes of mutation were identified, including one underexplored class that interferes with nuclear-mitochondrial protein interactions. We demonstrate that this class currently eludes existing predictive approaches that do not take into account the quaternary structural organization inherent within and between the MRC complexes. The systematic and detailed structural analysis of disease-associated mutations in the mitochondrial Complex III and IV genes significantly enhances the predictive power of existing approaches and our understanding of how such mutations contribute to various pathologies. Given the general lack of any successful therapeutic approaches for disorders of the MRC, these findings may inform the development of new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, as well as new drugs and targets for gene therapy.

  3. Comparative proteomic and genetic analyses reveal unidentified mutations in Escherichia coli XL1-Blue and DH5α.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli has been used widely in laboratory and the biotech industry. However, the genetic and metabolic characteristics remain inadequately studied, particularly for those strains with extensive genetic manipulations that might have resulted in unknown mutations. Here, we demonstrate a comparative proteomics and genetics approach to identify unknown mutations in E. coli K-12 derivatives. The comparative proteomic and genetic analyses revealed an IS5 disruption of the kdgR gene in two commonly used derivative strains of E. coli K-12, XL1-Blue and DH5α, compared with K-12 wild-type strain W3110. In addition, a controversial deoR mutation was clarified as a wild type in E. coli DH5α using the same approach. This approach should be useful in characterizing the unknown mutations in various mutant strains developed. At the same time, comparative proteomic analysis also revealed the distinct metabolic characteristic of the two derivatives: higher biosynthetic flux to purine nucleotides. This is potentially beneficial for the synthesis of plasmid DNA. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutation causing severe myasthenia reveals functional asymmetry of AChR signature cystine loops in agonist binding and gating

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Ohno, Kinji; Tsujino, Akira; Brengman, Joan M.; Gingold, Monique; Sine, Steven M.; Engel, Andrew G.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a highly disabling congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) associated with rapidly decaying, low-amplitude synaptic currents, and trace its cause to a valine to leucine mutation in the signature cystine loop (cys-loop) of the AChR α subunit. The recently solved crystal structure of an ACh-binding protein places the cys-loop at the junction between the extracellular ligand-binding and transmembrane domains where it may couple agonist binding to channel gating. We therefore analyzed the kinetics of ACh-induced single-channel currents to identify elementary steps in the receptor activation mechanism altered by the αV132L mutation. The analysis reveals that αV132L markedly impairs ACh binding to receptors in the resting closed state, decreasing binding affinity for the second binding step 30-fold, but attenuates gating efficiency only about twofold. By contrast, mutation of the equivalent valine residue in the δ subunit impairs channel gating approximately fourfold with little effect on ACh binding, while corresponding mutations in the β and ε subunits are without effect. The unique functional contribution of the α subunit cys-loop likely owes to its direct connection via a β strand to αW149 at the center of the ligand-binding domain. The overall findings reveal functional asymmetry between cys-loops of the different AChR subunits in contributing to ACh binding and channel gating. PMID:12588888

  5. De novo mutations revealed by whole exome sequencing are strongly associated with autism

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Stephan J.; Murtha, Michael T.; Gupta, Abha R.; Murdoch, John D.; Raubeson, Melanie J.; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Ercan-Sencicek, A. Gulhan; DiLullo, Nicholas M.; Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Stein, Jason L.; Walker, Michael F.; Ober, Gordon T.; Teran, Nicole A.; Song, Youeun; El-Fishawy, Paul; Murtha, Ryan C.; Choi, Murim; Overton, John D.; Bjornson, Robert D.; Carriero, Nicholas J.; Meyer, Kyle A.; Bilguvar, Kaya; Mane, Shrikant M.; Šestan, Nenad; Lifton, Richard P.; Günel, Murat; Roeder, Kathryn; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Devlin, Bernie; State, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple studies have confirmed the contribution of rare de novo copy number variations (CNVs) to the risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).1-3 While de novo single nucleotide variants (SNVs) have been identified in affected individuals,4 their contribution to risk has yet to be clarified. Specifically, the frequency and distribution of these mutations has not been well characterized in matched unaffected controls, data that are vital to the interpretation of de novo coding mutations observed in probands. Here we show, via whole-exome sequencing of 928 individuals, including 200 phenotypically discordant sibling pairs, that highly disruptive (nonsense and splice-site) de novo mutations in brain-expressed genes are associated with ASD and carry large effects (OR=5.65; CI: 1.44-22.2; p=0.01 asymptotic test). Based on mutation rates in unaffected individuals, we demonstrate that multiple independent de novo SNVs in the same gene among unrelated probands reliably identifies risk alleles, providing a clear path forward for gene discovery. Among a total of 279 identified de novo coding mutations, there is a single instance in probands, and none in siblings, in which two independent nonsense variants disrupt the same gene, SCN2A (Sodium Channel, Voltage-Gated, Type II, Alpha Subunit), a result that is highly unlikely by chance (p=0.005). PMID:22495306

  6. De novo mutations revealed by whole-exome sequencing are strongly associated with autism.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Stephan J; Murtha, Michael T; Gupta, Abha R; Murdoch, John D; Raubeson, Melanie J; Willsey, A Jeremy; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; DiLullo, Nicholas M; Parikshak, Neelroop N; Stein, Jason L; Walker, Michael F; Ober, Gordon T; Teran, Nicole A; Song, Youeun; El-Fishawy, Paul; Murtha, Ryan C; Choi, Murim; Overton, John D; Bjornson, Robert D; Carriero, Nicholas J; Meyer, Kyle A; Bilguvar, Kaya; Mane, Shrikant M; Sestan, Nenad; Lifton, Richard P; Günel, Murat; Roeder, Kathryn; Geschwind, Daniel H; Devlin, Bernie; State, Matthew W

    2012-04-04

    Multiple studies have confirmed the contribution of rare de novo copy number variations to the risk for autism spectrum disorders. But whereas de novo single nucleotide variants have been identified in affected individuals, their contribution to risk has yet to be clarified. Specifically, the frequency and distribution of these mutations have not been well characterized in matched unaffected controls, and such data are vital to the interpretation of de novo coding mutations observed in probands. Here we show, using whole-exome sequencing of 928 individuals, including 200 phenotypically discordant sibling pairs, that highly disruptive (nonsense and splice-site) de novo mutations in brain-expressed genes are associated with autism spectrum disorders and carry large effects. On the basis of mutation rates in unaffected individuals, we demonstrate that multiple independent de novo single nucleotide variants in the same gene among unrelated probands reliably identifies risk alleles, providing a clear path forward for gene discovery. Among a total of 279 identified de novo coding mutations, there is a single instance in probands, and none in siblings, in which two independent nonsense variants disrupt the same gene, SCN2A (sodium channel, voltage-gated, type II, α subunit), a result that is highly unlikely by chance.

  7. Next-generation sequencing reveals DGUOK mutations in adult patients with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions

    PubMed Central

    Garone, Caterina; Bordoni, Andreina; Gutierrez Rios, Purificacion; Calvo, Sarah E.; Ripolone, Michela; Ranieri, Michela; Rizzuti, Mafalda; Villa, Luisa; Magri, Francesca; Corti, Stefania; Bresolin, Nereo; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Moggio, Maurizio; DiMauro, Salvatore; Comi, Giacomo P.; Sciacco, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The molecular diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders still remains elusive in a large proportion of patients, but advances in next generation sequencing are significantly improving our chances to detect mutations even in sporadic patients. Syndromes associated with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions are caused by different molecular defects resulting in a wide spectrum of predominantly adult-onset clinical presentations, ranging from progressive external ophthalmoplegia to multi-systemic disorders of variable severity. The mutations underlying these conditions remain undisclosed in half of the affected subjects. We applied next-generation sequencing of known mitochondrial targets (MitoExome) to probands presenting with adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy and harbouring mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions in skeletal muscle. We identified autosomal recessive mutations in the DGUOK gene (encoding mitochondrial deoxyguanosine kinase), which has previously been associated with an infantile hepatocerebral form of mitochondrial DNA depletion. Mutations in DGUOK occurred in five independent subjects, representing 5.6% of our cohort of patients with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions, and impaired both muscle DGUOK activity and protein stability. Clinical presentations were variable, including mitochondrial myopathy with or without progressive external ophthalmoplegia, recurrent rhabdomyolysis in a young female who had received a liver transplant at 9 months of age and adult-onset lower motor neuron syndrome with mild cognitive impairment. These findings reinforce the concept that mutations in genes involved in deoxyribonucleotide metabolism can cause diverse clinical phenotypes and suggest that DGUOK should be screened in patients harbouring mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. PMID:23043144

  8. Point mutation frequency in the FMR1 gene as revealed by fragile X syndrome screening.

    PubMed

    Handt, Maximilian; Epplen, Andrea; Hoffjan, Sabine; Mese, Kemal; Epplen, Jörg T; Dekomien, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a common cause of intellectual disability, developmental delay and autism spectrum disorders. This syndrome is due to a functional loss of the FMR1 gene product FMRP, and, in most cases, it is caused by CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 promoter. Yet, also other FMR1 mutations may cause a FXS-like phenotype. Since standard molecular testing does not include the analysis of the FMR1 coding region, the prevalence of point mutations causing FXS is not well known. Here, high resolution melting (HRM) was used to screen for FMR1 gene mutations in 508 males with clinical signs of mental retardation and developmental delay, but without CGG and GCC repeat expansions in the FMR1 gene and AFF2 genes, respectively. Sequence variations were identified by HRM analysis and verified by direct DNA sequencing. Two novel missense mutations (p.Gly482Ser in one patient and p.Arg534His in two unrelated patients), one intronic and two 3'-untranslated region (UTR) variations were identified in the FMR1 gene. Missense mutations in the FMR1 gene might account for a considerable proportion of cases in male patients with FXS-related symptoms, such as those linked to mental retardation and developmental delay.

  9. Revealing the function of a novel splice-site mutation of CHD7 in CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghyeon; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Sagong, Borum; Koparir, Asuman; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Choi, Jae Young; Seven, Mehmet; Yuksel, Adnan; Kim, Un-Kyung; Ozen, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Most cases of CHARGE syndrome are sporadic and autosomal dominant. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we screened CHD7 in two Turkish patients demonstrating symptoms of CHARGE syndrome such as coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth, genital abnomalities and ear anomalies. Two mutations of CHD7 were identified including a novel splice-site mutation (c.2443-2A>G) and a previously known frameshift mutation (c.2504_2508delATCTT). We performed exon trapping analysis to determine the effect of the c.2443-2A>G mutation at the transcriptional level, and found that it caused a complete skip of exon 7 and splicing at a cryptic splice acceptor site. Our current study is the second study demonstrating an exon 7 deficit in CHD7. Results of previous studies suggest that the c.2443-2A>G mutation affects the formation of nasal tissues and the neural retina during early development, resulting in choanal atresia and coloboma, respectively. The findings of the present study will improve our understanding of the genetic causes of CHARGE syndrome.

  10. Mutations revealed by sequencing the 5' half of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Byrd, P J; McConville, C M; Cooper, P; Parkhill, J; Stankovic, T; McGuire, G M; Thick, J A; Taylor, A M

    1996-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a recessive disorder in which patients show a progressive cerebellar degeneration leading to ataxia, abnormal eye movements and deterioration of speech. Other features include ocular telangiectasia, high serum AFP levels, immunodeficiency, growth retardation and an increased predisposition to some tumours, particularly T cell leukaemia and lymphoma. We report the 1348 amino acid sequence of the N-terminal half of the A-T gene product which, together with the previously published C-terminal half, completes the sequence of the A-T protein. No homologies with other genes have been found within the N-terminal half of the A-T protein. We have also identified six mutations affecting the N-terminal half of the protein. One of these mutations was found to be associated with a haplotype that is common to four apparently unrelated families of Irish descent. All the patients so far examined for both A-T alleles were shown to be compound heterozygotes. None of these mutations affected a putative promoter region which may direct divergent transcription of both the A-T gene and a novel gene E14. The ability to recognise mutations across the entire coding sequence of the A-T gene provides a practical advantage to A-T families since a DNA based prenatal diagnosis will be possible in families where the mutations are identified irrespective of the level of radiosensitivity in these families.

  11. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis reveals cooperating mutations and pathways in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mann, Karen M; Ward, Jerrold M; Yew, Christopher Chin Kuan; Kovochich, Anne; Dawson, David W; Black, Michael A; Brett, Benjamin T; Sheetz, Todd E; Dupuy, Adam J; Chang, David K; Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Grimmond, Sean M; Rust, Alistair G; Adams, David J; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G

    2012-04-17

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers affecting the Western world. Because the disease is highly metastatic and difficult to diagnosis until late stages, the 5-y survival rate is around 5%. The identification of molecular cancer drivers is critical for furthering our understanding of the disease and development of improved diagnostic tools and therapeutics. We have conducted a mutagenic screen using Sleeping Beauty (SB) in mice to identify new candidate cancer genes in pancreatic cancer. By combining SB with an oncogenic Kras allele, we observed highly metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Using two independent statistical methods to identify loci commonly mutated by SB in these tumors, we identified 681 loci that comprise 543 candidate cancer genes (CCGs); 75 of these CCGs, including Mll3 and Ptk2, have known mutations in human pancreatic cancer. We identified point mutations in human pancreatic patient samples for another 11 CCGs, including Acvr2a and Map2k4. Importantly, 10% of the CCGs are involved in chromatin remodeling, including Arid4b, Kdm6a, and Nsd3, and all SB tumors have at least one mutated gene involved in this process; 20 CCGs, including Ctnnd1, Fbxo11, and Vgll4, are also significantly associated with poor patient survival. SB mutagenesis provides a rich resource of mutations in potential cancer drivers for cross-comparative analyses with ongoing sequencing efforts in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  12. Hutchinson–Gilford progeria mutant lamin A primarily targets human vascular cells as detected by an anti-Lamin A G608G antibody

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Dayle; Gordon, Leslie B.; Djabali, Karima

    2006-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man accession no. 176670) is a rare disorder that is characterized by segmental premature aging and death between 7 and 20 years of age from severe premature atherosclerosis. Mutations in the LMNA gene are responsible for this syndrome. Approximately 80% of HGPS cases are caused by a G608 (GGC→GGT) mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, which elicits a deletion of 50 aa near the C terminus of prelamin A. In this article, we present evidence that the mutant lamin A (progerin) accumulates in the nucleus in a cellular age-dependent manner. In human HGPS fibroblast cultures, we observed, concomitantly to nuclear progerin accumulation, severe nuclear envelope deformations and invaginations preventable by farnesyltransferase inhibition. Nuclear alterations affect cell-cycle progression and cell migration and elicit premature senescence. Strikingly, skin biopsy sections from a subject with HGPS showed that the truncated lamin A accumulates primarily in the nuclei of vascular cells. This finding suggests that accumulation of progerin is directly involved in vascular disease in progeria. PMID:16461887

  13. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria mutant lamin A primarily targets human vascular cells as detected by an anti-Lamin A G608G antibody.

    PubMed

    McClintock, Dayle; Gordon, Leslie B; Djabali, Karima

    2006-02-14

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man accession no. 176670) is a rare disorder that is characterized by segmental premature aging and death between 7 and 20 years of age from severe premature atherosclerosis. Mutations in the LMNA gene are responsible for this syndrome. Approximately 80% of HGPS cases are caused by a G608 (GGC-->GGT) mutation within exon 11 of LMNA, which elicits a deletion of 50 aa near the C terminus of prelamin A. In this article, we present evidence that the mutant lamin A (progerin) accumulates in the nucleus in a cellular age-dependent manner. In human HGPS fibroblast cultures, we observed, concomitantly to nuclear progerin accumulation, severe nuclear envelope deformations and invaginations preventable by farnesyltransferase inhibition. Nuclear alterations affect cell-cycle progression and cell migration and elicit premature senescence. Strikingly, skin biopsy sections from a subject with HGPS showed that the truncated lamin A accumulates primarily in the nuclei of vascular cells. This finding suggests that accumulation of progerin is directly involved in vascular disease in progeria.

  14. Massively parallel sequencing of phyllodes tumours of the breast reveals actionable mutations, and TERT promoter hotspot mutations and TERT gene amplification as likely drivers of progression

    PubMed Central

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Murray, Melissa; Burke, Kathleen A; Edelweiss, Marcia; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Inagaki, Akiko; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Martelotto, Luciano G; Marchio, Caterina; Lim, Raymond S; Ioris, Rafael A; Nahar, Pooja K; De Bruijn, Ino; Smyth, Lillian; Akram, Muzaffar; Ross, Dara; Petrini, John H; Norton, Larry; Solit, David B; Baselga, Jose; Brogi, Edi; Ladanyi, Marc; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours (PTs) are breast fibroepithelial lesions that are graded based on histological criteria as benign, borderline or malignant. PTs may recur locally. Borderline PTs and malignant PTs may metastasize to distant sites. Breast fibroepithelial lesions, including PTs and fibroadenomas, are characterized by recurrent MED12 exon 2 somatic mutations. We sought to define the repertoire of somatic genetic alterations in PTs and whether these may assist in the differential diagnosis of these lesions. We collected 100 fibroadenomas, 40 benign PTs, 14 borderline PTs and 22 malignant PTs. Six, 6 and 13 benign, borderline and malignant PTs respectively and their matched normal tissue were subjected to targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) using the MSK-IMPACT sequencing assay. Recurrent MED12 mutations were found in 56% of PTs; in addition, mutations affecting cancer genes (e.g. TP53, RB1, SETD2 and EGFR) were exclusively detected in borderline and malignant PTs. We found a novel recurrent clonal hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter (−124 C>T) in 52% and TERT gene amplification in 4% of PTs. Laser capture microdissection revealed that these mutations were restricted to the mesenchymal component of PTs. Sequencing analysis of the entire cohort revealed that the frequency of TERT alterations increased from benign (18%), to borderline (57%) and to malignant PTs (68%; P<0.01), and TERT alterations were associated with increased levels of TERT mRNA (P<0.001). No TERT alterations were observed in fibroadenomas. An analysis of TERT promoter sequencing and gene amplification distinguished PTs from fibroadenomas with a sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 100% (CI 95.38%–100%) and 100% (CI 85.86%–100%), respectively, and a sensitivity and a negative predictive value of 39% (CI 28.65%–51.36%) and 68% (CI 60.21%–75.78%), respectively. Our results suggest that TERT alterations may drive the progression of PTs, and may assist in the differential

  15. Massively parallel sequencing of phyllodes tumours of the breast reveals actionable mutations, and TERT promoter hotspot mutations and TERT gene amplification as likely drivers of progression.

    PubMed

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte Ky; Murray, Melissa; Burke, Kathleen A; Edelweiss, Marcia; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Inagaki, Akiko; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Martelotto, Luciano G; Marchio, Caterina; Lim, Raymond S; Ioris, Rafael A; Nahar, Pooja K; Bruijn, Ino De; Smyth, Lillian; Akram, Muzaffar; Ross, Dara; Petrini, John H; Norton, Larry; Solit, David B; Baselga, Jose; Brogi, Edi; Ladanyi, Marc; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-03-01

    Phyllodes tumours (PTs) are breast fibroepithelial lesions that are graded based on histological criteria as benign, borderline or malignant. PTs may recur locally. Borderline PTs and malignant PTs may metastasize to distant sites. Breast fibroepithelial lesions, including PTs and fibroadenomas, are characterized by recurrent MED12 exon 2 somatic mutations. We sought to define the repertoire of somatic genetic alterations in PTs and whether these may assist in the differential diagnosis of these lesions. We collected 100 fibroadenomas, 40 benign PTs, 14 borderline PTs and 22 malignant PTs; six, six and 13 benign, borderline and malignant PTs, respectively, and their matched normal tissue, were subjected to targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) using the MSK-IMPACT sequencing assay. Recurrent MED12 mutations were found in 56% of PTs; in addition, mutations affecting cancer genes (eg TP53, RB1, SETD2 and EGFR) were exclusively detected in borderline and malignant PTs. We found a novel recurrent clonal hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter (-124 C>T) in 52% and TERT gene amplification in 4% of PTs. Laser capture microdissection revealed that these mutations were restricted to the mesenchymal component of PTs. Sequencing analysis of the entire cohort revealed that the frequency of TERT alterations increased from benign (18%) to borderline (57%) and to malignant PTs (68%; p < 0.01), and TERT alterations were associated with increased levels of TERT mRNA (p < 0.001). No TERT alterations were observed in fibroadenomas. An analysis of TERT promoter sequencing and gene amplification distinguished PTs from fibroadenomas with a sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 100% (CI 95.38-100%) and 100% (CI 85.86-100%), respectively, and a sensitivity and a negative predictive value of 39% (CI 28.65-51.36%) and 68% (CI 60.21-75.78%), respectively. Our results suggest that TERT alterations may drive the progression of PTs, and may assist in the differential diagnosis

  16. Exome sequencing of osteosarcoma reveals mutation signatures reminiscent of BRCA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Michal; Blattmann, Claudia; Ribi, Sebastian; Smida, Jan; Mueller, Nikola S; Engert, Florian; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Kovacova, Monika; Krieg, Andreas; Andreou, Dimosthenis; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Dürr, Hans Roland; Rechl, Hans; Schaser, Klaus-Dieter; Melcher, Ingo; Burdach, Stefan; Kulozik, Andreas; Specht, Katja; Heinimann, Karl; Fulda, Simone; Bielack, Stefan; Jundt, Gernot; Tomlinson, Ian; Korbel, Jan O; Nathrath, Michaela; Baumhoer, Daniel

    2015-12-03

    Osteosarcomas are aggressive bone tumours with a high degree of genetic heterogeneity, which has historically complicated driver gene discovery. Here we sequence exomes of 31 tumours and decipher their evolutionary landscape by inferring clonality of the individual mutation events. Exome findings are interpreted in the context of mutation and SNP array data from a replication set of 92 tumours. We identify 14 genes as the main drivers, of which some were formerly unknown in the context of osteosarcoma. None of the drivers is clearly responsible for the majority of tumours and even TP53 mutations are frequently mapped into subclones. However, >80% of osteosarcomas exhibit a specific combination of single-base substitutions, LOH, or large-scale genome instability signatures characteristic of BRCA1/2-deficient tumours. Our findings imply that multiple oncogenic pathways drive chromosomal instability during osteosarcoma evolution and result in the acquisition of BRCA-like traits, which could be therapeutically exploited.

  17. Sporadic autism exomes reveal a highly interconnected protein network of de novo mutations.

    PubMed

    O'Roak, Brian J; Vives, Laura; Girirajan, Santhosh; Karakoc, Emre; Krumm, Niklas; Coe, Bradley P; Levy, Roie; Ko, Arthur; Lee, Choli; Smith, Joshua D; Turner, Emily H; Stanaway, Ian B; Vernot, Benjamin; Malig, Maika; Baker, Carl; Reilly, Beau; Akey, Joshua M; Borenstein, Elhanan; Rieder, Mark J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bernier, Raphael; Shendure, Jay; Eichler, Evan E

    2012-04-04

    It is well established that autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have a strong genetic component; however, for at least 70% of cases, the underlying genetic cause is unknown. Under the hypothesis that de novo mutations underlie a substantial fraction of the risk for developing ASD in families with no previous history of ASD or related phenotypes--so-called sporadic or simplex families--we sequenced all coding regions of the genome (the exome) for parent-child trios exhibiting sporadic ASD, including 189 new trios and 20 that were previously reported. Additionally, we also sequenced the exomes of 50 unaffected siblings corresponding to these new (n = 31) and previously reported trios (n = 19), for a total of 677 individual exomes from 209 families. Here we show that de novo point mutations are overwhelmingly paternal in origin (4:1 bias) and positively correlated with paternal age, consistent with the modest increased risk for children of older fathers to develop ASD. Moreover, 39% (49 of 126) of the most severe or disruptive de novo mutations map to a highly interconnected β-catenin/chromatin remodelling protein network ranked significantly for autism candidate genes. In proband exomes, recurrent protein-altering mutations were observed in two genes: CHD8 and NTNG1. Mutation screening of six candidate genes in 1,703 ASD probands identified additional de novo, protein-altering mutations in GRIN2B, LAMC3 and SCN1A. Combined with copy number variant (CNV) data, these results indicate extreme locus heterogeneity but also provide a target for future discovery, diagnostics and therapeutics.

  18. Sporadic autism exomes reveal a highly interconnected protein network of de novo mutations

    PubMed Central

    O’Roak, Brian J.; Vives, Laura; Girirajan, Santhosh; Karakoc, Emre; Krumm, Nik; Coe, Bradley P.; Levy, Roie; Ko, Arthur; Lee, Choli; Smith, Joshua D.; Turner, Emily H.; Stanaway, Ian B.; Vernot, Benjamin; Malig, Maika; Baker, Carl; Reilly, Beau; Akey, Joshua M.; Borenstein, Elhanan; Rieder, Mark J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bernier, Raphael; Shendure, Jay; Eichler, Evan E.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have a strong genetic component. However, for at least 70% of cases, the underlying genetic cause is unknown1. Under the hypothesis that de novo mutations underlie a substantial fraction of the risk for developing ASD in families with no previous history of ASD or related phenotypes—so-called sporadic or simplex families2,3, we sequenced all coding regions of the genome, i.e. the exome, for parent-child trios exhibiting sporadic ASD, including 189 new trios and 20 previously reported4. Additionally, we also sequenced the exomes of 50 unaffected siblings corresponding to these new (n = 31) and previously reported trios (n = 19)4, for a total of 677 individual exomes from 209 families. Here we show de novo point mutations are overwhelmingly paternal in origin (4:1 bias) and positively correlated with paternal age, consistent with the modest increased risk for children of older fathers to develop ASD5. Moreover, 39% (49/126) of the most severe or disruptive de novo mutations map to a highly interconnected beta-catenin/chromatin remodeling protein network ranked significantly for autism candidate genes. In proband exomes, recurrent protein-altering mutations were observed in two genes, CHD8 and NTNG1. Mutation screening of six candidate genes in 1,703 ASD probands identified additional de novo, protein-altering mutations in GRIN2B, LAMC3, and SCN1A. Combined with copy number variant (CNV) data, these results suggest extreme locus heterogeneity but also provide a target for future discovery, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:22495309

  19. Hereditary Angioedema Nationwide Study in Slovenia Reveals Four Novel Mutations in SERPING1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rijavec, Matija; Korošec, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Zidarn, Mihaela; Miljković, Jovan; Košnik, Mitja

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by swelling of the face, lips, tongue, larynx, genitalia, or extremities, with abdominal pain caused by intra-abdominal edema. HAE is caused by mutations affecting the C1 inhibitor gene, SERPING1, resulting in low levels of C1 inhibitor (Type I HAE) or normal levels of ineffective C1 inhibitor (Type II HAE). A nationwide survey identified nine unrelated families with HAE in Slovenia, among whom 17 individuals from eight families were recruited for genetic analyses. A diagnosis of HAE was established in the presence of clinical and laboratory criteria (low C1 inhibitor antigenic levels and/or function), followed up by a positive family history. Genetic studies were carried out using PCR and sequencing to detect SERPING1 mutations in promoter, noncoding exon 1, the 7 coding exons, and exon-intron boundaries. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed in order to search for large deletions/duplications in SERPING1 gene. A mutation responsible for HAE was identified in patients from seven families with the disease. In HAE type I families, one previously reported substitution (Gln67Stop, c.265C>T) and four novel mutations were identified. The new mutations included two missense substitutions, Ser128Phe (c.449C>T), and Glu429Lys (c.1351G>A), together with two frameshift mutations, indel (c.49delGinsTT) and deletion (c.593_594delCT). Both families with HAE type II harbored the two well-known substitutions affecting the arginyl residue at the reactive center in exon 8, Arg444Cys (c.1396C>T) and Arg444His (c.1397G>A), respectively. In one patient only the homozygous variant g.566T>C (c.-21T>C) was identified. Our study identified four novel mutations in the Slovenian HAE population, highlighting the heterogeneity of mutations in the SERPING1 gene causing C1 inhibitor deficiency and HAE. In a single patient with HAE a homozygous variant g.566T>C (c.-21T>C) might be responsible

  20. Hereditary angioedema nationwide study in Slovenia reveals four novel mutations in SERPING1 gene.

    PubMed

    Rijavec, Matija; Korošec, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Zidarn, Mihaela; Miljković, Jovan; Košnik, Mitja

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by swelling of the face, lips, tongue, larynx, genitalia, or extremities, with abdominal pain caused by intra-abdominal edema. HAE is caused by mutations affecting the C1 inhibitor gene, SERPING1, resulting in low levels of C1 inhibitor (Type I HAE) or normal levels of ineffective C1 inhibitor (Type II HAE). A nationwide survey identified nine unrelated families with HAE in Slovenia, among whom 17 individuals from eight families were recruited for genetic analyses. A diagnosis of HAE was established in the presence of clinical and laboratory criteria (low C1 inhibitor antigenic levels and/or function), followed up by a positive family history. Genetic studies were carried out using PCR and sequencing to detect SERPING1 mutations in promoter, noncoding exon 1, the 7 coding exons, and exon-intron boundaries. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed in order to search for large deletions/duplications in SERPING1 gene. A mutation responsible for HAE was identified in patients from seven families with the disease. In HAE type I families, one previously reported substitution (Gln67Stop, c.265C>T) and four novel mutations were identified. The new mutations included two missense substitutions, Ser128Phe (c.449C>T), and Glu429Lys (c.1351G>A), together with two frameshift mutations, indel (c.49delGinsTT) and deletion (c.593_594delCT). Both families with HAE type II harbored the two well-known substitutions affecting the arginyl residue at the reactive center in exon 8, Arg444Cys (c.1396C>T) and Arg444His (c.1397G>A), respectively. In one patient only the homozygous variant g.566T>C (c.-21T>C) was identified. Our study identified four novel mutations in the Slovenian HAE population, highlighting the heterogeneity of mutations in the SERPING1 gene causing C1 inhibitor deficiency and HAE. In a single patient with HAE a homozygous variant g.566T>C (c.-21T>C) might be responsible

  1. Mechanism of midline defect-causing mutation P151L in MID1 revealed.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Linda K

    2017-07-01

    The P151L mutation in the B-box1 domain of MID1 causes midline defects in X-linked Opitz G Syndrome. MID1 is known to be a key regulator of phosphatase PP2A through formation of a complex with its catalytic (PP2Ac) and regulatory (α4) subunits. Wright et al. show that this mutation retains B-box1 domain structure and E3 ligase activity (star) but blocks interaction with α4, indicating disruption of the MID1-α4-PP2Ac complex. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Evolution of Escherichia coli to 42 °C and subsequent genetic engineering reveals adaptive mechanisms and novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Troy E; Pedersen, Margit; LaCroix, Ryan A; Ebrahim, Ali; Bonde, Mads; Herrgard, Markus J; Palsson, Bernhard O; Sommer, Morten; Feist, Adam M

    2014-10-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) has emerged as a valuable method by which to investigate microbial adaptation to a desired environment. Here, we performed ALE to 42 °C of ten parallel populations of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 grown in glucose minimal media. Tightly controlled experimental conditions allowed selection based on exponential-phase growth rate, yielding strains that uniformly converged toward a similar phenotype along distinct genetic paths. Adapted strains possessed as few as 6 and as many as 55 mutations, and of the 144 genes that mutated in total, 14 arose independently across two or more strains. This mutational recurrence pointed to the key genetic targets underlying the evolved fitness increase. Genome engineering was used to introduce the novel ALE-acquired alleles in random combinations into the ancestral strain, and competition between these engineered strains reaffirmed the impact of the key mutations on the growth rate at 42 °C. Interestingly, most of the identified key gene targets differed significantly from those found in similar temperature adaptation studies, highlighting the sensitivity of genetic evolution to experimental conditions and ancestral genotype. Additionally, transcriptomic analysis of the ancestral and evolved strains revealed a general trend for restoration of the global expression state back toward preheat stressed levels. This restorative effect was previously documented following evolution to metabolic perturbations, and thus may represent a general feature of ALE experiments. The widespread evolved expression shifts were enabled by a comparatively scant number of regulatory mutations, providing a net fitness benefit but causing suboptimal expression levels for certain genes, such as those governing flagellar formation, which then became targets for additional ameliorating mutations. Overall, the results of this study provide insight into the adaptation process and yield lessons important for the future

  3. Exome sequencing reveals VCP mutations as a cause of familial ALS

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Janel O.; Mandrioli, Jessica; Benatar, Michael; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Gibbs, J Raphael; Brunetti, Maura; Gronka, Susan; Wuu, Joanne; Ding, Jinhui; McCluskey, Leo; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Falcone, Dana; Hernandez, Dena G.; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Schymick, Jennifer C.; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Landi, Francesco; Wang, Michael; Calvo, Andrea; Mora, Gabriele; Sabatelli, Mario; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Battistini, Stefania; Salvi, Fabrizio; Spataro, Rossella; Sola, Patrizia; Borghero, Giuseppe; Galassi, Giuliana; Scholz, Sonja W.; Taylor, J. Paul; Restagno, Gabriella; Chiò, Adriano; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Using exome sequencing, we identified a p.R191Q amino acid change in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene in an Italian family with autosomal dominantly inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutations in VCP have previously been identified in families with Inclusion Body Myopathy, Paget’s disease and Frontotemporal Dementia (IBMPFD). Screening of VCP in a cohort of 210 familial ALS cases and 78 autopsy-proven ALS cases identified four additional mutations including a p.R155H mutation in a pathologically-proven case of ALS. VCP protein is essential for maturation of ubiquitin-containing autophagosomes, and mutant VCP toxicity is partially mediated through its effect on TDP-43 protein, a major constituent of ubiquitin inclusions that neuropathologically characterize ALS. Our data broaden the phenotype of IBMPFD to include motor neuron degeneration, suggest that VCP mutations may account for ~1–2% of familial ALS, and represent the first evidence directly implicating defects in the ubiquitination/protein degradation pathway in motor neuron degeneration. PMID:21145000

  4. Mutation causing congenital myasthenia reveals acetylcholine receptor β/δ subunit interaction essential for assembly

    PubMed Central

    Quiram, Polly A.; Ohno, Kinji; Milone, Margherita; Patterson, Marc C.; Pruitt, Ned J.; Brengman, Joan M.; Sine, Steven M.; Engel, Andrew G.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a severe postsynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome with marked endplate acetylcholine receptor (AChR) deficiency caused by 2 heteroallelic mutations in the β subunit gene. One mutation causes skipping of exon 8, truncating the β subunit before its M1 transmembrane domain, and abolishing surface expression of pentameric AChR. The other mutation, a 3-codon deletion (β426delEQE) in the long cytoplasmic loop between the M3 and M4 domains, curtails but does not abolish expression. By coexpressing β426delEQE with combinations of wild-type subunits in 293 HEK cells, we demonstrate that β426delEQE impairs AChR assembly by disrupting a specific interaction between β and δ subunits. Studies with related deletion and missense mutants indicate that secondary structure in this region of the β subunit is crucial for interaction with the δ subunit. The findings imply that the mutated residues are positioned at the interface between β and δ subunits and demonstrate contribution of this local region of the long cytoplasmic loop to AChR assembly. J. Clin. Invest. 104:1403–1410 (1999). PMID:10562302

  5. Exome sequencing reveals a mutation in DMP1 in a family with familial sclerosing bone dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gannagé-Yared, Marie-Hélène; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Chouery, Eliane; Sobacchi, Cristina; Mehawej, Cybel; Santoni, Federico A; Guipponi, Michel; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Hamamy, Hanan; Mégarbané, André

    2014-11-01

    Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) comprises a rare group of inherited diseases. Very recently, mutations in the dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) gene were identified in patients with an extremely rare autosomal recessive form of HR (ARHR). To date, very few cases of these mutations were reported. A Lebanese consanguineous family with 2 affected sisters was studied. Patients aged 45 and 47years old presented with short stature, severe genu varum, cranial hyperostosis and a very high bone density that led to a diagnosis of a familial sclerosing bone dysplasia. Molecular analysis of known genes involved in osteopetrosis showed normal results. A combination of genotyping and exome sequencing was performed in order to elucidate the genetic basis of this pathology. Biochemical analysis was consistent with normal serum calcium and 1-25(OH)2D levels, low to normal serum phosphorus and elevated PTH values. Serum c-terminal FGF-23 was elevated in one of the two patients. A homozygous mutation disrupting the initiation codon of the DMP1 gene (OMIM 600980), NM_001079911.2: c.1A>G, p.Met1Val, was identified by exome sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. We report here a family of ARHR secondary to a DMP1 mutation located in the first coding exon of the gene. Our cases show that some ARHR cases may develop with age an unaccountable increase in bone density and bone overgrowth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Whole exome sequencing in Thai patients with retinitis pigmentosa reveals novel mutations in six genes.

    PubMed

    Jinda, Worapoj; Taylor, Todd D; Suzuki, Yutaka; Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Limwongse, Chanin; Lertrit, Patcharee; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Trinavarat, Adisak; Atchaneeyasakul, La-ongsri

    2014-04-07

    To identify disease-causing mutations and describe genotype-phenotype correlations in Thai patients with nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Whole exome sequencing was performed in 20 unrelated patients. Eighty-six genes associated with RP, Leber congenital amaurosis, and cone-rod dystrophy were analyzed for variant detection. Seventeen variants (13 novel and 4 known) in 13 genes were identified in 11 patients. These variants include 10 missense substitutions, 2 nonsense mutations, 3 deletions, 1 insertion, and 1 splice site change. Nine patients with identified inheritance patterns carried a total of 10 potentially pathogenic mutations located in genes CRB1, C8orf37, EYS, PROM1, RP2, and USH2A. Three of the nine patients also demonstrated additional heterozygous variants in genes ABCA4, GUCY2D, RD3, ROM1, and TULP1. In addition, two patients carried variants of uncertain significance in genes FSCN2 and NR2E3. The RP phenotypes of our patients were consistent with previous reports. This is the first report of mutations in Thai RP patients. These findings are useful for genotype-phenotype comparisons among different ethnic groups.

  7. Epigenetic involvement in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Arancio, Walter; Pizzolanti, Giuseppe; Genovese, Swonild I; Pitrone, Maria; Giordano, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare human genetic disease that leads to a severe premature ageing phenotype, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene. The LMNA gene codes for lamin-A and lamin-C proteins, which are structural components of the nuclear lamina. HGPS is usually caused by a de novo C1824T mutation that leads to the accumulation of a dominant negative form of lamin-A called progerin. Progerin also accumulates physiologically in normal ageing cells as a rare splicing form of lamin-A transcripts. From this perspective, HGPS cells seem to be good candidates for the study of the physiological mechanisms of ageing. Progerin accumulation leads to faster cellular senescence, stem cell depletion and the progeroid phenotype. Tissues of mesodermic origin are especially affected by HGPS. HGPS patients usually have a bad quality of life and, with current treatments, their life expectancy does not exceed their second decade at best. Though progerin can be expressed in almost any tissue, when death occurs, it is usually due to cardiovascular complications. In HGPS, severe epigenetic alterations have been reported. Histone-covalent modifications are radically different from control specimens, with the tendency to lose the bipartition into euchromatin and heterochromatin. This is reflected in an altered spatial compartmentalization and conformation of chromatin within the nucleus. Moreover, it seems that microRNAs and microRNA biosynthesis might play a role in HGPS. Exemplary in this connection is the suggested protective effect of miR-9 on the central nervous system of affected individuals. This mini-review will report on the state of the art of HGPS epigenetics, and there will be a discussion of how epigenetic alterations in HGPS cells can alter the cellular metabolism and lead to the systemic syndrome.

  8. Analysis of ultra-deep targeted sequencing reveals mutation burden is associated with gender and clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuqiang; Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; He, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    Gender-associated difference in incidence and clinical outcomes of lung cancer have been established, but the biological mechanisms underlying these gender-associated differences are less studied. Recently we have characterized the genomic landscape of lung adenocarcinoma derived from Chinese population (Reference [1]). In this study we evaluated the clinical significance of mutation burden in lung adenocarcinoma and found that the male tumors harbored statistically greater burden of genetic alterations than female counterparts (Male median 3 (range 0–34) vs female median = 2 (0–24), male to female ratio = 1.636, 95% CI = 1.343–1.992) after adjustment of age at surgery, stage, smoking status. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that greater burden of genetic alterations was associated with worse overall survival. Moreover, multivariable analysis demonstrated mutation burden was an independent prognostic factor for the patients. Taken together, our analysis demonstrated gender disparity of mutation burden and their prognostic value in lung adenocarcinoma. This gender difference in mutation burden might provide an explanation for the distinct difference in the clinical outcomes between sexes in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27009843

  9. Craniofacial abnormalities in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, N J; Silvera, V M; Campbell, S E; Gordon, L B

    2012-09-01

    HGPS is a rare syndrome of segmental premature aging. Our goal was to expand the scope of structural bone and soft-tissue craniofacial abnormalities in HGPS through CT or MR imaging. Using The Progeria Research Foundation Medical and Research Database, 98 imaging studies on 25 patients, birth to 14.1 years of age, were comprehensively reviewed. Eight newly identified abnormalities involving the calvaria, skull base, and soft tissues of the face and orbits were present with prevalences between 43% and 100%. These included J-shaped sellas, a mottled appearance and increased vascular markings of the calvaria, abnormally configured mandibular condyles, hypoplastic articular eminences, small zygomatic arches, prominent parotid glands, and optic nerve kinking. This expanded craniofacial characterization helps link disease features and improves our ability to evaluate how underlying genetic and cellular abnormalities culminate in a disease phenotype.

  10. Experimentally guided models reveal replication principles that shape the mutation distribution of RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Michael B; Draghi, Jeremy A; Plotkin, Joshua B; Andino, Raul

    2015-01-30

    Life history theory posits that the sequence and timing of events in an organism's lifespan are fine-tuned by evolution to maximize the production of viable offspring. In a virus, a life history strategy is largely manifested in its replication mode. Here, we develop a stochastic mathematical model to infer the replication mode shaping the structure and mutation distribution of a poliovirus population in an intact single infected cell. We measure production of RNA and poliovirus particles through the infection cycle, and use these data to infer the parameters of our model. We find that on average the viral progeny produced from each cell are approximately five generations removed from the infecting virus. Multiple generations within a single cell infection provide opportunities for significant accumulation of mutations per viral genome and for intracellular selection.

  11. Cardiomyopathy mutations reveal variable region of myosin converter as major element of cross-bridge compliance.

    PubMed

    Seebohm, B; Matinmehr, F; Köhler, J; Francino, A; Navarro-Lopéz, F; Perrot, A; Ozcelik, C; McKenna, W J; Brenner, B; Kraft, T

    2009-08-05

    The ability of myosin to generate motile forces is based on elastic distortion of a structural element of the actomyosin complex (cross-bridge) that allows strain to develop before filament sliding. Addressing the question, which part of the actomyosin complex experiences main elastic distortion, we suggested previously that the converter domain might be the most compliant region of the myosin head domain. Here we test this proposal by studying functional effects of naturally occurring missense mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain, 723Arg --> Gly (R723G) and 736Ile --> Thr (I736T), in comparison to 719Arg --> Trp (R719W). All three mutations are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and are located in the converter region of the myosin head domain. We determined several mechanical parameters of single skinned slow fibers isolated from Musculus soleus biopsies of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients and healthy controls. Major findings of this study for mutation R723G were i), a >40% increase in fiber stiffness in rigor with a 2.9-fold increase in stiffness per myosin head (S( *)(rigor R723G) = 0.84 pN/nm S( *)(rigor WT) = 0.29 pN/nm); and ii), a significant increase in force per head (F( *)(10 degrees C), 1.99 pN vs. 1.49 pN = 1.3-fold increase; F( *)(20 degrees C), 2.56 pN vs. 1.92 pN = 1.3-fold increase) as well as stiffness per head during isometric steady-state contraction (S( *)(active10 degrees C), 0.52 pN/nm vs. 0.28 pN/nm = 1.9-fold increase). Similar changes were found for mutation R719W (2.6-fold increase in S( *)(rigor); 1.8-fold increase in F( *)(10 degrees C), 1.6-fold in F( *)(20 degrees C); twofold increase in S( *)(active10 degrees C)). Changes in active cross-bridge cycling kinetics could not account for the increase in force and active stiffness. For the above estimates the previously determined fraction of mutated myosin in the biopsies was taken into account. Data for wild-type myosin of slow soleus muscle fibers support previous

  12. A novel fragile X syndrome mutation reveals a conserved role for the carboxy-terminus in FMRP localization and function.

    PubMed

    Okray, Zeynep; de Esch, Celine E F; Van Esch, Hilde; Devriendt, Koen; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Verbeeck, Jelle; Froyen, Guy; Willemsen, Rob; de Vrij, Femke M S; Hassan, Bassem A

    2015-04-01

    Loss of function of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of intellectual disability. The loss of FMR1 function is usually caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 promoter leading to expansion and subsequent methylation of a CGG repeat in the 5' untranslated region. Very few coding sequence variations have been experimentally characterized and shown to be causal to the disease. Here, we describe a novel FMR1 mutation and reveal an unexpected nuclear export function for the C-terminus of FMRP. We screened a cohort of patients with typical FXS symptoms who tested negative for CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 locus. In one patient, we identified a guanine insertion in FMR1 exon 15. This mutation alters the open reading frame creating a short novel C-terminal sequence, followed by a stop codon. We find that this novel peptide encodes a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) targeting the patient FMRP to the nucleolus in human cells. We also reveal an evolutionarily conserved nuclear export function associated with the endogenous C-terminus of FMRP. In vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrate that a patient-mimetic mutation alters the localization and function of Dfmrp in neurons, leading to neomorphic neuronal phenotypes.

  13. Mutation in a primate-conserved retrotransposon reveals a noncoding RNA as a mediator of infantile encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cartault, François; Munier, Patrick; Benko, Edgar; Desguerre, Isabelle; Hanein, Sylvain; Boddaert, Nathalie; Bandiera, Simonetta; Vellayoudom, Jeanine; Krejbich-Trotot, Pascale; Bintner, Marc; Hoarau, Jean-Jacques; Girard, Muriel; Génin, Emmanuelle; de Lonlay, Pascale; Fourmaintraux, Alain; Naville, Magali; Rodriguez, Diana; Feingold, Josué; Renouil, Michel; Munnich, Arnold; Westhof, Eric; Fähling, Michael; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The human genome is densely populated with transposons and transposon-like repetitive elements. Although the impact of these transposons and elements on human genome evolution is recognized, the significance of subtle variations in their sequence remains mostly unexplored. Here we report homozygosity mapping of an infantile neurodegenerative disease locus in a genetic isolate. Complete DNA sequencing of the 400-kb linkage locus revealed a point mutation in a primate-specific retrotransposon that was transcribed as part of a unique noncoding RNA, which was expressed in the brain. In vitro knockdown of this RNA increased neuronal apoptosis, consistent with the inappropriate dosage of this RNA in vivo and with the phenotype. Moreover, structural analysis of the sequence revealed a small RNA-like hairpin that was consistent with the putative gain of a functional site when mutated. We show here that a mutation in a unique transposable element-containing RNA is associated with lethal encephalopathy, and we suggest that RNAs that harbor evolutionarily recent repetitive elements may play important roles in human brain development. PMID:22411793

  14. MtDNA analysis reveals enriched pathogenic mutations in Tibetan highlanders

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Longli; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Menghan; Yan, Shi; Li, Lei; Liu, Lijun; Liu, Kai; Hu, Kang; Chen, Feng; Ma, Lifeng; Qin, Zhendong; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Jin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan highlanders, including Tibetans, Monpas, Lhobas, Dengs and Sherpas, are considered highly adaptive to severe hypoxic environments. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might be important in hypoxia adaptation given its role in coding core subunits of oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, we employed 549 complete highlander mtDNA sequences (including 432 random samples) to obtain a comprehensive view of highlander mtDNA profile. In the phylogeny of a total of 36,914 sequences, we identified 21 major haplogroups representing founding events of highlanders, most of which were coalesced in 10 kya. Through founder analysis, we proposed a three-phase model of colonizing the plateau, i.e., pre-LGM Time (30 kya, 4.68%), post-LGM Paleolithic Time (16.8 kya, 29.31%) and Neolithic Time (after 8 kya, 66.01% in total). We observed that pathogenic mutations occurred far more frequently in 22 highlander-specific lineages (five lineages carrying two pathogenic mutations and six carrying one) than in the 6,857 haplogroups of all the 36,914 sequences (P = 4.87 × 10−8). Furthermore, the number of possible pathogenic mutations carried by highlanders (in average 3.18 ± 1.27) were significantly higher than that in controls (2.82 ± 1.40) (P = 1.89 × 10−4). Considering that function-altering and pathogenic mutations are enriched in highlanders, we therefore hypothesize that they may have played a role in hypoxia adaptation. PMID:27498855

  15. Genome Analysis of 17 Extensively Drug-Resistant Strains Reveals New Potential Mutations for Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona, D.; Galarza, M.; Borda, V.; Curitomay, R.

    2014-01-01

    We report the whole-genome sequence of an extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) strain of Latin American–Mediterranean (LAM) lineage. This strain is phenotypically resistant to aminoglycosides, but carries no related mutations in rrs, tlyA, and eis. Through genome analysis comparison with 16 XDR strains, we found 218 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shared that could confer resistance. PMID:25081269

  16. In vivo selection of lethal mutations reveals two functional domains in arginyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Geslain, R; Martin, F; Delagoutte, B; Cavarelli, J; Gangloff, J; Eriani, G

    2000-01-01

    Using random mutagenesis and a genetic screening in yeast, we isolated 26 mutations that inactivate Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS). The mutations were identified and the kinetic parameters of the corresponding proteins were tested after purification of the expression products in Escherichia coli. The effects were interpreted in the light of the crystal structure of ArgRS. Eighteen functional residues were found around the arginine-binding pocket and eight others in the carboxy-terminal domain of the enzyme. Mutations of these residues all act by strongly impairing the rates of tRNA charging and arginine activation. Thus, ArgRS and tRNA(Arg) can be considered as a kind of ribonucleoprotein, where the tRNA, before being charged, is acting as a cofactor that activates the enzyme. Furthermore, by using different tRNA(Arg) isoacceptors and heterologous tRNA(Asp), we highlighted the crucial role of several residues of the carboxy-terminal domain in tRNA recognition and discrimination. PMID:10744027

  17. Biophysical analysis of a lethal laminin alpha-1 mutation reveals altered self-interaction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Trushar R; Nikodemus, Denise; Besong, Tabot M D; Reuten, Raphael; Meier, Markus; Harding, Stephen E; Winzor, Donald J; Koch, Manuel; Stetefeld, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Laminins are key basement membrane molecules that influence several biological activities and are linked to a number of diseases. They are secreted as heterotrimeric proteins consisting of one α, one β, and one γ chain, followed by their assembly into a polymer-like sheet at the basement membrane. Using sedimentation velocity, dynamic light scattering, and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we studied self-association of three laminin (LM) N-terminal fragments α-1 (hLM α-1N), α-5 (hLM α-5N) and β-3 (hLM β-3N) originating from the short arms of the human laminin αβγ heterotrimer. Corresponding studies of the hLM α-1N C49S mutant, equivalent to the larval lethal C56S mutant in zebrafish, have shown that this mutation causes enhanced self-association behavior, an observation that provides a plausible explanation for the inability of laminin bearing this mutation to fulfill functional roles in vivo, and hence for the deleterious pathological consequences of the mutation on lens function.

  18. Mutational and fitness landscapes of an RNA virus revealed through population sequencing.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Ashley; Brodsky, Leonid; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-30

    RNA viruses exist as genetically diverse populations. It is thought that diversity and genetic structure of viral populations determine the rapid adaptation observed in RNA viruses and hence their pathogenesis. However, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying virus evolution has been limited by the inability to accurately describe the genetic structure of virus populations. Next-generation sequencing technologies generate data of sufficient depth to characterize virus populations, but are limited in their utility because most variants are present at very low frequencies and are thus indistinguishable from next-generation sequencing errors. Here we present an approach that reduces next-generation sequencing errors and allows the description of virus populations with unprecedented accuracy. Using this approach, we define the mutation rates of poliovirus and uncover the mutation landscape of the population. Furthermore, by monitoring changes in variant frequencies on serially passaged populations, we determined fitness values for thousands of mutations across the viral genome. Mapping of these fitness values onto three-dimensional structures of viral proteins offers a powerful approach for exploring structure-function relationships and potentially uncovering new functions. To our knowledge, our study provides the first single-nucleotide fitness landscape of an evolving RNA virus and establishes a general experimental platform for studying the genetic changes underlying the evolution of virus populations.

  19. Exome sequencing reveals HINT1 mutations as a cause of distal hereditary motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Race, Valérie; Matthijs, Gert; De Jonghe, Peter; Robberecht, Wim; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Damme, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMNs) are a heterogenous group of genetic disorders with length-dependent degeneration of motor axons. Obtaining a genetic diagnosis in patients with dHMN remains challenging. We performed exome sequencing in a diagnostic setting in 12 patients with a clinical diagnosis of dHMN. Potential disease-causing variants in genes associated with dHMN and other forms of inherited neuropathies/motor neuron diseases were validated using Sequenom. The coverage in the genes studied was >95% with an average coverage of >50 times. In none of the patients a mutations was found in genes previously reported to be associated with dHMN. However, in 2/12 patients a recessive mutation in histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (HINT1, recently discovered as a cause of axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia) was identified. Our results demonstrate the diagnostic value of exome sequencing for patients with inherited neuropathies. The phenotypic spectrum of recessive mutations in HINT1 includes dHMN. HINT1 should be added to the list of genes to check for in dHMN. PMID:24105373

  20. Antioxidants, radiation and mutation as revealed by sperm abnormality in barn swallows from Chernobyl

    PubMed Central

    Møller, A. P.; Surai, P.; Mousseau, T. A.

    2005-01-01

    Reduced levels of antioxidants such as carotenoids and vitamins A and E can increase DNA damage caused by free radicals. Exposure to radiation has been proposed to reduce levels of antioxidants that are used for DNA repair and this reduction may be responsible for increased levels of mutation in radioactively contaminated areas. We test this hypothesis using field measures of antioxidants in blood, liver and eggs of the barn swallow Hirundo rustica while relating these to levels of mutation as reflected by the frequency of abnormal sperm. Antioxidant levels in blood, liver and eggs were reduced in Chernobyl, Ukraine, compared with an uncontaminated control area, and levels of antioxidants correlated negatively with levels of background radiation. The frequency of abnormal sperm was almost an order of magnitude higher in Chernobyl than in the control area and was negatively related to antioxidant levels in blood and liver. This is consistent with the hypothesis of a direct link between radiation and individual levels of antioxidants, suggesting that levels of mutation differ among individuals owing to individual differences in the abundance of antioxidants. PMID:15705548

  1. Comprehensive characterization of HNPCC-related colorectal cancers reveals striking molecular features in families with no germline mismatch repair gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Ollikainen, Miina; Kariola, Reetta; Järvinen, Heikki J; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Nyström-Lahti, Minna; Knuutila, Sakari; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2005-02-24

    A considerable fraction of families with HNPCC shows no germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. We previously detected 'hidden' MMR gene defects in 42% of such families, leaving the remaining 58% 'truly' mutation negative. Here, we characterized 50 colorectal carcinomas and five adenomas arising in HNPCC families; 24 truly MMR gene mutation negative and 31 MMR gene mutation positive. Among 31 tumors from MMR gene mutation positive families, 25 (81%) had active Wnt signaling as indicated by aberrant beta-catenin localization with or without CTNNB1 mutations, compared to only 7/18 tumors from MMR gene mutation negative families (39%; P=0.005). CGH studies revealed stable profiles in 9/16 (56%) of MMR gene mutation negative tumors, which was significantly associated with membranous beta-catenin (P=0.005). Tumors with membranous beta-catenin from the MMR gene mutation negative group also showed low frequency of TP53 mutations compared to those with nuclear beta-catenin. Thus, a majority of the MMR gene mutation negative cases exhibited a novel molecular pattern characterized by the paucity of changes in common pathways to colorectal carcinogenesis. This feature distinguishes the MMR gene mutation negative families from both HNPCC families linked to MMR defects and sporadic cases, suggesting the involvement of novel predisposition genes and pathways in such families.

  2. Comprehensive Transcriptome and Mutational Profiling of Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma Reveals EBV Type-Specific Differences.

    PubMed

    Kaymaz, Yasin; Oduor, Cliff I; Yu, Hongbo; Otieno, Juliana A; Ong'echa, John Michael; Moormann, Ann M; Bailey, Jeffrey A

    2017-05-01

    Endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) is the most common pediatric cancer in malaria-endemic equatorial Africa and nearly always contains Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), unlike sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL) that occurs with a lower incidence in developed countries. Given these differences and the variable clinical presentation and outcomes, we sought to further understand pathogenesis by investigating transcriptomes using RNA sequencing (RNAseq) from multiple primary eBL tumors compared with sBL tumors. Within eBL tumors, minimal expression differences were found based on: anatomical presentation site, in-hospital survival rates, and EBV genome type, suggesting that eBL tumors are homogeneous without marked subtypes. The outstanding difference detected using surrogate variable analysis was the significantly decreased expression of key genes in the immunoproteasome complex (PSMB9/β1i, PSMB10/β2i, PSMB8/β5i, and PSME2/PA28β) in eBL tumors carrying type 2 EBV compared with type 1 EBV. Second, in comparison with previously published pediatric sBL specimens, the majority of the expression and pathway differences was related to the PTEN/PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway and was correlated most strongly with EBV status rather than geographic designation. Third, common mutations were observed significantly less frequently in eBL tumors harboring EBV type 1, with mutation frequencies similar between tumors with EBV type 2 and without EBV. In addition to the previously reported genes, a set of new genes mutated in BL, including TFAP4, MSH6, PRRC2C, BCL7A, FOXO1, PLCG2, PRKDC, RAD50, and RPRD2, were identified. Overall, these data establish that EBV, particularly EBV type 1, supports BL oncogenesis, alleviating the need for certain driver mutations in the human genome. Genomic and mutational analyses of Burkitt lymphoma tumors identify key differences based on viral content and clinical outcomes suggesting new avenues for the development of prognostic molecular biomarkers and therapeutic

  3. Multi-physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T CFTR mutation revealed by clinical and cellular investigations.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Raed; El-Seedy, Ayman; El-Moussaoui, Kamal; Pasquet, Marie-Claude; Adolphe, Catherine; Bieth, Eric; Languepin, Jeanne; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Kitzis, Alain; Ladevèze, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    This study combines a clinical approach and multiple level cellular analyses to determine the physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T (p.Lys464Asn) CFTR exon 10 mutation, detected in a CF patient with a frameshift deletion in trans and a TG(11)T(5) in cis. Minigene experiment, with different TG(m)T(n) alleles, and nasal cell mRNA extracts were used to study the impact of c.1392G>T on splicing in both in cellulo and in vivo studies. The processing and localization of p.Lys464Asn protein were evaluated, in cellulo, by western blotting analyses and confocal microscopy. Clinical and channel exploration tests were performed on the patient to determine the exact CF phenotype profile and the CFTR chloride transport activity. c.1392G>T affects exon 10 splicing by inducing its complete deletion and encoding a frameshift transcript. The polymorphism TG(11)T(5) aggravates the effects of this mutation on aberrant splicing. Analysis of mRNA obtained from parental airway epithelial cells confirmed these in cellulo results. At the protein level the p.Lys464Asn protein showed neither maturated form nor membrane localization. Furthermore, the in vivo channel tests confirmed the absence of CFTR activity. Thus, the c.1392G>T mutation alone or in association with the TG repeats and the poly T tract revealed obvious impacts on splicing and CFTR protein processing and functionality. The c.[T(5); 1392G>T] complex allele contributes to the CF phenotype by affecting splicing and inducing a severe misprocessing defect. These results demonstrate that the classical CFTR mutations classification is not sufficient: in vivo and in cellulo studies of a possible complex allele in a patient are required to provide correct CFTR mutation classification, adequate medical counseling, and adapted therapeutic strategies.

  4. Novel crystallin gamma B mutations in a Kuwaiti family with autosomal dominant congenital cataracts reveal genetic and clinical heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmoaty, Sidky; Al-Hajeri, Amal; Behbehani, Abdulmutalib; Alkuraya, Fowzan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To explore the disease locus and causative mutation for autosomal dominant congenital cataracts (ADCC) in a Kuwaiti family. There were seven affected and three unaffected subjects in the family. Methods Whole-genome linkage analysis was performed using Gene Chip Human Mapping 250 K Arrays to identify regions of linkage. Potential genes within this region were cloned and sequenced to identify the disease-causing mutation. Results The highest logarithm of odds score (1.5) region 2q34–36.1, spanning the crystallin beta A2 (CRYBA2) gene, showed no sequence changes. Thus, the second highest logarithm of odds score (1.49) region, 2q33–37, spanning the gamma crystalline gene cluster (CRYG), was considered. Sequencing of the CRYGA, B, C, and D genes revealed two novel heterozygous deletions and one trinucleotide polymorphism in the CRYGB gene. These mutations included a heterozygous g.67delG, intron 1 deletion in four of the affected family members with lamellar cataracts and a heterozygous g.167delC, exon 2 deletion inherited from the Egyptian grandmother by her granddaughter, resulting in anterior polar cataracts. Another patient with complete cataracts was a compound heterozygote with both of the above-mentioned mutations. In addition, the novel trinucleotide polymorphism g.20–22 GGT>AAA was detected in three of the family members. Conclusions We report the linkage of ADCC to chromosome 2q33–37, which spans the CRYGB gene. This study is the first to report complex heterogeneous mutations in the CRYGB gene resulting in ADCC with three distinct phenotypes (lamellar, anterior polar, and complete cataracts) in the same family. PMID:23288985

  5. Homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing reveal a novel homozygous COL18A1 mutation causing Knobloch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Alireza; Tiwari, Amit; Piri, Niloofar; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saleh-Gohari, Nasrollah; Haghighi, Amirreza; Neidhardt, John; Nürnberg, Peter; Berger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the genetic basis of a chorioretinal dystrophy with high myopia of unknown origin in a child of a consanguineous marriage. The proband and ten family members of Iranian ancestry participated in this study. Linkage analysis was carried out with DNA samples of the proband and her parents by using the Human SNP Array 6.0. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed with the patients' DNA. Specific sequence alterations within the homozygous regions identified by whole exome sequencing were verified by Sanger sequencing. Upon genetic analysis, a novel homozygous frameshift mutation was found in exon 42 of the COL18A1 gene in the patient. Both parents were heterozygous for this sequence variation. Mutations in COL18A1 are known to cause Knobloch syndrome (KS). Retrospective analysis of clinical records of the patient revealed surgical removal of a meningocele present at birth. The clinical features shown by our patient were typical of KS with the exception of chorioretinal degeneration which is a rare manifestation. This is the first case of KS reported in a family of Iranian ancestry. We identified a novel disease-causing (deletion) mutation in the COL18A1 gene leading to a frameshift and premature stop codon in the last exon. The mutation was not present in SNP databases and was also not found in 192 control individuals. Its localization within the endostatin domain implicates a functional relevance of endostatin in KS. A combined approach of linkage analysis and WES led to a rapid identification of the disease-causing mutation even though the clinical description was not completely clear at the beginning.

  6. Homozygosity Mapping and Whole Exome Sequencing Reveal a Novel Homozygous COL18A1 Mutation Causing Knobloch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Piri, Niloofar; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saleh-Gohari, Nasrollah; Haghighi, Amirreza; Neidhardt, John; Nürnberg, Peter; Berger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the genetic basis of a chorioretinal dystrophy with high myopia of unknown origin in a child of a consanguineous marriage. The proband and ten family members of Iranian ancestry participated in this study. Linkage analysis was carried out with DNA samples of the proband and her parents by using the Human SNP Array 6.0. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed with the patients’ DNA. Specific sequence alterations within the homozygous regions identified by whole exome sequencing were verified by Sanger sequencing. Upon genetic analysis, a novel homozygous frameshift mutation was found in exon 42 of the COL18A1 gene in the patient. Both parents were heterozygous for this sequence variation. Mutations in COL18A1 are known to cause Knobloch syndrome (KS). Retrospective analysis of clinical records of the patient revealed surgical removal of a meningocele present at birth. The clinical features shown by our patient were typical of KS with the exception of chorioretinal degeneration which is a rare manifestation. This is the first case of KS reported in a family of Iranian ancestry. We identified a novel disease-causing (deletion) mutation in the COL18A1 gene leading to a frameshift and premature stop codon in the last exon. The mutation was not present in SNP databases and was also not found in 192 control individuals. Its localization within the endostatin domain implicates a functional relevance of endostatin in KS. A combined approach of linkage analysis and WES led to a rapid identification of the disease-causing mutation even though the clinical description was not completely clear at the beginning. PMID:25392994

  7. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D.; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines. We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK. Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%. Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression. Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants. In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  8. Single-Nucleotide Mutations in FMR1 Reveal Novel Functions and Regulatory Mechanisms of the Fragile X Syndrome Protein FMRP

    PubMed Central

    Suhl, Joshua A.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a monogenic disorder and a common cause of intellectual disability. Despite nearly 25 years of research on FMR1, the gene underlying the syndrome, very few pathological mutations other than the typical CGG-repeat expansion have been reported. This is in contrast to other X-linked, monogenic, intellectual disability disorders, such as Rett syndrome, where many point mutations have been validated as causative of the disorder. As technology has improved and significantly driven down the cost of sequencing, allowing for whole genes to be sequenced with relative ease, in-depth sequencing studies on FMR1 have recently been performed. These studies have led to the identification of novel variants in FMR1, where some of which have been functionally evaluated and are likely pathogenic. In this review, we discuss recently identified FMR1 variants, the ways these novel variants cause dysfunction, and how they reveal new regulatory mechanisms and functionalities of the gene. PMID:26819560

  9. Exome Sequencing Reveals De Novo WDR45 Mutations Causing a Phenotypically Distinct, X-Linked Dominant Form of NBIA

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Tobias B.; Hogarth, Penelope; Kruer, Michael C.; Gregory, Allison; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Sanford, Lynn; Meyer, Esther; Kara, Eleanna; Cuno, Stephan M.; Harik, Sami I.; Dandu, Vasuki H.; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Dunaway, Todd; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Skinner, Steven; Frucht, Steven; Hanspal, Era; Schrander-Stumpel, Connie; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Garavaglia, Barbara; Bhatia, Kailash; Hardy, John; Strom, Tim M.; Boddaert, Nathalie; Houlden, Henry H.; Kurian, Manju A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by abnormal iron deposition in the basal ganglia. We report that de novo mutations in WDR45, a gene located at Xp11.23 and encoding a beta-propeller scaffold protein with a putative role in autophagy, cause a distinctive NBIA phenotype. The clinical features include early-onset global developmental delay and further neurological deterioration (parkinsonism, dystonia, and dementia developing by early adulthood). Brain MRI revealed evidence of iron deposition in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus. Males and females are phenotypically similar, an observation that might be explained by somatic mosaicism in surviving males and germline or somatic mutations in females, as well as skewing of X chromosome inactivation. This clinically recognizable disorder is among the more common forms of NBIA, and we suggest that it be named accordingly as beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:23176820

  10. Exome Sequence Reveals Mutations in CoA Synthase as a Cause of Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Dusi, Sabrina; Valletta, Lorella; Haack, Tobias B.; Tsuchiya, Yugo; Venco, Paola; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Goffrini, Paola; Tigano, Marco; Demchenko, Nikita; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Invernizzi, Federica; Garavaglia, Barbara; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Hamada, Jeffrey; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Chiapparini, Luisa; Zorzi, Giovanna; Kurian, Manju A.; Nardocci, Nardo; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan; Gout, Ivan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with progressive extrapyramidal signs and neurological deterioration, characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Exome sequencing revealed the presence of recessive missense mutations in COASY, encoding coenzyme A (CoA) synthase in one NBIA-affected subject. A second unrelated individual carrying mutations in COASY was identified by Sanger sequence analysis. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the final steps of CoA biosynthesis by coupling phosphopantetheine with ATP to form dephospho-CoA and its subsequent phosphorylation to generate CoA. We demonstrate alterations in RNA and protein expression levels of CoA synthase, as well as CoA amount, in fibroblasts derived from the two clinical cases and in yeast. This is the second inborn error of coenzyme A biosynthesis to be implicated in NBIA. PMID:24360804

  11. Mutations in TRAF3IP1/IFT54 reveal a new role for IFT proteins in microtubule stabilization.

    PubMed

    Bizet, Albane A; Becker-Heck, Anita; Ryan, Rebecca; Weber, Kristina; Filhol, Emilie; Krug, Pauline; Halbritter, Jan; Delous, Marion; Lasbennes, Marie-Christine; Linghu, Bolan; Oakeley, Edward J; Zarhrate, Mohammed; Nitschké, Patrick; Garfa-Traore, Meriem; Serluca, Fabrizio; Yang, Fan; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Pinson, Lucile; Cassuto, Elisabeth; Dubot, Philippe; Elshakhs, Neveen A Soliman; Sahel, José A; Salomon, Rémi; Drummond, Iain A; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Antignac, Corinne; Chibout, Salahdine; Szustakowski, Joseph D; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Lorentzen, Esben; Sailer, Andreas W; Benmerah, Alexandre; Saint-Mezard, Pierre; Saunier, Sophie

    2015-10-21

    Ciliopathies are a large group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by defects in primary cilia. Here we identified mutations in TRAF3IP1 (TNF Receptor-Associated Factor Interacting Protein 1) in eight patients from five families with nephronophthisis (NPH) and retinal degeneration, two of the most common manifestations of ciliopathies. TRAF3IP1 encodes IFT54, a subunit of the IFT-B complex required for ciliogenesis. The identified mutations result in mild ciliary defects in patients but also reveal an unexpected role of IFT54 as a negative regulator of microtubule stability via MAP4 (microtubule-associated protein 4). Microtubule defects are associated with altered epithelialization/polarity in renal cells and with pronephric cysts and microphthalmia in zebrafish embryos. Our findings highlight the regulation of cytoplasmic microtubule dynamics as a role of the IFT54 protein beyond the cilium, contributing to the development of NPH-related ciliopathies.

  12. Mutational analysis of the transferrin receptor reveals overlapping HFE and transferrin binding sites.

    PubMed

    West, A P; Giannetti, A M; Herr, A B; Bennett, M J; Nangiana, J S; Pierce, J R; Weiner, L P; Snow, P M; Bjorkman, P J

    2001-10-19

    The transferrin receptor (TfR) binds two proteins critical for iron metabolism: transferrin (Tf) and HFE, the protein mutated in hereditary hemochromatosis. Previous results demonstrated that Tf and HFE compete for binding to TfR, suggesting that Tf and HFE bind to the same or an overlapping site on TfR. TfR is a homodimer that binds one Tf per polypeptide chain (2:2, TfR/Tf stoichiometry), whereas both 2:1 and 2:2 TfR/HFE stoichiometries have been observed. In order to more fully characterize the interaction between HFE and TfR, we determined the binding stoichiometry using equilibrium gel-filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation. Both techniques indicate that a 2:2 TfR/HFE complex can form at submicromolar concentrations in solution, consistent with the hypothesis that HFE competes for Tf binding to TfR by blocking the Tf binding site rather than by exerting an allosteric effect. To determine whether the Tf and HFE binding sites on TfR overlap, residues at the HFE binding site on TfR were identified from the 2.8 A resolution HFE-TfR co-crystal structure, then mutated and tested for their effects on HFE and Tf binding. The binding affinities of soluble TfR mutants for HFE and Tf were determined using a surface plasmon resonance assay. Substitutions of five TfR residues at the HFE binding site (L619A, R629A, Y643A, G647A and F650Q) resulted in significant reductions in Tf binding affinity. The findings that both HFE and Tf form 2:2 complexes with TfR and that mutations at the HFE binding site affect Tf binding support a model in which HFE and Tf compete for overlapping binding sites on TfR. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Adhesion of Escherichia coli under flow conditions reveals potential novel effects of FimH mutations.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, T; Thøgersen, M S; Wieser, E; Peschel, A; Ball, M J; Brandes, R; Satchell, S C; Stockner, T; Aarestrup, F M; Rees, A J; Kain, R

    2017-03-01

    FimH-mediated adhesion of Escherichia coli to bladder epithelium is a prerequisite for urinary tract infections. FimH is also essential for blood-borne bacterial dissemination, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of different FimH mutations on bacterial adhesion using a novel adhesion assay, which models the physiological flow conditions bacteria are exposed to. We introduced 12 different point mutations in the mannose binding pocket of FimH in an E. coli strain expressing type 1 fimbriae only (MSC95-FimH). We compared the bacterial adhesion of each mutant across several commonly used adhesion assays, including agglutination of yeast, adhesion to mono- and tri-mannosylated substrates, and static adhesion to bladder epithelial and endothelial cells. We performed a comparison of these assays to a novel method that we developed to study bacterial adhesion to mammalian cells under flow conditions. We showed that E. coli MSC95-FimH adheres more efficiently to microvascular endothelium than to bladder epithelium, and that only endothelium supports adhesion at physiological shear stress. The results confirmed that mannose binding pocket mutations abrogated adhesion. We demonstrated that FimH residues E50 and T53 are crucial for adhesion under flow conditions. The coating of endothelial cells on biochips and modelling of physiological flow conditions enabled us to identify FimH residues crucial for adhesion. These results provide novel insights into screening methods to determine the effect of FimH mutants and potentially FimH antagonists.

  14. Combining Natural Sequence Variation with High Throughput Mutational Data to Reveal Protein Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Daniel; Young, David L.; Miller, Christina R.; Fields, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Many protein interactions are conserved among organisms despite changes in the amino acid sequences that comprise their contact sites, a property that has been used to infer the location of these sites from protein homology. In an inter-species complementation experiment, a sequence present in a homologue is substituted into a protein and tested for its ability to support function. Therefore, substitutions that inhibit function can identify interaction sites that changed over evolution. However, most of the sequence differences within a protein family remain unexplored because of the small-scale nature of these complementation approaches. Here we use existing high throughput mutational data on the in vivo function of the RRM2 domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae poly(A)-binding protein, Pab1, to analyze its sites of interaction. Of 197 single amino acid differences in 52 Pab1 homologues, 17 reduce the function of Pab1 when substituted into the yeast protein. The majority of these deleterious mutations interfere with the binding of the RRM2 domain to eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, isoforms of a translation initiation factor. A large-scale mutational analysis of the RRM2 domain in a two-hybrid assay for eIF4G1 binding supports these findings and identifies peripheral residues that make a smaller contribution to eIF4G1 binding. Three single amino acid substitutions in yeast Pab1 corresponding to residues from the human orthologue are deleterious and eliminate binding to the yeast eIF4G isoforms. We create a triple mutant that carries these substitutions and other humanizing substitutions that collectively support a switch in binding specificity of RRM2 from the yeast eIF4G1 to its human orthologue. Finally, we map other deleterious substitutions in Pab1 to inter-domain (RRM2–RRM1) or protein-RNA (RRM2–poly(A)) interaction sites. Thus, the combined approach of large-scale mutational data and evolutionary conservation can be used to characterize interaction sites at single

  15. A proteomic study of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: Application of 2D-chromotography in a premature aging disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Yang, Wu; Ju, Weina; Wang, Peirong; Zhao, Xinliang; Jenkins, Edmund C; Brown, W Ted; Zhong, Nanbert

    2012-01-27

    The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disease characterized by segmental premature aging. Applying a two-dimensional chromatographic proteomic approach, the 2D Protein Fractionation System (PF2D), we identified 30 differentially expressed proteins in cultured HGPS fibroblasts. We categorized them into five groups: methylation, calcium ion binding, cytoskeleton, duplication, and regulation of apoptosis. Among these 30 proteins, 23 were down-regulated, while seven were up-regulated in HGPS fibroblasts as compared to normal fibroblasts. Three differentially expressed cytoskeleton proteins, vimentin, actin, and tubulin, were validated via Western blotting and characterized by immunostaining that revealed densely thickened bundles and irregular structures. Furthermore in the HGPS cells, the cell cycle G1 phase was elongated and the concentration of free cytosolic calcium was increased, suggesting intracellular retention of calcium. The results that we obtained have implications for understanding the aging process.

  16. Dynamical network of residue-residue contacts reveals coupled allosteric effects in recognition, catalysis, and mutation.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Urmi; Holliday, Michael J; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-04-26

    Detailed understanding of how conformational dynamics orchestrates function in allosteric regulation of recognition and catalysis remains ambiguous. Here, we simulate CypA using multiple-microsecond-long atomistic molecular dynamics in explicit solvent and carry out NMR experiments. We analyze a large amount of time-dependent multidimensional data with a coarse-grained approach and map key dynamical features within individual macrostates by defining dynamics in terms of residue-residue contacts. The effects of substrate binding are observed to be largely sensed at a location over 15 Å from the active site, implying its importance in allostery. Using NMR experiments, we confirm that a dynamic cluster of residues in this distal region is directly coupled to the active site. Furthermore, the dynamical network of interresidue contacts is found to be coupled and temporally dispersed, ranging over 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Finally, using network centrality measures we demonstrate the changes in the communication network, connectivity, and influence of CypA residues upon substrate binding, mutation, and during catalysis. We identify key residues that potentially act as a bottleneck in the communication flow through the distinct regions in CypA and, therefore, as targets for future mutational studies. Mapping these dynamical features and the coupling of dynamics to function has crucial ramifications in understanding allosteric regulation in enzymes and proteins, in general.

  17. Functional Selectivity in Cytokine Signaling Revealed Through a Pathogenic EPO Mutation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ram; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Wilmes, Stephan; Unal, Ekrem; Moraga, Ignacio; Karakukcu, Musa; Yuan, Daniel; Kazerounian, Shideh; Abdulhay, Nour J; King, David S; Gupta, Namrata; Gabriel, Stacey B; Lander, Eric S; Patiroglu, Turkan; Ozcan, Alper; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Garcia, K Christopher; Piehler, Jacob; Gazda, Hanna T; Klein, Daryl E; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2017-03-09

    Cytokines are classically thought to stimulate downstream signaling pathways through monotonic activation of receptors. We describe a severe anemia resulting from a homozygous mutation (R150Q) in the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO). Surprisingly, the EPO R150Q mutant shows only a mild reduction in affinity for its receptor but has altered binding kinetics. The EPO mutant is less effective at stimulating erythroid cell proliferation and differentiation, even at maximally potent concentrations. While the EPO mutant can stimulate effectors such as STAT5 to a similar extent as the wild-type ligand, there is reduced JAK2-mediated phosphorylation of select downstream targets. This impairment in downstream signaling mechanistically arises from altered receptor dimerization dynamics due to extracellular binding changes. These results demonstrate how variation in a single cytokine can lead to biased downstream signaling and can thereby cause human disease. Moreover, we have defined a distinct treatable form of anemia through mutation identification and functional studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamical network of residue–residue contacts reveals coupled allosteric effects in recognition, catalysis, and mutation

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Urmi; Holliday, Michael J.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Detailed understanding of how conformational dynamics orchestrates function in allosteric regulation of recognition and catalysis remains ambiguous. Here, we simulate CypA using multiple-microsecond-long atomistic molecular dynamics in explicit solvent and carry out NMR experiments. We analyze a large amount of time-dependent multidimensional data with a coarse-grained approach and map key dynamical features within individual macrostates by defining dynamics in terms of residue–residue contacts. The effects of substrate binding are observed to be largely sensed at a location over 15 Å from the active site, implying its importance in allostery. Using NMR experiments, we confirm that a dynamic cluster of residues in this distal region is directly coupled to the active site. Furthermore, the dynamical network of interresidue contacts is found to be coupled and temporally dispersed, ranging over 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Finally, using network centrality measures we demonstrate the changes in the communication network, connectivity, and influence of CypA residues upon substrate binding, mutation, and during catalysis. We identify key residues that potentially act as a bottleneck in the communication flow through the distinct regions in CypA and, therefore, as targets for future mutational studies. Mapping these dynamical features and the coupling of dynamics to function has crucial ramifications in understanding allosteric regulation in enzymes and proteins, in general. PMID:27071107

  19. Mutational landscape of metastatic cancer revealed from prospective clinical sequencing of 10,000 patients.

    PubMed

    Zehir, Ahmet; Benayed, Ryma; Shah, Ronak H; Syed, Aijazuddin; Middha, Sumit; Kim, Hyunjae R; Srinivasan, Preethi; Gao, Jianjiong; Chakravarty, Debyani; Devlin, Sean M; Hellmann, Matthew D; Barron, David A; Schram, Alison M; Hameed, Meera; Dogan, Snjezana; Ross, Dara S; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; DeLair, Deborah F; Yao, JinJuan; Mandelker, Diana L; Cheng, Donavan T; Chandramohan, Raghu; Mohanty, Abhinita S; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Jayakumaran, Gowtham; Prasad, Meera; Syed, Mustafa H; Rema, Anoop Balakrishnan; Liu, Zhen Y; Nafa, Khedoudja; Borsu, Laetitia; Sadowska, Justyna; Casanova, Jacklyn; Bacares, Ruben; Kiecka, Iwona J; Razumova, Anna; Son, Julie B; Stewart, Lisa; Baldi, Tessara; Mullaney, Kerry A; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Vakiani, Efsevia; Abeshouse, Adam A; Penson, Alexander V; Jonsson, Philip; Camacho, Niedzica; Chang, Matthew T; Won, Helen H; Gross, Benjamin E; Kundra, Ritika; Heins, Zachary J; Chen, Hsiao-Wei; Phillips, Sarah; Zhang, Hongxin; Wang, Jiaojiao; Ochoa, Angelica; Wills, Jonathan; Eubank, Michael; Thomas, Stacy B; Gardos, Stuart M; Reales, Dalicia N; Galle, Jesse; Durany, Robert; Cambria, Roy; Abida, Wassim; Cercek, Andrea; Feldman, Darren R; Gounder, Mrinal M; Hakimi, A Ari; Harding, James J; Iyer, Gopa; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Jordan, Emmet J; Kelly, Ciara M; Lowery, Maeve A; Morris, Luc G T; Omuro, Antonio M; Raj, Nitya; Razavi, Pedram; Shoushtari, Alexander N; Shukla, Neerav; Soumerai, Tara E; Varghese, Anna M; Yaeger, Rona; Coleman, Jonathan; Bochner, Bernard; Riely, Gregory J; Saltz, Leonard B; Scher, Howard I; Sabbatini, Paul J; Robson, Mark E; Klimstra, David S; Taylor, Barry S; Baselga, Jose; Schultz, Nikolaus; Hyman, David M; Arcila, Maria E; Solit, David B; Ladanyi, Marc; Berger, Michael F

    2017-06-01

    Tumor molecular profiling is a fundamental component of precision oncology, enabling the identification of genomic alterations in genes and pathways that can be targeted therapeutically. The existence of recurrent targetable alterations across distinct histologically defined tumor types, coupled with an expanding portfolio of molecularly targeted therapies, demands flexible and comprehensive approaches to profile clinically relevant genes across the full spectrum of cancers. We established a large-scale, prospective clinical sequencing initiative using a comprehensive assay, MSK-IMPACT, through which we have compiled tumor and matched normal sequence data from a unique cohort of more than 10,000 patients with advanced cancer and available pathological and clinical annotations. Using these data, we identified clinically relevant somatic mutations, novel noncoding alterations, and mutational signatures that were shared by common and rare tumor types. Patients were enrolled on genomically matched clinical trials at a rate of 11%. To enable discovery of novel biomarkers and deeper investigation into rare alterations and tumor types, all results are publicly accessible.

  20. Molecular and functional analysis of the large 5' promoter region of CFTR gene revealed pathogenic mutations in CF and CFTR-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Sonia; Amato, Felice; Elce, Ausilia; Monti, Maria; Iannone, Carla; Pucci, Pietro; Seia, Manuela; Angioni, Adriano; Zarrilli, Federica; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Tomaiuolo, Rossella

    2013-05-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) manifest a multisystemic disease due to mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); despite extensive testing of coding regions, a proportion of CF alleles remains unidentified. We studied 118 patients with CF and CFTR-related disorders, most with one or both unknown mutations after the scanning of CFTR coding regions, and a non-CF control group (n = 75) by sequencing the 6000-bp region at the 5' of the CFTR gene. We identified 23 mutations, of which 9 were novel. We expressed such mutations in vitro using four cell systems to explore their functional effect, relating the data to the clinical expression of each patient. Some mutations reduced expression of the gene reporter firefly luciferase in various cell lines and may act as disease-causing mutations. Other mutations caused an increase in luciferase expression in some cell lines. One mutation had a different effect in different cells. For other mutations, the expression assay excluded a functional role. Gene variants in the large 5' region may cause altered regulation of CFTR gene expression, acting as disease-causing mutations or modifiers of its clinical phenotype. Studies of in vitro expression in different cell systems may help reveal the effect of such mutations.

  1. Blocking farnesylation of the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters the distribution of A-type lamins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Ostlund, Cecilia; Choi, Jason C; Swayne, Theresa C; Gundersen, Gregg G; Worman, Howard J

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the lamin A/C gene that cause Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome lead to expression of a truncated, permanently farnesylated prelamin A variant called progerin. Blocking farnesylation leads to an improvement in the abnormal nuclear morphology observed in cells expressing progerin, which is associated with a re-localization of the variant protein from the nuclear envelope to the nuclear interior. We now show that a progerin construct that cannot be farnesylated is localized primarily in intranuclear foci and that its diffusional mobility is significantly greater than that of farnesylated progerin localized predominantly at the nuclear envelope. Expression of non-farnesylated progerin in transfected cells leads to a redistribution of lamin A and lamin C away from the nuclear envelope into intranuclear foci but does not significantly affect the localization of endogenous lamin B1 at nuclear envelope. There is a similar redistribution of lamin A and lamin C into intranuclear foci in transfected cells expressing progerin in which protein farnesylation is blocked by treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor. Blocking farnesylation of progerin can lead to a redistribution of normal A-type lamins away from the inner nuclear envelope. This may have implications for using drugs that block protein prenylation to treat children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. These findings also provide additional evidence that A-type and B-type lamins can form separate microdomains within the nucleus.

  2. Independent role for presynaptic FMRP revealed by an FMR1 missense mutation associated with intellectual disability and seizures

    PubMed Central

    Myrick, Leila K.; Deng, Pan-Yue; Hashimoto, Hideharu; Oh, Young Mi; Cho, Yongcheol; Poidevin, Mickael J.; Suhl, Joshua A.; Visootsak, Jeannie; Cavalli, Valeria; Jin, Peng; Cheng, Xiaodong; Warren, Stephen T.; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) results in intellectual disability (ID) most often caused by silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The resulting absence of fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMRP) leads to both pre- and postsynaptic defects, yet whether the pre- and postsynaptic functions of FMRP are independent and have distinct roles in FXS neuropathology remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate an independent presynaptic function for FMRP through the study of an ID patient with an FMR1 missense mutation. This mutation, c.413G > A (R138Q), preserves FMRP’s canonical functions in RNA binding and translational regulation, which are traditionally associated with postsynaptic compartments. However, neuronally driven expression of the mutant FMRP is unable to rescue structural defects at the neuromuscular junction in fragile x mental retardation 1 (dfmr1)-deficient Drosophila, suggesting a presynaptic-specific impairment. Furthermore, mutant FMRP loses the ability to rescue presynaptic action potential (AP) broadening in Fmr1 KO mice. The R138Q mutation also disrupts FMRP’s interaction with the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels that modulate AP width. These results reveal a presynaptic- and translation-independent function of FMRP that is linked to a specific subset of FXS phenotypes. PMID:25561520

  3. Neurodegenerative disease mutations in TREM2 reveal a functional surface and distinct loss-of-function mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kober, Daniel L.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Karch, Celeste M.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Thomas J.

    2016-12-20

    Genetic variations in the myeloid immune receptor TREM2 are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. To determine how TREM2 variants contribute to these diseases, we performed structural and functional studies of wild-type and variant proteins. Our 3.1 Å TREM2 crystal structure revealed that mutations found in Nasu-Hakola disease are buried whereas Alzheimer’s disease risk variants are found on the surface, suggesting that these mutations have distinct effects on TREM2 function. Biophysical and cellular methods indicate that Nasu-Hakola mutations impact protein stability and decrease folded TREM2 surface expression, whereas Alzheimer’s risk variants impact binding to a TREM2 ligand. Additionally, the Alzheimer’s risk variants appear to epitope map a functional surface on TREM2 that is unique within the larger TREM family. These findings provide a guide to structural and functional differences among genetic variants of TREM2, indicating that therapies targeting the TREM2 pathway should be tailored to these genetic and functional differences with patient-specific medicine approaches for neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Genomic analyses reveal recurrent mutations in epigenetic modifiers and the JAK–STAT pathway in Sézary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Mark J.; Sahasrabuddhe, Anagh A.; Rolland, Delphine C. M.; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Chung, Fuzon; Schaller, Matthew; Bailey, Nathanael G.; Betz, Bryan L.; Miranda, Roberto N.; Porcu, Pierluigi; Byrd, John C.; Jeffrey Medeiros, L.; Kunkel, Steven L.; Bahler, David W.; Lim, Megan S.; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SS) is an aggressive leukaemia of mature T cells with poor prognosis and limited options for targeted therapies. The comprehensive genetic alterations underlying the pathogenesis of SS are unknown. Here we integrate whole-genome sequencing (n=6), whole-exome sequencing (n=66) and array comparative genomic hybridization-based copy-number analysis (n=80) of primary SS samples. We identify previously unknown recurrent loss-of-function aberrations targeting members of the chromatin remodelling/histone modification and trithorax families, including ARID1A in which functional loss from nonsense and frameshift mutations and/or targeted deletions is observed in 40.3% of SS genomes. We also identify recurrent gain-of-function mutations targeting PLCG1 (9%) and JAK1, JAK3, STAT3 and STAT5B (JAK/STAT total ∼11%). Functional studies reveal sensitivity of JAK1-mutated primary SS cells to JAK inhibitor treatment. These results highlight the complex genomic landscape of SS and a role for inhibition of JAK/STAT pathways for the treatment of SS. PMID:26415585

  5. Independent role for presynaptic FMRP revealed by an FMR1 missense mutation associated with intellectual disability and seizures.

    PubMed

    Myrick, Leila K; Deng, Pan-Yue; Hashimoto, Hideharu; Oh, Young Mi; Cho, Yongcheol; Poidevin, Mickael J; Suhl, Joshua A; Visootsak, Jeannie; Cavalli, Valeria; Jin, Peng; Cheng, Xiaodong; Warren, Stephen T; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2015-01-27

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) results in intellectual disability (ID) most often caused by silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The resulting absence of fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMRP) leads to both pre- and postsynaptic defects, yet whether the pre- and postsynaptic functions of FMRP are independent and have distinct roles in FXS neuropathology remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate an independent presynaptic function for FMRP through the study of an ID patient with an FMR1 missense mutation. This mutation, c.413G > A (R138Q), preserves FMRP's canonical functions in RNA binding and translational regulation, which are traditionally associated with postsynaptic compartments. However, neuronally driven expression of the mutant FMRP is unable to rescue structural defects at the neuromuscular junction in fragile x mental retardation 1 (dfmr1)-deficient Drosophila, suggesting a presynaptic-specific impairment. Furthermore, mutant FMRP loses the ability to rescue presynaptic action potential (AP) broadening in Fmr1 KO mice. The R138Q mutation also disrupts FMRP's interaction with the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels that modulate AP width. These results reveal a presynaptic- and translation-independent function of FMRP that is linked to a specific subset of FXS phenotypes.

  6. Characterization of PTEN mutations in brain cancer reveals that pten mono-ubiquitination promotes protein stability and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jr-M; Schiapparelli, P; Nguyen, H-N; Igarashi, A; Zhang, Q; Abbadi, S; Amzel, L M; Sesaki, H; Quiñones-Hinojosa, A; Iijima, M

    2017-03-06

    PTEN is a PIP3 phosphatase that antagonizes oncogenic PI3-kinase signalling. Due to its critical role in suppressing the potent signalling pathway, it is one of the most mutated tumour suppressors, especially in brain tumours. It is generally thought that PTEN deficiencies predominantly result from either loss of expression or enzymatic activity. By analysing PTEN in malignant glioblastoma primary cells derived from 16 of our patients, we report mutations that block localization of PTEN at the plasma membrane and nucleus without affecting lipid phosphatase activity. Cellular and biochemical analyses as well as structural modelling revealed that two mutations disrupt intramolecular interaction of PTEN and open its conformation, enhancing polyubiquitination of PTEN and decreasing protein stability. Moreover, promoting mono-ubiquitination increases protein stability and nuclear localization of mutant PTEN. Thus, our findings provide a molecular mechanism for cancer-associated PTEN defects and may lead to a brain cancer treatment that targets PTEN mono-ubiquitination.Oncogene advance online publication, 6 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.493.

  7. Neurodegenerative disease mutations in TREM2 reveal a functional surface and distinct loss-of-function mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Daniel L; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M; Karch, Celeste M; Cruchaga, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Holtzman, Michael J; Brett, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in the myeloid immune receptor TREM2 are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. To determine how TREM2 variants contribute to these diseases, we performed structural and functional studies of wild-type and variant proteins. Our 3.1 Å TREM2 crystal structure revealed that mutations found in Nasu-Hakola disease are buried whereas Alzheimer’s disease risk variants are found on the surface, suggesting that these mutations have distinct effects on TREM2 function. Biophysical and cellular methods indicate that Nasu-Hakola mutations impact protein stability and decrease folded TREM2 surface expression, whereas Alzheimer’s risk variants impact binding to a TREM2 ligand. Additionally, the Alzheimer’s risk variants appear to epitope map a functional surface on TREM2 that is unique within the larger TREM family. These findings provide a guide to structural and functional differences among genetic variants of TREM2, indicating that therapies targeting the TREM2 pathway should be tailored to these genetic and functional differences with patient-specific medicine approaches for neurodegenerative disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20391.001 PMID:27995897

  8. Chemogenomic landscape of RUNX1-mutated AML reveals importance of RUNX1 allele dosage in genetics and glucocorticoid sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Simon, Laura; Lavallée, Vincent-Philippe; Bordeleau, Marie-Eve; Krosl, Jana; Baccelli, Irene; Boucher, Geneviève; Lehnertz, Bernhard; Chagraoui, Jalila; MacRae, Tara; Ruel, Réjean; Chantigny, Yves A; Lemieux, Sébastien; Marinier, Anne; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2017-08-30

    RUNX1-mutated (RUNX1mut) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is associated with adverse outcome, highlighting the urgent need for a better genetic characterization of this AML subgroup and for the design of efficient therapeutic strategies for this disease. Towards this goal, we further dissected the mutational spectrum and gene expression profile of RUNX1mut AML and correlated these results to drug sensitivity to identify novel compounds targeting this AML subgroup. RNA-sequencing of 47 RUNX1mut primary AML specimens was performed and sequencing results were compared to those of RUNX1 wild-type samples. Chemical screens were also conducted using RUNX1mut specimens to identify compounds selectively affecting the viability of RUNX1mut AML. We show that samples with no remaining RUNX1 wild-type allele are clinically and genetically distinct and display a more homogeneous gene expression profile. Chemical screening revealed that most RUNX1mut specimens are sensitive to glucocorticoids (GCs) and we confirmed that GCs inhibit AML cell proliferation through their interaction with the Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR). We observed that specimens harboring RUNX1 mutations expected to result in low residual RUNX1 activity are most sensitive to GCs, and that co-associating mutations as well as that GR levels contribute to GC sensitivity. Accordingly, acquired glucocorticoid sensitivity was achieved by negatively regulating RUNX1 expression in human AML cells. Our findings show the profound impact of RUNX1 allele dosage on gene expression profile and glucocorticoid sensitivity in AML, thereby opening opportunities for preclinical testing which may lead to drug repurposing and improved disease characterization. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Mutations in the parainfluenza virus 5 fusion protein reveal domains important for fusion triggering and metastability.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Heath, Carissa M; Shah, Priya A; Alayyoubi, Maher; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Lamb, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    Paramyxovirus membrane glycoproteins F (fusion protein) and HN, H, or G (attachment protein) are critical for virus entry, which occurs through fusion of viral and cellular envelopes. The F protein folds into a homotrimeric, metastable prefusion form that can be triggered by the attachment protein to undergo a series of structural rearrangements, ultimately folding into a stable postfusion form. In paramyxovirus-infected cells, the F protein is activated in the Golgi apparatus by cleavage adjacent to a hydrophobic fusion peptide that inserts into the target membrane, eventually bringing the membranes together by F refolding. However, it is not clear how the attachment protein, known as HN in parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5), interacts with F and triggers F to initiate fusion. To understand the roles of various F protein domains in fusion triggering and metastability, single point mutations were introduced into the PIV5 F protein. By extensive study of F protein cleavage activation, surface expression, and energetics of fusion triggering, we found a role for an immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain, where multiple hydrophobic residues on the PIV5 F protein may mediate F-HN interactions. Additionally, destabilizing mutations of PIV5 F that resulted in HN trigger-independent mutant F proteins were identified in a region along the border of F trimer subunits. The positions of the potential HN-interacting region and the region important for F stability in the lower part of the PIV5 F prefusion structure provide clues to the receptor-binding initiated, HN-mediated F trigger.

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Targeted Mouse Mutations Reveals the Topography of Local Changes in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Kirov, Julia V.; Cipollone, Andreanna; Willis, Brandon; Rapp, Jared; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, Kent C.

    2016-01-01

    The unintended consequences of gene targeting in mouse models have not been thoroughly studied and a more systematic analysis is needed to understand the frequency and characteristics of off-target effects. Using RNA-seq, we evaluated targeted and neighboring gene expression in tissues from 44 homozygous mutants compared with C57BL/6N control mice. Two allele types were evaluated: 15 targeted trap mutations (TRAP); and 29 deletion alleles (DEL), usually a deletion between the translational start and the 3’ UTR. Both targeting strategies insert a bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter (LacZ) and a neomycin resistance selection cassette. Evaluating transcription of genes in +/- 500 kb of flanking DNA around the targeted gene, we found up-regulated genes more frequently around DEL compared with TRAP alleles, however the frequency of alleles with local down-regulated genes flanking DEL and TRAP targets was similar. Down-regulated genes around both DEL and TRAP targets were found at a higher frequency than expected from a genome-wide survey. However, only around DEL targets were up-regulated genes found with a significantly higher frequency compared with genome-wide sampling. Transcriptome analysis confirms targeting in 97% of DEL alleles, but in only 47% of TRAP alleles probably due to non-functional splice variants, and some splicing around the gene trap. Local effects on gene expression are likely due to a number of factors including compensatory regulation, loss or disruption of intragenic regulatory elements, the exogenous promoter in the neo selection cassette, removal of insulating DNA in the DEL mutants, and local silencing due to disruption of normal chromatin organization or presence of exogenous DNA. An understanding of local position effects is important for understanding and interpreting any phenotype attributed to targeted gene mutations, or to spontaneous indels. PMID:26839965

  11. Fundamental Gating Mechanism of Nicotinic Receptor Channel Revealed by Mutation Causing a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Long; Ohno, Kinji; Milone, Margherita; Brengman, Joan M.; Evoli, Amelia; Batocchi, Anna-Paola; Middleton, Lefkos T.; Christodoulou, Kyproula; Engel, Andrew G.; Sine, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the genetic and kinetic defects in a congenital myasthenic syndrome due to the mutation εA411P in the amphipathic helix of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ε subunit. Myasthenic patients from three unrelated families are either homozygous for εA411P or are heterozygous and harbor a null mutation in the second ε allele, indicating that εA411P is recessive. We expressed human AChRs containing wild-type or A411P ε subunits in 293HEK cells, recorded single channel currents at high bandwidth, and determined microscopic rate constants for individual channels using hidden Markov modeling. For individual wild-type and mutant channels, each rate constant distributes as a Gaussian function, but the spread in the distributions for channel opening and closing rate constants is greatly expanded by εA411P. Prolines engineered into positions flanking residue 411 of the ε subunit greatly increase the range of activation kinetics similar to εA411P, whereas prolines engineered into positions equivalent to εA411 in β and δ subunits are without effect. Thus, the amphipathic helix of the ε subunit stabilizes the channel, minimizing the number and range of kinetic modes accessible to individual AChRs. The findings suggest that analogous stabilizing structures are present in other ion channels, and possibly allosteric proteins in general, and that they evolved to maintain uniformity of activation episodes. The findings further suggest that the fundamental gating mechanism of the AChR channel can be explained by a corrugated energy landscape superimposed on a steeply sloped energy well. PMID:10962020

  12. Mutations in the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Fusion Protein Reveal Domains Important for Fusion Triggering and Metastability

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Sayantan; Heath, Carissa M.; Shah, Priya A.; Alayyoubi, Maher; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2013-01-01

    Paramyxovirus membrane glycoproteins F (fusion protein) and HN, H, or G (attachment protein) are critical for virus entry, which occurs through fusion of viral and cellular envelopes. The F protein folds into a homotrimeric, metastable prefusion form that can be triggered by the attachment protein to undergo a series of structural rearrangements, ultimately folding into a stable postfusion form. In paramyxovirus-infected cells, the F protein is activated in the Golgi apparatus by cleavage adjacent to a hydrophobic fusion peptide that inserts into the target membrane, eventually bringing the membranes together by F refolding. However, it is not clear how the attachment protein, known as HN in parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5), interacts with F and triggers F to initiate fusion. To understand the roles of various F protein domains in fusion triggering and metastability, single point mutations were introduced into the PIV5 F protein. By extensive study of F protein cleavage activation, surface expression, and energetics of fusion triggering, we found a role for an immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain, where multiple hydrophobic residues on the PIV5 F protein may mediate F-HN interactions. Additionally, destabilizing mutations of PIV5 F that resulted in HN trigger-independent mutant F proteins were identified in a region along the border of F trimer subunits. The positions of the potential HN-interacting region and the region important for F stability in the lower part of the PIV5 F prefusion structure provide clues to the receptor-binding initiated, HN-mediated F trigger. PMID:24089572

  13. Mutational analysis of Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing ligase reveals regions critical for interaction with KREPA2.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vaibhav; Sen, Rajashree; Moshiri, Houtan; Salavati, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The Trypanosoma brucei parasite causes the vector-borne disease African sleeping sickness. Mitochondrial mRNAs of T. brucei undergo posttranscriptional RNA editing to make mature, functional mRNAs. The final step of this process is catalyzed by the essential ligase, T. brucei RNA Editing Ligase 1 (TbREL1) and the closely related T. brucei RNA Editing Ligase 2 (TbREL2). While other ligases such as T7 DNA ligase have both a catalytic and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB)-fold domain, T. brucei RNA editing ligases contain only the catalytic domain. The OB-fold domain, which is required for interaction with the substrate RNA, is provided in trans by KREPA2 (for TbREL1) and KREPA1 (for TbREL2). KREPA2 enhancement of TbREL1 ligase activity is presumed to occur via an OB-fold-mediated increase in substrate specificity and catalysis. We characterized the interaction between TbREL1 and KREPA2 in vitro using full-length, truncated, and point-mutated ligases. As previously shown, our data indicate strong, specific stimulation of TbREL1 catalytic activity by KREPA2. We narrowed the region of contact to the final 59 C-terminal residues of TbREL1. Specifically, the TbREL1 C-terminal KWKE (441-444) sequence appear to coordinate the KREPA2-mediated enhancement of TbREL1 activities. N-terminal residues F206, T264 and Y275 are crucial for the overall activity of TbREL1, particularly for F206, a mutation of this residue also disrupts KREPA2 interaction. Thus, we have identified the critical TbREL1 regions and amino acids that mediate the KREPA2 interaction.

  14. Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Novel Mutations in X-linked Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Selvan, Lakshmi Dhevi N; Nguyen, Thong T; Manoj, Jesna; Stawiski, Eric W; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Wang, Weiru; Raja, Remya; Ramprasad, Vedam Laxmi; Gupta, Ravi; Murugan, Sakthivel; Kadandale, Jayarama S; Prasad, T S Keshava; Reddy, Kavita; Peterson, Andrew; Pandey, Akhilesh; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Girimaji, Satish Chandra; Gowda, Harsha

    2017-05-01

    Robust diagnostics for many human genetic disorders are much needed in the pursuit of global personalized medicine. Next-generation sequencing now offers new promise for biomarker and diagnostic discovery, in developed as well as resource-limited countries. In this broader global health context, X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is an inherited genetic disorder that is associated with a range of phenotypes impacting societies in both developed and developing countries. Although intellectual disability arises due to diverse causes, a substantial proportion is caused by genomic alterations. Studies have identified causal XLID genomic alterations in more than 100 protein-coding genes located on the X-chromosome. However, the causes for a substantial number of intellectual disability and associated phenotypes still remain unknown. Identification of causative genes and novel mutations will help in early diagnosis as well as genetic counseling of families. Advent of next-generation sequencing methods has accelerated the discovery of new genes involved in mental health disorders. In this study, we analyzed the exomes of three families from India with nonsyndromic XLID comprising seven affected individuals. The affected individuals had varying degrees of intellectual disability, microcephaly, and delayed motor and language milestones. We identified potential causal variants in three XLID genes, including PAK3 (V294M), CASK (complex structural variant), and MECP2 (P354T). Our findings reported in this study extend the spectrum of mutations and phenotypes associated with XLID, and calls for further studies of intellectual disability and mental health disorders with use of next-generation sequencing technologies.

  15. Yeast gain-of-function mutations reveal structure–function relationships conserved among different subfamilies of transient receptor potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhenwei; Zhou, Xinliang; Haynes, W. John; Loukin, Stephen H.; Anishkin, Andriy; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels found in animals, protists, and fungi are primary chemo-, thermo-, or mechanosensors. Current research emphasizes the characteristics of individual channels in each animal TRP subfamily but not the mechanisms common across subfamilies. A forward genetic screen of the TrpY1, the yeast TRP channel, recovered gain-of-function (GOF) mutations with phenotype in vivo and in vitro. Single-channel patch-clamp analyses of these GOF-mutant channels show prominent aberrations in open probability and channel kinetics. These mutations revealed functionally important aromatic amino acid residues in four locations: at the intracellular end of the fifth transmembrane helix (TM5), at both ends of TM6, and at the immediate extension of TM6. These aromatics have counterparts in most TRP subfamilies. The one in TM5 (F380L) aligns precisely with an exceptional Drosophila mutant allele (F550I) that causes constitutive activity in the canonical TRP channel, resulting in rapid and severe retinal degeneration beyond mere loss of phototaxis. Thus, this phenylalanine maintains the balance of various functional states (conformations) of a channel for insect phototransduction as well as one for fungal mechanotransduction. This residue is among a small cluster of phenylalanines found in all known subfamilies of TRP channels. This unique case illustrates that GOF mutations can reveal structure–function principles that can be generalized across different TRP subfamilies. It appears that the conserved aromatics in the four locations have conserved functions in most TRP channels. The possible mechanistic roles of these aromatics and the further use of yeast genetics to dissect TRP channels are discussed. PMID:18042709

  16. Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma With a Somatic KCNJ5 Mutation Revealing APC-Dependent Familial Adenomatous Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Vouillarmet, Julien; Fernandes-Rosa, Fabio; Graeppi-Dulac, Julia; Lantelme, Pierre; Decaussin-Petrucci, Myriam; Thivolet, Charles; Peix, Jean-Louis; Boulkroun, Sheerazed; Clauser, Eric; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2016-11-01

    Recurrent somatic mutations in KCNJ5, CACNA1D, ATP1A1, and ATP2B3 have been identified in aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs). The question as to whether they are responsible for both nodulation and aldosterone production is not solved. We describe the case of a young patient who was diagnosed with severe arterial hypertension due to primary aldosteronism at age 26 years, followed by hemorrhagic stroke 4 years later. Abdominal computed tomography showed bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. Identification of lateralized aldosterone secretion led to right adrenalectomy, followed by normalization of biochemical and hormonal parameters and amelioration of blood pressure. The resected adrenal showed three nodules, one of them expressing aldosterone synthase and harboring a somatic KNCJ5 mutation. A Weiss revisited index of 3 of the APA prompted us to perform a second 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography after surgery, which revealed abnormal rectal activity despite the absence of clinical symptoms. Gastrointestinal exploration showed multiple polyps with severe dysplasia, and the diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis was established in the presence of a germline heterozygous APC gene mutation. Sequencing of somatic DNA from the APA and a second adrenal nodule revealed biallelic APC inactivation due to loss of heterozygosity in both nodules. This case report underlines the need for establishing the frequency of germline APC variants in patients with primary aldosteronism and bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia because their presence may predispose to APA development and severe hypertension well before the first familial adenomatous polyposis symptoms appear. From a mechanistic point of view, it supports a two-hit model for APA development, whereby the first hit drives increased cell proliferation whereas the second hit specifies the pattern of hormonal secretion.

  17. In Silico Analysis of Missense Mutations in LPAR6 Reveals Abnormal Phospholipid Signaling Pathway Leading to Hypotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Syed Irfan; Muhammad, Dost; Jan, Abid; Ali, Raja Hussain; Hassan, Mubashir; Ahmad, Wasim; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis is a rare genetic irreversible hair loss disorder characterized by sparse scalp hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, and sparse axillary and body hair. The study, presented here, established genetic linkage in four families showing similar phenotypes to lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6) gene on chromosome 13q14.11-q21.32. Subsequently, sequence analysis of the gene revealed two previously reported missense mutations including p.D63V in affected members of one and p.I188F in three other families. Molecular modeling and docking analysis was performed to investigate binding of a ligand oleoyl-L-alpha-lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) to modeled protein structures of normal and mutated (D63V, G146R, I188F, N248Y, S3T, L277P) LPAR6 receptors. The mutant receptors showed a complete shift in orientation of LPA at the binding site. In addition, hydropathy analysis revealed a significant change in the membrane spanning topology of LPAR6 helical segments. The present study further substantiated involvement of LPAR6-LPA signaling in the pathogenesis of hypotrichosis/woolly hair and provided additional insight into the molecular mechanism of hair development. PMID:25119526

  18. Progerin impairs chromosome maintenance by depleting CENP-F from metaphase kinetochores in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Eisch, Veronika; Lu, Xiang; Gabriel, Diana; Djabali, Karima

    2016-04-26

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare premature aging disorder that leads to death at an average age of 14.7 years due to myocardial infarction or stroke. The most common mutation in HGPS is at position G608G (GGC>GGT) within exon 11 of the LMNA gene. This mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids at the carboxyl-terminal tail of prelamin A, producing a truncated farnesylated protein called progerin. Lamins play important roles in the organization and structure of the nucleus. The nuclear build-up of progerin causes severe morphological and functional changes in interphase HGPS cells. In this study, we investigated whether progerin elicits spatiotemporal deviations in mitotic processes in HGPS fibroblasts. We analyzed the nuclear distribution of endogenous progerin during mitosis in relation to components of the nuclear lamina, nuclear envelope (NE) and nuclear pores. We found that progerin caused defects in chromosome segregation as early as metaphase, delayed NE reformation and trapped lamina components and inner NE proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum at the end of mitosis. Progerin displaced the centromere protein F (CENP-F) from metaphase chromosome kinetochores, which caused increased chromatin lagging, binucleated cells and genomic instability. This accumulation of progerin-dependent defects with each round of mitosis predisposes cells to premature senescence.

  19. Progerin impairs chromosome maintenance by depleting CENP-F from metaphase kinetochores in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Eisch, Veronika; Lu, Xiang; Gabriel, Diana; Djabali, Karima

    2016-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare premature aging disorder that leads to death at an average age of 14.7 years due to myocardial infarction or stroke. The most common mutation in HGPS is at position G608G (GGC>GGT) within exon 11 of the LMNA gene. This mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids at the carboxyl-terminal tail of prelamin A, producing a truncated farnesylated protein called progerin. Lamins play important roles in the organization and structure of the nucleus. The nuclear build-up of progerin causes severe morphological and functional changes in interphase HGPS cells. In this study, we investigated whether progerin elicits spatiotemporal deviations in mitotic processes in HGPS fibroblasts. We analyzed the nuclear distribution of endogenous progerin during mitosis in relation to components of the nuclear lamina, nuclear envelope (NE) and nuclear pores. We found that progerin caused defects in chromosome segregation as early as metaphase, delayed NE reformation and trapped lamina components and inner NE proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum at the end of mitosis. Progerin displaced the centromere protein F (CENP-F) from metaphase chromosome kinetochores, which caused increased chromatin lagging, binucleated cells and genomic instability. This accumulation of progerin-dependent defects with each round of mitosis predisposes cells to premature senescence. PMID:27015553

  20. Defective Lamin A-Rb Signaling in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome and Reversal by Farnesyltransferase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Marji, Jackleen; O'Donoghue, Seán I.; McClintock, Dayle; Satagopam, Venkata P.; Schneider, Reinhard; Ratner, Desiree; J. Worman, Howard; Gordon, Leslie B.; Djabali, Karima

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder caused by a de novo heterozygous point mutation G608G (GGC>GGT) within exon 11 of LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins. This mutation elicits an internal deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A. The truncated protein, progerin, retains a farnesylated cysteine at its carboxyl terminus, a modification involved in HGPS pathogenesis. Inhibition of protein farnesylation has been shown to improve abnormal nuclear morphology and phenotype in cellular and animal models of HGPS. We analyzed global gene expression changes in fibroblasts from human subjects with HGPS and found that a lamin A-Rb signaling network is a major defective regulatory axis. Treatment of fibroblasts with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor reversed the gene expression defects. Our study identifies Rb as a key factor in HGPS pathogenesis and suggests that its modulation could ameliorate premature aging and possibly complications of physiological aging. PMID:20559568

  1. Epidermal expression of the truncated prelamin A causing Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: effects on keratinocytes, hair and skin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Panteleyev, Andrey A; Owens, David M; Djabali, Karima; Stewart, Colin L; Worman, Howard J

    2008-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by point mutation in LMNA encoding A-type nuclear lamins. The mutations in LMNA activate a cryptic splice donor site, resulting in expression of a truncated, prenylated prelamin A called progerin. Expression of progerin leads to alterations in nuclear morphology, which may underlie pathology in HGPS. We generated transgenic mice expressing progerin in epidermis under control of a keratin 14 promoter. The mice had severe abnormalities in morphology of skin keratinocyte nuclei, including nuclear envelope lobulation and decreased nuclear circularity not present in transgenic mice expressing wild-type human lamin A. Primary keratinocytes isolated from these mice had a higher frequency of nuclei with abnormal shape compared to those from transgenic mice expressing wild-type human lamin A. Treatment with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor significantly improved nuclear shape abnormalities and induced the formation of intranuclear foci in the primary keratinocytes expressing progerin. Similarly, spontaneous immortalization of progerin-expressing cultured keratinocytes selected for cells with normal nuclear morphology. Despite morphological alterations in keratinocyte nuclei, mice expressing progerin in epidermis had normal hair grown and wound healing. Hair and skin thickness were normal even after crossing to Lmna null mice to reduce or eliminate expression of normal A-type lamins. Although progerin induces significant alterations in keratinocyte nuclear morphology that are reversed by inhibition of farnesyltransferasae, epidermal expression does not lead to alopecia or other skin abnormalities typically seen in human subjects with HGPS.

  2. Disease progression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: impact on growth and development.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Leslie B; McCarten, Kathleen M; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Machan, Jason T; Campbell, Susan E; Berns, Scott D; Kieran, Mark W

    2007-10-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare and uniformly fatal segmental "premature aging" disease that affects a variety of organ systems. We sought to more clearly define the bone and weight abnormalities in patients with progeria as potential outcome parameters for prospective clinical trials. We collected and analyzed longitudinal medical information, both retrospectively and prospectively, from a total of 41 children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome spanning 14 countries, from the Progeria Research Foundation Medical and Research Database at the Brown University Center for Gerontology. In addition to a number of previously well-defined phenotypic findings in children with progeria, this study identified abnormalities in the eruption of secondary incisors lingually and palatally in the mandible and maxilla, respectively. Although bony structures appeared normal in early infancy, clavicular resorption, coxa valga, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, modeling abnormalities of long bones with slender diaphyses, flared metaphyses, and overgrown epiphyses developed. Long bones showed normal cortical thickness centrally and progressive focal demineralization peripherally. The most striking finding identified in the retrospective data set of 35 children was an average weight increase of only 0.44 kg/year, beginning at approximately 24 months of age and persisting through life, with remarkable intrapatient linearity. This rate is >2 SD below normal weight gain for any corresponding age and sharply contrasts with the parabolic growth pattern for normal age- and gender-matched children. This finding was also confirmed prospectively. Our analysis shows evidence of a newly identified abnormal growth pattern for children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. The skeletal and dental findings are suggestive of a developmental dysplasia rather than a classical aging process. The presence of decreased and linear weight gain, maintained in all of the

  3. Structural analysis of Notch-regulating Rumi reveals basis for pathogenic mutations

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Hongjun; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Megumi; ...

    2016-07-18

    We present Rumi O-glucosylates the EGF repeats of a growing list of proteins essential in metazoan development, including Notch. Rumi is essential for Notch signaling, and Rumi dysregulation is linked to several human diseases. Despite Rumi's critical roles, it is unknown how Rumi glucosylates a serine of many but not all EGF repeats. Here we report crystal structures of Drosophila Rumi as binary and ternary complexes with a folded EGF repeat and/or donor substrates. These structures provide insights into the catalytic mechanism and show that Rumi recognizes structural signatures of the EGF motif, the U-shaped consensus sequence, C-X-S-X-(P/A)-C and amore » conserved hydrophobic region. We found that five Rumi mutations identified in cancers and Dowling–Degos disease are clustered around the enzyme active site and adversely affect its activity. In conclusion, our study suggests that loss of Rumi activity may underlie these diseases, and the mechanistic insights may facilitate the development of modulators of Notch signaling.« less

  4. Structural analysis of Notch-regulating Rumi reveals basis for pathogenic mutations.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongjun; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Megumi; Liu, Qun; Kantharia, Joshua; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Li, Huilin

    2016-09-01

    Rumi O-glucosylates the EGF repeats of a growing list of proteins essential in metazoan development, including Notch. Rumi is essential for Notch signaling, and Rumi dysregulation is linked to several human diseases. Despite Rumi's critical roles, it is unknown how Rumi glucosylates a serine of many but not all EGF repeats. Here we report crystal structures of Drosophila Rumi as binary and ternary complexes with a folded EGF repeat and/or donor substrates. These structures provide insights into the catalytic mechanism and show that Rumi recognizes structural signatures of the EGF motif, the U-shaped consensus sequence, C-X-S-X-(P/A)-C and a conserved hydrophobic region. We found that five Rumi mutations identified in cancers and Dowling-Degos disease are clustered around the enzyme active site and adversely affect its activity. Our study suggests that loss of Rumi activity may underlie these diseases, and the mechanistic insights may facilitate the development of modulators of Notch signaling.

  5. Structural analysis of Notch-regulating Rumi reveals basis for pathogenic mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hongjun; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Megumi; Liu, Qun; Kantharia, Joshua; Haltiwanger, Robert S.; Li, Huilin

    2016-07-18

    We present Rumi O-glucosylates the EGF repeats of a growing list of proteins essential in metazoan development, including Notch. Rumi is essential for Notch signaling, and Rumi dysregulation is linked to several human diseases. Despite Rumi's critical roles, it is unknown how Rumi glucosylates a serine of many but not all EGF repeats. Here we report crystal structures of Drosophila Rumi as binary and ternary complexes with a folded EGF repeat and/or donor substrates. These structures provide insights into the catalytic mechanism and show that Rumi recognizes structural signatures of the EGF motif, the U-shaped consensus sequence, C-X-S-X-(P/A)-C and a conserved hydrophobic region. We found that five Rumi mutations identified in cancers and Dowling–Degos disease are clustered around the enzyme active site and adversely affect its activity. In conclusion, our study suggests that loss of Rumi activity may underlie these diseases, and the mechanistic insights may facilitate the development of modulators of Notch signaling.

  6. Autozygosity reveals recessive mutations and novel mechanisms in dominant genes: implications in variant interpretation.

    PubMed

    Monies, Dorota; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Kurdi, Wesam; Alanazy, Mohammed H; Alkhalidi, Hisham; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Sulaiman, Raashda A; Faqeih, Eissa; Goljan, Ewa; Ibrahim, Niema; Abdulwahab, Firdous; Hashem, Mais; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Shaheen, Ranad; Arold, Stefan T; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe recessive alleles in strictly dominant genes. Identifying recessive mutations in genes for which only dominant disease or risk alleles have been reported can expand our understanding of the medical relevance of these genes both phenotypically and mechanistically. The Saudi population is enriched for autozygosity, which enhances the homozygous occurrence of alleles, including pathogenic alleles in genes that have been associated only with a dominant inheritance pattern. Exome sequencing of patients from consanguineous families with likely recessive phenotypes was performed. In one family, the genotype of the deceased children was inferred from their parents due to lack of available samples. We describe the identification of 11 recessive variants (5 of which are reported here for the first time) in 11 genes for which only dominant disease or risk alleles have been reported. The observed phenotypes for these recessive variants were novel (e.g., FBN2-related myopathy and CSF1R-related brain malformation and osteopetrosis), typical (e.g., ACTG2-related visceral myopathy), or an apparently healthy state (e.g., PDE11A), consistent with the corresponding mouse knockout phenotypes. Our results show that, in the era of genomic sequencing and "reverse phenotyping," recessive variants in dominant genes should not be dismissed based on perceived "incompatibility" with the patient's phenotype before careful consideration.Genet Med advance online publication 06 April 2017.

  7. Biased clique shuffling reveals stabilizing mutations in cellulase Cel7A.

    PubMed

    Dana, Craig M; Saija, Poonam; Kal, Sarala M; Bryan, Mara B; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2012-11-01

    Renewable fuels produced from biomass-derived sugars are receiving increasing attention. Lignocellulose-degrading enzymes derived from fungi are attractive for saccharification of biomass because they can be produced at higher titers and at significantly less cost than those produced by bacteria or archaea. However, their properties can be suboptimal; for example, they are subject to product inhibition and are sensitive to small changes in pH. Furthermore, increased thermostability would be advantageous for saccharification as increased temperature may reduce the opportunity for microbial contamination. We have developed a mutagenesis platform to improve these properties and applied it to increase the operating temperature and thermostability of the fungal glycosyl hydrolase Cel7A. Secretion of Cel7A at titers of 26 mg/L with limited hyperglycosylation was achieved using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with upregulated protein disulfide isomerase, an engineered α-factor prepro leader, and deletion of a plasma membrane ATPase. Using biased clique shuffling (BCS) of 11 Cel7A genes, we generated a small library (469) rich in activity (86% of the chimeras were active) and identified 51 chimeras with improved thermostability, many of which contained mutations in the loop networks that extend over the enzyme's active site. This BCS library was far superior as a source of active and stable chimeras compared to an equimolar library prepared from the same 11 genes.

  8. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals a De Novo SHANK3 Mutation in Familial Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nemirovsky, Sergio I.; Córdoba, Marta; Zaiat, Jonathan J.; Completa, Sabrina P.; Vega, Patricia A.; González-Morón, Dolores; Medina, Nancy M.; Fabbro, Mónica; Romero, Soledad; Brun, Bianca; Revale, Santiago; Ogara, María Florencia; Pecci, Adali; Marti, Marcelo; Vazquez, Martin; Turjanski, Adrián; Kauffman, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical genomics promise to be especially suitable for the study of etiologically heterogeneous conditions such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Here we present three siblings with ASD where we evaluated the usefulness of Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) for the diagnostic approach to ASD. Methods We identified a family segregating ASD in three siblings with an unidentified cause. We performed WGS in the three probands and used a state-of-the-art comprehensive bioinformatic analysis pipeline and prioritized the identified variants located in genes likely to be related to ASD. We validated the finding by Sanger sequencing in the probands and their parents. Results Three male siblings presented a syndrome characterized by severe intellectual disability, absence of language, autism spectrum symptoms and epilepsy with negative family history for mental retardation, language disorders, ASD or other psychiatric disorders. We found germline mosaicism for a heterozygous deletion of a cytosine in the exon 21 of the SHANK3 gene, resulting in a missense sequence of 5 codons followed by a premature stop codon (NM_033517:c.3259_3259delC, p.Ser1088Profs*6). Conclusions We reported an infrequent form of familial ASD where WGS proved useful in the clinic. We identified a mutation in SHANK3 that underscores its relevance in Autism Spectrum Disorder. PMID:25646853

  9. Arrhythmia Caused by a Drosophila Tropomyosin Mutation Is Revealed Using a Novel Optical Coherence Tomography Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lisha; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.; Bloor, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a severe cardiac condition that causes high mortality. Many genes have been confirmed to be involved in this disease. An ideal system with which to uncover disease mechanisms would be one that can measure the changes in a wide range of cardiac activities associated with mutations in specific, diversely functional cardiac genes. Such a system needs a genetically manipulable model organism that allows in vivo measurement of cardiac phenotypes and a detecting instrument capable of recording multiple phenotype parameters. Methodology and Principal Findings With a simple heart, a transparent body surface at larval stages and available genetic tools we chose Drosophila melanogaster as our model organism and developed for it a dual en-face/Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) instrument capable of recording multiple aspects of heart activity, including heart contraction cycle dynamics, ostia dynamics, heartbeat rate and rhythm, speed of heart wall movement and light reflectivity of cardiomyocytes in situ. We applied this OCT instrument to a model of Tropomyosin-associated DCM established in adult Drosophila. We show that DCM pre-exists in the larval stage and is accompanied by an arrhythmia previously unidentified in this model. We also detect reduced mobility and light reflectivity of cardiomyocytes in mutants. Conclusion These results demonstrate the capability of our OCT instrument to characterize in detail cardiac activity in genetic models for heart disease in Drosophila. PMID:21179409

  10. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural analysis of Notch-regulating Rumi reveals basis for pathogenic mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hongjun; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Megumi; Liu, Qun; Kantharia, Joshua; Haltiwanger, Robert S.; Li, Huilin

    2016-07-18

    We present Rumi O-glucosylates the EGF repeats of a growing list of proteins essential in metazoan development, including Notch. Rumi is essential for Notch signaling, and Rumi dysregulation is linked to several human diseases. Despite Rumi's critical roles, it is unknown how Rumi glucosylates a serine of many but not all EGF repeats. Here we report crystal structures of Drosophila Rumi as binary and ternary complexes with a folded EGF repeat and/or donor substrates. These structures provide insights into the catalytic mechanism and show that Rumi recognizes structural signatures of the EGF motif, the U-shaped consensus sequence, C-X-S-X-(P/A)-C and a conserved hydrophobic region. We found that five Rumi mutations identified in cancers and Dowling–Degos disease are clustered around the enzyme active site and adversely affect its activity. In conclusion, our study suggests that loss of Rumi activity may underlie these diseases, and the mechanistic insights may facilitate the development of modulators of Notch signaling.

  12. Genome biogeography reveals the intraspecific spread of adaptive mutations for a complex trait.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Jill K; Bianconi, Matheus; Besnard, Guillaume; Dunning, Luke T; Lundgren, Marjorie R; Holota, Helene; Vorontsova, Maria S; Hidalgo, Oriane; Leitch, Ilia J; Nosil, Patrik; Osborne, Colin P; Christin, Pascal-Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Physiological novelties are often studied at macro-evolutionary scales such that their micro-evolutionary origins remain poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that key components of a complex trait can evolve in isolation and later be combined by gene flow. We use C4 photosynthesis as a study system, a derived physiology that increases plant productivity in warm, dry conditions. The grass Alloteropsis semialata includes C4 and non-C4 genotypes, with some populations using laterally acquired C4 -adaptive loci, providing an outstanding system to track the spread of novel adaptive mutations. Using genome data from C4 and non-C4 A. semialata individuals spanning the species' range, we infer and date past migrations of different parts of the genome. Our results show that photosynthetic types initially diverged in isolated populations, where key C4 components were acquired. However, rare but recurrent subsequent gene flow allowed the spread of adaptive loci across genetic pools. Indeed, laterally acquired genes for key C4 functions were rapidly passed between populations with otherwise distinct genomic backgrounds. Thus, our intraspecific study of C4 -related genomic variation indicates that components of adaptive traits can evolve separately and later be combined through secondary gene flow, leading to the assembly and optimization of evolutionary innovations.

  13. Mutation in TECPR2 Reveals a Role for Autophagy in Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis

    PubMed Central

    Oz-Levi, Danit; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K.; Hitomi, Yuki; Gelman, Amir; Pelak, Kimberly; Anikster, Yair; Reznik-Wolf, Haike; Bar-Joseph, Ifat; Olender, Tsviya; Alkelai, Anna; Weiss, Meira; Ben-Asher, Edna; Ge, Dongliang; Shianna, Kevin V.; Elazar, Zvulun; Goldstein, David B.; Pras, Elon; Lancet, Doron

    2012-01-01

    We studied five individuals from three Jewish Bukharian families affected by an apparently autosomal-recessive form of hereditary spastic paraparesis accompanied by severe intellectual disability, fluctuating central hypoventilation, gastresophageal reflux disease, wake apnea, areflexia, and unique dysmorphic features. Exome sequencing identified one homozygous variant shared among all affected individuals and absent in controls: a 1 bp frameshift TECPR2 deletion leading to a premature stop codon and predicting significant degradation of the protein. TECPR2 has been reported as a positive regulator of autophagy. We thus examined the autophagy-related fate of two key autophagic proteins, SQSTM1 (p62) and MAP1LC3B (LC3), in skin fibroblasts of an affected individual, as compared to a healthy control, and found that both protein levels were decreased and that there was a more pronounced decrease in the lipidated form of LC3 (LC3II). siRNA knockdown of TECPR2 showed similar changes, consistent with aberrant autophagy. Our results are strengthened by the fact that autophagy dysfunction has been implicated in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases. The discovered TECPR2 mutation implicates autophagy, a central intracellular mechanism, in spastic paraparesis. PMID:23176824

  14. Whole genome sequencing reveals a de novo SHANK3 mutation in familial autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Nemirovsky, Sergio I; Córdoba, Marta; Zaiat, Jonathan J; Completa, Sabrina P; Vega, Patricia A; González-Morón, Dolores; Medina, Nancy M; Fabbro, Mónica; Romero, Soledad; Brun, Bianca; Revale, Santiago; Ogara, María Florencia; Pecci, Adali; Marti, Marcelo; Vazquez, Martin; Turjanski, Adrián; Kauffman, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical genomics promise to be especially suitable for the study of etiologically heterogeneous conditions such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Here we present three siblings with ASD where we evaluated the usefulness of Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) for the diagnostic approach to ASD. We identified a family segregating ASD in three siblings with an unidentified cause. We performed WGS in the three probands and used a state-of-the-art comprehensive bioinformatic analysis pipeline and prioritized the identified variants located in genes likely to be related to ASD. We validated the finding by Sanger sequencing in the probands and their parents. Three male siblings presented a syndrome characterized by severe intellectual disability, absence of language, autism spectrum symptoms and epilepsy with negative family history for mental retardation, language disorders, ASD or other psychiatric disorders. We found germline mosaicism for a heterozygous deletion of a cytosine in the exon 21 of the SHANK3 gene, resulting in a missense sequence of 5 codons followed by a premature stop codon (NM_033517:c.3259_3259delC, p.Ser1088Profs*6). We reported an infrequent form of familial ASD where WGS proved useful in the clinic. We identified a mutation in SHANK3 that underscores its relevance in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

  15. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  16. High-throughput mutation profiling of CTCL samples reveals KRAS and NRAS mutations sensitizing tumors toward inhibition of the RAS/RAF/MEK signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Kießling, Michael K.; Oberholzer, Patrick A.; Mondal, Chandrani; Karpova, Maria B.; Zipser, Marie C.; Lin, William M.; Girardi, Michael; MacConaill, Laura E.; Kehoe, Sarah M.; Hatton, Charlie; French, Lars E.; Garraway, Levi A.; Polier, Gernot; Süss, Dorothee; Klemke, Claus-Detlev; Krammer, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are malignancies of skin-homing lymphoid cells, which have so far not been investigated thoroughly for common oncogenic mutations. We screened 90 biopsy specimens from CTCL patients (41 mycosis fungoides, 36 Sézary syndrome, and 13 non–mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome CTCL) for somatic mutations using OncoMap technology. We detected oncogenic mutations for the RAS pathway in 4 of 90 samples. One mycosis fungoides and one pleomorphic CTCL harbored a KRASG13D mutation; one Sézary syndrome and one CD30+ CTCL harbored a NRASQ61K amino acid change. All mutations were found in stage IV patients (4 of 42) who showed significantly decreased overall survival compared with stage IV patients without mutations (P = .04). In addition, we detected a NRASQ61K mutation in the CTCL cell line Hut78. Knockdown of NRAS by siRNA induced apoptosis in mutant Hut78 cells but not in CTCL cell lines lacking RAS mutations. The NRASQ61K mutation sensitized Hut78 cells toward growth inhibition by the MEK inhibitors U0126, AZD6244, and PD0325901. Furthermore, we found that MEK inhibitors exclusively induce apoptosis in Hut78 cells. Taken together, we conclude that RAS mutations are rare events at a late stage of CTCL, and our preclinical results suggest that such late-stage patients profit from MEK inhibitors. PMID:21209378

  17. A Serendipitous Mutation Reveals the Severe Virulence Defect of a Klebsiella pneumoniae fepB Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Michelle; Broberg, Christopher A.; Walker, Kimberly A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is considered a significant public health threat because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains and the challenge associated with treating life-threatening infections. Capsule, siderophores, and adhesins have been implicated as virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae, yet we lack a clear understanding of how this pathogen causes disease. In a previous screen for virulence genes, we identified a potential new virulence locus and constructed a mutant (smr) with this locus deleted. In this study, we characterize the smr mutant and show that this mutation renders K. pneumoniae avirulent in a pneumonia model of infection. The smr mutant was expected to have a deletion of three genes, but subsequent genome sequencing indicated that a much larger deletion had occurred. Further analysis of the deleted region indicated that the virulence defect of the smr mutant could be attributed to the loss of FepB, a periplasmic protein required for import of the siderophore enterobactin. Interestingly, a ΔfepB mutant was more attenuated than a mutant unable to synthesize enterobactin, suggesting that additional processes are affected. As FepB is highly conserved among the members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, therapeutic targeting of FepB may be useful for the treatment of Klebsiella and other bacterial infections. IMPORTANCE In addition to having a reputation as the causative agent of several types of hospital-acquired infections, Klebsiella pneumoniae has gained widespread attention as a pathogen with a propensity for acquiring antibiotic resistance. It is capable of causing a range of infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis. Because of the rapid emergence of carbapenem resistance among Klebsiella strains, there is a dire need for a better understanding of virulence mechanisms and identification of new drug targets. Here, we identify the periplasmic transporter FepB as one such potential target. PMID

  18. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, cardiovascular disease and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Gonzalez, Jose M; Rivera, Jose; Andres, Vicente

    2011-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a rare human disease characterized by premature aging, is mainly caused by the abnormal accumulation of progerin, a mutant form of the mammalian nuclear envelope component lamin A. HGPS patients exhibit vascular alterations and die at an average age of 13 years, predominantly from myocardial infarction or stroke. Animal models of HGPS have been a valuable tool in the study of the pathological processes implicated in the origin of this disease and its associated cardiovascular alterations. Some of the molecular mechanisms of HGPS might be relevant to the process of normal aging, since progerin is detected in cells from normal elderly humans. Conversely, processes linked to normal aging, such as the increase in oxidative stress, might be relevant to the pathogenic mechanisms of HGPS. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular alterations associated with HGPS, the potential role of oxidative stress, and therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this devastating disease.

  19. Next-generation sequencing of a 40 Mb linkage interval reveals TSPAN12 mutations in patients with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Gilissen, Christian; Hoischen, Alexander; van Nouhuys, C Erik; Boonstra, F Nienke; Blokland, Ellen A W; Arts, Peer; Wieskamp, Nienke; Strom, Tim M; Ayuso, Carmen; Tilanus, Mauk A D; Bouwhuis, Sanne; Mukhopadhyay, Arijit; Scheffer, Hans; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Veltman, Joris A; Cremers, Frans P M; Collin, Rob W J

    2010-02-12

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder characterized by abnormal vascularisation of the peripheral retina, often accompanied by retinal detachment. To date, mutations in three genes (FZD4, LRP5, and NDP) have been shown to be causative for FEVR. In two large Dutch pedigrees segregating autosomal-dominant FEVR, genome-wide SNP analysis identified an FEVR locus of approximately 40 Mb on chromosome 7. Microsatellite marker analysis suggested similar at risk haplotypes in patients of both families. To identify the causative gene, we applied next-generation sequencing in the proband of one of the families, by analyzing all exons and intron-exon boundaries of 338 genes, in addition to microRNAs, noncoding RNAs, and other highly conserved genomic regions in the 40 Mb linkage interval. After detailed bioinformatic analysis of the sequence data, prioritization of all detected sequence variants led to three candidates to be considered as the causative genetic defect in this family. One of these variants was an alanine-to-proline substitution in the transmembrane 4 superfamily member 12 protein, encoded by TSPAN12. This protein has very recently been implicated in regulating the development of retinal vasculature, together with the proteins encoded by FZD4, LRP5, and NDP. Sequence analysis of TSPAN12 revealed two mutations segregating in five of 11 FEVR families, indicating that mutations in TSPAN12 are a relatively frequent cause of FEVR. Furthermore, we demonstrate the power of targeted next-generation sequencing technology to identify disease genes in linkage intervals.

  20. Exome sequencing of a colorectal cancer family reveals shared mutation pattern and predisposition circuitry along tumor pathways

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Suleiman H.; Koko, Mahmoud E.; Nasir, Wafaa H.; Elfateh, Ommnyiah; Elgizouli, Ubai K.; Abdallah, Mohammed O. E.; Alfarouk, Khalid O.; Hussain, Ayman; Faisal, Shima; Ibrahim, Fathelrahamn M. A.; Romano, Maurizio; Sultan, Ali; Banks, Lawrence; Newport, Melanie; Baralle, Francesco; Elhassan, Ahmed M.; Mohamed, Hiba S.; Ibrahim, Muntaser E.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of cancer and cancer multiple phenotypes are not yet fully understood. Next Generation Sequencing promises new insight into the role of genetic interactions in shaping the complexity of cancer. Aiming to outline the differences in mutation patterns between familial colorectal cancer cases and controls we analyzed whole exomes of cancer tissues and control samples from an extended colorectal cancer pedigree, providing one of the first data sets of exome sequencing of cancer in an African population against a background of large effective size typically with excess of variants. Tumors showed hMSH2 loss of function SNV consistent with Lynch syndrome. Sets of genes harboring insertions–deletions in tumor tissues revealed, however, significant GO enrichment, a feature that was not seen in control samples, suggesting that ordered insertions–deletions are central to tumorigenesis in this type of cancer. Network analysis identified multiple hub genes of centrality. ELAVL1/HuR showed remarkable centrality, interacting specially with genes harboring non-synonymous SNVs thus reinforcing the proposition of targeted mutagenesis in cancer pathways. A likely explanation to such mutation pattern is DNA/RNA editing, suggested here by nucleotide transition-to-transversion ratio that significantly departed from expected values (p-value 5e-6). NFKB1 also showed significant centrality along with ELAVL1, raising the suspicion of viral etiology given the known interaction between oncogenic viruses and these proteins. PMID:26442106

  1. Exome sequencing of a colorectal cancer family reveals shared mutation pattern and predisposition circuitry along tumor pathways.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Suleiman H; Koko, Mahmoud E; Nasir, Wafaa H; Elfateh, Ommnyiah; Elgizouli, Ubai K; Abdallah, Mohammed O E; Alfarouk, Khalid O; Hussain, Ayman; Faisal, Shima; Ibrahim, Fathelrahamn M A; Romano, Maurizio; Sultan, Ali; Banks, Lawrence; Newport, Melanie; Baralle, Francesco; Elhassan, Ahmed M; Mohamed, Hiba S; Ibrahim, Muntaser E

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of cancer and cancer multiple phenotypes are not yet fully understood. Next Generation Sequencing promises new insight into the role of genetic interactions in shaping the complexity of cancer. Aiming to outline the differences in mutation patterns between familial colorectal cancer cases and controls we analyzed whole exomes of cancer tissues and control samples from an extended colorectal cancer pedigree, providing one of the first data sets of exome sequencing of cancer in an African population against a background of large effective size typically with excess of variants. Tumors showed hMSH2 loss of function SNV consistent with Lynch syndrome. Sets of genes harboring insertions-deletions in tumor tissues revealed, however, significant GO enrichment, a feature that was not seen in control samples, suggesting that ordered insertions-deletions are central to tumorigenesis in this type of cancer. Network analysis identified multiple hub genes of centrality. ELAVL1/HuR showed remarkable centrality, interacting specially with genes harboring non-synonymous SNVs thus reinforcing the proposition of targeted mutagenesis in cancer pathways. A likely explanation to such mutation pattern is DNA/RNA editing, suggested here by nucleotide transition-to-transversion ratio that significantly departed from expected values (p-value 5e-6). NFKB1 also showed significant centrality along with ELAVL1, raising the suspicion of viral etiology given the known interaction between oncogenic viruses and these proteins.

  2. Computational Assay of H7N9 Influenza Neuraminidase Reveals R292K Mutation Reduces Drug Binding Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Christopher J.; Malaisree, Maturos; Long, Ben; McIntosh-Smith, Simon; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of a novel H7N9 avian influenza that infects humans is a serious cause for concern. Of the genome sequences of H7N9 neuraminidase available, one contains a substitution of arginine to lysine at position 292, suggesting a potential for reduced drug binding efficacy. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir bound to H7N9, H7N9-R292K, and a structurally related H11N9 neuraminidase. They show that H7N9 neuraminidase is structurally homologous to H11N9, binding the drugs in identical modes. The simulations reveal that the R292K mutation disrupts drug binding in H7N9 in a comparable manner to that observed experimentally for H11N9-R292K. Absolute binding free energy calculations with the WaterSwap method confirm a reduction in binding affinity. This indicates that the efficacy of antiviral drugs against H7N9-R292K will be reduced. Simulations can assist in predicting disruption of binding caused by mutations in neuraminidase, thereby providing a computational `assay.'

  3. Mutational analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lysine ɛ-aminotransferase and inhibitor co-crystal structures, reveals distinct binding modes.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sarvind Mani; Agarwal, Aparna; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    Lysine ɛ-aminotransferase (LAT) converts lysine to α-aminoadipate-δ-semialdehyde in a PLP-mediated reaction. We mutated active-site T330, N328 and E243, and structurally rationalized their properties. T330A and T330S mutants cannot bind PLP and are inactive. N328A although inactive, binds to PLP. E243A retains activity, but binds α-ketoglutarate in a different conformation. We had earlier identified 2-aminomethyl piperidine derivative as a LAT inhibitor. The co-crystal structure reveals that it mimics binding of C5 substrates and exhibits two binding modes. E243, that shields R422 in the apo enzyme, exhibits conformational changes to permit the binding of the inhibitor in one of the binding modes. Structure-based analysis of bound water in the active site suggests optimization strategies for synthesis of improved inhibitors.

  4. Exome sequencing revealed PMM2 gene mutations in a French-Canadian family with congenital atrophy of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Noreau, Anne; Beauchemin, Philippe; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A; Dupré, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Two affected and one unaffected siblings from a French-Canadian family were evaluated in our neurogenetic clinic. The oldest brother had intentional and postural hand tremor while his youngest sister presented mild ataxia, a similar hand tremor and global developmental delay. Brain MRIs of the two affected family members further revealed a significant cerebellar atrophy. For this study we conducted a whole exome sequencing (WES) investigation using genomic DNA prepared from the affected brother and sister, alongside DNA prepared from their unaffected mother, and identified two mutations previously reported to cause a rare disorder known as Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation, type Ia (CDG1A) (OMIM #212065). This study emphasizes how the diagnosis of patients presenting a mild tremor phenotype associated with cerebellar atrophy may benefit from WES in establishing genetic defects associated with their conditions.

  5. Pyrosequencing-based methods reveal marked inter-individual differences in oncogene mutation burden in human colorectal tumours.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, S; Walsh, K; Crowther, D; Burczynski, M E; Feuerstein, G; Carey, F A; Steele, R J C; Wolf, C R; Miele, G; Smith, G

    2011-07-12

    The epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted monoclonal antibody cetuximab (Erbitux) was recently introduced for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Treatment response is dependent on Kirsten-Ras (K-Ras) mutation status, in which the majority of patients with tumour-specific K-Ras mutations fail to respond to treatment. Mutations in the oncogenes B-Raf and PIK3CA (phosphoinositide-3-kinase) may also influence cetuximab response, highlighting the need for a sensitive, accurate and quantitative assessment of tumour mutation burden. Mutations in K-Ras, B-Raf and PIK3CA were identified by both dideoxy and quantitative pyrosequencing-based methods in a cohort of unselected colorectal tumours (n=102), and pyrosequencing-based mutation calls correlated with various clinico-pathological parameters. The use of quantitative pyrosequencing-based methods allowed us to report a 13.7% increase in mutation burden, and to identify low-frequency (<30% mutation burden) mutations not routinely detected by dideoxy sequencing. K-Ras and B-Raf mutations were mutually exclusive and independently associated with a more advanced tumour phenotype. Pyrosequencing-based methods facilitate the identification of low-frequency tumour mutations and allow more accurate assessment of tumour mutation burden. Quantitative assessment of mutation burden may permit a more detailed evaluation of the role of specific tumour mutations in the pathogenesis and progression of colorectal cancer and may improve future patient selection for targeted drug therapies.

  6. Pyrosequencing-based methods reveal marked inter-individual differences in oncogene mutation burden in human colorectal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, S; Walsh, K; Crowther, D; Burczynski, M E; Feuerstein, G; Carey, F A; Steele, R J C; Wolf, C R; Miele, G; Smith, G

    2011-01-01

    Background: The epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted monoclonal antibody cetuximab (Erbitux) was recently introduced for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Treatment response is dependent on Kirsten-Ras (K-Ras) mutation status, in which the majority of patients with tumour-specific K-Ras mutations fail to respond to treatment. Mutations in the oncogenes B-Raf and PIK3CA (phosphoinositide-3-kinase) may also influence cetuximab response, highlighting the need for a sensitive, accurate and quantitative assessment of tumour mutation burden. Methods: Mutations in K-Ras, B-Raf and PIK3CA were identified by both dideoxy and quantitative pyrosequencing-based methods in a cohort of unselected colorectal tumours (n=102), and pyrosequencing-based mutation calls correlated with various clinico-pathological parameters. Results: The use of quantitative pyrosequencing-based methods allowed us to report a 13.7% increase in mutation burden, and to identify low-frequency (<30% mutation burden) mutations not routinely detected by dideoxy sequencing. K-Ras and B-Raf mutations were mutually exclusive and independently associated with a more advanced tumour phenotype. Conclusion: Pyrosequencing-based methods facilitate the identification of low-frequency tumour mutations and allow more accurate assessment of tumour mutation burden. Quantitative assessment of mutation burden may permit a more detailed evaluation of the role of specific tumour mutations in the pathogenesis and progression of colorectal cancer and may improve future patient selection for targeted drug therapies. PMID:21712828

  7. Spontaneous mutation reveals influence of exopolysaccharide on Lactobacillus johnsonii surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dertli, Enes; Mulholland, Francis; Collins, Samuel R A; Waldron, Keith W; Bongaerts, Roy J; Mayer, Melinda J; Narbad, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    As a competitive exclusion agent, Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 has been shown to prevent the colonization of selected pathogenic bacteria from the chicken gastrointestinal tract. During growth of the bacterium a rare but consistent emergence of an altered phenotype was noted, generating smooth colonies in contrast to the wild type rough form. A smooth colony variant was isolated and two-dimensional gel analysis of both strains revealed a protein spot with different migration properties in the two phenotypes. The spot in both gels was identified as a putative tyrosine kinase (EpsC), associated with a predicted exopolysaccharide gene cluster. Sequencing of the epsC gene from the smooth mutant revealed a single substitution (G to A) in the coding strand, resulting in the amino acid change D88N in the corresponding gene product. A native plasmid of L. johnsonii was engineered to produce a novel vector for constitutive expression and this was used to demonstrate that expression of the wild type epsC gene in the smooth mutant produced a reversion to the rough colony phenotype. Both the mutant and epsC complemented strains had increased levels of exopolysaccharides compared to the wild type strain, indicating that the rough phenotype is not solely associated with the quantity of exopolysaccharide. Another gene in the cluster, epsE, that encoded a putative undecaprenyl-phosphate galactosephosphotransferase, was deleted in order to investigate its role in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. The ΔepsE strain exhibited a large increase in cell aggregation and a reduction in exopolysaccharide content, while plasmid complementation of epsE restored the wild type phenotype. Flow cytometry showed that the wild type and derivative strains exhibited clear differences in their adhesive ability to HT29 monolayers in tissue culture, demonstrating an impact of EPS on surface properties and bacteria-host interactions.

  8. Coronary artery disease in a Werner syndrome-like form of progeria characterized by low levels of progerin, a splice variant of lamin A.

    PubMed

    Hisama, Fuki M; Lessel, Davor; Leistritz, Dru; Friedrich, Katrin; McBride, Kim L; Pastore, Matthew T; Gottesman, Gary S; Saha, Bidisha; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2011-12-01

    Classical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by LMNA mutations that generate an alternatively spliced form of lamin A, termed progerin. HGPS patients present in early childhood with atherosclerosis and striking features of accelerated aging. We report on two pedigrees of adult-onset coronary artery disease with progeroid features, who were referred to our International Registry of Werner Syndrome (WS) because of clinical features consistent with the diagnosis. No mutations were identified in the WRN gene that is responsible for WS, among these patients. Instead, we found two novel heterozygous mutations at the junction of exon 10 and intron 11 of the LMNA gene. These mutations resulted in the production of progerin at a level substantially lower than that of HGPS. Our findings indicate that LMNA mutations may result in coronary artery disease presenting in the fourth to sixth decades along with short stature and a progeroid appearance resembling WS. The absence of early-onset cataracts in this setting should suggest the diagnosis of progeroid laminopathy. This study illustrates the evolving genotype-phenotype relationship between the amount of progerin produced and the age of onset among the spectrum of restrictive dermopathy, HGPS, and atypical forms of WS.

  9. Enhanced SRSF5 Protein Expression Reinforces Lamin A mRNA Production in HeLa Cells and Fibroblasts of Progeria Patients.

    PubMed

    Vautrot, Valentin; Aigueperse, Christelle; Oillo-Blanloeil, Florence; Hupont, Sébastien; Stevenin, James; Branlant, Christiane; Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    The Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disease leading to accelerated aging. Three mutations of the LMNA gene leading to HGPS were identified. The more frequent ones, c.1824C>T and c.1822G>A, enhance the use of the intron 11 progerin 5'splice site (5'SS) instead of the LMNA 5'SS, leading to the production of the truncated dominant negative progerin. The less frequent c.1868C>G mutation creates a novel 5'SS (LAΔ35 5'SS), inducing the production of another truncated LMNA protein (LAΔ35). Our data show that the progerin 5'SS is used at low yield in the absence of HGPS mutation, whereas utilization of the LAΔ35 5'SS is dependent upon the presence of the c.1868C>G mutation. In the perspective to correct HGPS splicing defects, we investigated whether SR proteins can modify the relative yields of utilization of intron 11 5'SSs. By in cellulo and in vitro assays, we identified SRSF5 as a direct key regulator increasing the utilization of the LMNA 5'SS in the presence of the HGPS mutations. Enhanced SRSF5 expression in dermal fibroblasts of HGPS patients as well as PDGF-BB stimulation of these cells decreased the utilization of the progerin 5'SS, and improves nuclear morphology, opening new therapeutic perspectives for premature aging.

  10. Coronary Artery Disease in a Werner Syndrome-Like Form of Progeria Characterized by Low Levels of Progerin, a Splice Variant of Lamin A

    PubMed Central

    Hisama, Fuki M.; Lessel, Davor; Leistritz, Dru; Friedrich, Katrin; McBride, Kim L.; Pastore, Matthew T.; Gottesman, Gary S.; Saha, Bidisha; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Classical Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by LMNA mutations that generate an alternatively spliced form of lamin A, termed progerin. HGPS patients present in early childhood with atherosclerosis and striking features of accelerated aging. We report on two pedigrees of adult-onset coronary artery disease with progeroid features, who were referred to our International Registry of Werner Syndrome (WS) because of clinical features consistent with the diagnosis. No mutations were identified in the WRN gene that is responsible for WS, among these patients. Instead, we found two novel heterozygous mutations at the junction of exon 10 and intron 11 of the LMNA gene. These mutations resulted in the production of progerin at a level substantially lower than that of HGPS. Our findings indicate that LMNA mutations may result in coronary artery disease presenting in the fourth to sixth decades along with short stature and a progeroid appearance resembling WS. The absence of early-onset cataracts in this setting should suggest the diagnosis of progeroid laminopathy. This study illustrates the evolving genotype–phenotype relationship between the amount of progerin produced and the age of onset among the spectrum of restrictive dermopathy, HGPS, and atypical forms of WS. PMID:22065502

  11. Isolation and characterization of a low phytic acid rice mutant reveals a mutation in the rice orthologue of maize MIK.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Andaya, C B; Newman, J W; Goyal, S S; Tai, T H

    2008-11-01

    Using a forward genetics approach, we isolated two independent low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutants, N15-186 and N15-375. Both mutants are caused by single gene, recessive non-lethal mutations, which result in approximately 75% (N15-186) and 43% (N15-375) reductions in seed phytic acid (inositol hexakisphosphate). High-performance liquid chromatography and GC-MS analysis of seed extracts from N15-186 indicated that, in addition to phytic acid, inositol monophosphate was significantly reduced whereas inorganic phosphorus and myo-inositol were greatly increased when compared with wild-type. The changes observed in N15-186 resemble those previously described for the maize lpa3 mutant. Analysis of N15-375 revealed changes similar to those observed in previously characterized rice lpa1 mutants (i.e. significant reduction in phytic acid and corresponding increase in inorganic phosphorus with little or no change in inositol phosphate intermediates or myo-inositol). Further genetic analysis of the N15-186 mutant indicated that the mutation, designated lpa N15-186, was located in a region on chromosome 3 between the microsatellite markers RM15875 and RM15907. The rice orthologue of maize lpa3, which encodes a myo-inositol kinase, is in this interval. Sequence analysis of the N15-186 allele of this orthologue (Os03g52760) revealed a single base pair change (C/G to T/A) in the first exon of the gene, which results in a nonsense mutation. Our results indicate that lpa N15-186 is a mutant allele of the rice myo-inositol kinase (OsMIK) gene. Identification and characterization of lpa mutants, such as N15-186, will facilitate studies on the regulation of phytic acid biosynthesis and accumulation and help address questions concerning the contribution of the inositol lipid-dependent and independent biosynthetic pathways to the production of seed phytic acid.

  12. Whole-genome sequencing reveals mutational landscape underlying phenotypic differences between two widespread Chinese cattle breeds

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Shi, Tao; Cai, Hanfang; Lan, Xianyong; Zhao, Xin; Plath, Martin; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing provides a powerful tool to obtain more genetic variability that could produce a range of benefits for cattle breeding industry. Nanyang (Bos indicus) and Qinchuan (Bos taurus) are two important Chinese indigenous cattle breeds with distinct phenotypes. To identify the genetic characteristics responsible for variation in phenotypes between the two breeds, in the present study, we for the first time sequenced the genomes of four Nanyang and four Qinchuan cattle with 10 to 12 fold on average of 97.86% and 98.98% coverage of genomes, respectively. Comparison with the Bos_taurus_UMD_3.1 reference assembly yielded 9,010,096 SNPs for Nanyang, and 6,965,062 for Qinchuan cattle, 51% and 29% of which were novel SNPs, respectively. A total of 154,934 and 115,032 small indels (1 to 3 bp) were found in the Nanyang and Qinchuan genomes, respectively. The SNP and indel distribution revealed that Nanyang showed a genetically high diversity as compared to Qinchuan cattle. Furthermore, a total of 2,907 putative cases of copy number variation (CNV) were identified by aligning Nanyang to Qinchuan genome, 783 of which (27%) encompassed the coding regions of 495 functional genes. The gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that many CNV genes were enriched in the immune system and environment adaptability. Among several CNV genes related to lipid transport and fat metabolism, Lepin receptor gene (LEPR) overlapping with CNV_1815 showed remarkably higher copy number in Qinchuan than Nanyang (log2 (ratio) = -2.34988; P value = 1.53E-102). Further qPCR and association analysis investigated that the copy number of the LEPR gene presented positive correlations with transcriptional expression and phenotypic traits, suggesting the LEPR CNV may contribute to the higher fat deposition in muscles of Qinchuan cattle. Our findings provide evidence that the distinct phenotypes of Nanyang and Qinchuan breeds may be due to the different genetic variations including SNPs, indels

  13. Mechanisms of premature vascular aging in children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gerhard-Herman, Marie; Smoot, Leslie B; Wake, Nicole; Kieran, Mark W; Kleinman, Monica E; Miller, David T; Schwartzman, Armin; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Neuberg, Donna; Gordon, Leslie B

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare, segmental premature aging syndrome of accelerated atherosclerosis and early death from myocardial infarction or stroke. This study sought to establish comprehensive characterization of the fatal vasculopathy in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and its relevance to normal aging. We performed cardiovascular assessments at a single clinical site on the largest prospectively studied cohort to date. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was dramatically elevated (mean: 13.00±3.83 m/s). Carotid duplex ultrasound echobrightness, assessed in predefined tissue sites as a measure of arterial wall density, was significantly greater than age- and sex-matched controls in the intima-media (P<0.02), near adventitia (P<0.003), and deep adventitia (P<0.01), as was internal carotid artery mean flow velocity (P<0.0001). Ankle-brachial indices were abnormal in 78% of patients. Effective disease treatments may be heralded by normalizing trends of these noninvasive cardiovascular measures. The data demonstrate that, along with peripheral vascular occlusive disease, accelerated vascular stiffening is an early and pervasive mechanism of vascular disease in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. There is considerable overlap with cardiovascular changes of normal aging, which reinforces the view that defining mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome provides a unique opportunity to isolate a subset of factors influencing cardiovascular disease in the general aging population.

  14. Speeding up the clock: The past, present and future of progeria.

    PubMed

    Swahari, Vijay; Nakamura, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Progeria is a devastating disorder in which patients exhibit signs of premature aging. The most well-known progeroid syndromes include Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) and Werner Syndrome (WS). While HGPS and WS are rare, they often result in severe age-associated complications starting in the early developmental period or after the pubertal growth spurt during adolescence, respectively. In addition, patients with HGPS ultimately die of diseases normally seen in the elderly population, with stroke and myocardial infarction as the leading causes of death. Many WS patients develop similar cardiovascular complications but also have an increased predisposition to developing multiple rare malignancies. These premature aging disorders, as well as animal and cell culture models that recapitulate these diseases, have provided insight into the genetics and cellular pathways that underlie these human conditions and have also uncovered possible mechanisms behind normal aging. Here we discuss the history, the types of progeria, and the various pathophysiological mechanisms that drive these diseases. We also address recent medical advances and treatment modalities for patients with progeria.

  15. Molecular analysis of genetic mutations among cross-resistant second-line injectable drugs reveals a new resistant mutation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Malinga, Lesibana; Brand, Jeannette; Olorunju, Steve; Stoltz, Anton; van der Walt, Martie

    2016-08-01

    Mutations causing mono and cross-resistance among amikacin, kanamycin and capreomycin of second-line injectable drugs (SLIDs) namely are not well understood. We investigated 124 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for mutations within rrs, eis, tlyA and efflux pump (Rv1258c and Rv0194) genes involved in resistance towards SLIDs. The distribution of mutations across these genes were significantly different in strains with mono-resistance or cross-resistance. A new mutation G878A was found in rrs gene, among strains with capreomycin mono-resistant, or in strains with cross-resistance of capreomycin, kanamycin and amikacin. This mutation was associated with the Euro-American X3 lineage (P < 0.0001). Mutations in the two efflux genes Rv1258c and Rv0194 were confined to strains with only capreomycin/amikacin/kanamycin cross-resistance. We further investigated the minimum inhibitory concentration of capreomycin on isolates with new G878A mutation ranging from 8 μg/mL to 64 μg/mL. Inclusion of G878A on new molecular assays could increase the sensitivity of capreomycin resistance detection.

  16. Atypical Progeroid Syndrome due to Heterozygous Missense LMNA Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Subramanyam, Lalitha; Agarwal, Anil K.; Simha, Vinaya; Levine, Benjamin; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Novelli, Giuseppe; Crow, Yanick

    2009-01-01

    Context: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and mandibuloacral dysplasia are well-recognized allelic autosomal dominant and recessive progeroid disorders, respectively, due to mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA) gene. Heterozygous LMNA mutations have also been reported in a small number of patients with a less well-characterized atypical progeroid syndrome (APS). Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the underlying genetic and molecular basis of the phenotype of patients presenting with APS. Results: We report 11 patients with APS from nine families, many with novel heterozygous missense LMNA mutations, such as, P4R, E111K, D136H, E159K, and C588R. These and previously reported patients now reveal a spectrum of clinical features including progeroid manifestations such as short stature, beaked nose, premature graying, partial alopecia, high-pitched voice, skin atrophy over the hands and feet, partial and generalized lipodystrophy with metabolic complications, and skeletal anomalies such as mandibular hypoplasia and mild acroosteolysis. Skin fibroblasts from these patients when assessed for lamin A/C expression using epifluorescence microscopy revealed variable nuclear morphological abnormalities similar to those observed in patients with HGPS. However, these nuclear abnormalities in APS patients could not be rescued with 48 h treatment with farnesyl transferase inhibitors, geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitors or trichostatin-A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Immunoblots of cell lysates from fibroblasts did not reveal prelamin A accumulation in any of these patients. Conclusions: APS patients have a few overlapping but some distinct clinical features as compared with HGPS and mandibuloacral dysplasia. The pathogenesis of clinical manifestations in APS patients seems not to be related to accumulation of mutant farnesylated prelamin A. PMID:19875478

  17. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift mutation in the FAM161A gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in the Indian population.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Saikia, Bibhuti B; Jiang, Zhilin; Zhu, Xiong; Liu, Yuqing; Huang, Lulin; Kim, Ramasamy; Yang, Yin; Qu, Chao; Hao, Fang; Gong, Bo; Tai, Zhengfu; Niu, Lihong; Yang, Zhenglin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Zhu, Xianjun

    2015-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogenous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 50 genes. To identify genetic mutations underlying autosomal recessive RP (arRP), we performed whole-exome sequencing study on two consanguineous marriage Indian families (RP-252 and RP-182) and 100 sporadic RP patients. Here we reported novel mutation in FAM161A in RP-252 and RP-182 with two patients affected with RP in each family. The FAM161A gene was identified as the causative gene for RP28, an autosomal recessive form of RP. By whole-exome sequencing we identified several homozygous genomic regions, one of which included the recently identified FAM161A gene mutated in RP28-linked arRP. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous frameshift mutation p.R592FsX2 in both patients of family RP-252 and family RP-182. In 100 sporadic Indian RP patients, this novel homozygous frameshift mutation p.R592FsX2 was identified in one sporadic patient ARRP-S-I-46 by whole-exome sequencing and validated by Sanger sequencing. Meanwhile, this homozygous frameshift mutation was absent in 1000 ethnicity-matched control samples screened by direct Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, we identified a novel homozygous frameshift mutations of RP28-linked RP gene FAM161A in Indian population.

  18. Massively Parallel Sequencing Reveals an Accumulation of De Novo Mutations and an Activating Mutation of LPAR1 in a Patient with Metastatic Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun S.; Johansson, Peter; Chen, Li; Song, Young K.; Tolman, Catherine; Li, Samuel; Hurd, Laura; Patidar, Rajesh; Wen, Xinyu; Badgett, Thomas C.; Cheuk, Adam T. C.; Marshall, Jean-Claude; Steeg, Patricia S.; Vaqué Díez, José P.; Yu, Yanlin; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Khan, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most genomically heterogeneous childhood malignances studied to date, and the molecular events that occur during the course of the disease are not fully understood. Genomic studies in neuroblastoma have showed only a few recurrent mutations and a low somatic mutation burden. However, none of these studies has examined the mutations arising during the course of disease, nor have they systemically examined the expression of mutant genes. Here we performed genomic analyses on tumors taken during a 3.5 years disease course from a neuroblastoma patient (bone marrow biopsy at diagnosis, adrenal primary tumor taken at surgical resection, and a liver metastasis at autopsy). Whole genome sequencing of the index liver metastasis identified 44 non-synonymous somatic mutations in 42 genes (0.85 mutation/MB) and a large hemizygous deletion in the ATRX gene which has been recently reported in neuroblastoma. Of these 45 somatic alterations, 15 were also detected in the primary tumor and bone marrow biopsy, while the other 30 were unique to the index tumor, indicating accumulation of de novo mutations during therapy. Furthermore, transcriptome sequencing on the 3 tumors demonstrated only 3 out of the 15 commonly mutated genes (LPAR1, GATA2, and NUFIP1) had high level of expression of the mutant alleles, suggesting potential oncogenic driver roles of these mutated genes. Among them, the druggable G-protein coupled receptor LPAR1 was highly expressed in all tumors. Cells expressing the LPAR1 R163W mutant demonstrated a significantly increased motility through elevated Rho signaling, but had no effect on growth. Therefore, this study highlights the need for multiple biopsies and sequencing during progression of a cancer and combinatorial DNA and RNA sequencing approach for systematic identification of expressed driver mutations. PMID:24147068

  19. Exomic Sequencing of Medullary Thyroid Cancer Reveals Dominant and Mutually Exclusive Oncogenic Mutations in RET and RAS

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yuchen; Sausen, Mark; Leary, Rebecca; Bettegowda, Chetan; Roberts, Nicholas J.; Bhan, Sheetal; Ho, Allen S.; Khan, Zubair; Bishop, Justin; Westra, William H.; Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Tufano, Ralph P.; Robinson, Bruce; Dralle, Henning; Toledo, Sergio P. A.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Morris, Luc G. T.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Fagin, James A.; Chan, Timothy A.; Velculescu, Victor E.; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Nelkin, Barry D.; Ball, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare thyroid cancer that can occur sporadically or as part of a hereditary syndrome. Objective: To explore the genetic origin of MTC, we sequenced the protein coding exons of approximately 21,000 genes in 17 sporadic MTCs. Patients and Design: We sequenced the exomes of 17 sporadic MTCs and validated the frequency of all recurrently mutated genes and other genes of interest in an independent cohort of 40 MTCs comprised of both sporadic and hereditary MTC. Results: We discovered 305 high-confidence mutations in the 17 sporadic MTCs in the discovery phase, or approximately 17.9 somatic mutations per tumor. Mutations in RET, HRAS, and KRAS genes were identified as the principal driver mutations in MTC. All of the other additional somatic mutations, including mutations in spliceosome and DNA repair pathways, were not recurrent in additional tumors. Tumors without RET, HRAS, or KRAS mutations appeared to have significantly fewer mutations overall in protein coding exons. Conclusions: Approximately 90% of MTCs had mutually exclusive mutations in RET, HRAS, and KRAS, suggesting that RET and RAS are the predominant driver pathways in MTC. Relatively few mutations overall and no commonly recurrent driver mutations other than RET, HRAS, and KRAS were seen in the MTC exome. PMID:23264394

  20. Analysis of Founder Mutations in Rare Tumors Associated With Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Reveals a Novel Association of BRCA2 Mutations with Ampulla of Vater Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Pedro; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Carla; Pinheiro, Manuela; Leça, Luís; Martins, Ana Teresa; Ferreira, Verónica; Bartosch, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, but they also confer an increased risk for the development of rarer cancers associated with this syndrome, namely, cancer of the pancreas, male breast, peritoneum, and fallopian tube. The objective of this work was to quantify the contribution of the founder mutations BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu and BRCA1 c.3331_3334del for cancer etiology in unselected hospital-based cohorts of Portuguese patients diagnosed with these rarer cancers, by using a strategy that included testing of archival tumor tissue. A total of 102 male breast, 68 pancreatic and 33 peritoneal/fallopian tube carcinoma cases were included in the study. The BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation was observed with a frequency of 7.8% in male breast cancers, 3.0% in peritoneal/fallopian tube cancers, and 1.6% in pancreatic cancers, with estimated total contributions of germline BRCA2 mutations of 14.3%, 5.5%, and 2.8%, respectively. No carriers of the BRCA1 c.3331_3334del mutation were identified. During our study, a patient with an ampulla of Vater carcinoma was incidentally found to carry the BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation, so we decided to test a consecutive series of additional 15 ampullary carcinomas for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations using a combination of direct founder mutation testing and full gene analysis with next generation sequencing. BRCA2 mutations were observed with a frequency of 14.3% in ampulla of Vater carcinomas. In conclusion, taking into account the implications for both the individuals and their family members, we recommend that patients with these neoplasias should be offered BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing and we here show that it is feasible to test for founder mutations in archival tumor tissue. Furthermore, we identified for the first time a high frequency of germline BRCA2 mutations in ampullary cancers.

  1. Analysis of Founder Mutations in Rare Tumors Associated With Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Reveals a Novel Association of BRCA2 Mutations with Ampulla of Vater Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Pedro; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Carla; Pinheiro, Manuela; Leça, Luís; Martins, Ana Teresa; Ferreira, Verónica; Bartosch, Carla

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, but they also confer an increased risk for the development of rarer cancers associated with this syndrome, namely, cancer of the pancreas, male breast, peritoneum, and fallopian tube. The objective of this work was to quantify the contribution of the founder mutations BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu and BRCA1 c.3331_3334del for cancer etiology in unselected hospital-based cohorts of Portuguese patients diagnosed with these rarer cancers, by using a strategy that included testing of archival tumor tissue. A total of 102 male breast, 68 pancreatic and 33 peritoneal/fallopian tube carcinoma cases were included in the study. The BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation was observed with a frequency of 7.8% in male breast cancers, 3.0% in peritoneal/fallopian tube cancers, and 1.6% in pancreatic cancers, with estimated total contributions of germline BRCA2 mutations of 14.3%, 5.5%, and 2.8%, respectively. No carriers of the BRCA1 c.3331_3334del mutation were identified. During our study, a patient with an ampulla of Vater carcinoma was incidentally found to carry the BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation, so we decided to test a consecutive series of additional 15 ampullary carcinomas for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations using a combination of direct founder mutation testing and full gene analysis with next generation sequencing. BRCA2 mutations were observed with a frequency of 14.3% in ampulla of Vater carcinomas. In conclusion, taking into account the implications for both the individuals and their family members, we recommend that patients with these neoplasias should be offered BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing and we here show that it is feasible to test for founder mutations in archival tumor tissue. Furthermore, we identified for the first time a high frequency of germline BRCA2 mutations in ampullary cancers. PMID:27532258

  2. Revealing selection in cancer using the predicted functional impact of cancer mutations. Application to nomination of cancer drivers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Every malignant tumor has a unique spectrum of genomic alterations including numerous protein mutations. There are also hundreds of personal germline variants to be taken into account. The combinatorial diversity of potential cancer-driving events limits the applicability of statistical methods to determine tumor-specific "driver" alterations among an overwhelming majority of "passengers". An alternative approach to determining driver mutations is to assess the functional impact of mutations in a given tumor and predict drivers based on a numerical value of the mutation impact in a particular context of genomic alterations. Recently, we introduced a functional impact score, which assesses the mutation impact by the value of entropic disordering of the evolutionary conservation patterns in proteins. The functional impact score separates disease-associated variants from benign polymorphisms with an accuracy of ~80%. Can the score be used to identify functionally important non-recurrent cancer-driver mutations? Assuming that cancer-drivers are positively selected in tumor evolution, we investigated how the functional impact score correlates with key features of natural selection in cancer, such as the non-uniformity of distribution of mutations, the frequency of affected tumor suppressors and oncogenes, the frequency of concurrent alterations in regions of heterozygous deletions and copy gain; as a control, we used presumably non-selected silent mutations. Using mutations of six cancers studied in TCGA projects, we found that predicted high-scoring functional mutations as well as truncating mutations tend to be evolutionarily selected as compared to low-scoring and silent mutations. This result justifies prediction of mutations-drivers using a shorter list of predicted high-scoring functional mutations, rather than the "long tail" of all mutations. PMID:23819556

  3. A farnesyltransferase inhibitor prevents both the onset and late progression of cardiovascular disease in a progeria mouse model.

    PubMed

    Capell, Brian C; Olive, Michelle; Erdos, Michael R; Cao, Kan; Faddah, Dina A; Tavarez, Urraca L; Conneely, Karen N; Qu, Xuan; San, Hong; Ganesh, Santhi K; Chen, Xiaoyan; Avallone, Hedwig; Kolodgie, Frank D; Virmani, Renu; Nabel, Elizabeth G; Collins, Francis S

    2008-10-14

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is the most dramatic form of human premature aging. Death occurs at a mean age of 13 years, usually from heart attack or stroke. Almost all cases of HGPS are caused by a de novo point mutation in the lamin A (LMNA) gene that results in production of a mutant lamin A protein termed progerin. This protein is permanently modified by a lipid farnesyl group, and acts as a dominant negative, disrupting nuclear structure. Treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) has been shown to prevent and even reverse this nuclear abnormality in cultured HGPS fibroblasts. We have previously created a mouse model of HGPS that shows progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells in the media of the large arteries, in a pattern that is strikingly similar to the cardiovascular disease seen in patients with HGPS. Here we show that the dose-dependent administration of the FTI tipifarnib (R115777, Zarnestra) to this HGPS mouse model can significantly prevent both the onset of the cardiovascular phenotype as well as the late progression of existing cardiovascular disease. These observations provide encouraging evidence for the current clinical trial of FTIs for this rare and devastating disease.

  4. Activating the synthesis of progerin, the mutant prelamin A in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, with antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Fong, Loren G; Vickers, Timothy A; Farber, Emily A; Choi, Christine; Yun, Ui Jeong; Hu, Yan; Yang, Shao H; Coffinier, Catherine; Lee, Roger; Yin, Liya; Davies, Brandon S J; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Bennett, C Frank; Young, Stephen G

    2009-07-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by point mutations that increase utilization of an alternate splice donor site in exon 11 of LMNA (the gene encoding lamin C and prelamin A). The alternate splicing reduces transcripts for wild-type prelamin A and increases transcripts for a truncated prelamin A (progerin). Here, we show that antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) against exon 11 sequences downstream from the exon 11 splice donor site promote alternate splicing in both wild-type and HGPS fibroblasts, increasing the synthesis of progerin. Indeed, wild-type fibroblasts transfected with these ASOs exhibit progerin levels similar to (or greater than) those in fibroblasts from HGPS patients. This progerin was farnesylated, as judged by metabolic labeling studies. The synthesis of progerin in wild-type fibroblasts was accompanied by the same nuclear shape and gene-expression perturbations observed in HGPS fibroblasts. An ASO corresponding to the 5' portion of intron 11 also promoted alternate splicing. In contrast, an ASO against exon 11 sequences 5' to the alternate splice site reduced alternate splicing in HGPS cells and modestly lowered progerin levels. Thus, different ASOs can be used to increase or decrease 'HGPS splicing'. ASOs represent a new and powerful tool for recreating HGPS pathophysiology in wild-type cells.

  5. A bioinformatics analysis of Lamin-A regulatory network: a perspective on epigenetic involvement in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arancio, Walter

    2012-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare human genetic disease that leads to premature aging. HGPS is caused by mutation in the Lamin-A (LMNA) gene that leads, in affected young individuals, to the accumulation of the progerin protein, usually present only in aging differentiated cells. Bioinformatics analyses of the network of interactions of the LMNA gene and transcripts are presented. The LMNA gene network has been analyzed using the BioGRID database (http://thebiogrid.org/) and related analysis tools such as Osprey (http://biodata.mshri.on.ca/osprey/servlet/Index) and GeneMANIA ( http://genemania.org/). The network of interaction of LMNA transcripts has been further analyzed following the competing endogenous (ceRNA) hypotheses (RNA cross-talk via microRNAs [miRNAs]) and using the miRWalk database and tools (www.ma.uni-heidelberg.de/apps/zmf/mirwalk/). These analyses suggest particular relevance of epigenetic modifiers (via acetylase complexes and specifically HTATIP histone acetylase) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodelers (via pBAF, BAF, and SWI/SNF complexes).

  6. Mutational analysis of the pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin, PP2 reveals Ser-104 is crucial for carbohydrate binding.

    PubMed

    Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Bandari, Shyam; Grobe, Kay; Swamy, Musti J

    2014-07-18

    The pumpkin phloem lectin (PP2) is an RNA-binding, defense-related, chitooligosaccharide-specific, homodimeric lectin of Mr 48 kDa expressed at high concentrations in the sieve elements and companion cells of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). In the present study, PP2 was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris with the Saccharomyces α-factor sequence to direct the recombinant protein into the secretory pathway as a prerequisite for unimpaired folding and posttranslational glycosylation of recombinant PP2. Previous computational modeling and ligand docking studies predicted a putative chitooligosaccharide-binding site on the PP2 surface, which was divided into three subsites, with two amino acid residues in each subsite identified as possible candidates for interaction with chitooligosaccharides (CHOs). In this work, mutational analysis and hemagglutination assays were employed to verify the role of the predicted residues in the carbohydrate binding activity of the protein. The results obtained revealed that mutation of Ser-104 to Ala (S104A) at subsite-2 resulted in about 90% loss of agglutination activity of the protein, indicating that Ser-104 is crucial for the binding of CHOs to PP2. Also, L100A (at subsite-1) and K200A (at subsite-3) independently decreased the lectin activity by about 40%, indicating that these two residues also contribute significantly to sugar binding by PP2. Together, these findings confirm that all the three subsites contribute to varying degrees toward PP2-carbohydrate interaction, and confirm the validity of the computational model, as proposed earlier. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Complex mutations & subpopulations of deletions at exon 19 of EGFR in NSCLC revealed by next generation sequencing: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Antonio; Del Grammastro, Maela; Filice, Giampaolo; Felicioni, Lara; Rossi, Giulio; Graziano, Paolo; Sartori, Giuliana; Leone, Alvaro; Malatesta, Sara; Iacono, Michele; Guetti, Luigi; Viola, Patrizia; Mucilli, Felice; Cuccurullo, Franco; Buttitta, Fiamma

    2012-01-01

    Microdeletions at exon 19 are the most frequent genetic alterations affecting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) gene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and they are strongly associated with response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A series of 116 NSCLC DNA samples investigated by Sanger Sequencing (SS), including 106 samples carrying exon 19 EGFR deletions and 10 without deletions (control samples), were subjected to deep next generation sequencing (NGS). All samples with deletions at SS showed deletions with NGS. No deletions were seen in control cases. In 93 (88%) cases, deletions detected by NGS were exactly corresponding to those identified by SS. In 13 cases (12%) NGS resolved deletions not accurately characterized by SS. In 21 (20%) cases the NGS showed presence of complex (double/multiple) frameshift deletions producing a net in-frame change. In 5 of these cases the SS could not define the exact sequence of mutant alleles, in the other 16 cases the results obtained by SS were conventionally considered as deletions plus insertions. Different interpretative hypotheses for complex mutations are discussed. In 46 (43%) tumors deep NGS showed, for the first time to our knowledge, subpopulations of DNA molecules carrying EGFR deletions different from the main one. Each of these subpopulations accounted for 0.1% to 17% of the genomic DNA in the different tumors investigated. Our findings suggest that a region in exon 19 is highly unstable in a large proportion of patients carrying EGFR deletions. As a corollary to this study, NGS data were compared with those obtained by immunohistochemistry using the 6B6 anti-mutant EGFR antibody. The immunoreaction was E746-A750del specific. In conclusion, NGS analysis of EGFR exon 19 in NSCLCs allowed us to formulate a new interpretative hypothesis for complex mutations and revealed the presence of subpopulations of deletions with potential pathogenetic and clinical impact.

  8. Functional analysis reveals splicing mutations of the CASQ2 gene in patients with CPVT: implication for genetic counselling and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Roux-Buisson, Nathalie; Rendu, John; Denjoy, Isabelle; Guicheney, Pascale; Goldenberg, Alice; David, Nadine; Faivre, Laurence; Barthez, Olivier; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Marty, Isabelle; Lunardi, Joel; Fauré, Julien

    2011-09-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a rare and severe arrhythmogenic disorder. Although usually transmitted in a recessive form, few cases of dominant mutations have been reported. Thirteen mutations in the CASQ2 gene have been reported so far in association with CPVT. We performed molecular analysis of the CASQ2 gene in 43 probands with CPVT and identified eight mutations in five patients. Six mutations were novel: one was a single nucleotide deletion, three affected consensus splice sites, and two had unknown consequences: the c.939 + 5G>C and the synonymous c.381C>T variations. We demonstrated that these two variations affected CASQ2 splicing using a splicing minigene assay. These data increased significantly the number of CASQ2 mutations described in association with CPVT, revealed the high prevalence of splicing and truncating mutations in this gene and brought new insight regarding the dominant inheritance of the disease. Moreover, our report of the first splicing abnormalities in CASQ2 caused by intronic mutation or synonymous change underlines the absolute necessity to perform extensive molecular analysis for genetic diagnosis and counseling of CPVT.

  9. Ultra-sensitive sequencing reveals an age-related increase in somatic mitochondrial mutations that are inconsistent with oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Scott R; Salk, Jesse J; Schmitt, Michael W; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is believed to be highly vulnerable to age-associated damage and mutagenesis by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, somatic mtDNA mutations have historically been difficult to study because of technical limitations in accurately quantifying rare mtDNA mutations. We have applied the highly sensitive Duplex Sequencing methodology, which can detect a single mutation among >10(7) wild type molecules, to sequence mtDNA purified from human brain tissue from both young and old individuals with unprecedented accuracy. We find that the frequency of point mutations increases ~5-fold over the course of 80 years of life. Overall, the mutation spectra of both groups are comprised predominantly of transition mutations, consistent with misincorporation by DNA polymerase γ or deamination of cytidine and adenosine as the primary mutagenic events in mtDNA. Surprisingly, G → T mutations, considered the hallmark of oxidative damage to DNA, do not significantly increase with age. We observe a non-uniform, age-independent distribution of mutations in mtDNA, with the D-loop exhibiting a significantly higher mutation frequency than the rest of the genome. The coding regions, but not the D-loop, exhibit a pronounced asymmetric accumulation of mutations between the two strands, with G → A and T → C mutations occurring more often on the light strand than the heavy strand. The patterns and biases we observe in our data closely mirror the mutational spectrum which has been reported in studies of human populations and closely related species. Overall our results argue against oxidative damage being a major driver of aging and suggest that replication errors by DNA polymerase γ and/or spontaneous base hydrolysis are responsible for the bulk of accumulating point mutations in mtDNA.

  10. Multiregion sequencing reveals the intratumor heterogeneity of driver mutations in TP53-driven non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le-Le; Kan, Mengyuan; Zhang, Man-Man; Yu, Sha-Sha; Xie, Hui-Jun; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Wang, Hai-Ning; Zhao, Shuang-Xia; Zhou, Guang-Biao; Song, Huai-Dong; Zheng, Cui-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may account for resistance after a period of targeted therapies because drugs destroy only a portion of tumor cells. The recognition of ITH helps identify high-risk patients to make effective treatment decisions. However, ITH studies are confounded by interpatient heterogeneity in NSCLC and a large amount of passenger mutations. To address these issues, we recruited NSCLC patients carrying TP53 mutations and selected driver mutations within recurrently mutated genes in NSCLC. A total of 12-paired normal-tumor tissues were subjected to whole-genome/whole-exome sequencing. From these, 367 non-silent mutations were selected as driver mutations and deeply sequenced in 61 intratumoral microdissections. We identified a universal prevalence of heterogeneity in all 12 tumors, indicating branched evolution. Although TP53 mutations were observed in single biopsy of all 12 tumors, most tumors consist of both TP53 mutated and non-mutated cells in separate regions within the same tumor. This suggests the late molecular timing of the acquisition of TP53 mutations; therefore, the detection of TP53 mutations in a single biopsy may simply not reflect the early malignant potential. In addition, we identified regions of loss of heterozygosity surrounding TP53 and CDKN2A mutations in tumor 711, which also exhibited heterogeneity in different regional samples. Because the ITH of driver mutations likely has clinical consequences, further efforts are needed to limit the impact of ITH and to improve therapeutic efficiency, which will benefit NSCLC patients receiving targeted treatments.

  11. Targeted next generation sequencing reveals unique mutation profile of primary melanocytic tumors of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    van de Nes, Johannes; Gessi, Marco; Sucker, Antje; Moller, Inga; Stiller, Mathias; Horn, Susanne; Scholz, Simone L.; Pischler, Carina; Stadtler, Nadine; Schilling, Bastian; Zimmer, Lisa; Hillen, Uwe; Scolyer, Richard A.; Buckland, Michael E.; Lauriola, Libero; Pietsch, Torsten; Waha, Andreas; Schadendorf, Dirk; Murali, Rajmohan; Griewank, Klaus G.

    2017-01-01

    Melanocytic tumors originating in the central nervous system (MT-CNS) are rare tumors that generally have a favorable prognosis, however malignant tumors do occur. Pathogenetically MT-CNS are not well characterized. Similar to uveal melanoma and blue nevi, they frequently harbor activating GNAQ or GNA11 mutations. Rare NRAS mutations have also been reported. Other mutations have not yet been described. We analyzed 19 MT-CNS, 7 uveal melanomas and 19 cutaneous melanomas using a targeted next generation sequencing approach analyzing 29 genes known to be frequently mutated in other melanocytic tumors (in particular uveal and cutaneous melanomas). In concordance with previous studies, cutaneous melanoma samples showed frequent NRAS or BRAF mutations, as well as mutations in other genes (e.g. NF1, RAC1, PIK3CA, ARID1A). Metastasized uveal melanomas exhibited mutations in GNAQ, GNA11 and BAP1. In contrast, MT-CNS almost exclusively demonstrated mutations in GNAQ (71 %) or GNA11 (12 %). Interestingly both GNA11 mutations identified were detected in MT-CNS diagnosed as intermediate grade melanocytomas which also recurred. One of these recurrent cases also harbored an inactivating BAP1 mutation and was found to have lost one copy of chromosome 3. Our findings show that while MT-CNS do have GNAQ or GNA11 mutations, they rarely harbor other recurrent mutations found in uveal or cutaneous melanomas. Considering chromosome 3 and BAP1 loss are robust markers of poor prognosis in uveal melanoma, it will prove interesting to determine whether these genomic alterations are also of prognostic significance in MT-CNS. PMID:26744134

  12. Targeted next generation sequencing reveals unique mutation profile of primary melanocytic tumors of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    van de Nes, Johannes; Gessi, Marco; Sucker, Antje; Möller, Inga; Stiller, Mathias; Horn, Susanne; Scholz, Simone L; Pischler, Carina; Stadtler, Nadine; Schilling, Bastian; Zimmer, Lisa; Hillen, Uwe; Scolyer, Richard A; Buckland, Michael E; Lauriola, Libero; Pietsch, Torsten; Waha, Andreas; Schadendorf, Dirk; Murali, Rajmohan; Griewank, Klaus G

    2016-05-01

    Melanocytic tumors originating in the central nervous system (MT-CNS) are rare tumors that generally have a favorable prognosis, however malignant tumors do occur. Pathogenetically MT-CNS are not well characterized. Similar to uveal melanoma and blue nevi, they frequently harbor activating GNAQ or GNA11 mutations. Rare NRAS mutations have also been reported. Other mutations have not yet been described. We analyzed 19 MT-CNS, 7 uveal melanomas and 19 cutaneous melanomas using a targeted next generation sequencing approach analyzing 29 genes known to be frequently mutated in other melanocytic tumors (in particular uveal and cutaneous melanomas). In concordance with previous studies, cutaneous melanoma samples showed frequent NRAS or BRAF mutations, as well as mutations in other genes (e.g. NF1, RAC1, PIK3CA, ARID1A). Metastasized uveal melanomas exhibited mutations in GNAQ, GNA11 and BAP1. In contrast, MT-CNS almost exclusively demonstrated mutations in GNAQ (71 %) or GNA11 (12 %). Interestingly both GNA11 mutations identified were detected in MT-CNS diagnosed as intermediate grade melanocytomas which also recurred. One of these recurrent cases also harbored an inactivating BAP1 mutation and was found to have lost one copy of chromosome 3. Our findings show that while MT-CNS do have GNAQ or GNA11 mutations, they rarely harbor other recurrent mutations found in uveal or cutaneous melanomas. Considering chromosome 3 and BAP1 loss are robust markers of poor prognosis in uveal melanoma, it will prove interesting to determine whether these genomic alterations are also of prognostic significance in MT-CNS.

  13. Genotypic and Phenotypic Variation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals Signatures of Secondary Infection and Mutator Activity in Certain Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Chronic Lung Infections ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ashley E.; Boulianne-Larsen, Carla M.; Chandler, Christine B.; Chiotti, Kami; Kroll, Evgueny; Miller, Scott R.; Taddei, Francois; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Ferroni, Agnes; McInnerney, Kathleen; Franklin, Michael J.; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis lung is limited by genetic variation, which depends on rates of horizontal gene transfer and mutation supply. Because each may increase following secondary infection or mutator emergence, we sought to ascertain the incidence of secondary infection and genetic variability in populations containing or lacking mutators. Forty-nine strains collected over 3 years from 16 patients were phenotyped for antibiotic resistance and mutator status and were genotyped by repetitive-sequence PCR (rep-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Though phenotypic and genetic polymorphisms were widespread and clustered more strongly within than between longitudinal series, their distribution revealed instances of secondary infection. Sequence data, however, indicated that interlineage recombination predated initial strain isolation. Mutator series were more likely to be multiply antibiotic resistant, but not necessarily more variable in their nucleotide sequences, than nonmutators. One mutator and one nonmutator series were sequenced at mismatch repair loci and analyzed for gene content using DNA microarrays. Both were wild type with respect to mutL, but mutators carried an 8-bp mutS deletion causing a frameshift mutation. Both series lacked 126 genes encoding pilins, siderophores, and virulence factors whose inactivation has been linked to adaptation during chronic infection. Mutators exhibited loss of severalfold more genes having functions related to mobile elements, motility, and attachment. A 105-kb, 86-gene deletion was observed in one nonmutator that resulted in loss of virulence factors related to pyoverdine synthesis and elements of the multidrug efflux regulon. Diminished DNA repair activity may facilitate but not be absolutely required for rapid evolutionary change. PMID:21930755

  14. Activating mutations in FGFR3 and HRAS reveal a shared genetic origin for congenital disorders and testicular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Goriely, Anne; Hansen, Ruth M. S.; Taylor, Indira B.; Olesen, Inge A.; Jacobsen, Grete Krag; McGowan, Simon J.; Pfeifer, Susanne P.; McVean, Gilean A. T.; Meyts, Ewa Rajpert-De; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2010-01-01

    Genes mutated in congenital malformation syndromes are frequently implicated in oncogenesis1,2, but the causative germline and somatic mutations occur in separate cells at different times of an organism’s life. Here we unify these processes for mutations arising in male germ cells that show a paternal age effect3. Screening of 30 spermatocytic seminomas4,5 for oncogenic mutations in 17 genes identified 2 mutations in FGFR3 (both 1948A>G encoding K650E, which causes thanatophoric dysplasia in the germline)6 and 5 mutations in HRAS. Massively parallel sequencing of sperm DNA showed that the FGFR3 mutation increases with paternal age, with a similar mutation spectrum at the K650 codon to that in bladder cancer7,8. Most spermatocytic seminomas show increased immunoreactivity for FGFR3 and/or HRAS. We propose that paternal age effect mutations activate a common “selfish” pathway supporting proliferation in the testis, leading to diverse phenotypes in the next generation including fetal lethality, congenital syndromes and cancer. PMID:19855393

  15. The pugilistDominant Mutation of Drosophila melanogaster: A Simple-Sequence Repeat Disorder Reveals Localized Transport in the Eye.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yikang S; Golic, Mary M; Golic, Kent G

    2016-01-01

    The pugilist-Dominant mutation results from fusion of a portion of the gene encoding the tri-functional Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase (E.C.1.5.1.5, E.C.3.5.4.9, E.C.6.3.4.3) to approximately one kb of a heterochromatic satellite repeat. Expression of this fusion gene results in an unusual ring pattern of pigmentation around the eye. We carried out experiments to determine the mechanism for this pattern. By using FLP-mediated DNA mobilization to place different pugD transgenes at pre-selected sites we found that variation in repeat length makes a strong contribution to variability of the pug phenotype. This variation is manifest primarily as differences in the thickness of the pigmented ring. We show that similar phenotypic variation can also be achieved by changing gene copy number. We found that the pugD pattern is not controlled by wingless, which is normally expressed in a similar ring pattern. Finally, we found that physical injury to a pugD eye can lead to pigment deposition in parts of the eye that would not have been pigmented in the absence of injury. Our results are consistent with a model in which a metabolite vital for pigment formation is imported from the periphery of the eye, and pugD limits the extent of its transport towards the center of the eye, thus revealing the existence of a hitherto unknown mechanism of localized transport in the eye.

  16. bop5 mutations reveal new roles for the IC138 phosphoprotein in the regulation of flagellar motility and asymmetric waveforms

    PubMed Central

    VanderWaal, Kristyn E.; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; Fox, Laura; Kamiya, Ritsu; Dutcher, Susan K.; Bayly, Phillip V.; Sale, Winfield S.; Porter, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    I1 dynein, or dynein f, is a highly conserved inner arm isoform that plays a key role in the regulation of flagellar motility. To understand how the IC138 IC/LC subcomplex modulates I1 activity, we characterized the molecular lesions and motility phenotypes of several bop5 alleles. bop5-3, bop5-4, and bop5-5 are null alleles, whereas bop5-6 is an intron mutation that reduces IC138 expression. I1 dynein assembles into the axoneme, but the IC138 IC/LC subcomplex is missing. bop5 strains, like other I1 mutants, swim forward with reduced swimming velocities and display an impaired reversal response during photoshock. Unlike mutants lacking the entire I1 dynein, however, bop5 strains exhibit normal phototaxis. bop5 defects are rescued by transformation with the wild-type IC138 gene. Analysis of flagellar waveforms reveals that loss of the IC138 subcomplex reduces shear amplitude, sliding velocities, and the speed of bend propagation in vivo, consistent with the reduction in microtubule sliding velocities observed in vitro. The results indicate that the IC138 IC/LC subcomplex is necessary to generate an efficient waveform for optimal motility, but it is not essential for phototaxis. These findings have significant implications for the mechanisms by which IC/LC complexes regulate dynein motor activity independent of effects on cargo binding or complex stability. PMID:21697502

  17. Asymmetric mutations in the tetrameric R67 dihydrofolate reductase reveal high tolerance to active-site substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Maximilian C C J C; Morley, Krista L; Volpato, Jordan P; Schmitzer, Andreea R; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2015-01-01

    Type II R67 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a bacterial plasmid-encoded enzyme that is intrinsically resistant to the widely-administered antibiotic trimethoprim. R67 DHFR is genetically and structurally unrelated to E. coli chromosomal DHFR and has an unusual architecture, in that four identical protomers form a single symmetrical active site tunnel that allows only one substrate binding/catalytic event at any given time. As a result, substitution of an active-site residue has as many as four distinct consequences on catalysis, constituting an atypical model of enzyme evolution. Although we previously demonstrated that no single residue of the native active site is indispensable for function, library selection here revealed a strong bias toward maintenance of two native protomers per mutated tetramer. A variety of such “half-native” tetramers were shown to procure native-like catalytic activity, with similar KM values but kcat values 5- to 33-fold lower, illustrating a high tolerance for active-site substitutions. The selected variants showed a reduced thermal stability (Tm ∼12°C lower), which appears to result from looser association of the protomers, but generally showed a marked increase in resilience to heat denaturation, recovering activity to a significantly greater extent than the variant with no active-site substitutions. Our results suggest that the presence of two native protomers in the R67 DHFR tetramer is sufficient to provide native-like catalytic rate and thus ensure cellular proliferation. PMID:25401264

  18. A BLOC-1 Mutation Screen Reveals a Novel BLOC1S3 Mutation in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type 8 (HPS-8)

    PubMed Central

    Cullinane, Andrew R; Curry, James A; Golas, Gretchen; Pan, James; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Hess, Richard A; White, James G; Huizing, Marjan; Gahl, William A

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder of lysosome-related organelle biogenesis and is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and a bleeding diathesis. Over the past decade, we screened 250 patients with HPS-like symptoms for mutations in the genes responsible for HPS subtypes 1–6. We identified 38 individuals with no functional mutations, and therefore, we analyzed all 8 genes encoding the Biogenesis of Lysosome-related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1) proteins in these individuals. Here we describe the identification of a novel nonsense mutation in BLOC1S3 (HPS-8) in a 6 year-old Iranian boy. This mutation caused nonsense mediated decay of BLOC1S3 mRNA and destabilized the BLOC-1 complex. Our patient’s melanocytes showed aberrant localization of TYRP1, with increased plasma-membrane trafficking. These findings confirm a common cellular defect for HPS patients with defects in BLOC-1 subunits. We identified only 2 patients with BLOC-1 defects in our cohort, suggesting that other HPS genes remain to be identified. PMID:22709368

  19. Tissue-specific signaling networks rewired by major somatic mutations in human cancer revealed by proteome-wide discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfei; Cheng, Feixiong; Zhao, Zhongming

    2017-03-31

    Massive somatic mutations discovered by large cancer genome sequencing projects provide unprecedented opportunities in the development of precision oncology. However, deep understanding of functional consequences of somatic mutations and identifying actionable mutations and the related drug responses currently remain formidable challenges. Dysfunction of protein post-translational modification plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and drug responses. In this study, we proposed a novel computational oncoproteomics approach, named kinome-wide network module for cancer pharmacogenomics (KNMPx), for identifying actionable mutations that rewired signaling networks and further characterized tumorigenesis and anticancer drug responses. Specifically, we integrated 746,631 missense mutations in 4,997 tumor samples across 16 major cancer types/subtypes from The Cancer Genome Atlas into over 170,000 carefully curated non-redundant phosphorylation sites covering 18,610 proteins. We found 47 mutated proteins (e.g., ERBB2, TP53, and CTNNB1) that had enriched missense mutations at their phosphorylation sites in pan-cancer analysis. In addition, tissue-specific kinase-substrate interaction modules altered by somatic mutations identified by KNMPx were significantly associated with patient survival. We further reported a kinome-wide landscape of pharmacogenomic interactions by incorporating somatic mutation-rewired signaling networks in 1,001 cancer cell lines via KNMPx. Interestingly, we found that cell lines could highly reproduce oncogenic phosphorylation site mutations identified in primary tumors, supporting the confidence in their associations with sensitivity/resistance of inhibitors targeting EGF, MAPK, PI3K, mTOR, and Wnt signaling pathways. In summary, this systematic oncoproteomics analysis of kinome phosphorylation site mutations illustrates new capabilities to speed the development of precision oncology.

  20. Exome sequencing reveals RAG1 mutations in a child with autoimmunity and sterile chronic multifocal osteomyelitis evolving into disseminated granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Reiff, Andreas; Bassuk, Alexander G; Church, Joseph A; Campbell, Elizabeth; Bing, Xinyu; Ferguson, Polly J

    2013-01-01

    We describe a boy who developed autoinflammatory (chronic sterile multifocal osteomyelitis) and autoimmune (autoimmune cytopenias; vitiligo) phenotypes who subsequently developed disseminated granulomatous disease. Whole exome sequencing revealed homozygous RAG1 mutations thus expanding the spectrum of combined immunodeficiency with autoimmunity and granuloma that can occur with RAG deficiency. PMID:24122031

  1. Pathogenetic Analysis of Sinonasal Teratocarcinosarcomas Reveal Actionable β-catenin Overexpression and a β-catenin Mutation.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Burgin, Sarah J; Yanik, Megan; Scott, Megan V; Bradford, Carol R; McHugh, Jonathan B; McLean, Scott A; Sullivan, Stephen E; Nor, Jacques E; McKean, Erin L; Brenner, J Chad

    2017-08-01

    Objective  Sinonasal teratocarcinosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors of the skull base. Treatment options are limited and outcomes are poor. Little is known in regard to the genetic factors regulating these tumors. Characterization of actionable molecular alterations in these tumors could provide potentially successful therapeutic options. Methods  We performed targeted exome sequencing on an index sinonasal teratocarcinosarcoma specimen to identify potential driver mutations. We performed immunohistochemical stains for β-catenin on paraffin-embedded tissue on the index tumor and a subsequent teratocarcinosarcoma. Online databases of cancer mutations (Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer and The Cancer Genome Atlas) were accessed. Results  We identified an activating p.S45F mutation in β-catenin in our index sinonasal teratocarcinosarcoma. This mutation results in constitutive signaling in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. We confirmed β-catenin overexpression and nuclear localization via immunohistochemistry in the index tumor and a second patient. The p.S45F activating mutation was found in a variety of solid tumors, and accounts for 3.3 to 10.4% of all known β-catenin mutations. Conclusion  We identified a potential driver mutation in β-catenin in a sinonasal teratocarcinosarcoma, resulting in β-catenin overexpression. These findings suggest a role for the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in sinonasal teratocarcinosarcoma tumorigenesis and a role for anti-β-catenin targeted therapy.

  2. Analyses of Dynein Heavy Chain Mutations Reveal Complex Interactions Between Dynein Motor Domains and Cellular Dynein Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Razafsky, David S.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies. PMID:22649085

  3. Mutational landscape of antibody variable domains reveals a switch modulating the interdomain conformational dynamics and antigen binding

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Patrick; Lee, Chingwei V.; Walters, Benjamin T.; Janakiraman, Vasantharajan; Stinson, Jeremy; Patapoff, Thomas W.; Fuh, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    Somatic mutations within the antibody variable domains are critical to the immense capacity of the immune repertoire. Here, via a deep mutational scan, we dissect how mutations at all positions of the variable domains of a high-affinity anti-VEGF antibody G6.31 impact its antigen-binding function. The resulting mutational landscape demonstrates that large portions of antibody variable domain positions are open to mutation, and that beneficial mutations can be found throughout the variable domains. We determine the role of one antigen-distal light chain position 83, demonstrating that mutation at this site optimizes both antigen affinity and thermostability by modulating the interdomain conformational dynamics of the antigen-binding fragment. Furthermore, by analyzing a large number of human antibody sequences and structures, we demonstrate that somatic mutations occur frequently at position 83, with corresponding domain conformations observed for G6.31. Therefore, the modulation of interdomain dynamics represents an important mechanism during antibody maturation in vivo. PMID:28057863

  4. A multi-species comparative structural bioinformatics analysis of inherited mutations in α-D-Mannosidase reveals strong genotype-phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Lysosomal α-mannosidase is an enzyme that acts to degrade N-linked oligosaccharides and hence plays an important role in mannose metabolism in humans and other mammalian species, especially livestock. Mutations in the gene (MAN2B1) encoding lysosomal α-D-mannosidase cause improper coding, resulting in dysfunctional or non-functional protein, causing the disease α-mannosidosis. Mapping disease mutations to the structure of the protein can help in understanding the functional consequences of these mutations and thus indirectly, the finer aspects of the pathology and clinical manifestations of the disease, including phenotypic severity as a function of the genotype. Results A comprehensive homology modeling study of all the wild-type and inherited mutations of lysosomal α-mannosidase in four different species, human, cow, cat and guinea pig, reveals a significant correlation between the severity of the genotype and the phenotype in α-mannosidosis. We used the X-ray crystallographic structure of bovine lysosomal α-mannosidase as template, containing only two disulphide bonds and some ligands, to build structural models of wild-type structures with four disulfide linkages and all bound ligands. These wild-type models were then used as templates for disease mutations. All the truncations and substitutions involving the residues in and around the active site and those that destabilize the fold led to severe genotypes resulting in lethal phenotypes, whereas the mutations lying away from the active site were milder in both their genotypic and phenotypic expression. Conclusion Based on the co-location of mutations from different organisms and their proximity to the enzyme active site, we have extrapolated observed mutations from one species to homologous positions in other organisms, as a predictive approach for detecting likely α-mannosidosis. Besides predicting new disease mutations, this approach also provides a way for detecting mutation hotspots in the

  5. Genomic analysis of non-NF2 meningiomas reveals mutations in TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, and SMO

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Victoria E.; Erson-Omay, E. Zeynep; Serin, Akdes; Yin, Jun; Cotney, Justin; Özduman, Koray; Avşar, Timuçin; Li, Jie; Murray, Phillip B.; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Günel, Jennifer Moliterno; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Yılmaz, Baran; Grady, Conor; Tanrıkulu, Bahattin; Bakırcıoğlu, Mehmet; Kaymakçalan, Hande; Caglayan, Ahmet Okay; Sencar, Leman; Ceyhun, Emre; Atik, A. Fatih; Bayri, Yaşar; Bai, Hanwen; Kolb, Luis E.; Hebert, Ryan; Omay, S. Bulent; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Choi, Murim; Overton, John D.; Holland, Eric C.; Mane, Shrikant; State, Matthew W.; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Baehring, Joachim M.; Gutin, Philip H.; Piepmeier, Joseph M.; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Brennan, Cameron W.; Pamir, M. Necmettin; Kılıç, Türker; Lifton, Richard P.; Noonan, James P.; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2016-01-01

    We report genomic analysis of 300 meningiomas, the most common primary brain tumors, leading to the discovery of mutations in TRAF7, a proapoptotic E3 ubiquitin ligase, in nearly one-fourth of all meningiomas. Mutations in TRAF7commonly occurred with a recurrent mutation (K409Q) in KLF4, a transcription factor known for its role in inducing pluripotency, or with AKT1E17K, a mutation known to activate the PI3K pathway. SMO mutations, which activate Hedgehog signaling, were identified in ~5% of non-NF2 mutant meningiomas. These non-NF2 meningiomas were clinically distinctive—nearly always benign, with chromosomal stability, and originating from the medial skull base. In contrast, meningiomas with mutant NF2 and/or chromosome 22 loss were more likely to be atypical, showing genomic instability, and localizing to the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. Collectively, these findings identify distinct meningioma subtypes, suggesting avenues for targeted therapeutics. PMID:23348505

  6. Genomic analysis of non-NF2 meningiomas reveals mutations in TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, and SMO.

    PubMed

    Clark, Victoria E; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Serin, Akdes; Yin, Jun; Cotney, Justin; Ozduman, Koray; Avşar, Timuçin; Li, Jie; Murray, Phillip B; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Günel, Jennifer Moliterno; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Yilmaz, Baran; Grady, Conor; Tanrikulu, Bahattin; Bakircioğlu, Mehmet; Kaymakçalan, Hande; Caglayan, Ahmet Okay; Sencar, Leman; Ceyhun, Emre; Atik, A Fatih; Bayri, Yaşar; Bai, Hanwen; Kolb, Luis E; Hebert, Ryan M; Omay, S Bulent; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Choi, Murim; Overton, John D; Holland, Eric C; Mane, Shrikant; State, Matthew W; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Baehring, Joachim M; Gutin, Philip H; Piepmeier, Joseph M; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Brennan, Cameron W; Pamir, M Necmettin; Kiliç, Türker; Lifton, Richard P; Noonan, James P; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2013-03-01

    We report genomic analysis of 300 meningiomas, the most common primary brain tumors, leading to the discovery of mutations in TRAF7, a proapoptotic E3 ubiquitin ligase, in nearly one-fourth of all meningiomas. Mutations in TRAF7 commonly occurred with a recurrent mutation (K409Q) in KLF4, a transcription factor known for its role in inducing pluripotency, or with AKT1(E17K), a mutation known to activate the PI3K pathway. SMO mutations, which activate Hedgehog signaling, were identified in ~5% of non-NF2 mutant meningiomas. These non-NF2 meningiomas were clinically distinctive-nearly always benign, with chromosomal stability, and originating from the medial skull base. In contrast, meningiomas with mutant NF2 and/or chromosome 22 loss were more likely to be atypical, showing genomic instability, and localizing to the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. Collectively, these findings identify distinct meningioma subtypes, suggesting avenues for targeted therapeutics.

  7. A postnatal role for embryonic myosin revealed by MYH3 mutations that alter TGFβ signaling and cause autosomal dominant spondylocarpotarsal synostosis

    PubMed Central

    Zieba, Jennifer; Zhang, Wenjuan; Chong, Jessica X.; Forlenza, Kimberly N.; Martin, Jorge H.; Heard, Kelly; Grange, Dorothy K.; Butler, Merlin G.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Lachman, Ralph S.; Nickerson, Deborah; Regnier, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H.; Bamshad, Michael; Krakow, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is a skeletal disorder characterized by progressive vertebral, carpal and tarsal fusions, and mild short stature. The majority of affected individuals have an autosomal recessive form of SCT and are homozygous or compound heterozygous for nonsense mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein filamin B (FLNB), but a subset do not have FLNB mutations. Exome sequence analysis of three SCT patients negative for FLNB mutations identified an autosomal dominant form of the disease due to heterozygosity for missense or nonsense mutations in MYH3, which encodes embryonic myosin. Cells transfected with the MYH3 missense mutations had reduced TGFβ signaling, revealing a regulatory role for embryonic myosin in the TGFβ signaling pathway. In wild-type mice, there was persistent postnatal expression of embryonic myosin in the small muscles joining the neural arches of the spine suggesting that loss of myosin function in these muscles contribute to the disease. Our findings demonstrate that dominant mutations in MYH3 underlie autosomal dominant SCT, identify a postnatal role for embryonic myosin and suggest that altered regulation of signal transduction in the muscles within the spine may lead to the development of vertebral fusions. PMID:28205584

  8. Whole Genome Sequencing Revealed Mutations in Two Independent Genes as the Underlying Cause of Retinal Degeneration in an Ashkenazi Jewish Pedigree.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Kevin; Duncan, Jacque L; Biswas, Pooja; Soto-Hermida, Angel; Matsui, Hiroko; Jakubosky, David; Suk, John; Telenti, Amalio; Frazer, Kelly A; Ayyagari, Radha

    2017-08-24

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) causes progressive photoreceptor loss resulting from mutations in over 80 genes. This study identified the genetic cause of RP in three members of a non-consanguineous pedigree. Detailed ophthalmic evaluation was performed in the three affected family members. Whole exome sequencing (WES) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) were performed in the three affected and the two unaffected family members and variants were filtered to detect rare, potentially deleterious variants segregating with disease. WES and WGS did not identify potentially pathogenic variants shared by all three affected members. However, WES identified a previously reported homozygous nonsense mutation in KIZ (c.226C>T, p.Arg76*) in two affected sisters, but not in their affected second cousin. WGS revealed a novel 1.135 kb homozygous deletion in a retina transcript of C21orf2 and a novel 30.651 kb heterozygous deletion in CACNA2D4 in the affected second cousin. The sisters with the KIZ mutation carried no copies of the C21orf2 or CACNA2D4 deletions, while the second cousin with the C21orf2 and CACNA2D4 deletions carried no copies of the KIZ mutation. This study identified two independent, homozygous mutations in genes previously reported in autosomal recessive RP in a non-consanguineous family, and demonstrated the value of WGS when WES fails to identify likely disease-causing mutations.

  9. A postnatal role for embryonic myosin revealed by MYH3 mutations that alter TGFβ signaling and cause autosomal dominant spondylocarpotarsal synostosis.

    PubMed

    Zieba, Jennifer; Zhang, Wenjuan; Chong, Jessica X; Forlenza, Kimberly N; Martin, Jorge H; Heard, Kelly; Grange, Dorothy K; Butler, Merlin G; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Lachman, Ralph S; Nickerson, Deborah; Regnier, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H; Bamshad, Michael; Krakow, Deborah

    2017-02-16

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is a skeletal disorder characterized by progressive vertebral, carpal and tarsal fusions, and mild short stature. The majority of affected individuals have an autosomal recessive form of SCT and are homozygous or compound heterozygous for nonsense mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein filamin B (FLNB), but a subset do not have FLNB mutations. Exome sequence analysis of three SCT patients negative for FLNB mutations identified an autosomal dominant form of the disease due to heterozygosity for missense or nonsense mutations in MYH3, which encodes embryonic myosin. Cells transfected with the MYH3 missense mutations had reduced TGFβ signaling, revealing a regulatory role for embryonic myosin in the TGFβ signaling pathway. In wild-type mice, there was persistent postnatal expression of embryonic myosin in the small muscles joining the neural arches of the spine suggesting that loss of myosin function in these muscles contribute to the disease. Our findings demonstrate that dominant mutations in MYH3 underlie autosomal dominant SCT, identify a postnatal role for embryonic myosin and suggest that altered regulation of signal transduction in the muscles within the spine may lead to the development of vertebral fusions.

  10. Whole exome sequencing reveals a functional mutation in the GAIN domain of the Bai2 receptor underlying a forward mutagenesis hyperactivity QTL.

    PubMed

    Speca, David J; Trimmer, James S; Peterson, Andrew S; Díaz, Elva

    2017-09-12

    The identification of novel genes underlying complex mouse behavioral traits remains an important step in understanding normal brain function and its dysfunction in mental health disorders. To identify dominant mutations that influence locomotor activity, we performed a mouse N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) forward mutagenesis screen and mapped several loci as quantitative traits. Here we describe the fine-mapping and positional cloning of a hyperactivity locus mapped to the medial portion of mouse chromosome four. We employed a modified recombinant progeny testing approach to fine-map the confidence interval from ≈20 Mb down to ≈5 Mb. Whole exome resequencing of all exons in this region revealed a single missense mutation in the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (Bai2). This mutation, R619W, is located in a critical extracellular domain that is a hotspot for mutations in this receptor class. We find that in two different mammalian cell lines, surface expression of Bai2 R619W is markedly reduced relative to wild-type Bai2, suggesting that R619W is a loss-of-function mutation. Our results highlight the powerful combination of ENU mutagenesis and next-generation sequencing to identify specific mutations that manifest as subtle behavioral phenotypes.

  11. X chromosome exome sequencing reveals a novel ALG13 mutation in a nonsyndromic intellectual disability family with multiple affected male siblings.

    PubMed

    Bissar-Tadmouri, Nesrine; Donahue, Whithey L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Nelson, Stanley F; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Kantarci, Sibel

    2014-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a heterogeneous condition associated with mutations in >100 genes, accounting for over 10% of all cases of intellectual impairment. The majority of XLID cases show nonsyndromic forms (NSXLID), in which intellectual disability is the sole clinically consistent manifestation. Here we performed X chromosome exome (X-exome) sequencing to identify the causative mutation in an NSXLID family with four affected male siblings and five unaffected female siblings. The X-exome sequencing at 88× coverage in one affected male sibling revealed a novel missense mutation (p.Tyr1074Cys) in the asparagine-linked glycosylation 13 homolog (ALG13) gene. Segregation analysis by Sanger sequencing showed that the all affected siblings were hemizygous and the mother was heterozygous for the mutation. Recently, a de novo missense mutation in ALG13 has been reported in a patient with X-linked congenital disorders of glycosylation type I. Our study reports the first case of NSXLID caused by a mutation in ALG13 involved in protein N-glycosylation.

  12. Ultra-deep sequencing detects ovarian cancer cells in peritoneal fluid and reveals somatic TP53 mutations in noncancerous tissues.

    PubMed

    Krimmel, Jeffrey D; Schmitt, Michael W; Harrell, Maria I; Agnew, Kathy J; Kennedy, Scott R; Emond, Mary J; Loeb, Lawrence A; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Risques, Rosa Ana

    2016-05-24

    Current sequencing methods are error-prone, which precludes the identification of low frequency mutations for early cancer detection. Duplex sequencing is a sequencing technology that decreases errors by scoring mutations present only in both strands of DNA. Our aim was to determine whether duplex sequencing could detect extremely rare cancer cells present in peritoneal fluid from women with high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). These aggressive cancers are typically diagnosed at a late stage and are characterized by TP53 mutations and peritoneal dissemination. We used duplex sequencing to analyze TP53 mutations in 17 peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC and 20 from women without cancer. The tumor TP53 mutation was detected in 94% (16/17) of peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC (frequency as low as 1 mutant per 24,736 normal genomes). Additionally, we detected extremely low frequency TP53 mutations (median mutant fraction 1/13,139) in peritoneal fluid from nearly all patients with and without cancer (35/37). These mutations were mostly deleterious, clustered in hotspots, increased with age, and were more abundant in women with cancer than in controls. The total burden of TP53 mutations in peritoneal fluid distinguished cancers from controls with 82% sensitivity (14/17) and 90% specificity (18/20). Age-associated, low frequency TP53 mutations were also found in 100% of peripheral blood samples from 15 women with and without ovarian cancer (none with hematologic disorder). Our results demonstrate the ability of duplex sequencing to detect rare cancer cells and provide evidence of widespread, low frequency, age-associated somatic TP53 mutation in noncancerous tissue.

  13. Genetic mutational profiling analysis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveal mutant FBXW7 as a prognostic indicator for inferior survival.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lan; Lu, Ling; Yang, Yongchen; Sun, Hengjuan; Chen, Xi; Huang, Yi; Wang, Xingjuan; Zou, Lin; Bao, Liming

    2015-11-01

    T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive neoplasm for which there are currently no adequate biomarkers for developing risk-adapted therapeutic regimens to improve the treatment outcome. In this prospective study of 83 Chinese patients (54 children and 29 adults) with de novo T-ALL, we analyzed mutations in 11 T-ALL genes: NOTCH1, FBXW7, PHF6, PTEN, N-RAS, K-RAS, WT1, IL7R, PIK3CA, PIK3RA, and AKT1. NOTCH1 mutations were identified in 51.9 and 37.9 % of pediatric and adult patients, respectively, and these patients showed improved overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS). The FBXW7 mutant was present in 25.9 and 6.9 % of pediatric and adult patients, respectively, and was associated with inferior OS and EFS in pediatric T-ALL. Multivariate analysis revealed that mutant FBXW7 was an independent prognostic indicator for inferior EFS (hazard ratio [HR] 4.38; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.15-16.71; p = 0.03) and tended to be associated with reduced OS (HR 2.81; 95 % CI 0.91-8.69; p = 0.074) in pediatric T-ALL. Mutant PHF6 was present in 13 and 20.7 % of our childhood and adult cohorts, respectively, while PTEN mutations were noted in 11.1 % of the pediatric patients. PTEN and NOTCH1 mutations were almost mutually exclusive, while IL7R and WT1 mutations were rare in pediatric T-ALL and PTPN11 and AKT1 mutations were infrequent in adult T-ALL. This study revealed differences in the mutational profiles of pediatric and adult T-ALL and suggests mutant FBXW7 as an independent prognostic indicator for inferior survival in pediatric T-ALL.

  14. Integrative proteomics, genomics, and translational immunology approaches reveal mutated forms of Proteolipid Protein 1 (PLP1) and mutant-specific immune response in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qendro, Veneta; Bugos, Grace A; Lundgren, Debbie H; Glynn, John; Han, May H; Han, David K

    2017-03-01

    In order to gain mechanistic insights into multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis, we utilized a multi-dimensional approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in myelin proteins lead to immune activation and central nervous system autoimmunity in MS. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human MS brain lesions revealed seven unique mutations of PLP1; a key myelin protein that is known to be destroyed in MS. Surprisingly, in-depth genomic analysis of two MS patients at the genomic DNA and mRNA confirmed mutated PLP1 in RNA, but not in the genomic DNA. Quantification of wild type and mutant PLP RNA levels by qPCR further validated the presence of mutant PLP RNA in the MS patients. To seek evidence linking mutations in abundant myelin proteins and immune-mediated destruction of myelin, specific immune response against mutant PLP1 in MS patients was examined. Thus, we have designed paired, wild type and mutant peptide microarrays, and examined antibody response to multiple mutated PLP1 in sera from MS patients. Consistent with the idea of different patients exhibiting unique mutation profiles, we found that 13 out of 20 MS patients showed antibody responses against specific but not against all the mutant-PLP1 peptides. Interestingly, we found mutant PLP-directed antibody response against specific mutant peptides in the sera of pre-MS controls. The results from integrative proteomic, genomic, and immune analyses reveal a possible mechanism of mutation-driven pathogenesis in human MS. The study also highlights the need for integrative genomic and proteomic analyses for uncovering pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases.

  15. Mutational analyses on X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy reveal a novel cryptic splicing and three missense mutations in the ABCD1 gene.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kun-Long; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Keng, Wee Teik; Chen, Hui-Ju; Liang, Jao-Shwann; Ngu, Lock Hock; Lu, Jyh-Feng

    2013-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by a defective peroxisomal membrane transporter, ABCD1, responsible for transporting very-long-chain fatty acid substrate into peroxisomes for degradation. The main biochemical defect, which is also one of the major diagnostic hallmarks, of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is the accumulation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids in all tissues and body fluids. Direct and reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reactions followed by DNA sequencing-based mutational analyses were performed on one Taiwanese and three Malaysian X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy families. A novel splicing donor site mutation (c.1272+1g>a) was identified in a Taiwanese X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patient, resulting in a deletion of 121 bp and a premature stop codon (p.Val425fs*92) in messenger-RNA transcript. This deletion is caused by the activation of a cryptic splicing donor site in exon 4 of the ABCD1 gene, which is consistent with the prediction by several online algorithms. In addition, three previously described missense mutations (c.965T>C, c.1978C>T, and c.2006A>G), leading to aberrant ABCD1 of p.Leu322Pro, p.Arg660Trp, and p.His669Arg, were also identified in Malaysian probands. This is the first report to unveil unequivocally that cryptic splicing-induced aberrant messenger-RNA carrying an internal frameshift deletion results from an intronic mutation in the ABCD1 gene. Furthermore, a polymorphism in intron 9 (c.1992-32c/t; refSNP: rs4898368) of the ABCD1 gene was commonly observed in both Taiwanese and Malaysian populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequency and type of inheritable mutations induced by γ rays in rice as revealed by whole genome sequencing*#

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Zheng, Yun-chao; Cui, Hai-rui; Fu, Hao-wei; Shu, Qing-yao; Huang, Jian-zhong

    2016-01-01

    Mutation breeding is based on the induction of genetic variations; hence knowledge of the frequency and type of induced mutations is of paramount importance for the design and implementation of a mutation breeding program. Although γ ray irradiation has been widely used since the 1960s in the breeding of about 200 economically important plant species, molecular elucidation of its genetic effects has so far been achieved largely by analysis of target genes or genomic regions. In the present study, the whole genomes of six γ-irradiated M2 rice plants were sequenced; a total of 144–188 million high-quality (Q>20) reads were generated for each M2 plant, resulting in genome coverage of >45 times for each plant. Single base substitution (SBS) and short insertion/deletion (Indel) mutations were detected at the average frequency of 7.5×10−6–9.8×10−6 in the six M2 rice plants (SBS being about 4 times more frequent than Indels). Structural and copy number variations, though less frequent than SBS and Indel, were also identified and validated. The mutations were scattered in all genomic regions across 12 rice chromosomes without apparent hotspots. The present study is the first genome-wide single-nucleotide resolution study on the feature and frequency of γ irradiation-induced mutations in a seed propagated crop; the findings are of practical importance for mutation breeding of rice and other crop species. PMID:27921396

  17. Frequency and type of inheritable mutations induced by γ rays in rice as revealed by whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Zheng, Yun-Chao; Cui, Hai-Rui; Fu, Hao-Wei; Shu, Qing-Yao; Huang, Jian-Zhong

    Mutation breeding is based on the induction of genetic variations; hence knowledge of the frequency and type of induced mutations is of paramount importance for the design and implementation of a mutation breeding program. Although γ ray irradiation has been widely used since the 1960s in the breeding of about 200 economically important plant species, molecular elucidation of its genetic effects has so far been achieved largely by analysis of target genes or genomic regions. In the present study, the whole genomes of six γ-irradiated M2 rice plants were sequenced; a total of 144-188 million high-quality (Q>20) reads were generated for each M2 plant, resulting in genome coverage of >45 times for each plant. Single base substitution (SBS) and short insertion/deletion (Indel) mutations were detected at the average frequency of 7.5×10(-6)-9.8×10(-6) in the six M2 rice plants (SBS being about 4 times more frequent than Indels). Structural and copy number variations, though less frequent than SBS and Indel, were also identified and validated. The mutations were scattered in all genomic regions across 12 rice chromosomes without apparent hotspots. The present study is the first genome-wide single-nucleotide resolution study on the feature and frequency of γ irradiation-induced mutations in a seed propagated crop; the findings are of practical importance for mutation breeding of rice and other crop species.

  18. Comprehensive genotyping and clinical characterisation reveal 27 novel NKX2-1 mutations and expand the phenotypic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Thorwarth, Anne; Schnittert-Hübener, Sarah; Schrumpf, Pamela; Müller, Ines; Jyrch, Sabine; Dame, Christof; Biebermann, Heike; Kleinau, Gunnar; Katchanov, Juri; Schuelke, Markus; Ebert, Grit; Steininger, Anne; Bönnemann, Carsten; Brockmann, Knut; Christen, Hans-Jürgen; Crock, Patricia; deZegher, Francis; Griese, Matthias; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Ivarsson, Sten; Hübner, Christoph; Kapelari, Klaus; Plecko, Barbara; Rating, Dietz; Stoeva, Iva; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Grüters, Annette; Ullmann, Reinhard; Krude, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    Background NKX2-1 encodes a transcription factor with large impact on the development of brain, lung and thyroid. Germline mutations of NKX2-1 can lead to dysfunction and malformations of these organs. Starting from the largest coherent collection of patients with a suspected phenotype to date, we systematically evaluated frequency, quality and spectrum of phenotypic consequences of NKX2-1 mutations. Methods After identifying mutations by Sanger sequencing and array CGH, we comprehensively reanalysed the phenotype of affected patients and their relatives. We employed electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) to detect alterations of NKX2-1 DNA binding. Gene expression was monitored by means of in situ hybridisation and compared with the expression level of MBIP, a candidate gene presumably involved in the disorders and closely located in close genomic proximity to NKX2-1. Results Within 101 index patients, we detected 17 point mutations and 10 deletions. Neurological symptoms were the most consistent finding (100%), followed by lung affection (78%) and thyroidal dysfunction (75%). Novel symptoms associated with NKX2-1 mutations comprise abnormal height, bouts of fever and cardiac septum defects. In contrast to previous reports, our data suggest that missense mutations in the homeodomain of NKX2-1 not necessarily modify its DNA binding capacity and that this specific type of mutations may be associated with mild pulmonary phenotypes such as asthma. Two deletions did not include NKX2-1, but MBIP, whose expression spatially and temporarily coincides with NKX2-1 in early murine development. Conclusions The high incidence of NKX2-1 mutations strongly recommends the routine screen for mutations in patients with corresponding symptoms. However, this analysis should not be confined to the exonic sequence alone, but should take advantage of affordable NGS technology to expand the target to adjacent regulatory sequences and the NKX2-1 interactome in order to maximise the

  19. Comprehensive Mutational Analysis of Sucrose-Metabolizing Pathways in Streptococcus mutans Reveals Novel Roles for the Sucrose Phosphotransferase System Permease

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Sucrose is perhaps the most efficient carbohydrate for the promotion of dental caries in humans, and the primary caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans encodes multiple enzymes involved in the metabolism of this disaccharide. Here, we engineered a series of mutants lacking individual or combinations of sucrolytic pathways to understand the control of sucrose catabolism and to determine whether as-yet-undisclosed pathways for sucrose utilization were present in S. mutans. Growth phenotypes indicated that gtfBCD (encoding glucan exopolysaccharide synthases), ftf (encoding the fructan exopolysaccharide synthase), and the scrAB pathway (sugar-phosphotransferase system [PTS] permease and sucrose-6-PO4 hydrolase) constitute the majority of the sucrose-catabolizing activity; however, mutations in any one of these genes alone did not affect planktonic growth on sucrose. The multiple-sugar metabolism pathway (msm) contributed minimally to growth on sucrose. Notably, a mutant lacking gtfBC, which cannot produce water-insoluble glucan, displayed improved planktonic growth on sucrose. Meanwhile, loss of scrA led to growth stimulation on fructooligosaccharides, due in large part to increased expression of the fruAB (fructanase) operon. Using the LevQRST four-component signal transduction system as a model for carbohydrate-dependent gene expression in strains lacking extracellular sucrases, a PlevD-cat (EIIALev) reporter was activated by pulsing with sucrose. Interestingly, ScrA was required for activation of levD expression by sucrose through components of the LevQRST complex, but not for activation by the cognate LevQRST sugars fructose or mannose. Sucrose-dependent catabolite repression was also evident in strains containing an intact sucrose PTS. Collectively, these results reveal a novel regulatory circuitry for the control of sucrose catabolism, with a central role for ScrA. PMID:23222725

  20. The E646D-ATP13A4 mutation associated with autism reveals a defect in calcium regulation.

    PubMed

    Vallipuram, Janaki; Grenville, Jeffrey; Crawford, Dorota A

    2010-03-01

    ATP13A4 is a member of the subfamily of P5-type ATPases. P5-type ATPases are the least studied of the P-type ATPase subfamilies with no ion specificities assigned to them. In order to elucidate ATP13A4 function, we studied the protein's subcellular localization and tested whether it is involved in calcium regulation. The intracellular calcium concentration was measured in COS-7 cells over-expressing mouse ATP13A4 using ratiometric calcium imaging with fura-2 AM as a calcium indicator. The results of this study show that ATP13A4 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Furthermore, we demonstrate that over-expression of ATP13A4 in COS-7 cells caused a significant increase in the intracellular calcium level. Interestingly, over-expression of the sequence variant containing a substitution of aspartic acid for a glutamic acid (E646D), previously found in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), did not increase the free cellular calcium likely due to the mutation. In this study, we also describe the expression of ATP13A4 during mouse embryonic development. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that ATP13A4 was highly expressed at embryonic days 15-17, when neurogenesis takes place. The present study is the first to provide further insights into the biological role of a P5-type ATPase. Our results demonstrate that ATP13A4 may be involved in calcium regulation and that its expression is developmentally regulated. Overall, this study provides support for the hypothesis that ATP13A4 may play a vital role in the developing nervous system and its impairment can contribute to the symptoms seen in ASD.

  1. Analysis of GNAS1 and overlapping transcripts identifies the parental origin of mutations in patients with sporadic Albright hereditary osteodystrophy and reveals a model system in which to observe the effects of splicing mutations on translated and untranslated messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Sarah J; Wilson, Louise C

    2003-04-01

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is caused by heterozygous deactivating GNAS1 mutations. There is a parent-of-origin effect. Maternally derived mutations are usually associated with resistance to parathyroid hormone termed "pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia." Paternally derived mutations are associated with AHO but usually normal hormone responsiveness, known as "pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism." These observations can be explained by tissue-specific GNAS1 imprinting. Regulation of the genomic region that encompasses GNAS1 is complex. At least three upstream exons that splice to exon 2 of GNAS1 and that are imprinted have been reported. NESP55 is exclusively maternally expressed, whereas exon 1A and XL alphas are exclusively paternally expressed. We set out to identify the parental origin of GNAS1 mutations in patients with AHO by searching for their mutation in the overlapping transcripts. This information would be of value in patients with sporadic disease, for predicting their endocrine phenotype and planning follow-up. In doing so, we identified mutations that resulted in nonsense-mediated decay of the mutant Gs alpha transcript but that were detectable in NESP55 messenger RNA (mRNA), probably because they lie within its 3' untranslated region. Analysis of the NESP55 transcripts revealed the creation of a novel splice site in one patient and an unusual intronic mutation that caused retention of the intron in a further patient, neither of which could be detected by analysis of the Gs alpha complementary DNA. This cluster of overlapping transcripts represents a useful model system in which to analyze the effects that mutant sequence has on mRNA-in particular, splicing-and the mechanisms of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

  2. Analysis of GNAS1 and Overlapping Transcripts Identifies the Parental Origin of Mutations in Patients with Sporadic Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy and Reveals a Model System in Which to Observe the Effects of Splicing Mutations on Translated and Untranslated Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, Sarah J.; Wilson, Louise C.

    2003-01-01

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is caused by heterozygous deactivating GNAS1 mutations. There is a parent-of-origin effect. Maternally derived mutations are usually associated with resistance to parathyroid hormone termed “pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia.” Paternally derived mutations are associated with AHO but usually normal hormone responsiveness, known as “pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism.” These observations can be explained by tissue-specific GNAS1 imprinting. Regulation of the genomic region that encompasses GNAS1 is complex. At least three upstream exons that splice to exon 2 of GNAS1 and that are imprinted have been reported. NESP55 is exclusively maternally expressed, whereas exon 1A and XLαs are exclusively paternally expressed. We set out to identify the parental origin of GNAS1 mutations in patients with AHO by searching for their mutation in the overlapping transcripts. This information would be of value in patients with sporadic disease, for predicting their endocrine phenotype and planning follow-up. In doing so, we identified mutations that resulted in nonsense-mediated decay of the mutant Gsα transcript but that were detectable in NESP55 messenger RNA (mRNA), probably because they lie within its 3′ untranslated region. Analysis of the NESP55 transcripts revealed the creation of a novel splice site in one patient and an unusual intronic mutation that caused retention of the intron in a further patient, neither of which could be detected by analysis of the Gsα complementary DNA. This cluster of overlapping transcripts represents a useful model system in which to analyze the effects that mutant sequence has on mRNA—in particular, splicing—and the mechanisms of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. PMID:12624854

  3. Single cell mutational analysis of PIK3CA in circulating tumor cells and metastases in breast cancer reveals heterogeneity, discordance, and mutation persistence in cultured disseminated tumor cells from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic decisions in cancer are generally guided by molecular biomarkers or, for some newer therapeutics, primary tumor genotype. However, because biomarkers or genotypes may change as new metastases emerge, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood are being investigated for a role in guiding real-time drug selection during disease progression, expecting that CTCs will comprehensively represent the full spectrum of genomic changes in metastases. However, information is limited regarding mutational heterogeneity among CTCs and metastases in breast cancer as discerned by single cell analysis. The presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow also carry prognostic significance in breast cancer, but with variability between CTC and DTC detection. Here we analyze a series of single tumor cells, CTCs, and DTCs for PIK3CA mutations and report CTC and corresponding metastatic genotypes. Methods We used the MagSweeper, an immunomagnetic separation device, to capture live single tumor cells from breast cancer patients’ primary and metastatic tissues, blood, and bone marrow. Single cells were screened for mutations in exons 9 and 20 of the PIK3CA gene. Captured DTCs grown in cell culture were also sequenced for PIK3CA mutations. Results Among 242 individual tumor cells isolated from 17 patients and tested for mutations, 48 mutated tumor cells were identified in three patients. Single cell analyses revealed mutational heterogeneity among CTCs and tumor cells in tissues. In a patient followed serially, there was mutational discordance between CTCs, DTCs, and metastases, and among CTCs isolated at different time points. DTCs from this patient propagated in vitro contained a PIK3CA mutation, which was maintained despite morphological changes during 21 days of cell culture. Conclusions Single cell analysis of CTCs can demonstrate genotypic heterogeneity, changes over time, and discordance from DTCs and distant metastases. We present a cautionary

  4. Genomic and immunohistochemical analysis in human adrenal cortical neoplasia reveal beta-catenin mutations as potential prognostic biomarker.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Alexandra E; Nucera, Carmelo; Lam, Quynh T; Nguyen, Ahnthu; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Sadow, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation for malignancy of the adrenal cortex, adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC), is a challenge in surgical pathology due to its relative rarity and histologic overlap with its benign counterpart, adrenocortical adenoma (ACA). We characterized a cohort of human ACC and ACA, including a molecular screen, with a goal of identifying potential diagnostic adjuncts. Thirty-six cases of ACC underwent histologic and clinical review. In the 31 ACC cases with available material and a cohort of 10 ACA cases, a multiplex nucleotide amplification molecular screen from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue was peformed. ACCs demonstrated a wide variety of clinical and histologic characteristics with overall poor but unpredictable survival for subjects with ACC. By mutational screen, 12/31 (38.7%) carcinomas harbored CTNNB1 mutations, 1 with an additional TP53 mutation; 1 case each had isolated APC and TP53 mutations; 16 were wild-type for all tested loci; and 1 case demonstrated repeated assay failures. Two of the 10 ACA (20%) demonstrated CTNNB1 mutations by mutational screen, with no additional mutations. Immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin was performed and compared with the results of the molecular screen. Strong nuclear beta-catenin immunopositivity corresponded to the presence of CTNNB1 mutation by genotyping in 10 of 12 cases (83% sensitivity); the mismatched case(s) demonstrated strong membranous staining by immunohistochemistry. Seventeen of the 18 cases without CTNNB1 mutation showed membranous staining or did not stain (94% specificity); the mismatched case demonstrated scattered (<10%) positive nuclei. Both mutations in ACA were corroborated with immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin. No histomorphologic parameter appeared dominant in lesions with a particular mutational status. Based on these results, mutational status of CTNNB1 in adrenal cortical neoplasms can be predicted with reasonable accuracy by immunohistochemical cellular localization. Nuclear

  5. Computational Analysis Reveals the Association of Threonine 118 Methionine Mutation in PMP22 Resulting in CMT-1A.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Chundi Vinay; Swetha, Rayapadi G; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    The T118M mutation in PMP22 gene is associated with Charcot Marie Tooth, type 1A (CMT1A). CMT1A is a form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Mutations in CMT related disorder are seen to increase the stability of the protein resulting in the diseased state. We performed SNP analysis for all the nsSNPs of PMP22 protein and carried out molecular dynamics simulation for T118M mutation to compare the stability difference between the wild type protein structure and the mutant protein structure. The mutation T118M resulted in the overall increase in the stability of the mutant protein. The superimposed structure shows marked structural variation between the wild type and the mutant protein structures.

  6. Assessing the efficacy of protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors in mouse models of progeria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao H; Chang, Sandy Y; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Young, Stephen G; Fong, Loren G

    2010-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by the accumulation of a farnesylated form of prelamin A (progerin). Previously, we showed that blocking protein farnesylation with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI) ameliorates the disease phenotypes in mouse model of HGPS (Lmna(HG/+)). However, the interpretation of the FTI treatment studies is open to question in light of recent studies showing that mice expressing a nonfarnesylated version of progerin (Lmna(nHG/+)) develop progeria-like disease phenotypes. The fact that Lmna(nHG/+) mice manifest disease raised the possibility that the beneficial effects of an FTI in Lmna(HG/+) mice were not due to the effects of the drug on the farnesylation of progerin, but may have been due to unanticipated secondary effects of the drug on other farnesylated proteins. To address this issue, we compared the ability of an FTI to improve progeria-like disease phenotypes in both Lmna(HG/+) and Lmna(nHG/+) mice. In Lmna(HG/+) mice, the FTI reduced disease phenotypes in a highly significant manner, but the drug had no effect in Lmna(nHG/+) mice. The failure of the FTI to ameliorate disease in Lmna(nHG/+) mice supports the idea that the beneficial effects of an FTI in Lmna(HG/+) mice are due to the effect of drug on the farnesylation of progerin.

  7. Treatment considerations in hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hazan-Molina, H; Aizenbud, D; Dror, Aizenbud D

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Guilford progeria syndrome is an extremely rare condition classified as one of the premature ageing syndromes. This case presents a 16-year-old Israeli female patient, suffering from a variant of Hutchinson-Guilford progeria with a history of treatment with oral biphosphnates. The patient presented with typical cranial and facial features of the syndrome including delayed teeth eruption and root development probably due to insufficient jaw growth and severs retrognatic position of the maxilla and mandible. Orthodontic treatment considerations are described along with those required in light of the previous treatment by oral biphosphonates.All primary teeth were extracted in three appointments while creating as minimal trauma as possible to the surrounding tissue and alveolar bone. For now, the patient refuses to begin the orthodontic treatment course. There are no limitations to conduct any dental procedures in progeria patients, however, extreme caution must be exercised during oral surgery due to the inelasticity of tissues and dermal atrophy. Orthodontic procedure commencement should be early enough to manage the delayed development and eruption of teeth. Patients taking oral biphosphonates should be advised of this potential complication. If orthodontic treatment is considered appropriate, plans should be assessed and modified to include compromises.

  8. Biomechanical Strain Exacerbates Inflammation on a Progeria-on-a-Chip Model.

    PubMed

    Ribas, João; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Pitrez, Patrícia R; Leijten, Jeroen; Miscuglio, Mario; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Nissan, Xavier; Ferreira, Lino; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-02-17

    Organ-on-a-chip platforms seek to recapitulate the complex microenvironment of human organs using miniaturized microfluidic devices. Besides modeling healthy organs, these devices have been used to model diseases, yielding new insights into pathophysiology. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disease showing accelerated vascular aging, leading to the death of patients due to cardiovascular diseases. HGPS targets primarily vascular cells, which reside in mechanically active tissues. Here, a progeria-on-a-chip model is developed and the effects of biomechanical strain are examined in the context of vascular aging and disease. Physiological strain induces a contractile phenotype in primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs), while a pathological strain induces a hypertensive phenotype similar to that of angiotensin II treatment. Interestingly, SMCs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells of HGPS donors (HGPS iPS-SMCs), but not from healthy donors, show an exacerbated inflammatory response to strain. In particular, increased levels of inflammation markers as well as DNA damage are observed. Pharmacological intervention reverses the strain-induced damage by shifting gene expression profile away from inflammation. The progeria-on-a-chip is a relevant platform to study biomechanics in vascular biology, particularly in the setting of vascular disease and aging, while simultaneously facilitating the discovery of new drugs and/or therapeutic targets.

  9. K-core decomposition of a protein domain co-occurrence network reveals lower cancer mutation rates for interior cores.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Arnold I; Andrews, Simeon; Ahmed, Ikhlak; Azis, Thasni Ka; Malek, Joel A

    2015-01-01

    Network biology currently focuses primarily on metabolic pathways, gene regulatory, and protein-protein interaction networks. While these approaches have yielded critical information, alternative methods to network analysis will offer new perspectives on biological information. A little explored area is the interactions between domains that can be captured using domain co-occurrence networks (DCN). A DCN can be used to study the function and interaction of proteins by representing protein domains and their co-existence in genes and by mapping cancer mutations to the individual protein domains to identify signals. The domain co-occurrence network was constructed for the human proteome based on PFAM domains in proteins. Highly connected domains in the central cores were identified using the k-core decomposition technique. Here we show that these domains were found to be more evolutionarily conserved than the peripheral domains. The somatic mutations for ovarian, breast and prostate cancer diseases were obtained from the TCGA database. We mapped the somatic mutations to the individual protein domains and the local false discovery rate was used to identify significantly mutated domains in each cancer type. Significantly mutated domains were found to be enriched in cancer disease pathways. However, we found that the inner cores of the DCN did not contain any of the significantly mutated domains. We observed that the inner core protein domains are highly conserved and these domains co-exist in large numbers with other protein domains. Mutations and domain co-occurrence networks provide a framework for understanding hierarchal designs in protein function from a network perspective. This study provides evidence that a majority of protein domains in the inner core of the DCN have a lower mutation frequency and that protein domains present in the peripheral regions of the k-core contribute more heavily to the disease. These findings may contribute further to drug development.

  10. Structural Analysis Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Telomerase Mutations in Telomerase-Associated Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Hunter; Rice, Cory; Skordalakes, Emmanuel

    2017-02-01

    Naturally occurring mutations in the ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase, telomerase, are associated with the bone marrow failure syndromes dyskeratosis congenita (DKC), aplastic anemia (AA), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the mechanism by which these mutations impact telomerase function remains unknown. Here we present the structure of the human telomerase c-terminal extension (CTE or thumb domain) determined by the method of single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) to 2.31 A resolution. We also used direct telomerase activity and nucleic acid binding assays to explain how naturally occurring mutations within this portion of telomerase contribute to human disease. The single mutations localize within three highly conserved regions of the telomerase thumb domain referred to as motifs E-I, (thumb loop and helix) E-II and E-III (the FVYL pocket, comprising the hydrophobic residues F1012, V1025, Y1089 and L1092). Biochemical data shows that the mutations associated with DKC, AA and IFP disrupt the binding between telomerases protein subunit reverse transcriptase (TERT) and its nucleic acid substrates leading to loss of telomerase activity and processivity. Collectively our data shows that although these mutations do not alter the overall stability or expression of TERT, these rare genetic disorders are associated with an impaired telomerase holoenzyme that is unable to correctly assemble with its nucleic acid substrates, leading to incomplete telomere extension and telomere attrition, which are hallmarks of these diseases.

  11. Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing Reveals Spontaneous Single-Nucleotide Mutations in Rice OsMsh6 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiongyu; Zhu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Genomic stability depends in part on an efficient DNA lesion recognition and correction by the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. We investigated mutations arising spontaneously in rice OsMsh6 mutants by specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing. Totally 994 single-nucleotide mutations were identified in three mutants and on average the mutation density is about 1/136.72 Kb per mutant line. These mutations were relatively randomly distributed in genome and might be accumulated in generation-dependent manner. All possible base transitions and base transversions could be seen and the ratio of transitions to transversions was about 3.12. We also observed the nearest-neighbor bias around the mutated base. Our data suggests that OsMsh6 (LOC_Os09g24220) is important in ensuring genome stability by recognizing mismatches that arise spontaneously and provides useful information for investigating the function of the OsMsh6 gene in DNA repair and exploiting MMR mutants in rice induced mutation breeding. PMID:28589142

  12. Heterogeneous evolution of microsatellites revealed by reconstruction of recent mutation history in an invasive apomictic snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    PubMed

    Weetman, David; Hauser, Lorenz; Carvalho, Gary R

    2006-05-01

    Heterogeneous patterns of microsatellite evolution present a major challenge for the development of mutation models, and an improved understanding of the determinants of variation in mutation rates and patterns among loci, alleles and taxa is required. A 19th Century bottleneck associated with the introduction of clones of the snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to Britain presented an opportunity to reconstruct recent microsatellite evolution within the most common apomictic lineage. There was significant variation in both the number and step size of mutations among the seven loci studied. Patterns of mutability were consistent with higher mutation rates for di- than trinucleotides and for longer alleles at a locus. Mutation size was influenced in a more complex way, decreasing with relative allele length much more strongly for tri-, than dinucleotides. We found support for this latter, highly novel result in the literature via reanalysis of data in a recent genome-scan study of human microsatellites, which showed a similarly disparate pattern of length-dependence between di- and trinucleotides. In spite of the apomictic form of reproduction and an unusually strong excess of microsatellite contractions in P. antipodarum, there were notable similarities with mutation processes of human microsatellites, supporting the wider taxonomic generality of such evolutionary mechanisms.

  13. Mutation-Structure-Function Relationship Based Integrated Strategy Reveals the Potential Impact of Deleterious Missense Mutations in Autophagy Related Proteins on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): A Comprehensive Informatics Approach.

    PubMed

    Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Obaid, Ayesha; Ikram, Aqsa; Janjua, Hussnain Ahmed

    2017-01-11

    Autophagy, an evolutionary conserved multifaceted lysosome-mediated bulk degradation system, plays a vital role in liver pathologies including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Post-translational modifications (PTMs) and genetic variations in autophagy components have emerged as significant determinants of autophagy related proteins. Identification of a comprehensive spectrum of genetic variations and PTMs of autophagy related proteins and their impact at molecular level will greatly expand our understanding of autophagy based regulation. In this study, we attempted to identify high risk missense mutations that are highly damaging to the structure as well as function of autophagy related proteins including LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1. Number of putative structural and functional residues, including several sites that undergo PTMs were also identified. In total, 16 high-risk SNPs in LC3A, 18 in LC3B, 40 in BECN1 and 43 in SCD1 were prioritized. Out of these, 2 in LC3A (K49A, K51A), 1 in LC3B (S92C), 6 in BECN1 (S113R, R292C, R292H, Y338C, S346Y, Y352H) and 6 in SCD1 (Y41C, Y55D, R131W, R135Q, R135W, Y151C) coincide with potential PTM sites. Our integrated analysis found LC3B Y113C, BECN1 I403T, SCD1 R126S and SCD1 Y218C as highly deleterious HCC-associated mutations. This study is the first extensive in silico mutational analysis of the LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1 proteins. We hope that the observed results will be a valuable resource for in-depth mechanistic insight into future investigations of pathological missense SNPs using an integrated computational platform.

  14. Mutation-Structure-Function Relationship Based Integrated Strategy Reveals the Potential Impact of Deleterious Missense Mutations in Autophagy Related Proteins on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): A Comprehensive Informatics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Obaid, Ayesha; Ikram, Aqsa; Janjua, Hussnain Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionary conserved multifaceted lysosome-mediated bulk degradation system, plays a vital role in liver pathologies including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Post-translational modifications (PTMs) and genetic variations in autophagy components have emerged as significant determinants of autophagy related proteins. Identification of a comprehensive spectrum of genetic variations and PTMs of autophagy related proteins and their impact at molecular level will greatly expand our understanding of autophagy based regulation. In this study, we attempted to identify high risk missense mutations that are highly damaging to the structure as well as function of autophagy related proteins including LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1. Number of putative structural and functional residues, including several sites that undergo PTMs were also identified. In total, 16 high-risk SNPs in LC3A, 18 in LC3B, 40 in BECN1 and 43 in SCD1 were prioritized. Out of these, 2 in LC3A (K49A, K51A), 1 in LC3B (S92C), 6 in BECN1 (S113R, R292C, R292H, Y338C, S346Y, Y352H) and 6 in SCD1 (Y41C, Y55D, R131W, R135Q, R135W, Y151C) coincide with potential PTM sites. Our integrated analysis found LC3B Y113C, BECN1 I403T, SCD1 R126S and SCD1 Y218C as highly deleterious HCC-associated mutations. This study is the first extensive in silico mutational analysis of the LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1 proteins. We hope that the observed results will be a valuable resource for in-depth mechanistic insight into future investigations of pathological missense SNPs using an integrated computational platform. PMID:28085066

  15. The structural pathway of interleukin 1 (IL-1) initiated signaling reveals mechanisms of oncogenic mutations and SNPs in inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Acuner Ozbabacan, Saliha Ece; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Keskin, Ozlem

    2014-02-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a large cytokine family closely related to innate immunity and inflammation. IL-1 proteins are key players in signaling pathways such as apoptosis, TLR, MAPK, NLR and NF-κB. The IL-1 pathway is also associated with cancer, and chronic inflammation increases the risk of tumor development via oncogenic mutations. Here we illustrate that the structures of interfaces between proteins in this pathway bearing the mutations may reveal how. Proteins are frequently regulated via their interactions, which can turn them ON or OFF. We show that oncogenic mutations are significantly at or adjoining interface regions, and can abolish (or enhance) the protein-protein interaction, making the protein constitutively active (or inactive, if it is a repressor). We combine known structures of protein-protein complexes and those that we have predicted for the IL-1 pathway, and integrate them with literature information. In the reconstructed pathway there are 104 interactions between proteins whose three dimensional structures are experimentally identified; only 15 have experimentally-determined structures of the interacting complexes. By predicting the protein-protein complexes throughout the pathway via the PRISM algorithm, the structural coverage increases from 15% to 71%. In silico mutagenesis and comparison of the predicted binding energies reveal the mechanisms of how oncogenic and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations can abrogate the interactions or increase the binding affinity of the mutant to the native partner. Computational mapping of mutations on the interface of the predicted complexes may constitute a powerful strategy to explain the mechanisms of activation/inhibition. It can also help explain how an oncogenic mutation or SNP works.

  16. The Structural Pathway of Interleukin 1 (IL-1) Initiated Signaling Reveals Mechanisms of Oncogenic Mutations and SNPs in Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Acuner Ozbabacan, Saliha Ece; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Keskin, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a large cytokine family closely related to innate immunity and inflammation. IL-1 proteins are key players in signaling pathways such as apoptosis, TLR, MAPK, NLR and NF-κB. The IL-1 pathway is also associated with cancer, and chronic inflammation increases the risk of tumor development via oncogenic mutations. Here we illustrate that the structures of interfaces between proteins in this pathway bearing the mutations may reveal how. Proteins are frequently regulated via their interactions, which can turn them ON or OFF. We show that oncogenic mutations are significantly at or adjoining interface regions, and can abolish (or enhance) the protein-protein interaction, making the protein constitutively active (or inactive, if it is a repressor). We combine known structures of protein-protein complexes and those that we have predicted for the IL-1 pathway, and integrate them with literature information. In the reconstructed pathway there are 104 interactions between proteins whose three dimensional structures are experimentally identified; only 15 have experimentally-determined structures of the interacting complexes. By predicting the protein-protein complexes throughout the pathway via the PRISM algorithm, the structural coverage increases from 15% to 71%. In silico mutagenesis and comparison of the predicted binding energies reveal the mechanisms of how oncogenic and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations can abrogate the interactions or increase the binding affinity of the mutant to the native partner. Computational mapping of mutations on the interface of the predicted complexes may constitute a powerful strategy to explain the mechanisms of activation/inhibition. It can also help explain how an oncogenic mutation or SNP works. PMID:24550720

  17. Lifespan extension by dietary intervention in a mouse model of Cockayne syndrome uncouples early postnatal development from segmental progeria.

    PubMed

    Brace, Lear E; Vose, Sarah C; Vargas, Dorathy F; Zhao, Shuangyun; Wang, Xiu-Ping; Mitchell, James R

    2013-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeria characterized by growth failure, lipodystrophy, neurological abnormalities, and photosensitivity, but without skin cancer predisposition. Cockayne syndrome life expectancy ranges from 5 to 16 years for the two most severe forms (types II and I, respectively). Mouse models of CS have thus far been of limited value due to either very mild phenotypes, or premature death during postnatal development prior to weaning. The cause of death in severe CS models is unknown, but has been attributed to extremely rapid aging. Here, we found that providing mutant pups with soft food from as late as postnatal day 14 allowed survival past weaning with high penetrance independent of dietary macronutrient balance in a novel CS model (Csa(-/-) | Xpa(-/-)). Survival past weaning revealed a number of CS-like symptoms including small size, progressive loss of adiposity, and neurological symptoms, with a maximum lifespan of 19 weeks. Our results caution against interpretation of death before weaning as premature aging, and at the same time provide a valuable new tool for understanding mechanisms of progressive CS-related progeroid symptoms including lipodystrophy and neurodysfunction.

  18. Chemical screening identifies ROCK as a target for recovering mitochondrial function in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Joon Tae; Choi, Kobong; Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Gyu Ree; Lee, Young-Sam; Park, Sang Chul

    2017-03-19

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) constitutes a genetic disease wherein an aging phenotype manifests in childhood. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in HGPS phenotype progression. Thus, pharmacological reduction in ROS levels has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for patient with this disorder. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to find compounds that could reduce ROS levels in HGPS fibroblasts and identified rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) as an effective agent. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of ROCK in regulating ROS levels, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen and discovered that ROCK1 interacts with Rac1b. ROCK activation phosphorylated Rac1b at Ser71 and increased ROS levels by facilitating the interaction between Rac1b and cytochrome c. Conversely, ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 abolished their interaction, concomitant with ROS reduction. Additionally, ROCK activation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 induced the recovery of mitochondrial function. Furthermore, a reduction in the frequency of abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA double-strand breaks was observed along with decreased ROS levels. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism through which alleviation of the HGPS phenotype is mediated by the recovery of mitochondrial function upon ROCK inactivation.

  19. Lifespan extension by dietary intervention in a mouse model of Cockayne Syndrome uncouples early postnatal development from segmental progeria

    PubMed Central

    Brace, Lear E.; Vose, Sarah C.; Vargas, Dorathy F.; Zhao, Shuangyun; Wang, Xiu-Ping; Mitchell, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne Syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive segmental progeria characterized by growth failure, lipodystrophy, neurological abnormalities and photosensitivity but without skin cancer predisposition. CS life expectancy ranges from 5 to 16 years for the two most severe forms (Types II and I, respectively). Mouse models of CS have thus far been of limited value due either to very mild phenotypes, or premature death during postnatal development prior to weaning. The cause of death in severe CS models is unknown but has been attributed to extremely rapid aging. Here, we found that providing mutant pups with soft food from as late as postnatal day 14 allowed survival past weaning with high penetrance independent of dietary macronutrient balance in a novel CS model (Csa-/- ∣ Xpa-/-). Survival past weaning revealed a number of CS-like symptoms including small size, progressive loss of adiposity and neurological symptoms, with a maximum lifespan of 19 weeks. Our results caution against interpretation of death before weaning as premature aging, and at the same time provide a valuable new tool for understanding mechanisms of progressive CS-related progeroid symptoms including lipodystrophy and neurodysfunction. PMID:23895664

  20. Cardiac electrical defects in progeroid mice and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patients with nuclear lamina alterations.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, José; Calvo, Conrado J; Llach, Anna; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Caballero, Ricardo; González-Gómez, Cristina; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis J; Guadix, Juan A; Osorio, Fernando G; López-Otín, Carlos; Herraiz-Martínez, Adela; Cabello, Nuria; Vallmitjana, Alex; Benítez, Raul; Gordon, Leslie B; Jalife, José; Pérez-Pomares, José M; Tamargo, Juan; Delpón, Eva; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Andrés, Vicente

    2016-11-15

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disease caused by defective prelamin A processing, leading to nuclear lamina alterations, severe cardiovascular pathology, and premature death. Prelamin A alterations also occur in physiological aging. It remains unknown how defective prelamin A processing affects the cardiac rhythm. We show age-dependent cardiac repolarization abnormalities in HGPS patients that are also present in the Zmpste24(-/-) mouse model of HGPS. Challenge of Zmpste24(-/-) mice with the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol did not trigger ventricular arrhythmia but caused bradycardia-related premature ventricular complexes and slow-rate polymorphic ventricular rhythms during recovery. Patch-clamping in Zmpste24(-/-) cardiomyocytes revealed prolonged calcium-transient duration and reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium loading and release, consistent with the absence of isoproterenol-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Zmpste24(-/-) progeroid mice also developed severe fibrosis-unrelated bradycardia and PQ interval and QRS complex prolongation. These conduction defects were accompanied by overt mislocalization of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43). Remarkably, Cx43 mislocalization was also evident in autopsied left ventricle tissue from HGPS patients, suggesting intercellular connectivity alterations at late stages of the disease. The similarities between HGPS patients and progeroid mice reported here strongly suggest that defective cardiac repolarization and cardiomyocyte connectivity are important abnormalities in the HGPS pathogenesis that increase the risk of arrhythmia and premature death.

  1. Cardiac electrical defects in progeroid mice and Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome patients with nuclear lamina alterations

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Torres, José; Calvo, Conrado J.; Llach, Anna; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Caballero, Ricardo; González-Gómez, Cristina; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis J.; Guadix, Juan A.; Osorio, Fernando G.; López-Otín, Carlos; Herraiz-Martínez, Adela; Cabello, Nuria; Vallmitjana, Alex; Benítez, Raul; Gordon, Leslie B.; Pérez-Pomares, José M.; Tamargo, Juan; Delpón, Eva; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Andrés, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disease caused by defective prelamin A processing, leading to nuclear lamina alterations, severe cardiovascular pathology, and premature death. Prelamin A alterations also occur in physiological aging. It remains unknown how defective prelamin A processing affects the cardiac rhythm. We show age-dependent cardiac repolarization abnormalities in HGPS patients that are also present in the Zmpste24−/− mouse model of HGPS. Challenge of Zmpste24−/− mice with the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol did not trigger ventricular arrhythmia but caused bradycardia-related premature ventricular complexes and slow-rate polymorphic ventricular rhythms during recovery. Patch-clamping in Zmpste24−/− cardiomyocytes revealed prolonged calcium-transient durati