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Sample records for prognozirovanie ee dlya

  1. FCC-ee: Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Koratzinos, M.; Blondel, A.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Zimmermann, F.

    2015-06-02

    The FCC-ee aims to improve on electroweak precision measurements, with goals of 100 ke V on the Z mass and width, and a fraction of MeV on the W mass. Compared to LEP, this implies a much improved knowledge of the center-of-mass energy when operating at the Z peak and WW threshold. This can be achieved by making systematic use of resonant depolarization. A number of issues have been identified, due in particular to the long polarization times. However the smaller emittance and energy spread of FCC-ee with respect to LEP should help achieve a much improved performance.

  2. EE-3A Logging Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, David W.

    1993-12-15

    Two logs of EE-3A were performed during the last couple of weeks. The first of which, was a Temperature/Casing-Collar Locator (CCL) log, which took place on Friday, December 10th., 1993. The second log was a Caliper log which was done in cooperation with the Dia-Log Company, of Odessa, TX. on Monday, December, 13th., 1993.

  3. Redrilling Plan for EE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Hugh D.

    1984-11-14

    Attached is the 3rd draft copy of the EE-3 redrilling plan. We believe that we have taken the document as far as we can and feel that it is ready for distribution as soon as the trajectory question is resolved and necessary changes in wording that result are made. The figures are presently being redrawn by John Paskiewicz and should be ready in about one week.

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ee of... - Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart EE

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Reference Applies to subpart EE Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes Additional terms defined in § 63.702(a); when overlap between subparts A and EE occurs, subpart EE takes precedence. 63.1(a)(2)-(14) Yes. 63.1(b)(1)-(3) Yes. 63.1(c)(1) Yes Subpart EE specifies the applicability of each paragraph in subpart A to sources...

  5. EE Certification: Making Best Practice Standard Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Joanne M. Lozar

    2006-01-01

    Pursuing environmental education certification is difficult, so why do it? What does it mean to be certified? Who benefits? How? These are just a few of the compelling questions addressed in "EE Certification: Making Best Practice Standard Practice," a new article exploring advancements and challenges in state and national EE certification. A…

  6. Job Prospects for E/E Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the trends in employment in the electrical/electronics (E/E) engineering industry. States that although the number of E/E graduates grew at a rate of over 11 percent from 1985 to 1986, the economy continues to be the major determinant in the job outlook in the field. (TW)

  7. Procedure to Complete EE-2A

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Dash, Zora V.; Brown, Donald W.

    1988-04-07

    This report details the general procedure for testing well EE-2A. Well EE-2A was side-tracked off of a whipstock set at 9,748 ft within section milled in the 9-5/8 in. casing from 9,688 ft. to 9,748 ft. The well was then directionally drilled to 12,360 ft. A number of in-flow zones from well EE-3A have been determined. The shallowest in-flow zones occurs at approximately 10,800 ft.

  8. 31 CFR 353.30 - Series EE bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of the Treasury Circular, Public Debt Series No. 1-80 (31 CFR part 351). ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Series EE bonds. 353.30 Section 353... BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Interest § 353.30 Series EE bonds. Series EE bonds are issued at a discount....

  9. 31 CFR 353.30 - Series EE bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Department of the Treasury Circular, Public Debt Series No. 1-80 (31 CFR part 351). ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Series EE bonds. 353.30 Section 353.30... BONDS, SERIES EE AND HH Interest § 353.30 Series EE bonds. Series EE bonds are issued at a discount....

  10. EE Cep observations requested for upcoming eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-07-01

    The AAVSO requests observations for the upcoming eclipse of EE Cephei, a long-period eclipsing variable. EE Cep has a period of 2,050 days, and shows strong variations in the eclipse light curve from one event to the next. Observations are needed to study the morphology of the upcoming eclipse, which will be used to better understand the shape of the eclipsing disk and how it precesses. Mid-eclipse is predicted to be August 23, 2014, but the early stages of the eclipse may begin as much as a month earlier. EE Cep is being observed by a number of amateur and professional astronomers using multiple telescopes at multiple wavelengths. Among these is a collaboration (see https://sites.google.com/site/eecep2014campaign/) headed by Cezary Galan at the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland; several individual AAVSO observers are already participating in this effort. The AAVSO is not currently a partner in that campaign, but all data submitted to the AAVSO will be publicly available. The AAVSO strongly encourages observers to begin following this star now, and to continue observations into October 2014 at least. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  11. The Co-Evolution of ESD and EE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Martha C.

    2012-01-01

    William B. Stapp, a major author of the founding documents of environmental education (EE), foreshadowed the triple concerns of education for sustainable development (ESD) with environment, social justice and economic health. Yet EE in the USA tended to follow the advocacy orientation of the environmental movement of the 1970s and later, following…

  12. Some Historical Thoughts on the ee-Learning Renaissance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilles, Jack M.

    2007-01-01

    Jack Nilles surveys the evolution of ee-learning at the University of Southern California, together with the first formal telecommuting demonstration program, from its beginnings in the early 1970s to the relevant trends in 2006. Although the basic technologies of telecommuting and ee-learning were in evidence in the 1970s, subsequent…

  13. High Energy Polarized e+e- Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatunov, Yu.; Koop, I.; Otboev, A.; Mane, S.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the wide discussion about Higgs-factory design again returns to problem of high energy polarized electrons and positrons. It’s good known the radiative beam polarization at LEP-collider. It was obtained after spin resonance suppression at Z0 pick, but didn’t appear at energies above 70 GeV due to an enhancement of unavoidable depolarization effects. We examine in this paper various ideas for radiative polarization at TLEP/FCC-ee and formulate some estimates for the polarization buildup time and the asymptotic polarization. Using wigglers, a useful degree of polarization (for energy calibration), with a time constant of about 1 h, may be possible up to the threshold of W pair production. At higher energies such as the threshold of Higgs production, attaining a useful level of polarization may be difficult in a planar ring. With Siberian Snakes, wigglers and some imagination, polarization of reasonable magnitude, with a reasonable time constant (of not more than about 1 h), may be achievable at very high energies.

  14. Experiment 2030. EE-2 Temperature Log and Downhole Water Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, Charles O.

    1983-07-29

    A temperature log and downhole water sample run were conducted in EE-2 on July 13, 1983. The temperature log was taken to show any changes which had occurred in the fracture-to-wellbore intersections as a result of the Experiment 2020 pumping and to locate fluid entries for taking the water sample. The water sample was requested primarily to determine the arsenic concentration in EE-2 fluids (see memo from C.Grigsby, June 28, 1983 concerning arsenic in EE-3 samples.) The temperature log was run using the thermistor in the ESS-6 water samples.

  15. 31 CFR 351.8 - When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When is interest payable on Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.8 When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds? Interest on a bond...

  16. 31 CFR 351.5 - What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.5 Section 351.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.5 What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?...

  17. 31 CFR 351.5 - What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.5 Section 351.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.5 What is the maturity period of a Series EE savings bond?...

  18. 31 CFR 351.8 - When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When is interest payable on Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.8 When is interest payable on Series EE savings bonds? Interest on a bond...

  19. 31 CFR 351.49 - How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are definitive Series EE savings... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.49 How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered? We deliver definitive bonds by mail to your address. If your...

  20. 31 CFR 351.6 - When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series EE savings... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.6 When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond? (a) Bonds with issue dates on...

  1. 31 CFR 351.4 - In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In what form are Series EE savings... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.4 In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued? Series EE savings bonds are issued in either book-entry or definitive form....

  2. 31 CFR 351.6 - When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series EE... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.6 When may I redeem my Series EE savings bond? (a) Bonds with issue dates on...

  3. 31 CFR 351.49 - How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are definitive Series EE savings... UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.49 How are definitive Series EE savings bonds delivered? We deliver definitive bonds by mail to your address. If your...

  4. 31 CFR 351.4 - In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In what form are Series EE savings... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE General Information § 351.4 In what form are Series EE savings bonds issued? Series EE savings bonds are issued in either book-entry or definitive form....

  5. Designing ee-Learning Environments: Lessons from an Online Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin, Lindsey; Kaplan, Soren

    2008-01-01

    Based on their work leading three experiential, online workshops with over 180 participants from around the world, Lindsey Godwin and Soren Kaplan share reflections on designing and conducting successful ee-learning courses. The workshops sought to translate a popular face-to-face seminar in appreciative inquiry, an increasingly popular…

  6. 32. SECTIONS AA, BB, CC, DD, AND EE WASTE CALCINATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SECTIONS A-A, B-B, C-C, D-D, AND E-E WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY SHOWING RELATIONSHIPS OF DIFFERENT FLOOR LEVELS TO ONE ANOTHER. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106353. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. 31 CFR 351.64 - What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-entry Series EE savings bond? 351.64 Section 351.64 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.64 What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings...

  8. Pilot Fullerton dons EES anti-gravity suit lower torso on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Fullerton dons ejection escape suit (EES) anti-gravity (anti-g) suit lower torso on forward port side middeck above potable water tank. Anti-g suit is an olive drab inner garment that complements EES.

  9. Pilot Fullerton in ejection escape suit (EES) on aft flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Fullerton, wearing communications kit assembly (ASSY) mini headset (HDST) and ejection escape suit (EES), holds flexible hose attached to his EES vent hose fitting and second hose for commanders EES while behind pilots ejection seat (S2) seat back on the aft flight deck. Forward flight deck control panels are visible in the background.

  10. 31 CFR 351.41 - When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... as provided in 31 CFR part 353, and when it bears an issue date and the validation indicia of an... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When are definitive Series EE savings... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.41 When...

  11. 31 CFR 351.41 - When are definitive Series EE savings bonds validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... as provided in 31 CFR part 353, and when it bears an issue date and the validation indicia of an... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When are definitive Series EE savings... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.41 When...

  12. Experiment 2003 – First Pressurization of EE-2

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Hugh D.; Matsunaga, Isao; Kuriyagawa, Michio

    1982-01-07

    Water was pumped into EE-2 at a nominal rate of 9gpm, to a final pressure of 2070 psi. The wellbore was exceptionally tight we might just have well pumped into a steel pressure vessel not only was there no evidence of breakdown, but only a total of about 30 gallons of water permeated the rock during the 2-1/2 hour-long pressurization.

  13. Observation of η'→ω e+e-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Eren, E. E.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Based on a sample of η' mesons produced in the radiative decay J /ψ →γ η' in 1.31 ×109 J /ψ events collected with the BESIII detector, the decay η'→ω e+e- is observed for the first time, with a statistical significance of 8 σ . The branching fraction is measured to be B (η'→ω e+e-)=(1.97 ±0.34 (stat)±0.17 (syst))×10-4 , which is in agreement with theoretical predictions. The branching fraction of η'→ω γ is also measured to be (2.55 ±0.03 (stat)±0.16 (syst))×10-2 , which is the most precise measurement to date, and the relative branching fraction B/(η'→ω e+e-) B (η'→ω γ ) is determined to be (7.71 ±1.34 (stat)±0.54 (syst))×10-3 .

  14. Drilling of hot-dry-rock geothermal-energy extraction well EE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.C.; Carden, R.S.

    1982-08-01

    The drilling of EE-3, the production well of the hot dry rock geothermal energy-extraction engineering system at the Fenton Hill site, was finished August 25, 1981. EE-3 was designed to be directionally drilled in the inclined reservoir section to be parallel to and spaced vertically 370 m (1200 ft) above EE-2, the injection well, which was drilled at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical. The reservoir heat transfer area will be formed by creating and extending several vertical parallel hydraulic fractures from EE-2 to EE-3. EE-3 required precision directional drilling because the borehole trajectory had to be drilled within specified tolerances with respect to EE-2. Well EE-2 was drilled with a packed (stiff) bottom-hole assembly that held the 35/sup 0/ inclination, but permitted the borehole to turn in azimuth. Directional drilling experience in EE-2 provided the basis to optimize the directional trajectory of EE-3 to within the desired tolerances. The EE-3 well was drilled into hot granite reservoir rock to total depth of 370 m (1200 ft) parallel and above EE-2 at a measured (drill-string) depth of 4.25 km (13,933 ft), with a maximum lateral deviation of about 60 m (180 ft). A bottom-hole static temperature of 280/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F) is estimated. Two severe drill-pipe twist-offs extended the drilling time of EE-3 to 461 days. These, and other drilling problems, are recorded and solution approaches are discussed. Drilling costs of EE-2/EE-3 are shown to be comparable to commercial drilling of hydrothermal wells and to the US Department of Energy sponsored geothermal projects when these cost trends are extrapolated to 4.5-km (15,000-ft) depths.

  15. Neutrino mass matrices with M{sub ee}=0

    SciTech Connect

    BenTov, Yoni; Zee, A.

    2011-10-01

    Motivated by the possibility that the amplitude for neutrinoless double beta decay may be much smaller than the planned sensitivity of future experiments, we study Ansaetze for the neutrino mass matrix with M{sub ee}=0. For the case in which CP is conserved, we consider two classes of real-valued mass matrices: ''Class I'' defined by |M{sub e{mu}|}=|M{sub e{tau}|}, and ''Class II'' defined by |M{sub {mu}{mu}|}=|M{sub {tau}{tau}|}. The important phenomenological distinction between the two is that Class I permits only small values of V{sub e3} up to {approx}0.03, while Class II admits large values of V{sub e3} up to its empirical upper limit of 0.22. Then we introduce CP-violating complex phases into the mass matrix. We show that it is possible to have tribimaximal mixing with M{sub ee}=0 and |M{sub {mu}{tau}|}=|M{sub {mu}{mu}|}=|M{sub {tau}{tau}|} if the Majorana phase angles are {+-}{pi}/4. Alternatively, for smaller values of |M{sub {mu}{tau}|}=|M{sub {mu}{mu}|}=|M{sub {tau}{tau}|} it is possible to obtain |V{sub e3}|{approx}0.2 and generate relatively large CP-violating amplitudes. To eliminate phase redundancy, we emphasize rephasing any mass matrix with M{sub ee}=0 into a standard form with two complex phases. The discussion alternates between analytical and numerical but remains purely phenomenological, without any attempt to derive mass matrices from a fundamental theory.

  16. 31 CFR 351.61 - What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.61 Section 351.61 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.61 What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? Book-entry bonds...

  17. 31 CFR 351.65 - What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.65 What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year? The principal amount of...

  18. 31 CFR 351.70 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.70 Section 351.70 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.70 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We base current...

  19. 31 CFR 351.63 - How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.63 Section 351.63 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.63 How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We will...

  20. 31 CFR 351.62 - How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.62 Section 351.62 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.62 How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? You may only purchase...

  1. 31 CFR 351.66 - What book-entry Series EE savings bonds are included in the computation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What book-entry Series EE savings... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.66 What book-entry Series EE savings bonds are included in the computation? (a) We include all bonds...

  2. 31 CFR 351.60 - How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How are book-entry Series EE savings... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.60 How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held? Book-entry bonds must be purchased and held...

  3. 31 CFR 351.47 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.47 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?...

  4. 31 CFR 351.51 - How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.51 Section 351.51 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.51 How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. We...

  5. 31 CFR 351.40 - What are the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of definitive Series EE savings bonds? 351.40 Section 351.40 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.40 What are the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds? We issue definitive...

  6. 31 CFR 351.42 - What is the issue date of a definitive Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bond? 351.42 Section 351.42 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.42 What is the issue date of a definitive Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a definitive bond is the first...

  7. 31 CFR 351.48 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through employee thrift, savings, vacation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.48 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds...

  8. 31 CFR 351.65 - What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.65 What amount of book-entry Series EE savings bonds may I acquire per year? The principal amount of...

  9. 31 CFR 351.70 - How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.70 Section 351.70 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.70 How are redemption values calculated for book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We base current...

  10. 31 CFR 351.48 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through employee thrift, savings, vacation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.48 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds...

  11. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE... Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  12. 31 CFR 351.66 - What book-entry Series EE savings bonds are included in the computation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What book-entry Series EE savings... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.66 What book-entry Series EE savings bonds are included in the computation? (a) We include all bonds...

  13. 31 CFR 351.51 - How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.51 Section 351.51 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.51 How can I find out what my definitive Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. We...

  14. 31 CFR 351.40 - What are the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of definitive Series EE savings bonds? 351.40 Section 351.40 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.40 What are the denominations and prices of definitive Series EE savings bonds? We issue definitive...

  15. 31 CFR 351.42 - What is the issue date of a definitive Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... definitive Series EE savings bond? 351.42 Section 351.42 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.42 What is the issue date of a definitive Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a definitive bond is the first...

  16. 31 CFR 351.7 - May Series EE savings bonds be called for redemption prior to final maturity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May Series EE savings bonds be called... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.7 May Series EE savings bonds be called...

  17. 31 CFR 351.7 - May Series EE savings bonds be called for redemption prior to final maturity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May Series EE savings bonds be called... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.7 May Series EE savings bonds be called...

  18. 31 CFR 351.47 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.47 May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds through a payroll savings plan? You may...

  19. 31 CFR 351.61 - What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.61 Section 351.61 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.61 What are the denominations and prices of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? Book-entry bonds...

  20. 31 CFR 351.62 - How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.62 Section 351.62 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.62 How is payment made for purchases of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? You may only purchase...

  1. 31 CFR 351.60 - How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are book-entry Series EE savings... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.60 How are book-entry Series EE savings bonds purchased and held? Book-entry bonds must be purchased and held...

  2. 31 CFR 351.63 - How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.63 Section 351.63 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.63 How are redemption payments made for my redeemed book-entry Series EE savings bonds? We will...

  3. Autophosphorylation is crucial for CDK-activating kinase (Ee;CDKF;1) activity and complex formation in leafy spurge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ee;CDKF;1 protein is involved in a phosphorylation cascade linked to early stages of cell cycle progression. Yeast two-hybrid screening performed using Ee;CDKF;1 as a bait indicated that one of the interacting proteins was Ee;CDKF;1. Protein-protein interaction of Ee;CDKF;1 was further confirmed by ...

  4. Constraints on axions from π0 --> e+e- decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massó, Eduard

    1986-12-01

    The contribution of axions to π0 --> e+e- decay is considered. It is found that a recently proposed short-lived axion with a mass of 1.8 MeV induces a decay rate inconsistent with experimental observations. More generally, upper limits are placed on the mass of an axion that couples to first-generations fermions. On leave of absence from Department de Física Teòrica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain.

  5. A Search for Point Sources of EeV Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Auger Collaboration102, The Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Measurements of air showers made using the hybrid technique developed with the fluorescence and surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory allow a sensitive search for point sources of EeV photons anywhere in the exposed sky. A multivariate analysis reduces the background of hadronic cosmic rays. The search is sensitive to a declination band from -85° to +20°, in an energy range from 1017.3 eV to 1018.5 eV. No photon point source has been detected. An upper limit on the photon flux has been derived for every direction. The mean value of the energy flux limit that results from this, assuming a photon spectral index of -2, is 0.06 eV cm-2 s-1, and no celestial direction exceeds 0.25 eV cm-2 s-1. These upper limits constrain scenarios in which EeV cosmic ray protons are emitted by non-transient sources in the Galaxy.

  6. Double Higgs Boson Production via WW Fusion in TeV e+e- Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, V.; Han, T.

    The production of two standard model Higgs bosons via the WW fusion process e+e- → bar ve ve HH would test the predicted HHH, HWW and HHWW couplings. At TeV energies this fusion cross section dominates over that from e+e- →ZHH and would give significant event rates for mH ≲ 1/2 MZ at high luminosity e+e- colliders. We evaluate the rates and present the dynamical distributions.

  7. A Search for Point Sources of EeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antiči'c, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; 'Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-12-01

    A thorough search of the sky exposed at the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory reveals no statistically significant excess of events in any small solid angle that would be indicative of a flux of neutral particles from a discrete source. The search covers from -90° to +15° in declination using four different energy ranges above 1 EeV (1018 eV). The method used in this search is more sensitive to neutrons than to photons. The upper limit on a neutron flux is derived for a dense grid of directions for each of the four energy ranges. These results constrain scenarios for the production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in the Galaxy.

  8. Experiment 2059: Second Packer Stimulation of EE-3A

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.

    1985-05-09

    By late Thursday, 5-9-85, EE-3A should be at a depth of about 12,200 feet. We plan to stop drilling at this point and pressurize the bottom 600 to 700 feet of the open hole using a Lynes packer. The Lynes packer would be set somewhere in the interval of very competent, slow-drilling, and only slightly altered biotite granodiorite from 11,460 ft to 11,590 ft. This would place the packer below the two fractures (at 10,880 ft and 11,000 ft) stimulated during Expt. 2057, and also below the producing fracture at 11,440 ft as reported on 5-2-85.

  9. Collins Effect from Polarized SIDIS and e+e- Data

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, A.; Tuerk, C.

    2007-06-13

    The recent data on the transverse single spin asymmetry A{sub UT}{sup sin({phi}{sub h}+{phi}{sub S})} from HERMES and COMPASS Collaborations are analysed within LO parton model with unintegrated parton distribution and fragmentation functions. A fit of SIDIS data from HERMES Collaboration is performed leading to the extraction of favoured and unfavoured Collins fragmentation functions. A very good description of COMPASS data is obtained. BELLE e+e- data are shown to be compatible with our estimates based on the extracted Collins fragmentation functions. Predictions for A{sub UT}{sup sin({phi}{sub h}+{phi}{sub S})} asymmetries at JLab and COMPASS operating on a proton target are given.

  10. Improvements to an Electrical Engineering Skill Audit Exam to Improve Student Mastery of Core EE Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    The San Jose State University Electrical Engineering (EE) Department implemented a skill audit exam for graduating seniors in 1999 with the purpose of assessing the teaching and the students' mastery of core concepts in EE. However, consistent low scores for the first years in which the test was administered suggested that students had little…

  11. Reschooling Society and the Promise of ee-Learning: An Interview with Steve Eskow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevitte, Chad; Eskow, Steve

    2007-01-01

    In this article, Chad Trevitte interviews "Innovate" guest editor Steve Eskow about the concept of ee-learning and the promise it holds for revitalizing higher education. Eskow defines ee-learning as a combination of the electronic technologies employed in online learning ("e-learning 1") and a pedagogy of experiential learning rooted in real-life…

  12. Analysis of the EE-3A Temperature Logs Following the Expt. 2064 Pre-Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.

    1985-12-24

    From Nov. 25 to Dec. 1, 1985, 189,700 gallons of Fenton Hill well water were injected into EE-2 using the big Kobe pump (at 34 gpm). Temperature logs were run in EE-3A on Dec. 3 and 5 to assess the results of this reservoir reinflation.

  13. Moving beyond the EE and ESD Disciplinary Debate in Formal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Rosalyn; Hopkins, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Many educators think of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) on a disciplinary level--what is Environmental Education's (EE) contribution to a more sustainable future? Briefly, we describe differences and similarities between EE and ESD. Next, we examine four levels of activity--disciplinary, whole school, educational system, and…

  14. 31 CFR 351.64 - What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the issue date of a book-entry... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.64 What is the issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings bond? The issue date of a book-entry Series EE savings...

  15. 31 CFR 351.69 - When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When is a book-entry Series EE savings... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.69 When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued? A book-entry bond is validly issued when it is posted...

  16. 31 CFR 351.69 - When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When is a book-entry Series EE... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.69 When is a book-entry Series EE savings bond validly issued? A book-entry bond is validly issued when it is...

  17. Experiment 2062: Packer Stimulation of the Intermediate Portion of EE-3A (Below 12,000 FT)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.; Kelkar, Sharad

    1985-07-11

    The deepest EE-3A interval stimulated during Expt. 2061 did not connect to EE-2, but rather extended a fractured region downwards some 300 m below the bottom of EE-3A. Therefore, the decision has been made to abandon for now the bottom 600 feet of EE-3A, and to stimulate the three flowing fractures between 12,050 ft and 12,200 ft identified by temperature logging prior to Expt. 2059 (our successful Memorial Day reservoir connection experiment).

  18. Lower bound on e+e- decay of massive neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowsik, R.; Schramm, D. N.; Hoflicn, P

    1988-01-01

    Astronomical observations of SN1987A, such as the light curve, spectral intensities of lines, the X-ray emissions, etc., constrain the lifetime for the decay of a heavy neutrino 1 MeV less than or equivalent to m sub nu H less than or equal to 50 MeV through nu sub H yields nu sub 1+e(+)+e(-) exceeds 4 x 10 to the 15th exp(-m sub nuH/5MeV) seconds. Otherwise. resulting ionization energy deposits and stronger X-ray emission would have been observed. This coupled with traditional cosmological considerations argues that the lifetime of tau-neutrinos probably exceeds the age of the universe. This in turn would imply the standard cosmological mass bound does apply to nu sub tau, namely m sub nu sub tau less than or equivalent to 100 h squared eV (where h is the Hubble constant in units of 100 km/sec/mpc). The only significant loophole for these latter arguments would be if nu sub tau primarily decays rapidly into particles having very weak interactions.

  19. [Homozygous hemoglobin-E (Hb-EE) disease].

    PubMed

    Amendola, G; Danise, P; Di Palma, A; Franzese, M; Avino, D; D'Arco, A M

    2004-01-01

    The Authors report on a 16 year-old girl, of Cambodian descent, who was admitted to the hospital for hematuria. She showed a mild microcytic, hypochromic anemia with a normal iron balance; clinical examination was normal with neither pallor nor icterus nor splenomegaly; electrophoresis of hemoglobin yielded no hemoglobin A, a sligtly increased amount of HbF and a single band with a mobility similar to that of HbA2; the patient showed no evidence of overt increased hemolysis. With the DNA technology a final diagnosis of homozygous hemoglobin E was made. Hemoglobin E is the most common Hb variant among Southeast Asian populations. The Authors discuss on the benign nature of Hb-EE disease, pointing out that the presence of a single HbE gene in combination with that for beta-thalassemia leads generally to a disorder often comparable in severity to that of homozygous beta-thalassemia. With the recent migration of a high number of people from the countries, where HbE is extremely frequent, to the Western world (including Italy), this thalassemia syndrome is now a global health problem; therefore its knowledge is an important diagnostic challenge to all the experts involved in the care of thalassemic patients.

  20. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of...

  1. 31 CFR 351.14 - When are rate announcements that apply to Series EE savings bonds announced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... apply to Series EE savings bonds announced? 351.14 Section 351.14 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.14 When are rate announcements...

  2. 31 CFR 351.81 - Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... available for Series EE savings bonds? 351.81 Section 351.81 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.81 Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds? You may be able to exclude from...

  3. 31 CFR 351.46 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-counter through any issuing agent qualified under 31 CFR part 317. To purchase over-the-counter, you must... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.46 May...

  4. 31 CFR 351.44 - What amount of definitive Series EE savings bonds may I purchase per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... year is limited to $5,000. See 31 CFR 353.10 and 353.11 of this Chapter for rules governing the... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What amount of definitive Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds §...

  5. 31 CFR 351.83 - May Public Debt issue Series EE savings bonds only in book-entry form?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May Public Debt issue Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.83 May Public Debt issue Series EE savings bonds only in book-entry form? We reserve the right to issue bonds only...

  6. 31 CFR 351.14 - When are rate announcements that apply to Series EE savings bonds announced?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to Series EE savings bonds announced? 351.14 Section 351.14 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and Investment Yields of Series EE Savings Bonds General Provisions § 351.14 When are rate announcements that apply...

  7. 31 CFR 351.46 - May I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds over-the-counter?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-counter through any issuing agent qualified under 31 CFR part 317. 2 To purchase over-the-counter, you... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I purchase definitive Series EE... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.46 May...

  8. 31 CFR 351.84 - Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? 351.84 Section 351.84 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.84 Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? We may reject any...

  9. 31 CFR 351.81 - Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... available for Series EE savings bonds? 351.81 Section 351.81 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.81 Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds? You may be able to exclude from...

  10. 31 CFR 351.84 - Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? 351.84 Section 351.84 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.84 Does Public Debt make any reservations as to issue of Series EE savings bonds? We may reject any application...

  11. 31 CFR 351.44 - What amount of definitive Series EE savings bonds may I purchase per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... year is limited to $5,000. See 31 CFR 353.10 and 353.11 of this Chapter for rules governing the... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What amount of definitive Series EE... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds §...

  12. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... EE Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required...

  13. Preferential acceleration and magnetic field enhancement in plasmas with e+/e- beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Cong Tuan; Ryu, Chang-Mo

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical model of current filaments predicting preferential acceleration/deceleration and magnetic field enhancement in a plasma with e+/e- beam injection is presented. When the e+/e- beams are injected into a plasma, current filaments are formed. The beam particles are accelerated or decelerated depending on the types of current filaments in which they are trapped. It is found that in the electron/ion ambient plasma, the e+ beam particles are preferentially accelerated, while the e- beam particles are preferentially decelerated. The preferential particle acceleration/deceleration is absent when the ambient plasma is the e+/e- plasma. We also find that the particle momentum decrease can explain the magnetic field increase during the development of Weibel/filamentation instability. Supporting simulation results of particle acceleration/deceleration and magnetic field enhancement are presented. Our findings can be applied to a wide range of astrophysical plasmas with the e+/e- beam injection.

  14. Environmental exposure assessment of ethinyl estradiol (EE) from a combined hormonal vaginal contraceptive ring after disposal; leaching from landfills.

    PubMed

    Geurts, M G J; de Boer, W; de Graaf, J S; van Ginkel, C G

    2007-05-15

    In this study an environmental exposure assessment and experiments were carried out to identify the leaching potential of ethinyl estradiol (EE) present in a vaginal contraceptive (NuvaRing) when disposed of in landfills. Landfill material and a sandy soil were used to investigate the mobility of EE. Log K(oc) values determined in the range of 3 to 4 indicate that EE does not have a high mobility in landfills and soils. Column experiments were used to estimate that it takes approximately 40 years before EE leaches from a column of 1 m of landfill material or sandy soil. This column experiment, which was performed with an EE concentration based on worst-case assumptions, demonstrates that the emission of EE from landfills is negligible. Sandy soils below landfills also act as a strong sorbent of EE, thereby further reducing the potential for groundwater contamination.

  15. Arrival directions of cosmic rays of E .4 EeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cady, R.; Cassiday, G. I.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Ko, S.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Salamon, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The anisotropy of cosmic rays observed by the Utah Fly's Eye detector has been studied. Emphasis has been placed on examining distributions of events in galactic coordinates. No statistically significant departure from isotropy has been observed for energies greater than 0.4 EeV (1 EeV = 10 to the 18th power eV). Results of the standard harmonic analysis in right ascension are also presented.

  16. 31 CFR 351.71 - How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Series EE savings bonds are worth? 351.71 Section 351.71 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.71 How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. You may...

  17. BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE, DR and PV in Existing California Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Craig; Horowitz, Scott; Maguire, Jeff; Velasco, Paulo Tabrares; Springer, David; Coates, Peter; Bell, Christy; Price, Snuller; Sreedharan, Priya; Pickrell, Katie

    2014-04-01

    This project targeted the development of a software tool, BEopt-CA (Ex) (Building Energy Optimization Tool for California Existing Homes), that aims to facilitate balanced integration of energy efficiency (EE), demand response (DR), and photovoltaics (PV) in the residential retrofit1 market. The intent is to provide utility program managers and contractors in the EE/DR/PV marketplace with a means of balancing the integration of EE, DR, and PV

  18. Occurrence of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) in the environment and effect on exposed biota: a review.

    PubMed

    Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Shamsuddin, Aida Soraya; Praveena, Sarva Mangala

    2014-08-01

    17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic hormone, which is a derivative of the natural hormone, estradiol (E2). EE2 is an orally bio-active estrogen, and is one of the most commonly used medications for humans as well as livestock and aquaculture activity. EE2 has become a widespread problem in the environment due to its high resistance to the process of degradation and its tendency to (i) absorb organic matter, (ii) accumulate in sediment and (iii) concentrate in biota. Numerous studies have reported the ability of EE2 to alter sex determination, delay sexual maturity, and decrease the secondary sexual characteristics of exposed organisms even at a low concentration (ng/L) by mimicking its natural analogue, 17β-estradiol (E2). Thus, the aim of this review is to provide an overview of the science regarding EE2, the concentration levels in the environment (water, sediment and biota) and summarize the effects of this compound on exposed biota at various concentrations, stage life, sex, and species. The challenges in respect of EE2 include the extension of the limited database on the EE2 pollution profile in the environment, its fate and transport mechanism, as well as the exposure level of EE2 for better prediction and definition revision of EE2 toxicity end points, notably for the purpose of environmental risk assessment. PMID:24825791

  19. Occurrence of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) in the environment and effect on exposed biota: a review.

    PubMed

    Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Shamsuddin, Aida Soraya; Praveena, Sarva Mangala

    2014-08-01

    17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic hormone, which is a derivative of the natural hormone, estradiol (E2). EE2 is an orally bio-active estrogen, and is one of the most commonly used medications for humans as well as livestock and aquaculture activity. EE2 has become a widespread problem in the environment due to its high resistance to the process of degradation and its tendency to (i) absorb organic matter, (ii) accumulate in sediment and (iii) concentrate in biota. Numerous studies have reported the ability of EE2 to alter sex determination, delay sexual maturity, and decrease the secondary sexual characteristics of exposed organisms even at a low concentration (ng/L) by mimicking its natural analogue, 17β-estradiol (E2). Thus, the aim of this review is to provide an overview of the science regarding EE2, the concentration levels in the environment (water, sediment and biota) and summarize the effects of this compound on exposed biota at various concentrations, stage life, sex, and species. The challenges in respect of EE2 include the extension of the limited database on the EE2 pollution profile in the environment, its fate and transport mechanism, as well as the exposure level of EE2 for better prediction and definition revision of EE2 toxicity end points, notably for the purpose of environmental risk assessment.

  20. eeDAP: an evaluation environment for digital and analog pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, Brandon D.; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Ivansky, Adam; Keay, Tyler; Wunderlich, Adam; Hipp, Jason; Hewitt, Stephen M.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to present a platform for designing and executing studies that compare pathologists interpreting histopathology of whole slide images (WSI) on a computer display to pathologists interpreting glass slides on an optical microscope. Methods: Here we present eeDAP, an evaluation environment for digital and analog pathology. The key element in eeDAP is the registration of theWSI to the glass slide. Registration is accomplished through computer control of the microscope stage and a camera mounted on the microscope that acquires images of the real time microscope view. Registration allows for the evaluation of the same regions of interest (ROIs) in both domains. This can reduce or eliminate disagreements that arise from pathologists interpreting different areas and focuses the comparison on image quality. Results: We reduced the pathologist interpretation area from an entire glass slide (≈10-30 mm)2 to small ROIs <(50 um)2. We also made possible the evaluation of individual cells. Conclusions: We summarize eeDAP's software and hardware and provide calculations and corresponding images of the microscope field of view and the ROIs extracted from the WSIs. These calculations help provide a sense of eeDAP's functionality and operating principles, while the images provide a sense of the look and feel of studies that can be conducted in the digital and analog domains. The eeDAP software can be downloaded from code.google.com (project: eeDAP) as Matlab source or as a precompiled stand-alone license-free application.

  1. e+e- collisions in the multi-TeV region

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.

    1983-05-01

    A leading role in the elucidation of the Standard Model during the last few years has been played by e+e- colliding beam experiments. The e+e- discoveries have been made possible by the cleanliness of the experimental conditions and the ability to tune the centre-of-mass energy with precision to the desired value, thus avoiding less interesting background events. We expect history to repeat itself in the next step of elucidating physics beyond the Standard Model. Just as past e+e- machines such as SPEAR, DORIS and CESR have uncovered physics inaccessible to hadron-hadron collisions with a centre-of-mass energy several times higher, so we feel that future e+e- colliders will provide information that could not be duplicated by hadron colliders with much larger centre-of-mass energies. There is a general consensus that the next interesting energy range is likely to be in the TeV range. It is in this energy range that whatever physics provides and stabilizes the masses of the intermediate vector bosons must be revealed. Unravelling this mass generation mechanism takes us beyond the gauge principle of the Standard Model which has been so triumphantly vindicated in recent months. Therefore we discuss here the capabilities and attributes of an e+e- collider with at least 1 TeV energy per beam. We believe that by enabling an important new energy domain to be explored in detail, such an e+e- collider provides physics opportunities which cannot be paralled by hadron-hadron colliding rings with centre-of-mass energies several times higher. (WHK)

  2. The 2009 Eclipse of EE Cephei: An Educational and Collaborative Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, John; Elder, Lauren; Hopkins, Jeff

    2009-05-01

    In December 2008 Jeff Hopkins of the Hopkins Phoenix Observatory (HPO) put out a request for assistance in extracting data from images taken by the AAVSO SRO (Sonoita Research Observatory) of EE Cephei, an 11th magnitude (V) long period (5.6 years) eclipsing binary star system that was due to eclipse in January of 2009. The Hopkins Phoenix Observatory originally planned to do BVRI CCD photometry of EE Cephei for the 2009 eclipse, but equipment and logistical changes at HPO meant the EE Cephei project would not be possible. However, in the fall of 2008 Arne Henden of the AAVSO announced the availability of a remote robotic 16" telescope (the Sonoita Research Observatory) in southern Arizona for use by members of the AAVSO. Jeff Hopkins contacted Arne Henden and arrangements were made to have the EE Cephei star system imaged with BVRI filters beginning in November 2008 and running through February 2009. Image files were archived on the AAVSO web site. Soon after his initial request went out, Jeff Hopkins was contacted by John Pye from Maui Community College, who agreed to help with the project by having one of his students, Lauren Elder, examine the image files and extract EE Cephei and 3 comparison stars flux (ADU) counts for each band. The resulting data were then sent to the Hopkins Phoenix Observatory for data reduction and analysis. The project was a successful joint collaboration with 40 nights of observations for over 300 BVRI data points from 20 November 2008 to 17 February 2009. Light curves for each band as well as color indices were plotted and eclipse contact points were determined. The data were also contributed to the EE Cephei Campaign organized by Cezary Galan at the Centre for Astronomy at Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun (Poland). Our results are plotted along with those of several dozen other observers from around the world.

  3. Effective fermion-Higgs interactions at an e+e- collider with polarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huitu, Katri; Rao, Kumar; Rindani, Saurabh D.; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-10-01

    We consider the possibility of new physics giving rise to effective interactions of the form e+e- Hf f bar , where f represents a charged lepton ℓ or a (light) quark q, and H the recently discovered Higgs boson. Such vertices would give contributions beyond the standard model to the Higgs production processes e+e- → Hℓ+ℓ- and e+e- → Hq q bar at a future e+e- collider. We write the most general form for these vertices allowed by Lorentz symmetry. Assuming that such interactions contribute in addition to the standard model production processes, where the final-state fermion pair comes from the decay of the Z boson, we obtain the differential cross section for the processes e+e- → Hℓ+ℓ- and e+e- → Hq q bar to linear order in the effective interactions. We propose several observables with differing CP and T properties which, if measured, can be used to constrain the couplings occurring in interaction vertices. We derive possible limits on these couplings that may be obtained at a collider with centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV and an integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1. We also carry out the analysis assuming that both the electron and positron beams can be longitudinally polarized, and find that the sensitivity to the couplings can be improved by a factor of 2-4 by a specific choice of the signs of the polarizations of both the electron and positron beams for the same integrated luminosity.

  4. Space-charge-mediated anomalous ferroelectric switching in P(VDF-TrEE) polymer films.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weijin; Wang, Zhihong; Du, Yuanmin; Zhang, Xi-Xiang; Wu, Tom

    2014-11-12

    We report on the switching dynamics of P(VDF-TrEE) copolymer devices and the realization of additional substable ferroelectric states via modulation of the coupling between polarizations and space charges. The space-charge-limited current is revealed to be the dominant leakage mechanism in such organic ferroelectric devices, and electrostatic interactions due to space charges lead to the emergence of anomalous ferroelectric loops. The reliable control of ferroelectric switching in P(VDF-TrEE) copolymers opens doors toward engineering advanced organic memories with tailored switching characteristics.

  5. [Sex determination in ten crane species by DNA marker EE0.6].

    PubMed

    Mudrik, E A; Kashentseva, T A; Gamburg, E A; Politov, D V

    2013-12-01

    Using a unique DNA sequence of W-chromosome EE0.6, we carried out molecular sex determination in 383 individuals often species of cranes (Grusgrus L., G. leucogeranus Pallas, G. japonensis Muller, G. vipio Pallas, G. Canadensis L., G. antigone L., G. monacha Temminck, Anthropoides virgo L., Balearica regulorum Bennett, and B. pavonia L.) kept in zoos and other centers of captive propagation. In 211 birds, sex was determined or verified for the first time. The efficiency of using the sex marker EE0.6 for chicks and immature and adult cranes of different species, as well as for interspecific hybrids was shown. PMID:25438606

  6. [Sex determination in ten crane species by DNA marker EE0.6].

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Using a unique DNA sequence of W-chromosome EE0.6, we carried out molecular sex determination in 383 individuals often species of cranes (Grusgrus L., G. leucogeranus Pallas, G. japonensis Muller, G. vipio Pallas, G. Canadensis L., G. antigone L., G. monacha Temminck, Anthropoides virgo L., Balearica regulorum Bennett, and B. pavonia L.) kept in zoos and other centers of captive propagation. In 211 birds, sex was determined or verified for the first time. The efficiency of using the sex marker EE0.6 for chicks and immature and adult cranes of different species, as well as for interspecific hybrids was shown. PMID:25508137

  7. A Possible Excess of γ + Missing Energy Events in e+e- Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senju, H.

    1996-02-01

    It is shown that the preon model with preonic charge can explain qualitatively and, taking αs(Mz) = 0.11, also quantitatively the unique features of Z decay data, if the new vector boson D1 is sufficiently heavy. A heavy D1 manifests itself in a sizeable excess of the cross section for e+e- --> photon + missing energy. We study this process in the LEP200 energy region, including another source of photon + missing energy events, e+e- --> lsbar{l}sγ.

  8. Possible Signatures of New Physics in e+e- and bar bar{p}p Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senju, H.

    1998-12-01

    A preon model with preonic charge predicts many unique new particles. Among them, several are expected to be relatively light, including the fermion lS, which is a stable WIMP, bosons U0 and U+ and the lepto-quark fermion q'. The production of these particles in e+e- and bar{p}p collisions is discussed, focusing on e+e- --> UlS(e) and bar{p}p --> bar{q}'q' + X. A signature of the latter is dilepton + 2 charm jets + missing energy. A discussion on reported unusual events in the dilepton + jets sample is made based on bar{q}'q' production.

  9. Experiment 2034. The Evaluation of Heat Transfer in the Foam-Filled EE-3 Annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Hugh D.; Zyvoloski, George A.; Dash, Zora V.; Cocks, George G.

    1983-11-10

    The purpose of Experiment 2034, conducted October 20, 1983, was to measure the heat transfer coefficient in a foam filled annulus. Previous experiments with using nitrogen gas in the annulus resulted in transfer coefficients high enough that heating of the injected water would be required if fracturing were ever to be resumed in EE-3.

  10. 31 CFR 351.1 - What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) The regulations in 31 CFR part 353 apply to definitive (paper) Series EE savings bonds that have not been converted to book-entry bonds through New Treasury Direct. (b) The regulations in 31 CFR part 363... through New Treasury Direct. (c) The regulations in 31 CFR part 370 apply to transactions for the...

  11. 31 CFR 351.1 - What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) The regulations in 31 CFR part 353 apply to definitive (paper) Series EE savings bonds that have not been converted to book-entry bonds through New Treasury Direct. (b) The regulations in 31 CFR part 363... through New Treasury Direct. (c) The regulations in 31 CFR part 370 apply to transactions for the...

  12. To Learn Production of Scalars VS. Tensors in e+e- Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, N. N.; Goncharenko, A. I.; Kiselev, A. V.; Rogozina, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The intensity of scalar a0(980), f0(980) and tensor a2(1320), f2(1270) mesons production at VEPP-2000 (BINP, Novosibirsk) and the upgraded DAΦNE (Frascati, Italy) in the processes e+e- → a0(f0, a2, f2)γ is calculated.

  13. 31 CFR 351.1 - What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) The regulations in 31 CFR part 353 apply to definitive (paper) Series EE savings bonds that have not been converted to book-entry bonds through New Treasury Direct. (b) The regulations in 31 CFR part 363... through New Treasury Direct. (c) The regulations in 31 CFR part 370 apply to transactions for the...

  14. 31 CFR 351.1 - What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The regulations in 31 CFR part 353 apply to definitive (paper) Series EE savings bonds that have not been converted to book-entry bonds through New Treasury Direct. (b) The regulations in 31 CFR part 363... through New Treasury Direct. (c) The regulations in 31 CFR part 370 apply to transactions for the...

  15. 31 CFR 351.1 - What regulations govern Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The regulations in 31 CFR part 353 apply to definitive (paper) Series EE savings bonds that have not been converted to book-entry bonds through New Treasury Direct. (b) The regulations in 31 CFR part 363... through New Treasury Direct. (c) The regulations in 31 CFR part 370 apply to transactions for the...

  16. Resource Materials To Support Your Environmental Education Efforts. EE-TIPS (Environmental Education Technical Information Packages).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North American Association for Environmental Education, Troy, OH.

    This collection gathers together over 50 high-quality materials to support environmental education (EE) curricula. Because each community has unique environmental and educational needs, the guide includes a broad set of educational materials that can be adapted to a variety of settings. The materials can be used to supplement educational…

  17. Perspectives from Emerging Researchers: What Next in EE/SE Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguayo, Claudio; Higgins, Blanche; Field, Ellen; Nicholls, Jennifer; Pudin, Susan; Tiu, Sangion Appiee; Osborn, Maia; Hashemzadeh, Farshad; Lubuulwa, Kevin Kezabu; Boulet, Mark; Christie, Belinda A.; Mah, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Following the inaugural Australian Association for Environmental Education (AAEE) research symposium in November 2014, we--a group of emerging researchers in Environmental Education/Sustainability Education (EE/SE)--commenced an online collaboration to identify and articulate our responses to the main themes of the symposium. Identifying as…

  18. The Semantics and Pragmatics of Deverbal Nouns Ending in -ee: A Report on Work in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flognfeldt, Mona E.

    A study of English nouns derived from verbs and ending in "-ee" is outlined. The objective was to determine whether those nouns exhibit verbal characteristics (aspectual, temporal, or modal) that can be attributed to their derivation from verbs. The study examined 209 nouns. Progress made in the investigation of four hypotheses is described. The…

  19. 77 FR 213 - United States Savings Bonds, Series EE and I

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... Parts 351, 359, and 363 United States Savings Bonds, Series EE and I AGENCY: Bureau of the Public Debt... Order 12866. Administrative Procedure Act (APA). Because this rule relates to United States securities... 359--OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I 0 5. The authority citation for part...

  20. Self-consistency correlations between QCD parameters from e+e- annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verzegnassi, Claudio

    1983-08-01

    I propose a method to generate correlations between QCD parameters using the available e+e- data. The method reproduces ``standard'' results, but needs a rather large strange quark ``mass'' mS >~ 250 MeV assuming ``standard'' values for the non perturbative parameters. On leave of absence from Istituto di Fisica teorica dell'Universitá, Trieste, Italy.

  1. A coordinated set of ecosystem research platforms open to international research in ecotoxicology, AnaEE-France.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Christian; Azam, Didier; Caquet, Thierry; Cheviron, Nathalie; Dequiedt, Samuel; Le Galliard, Jean-François; Guillaume, Olivier; Houot, Sabine; Lacroix, Gérard; Lafolie, François; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Michniewicz, Radika; Pichot, Christian; Ranjard, Lionel; Roy, Jacques; Zeller, Bernd; Clobert, Jean; Chanzy, André

    2015-10-01

    The infrastructure for Analysis and Experimentation on Ecosystems (AnaEE-France) is an integrated network of the major French experimental, analytical, and modeling platforms dedicated to the biological study of continental ecosystems (aquatic and terrestrial). This infrastructure aims at understanding and predicting ecosystem dynamics under global change. AnaEE-France comprises complementary nodes offering access to the best experimental facilities and associated biological resources and data: Ecotrons, seminatural experimental platforms to manipulate terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, in natura sites equipped for large-scale and long-term experiments. AnaEE-France also provides shared instruments and analytical platforms dedicated to environmental (micro) biology. Finally, AnaEE-France provides users with data bases and modeling tools designed to represent ecosystem dynamics and to go further in coupling ecological, agronomical, and evolutionary approaches. In particular, AnaEE-France offers adequate services to tackle the new challenges of research in ecotoxicology, positioning its various types of platforms in an ecologically advanced ecotoxicology approach. AnaEE-France is a leading international infrastructure, and it is pioneering the construction of AnaEE (Europe) infrastructure in the field of ecosystem research. AnaEE-France infrastructure is already open to the international community of scientists in the field of continental ecotoxicology.

  2. A coordinated set of ecosystem research platforms open to international research in ecotoxicology, AnaEE-France.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Christian; Azam, Didier; Caquet, Thierry; Cheviron, Nathalie; Dequiedt, Samuel; Le Galliard, Jean-François; Guillaume, Olivier; Houot, Sabine; Lacroix, Gérard; Lafolie, François; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Michniewicz, Radika; Pichot, Christian; Ranjard, Lionel; Roy, Jacques; Zeller, Bernd; Clobert, Jean; Chanzy, André

    2015-10-01

    The infrastructure for Analysis and Experimentation on Ecosystems (AnaEE-France) is an integrated network of the major French experimental, analytical, and modeling platforms dedicated to the biological study of continental ecosystems (aquatic and terrestrial). This infrastructure aims at understanding and predicting ecosystem dynamics under global change. AnaEE-France comprises complementary nodes offering access to the best experimental facilities and associated biological resources and data: Ecotrons, seminatural experimental platforms to manipulate terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, in natura sites equipped for large-scale and long-term experiments. AnaEE-France also provides shared instruments and analytical platforms dedicated to environmental (micro) biology. Finally, AnaEE-France provides users with data bases and modeling tools designed to represent ecosystem dynamics and to go further in coupling ecological, agronomical, and evolutionary approaches. In particular, AnaEE-France offers adequate services to tackle the new challenges of research in ecotoxicology, positioning its various types of platforms in an ecologically advanced ecotoxicology approach. AnaEE-France is a leading international infrastructure, and it is pioneering the construction of AnaEE (Europe) infrastructure in the field of ecosystem research. AnaEE-France infrastructure is already open to the international community of scientists in the field of continental ecotoxicology. PMID:26315587

  3. 31 CFR 351.9 - When will I receive the redemption value of my Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... you surrender the bond for payment as provided in these regulations and in 31 CFR part 353. (b) You... value of my Series EE savings bonds? 351.9 Section 351.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and...

  4. 31 CFR 351.9 - When will I receive the redemption value of my Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... you surrender the bond for payment as provided in these regulations and in 31 CFR part 353. (b) You... value of my Series EE savings bonds? 351.9 Section 351.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Maturities, Redemption Values, and...

  5. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  6. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  7. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides EeCentrocins 1, 2 and EeStrongylocin 2 from the Edible Sea Urchin Echinus esculentus Have 6-Br-Trp Post-Translational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Solstad, Runar Gjerp; Li, Chun; Isaksson, Johan; Johansen, Jostein; Svenson, Johan; Stensvåg, Klara; Haug, Tor

    2016-01-01

    The global problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics has resulted in an urgent need to develop new antimicrobial agents. Natural antimicrobial peptides are considered promising candidates for drug development. Echinoderms, which rely on innate immunity factors in the defence against harmful microorganisms, are sources of novel antimicrobial peptides. This study aimed to isolate and characterise antimicrobial peptides from the Edible sea urchin Echinus esculentus. Using bioassay-guided purification and cDNA cloning, three antimicrobial peptides were characterised from the haemocytes of the sea urchin; two heterodimeric peptides and a cysteine-rich peptide. The peptides were named EeCentrocin 1 and 2 and EeStrongylocin 2, respectively, due to their apparent homology to the published centrocins and strongylocins isolated from the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. The two centrocin-like peptides EeCentrocin 1 and 2 are intramolecularly connected via a disulphide bond to form a heterodimeric structure, containing a cationic heavy chain of 30 and 32 amino acids and a light chain of 13 amino acids. Additionally, the light chain of EeCentrocin 2 seems to be N-terminally blocked by a pyroglutamic acid residue. The heavy chains of EeCentrocins 1 and 2 were synthesised and shown to be responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the natural peptides. EeStrongylocin 2 contains 6 cysteines engaged in 3 disulphide bonds. A fourth peptide (Ee4635) was also discovered but not fully characterised. Using mass spectrometric and NMR analyses, EeCentrocins 1 and 2, EeStrongylocin 2 and Ee4635 were all shown to contain post-translationally brominated Trp residues in the 6 position of the indole ring. PMID:27007817

  8. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides EeCentrocins 1, 2 and EeStrongylocin 2 from the Edible Sea Urchin Echinus esculentus Have 6-Br-Trp Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Solstad, Runar Gjerp; Li, Chun; Isaksson, Johan; Johansen, Jostein; Svenson, Johan; Stensvåg, Klara; Haug, Tor

    2016-01-01

    The global problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics has resulted in an urgent need to develop new antimicrobial agents. Natural antimicrobial peptides are considered promising candidates for drug development. Echinoderms, which rely on innate immunity factors in the defence against harmful microorganisms, are sources of novel antimicrobial peptides. This study aimed to isolate and characterise antimicrobial peptides from the Edible sea urchin Echinus esculentus. Using bioassay-guided purification and cDNA cloning, three antimicrobial peptides were characterised from the haemocytes of the sea urchin; two heterodimeric peptides and a cysteine-rich peptide. The peptides were named EeCentrocin 1 and 2 and EeStrongylocin 2, respectively, due to their apparent homology to the published centrocins and strongylocins isolated from the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. The two centrocin-like peptides EeCentrocin 1 and 2 are intramolecularly connected via a disulphide bond to form a heterodimeric structure, containing a cationic heavy chain of 30 and 32 amino acids and a light chain of 13 amino acids. Additionally, the light chain of EeCentrocin 2 seems to be N-terminally blocked by a pyroglutamic acid residue. The heavy chains of EeCentrocins 1 and 2 were synthesised and shown to be responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the natural peptides. EeStrongylocin 2 contains 6 cysteines engaged in 3 disulphide bonds. A fourth peptide (Ee4635) was also discovered but not fully characterised. Using mass spectrometric and NMR analyses, EeCentrocins 1 and 2, EeStrongylocin 2 and Ee4635 were all shown to contain post-translationally brominated Trp residues in the 6 position of the indole ring. PMID:27007817

  9. Long-term EEJ variations by using the improved EE-index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, A.; Uozumi, T.; Abe, Sh.; Matsushita, H.; Imajo, Sh.; Ishitsuka, J. K.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2016-03-01

    In 2008, International Center for Space Weather Science and Education, Kyushu University (ICSWSE) proposed the EE-index, which is an index to monitor the equatorial geomagnetic phenomena. EE-index has been improved with the development of the MAGnetic Data Acquisition System and the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (MAGDAS/CPMN) and the enormous archive of MAGDAS/CPMN data over 10 years since the initial article. Using the improved EE-index, we examined the solar cycle variation of equatorial electrojet (EEJ) by the time series analysis for EUEL (one part of EE-index) at Ancon in Peru and the solar activity from September 18, 1998 to March 31, 2015. We found that the long-term variation of daily EEJ peak intensity has a trend similar to that of F10.7 (the solar activity). The power spectrum of the daily EEJ peak has clearly two dominant peaks throughout the analysis interval: 14.5 days and 180 days (semi-annual). The solar cycle variation of daily EEJ peak correlates well with that of F10.7 (the correlation coefficient 0.99). We conclude that the daily EEJ peak intensity is roughly determined as the summation of the long-period trend of the solar activity resulting from the solar cycle and day-to-day variations caused by various sources such as lunar tides, geometric effects, magnetospheric phenomena and atmospheric phenomena. This work presents the primary evidence for solar cycle variations of EEJ on the long-term study of the EE-index

  10. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    SciTech Connect

    d'Enterria, David; Skands, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  11. Photocatalytic degradation of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in the presence of TiO2-doped zeolite.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhong; Stemmler, Elizabeth A; Cho, Hong Je; Fan, Wei; LeBlanc, Lawrence A; Patterson, Howard H; Amirbahman, Aria

    2014-08-30

    Current design limitations and ineffective remediation techniques in wastewater treatment plants have led to concerns about the prevalence of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in receiving waters. A novel photocatalyst, TiO2-doped low-silica X zeolite (TiO2-LSX), was used to study the degradation of the pharmaceutical compound, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). The catalyst was synthesized and characterized using XRD, BET surface analysis, SEM-EDAX, and ICP-OES. The effects of different UV light intensities, initial EE2 concentrations, and catalyst dosages on the EE2 removal efficiency were studied. A higher EE2 removal efficiency was attained with UV-TiO2-LSX when compared with UV-TiO2 or UV alone. The EE2 degradation process followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. A comprehensive empirical model was developed to describe the EE2 degradation kinetics under different conditions using multiple linear regression analysis. The EE2 degradation mechanism was proposed based on molecular calculations, identification of photoproducts using HPLC-MS/MS, and reactive species quenching experiments; the results showed that oxidative degradation pathways initiated by hydroxyl radicals were predominant. This novel TiO2-doped zeolite system provides a promising application for the UV disinfection process in wastewater treatment plants.

  12. 31 CFR 351.82 - Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme? 351.82 Section 351.82 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.82 Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?...

  13. 31 CFR 351.82 - Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme? 351.82 Section 351.82 Money and Finance... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Miscellaneous Provisions § 351.82 Does Public Debt prohibit the issuance of Series EE savings bonds in a chain letter scheme?...

  14. OBSERVATIONAL SEARCH FOR PeV-EeV TAU NEUTRINO FROM GRB081203A

    SciTech Connect

    Aita, Y.; Aoki, T.; Asaoka, Y.; Chonan, T.; Jobashi, M.; Masuda, M.; Morimoto, Y.; Noda, K.; Sasaki, M.; Asoh, J.; Ishikawa, N.; Ogawa, S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Olsen, S.; Binder, P.-M.; Hamilton, J.; Sugiyama, N.; Watanabe, Y. E-mail: sasakim@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-07-20

    We report the first observational search for tau neutrinos ({nu}{sub {tau}}) from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using one of the Ashra light collectors. The Earth-skimming {nu}{sub {tau}} technique of imaging Cherenkov {tau} showers was applied as a detection method. We set stringent upper limits on the {nu}{sub {tau}} fluence in PeV-EeV region for 3780 s (between 2.83 and 1.78 hr before) and another 3780 s (between 21.2 and 22.2 hr after) surrounding GRB081203A triggered by the Swift satellite. This first search for PeV-EeV {nu}{sub {tau}} complements other experiments in energy range and methodology, and suggests the prologue of 'multi-particle astronomy' with a precise determination of time and location.

  15. Probing MeV dark matter at low-energy e+e- colliders.

    PubMed

    Borodatchenkova, Natalia; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Drees, Manuel

    2006-04-14

    It has been suggested that the pair annihilation of dark matter particles chi with mass between 0.5 and 20 MeV into e+e- pairs could be responsible for the excess flux (detected by the INTEGRAL satellite) of 511 keV photons coming from the central region of our Galaxy. The simplest way to achieve the required cross section while respecting existing constraints is to introduce a new vector boson U with mass M(U) below a few hundred MeV. We point out that over most of the allowed parameter space, the process e+e--->U(gamma), followed by the decay of U into either an e+e- pair or an invisible (nu(-)nu or chi(-)chi) channel, should lead to signals detectable by current B-factory experiments. A smaller, but still substantial, region of parameter space can also be probed at the Phi factory DAPhiNE.

  16. Anisotropy studies around the Galactic Centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; Aramo, C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, IAFE /Buenos Aires, CONICET /Pierre Auger Observ. /La Plata U. /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-07-01

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius A. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the ''hybrid'' data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  17. Experiment 2061: Packer Stimulation of the Deepest Portion of EE-3A

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.; Dash, Zora V.; Kelkar, Sharad; Fehler, Michael C.; Robinson, Bruce A.; Yamaguchi, Tsutomu; Zyvoloski, George A.

    1985-06-17

    At our present rate of drilling, EE-3A should have been drilled to a final depth of 13,100 ft by next Monday, 6-17-85. We then plan to stimulate the bottom portion of the hole by setting a Lynes packer some 400 to 600 ft off bottom, to be determined from the temperature and caliper logs run during Expt. 2060 and mud log. We plan to pump into this bottom zone of EE-3A at a nominal rate of 6 BPM for up to 72 hours, with an early higher flow interval (about 12 hours) at from 10 to 12 BPM. The total injection will be about 1.2 million gallons.

  18. Slow down of a globally neutral relativistic e-e+ beam shearing the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. P.; Grismayer, T.; Silveirinha, M. G.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    The microphysics of relativistic collisionless shear flows is investigated in a configuration consisting of a globally neutral, relativistic {{e}-}{{e}+} beam streaming through a hollow plasma/dielectric channel. We show through multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations that this scenario excites the mushroom instability (MI), a transverse shear instability on the electron-scale, when there is no overlap (no contact) between the {{e}-}{{e}+} beam and the walls of the hollow plasma channel. The onset of the MI leads to the conversion of the beam’s kinetic energy into magnetic (and electric) field energy, effectively slowing down a globally neutral body in the absence of contact. The collisionless shear physics explored in this configuration may operate in astrophysical environments, particularly in highly relativistic and supersonic settings where macroscopic shear processes are stable.

  19. Repair, sidetrack, drilling, and completion of EE-2A for Phase 2 reservoir production service

    SciTech Connect

    Dreesen, D.S.; Cocks, G.G.; Nicholson, R.W.; Thomson, J.C.

    1989-08-01

    Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy well EE-2 at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was sidetracked and redrilled into the HDR Phase II reservoir after two unsuccessful attempts to repair damage in the lower wellbore. Before sidetracking was begun, six cement slurries were pumped to plug the abandoned lower wellbore and to support the production casing where drilling wear was predicted and where sidetracking was to occur. This work and the redrill of EE-2A were completed in November 1987. Specifications were prepared for a state-of-the-art tie-back casing, which was procured, manufactured, and delivered to Fenton Hill in May 1988. The well was then completed in June 1988 for hot-water production service by cementing in a liner and the upper section of production casing and installing and cementing a tie-back casing string. 24 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. The e+e- perspective on the state of heavy flavor physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David

    2010-02-01

    Beyond the beautiful confirmation of the CKM model of three-generation quark flavor mixing and CP violation in weak interactions, the B-factories have left a legacy of precision measurements involving heavy quark and lepton flavors. While there are a few hints, these measurements have not yet revealed any evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. Proposed future e+e- B-factories will be capable of accumulating data samples roughly 100 times those of the existing B-factories, allowing measurements sensitive to effects predicted by many Standard Model extensions. In this talk I will review the status of existing B-factories measurements, concentrating on those most sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model. I will also discuss the potential physics reach of proposed next-generation e+e- heavy flavor factories, and their relevance to HEP at the dawn of the LHC era. )

  1. Study of baryon production mechanism in e+e- annihilation into hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz Collaboration; Aoki, M.; Itoh, R.; Watanabe, Y.; Kaneyuki, K.; Ohshima, Y.; Ochi, A.; Tanimori, T.; Abe, K.; Abe, T.; Adachi, I.; Adachi, K.; Aoki, M.; Emi, K.; Enomoto, R.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, T.; Fujii, K.; Fujimoto, J.; Fujiwara, N.; Hayashii, H.; Hirano, H.; Howell, B.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, Y.; Itami, S.; Iwasaki, H.; Iwasaki, M.; Kajikawa, R.; Kato, S.; Kawabata, S.; Kichimi, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Koltick, D.; Levine, I.; Mamada, H.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyamoto, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakabayashi, K.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, E.; Nitoh, O.; Noguchi, S.; Ochiai, F.; Ohishi, N.; Ohnishi, Y.; Okuno, H.; Okusawa, T.; Shibata, E.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Tauchi, T.; Tomoto, M.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tsumura, T.; Uno, S.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamauchi, M.

    1998-11-01

    The mechanism of baryon-anti-baryon pair production in e+e- annihilation into hadrons has been studied using the TOPAZ detector at the TRISTAN e+e- collider at an average center-of-mass energy of 58 GeV. The distributions of various p¯p correlations were compared with two prominent models: the cluster-fragmentation model and the string-fragmentation model. We rejected the cluster-fragmentation model at the 90% C.L. Furthermore, in the context of the string-fragmentation model, we favor the ``popcorn'' model, rejecting the ``diquark'' model, where a diquark is considered to be a fundamental entity, at the 95% C.L.

  2. Recent results from CMD-3 detector at VEPP-2000 e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, E. P.; Amirkhanov, A. N.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Banzarov, V. S.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Bondar, A. E.; Bragin, A. V.; Eidelman, S. I.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Gribanov, S. S.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Ignatov, F. V.; Ivanov, V. L.; Karpov, S. V.; Kazanin, V. F.; Korobov, A. A.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kozyrev, E. A.; Krokovny, P. P.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Lukin, P. A.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Popov, A. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Ryskulov, N. M.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Shebalin, V. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Shwartz, B. A.; Sibidanov, A. L.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Solodov, E. P.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-05-01

    The CMD-3 detector has been taking data since December 2010 at the VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider. The collected data sample corresponds to about 60 inverse picobarn of integrated luminosity in the c.m. energy range from 0.32 to 2.0 GeV. Preliminary results of the analysis of various hadronic cross sections, in particular, e+e- → π+π-, π+π-π0, KL KS, K+ K-, ηγ, 3(π+π-), 2(π+π-π0), K+ K-π+π-, K+ K-η, K+ K-π0, ηπ+π-, ωπ+π- and ω → π0e+e- are presented. The processes with multihadron final states have several intermediate states which have to be taken into account to correctly describe the angular and invariant mass distributions, as well as cross section energy dependence.

  3. DATA REVIEW: A compilation of data on hadronic total cross sections in e+e- interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on total hadronic cross sections, and R ratios, in e+e- interactions is presented. Published data from the Novosibirsk, Orsay, Frascati, SLAC, CORNELL, DESY, KEK and CERN e+e- colliders on both exclusive and inclusive final particle states are included from threshold energies to the highest LEP energies. The data are presented in tabular form supplemented by compilation plots of different exclusive final particle states and of different energy regions. All the data in this review, together with data on a wide variety of other reactions, can be found in, and retrieved from, the Durham HEP Databases on the World Wide Web http://durpdg.dur.ac.uk/HEPDATA.

  4. Photocopy of a photograph showing a woman (not E.E. Lape, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of a photograph showing a woman (not E.E. Lape, but possibly E.F. Read) seated outside of southwest corner of Murdock House (circa 1930s?). (Photo found in Lape-Read House, located at U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Murdock Hill, Murdock House, South side of Old Clinton Road (U.S. Route 1), 1 mile east of Horse Hill Road, Westbrook, Middlesex County, CT

  5. Experiment 2074: post-drilling reservoir flow testing through EE-3A first revision

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.; Robinson, Bruce A.

    1987-11-20

    As previously outlined in memorandum ESS-4-87-305 (11/12/87), EE-3A will be pressurized with the Kobe pumps for the next week, and then a sequence of reservoir flow tests and logs will be conducted for a one to two week period beginning Tuesday, 12/1/87. The purpose of this memorandum is to better define this flow test and sequence of logs, organized as a "formal" experiment.

  6. Extracting the kaon Collins function from e+e- hadron pair production data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; D'Alesio, U.; Hernandez, J. O. Gonzalez; Melis, S.; Murgia, F.; Prokudin, A.

    2016-02-01

    The latest data released by the BABAR Collaboration on azimuthal correlations measured for pion-kaon and kaon-kaon pairs produced in e+e- annihilations allow, for the first time, a direct extraction of the kaon Collins functions. These functions are then used to compute the kaon Collins asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes, which result in good agreement with the measurements performed by the HERMES and COMPASS collaborations.

  7. CO2 Flow in the EE-3 Annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, Sharad

    1985-05-10

    Don Brown asked me to look at how much CO2 would be required to produce a 600 psi pressure change in the EE-3 annulus. If a column of water were replaced by a column of CO2, at 500 psi and 50°C, 1583 feet would be required to produce a 600 psi change in the static head.

  8. Measurements of the Collins asymmetries for kaons and pions in e+e- annihilations at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, A.

    2016-07-01

    New measurements of the Collins asymmetries were performed by BABAR exploiting inclusive e+e- → h1h2 X annihilations (with h1,2 = π and/or K) mainly at the energy of the ϒ(4S), which corresponds to a squared transferred momentum Q2 ~ 110 GeV2c4. For the first time asymmetries following strange quarks fragmentation could be derived as a function of the fractional energy carried out by inclusively emitted hadron pairs.

  9. Finite pulse effects on e+e- pair creation from strong electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taya, H.; Fujii, H.; Itakura, K.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate electron-positron pair creation from the vacuum in a pulsed electric background field. Employing the Sauter-type pulsed field E(t)=E0sech2(t/τ) with height E0 and width τ, we demonstrate explicitly the interplay between the nonperturbative and perturbative aspects of pair creation in the background field. We analytically compute the number of produced pairs from the vacuum in the Sauter-type field, and the result reproduces Schwinger's nonperturbative formula in the long pulse limit (the constant field limit), while in the short pulse limit it coincides with the leading-order perturbative result. We show that two dimensionless parameters ν =|eE0|τ2 and γ =|eE0|τ/me characterize the importance of multiple interactions with the fields and the transition from the perturbative to the nonperturbative regime. We also find that pair creation is enhanced compared to Schwinger's formula when the field strength is relativity weak |eE0|/me2≲1 and the pulse duration is relatively short meτ ≲1, and reveal that the enhancement is predominantly described by the lowest order perturbation with a single photon.

  10. CN-GELFrEE - Clear Native Gel-eluted Liquid Fraction Entrapment Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Melani, Rafael D; Seckler, Henrique S; Skinner, Owen S; Do Vale, Luis H F; Catherman, Adam D; Havugimana, Pierre C; Valle de Sousa, Marcelo; Domont, Gilberto B; Kelleher, Neil L; Compton, Philip D

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes perform an array of crucial cellular functions. Elucidating their non-covalent interactions and dynamics is paramount for understanding the role of complexes in biological systems. While the direct characterization of biomolecular assemblies has become increasingly important in recent years, native fractionation techniques that are compatible with downstream analysis techniques, including mass spectrometry, are necessary to further expand these studies. Nevertheless, the field lacks a high-throughput, wide-range, high-recovery separation method for native protein assemblies. Here, we present clear native gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (CN-GELFrEE), which is a novel separation modality for non-covalent protein assemblies. CN-GELFrEE separation performance was demonstrated by fractionating complexes extracted from mouse heart. Fractions were collected over 2 hr and displayed discrete bands ranging from ~30 to 500 kDa. A consistent pattern of increasing molecular weight bandwidths was observed, each ranging ~100 kDa. Further, subsequent reanalysis of native fractions via SDS-PAGE showed molecular-weight shifts consistent with the denaturation of protein complexes. Therefore, CN-GELFrEE was proved to offer the ability to perform high-resolution and high-recovery native separations on protein complexes from a large molecular weight range, providing fractions that are compatible with downstream protein analyses. PMID:26967310

  11. Characterizing invisible electroweak particles through single-photon processes at high energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong Youl; Han, Tao; Kalinowski, Jan; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Wang, Xing

    2015-11-01

    We explore the scenarios where the only accessible new states at the electroweak scale consist of a pair of color-singlet electroweak particles, the masses of which are degenerate at the tree level and split only by electroweak symmetry breaking at the loop level. For the sake of illustration, we consider a supersymmetric model and study the following three representative cases with the lower-lying states as (a) two spin-1 /2 Higgsino SU(2 ) L doublets, (b) a spin-1 /2 wino SU(2 ) L triplet and (c) a spin-0 left-handed slepton SU(2 ) L doublet. Due to the mass degeneracy, those lower-lying electroweak states are difficult to observe at the LHC and rather challenging to detect at the e+e- collider as well. We exploit the pair production in association with a hard photon radiation in high energy e+e- collisions. If kinematically accessible, such single-photon processes at e+e- colliders with polarized beams enable us to characterize each scenario by measuring the energy of the associated hard photon and to determine the spin of the nearly invisible particles unambiguously through the threshold behavior in the photon energy distribution.

  12. Production and decay of the diphoton resonance at future e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hayato; Moroi, Takeo

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the ATLAS and CMS announcements of the excesses of diphoton events, we discuss the production and decay processes of diphoton resonance at future e+e- colliders. We assume that the excess of the diphoton events at the LHC is explained by a scalar resonance decaying into a pair of photons. In such a case, the scalar interacts with standard model gauge bosons and, consequently, the production of such a scalar is possible at the e+e- colliders. We study the production of the scalar resonance via the associated production with the photon or Z , as well as via the vector-boson fusion, and calculate the cross sections of these processes. We also study the backgrounds, and discuss the detectability of the signals of scalar production with various decay processes of the scalar resonance. We also consider the case where the scalar resonance has an invisible decay mode, and study how the invisible decay can be observed at the e+e- colliders.

  13. Search for Long-Lived Particles in e+e- Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We present a search for a neutral, long-lived particle L that is produced in e+e- collisions and decays at a significant distance from the e+e- interaction point into various flavor combinations of two oppositely charged tracks. The analysis uses an e+e- data sample with a luminosity of 489.1 fb-1 collected by the BABAR detector at the ϒ (4 S ) , ϒ (3 S ) , and ϒ (2 S ) resonances and just below the ϒ (4 S ) . Fitting the two-track mass distribution in search of a signal peak, we do not observe a significant signal, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the L production cross section, branching fraction, and reconstruction efficiency for six possible two-body L decay modes as a function of the L mass. The efficiency is given for each final state as a function of the mass, lifetime, and transverse momentum of the candidate, allowing application of the upper limits to any production model. In addition, upper limits are provided on the branching fraction B (B →XsL ) , where Xs is a strange hadronic system.

  14. Measurement of the ϕ → π0e+e- transition form factor with the KLOE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasi, A.; Babusci, D.; Bencivenni, G.; Berlowski, M.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Cao, B.; Ceradini, F.; Ciambrone, P.; Curciarello, F.; Czerwiński, E.; D'Agostini, G.; Danè, E.; De Leo, V.; De Lucia, E.; De Santis, A.; De Simone, P.; Di Cicco, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Salvo, R.; Domenici, D.; D'Uffizi, A.; Fantini, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, S.; Gajos, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Giardina, G.; Giovannella, S.; Graziani, E.; Happacher, F.; Heijkenskjöld, L.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Johansson, T.; Kamińska, D.; Krzemien, W.; Kupsc, A.; Loffredo, S.; Mandaglio, G.; Martini, M.; Mascolo, M.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Morello, G.; Moricciani, D.; Moskal, P.; Papenbrock, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Perez del Rio, E.; Ranieri, A.; Salabura, P.; Santangelo, P.; Sarra, I.; Schioppa, M.; Silarski, M.; Sirghi, F.; Tortora, L.; Venanzoni, G.; Wiślicki, W.; Wolke, M.

    2016-06-01

    A measurement of the vector to pseudoscalar conversion decay ϕ →π0e+e- with the KLOE experiment is presented. A sample of ∼9500 signal events was selected from a data set of 1.7 fb-1 of e+e- collisions at √{ s} ∼mϕ collected at the DAΦNE e+e- collider. These events were used to perform the first measurement of the transition form factor |Fϕπ0 (q2) | and a new measurement of the branching ratio of the decay: BR (ϕ →π0e+e-) = (1.35 ±0.05-0.10+0.05) ×10-5. The result improves significantly on previous measurements and is in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  15. ON THE SPIN CORRELATIONS OF MUONS AND TAU LEPTONS GENERATED IN THE ANNIHILATION PROCESSES e+e- → μ+μ-, e+e- → τ+τ-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyuboshitz, Valery V.; Lyuboshitz, Vladimir L.

    2014-12-01

    Using the technique of helicity amplitudes, the electromagnetic process e+e- → μ+μ-(τ+τ-) is theoretically studied in the one-photon approximation. The structure of the triplet states of the final (μ+μ-) system is analyzed. It is shown that in the case of unpolarized electron and positron the final muons are also unpolarized, but their spins are strongly correlated. Explicit expressions for the components of the correlation tensor of the (μ+μ-) system are derived. The formula for the angular correlation at the decays of final muons μ+ and μ- is obtained. It is demonstrated that spin correlations of muons in the considered process have the purely quantum character, since one of the Bell-type incoherence inequalities for the correlation tensor components is always violated.

  16. Test of QED with the Reaction e+e- → γγ(γ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, U.; Rubbia, A.; Ulbricht, J.; Sakharov, A. S.; Lin, C. H.; Zhao, J.; Dymnikova, I.

    2006-04-01

    We search for a non point-like behavior of fundamental particles, which could be caused by hypothesis of an exited electron. In particular we focus on the measurements of the differential cross sections for QED process e+e- → γγ(γ) made at center-of-mass energies from 51.8 GeV to 209 GeV by LEP and TRISTAN. The global fit we performed indicates about 5σ deviation from the standard QED expectations when the mass of the exited electron approaches me* = 308±56 GeV.

  17. Assessment and classification of service learning: a case study of CS/EE students.

    PubMed

    Kao, Han-Ying; Wang, Yu-Tseng; Huang, Chia-Hui; Lai, Pao-Lien; Chen, Jen-Yeu

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the undergraduate students in computer science/electric engineering (CS/EE) in Taiwan to measure their perceived benefits from the experiences in service learning coursework. In addition, the confidence of their professional disciplines and its correlation with service learning experiences are examined. The results show that students take positive attitudes toward service learning and their perceived benefits from service learning are correlated with their confidence in professional disciplines. Furthermore, this study designs the knowledge model by Bayesian network (BN) classifiers and term frequency-inverse document frequency (TFIDF) for counseling students on the optimal choice of service learning.

  18. Precision measurements of e+, e_, e++e_ fluxes with AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolotto, Cecilia

    2016-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a large acceptance particle physics detector installed on board the International Space Station (ISS) since May 19th 2011 to search for primordial anti-matter, for indirect signals of dark matter and to perform a high statistic and long duration measurement of the spectra of primary charged cosmic rays. Precise measurements of the electron and positron fluxes and of the total e++e_ flux are presented. These AMS results provide a deeper understanding of the nature of high energy cosmic rays and can shed more light on the nature of dark matter.

  19. Physics cross sections and event generation of e+e- annihilations at the CEPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Xin; Li, Gang; Ruan, Man-Qi; Lou, Xin-Chou

    2016-03-01

    The cross sections of the Higgs production and the corresponding backgrounds of e+e- annihilations at the CEPC (Circular Electron and Positron Collider) are calculated by a Monte-Carlo method, and the beamstrahlung effect at the CEPC is carefully investigated. The numerical results and the expected number of events for the CEPC are provided. Supported by CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams, and funding from CAS and IHEP for the Thousand Talent and Hundred Talent programs, as well as grants from the State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Electronics and Particle Detectors

  20. Multiple production of MSSM neutral Higgs bosons at high-energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouadi, A.; Haber, H. E.; Zerwas, P. M.

    1996-02-01

    The cross sections for the multiple production of the lightest neutral Higgs boson at high-energy e+e- colliders are presented in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). We consider production through Higgs-strahlung, associated production of the scalar and the pseudoscalar bosons, and the fusion mechanisms for which we use the effective longitudinal vector-boson approximation. These cross sections allow one to determine trilinear Higgs couplings λHhh and λhhh, which are theoretically determined by the Higgs potential.

  1. Packaging and environment in Europe (EUREKA PACK-EE): Automated sorting of aluminum from domestic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bertaud, Y.; Guillermet, R.; Lemaire, H.; Cael, J.; Nijhof, G.; Rossel, H.

    1996-10-01

    A large European research project named EUREKA PACK-EE (for Packaging Environment in Europe) has been started in June 1993. The project carries out research and innovation into collection, sorting and valorization of types of packaging, with improvements to sorting procedures capable of meeting the needs of the recovery and recycling industries. The project includes studies of consumer behavior concerning waste, which will influence the choice of sorting techniques. The results are presented for automated sorting by different eddy current (EC) engineering and in two other papers for thermal separation and purification.

  2. Type-III seesaw fermionic triplets at high energy e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Deepanjali; Poulose, Poulose

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the signature of heavy fermionic triplets belonging to Type-III seesaw model through their direct production at the high energy e+e- collider. Single and pair production of the charged (Σ+/-) and neutral (Σ0) triplets through the processes, e+e- -->Σ+Σ- ,Σ0Σ0 ,Σ0 ν ,Σ+/- l are considered for the study. The subsequent decay of the triplets to the detector level final states are studied with the corresponding Standard Model (SM) background processes. The decay distributions are considered in details to identify the significant channels, after devising and employing suitable methods to reduce backgrounds and enhance the signal significance. Advantage of single triplet production in association with the charged SM leptons to investigate the mixing of the triplet with the SM leptons is exploited. Preliminary results show the presence of charged fermionic triplets up to a mass of ~ 950 GeV could be established through the single production at 1 TeV ILC, assuming a fermionic triplet electron mixing of 0.05 and a moderate integrated luminosity of 300 fb-1 . Further, constraints in the mass-mixing are obtained for different CM energies assuming different luminosities.

  3. Beyond Higgs couplings: Probing the Higgs with angular observables at future e$$^{+}$$e$$^{-}$$ colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Craig, Nathaniel; Gu, Jiayin; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Kechen

    2016-03-09

    Here, we study angular observables in themore » $$ {e}^{+}{e}^{-}\\to ZH\\to {\\ell}^{+}{\\ell}^{-}b\\overline{b} $$ channel at future circular e$$^{+}$$ e$$^{-}$$ colliders such as CEPC and FCC-ee. Taking into account the impact of realistic cut acceptance and detector effects, we forecast the precision of six angular asymmetries at CEPC (FCC-ee) with center-of-mass energy $$ \\sqrt{s}=240 $$ GeV and 5 (30) ab$$^{-1}$$ integrated luminosity. We then determine the projected sensitivity to a range of operators relevant for he Higgs-strahlung process in the dimension-6 Higgs EFT. Our results show that angular observables provide complementary sensitivity to rate measurements when constraining various tensor structures arising from new physics. We further find that angular asymmetries provide a novel means of both probing BSM corrections to the HZγ coupling and constraining the “blind spot” in indirect limits on supersymmetric scalar top partners.« less

  4. Studies of charmonium production in e+e- annihilation and B decays at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzia, Isabella

    2016-05-01

    In an e+e- B factory, charmonium states can be produced through different mechanisms, e.g. direct production in e+e- annihilation, double charmonium production, and in B-meson decays. Prompt production of J/ψ or ψ(2S) in association with a second charmonium states has been observed by both the BABAR and the Belle experiments. These processes provide an opportunity to study both perturbative and non perturbative effects in QCD and to search for new charmonium states recoiling against the reconstructed J/ψ or ψ(2S). Using the full BABAR data set collected at the ϒ(4S) resonance, we measure the absolute branching fractions of the two-body decays of B mesons (B → KXc), where Xc is a charmonium state. For events in which a B is fully reconstructed, the charmonium spectrum can be observed in an unbiased way by looking at the distribution of the K momentum in the rest frame of the recoiling B. We present also Dalitz plot analysis for the decays of B mesons to D- D0 K+ and D¯ 0 D0 K+, and we report about the observation of the Ds1 * (2700)+ resonance in these two channels, and obtain measurements of the mass and width.

  5. Phenomenology from SIDIS and e+e- multiplicities: multiplicities and phenomenology - part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchetta, Alessandro; Echevarria, Miguel G.; Radici, Marco; Signori, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This study is part of a project to investigate the transverse momentum dependence in parton distribution and fragmentation functions, analyzing (semi-)inclusive high-energy processes within a proper QCD framework. We calculate the transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) multiplicities for e+e- annihilation into two hadrons (considering different combinations of pions and kaons) aiming to investigate the impact of intrinsic and radiative partonic transverse momentum and their mixing with flavor. Different descriptions of the non-perturbative evolution kernel (see, e.g., Refs. [1-5]) are available on the market and there are 200 sets of flavor configurations for the unpolarized TMD fragmentation functions (FFs) resulting from a Monte Carlo fit of Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) data at Hermes (see Ref. [6]). We build our predictions of e+e- multiplicities relying on this rich phenomenology. The comparison of these calculations with future experimental data (from Belle and BaBar collaborations) will shed light on non-perturbative aspects of hadron structure, opening important insights into the physics of spin, flavor and momentum structure of hadrons.

  6. Possible futures of electroweak precision: ILC, FCC-ee, and CEPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, JiJi; Reece, Matthew; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-09-01

    The future of high-precision electroweak physics lies in e + e - collider measurements of properties of the Z boson, the W boson, the Higgs boson, and the top quark. We estimate the expected performance of three possible future colliders: the ILC, FCC-ee (formerly known as TLEP), and CEPC. In particular, we present the first estimates of the possible reach of CEPC, China's proposed Circular Electron-Positron Collider, for the oblique parameters S and T and for seven-parameter fits of Higgs couplings. These results allow the physics potential for CEPC to be compared with that of the ILC and FCC-ee. We also show how the constraints on S and T would evolve as the uncertainties on each of the most important input measurements change separately. This clarifies the basic physics goals for future colliders. To improve on the current precision, the highest priorities are improving the uncertainties on m W and sin2 θ eff . At the same time, improved measurements of the top mass, the Z mass, the running of α, and the Z width will offer further improvement which will determine the ultimate reach. Each of the possible future colliders we consider has strong prospects for probing TeV-scale electroweak physics.

  7. V-ATPase-activity in the TGN/EE is required for exocytosis and recycling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Irani, Niloufer G.; Rubbo, Simone Di; Neumetzler, Lutz; Krishnamoorthy, Praveen; Van Houtte, Isabelle; Mylle, Evelien; Bischoff, Volker; Vernhettes, Samantha; Winne, Johan; Friml, Jiří; Stierhof, York-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    In plants, vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) activity acidifies both the trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE) and the vacuole. This dual V-ATPase function has impeded our understanding in how the pH homeostasis within the plant TGN/EE controls exo- and endocytosis. Here, we show that the weak V-ATPase mutant deetiolated3 (det3) displayed a pH increase in the TGN/EE, but not in the vacuole, strongly impairing secretion and recycling of the brassinosteroid receptor and the cellulose synthase complexes to the plasma membrane, in contrast to mutants lacking tonoplast-localized V-ATPase activity only. The brassinosteroid insensitivity and the cellulose deficiency defects in det3 were tightly correlated with reduced Golgi and TGN/EE motility. Thus, our results provide strong evidence that acidification of the TGN/EE, but not of the vacuole, is indispensable for functional secretion and recycling in plants. PMID:27250258

  8. Study of the process e+e- → KS0 KL0 in the center-of-mass energy range 1004-1060 MeV with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, E. A.; Solodov, E. P.; Amirkhanov, A. N.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Banzarov, V. S.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Berkaev, D. E.; Bondar, A. E.; Bragin, A. V.; Eidelman, S. I.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Gribanov, S. S.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Ignatov, F. V.; Ivanov, V. L.; Karpov, S. V.; Kasaev, A. S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kirpotin, A. N.; Korobov, A. A.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Koop, I. A.; Krokovny, P. P.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Lukin, P. A.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Otboev, A. V.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Popov, A. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Ryskulov, N. M.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Senchenko, A. I.; Shebalin, V. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Shwartz, B. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Sibidanov, A. L.; Shatunov, P. Yu.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    The e+e- → KS0 KL0 cross section has been measured in the center-of-mass energy range 1004-1060 MeV at 25 energy points using 6.1 ×105 events with KS0 →π+π- decay. The analysis is based on 5.9 pb-1 of an integrated luminosity collected with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider. To obtain ϕ (1020) meson parameters the measured cross section is approximated according to the Vector Meson Dominance model as a sum of the ρ , ω , ϕ-like amplitudes and their excitations. This is the most precise measurement of the e+e- → KS0 KL0 cross section with a 1.8% systematic uncertainty.

  9. Precision measurement of σ (e+e- →π+π- γ) / σ (e+e- →μ+μ- γ) and determination of the π+π- contribution to the muon anomaly with the KLOE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babusci, D.; Badoni, D.; Balwierz-Pytko, I.; Bencivenni, G.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Capon, G.; Ceradini, F.; Ciambrone, P.; Curciarello, F.; Czerwiński, E.; Dané, E.; De Leo, V.; De Lucia, E.; De Robertis, G.; De Santis, A.; De Simone, P.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Domenici, D.; Erriquez, O.; Fanizzi, G.; Felici, G.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gauzzi, P.; Giardina, G.; Giovannella, S.; Gonnella, F.; Graziani, E.; Happacher, F.; Heijkenskjöld, L.; Höistad, B.; Iafolla, L.; Iarocci, E.; Jacewicz, M.; Johansson, T.; Kluge, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Loddo, F.; Lukin, P.; Mandaglio, G.; Martemianov, M.; Martini, M.; Mascolo, M.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Morello, G.; Moricciani, D.; Moskal, P.; Müller, S.; Nguyen, F.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Prado Longhi, I.; Ranieri, A.; Redmer, C. F.; Santangelo, P.; Sarra, I.; Schioppa, M.; Sciascia, B.; Silarski, M.; Taccini, C.; Tortora, L.; Venanzoni, G.; Versaci, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wolke, M.; Zdebik, J.; KLOE; KLOE-2 Collaborations

    2013-03-01

    We have measured the ratio σ (e+e- →π+π- γ) / σ (e+e- →μ+μ- γ), with the KLOE detector at DAΦNE for a total integrated luminosity of ∼ 240pb-1. From this ratio we obtain the cross section σ (e+e- →π+π-). From the cross section we determine the pion form factor |Fπ | 2 and the two-pion contribution to the muon anomaly aμ for 0.592

  10. 31 CFR 351.71 - How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How can I find out what my book-entry... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Book-Entry Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.71 How can I find out what my book-entry Series EE savings bonds are worth? (a) Redemption values. You may...

  11. High e+/e- Ratio Dense Pair Creation with 1021W.cm-2 Laser Irradiating Solid Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, E.; Clarke, T.; Henderson, A.; Fu, W.; Lo, W.; Taylor, D.; Chaguine, P.; Zhou, S.; Hua, Y.; Cen, X.; Wang, X.; Kao, J.; Hasson, H.; Dyer, G.; Serratto, K.; Riley, N.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2015-09-01

    We report results of new pair creation experiments using ~100 Joule pulses of the Texas Petawatt Laser to irradiate solid gold and platinum targets, with intensities up to ~1.9 × 1021 W.cm-2 and pulse durations as short as ~130 fs. Positron to electron (e+/e-) ratios >15% were observed for many thick disk and rod targets, with the highest e+/e- ratio reaching ~50% for a Pt rod. The inferred pair yield was ~ few ×1010 with emerging pair density reaching ~1015/cm3 so that the pair skin depth becomes < pair jet transverse size. These results represent major milestones towards the goal of creating a significant quantity of dense pair-dominated plasmas with e+/e- approaching 100% and pair skin depth ≪ pair plasma size, which will have wide-ranging applications to astrophysics and fundamental physics.

  12. TiO2 and ZnO mediated photocatalytic degradation of E2 and EE2 estrogens.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Belisa Alcântara; de Liz, Marcus Vinicius; Lopes Tiburtius, Elaine R; Nagata, Noemi; Peralta-Zamora, Patricio

    2013-04-01

    In this work, the photocatalytic degradation of selected estrogens (E2 and EE2) was evaluated, using bench-scale and continuous treatment systems assisted by artificial UV-A and solar radiation. Processes based on the use of TiO2 permit an efficient degradation of E2 and EE2 estrogens, usually at reaction times lower than 15 min. Especially remarkable is the high degradation efficiency shown by sunlight-assisted processes, which are extremely favored by the high efficiency of compound parabolic collectors.

  13. Future e(+)e(-) colliders' sensitivity to Hbb coupling and CP violation.

    PubMed

    Braguta, V; Chalov, A; Likhoded, A; Rosenfeld, R

    2003-06-20

    We perform a complete simulation of the process e(+)e(-)-->bbvv, where nu can be an electron, muon, or tau neutrino, in the context of a general Higgs coupling to b quarks. We parametrize the Hbb; coupling as (m(b)/v)(a+igamma(5)b). Taking into account interference effects between pure Higgs and Standard Model contributions, we find that sensitivities of the order of 2% and 20% can be obtained at a future e(+)e(-) collider for deviations of the a and b parameters, respectively, from their Standard Model values. Combining our analysis with an independent measurement of Gamma(H-->bb) can provide evidence about the CP nature of the Higgs sector.

  14. Miniature high-throughput chemosensing of yield, ee, and absolute configuration from crude reaction mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Keith W.; Zhang, Peng; Wolf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput experimentation (HTE) has emerged as a widely used technology that accelerates discovery and optimization processes with parallel small-scale reaction setups. A high-throughput screening (HTS) method capable of comprehensive analysis of crude asymmetric reaction mixtures (eliminating product derivatization or isolation) would provide transformative impact by matching the pace of HTE. We report how spontaneous in situ construction of stereodynamic metal probes from readily available, inexpensive starting materials can be applied to chiroptical chemosensing of the total amount, enantiomeric excess (ee), and absolute configuration of a wide variety of amines, diamines, amino alcohols, amino acids, carboxylic acids, α-hydroxy acids, and diols. This advance and HTS potential are highlighted with the analysis of 1 mg of crude reaction mixtures of a catalytic asymmetric reaction. This operationally simple assay uses a robust mix-and-measure protocol, is amenable to microscale platforms and automation, and provides critical time efficiency and sustainability advantages over traditional serial methods. PMID:26933684

  15. Study of DsJ decays to D*K in inclusive e+e- interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-11-01

    We observe the decays Ds1*(2710)+→D*K and DsJ*(2860)+→D*K and measure their branching fractions relative to the DK final state. We also observe, in the D*K mass spectrum, a new broad structure at a mass of (3044±8stat((+30)/(-5))syst)MeV/c2 having a width Γ=(239±35stat((+46)/(-42))syst)MeV. To obtain this result we use 470fb-1 of data recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center running at center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  16. Radiative return capabilities of a high-energy, high-luminosity e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek; Low, Matthew; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-01

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy ECM can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at ECM=250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy e+e- colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  17. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) SUB-GRADE EE/CA EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVES A NEW MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2007-06-08

    An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was performed at the Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The purpose of the EVCA was to identify the sub-grade items to be evaluated; determine the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) hazardous substances through process history and available data; evaluate these hazards; and as necessary, identify the available alternatives to reduce the risk associated with the contaminants. The sub-grade EWCA considered four alternatives for an interim removal action: (1) No Action; (2) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M); (3) Stabilize and Leave in Place (Stabilization); and (4) Remove, Treat and Dispose (RTD). Each alternative was evaluated against the CERCLA criteria for effectiveness, implementability, and cost.

  18. Stellar dynamics in E+E pairs of galaxies. 2: Simulations and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.; Rampazzo, R.; Bonfanti, P. P.; Prugniel, P.; Sulentic, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    We have presented in a companion article a kinematic study of three E+E galaxy pairs, NGC741/742, 1587/1588 (CPG 99) and 2672/2673 (CPG 175). We find some evidence for perturbed velocity dispersion profiles. These perturbation features are now reported for 14 galaxies in the literature. They occur, or require observations for detection, at large radii where the S/N in the data is low. While observations of individual galaxies are sometimes uncertain, the large number of objects where such features are suspected gives confidence that they are real. These perturbations can be attributed to projection effects contamination along the line of sight, or directly to the tidal interaction. We report the results of several self-gravitating simulations of unbound pairs in an effort to better understand these perturbations another generic features of close E+E pairs reported in the literature. The models frequently show off-center envelopes created by the asymmetry of tidal forces during interpenetrating encounters. The envelopes last for a few 108 yrs, which explains the frequency of such features in observed pairs. This phenomenon is stronger in the self-gravitating simulations than in the MTBA runs. U-shaped (and an equal number of inverse U shaped velocity profiles are seen in the simulations, a result of ablation in the outer envelopes. Simulations including inner galaxy rotation also preserve this feature, irrespective of the spin vector direction in each galaxy. U-shape velocity structure is found to be a robust indicator of the ongoing interaction. All simulations show evidence for enhanced velocity dispersion between the galaxies even in the case of simple superposition of two non interacting objects. We therefore conclude that this cannot be considered an unambiguous indicator of the interaction.

  19. 31 CFR 351.83 - May Public Debt issue Series EE savings bonds only in book-entry form?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... savings bonds only in book-entry form? 351.83 Section 351.83 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... Debt issue Series EE savings bonds only in book-entry form? We reserve the right to issue bonds only in book-entry form....

  20. Qualitative and event-specific real-time PCR detection methods for Bt brinjal event EE-1.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Gurinder Jit; Sharma, Ruchi; Singh, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Bt brinjal event EE-1 with cry1Ac gene, expressing insecticidal protein against fruit and shoot borer, is the first genetically modified food crop in the pipeline for commercialization in India. Qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) along with event-specific conventional as well as real-time PCR methods to characterize the event EE-1 is reported. A multiplex (pentaplex) PCR system simultaneously amplifying cry1Ac transgene, Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, nopaline synthase (nos) terminator, aminoglycoside adenyltransferase (aadA) marker gene, and a taxon-specific beta-fructosidase gene in event EE-1 has been developed. Furthermore, construct-specific PCR, targeting the approximate 1.8 kb region of inserted gene construct comprising the region of CaMV 35S promoter and cry1Ac gene has also been developed. The LOD of developed EE-1 specific conventional PCR assay is 0.01%. The method performance of the reported real-time PCR assay was consistent with the acceptance criteria of Codex Alimentarius Commission ALINORM 10/33/23, with the LOD and LOQ values of 0.05%. The developed detection methods would not only facilitate effective regulatory compliance for identification of genetic traits, risk assessment, management, and postrelease monitoring, but also address consumer concerns and resolution of legal disputes. PMID:23451391

  1. 31 CFR 351.81 - Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds? 351.81 Section 351.81 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE OFFERING OF UNITED STATES...

  2. 31 CFR 351.50 - How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... financial institution qualified as a paying agent under the provisions of 31 CFR part 321 will pay the... requirements for payment specified in 31 CFR part 353. You must establish your identity and entitlement to... Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? 351.50 Section 351.50 Money and Finance: Treasury...

  3. 31 CFR 351.50 - How is payment made when definitive Series EE savings bonds are redeemed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... financial institution qualified as a paying agent under the provisions of 31 CFR part 321 will pay the... requirements for payment specified in 31 CFR part 353. You must establish your identity and entitlement to... Series EE savings bonds are redeemed? 351.50 Section 351.50 Money and Finance: Treasury...

  4. 77 FR 29331 - Publication of the Petition for Waiver From Sanyo E&E Corporation From the Department of Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Publication of the Petition for Waiver From Sanyo E&E... AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of re... subject line of the message. Mail: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building...

  5. Evolution or Revolution in EE/SE Research? A Collaborative Dialogue from First-Year PhD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasy, Kim; Page, Leah; Emery, Sherridan; Ayre, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The AAEE 2014 research symposium in Hobart provided a privileged space for researchers and practitioners within environmental education and sustainability education (EE/SE) to come together and create dialogues about education for sustainability research. This essay is a critical reflection from postgraduate researchers about the symposium and the…

  6. Charged Higgs Boson production at e^+e^- colliders in the complex MSSM: a full one-loop analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemeyer, S.; Schappacher, C.

    2016-10-01

    For the search for additional Higgs bosons in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) as well as for future precision analyses in the Higgs sector precise knowledge of their production properties is mandatory. We evaluate the cross sections for the charged Higgs boson production at e^+e^- colliders in the MSSM with complex parameters (cMSSM). The evaluation is based on a full one-loop calculation of the production mechanism e^+e^- → H^+ H^- and e^+e^- → H^{± } W^{∓ }, including soft and hard QED radiation. The dependence of the Higgs boson production cross sections on the relevant cMSSM parameters is analyzed numerically. We find sizable contributions to many cross sections. They are, depending on the production channel, roughly of 5-10 % of the tree-level results, but can go up to 20 % or higher. The full one-loop contributions are important for a future linear e^+e^- collider such as the ILC or CLIC.

  7. Value of Free-Run Electromyographic Monitoring of Extraocular Cranial Nerves during Expanded Endonasal Surgery (EES) of the Skull Base.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Mohanraj, Santhosh Kumar; Habeych, Miguel; Wichman, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Crammond, Donald J; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    Objective To evaluate the value of free-run electromyography (f-EMG) monitoring of extraocular cranial nerves (EOCN) III, IV, and VI during expanded endonasal surgery (EES) of the skull base in reducing iatrogenic cranial nerve (CN) deficits. Design We retrospectively identified 200 patients out of 990 who had at least one EOCN monitored during EES. We further separated patients into groups according to the specific CN monitored. In each CN group, we classified patients who had significant (SG) f-EMG activity as Group I and those who did not as Group II. Results A total of 696 EOCNs were monitored. The number of muscles supplied by EOCNs that had SG f-EMG activity was 88, including CN III = 46, CN IV = 21, and CN VI = 21. There were two deficits involving CN VI in patients who had SG f-EMG activity during surgery. There were 14 deficits observed, including CN III = 3, CN IV = 2, and CN VI = 9 in patients who did not have SG f-EMG activity during surgery. Conclusions f-EMG monitoring of EOCN during EES can be useful in identifying the location of the nerve. It seems to have limited value in predicting postoperative neurological deficits. Future studies to evaluate the EMG of EOCN during EES need to be done with both f-EMG and triggered EMG.

  8. Qualitative and event-specific real-time PCR detection methods for Bt brinjal event EE-1.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Gurinder Jit; Sharma, Ruchi; Singh, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Bt brinjal event EE-1 with cry1Ac gene, expressing insecticidal protein against fruit and shoot borer, is the first genetically modified food crop in the pipeline for commercialization in India. Qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) along with event-specific conventional as well as real-time PCR methods to characterize the event EE-1 is reported. A multiplex (pentaplex) PCR system simultaneously amplifying cry1Ac transgene, Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, nopaline synthase (nos) terminator, aminoglycoside adenyltransferase (aadA) marker gene, and a taxon-specific beta-fructosidase gene in event EE-1 has been developed. Furthermore, construct-specific PCR, targeting the approximate 1.8 kb region of inserted gene construct comprising the region of CaMV 35S promoter and cry1Ac gene has also been developed. The LOD of developed EE-1 specific conventional PCR assay is 0.01%. The method performance of the reported real-time PCR assay was consistent with the acceptance criteria of Codex Alimentarius Commission ALINORM 10/33/23, with the LOD and LOQ values of 0.05%. The developed detection methods would not only facilitate effective regulatory compliance for identification of genetic traits, risk assessment, management, and postrelease monitoring, but also address consumer concerns and resolution of legal disputes.

  9. 10 CFR 905.17 - What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? 905.17 Section 905.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? (a) Requests to submit an...

  10. 10 CFR 905.17 - What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? 905.17 Section 905.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? (a) Requests to submit an...

  11. 10 CFR 905.17 - What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? 905.17 Section 905.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? (a) Requests to submit an...

  12. 10 CFR 905.17 - What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? 905.17 Section 905.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? (a) Requests to submit an...

  13. 10 CFR 905.17 - What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What are the requirements for the energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? 905.17 Section 905.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... energy efficiency and/or renewable energy report (EE/RE report) alternative? (a) Requests to submit an...

  14. 31 CFR 351.45 - What happens if I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds in excess of the maximum annual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings... obtain instructions for adjustment of the excess from us at the following address: email at savbonds@bpd.treas.gov, or writing to Bureau of the Public Debt, Parkersburg, WV 26106-1328....

  15. 31 CFR 351.45 - What happens if I purchase definitive Series EE savings bonds in excess of the maximum annual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings... obtain instructions for adjustment of the excess from us at the following address: email at savbonds@bpd.treas.gov, or writing to Bureau of the Public Debt, Parkersburg, WV 26106-1328....

  16. Higgs boson production and decay at e+e- colliders as a probe of the Left-Right twin Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinzhong; Li, Shaofeng; Yang, Bingfang; Liu, Ning

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the Left-Right twin Higgs (LRTH) model, we consider the constrains from the latest search for high-mass dilepton resonances at the LHC and find that the heavy neutral boson ZH is excluded with mass below 2.76 TeV. Under these constrains, we study the Higgs-Gauge coupling production processes e+e- → ZH, e+e- →νeνe bar H and e+e- →e+e- H, top quark Yukawa coupling production process e+e- → t t bar H, Higgs self-couplings production processes e+e- → ZHH and e+e- →νeνe bar HH at e+e- colliders. Besides, we study the major decay modes of the Higgs boson, namely h → f f bar (f = b, c, τ), VV* (V = W, Z), gg, γγ. We find that the LRTH effects are sizable so that the Higgs boson processes at e+e- collider can be a sensitive probe for the LRTH model.

  17. BEEC: An event generator for simulating the Bc meson production at an e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Xing-Gang; Wang, Xian-You

    2013-12-01

    The Bc meson is a doubly heavy quark-antiquark bound state and carries flavors explicitly, which provides a fruitful laboratory for testing potential models and understanding the weak decay mechanisms for heavy flavors. In view of the prospects in Bc physics at the hadronic colliders such as Tevatron and LHC, Bc physics is attracting more and more attention. It has been shown that a high luminosity e+e- collider running around the Z0-peak is also helpful for studying the properties of Bc meson and has its own advantages. For this purpose, we write down an event generator for simulating Bc meson production through e+e- annihilation according to relevant publications. We name it BEEC, in which the color-singlet S-wave and P-wave (cb¯)-quarkonium states together with the color-octet S-wave (cb¯)-quarkonium states can be generated. BEEC can also be adopted to generate the similar charmonium and bottomonium states via the semi-exclusive channels e++e-→|(QQ¯)[n]>+Q+Q¯ with Q=b and c respectively. To increase the simulation efficiency, we simplify the amplitude as compact as possible by using the improved trace technology. BEEC is a Fortran program written in a PYTHIA-compatible format and is written in a modular structure, one may apply it to various situations or experimental environments conveniently by using the GNU C compiler make. A method to improve the efficiency of generating unweighted events within PYTHIA environment is proposed. Moreover, BEEC will generate a standard Les Houches Event data file that contains useful information of the meson and its accompanying partons, which can be conveniently imported into PYTHIA to do further hadronization and decay simulation. Catalogue identifier: AEQC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEQC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in

  18. Economic and Ethical Consequences of Natural Hazards in Alpine Valleys (EE-Con)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, Florian; Brantl, Dirk; Meyer, Lukas; Steininger, Karl; Sass, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The Alps and their population are particularly vulnerable to geomorphological and hydrological hazards and this problem might be amplified by ongoing climate change. Natural disasters cause severe monetary damage which often leads to the difficult question whether it socially pays to protect settlements at high costs or whether alternatively settlement areas should better be abandoned. By investigations in the Johnsbachtal and the Kleinsölktal (Styria), the interdisciplinary project "Economic and Ethical Consequences of Natural Hazards in Alpine Valleys" (EE-Con), funded by the Austrian Academy of Sciences, seeks to answer the following questions: (1) Are natural hazards and associated damages in fact increasing, and is this due to meteorological triggers, to anthropogenic factors or to internal process dynamics? (2) What is the perception and knowledge of local people, how is risk and risk prevention communicated? (3) What is the respective cost ratio between protection infrastructure, soft measures of adaptation and other options (e.g. reduction of settlement area)? (4) What legitimate claims to compensation do people have, how far does societal responsibility go and where does individual responsibility start if parts of the settlement area had to be abandoned? These questions will be tackled in an interdisciplinary cooperation between geography, economics and normative theory (philosophy). EE-Con will follow broadly the path of risk analysis and risk assessment, focusing on the temporal dimension (past - present - future) with the aim to unravel the history of natural hazards in the areas and to analyse the economic values involved. In the following, natural hazard scenarios for the future (2050 and 2100) will be developed considering the economic consequences. Besides this, the project deals with local knowledge, risk perception and risk communication, which will be investigated via group interviews and stakeholder workshops and be integrated into a human

  19. Recent results from the JADE collaboration at PETRA on e+e- annihilation to multihadrons

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, L.H. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A search for production of a new quark flavor in multihadronic states from e+e- annihilation has been made up to an energy of 35.8 GeV in the center of mass. No evidence is seen for such production. A new statistical analysis by the JADE collaboration of the combined data of four PETRA experiments from a fine energy scan in the region 29.90 to 31.46 GeV in the center of mass sets new upper limits on the integrated cross section for a bound state consisting of a new flavor quark and antiquark. The ability of the JADE detector to measure dE/dx provides new upper bounds on the production of fractionally charged particles such as free quarks, or of heavy, integrally charged states such as long-lived B mesons. Finally the fractions of the final state energy carried by gamma rays and by neutral particles of all kinds are measured at center of mass energies from 12 to 35 GeV. The gamma ray and neutral energy fractions are approximately 26% and 38% respectively, while the fractional energy carried by neutrinos is less than 15%.

  20. Production of doubly heavy-flavored hadrons at e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xu-Chang; Chang, Chao-Hsi; Pan, Zan

    2016-02-01

    Production of the doubly heavy-flavored hadrons (Bc meson, doubly heavy baryons Ξc c , Ξb c , Ξb b , their excited states, and antiparticles of them as well) at e+e- colliders is investigated under two different approaches: LO (leading-order QCD complete calculation) and LL (leading-logarithm fragmentation calculation). The results for the production obtained by the LO and LL approaches, including the angle distributions of the produced hadrons with unpolarized and polarized incoming beams, the behaviors on the energy fraction of the produced doubly heavy-flavored hadron, and comparisons of results between the two approaches, are presented in tables and figures. Thus, characteristics of the production and uncertainties of the approaches are shown precisely, and it is concluded that only if the colliders run at the energies around the Z pole (which may be called the Z factories) and the luminosity of the colliders is as high as possible is the study of the doubly heavy-flavored hadrons completely accessible.

  1. Measurement of forward Z → e+e- production at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-05-01

    A measurement of the cross-section for Z-boson production in the forward region of pp collisions at 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy is presented. The measurement is based on a sample of Z → e+e- decays reconstructed using the LHCb detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb-1. The acceptance is defined by the requirements 2.0 < η < 4.5 and p T > 20 GeV for the pseudorapidities and transverse momenta of the leptons. Their invariant mass is required to lie in the range 60-120 GeV. The cross-section is determined to be where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second reflects all systematic effects apart from that arising from the luminosity, which is given as the third uncertainty. Differential cross-sections are presented as functions of the Z-boson rapidity and of the angular variable ϕ ∗, which is related to the Z-boson transverse momentum. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. A Targeted Search for Point Sources of EeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q. D.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Auger Collaboration101, The Pierre

    2014-07-01

    A flux of neutrons from an astrophysical source in the Galaxy can be detected in the Pierre Auger Observatory as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the direction of the source. To avoid the statistical penalty for making many trials, classes of objects are tested in combinations as nine "target sets," in addition to the search for a neutron flux from the Galactic center or from the Galactic plane. Within a target set, each candidate source is weighted in proportion to its electromagnetic flux, its exposure to the Auger Observatory, and its flux attenuation factor due to neutron decay. These searches do not find evidence for a neutron flux from any class of candidate sources. Tabulated results give the combined p-value for each class, with and without the weights, and also the flux upper limit for the most significant candidate source within each class. These limits on fluxes of neutrons significantly constrain models of EeV proton emission from non-transient discrete sources in the Galaxy.

  3. Diffusion of cosmic rays at EeV energies in inhomogeneous extragalactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, Rafael Alves; Sigl, Günter E-mail: guenter.sigl@desy.de

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays can propagate diffusively in cosmic magnetic fields. When their propagation time is comparable to the age of the universe, a suppression in the flux relative to the case in the absence of magnetic fields will occur. In this work we find an approximate parametrization for this suppression for energies below ∼ Z EeV using several magnetic field distributions obtained from cosmological simulations of the magnetized cosmic web. We assume that the magnetic fields have a Kolmogorov power spectrum with the field strengths distributed according to these simulations. We show that, if magnetic fields are coupled to the matter distribution, low field strengths will fill most of the volume, making the suppression milder compared to the case of a constant magnetic field with strength equal to the mean value of this distribution. We also derive upper limits for this suppression to occur for some models of extragalactic magnetic fields, as a function of the coherence length of these fields.

  4. A TARGETED SEARCH FOR POINT SOURCES OF EeV NEUTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Arqueros, F.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration101; and others

    2014-07-10

    A flux of neutrons from an astrophysical source in the Galaxy can be detected in the Pierre Auger Observatory as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the direction of the source. To avoid the statistical penalty for making many trials, classes of objects are tested in combinations as nine ''target sets'', in addition to the search for a neutron flux from the Galactic center or from the Galactic plane. Within a target set, each candidate source is weighted in proportion to its electromagnetic flux, its exposure to the Auger Observatory, and its flux attenuation factor due to neutron decay. These searches do not find evidence for a neutron flux from any class of candidate sources. Tabulated results give the combined p-value for each class, with and without the weights, and also the flux upper limit for the most significant candidate source within each class. These limits on fluxes of neutrons significantly constrain models of EeV proton emission from non-transient discrete sources in the Galaxy.

  5. Using an Effective Charges Method to extract Λ from event shape moments in ee annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, C. J.; Morgan, K. E.

    2012-05-01

    We use an Effective Charges (ECH) method to extract Λ, and hence α(M), from event shape moments in ee annihilation. We compare these results with ones obtained using standard MS¯ perturbation theory. The ECH method at NLO is found to perform better than standard MS¯ perturbation theory when applied to means of event shape observables. For example, when we apply the NLO ECH method to <1-T> we get α(M)=0.1193±0.0003. However ECH at NNLO is found to work less well than ECH at NLO, and the ECH method also fails to describe data for higher moments of event shapes. We attempt to explain this by considering the ECH β-function as an asymptotic series. We also examine the effect of adding two different models for non-perturbative power corrections to the perturbative approximation given by the ECH method and MS¯ perturbation theory. Whilst only small power corrections are required when using ECH at NLO, it is found that these models are insufficient to counteract the undesirable behaviour of ECH at NNLO.

  6. Wilson Prize Talk: The PEP-II e+e- Collider B-Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeman, John

    2004-05-01

    In the late 1980's the world particle physics community asked for an asymmetric e+e- collider to study Charge-Parity (CP) violation with B Mesons. Many accelerator possibilities were studied. Two "B-Factories" were ultimately built, including PEP-II at SLAC. In its first five years starting in 1999, PEP-II reached over twice its design goals which allowed the BaBar particle physics detector to soundly establish CP violation and to discover a new quark state, among other measurements. In the upcoming second half-decade a program is underway to increase the luminosity of PEP-II by a factor of three to four. This luminosity increase will require improvements in the beam-beam interaction, higher beam currents, and improved beam control. These improvements will allow BaBar to make many new measurements and establish CP violation in many channels, looking for new particle physics. The accelerator physics advances demonstrated at PEP-II offer a look at the design of the next accelerator on the luminosity frontier. These advances include high beam-beam parameters, continuous injection,and Electron Cloud Instability suppression.

  7. In search of a source for the 320 EeV Fly's Eye cosmic ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbert, Jerome W.; Sommers, Paul

    1995-03-01

    The 320 EeV air shower detected by the Fly's Eye poses and important problem. Careful analysis of path-length limitations for the possible particle types due to cosmic background radiation verifies that the particle very likely traveled less than 50 Mpc from its source. The best candidates for accelerating particles to such high energies are the very powerful radio galaxies; however, they are all more than 100 Mpc distant. Our search finds no likely source within 50 Mpc in the direction from which the particle arrived. This prompts consideration of less likely astrophysical sources, like M82, as well as nonstandard mechanisms like cosmic string annihilation. It is also conceivable that the air shower was produced by some nonstandard particle whose path length is unlimited because it does not interact with the cosmic background radiation. A less radical alternative is that relatively strong magnetic fields deflected the particle's path through a large angle, so it could have originated at a nearby radio galaxy at an earlier time of strong activity.

  8. DE-EE0000319 Final Technical Report [National Open-ocean Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Skemp, Susan

    2013-12-29

    Under the authorization provided by Section 634 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-140), in 2009 FAU was awarded U.S. Congressionally Directed Program (CDP) funding through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate and develop technologies to harness the energy of the Florida Current as a source of clean, renewable, base-load power for Florida and the U.S. A second CDP award in 2010 provided additional funding in order to enhance and extend FAU’s activities. These two CDPs in 2009 and 2010 were combined into a single DOE grant, DE-EE0000319, and are the subject of this report. Subsequently, in July 2010 funding was made available under a separate contract, DE-EE0004200. Under that funding, DOE’s Wind and Water Power Program designated FAU’s state of Florida marine renewable energy (MRE) center as the Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC). This report discusses SNMREC activities funded by the DE-EE0000319 grant, but will make reference, as appropriate, to activities that require further investigation under the follow-on grant. The concept of extracting energy from the motions of the oceans has a long history. However, implementation on large scales of the technologies to effect renewable energy recovery from waves, tides, and open-ocean currents is relatively recent. DOE’s establishment of SNMREC recognizes a significant potential for ocean current energy recovery associated with the (relatively) high-speed Florida Current, the reach of the Gulf Stream System flowing through the Straits of Florida, between the Florida Peninsula and the Bahamas Archipelago. The proximity of the very large electrical load center of southeast Florida’s metropolitan area to the resource itself makes this potential all the more attractive. As attractive as this potential energy source is, it is not without its challenges. Although the technology is conceptually simple, its design and implementation in a commercially

  9. Many-body correlation effects on the longitudinal response in the quasielastic (e,e') reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, P. M.; van Orden, J. W.

    1991-02-01

    A study is made of the influence of many-body corrections on the longitudinal response function for the inclusive quasielastic (e,e') reaction. This response function is well known to be suppressed, by about a factor of 2, when compared with theoretical predictions based on the concept of single nucleon ejection. This is a characteristic of the data that persists through a wide range of different nuclei and suggests a violation of the Coulomb sum rule. It is shown here how an estimation of the effect of many-body correlations, at large momentum transfers, including a consistent treatment of inelastic final-state interactions, can be computed through a relationship to the nuclear optical model. The approximations are such that the Coulomb sum rule is guaranteed to remain satisfied providing the optical potential is Hermitian analytic. Calculations of the longitudinal response are carried out within the Fermi-gas model using phenomenological parametrizations of the nuclear optical potential. The reductions in both the peak strength and the total integrated response are signficant, but not sufficient to explain the discrepancy between theory and experiment. The resulting distribution of strength is characterized by the energy-weighted sum rule which remains satisfied to the level of the approximations, about 5%.

  10. Augmentation of GG2EE macrophage cell line-mediated anti-Candida activity by gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-1.

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, E; Farinelli, S; Varesio, L; Bistoni, F

    1990-01-01

    The expression of anti-Candida activity in the GG2EE macrophage cell line, generated by immortalization of fresh bone marrow with v-raf and v-myc oncogenes, was studied. GG2EE cells spontaneously inhibited the growth of an agerminative mutant of Candida albicans in vitro. The anti-Candida activity was maximal after 8 h of coculture and was proportional to the effector-to-target ratio. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) all significantly enhanced the anti-Candida activity of GG2EE cells. In contrast, IL-3, IL-4, and colony-stimulating factor 1 were ineffective. The augmentation of anti-Candida activity was not always concomitant with enhancement of phagocytosis, since IFN-gamma and colony-stimulating factor 1, but not IL-1 or TNF, augmented the phagocytic ability of GG2EE cells. Furthermore, the augmentation of anti-Candida activity in GG2EE cells did not correlate with the acquisition of antitumor activity. In fact, none of the cytokines alone were able to induce antitumor activity in GG2EE cells, which, however, could be activated to a tumoricidal stage by IFN-gamma plus heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes. These findings demonstrate that GG2EE cells exhibit spontaneous anti-Candida activity and that such activity is enhanced by TNF, IL-1, and IFN-gamma. PMID:2108087

  11. Experiment 2008 – A Two Station Re-Measurement of the Geometry of the EE-3 Near Casing Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Robert M.; Pearson, Christopher F.

    1982-03-10

    Analysis of the accelerometer system response to 11 microseismic events created in Experiment 2007 indicates that they are located in an ellipsoidal volume whose major axis direction is N 48° E and dips 47° to the SW. The intermediate axis is essentially horizontal and whose direction N 42° W is the strike of the plane containing the two major axes. The dimensions of the three axes are 315,100 and 65 m respectively. The relationship of this seismic feature to the downhole wellbore map is shown in Figures 1 and 2. It will be noted that the ellipsoid is tangent to the injection point in EE-3 and descends at a 45 angle. The plan view shown in Figure 1 indicates that the zone of seismic activity nearly cut the EE-2 wellbore at a depth of 11500 ft (TVD). Examination of the EE-2 wellbore geology and drilling history shows a well defined zone from 11450-11550 ft TVD with a very fast drilling rate (30 ft/hr) and extensive alteration. Laney labels it as a fault zone. This then coudl be an unpressurized part of the planar feature described above.

  12. A Northern Sky Survey for Point-like Sources of EeV Neutral Particles with the Telescope Array Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the search for steady point-like sources of neutral particles around 1018 eV between 2008 and 2013 May with the scintillator SD of the Telescope Array experiment. We found overall no significant point-like excess above 0.5 EeV in the northern sky. Subsequently, we also searched for coincidence with the Fermi bright Galactic sources. No significant coincidence was found within the statistical uncertainty. Hence, we set an upper limit on the neutron flux that corresponds to an averaged flux of 0.07 km-2 yr-1 for E\\gt 1 EeV in the northern sky at the 95% confidence level. This is the most stringent flux upper limit in a northern sky survey assuming point-like sources. The upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the neutron flux from Cygnus X-3 is also set to 0.2 km-2 yr-1 for E\\gt 0.5 EeV. This is an order of magnitude lower than previous flux measurements.

  13. Geology and geochemistry of samples from Los Alamos National Laboratory HDR Well EE-2, Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, R.; Laughlin, A.W.; Aldrich, M.J. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Petrologic, geochemical, and structural analyses of cores and cuttings obtained from 3000 to 4389-m true vertical depth in drill hole EE-2 indicate that this deeper part of the Precambrian section at Fenton Hill, New Mexico is composed primarily of a very heterogeneous and structurally anisotropic metamorphic complex, locally intruded by dikes and sills of granodioritic and monzogranitic composition. In this borehole none of these igneous bodies approach in size the 335-m-thick biotite-granodiorite body encountered at 2591-m depth beneath Fenton Hill in the other two drill holes. Contacts between the igneous and metamorphic rocks range from sharp and discordant to gradational. Analysis of cuttings indicates that clay-rich alteration zones are relatively common in the openhole portion of EE-2. These zones average about 20 m in thickness. Fracture sets in the Precambrian basement rock intersected by the EE-2 well bore mostly trend northeast and are steeply dipping to vertical; however, one of the sets dips gently to the northwest. Slickensided fault planes are present in a core (No.5) taken from a true vertical depth of 4195 m. Available core orientation data and geologic inference suggest that the faults dip steeply and trend between N.42/sup 0/ and 59/sup 0/E.

  14. Weibel instability for a streaming electron, counterstreaming e-e, and e-p plasmas with intrinsic temperature anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbanalilu, M.; Sadegzadeh, S.; Ghaderi, Z.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-05-15

    The existence of Weibel instability for a streaming electron, counterstreaming electron-electron (e-e), and electron-positron (e-p) plasmas with intrinsic temperature anisotropy is investigated. The temperature anisotropy is included in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the streaming direction. It is shown that the beam mean speed changes the instability mode, for a streaming electron beam, from the classic Weibel to the Weibel-like mode. The analytical and numerical solutions approved that Weibel-like modes are excited for both counterstreaming e-e and e-p plasmas. The growth rates of the instabilities in e-e and e-p plasmas are compared. The growth rate is larger for e-p plasmas if the thermal anisotropy is small and the opposite is true for large thermal anisotropies. The analytical and numerical solutions are in good agreement only in the small parallel temperature and wave number limits, when the instability growth rate increases linearly with normalized wave number kc∕ω{sub p}.

  15. Nematicidal activity of (E,E)-2,4-decadienal and (E)-2-decenal from Ailanthus altissima against Meloidogyne javanica.

    PubMed

    Caboni, Pierluigi; Ntalli, Nikoletta G; Aissani, Nadhem; Cavoski, Ivana; Angioni, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Methanol extracts of various plant parts of Ailanthus altissima were tested against the root knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica . Extracts of bark (ABE), wood (AWE), roots (ARE), and leaves (ALE) from A. altissima were investigated against freshly hatched second-stage juveniles (J(2)). AWE was the most active extract, with EC(50/3d) of 58.9 mg/L, while ALE, ARE, and ABE did not show nematicidal activity. The chemical composition of the extracts of A. altissima was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, (E)-2-undecenal, (E)-2-decenal, hexanal, nonanal, and furfural were the most prominent constituents. (E,E)-2,4-Decadienal, (E)-2-decenal, and furfural showed the highest nematicidal activity against M. javanica , with EC(50/1d) = 11.7, 20.43, and 21.79 mg/L, respectively, while the other compounds were inactive at the concentrations tested. The results obtained showed that AWE and its constituents (E,E)-2,4-decadienal and (E)-2-decenal could be considered as potent botanical nematicidal agents. PMID:22224661

  16. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) for Decommissioning of TAN-607 Hot Shop Area

    SciTech Connect

    J. P. Floerke

    2007-02-05

    will be protective of human health and the environment. Decommissioning the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area is consistent with the joint DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, which establishes the CERCLA NTCRA process as the preferred approach for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities. Under this policy, a NTCRA may be taken when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to human health and/or the environment. When DOE determines that a CERCLA NTCRA is necessary, DOE is authorized to evaluate, select, and implement the removal action that DOE determines is most appropriate to address the potential risk posed by the release or threat of release. This action is taken in accordance with applicable authorities and in conjunction with EPA and the State of Idaho pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. In keeping with the joint policy, this engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was developed in accordance with CERCLA as amended by the ''Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986'' and in accordance with the ''National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan.'' This EE/CA is consistent with the remedial action objectives (RAOs) of the Final Record of Decision, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-10 and supports the overall remediation goals established through the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for Waste Area Group 1. Waste Area Group 1 is located at TAN.

  17. Production du baryon Sigma+ dans les collisions e+e- au LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joly, Andre

    Les mécanismes de production des baryons dans les interactions e+e- font l'objet de nombreuses études. De plus, les modes de production des baryons étranges semblent faire appel A des processus spécifiques, qui sont encore mal compris. Notre étude de la production des baryons Σ+ dans les interactions e+e- nous permet de formuler certaines remarques sur l'état des connaîssances acquises sur le sujet. Une methode de reconstruction originale et des critères de sélection spécifiques ont été développés afin d'identifier des baryons Σ+ de haute Energie ( ES+ > 5 GeV), partir de leur canal de désintégration en un proton et un π0 (S+-->p+p0 ). Trois mesures principales sont réalisées à partir de notre échantillon de baryons reconstruits. Le nombre mesuré de baryons Σ+ produits par événement e +e- à 91 GeV est de: =0.102+/-0.006(stat.) +/-0.008(syst.) +/-0.003(extrap.) où les erreurs sont dues à la statistique, aux systématiques et à la procédure d'extrapolation. Ce résultat est en accord avec ceux obtenus précédemment, mais avec des erreurs réduites. La section efficace différentielle en fonction de l'energie est mesurée et comparée aux prédictions des principaux générateurs Monte-Carlo (JETSET7.4(MOPS), JETSET7.4 et HERWIG5.9). A haute énergie, HERWIG ne semble pas reproduire les mesures, aussi bien que les deux versions de JETSET. Enfin, la position du maximum de la section efficace différentielle de production des baryons Σ+ en fonction de l'impulsion est mesurée. On trouve: overlinexoverlineS+=2.32+/- 0.47 Une étude spécifique du générateur JETSET7.4(MOPS) est réalisee, afin de mieux comprendre les mécanismes de production de l'étrangeté et du spin dans la production des baryons. Aucun générateur ne semble capable de décrire de manière simultanée la production du spin et de l'étrangeté.

  18. 17α-Ethinylestradiol (EE2) effect on global gene expression in primary rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Maria T; Song, You; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2015-12-01

    The potential impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the aquatic environment has driven the development of screening assays to evaluate the estrogenic properties of chemicals and their effects on aquatic organisms such as fish. However, obtaining full concentration-response relationships in animal (in vivo) exposure studies are laborious, costly and unethical, hence a need for developing feasible alternative (non-animal) methods. Use of in vitro bioassays such as primary fish hepatocytes, which retain many of the native properties of the liver, has been proposed for in vitro screening of estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and antagonists. The aim of present study was to characterize the molecular mode of action (MoA) of the ER agonist 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in primary rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. A custom designed salmonid 60,000-feature (60k) oligonucleotide microarray was used to characterize the potential MoAs after 48h exposure to EE2. The microarray analysis revealed several concentration-dependent gene expression alterations including classical estrogen sensitive biomarker gene expression (e.g. estrogen receptor α, vitellogenin, zona radiata). Gene Ontology (GO) analysis displayed transcriptional changes suggesting interference of cellular growth, fatty acid and lipid metabolism potentially mediated through the estrogen receptor (ER), which were proposed to be associated with modulation of genes involved in endocrine function and reproduction. Pathway analysis supported the identified GOs and revealed modulation of additional genes associated with apoptosis and cholesterol biosynthesis. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to impaired lipid metabolism (e.g. peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and γ), growth (e.g. insulin growth factor protein 1), phase I and II biotransformation (e.g. cytochrome P450 1A, sulfotransferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and glutathione S-transferase) provided additional

  19. 17α-Ethinylestradiol (EE2) effect on global gene expression in primary rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Maria T; Song, You; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2015-12-01

    The potential impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the aquatic environment has driven the development of screening assays to evaluate the estrogenic properties of chemicals and their effects on aquatic organisms such as fish. However, obtaining full concentration-response relationships in animal (in vivo) exposure studies are laborious, costly and unethical, hence a need for developing feasible alternative (non-animal) methods. Use of in vitro bioassays such as primary fish hepatocytes, which retain many of the native properties of the liver, has been proposed for in vitro screening of estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and antagonists. The aim of present study was to characterize the molecular mode of action (MoA) of the ER agonist 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in primary rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. A custom designed salmonid 60,000-feature (60k) oligonucleotide microarray was used to characterize the potential MoAs after 48h exposure to EE2. The microarray analysis revealed several concentration-dependent gene expression alterations including classical estrogen sensitive biomarker gene expression (e.g. estrogen receptor α, vitellogenin, zona radiata). Gene Ontology (GO) analysis displayed transcriptional changes suggesting interference of cellular growth, fatty acid and lipid metabolism potentially mediated through the estrogen receptor (ER), which were proposed to be associated with modulation of genes involved in endocrine function and reproduction. Pathway analysis supported the identified GOs and revealed modulation of additional genes associated with apoptosis and cholesterol biosynthesis. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to impaired lipid metabolism (e.g. peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and γ), growth (e.g. insulin growth factor protein 1), phase I and II biotransformation (e.g. cytochrome P450 1A, sulfotransferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and glutathione S-transferase) provided additional

  20. Environmental Technology Verification Report for Abraxis Ecologenia® Ethynylestradiol (EE2) Microplate Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) Test Kits

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) and its verification organization partner, Battelle, operate the Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center under ETV. The AMS Center recently evaluated the performance of the Abraxis Ecologenia Ethynylestradiol (EE2) ...

  1. Overlapping but distinct effects of genistein and ethinyl estradiol (EE2) in female Sprague-Dawley rats in multigenerational reproductive and chronic toxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    Delclos, K. Barry; Weis, Constance C.; Bucci, Thomas J.; Olson, Greg; Mellick, Paul; Sadovova, Natalya; Latendresse, John R.; Thorn, Brett; Newbold, Retha R.

    2009-01-01

    Genistein and ethinyl estradiol (EE2) were examined in multigenerational reproductive and chronic toxicity studies that had different treatment intervals among generations. Sprague-Dawley rats received genistein (0, 5, 100, or 500 ppm) or EE2 (0, 2, 10, or 50 ppb) in a low phytoestrogen diet. Nonneoplastic effects in females are summarized here. Genistein at 500 ppm and EE2 at 50 ppb produced similar effects in continuously exposed rats, including decreased body weights, accelerated vaginal opening, and altered estrous cycles in young animals. At the high dose, anogenital distance was subtly affected by both compounds, and a reduction in litter size was evident in genistein-treated animals. Genistein at 500 ppm induced an early onset of aberrant cycles relative to controls in the chronic studies. EE2 significantly increased the incidence of uterine lesions (atypical focal hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia). These compound-specific effects appeared to be enhanced in the offspring of prior exposed generations. PMID:19159674

  2. 40 CFR 180.1126 - Codlure, (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL... the insect pheromone codlure, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol, on all raw agricultural commodities...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1126 - Codlure, (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL... the insect pheromone codlure, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol, on all raw agricultural commodities...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1126 - Codlure, (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL... the insect pheromone codlure, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol, on all raw agricultural commodities...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1126 - Codlure, (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL... the insect pheromone codlure, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol, on all raw agricultural commodities...

  6. 31 CFR 363.52 - What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds may I purchase in one year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds may I purchase in one year? 363.52 Section 363.52 Money and Finance... Bonds Purchased Through TreasuryDirect General § 363.52 What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series...

  7. 31 CFR 363.52 - What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds may I purchase in one year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series I savings bonds may I purchase in one year? 363.52 Section 363.52 Money and Finance... Bonds Purchased Through TreasuryDirect General § 363.52 What amount of book-entry Series EE and Series...

  8. A Proxy Method for Estimation of EE-index using MAGDAS/CPMN Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, T.; Yumoto, K.; Uozumi, T.; Numata, Y.; Group, M.

    2008-12-01

    EE-index (EDst, EU, and EL) is a new index proposed by Space Environment Research Center, Kyushu University (see Uozumi et al., 2008) to monitor temporal and long-term variations of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ). EU and EL mainly represent the range of EEJ and CEJ (equatorial counter electrojet) components, respectively. The baseline levels of EU and EL are obtained by averaging the H-component magnetic variations observed at the nightside (LT = 18-06) MAGDAS/CPMN stations along the magnetic equator. EDst, defined by Uozumi et al. (2008) fluctuates depending on the number of stations in the nightside sector (LT = 18-06). If the number is few, EDst may include some local fluctuations: the partial ring current component, substorm component and so on. Such local components cause some error in estimating the baseline level of EU or EL. Therefore, we need to use as many stations' data as possible in order to derive EU and EL properly. Pacific region is one of the most difficult areas to measure the magnetic field near the dip equator, because there are few islands. In the present paper, we developed a new method to use the data obtained from Ewa Beach (EWA; G. Lat. = 21.32N, G. Long. = 158.0W, Dip Lat. = 38.03), Hawaii, USA for estimation of EDst. EWA is not the equatorial station, but its nighttime H-component magnetic variations are found to be similar to those of Christmas Island (CXI; G. Lat. = 2.05N, G. Long. = 157.5W, Dip Lat. = 5.24), Kiribati. Data from EWA can be used as a proxy of that from CXI for monitoring temporal and long-term variations of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) in real time. Acknowledgements: Authors appreciate Prof. Hisashi Utada of Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo for supplying the magnetometer data from Christmas Island, Kiribati. Our deepest gratitude goes to all the members of the MAGDAS/CPMN project for their ceaseless support. Especially, we wish to thank the staffs of the observation stations: Dr. Baylie Damtie

  9. Combined treatment with testosterone (T) and ethinylestradiol (EE2) in constitutionally tall boys: is treatment with T plus EE2 more effective in reducing final height in tall boys than T alone?

    PubMed

    Decker, Ralph; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G

    2002-04-01

    Estrogens have been shown to rapidly inhibit longitudinal growth in tall boys. To antagonize the initial growth accelerating effect of T, 41 boys with an initial height prediction in excess of 203 cm were treated prospectively with either T enanthate (TE) 250 mg/wk im in combination with ethinylestradiol (EE2) 0.1 mg/d taken orally for the first 5.8 +/- 0.47 wk (mean +/- SE) of treatment (group 1, n = 20) or with TE alone (group 2, n = 21). Patients were randomized to one or the other treatment regimen. Mean (+/-SE) predicted adult height was 206.8 +/- 0.7 cm in group 1 and 206.4 +/- 0.8 cm in group 2. Total duration of treatment was 16.1 +/- 0.8 months and 14.0 +/- 1.2 months in group 1 and 2, respectively (NS). EE2-induced side effects in group 1 (gynecomastia) were limited and fully reversible. No negative long-term sequelae were found at final height with respect to hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis activity and to testis volumes. Although there was a tendency to a lower initial growth velocity measured by knemometry in group 1 (0.30 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.38 +/- 0.05 mm/wk, NS), final height did not differ in both study groups (195.0 +/- 0.8 cm in group 1, 194.6 +/- 0.8 cm in group 2). Similarly, height reduction (initial predicted adult height minus final height) was not significantly different between the two groups (12.0 +/- 0.9 cm in group 1, 11.7 +/- 0.9 cm in group 2). In conclusion, the addition of EE2 during the initial treatment phase to high-dose T in tall boys has no significant effect on height reduction. The results of this clinical trial suggest that the initial growth inhibiting effect of EE2 on the epiphyseal growth plates is overridden by the long-term administration of high dose TE.

  10. An electron fixed target experiment to search for a new vector boson A' decaying to e+e-

    DOE PAGES

    Rouven Essig; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-02-02

    We describe an experiment to search for a new vector boson A' with weak coupling alpha' > 6 x 10–8 α to electrons (α' = e2/4π) in the mass range 65 MeV < mA' < 550 MeV. New vector bosons with such small couplings arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing of the "dark photon" A' with the photon -- one of the very few ways in which new forces can couple to the Standard Model -- and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. A' bosons are produced by radiation off an electronmore » beam, and could appear as narrow resonances with small production cross-section in the trident e+e- spectrum. We summarize the experimental approach described in a proposal submitted to Jefferson Laboratory's PAC35, PR-10-009. This experiment, the A' Experiment (APEX), uses the electron beam of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory (CEBAF) at energies of ~1-4 GeV incident on 0.5-10% radiation length Tungsten wire mesh targets, and measures the resulting e+e- pairs to search for the A' using the High Resolution Spectrometer and the septum magnet in Hall A. With a ~1 month run, APEX will achieve very good sensitivity because the statistics of e+e- pairs will be ~10,000 times larger in the explored mass range than any previous search for the A' boson. These statistics and the excellent mass resolution of the spectrometers allow sensitivity to α'/α one to three orders of magnitude below current limits, in a region of parameter space of great theoretical and phenomenological interest. Similar experiments could also be performed at other facilities, such as the Mainz Microtron.« less

  11. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lee

    2007-06-01

    The International Conference on Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino Activities, ARENA 2006 was jointly hosted by the Universities of Northumbria and Sheffield at the City of Newcastle Campus of the University of Northumbria in June 2006. ARENA 2006 was the latest in a series of meetings which have addressed, either separately or jointly, the use of radio and acoustic sensors for the detection of highly relativistic particles. Previous successful meetings have taken place in Los Angeles (RADHEP, 2000), Stanford (2003) and DESY Zeuthen (ARENA 2005). A total of 50 scientists from across Europe, the US and Japan attended the conference presenting status reports and results from a number of projects and initiatives spread as far afield as the Sweden and the South Pole. The talks presented at the meeting and the proceedings contained herein represent a `snapshot' of the status of the fields of acoustic and radio detection at the time of the conference. The three day meeting also included two invited talks by Dr Paula Chadwick and Dr Johannes Knapp who gave excellent summaries of the related astroparticle physics fields of high energy gamma ray detection and high energy cosmic ray detection respectively. As well as a full academic agenda there were social events including a Medieval themed conference banquet at Lumley Castle and a civic reception kindly provided by the Lord Mayor of Newcastle and hosted at the Mansion House. Thanks must go to the International Advisory Board members for their input and guidance, the Local Organising Committee for their hard work in bringing everything together and finally the delegates for the stimulating, enthusiastic and enjoyable spirit in which ARENA 2006 took place. Lee Thompson

    International Advisory Board

    G. Anton, ErlangenD. Besson, Kansas
    J. Blümer, KarlsruheA. Capone, Rome
    H. Falcke, BonnP. Gorham, Hawaii
    G. Gratta

  12. Design and implementation of a distributed large-scale spatial database system based on J2EE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jianya; Chen, Nengcheng; Zhu, Xinyan; Zhang, Xia

    2003-03-01

    With the increasing maturity of distributed object technology, CORBA, .NET and EJB are universally used in traditional IT field. However, theories and practices of distributed spatial database need farther improvement in virtue of contradictions between large scale spatial data and limited network bandwidth or between transitory session and long transaction processing. Differences and trends among of CORBA, .NET and EJB are discussed in details, afterwards the concept, architecture and characteristic of distributed large-scale seamless spatial database system based on J2EE is provided, which contains GIS client application, web server, GIS application server and spatial data server. Moreover the design and implementation of components of GIS client application based on JavaBeans, the GIS engine based on servlet, the GIS Application server based on GIS enterprise JavaBeans(contains session bean and entity bean) are explained.Besides, the experiments of relation of spatial data and response time under different conditions are conducted, which proves that distributed spatial database system based on J2EE can be used to manage, distribute and share large scale spatial data on Internet. Lastly, a distributed large-scale seamless image database based on Internet is presented.

  13. Observation of e(+)e(-) annihilation into the C = +1 hadronic final states rho(0)rho(0) and phirho(0).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch

    2006-09-15

    We report the first observation of e(+)e(-) annihilation into states of positive C parity, namely, rho(0)rho(0) and phirho(0). The two states are observed in the pi(+)pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) and K(+)K(-)pi(+)pi(-) final states, respectively, in a data sample of 225 fb(-1) collected by the BABAR experiment at the Positron-Electron Project II e(+)e(-) storage rings at energies near sqrt[s]=10.58 GeV. The distributions of costheta(*), where theta(*) is the center-of-mass polar angle of the phi meson or the forward rho(0) meson, suggest production by two-virtual-photon annihilation. We measure cross sections within the range |costheta(*)|<0.8 of sigma(e(+)e(-)-->rho(0)rho(0))=20.7+/-0.7(stat)+/-2.7(syst) fb and sigma(e(+)e(-)-->phirho(0))=5.7+/-0.5(stat)+/-0.8(syst) fb. PMID:17025878

  14. GRaNDScan An Experiment to Study Cosmic Ray Flux and Anisotropy around and below EeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhoff, S.; Adams, Todd; Benzvi, Segev; Loh, Eugene C.

    2003-07-01

    For our understanding of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic rays, the energy region between 1017 and 1019 eV is of crucial importance. Previous experiments have found indirect evidence that at these energies, the origin of cosmic rays changes from predominantly Galactic to extragalactic. In addition, weak evidence for an excess of cosmic rays from the direction of the Galactic center in a narrow energy band around 1018 eV has been claimed. However, so far there is no additional evidence supporting this scenario. Neither Galactic nor extragalactic sources have been unambiguously established. Given the importance of this energy range, there is a strong case for a dedicated experiment to study the EeV energy region with high precision. We describe the design and capabilities of a portable air fluorescence detector for stereo viewing of air showers at sub-EeV energies. located at a site on the southern hemisphere, the instrument proposed here will provide an accurate map of the Galactic center region, long susp ected to harb or one or several sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays. It will provide information on the chemical composition of any observed excess, and measure the energy spectrum in the region of the second knee.

  15. Measuring the trilinear couplings of MSSM neutral Higgs bosons at high-energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osland, P.; Pandita, P. N.

    1999-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of multiple production of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson (h) of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) at high-energy e+e- colliders. We consider the production of the heavier CP-even Higgs boson (H) via Higgs-strahlung e+e--->ZH, in association with the CP-odd Higgs boson (A) in e+e--->AH, or via the fusion mechanism e+e--->νeν¯eH, with H subsequently decaying through H-->hh, thereby resulting in a pair of lighter Higgs bosons (h) in the final state. These processes can enable one to measure the trilinear Higgs couplings λHhh and λhhh, which can be used to theoretically reconstruct the Higgs potential. We delineate the regions of the MSSM parameter space in which these trilinear Higgs couplings could be measured at a future e+e- collider. In our calculations, we include in detail the radiative corrections to the Higgs sector of the MSSM, especially the mixing in the squark sector.

  16. B{sup '}s with direct decays: Tevatron and LHC discovery prospects in the bb+Ee{sub T} channel

    SciTech Connect

    Alwall, Johan; Feng, Jonathan L.; Kumar, Jason; Su Shufang

    2011-10-01

    We explore the discovery prospects for B{sup '}B{sup '} pair production followed by direct decays B{sup '}{yields}bX, where B{sup '} is a new quark and X is a long-lived neutral particle. We develop optimized cuts in the (m{sub B}{sup '},m{sub X}) plane and show that the 7 TeV LHC with an integrated luminosity of 1(10) fb{sup -1} may exclude masses up to m{sub B}{sup '}{approx}620(800) GeV, completely covering the mass range allowed for new quarks that get mass from electroweak symmetry breaking. This analysis is applicable to other models with bbEe{sub T} signals, including supersymmetric models with bottom squarks decaying directly to neutralinos, and models with exotic quarks decaying directly to GeV-scale dark matter. To accommodate these and other interpretations, we also present model-independent results for the bbEe{sub T} cross section required for exclusion and discovery.

  17. BC3EE2,9B, a synthetic carbazole derivative, upregulates autophagy and synergistically sensitizes human GBM8901 glioblastoma cells to temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Min; Syu, Jhih-Pu; Way, Tzong-Der; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lin, Chung-Tien; Lin, Chih-Li

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most fatal form of human brain cancer. Although temozolomide (TMZ), an oral alkylating chemotherapeutic agent, improves the survival rate, the prognosis of patients with GBM remains poor. Naturally occurring carbazole alkaloids isolated from curry leaves (Murraya koenigii Spreng.) have been shown to possess a wide range of anticancer properties. However, the effects of carbazole derivatives on glioblastoma cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, anti‑glioblastoma profiles of a series of synthetic carbazole derivatives were evaluated in vitro. The most promising derivative in this series was BC3EE2,9B, which showed significant anti‑proliferative effects in GBM8401 and GBM8901 cells. BC3EE2,9B also triggered cell‑cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1 stage, and suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion and migration. Furthermore, BC3EE2,9B induced autophagy‑mediated cell death and synergistically sensitized GBM cells to TMZ cytotoxicity. The possible mechanism underlying BC3EE2,9B‑induced autophagy may involve activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the attenuation of the Akt and mammalian target of the rapamycin downstream signaling pathway. Taken together, the present results provide molecular evidence for the mode of action governing the ability of BC3EE2,9B to sensitize drug‑resistant glioblastoma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent TMZ.

  18. BC3EE2,9B, a synthetic carbazole derivative, upregulates autophagy and synergistically sensitizes human GBM8901 glioblastoma cells to temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, CHIEN-MIN; SYU, JHIH-PU; WAY, TZONG-DER; HUANG, LI-JIAU; KUO, SHENG-CHU; LIN, CHUNG-TIEN; LIN, CHIH-LI

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most fatal form of human brain cancer. Although temozolomide (TMZ), an oral alkylating chemotherapeutic agent, improves the survival rate, the prognosis of patients with GBM remains poor. Naturally occurring carbazole alkaloids isolated from curry leaves (Murraya koenigii Spreng.) have been shown to possess a wide range of anticancer properties. However, the effects of carbazole derivatives on glioblastoma cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, anti-glioblastoma profiles of a series of synthetic carbazole derivatives were evaluated in vitro. The most promising derivative in this series was BC3EE2,9B, which showed significant anti-proliferative effects in GBM8401 and GBM8901 cells. BC3EE2,9B also triggered cell-cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1 stage, and suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion and migration. Furthermore, BC3EE2,9B induced autophagy-mediated cell death and synergistically sensitized GBM cells to TMZ cytotoxicity. The possible mechanism underlying BC3EE2,9B-induced autophagy may involve activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the attenuation of the Akt and mammalian target of the rapamycin downstream signaling pathway. Taken together, the present results provide molecular evidence for the mode of action governing the ability of BC3EE2,9B to sensitize drug-resistant glioblastoma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent TMZ. PMID:26329365

  19. Precise measurement of the e+e- --> pi+pi-(gamma) cross section with the initial state radiation method at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-12-01

    A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e(+)e(-) --> pi(+)pi(-)(gamma) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method using 232 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector at e(+)e(-) center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The ISR luminosity is determined from a study of the leptonic process e(+)e(-) --> mu(+)mu(-)gamma(gamma). The leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon magnetic anomaly calculated using the pipi cross section measured from threshold to 1.8 GeV is (514.1 +/- 2.2(stat) +/- 3.1(syst)) x 10(-10). PMID:20366141

  20. Precise measurement of the e+e- --> pi+pi-(gamma) cross section with the initial state radiation method at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-12-01

    A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e(+)e(-) --> pi(+)pi(-)(gamma) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method using 232 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector at e(+)e(-) center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The ISR luminosity is determined from a study of the leptonic process e(+)e(-) --> mu(+)mu(-)gamma(gamma). The leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon magnetic anomaly calculated using the pipi cross section measured from threshold to 1.8 GeV is (514.1 +/- 2.2(stat) +/- 3.1(syst)) x 10(-10).

    1. SPIN CORRELATIONS OF THE FINAL LEPTONS IN THE TWO-PHOTON PROCESSES γγ → e+e-, μ+μ-, τ+τ-

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lyuboshitz, Valery V.; Lyuboshitz, Vladimir L.

      2014-12-01

      The spin structure of the process γγ → e+e- is theoretically investigated. It is shown that, if the primary photons are unpolarized, the final electron and positron are unpolarized as well but their spins are strongly correlated. For the final (e+e-) system, explicit expressions for the components of the correlation tensor are derived, and the relative fractions of singlet and triplet states are found. It is demonstrated that in the process γγ → e+e- one of the Bell-type incoherence inequalities for the correlation tensor components is always violated and, thus, spin correlations of the electron and positron in this process have the strongly pronounced quantum character. Analogous consideration can be wholly applied as well to the two-photon processes γγ → μ+μ- and γγ → τ+τ-, which become possible at considerably higher energies.

    2. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Thompson, Lee

      2007-06-01

      The International Conference on Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino Activities, ARENA 2006 was jointly hosted by the Universities of Northumbria and Sheffield at the City of Newcastle Campus of the University of Northumbria in June 2006. ARENA 2006 was the latest in a series of meetings which have addressed, either separately or jointly, the use of radio and acoustic sensors for the detection of highly relativistic particles. Previous successful meetings have taken place in Los Angeles (RADHEP, 2000), Stanford (2003) and DESY Zeuthen (ARENA 2005). A total of 50 scientists from across Europe, the US and Japan attended the conference presenting status reports and results from a number of projects and initiatives spread as far afield as the Sweden and the South Pole. The talks presented at the meeting and the proceedings contained herein represent a `snapshot' of the status of the fields of acoustic and radio detection at the time of the conference. The three day meeting also included two invited talks by Dr Paula Chadwick and Dr Johannes Knapp who gave excellent summaries of the related astroparticle physics fields of high energy gamma ray detection and high energy cosmic ray detection respectively. As well as a full academic agenda there were social events including a Medieval themed conference banquet at Lumley Castle and a civic reception kindly provided by the Lord Mayor of Newcastle and hosted at the Mansion House. Thanks must go to the International Advisory Board members for their input and guidance, the Local Organising Committee for their hard work in bringing everything together and finally the delegates for the stimulating, enthusiastic and enjoyable spirit in which ARENA 2006 took place. Lee Thompson

      International Advisory Board

      G. Anton, ErlangenD. Besson, Kansas
      J. Blümer, KarlsruheA. Capone, Rome
      H. Falcke, BonnP. Gorham, Hawaii
      G. Gratta

    3. Comparison of the reliability of E/E' to estimate pulmonary capillary wedge pressure in heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction versus those with reduced ejection fraction.

      PubMed

      Matsushita, Kenichi; Minamishima, Toshinori; Goda, Ayumi; Ishiguro, Haruhisa; Kosho, Hideyasu; Sakata, Konomi; Satoh, Toru; Yoshino, Hideaki

      2015-12-01

      Accurate assessment of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is essential for physicians to effectively manage patients with acute decompensated heart failure. The ratio of early transmittal velocity to tissue Doppler mitral annular early diastolic velocity (E/E') is used to estimate PCWP noninvasively in a wide range of cardiac patients. However, it remains contentious as to whether mitral E/E' is a reliable predictor of PCWP. In the present study, acute heart failure patients were divided into two groups on the basis of left ventricular (LV) systolic function: those with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and those with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The usefulness of mitral E/E' in estimating PCWP was compared between the two groups. Fifty consecutive patients who were admitted with acute decompensated heart failure and underwent both right-sided cardiac catheterization and transthoracic echocardiography during hospitalization were analyzed retrospectively. Pearson's correlation was used to evaluate associations between Doppler parameters and PCWP. E/E' was positively correlated with PCWP (r = 0.56, P = 0.01) in the heart failure with preserved ejection fraction group. However, no significant relationship was observed between PCWP and mitral E/E' (P = 0.85) in the heart failure with reduced ejection fraction group. There were no significant correlations between any of the conventional parameters considered (LVEF, left atrial dimension, E/A, IVRT, and DT) with PCWP in either group. In conclusion, mitral E/E' is useful for estimating PCWP in patients with acute heart failure with preserved ejection fraction but may not in those with reduced ejection fraction.

    4. 17α-Ethinylestradiol (EE2) treatment of wild roach (Rutilus rutilus) during early life development disrupts expression of genes directly involved in the feedback cycle of estrogen.

      PubMed

      Nikoleris, Lina; Hultin, Cecilia L; Hallgren, Per; Hansson, Maria C

      2016-02-01

      Fish are more sensitive to introduced disturbances from synthetic endocrine disrupting compounds during early life phases compared with mature stages. 17α-Ethinylestradiol (EE2), which is the active compound in human oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapies, is today ever present in the effluents from sewage treatment plants. EE2 targets and interacts with the endogenous biological systems of exposed vertebrates resulting in to large extents unknown short- and long-term effects. We investigated how EE2 exposure affects expression profiles of a large number of target genes during early life of roach (Rutilus rutilus). We exposed fertilized roach eggs collected from a lake in Southern Sweden to EE2 for 12weeks together with 1+-year-old roach in aquaria. We measured the gene expression of the estrogen receptor (esr)1/2a/2b, androgen receptor (ar), vitellogenin, cytochrome P450 (cyp)19a1a/1b in fertilized eggs; newly hatched larvae; 12-week-old fry; and juvenile wild roach (1+-year-old). Results shows that an EE2 concentration as low as 0.5ng/L significantly affects gene expression during early development. Gene expression responses vary both among life stages and molecular receptors. We also show that the gene profile of the estrogen feedback cycle to a large extent depends on the relationship between the three esr genes and the two cyp19a1 genes, which are all up-regulated with age. Results indicate that a disruption of the natural activity of the dominant esr gene could lead to detrimental biological effects if EE2 exposure occurs during development, even if this exposure occurred for only a short period. PMID:26689641

    5. Measurement of the Inclusive $Z \\to ee$ Production Cross Section in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7TeV and $Z \\to ee$ Decays as Standard Candles for Luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider

      SciTech Connect

      Werner, Jeremy

      2011-01-01

      This thesis comprises a precision measurement of the inclusive \\Zee production cross section in proton-proton collisions provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV and the absolute luminosity based on \\Zee decays. The data was collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector near Geneva, Switzerland during the year of 2010 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $\\int\\mathcal{L}dt = 35.9\\pm 1.4$~pb$^{-1}$. Electronic decays of $Z$ bosons allow one of the first electroweak measurements at the LHC, making the cross section measurement a benchmark of physics performance after the first year of CMS detector and LHC machine operations. It is the first systematic uncertainty limited \\Zee cross section measurement performed at $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The measured cross section pertaining to the invariant mass window $M_{ee}\\in (60,120)$~GeV is reported as: $\\sigma(pp\\to Z+X) \\times \\mathcal{B}( Z\\to ee ) = 997 \\pm 11 \\mathrm{(sta t)} \\pm 19 \\mathrm{(syst)} \\pm 40 \\mathrm{(lumi)} \\textrm{ pb}$, which agrees with the theoretical prediction calculated to NNLO in QCD. Leveraging \\Zee decays as ``standard candles'' for measuring the absolute luminosity at the LHC is examined; they are produced copiously, are well understood, and have clean detector signatures. Thus the consistency of the inclusive \\Zee production cross section measurement with the theoretical prediction motivates inverting the measurement to instead use the \\Zee signal yield to measure the luminosity. The result, which agrees with the primary relative CMS luminosity measurement calibrated using Van der Meer separation scans, is not only the most precise absolute luminosity measurement performed to date at a hadron collider, but also the first one based on a physics signal at the LHC.

    6. Transverse momentum and total cross section of e(+)e(-) pairs in the Z-boson region from p&pmacr; collisions at sqrt

      PubMed

      Vejcik; Velev; Vidal; Vilar; Vologouev; Vucinic; Wagner; Wagner; Wahl; Wallace; Walsh; Wang; Wang; Wang; Watanabe; Watts; Webb; Wenzel; Wester; Wicklund; Wicklund; Williams; Wilson; Winer; Winn; Wolbers

      2000-01-31

      The transverse momentum and total cross section of e(+)e(-) pairs in the Z-boson region of 66ee)<116 GeV/c(2) from p&pmacr; collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.8 TeV are measured using 110 pb(-1) of collisions taken by the Collider Detector at Fermilab during 1992-1995. The total cross section is measured to be 248+/-11 pb. The differential transverse momentum cross section is compared with calculations that match quantum chromodynamics perturbation theory at high transverse momentum with the gluon resummation formalism at low transverse momentum.

    7. Comprehensive Energy Assessment: EE and RE Project Optimization Modeling for United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance

      SciTech Connect

      Brigantic, Robert T.; Papatyi, Anthony F.; Perkins, Casey J.

      2010-09-30

      This report summarizes a study and corresponding model development conducted in support of the United States Pacific Command (USPACOM) as part of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA). This research was aimed at developing a mathematical programming framework and accompanying optimization methodology in order to simultaneously evaluate energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE) opportunities. Once developed, this research then demonstrated this methodology at a USPACOM installation - Camp H.M. Smith, Hawaii. We believe this is the first time such an integrated, joint EE and RE optimization methodology has been constructed and demonstrated.

    8. First measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by e+e- collisions

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Acton, P. D.; Adolphsen, C. E.; Agnew, G.; Alber, C.; Alzofon, D. F.; Antilogus, P.; Arroyo, C.; Ash, W. W.; Ashford, V.; Astbury, A.; Aston, D.; Au, Y.; Axen, D. A.; Bacchetta, N.; Baird, K. G.; Baker, W.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barrera, F.; Battiston, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bean, A.; Beer, G.; Belcinski, R. J.; Bell, R. A.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Berger, R.; Berridge, S. C.; Bethke, S.; Biasini, M.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G. M.; Bird, F.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Blumberg, R.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolton, T.; Bougerolle, S.; Bower, G. R.; Boyce, R. F.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Browder, T. E.; Bugg, W. M.; Burgess, B.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Byers, B. L.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Camilleri, L.; Carpinelli, M.; Carr, J.; Cartwright, S.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chadwick, G. B.; Chamberlain, O.; Chambers, D.; Chen, L.; Clarke, P. E.; Claus, R.; Clendenin, J.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cords, D.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyle, P. A.; Coyne, D. G.; Craddock, W.; Cutler, H.; D'oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J.; Dasu, S.; Davis, R.; de Sangro, R.; de Simone, P.; de Simone, S.; Dean, T.; Decker, F. J.; Dejongh, F.; dell'orso, R.; Disco, A.; Dolin, R.; Downing, R. W.; Du, Y. C.; Dubois, R.; Duboscq, J. E.; Dunwoodie, W.; Durrett, D. D.; Ecklund, S. D.; Eigen, G.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Emma, P. J.; Emmet, W. T.; English, R. L.; Erdos, E.; Escalera, J.; Fan, C.; Fero, M. J.; Ferrie, J.; Fieguth, T.; Flynn, J.; Forbush, D. A.; Fortune, K. M.; Fox, J. D.; Fox, M. J.; Frey, R.; Freytag, D. R.; Friedman, J. I.; Frisch, J.; Fujimoto, J.; Furuno, K.; Gaillard, M.; Gallinaro, M.; Garwin, E.; Gillman, T.; Gioumousis, A.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Gurd, D. P.; Hale, D. L.; Haller, G. M.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamilton, V.; Haney, M. J.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hargis, H.; Harrison, J.; Hart, E. L.; Hasegawa, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hilomen, R. C.; Himel, T. M.; Hitlin, D. G.; Hodges, T. A.; Hodgson, J.; Hoeflich, J. J.; Honma, A.; Horelick, D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Hyatt, E.; Iwasaki, Y.; Izen, J. M.; Jobe, R. K.; Jacques, P.; Jako, C.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Jones, S.; Junk, T.; Kaiser, S.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Keeler, R. K.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kharakh, D.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, P. C.; King, R.; Klein, M.; Kofler, R. R.; Kowitt, M.; Krejcik, P.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Kulikov, A. V.; Kunz, P. F.; Kwon, Y.; Labs, J. F.; Langstaff, R. R.; Langston, M.; Larsen, R.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W.; Limberg, T.; Lintern, L.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Lyons, T.; Ma, J.; Majid, W. A.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mansour, D.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Mason, G. R.; Masuda, H.; Mathys, L.; Mazaheri, G.; Mazzucato, A.; Mazzucato, E.; McCormick, D. J.; McGowan, J. F.; McHugh, S.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Mellor, D. J.; Messner, R.; Mincer, A. I.; Minty, M.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Morrison, R. J.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Mundy, G.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nelson, D.; Nesterov, V.; Nordby, M.; Nussbaum, M.; Nuttall, A.; Ogren, H.; Olsen, J.; Oram, C.; Osborne, L. S.; Ossa, R.; Oxoby, G.; Paffrath, L.; Palounek, A.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, H.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pavel, T. J.; Perrier, F.; Peruzzi, I.; Pescara, L.; Peters, D.; Petersen, H.; Petradza, M.; Phinney, N.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitthan, R.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Poffenberger, P. R.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Pripstein, D.; Punkar, G. D.; Putallaz, G.; Raimondi, P.; Rankin, P.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Rensing, P. E.; Richman, J. D.; Rinta, R.; Robertson, L. P.; Rochester, L. S.; Rosenson, L.; Ross, M. C.; Rothberg, J. E.; Rothenberg, A.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Rust, D.; Rutz, E.; Saez, P.; Santha, A. K.; Santocchia, A.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schenk, P. R.; Schindler, R. H.; Schneekloth, U.; Schneider, M.; Schultz, D.; Schultz, G. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seeman, J. T.; Seiden, A.; Servoli, L.; Settles, M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Shapiro, S. L.; Shaw, H.; Sheppard, J. C.; Sherden, D. J.; Shimomura, T.; Shoup, A.; Shypit, R. L.; Siemann, R. H.; Simopoulos, C.; Skarpaas, K.; Smith, S. R.; Snyder, A.; Snyder, J. A.; Sobie, R.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Spence, W. L.; Spencer, E. N.; St. Lorant, S.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Stephenson, R. J.; Stewart, G.; Stiles, P.; Stockdale, I. E.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Tahar, M. Z.; Takahashi, T.; Tang, H.; Tappern, G. J.; Tarnopolsky, G.; Taylor, F. E.; Tecchio, M.; Thaler, J. J.; Toevs, F.; Toge, N.; Turcotte, M.; Turk, J. D.; Turner, J. L.; Usher, T.; Va'vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wadsworth, B. F.; Waite, A. P.; Walker, N. J.; Walz, D.; Warner, D.; Watt, R.; Watts, S. J.; Weber, T.; Weidemann, A. W.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Wickert, S. A.; Williams, D. A.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, R. W.; Williams, S. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Woodly, M. D.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yee, C.; Yeremian, A. D.; Yellin, S. J.; Yim, A.; Young, C. C.; Young, K. K.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zeitlin, C.; Zhou, J.; Ziemann, V.; Zolotorev, M.; Zucchelli, P.

      1993-04-01

      We present the first measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (ALR) for Z boson production by e+e- collisions. The measurement was performed at a center-of-mass energy of 91.55 GeV with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider which utilized a longitudinally polarized electron beam. The average beam polarization was (22.4+/-0.6)%. Using a sample of 10 224 Z decays, we measure ALR to be 0.100+/-0.044(stat)+/-0.004(syst), which determines the effective weak mixing angle to be sin2θeffW=0.2378 +/-0.0056(stat)+/-0.0005(syst).

    9. An e^+e^- Top Factory in a 50+50 TeV Hadron Collider Tunnel

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Norem, J.; Jagger, J.; Noonan, J.; Sharma, S.; Keil, E.; Foster, G. W.; Malamud, E.; Chojnacki, E.; Winn, D.

      1997-05-01

      We have begun to look at the parameters of an e^+e^- collider in the tunnel of a 50 + 50 TeV superferric hadron collider. This machine would be an extrapolation of LEP technology. Assuming a diameter of 170 km, a maximum radiated power of 100 MW, this collider should have a maximum energy of 500 - 600 GeV (c.m.) and should be able to produce a luminosity L = 0.9 \\cdot 10^33 cm-2sec-1 at a center of mass energy of 360 GeV, (somewhat less at higher or lower energies) which would make it useful for producing top quarks or light Higgs bosons. Design problems include the very low field magnets, synchrotron radiation power, beam stability, and vacuum systems. Preliminary magnet, vacuum chamber and cooling designs will be presented along with possible construction techniques, and some costing algorithms.

    10. Collins asymmetries in inclusive charged K K and K π pairs produced in e+e- annihilation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

      2015-12-01

      We present measurements of Collins asymmetries in the inclusive process e+e- →h1h2X , h1h2=K K , K π , π π , at the center-of-mass energy of 10.6 GeV, using a data sample of 468 fb-1 collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC National Accelerator Center. Considering hadrons in opposite thrust hemispheres of hadronic events, we observe clear azimuthal asymmetries in the ratio of unlike sign to like sign, and unlike sign to all charged h1h2 pairs, which increase with hadron energies. The K π asymmetries are similar to those measured for the π π pairs, whereas those measured for high-energy K K pairs are, in general, larger.

    11. Lepton Universality Test in the Photoproduction of e-e+ Versus μ-μ+ Pairs on a Proton Target

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pauk, Vladyslav; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

      2015-11-01

      In view of the significantly different proton charge radius extracted from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements as compared to electronic hydrogen spectroscopy or electron-scattering experiments, we study in this Letter the photoproduction of a lepton pair on a proton target in the limit of very small momentum transfer as a way to provide a test of the lepton universality when extracting the proton charge form factor. By detecting the recoiling proton in the γ p →l-l+p reaction, we show that a measurement of a ratio of e-e++μ-μ+ over e-e+ cross sections with an absolute precision of 7 ×1 0-4 would allow for a test to distinguish, at the 3 σ level, between the two different proton charge radii currently extracted from muonic and electronic observables.

    12. Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock

      SciTech Connect

      Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

      1982-04-01

      During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

    13. Effect of lipid source and oxidation level on DE, ME, and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of DM, GE, EE, N, and C in young pigs

      Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

      To evaluate the effect of lipid source and oxidation level on DE, ME, and ATTD of DM, GE, EE, N, and C of young pigs, 108 barrows (~ 6.66 kg BW) were assigned to 1 of 13 dietary treatments, including a corn-soybean meal control diet and 12 diets containing 10% lipid (corn oil, canola oil, poultry fa...

    14. 40 CFR 180.1126 - Codlure, (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

      2010-07-01

      ... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1126 Codlure, (E,E)-8,10-Dodecadien-1-ol; exemption from... inadvertent physical contact. The design of the dispenser must be such as to preclude any exposure of its components to the raw agricultural commodity (RAC) or processed foods/feeds derived from the commodity due...

    15. Proceedings of the joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference

      SciTech Connect

      Geiling, D.W.

      1993-08-01

      The joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FEE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference; was sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507-0880, August 3--5, 1993. Individual papers have been entered separately.

    16. New developments for an electron impact (e,2e)/(e,3e) spectrometer with multiangle collection and multicoincidence detection

      SciTech Connect

      Catoire, F.; Staicu-Casagrande, E. M.; Lahmam-Bennani, A.; Duguet, A.; Naja, A.; Ren, X. G.; Lohmann, B.; Avaldi, L.

      2007-01-15

      We describe new developments aimed to extend the capabilities and the sensitivity of the (e,2e)/(e,3e) multicoincidence spectrometer at Orsay University [Duguet et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 3524 (1998)]. The spectrometer has been improved by the addition of a third multiangle detection channel for the fast ''scattered'' electron. The present system is unique in that it is the only system which combines three toroidal analyzers all equipped with position sensitive detectors, thus allowing the triple coincidence detection of the three electrons present in the final state of an electron impact double ionization process. The setup allows measurement of the angular and energy distributions of the ejected electrons over almost the totality of the collision plane as well as that of the scattered electron over a large range of scattering angles in the forward direction. The resulting gain in sensitivity ({approx}25) has rendered feasible a whole class of experiments which could not be otherwise envisaged. The setup is described with a special emphasis on the new toroidal analyzer, data acquisition hardware, and data analysis procedures. The performances are illustrated by selected results of (e,2e) and (e,3e) experiments on the rare gases.

    17. Precision measurements of the e+e- →π+π- (γ) cross section with the KLOE detector

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Mandaglio, G.; Babusci, D.; Badoni, D.; Balwierz-Pytko, I.; Bencivenni, G.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Capon, G.; Ceradini, F.; Ciambrone, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Danè, E.; De Lucia, E.; De Robertis, G.; De Santis, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Salvo, R.; Domenici, D.; Erriquez, O.; Fanizzi, G.; Fantini, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gauzzi, P.; Giardina, G.; Giovannella, S.; Gonnella, F.; Graziani, E.; Happacher, F.; Heijkenskjöld, L.; Höistad, B.; Iafolla, L.; Jacewicz, M.; Johansson, T.; Kupsc, A.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Leverington, B.; Loddo, F.; Loffredo, S.; Mandaglio, G.; Martemianov, M.; Martini, M.; Mascolo, M.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Morello, G.; Moricciani, D.; Moskal, P.; Nguyen, F.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Prado Longhi, I.; Ranieri, A.; Redmer, C. F.; Santangelo, P.; Sarra, I.; Schioppa, M.; Sciascia, B.; Silarski, M.; Taccini, C.; Tortora, L.; Venanzoni, G.; Wiślicki, W.; Wolke, M.; Zdebik, J.

      2014-08-01

      The muon anomalous magnetic moment is one of the most precisely measured quantities in particle physics and a persistent discrepancy of about 3 σ between standard model (SM) prediction and the experimental measurement has been observed. The leading order contribution aμhlois actually the main source of uncertainty in the theoretical evaluation of the muon anomaly. It is obtained by a dispersion integral using the precision measurement of hadronic cross section. The KLOE experiment at the DAΦNE ϕ-factory in Frascati was the first to exploit Initial State Radiation (ISR) processes to obtain the e+e- →π+π- (γ) cross section below 1 GeV, that accounts for most (70%) of the leading order contribution to the muon anomaly. In year 2005 and 2008 the KLOE-collaboration has published two measurements of the π+π- cross section with the photon in the initial state emitted at small angle, and an independent measurement with the photon emitted at large angle was finalized in year 2011. These measurements were normalized using luminosity from Bhabha. In the last years, a new analysis of KLOE data has been performed for obtaining the pion form factor directly from the bin-by-bin π+π- γ to μ+μ- γ ratio. We present the results of this new measurement, showing the comparison with our previous measurements, and its impact on the hadronic contribution to the muon anomaly.

    18. Late effects of enriched environment (EE) plus multimodal early onset stimulation (MEOS) after traumatic brain injury in rats: Ongoing improvement of neuromotor function despite sustained volume of the CNS lesion.

      PubMed

      Lippert-Gruener, Marcela; Maegele, Marc; Garbe, Janika; Angelov, Doychin N

      2007-01-01

      Recently we showed that the combination between MEOS and EE applied to rats for 7-15 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was associated with reduced CNS lesion volume and enhanced reversal of neuromotor dysfunction. In a continuation of this work, we tested whether these effects persisted for longer post-operative periods, e.g. 30 days post-injury (dpi). Rats were subjected to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) or to sham injury. After LFP, one third of the animals (injured and sham) was placed under conditions of standard housing (SH), one third was kept in EE-only, and one third received EE+MEOS. Standardized composite neuroscore (NS) for neurological functions and computerized analysis of the vibrissal motor performance were used to assess post-traumatic neuromotor deficits. These were followed by evaluation of the cortical lesion volume (CLV) after immunostaining for neuron-specific enolase, caspase 3 active, and GFAP. Finally, the volume of cortical lesion containing regeneration-associated proteins (CLV-RAP) was determined in sections stained for GAP-43, MAP2, and neuronal class III beta-tubulin. We found (i) no differences in the vibrissal motor performance; (ii) EE+MEOS rats performed significantly better than SH rats in NS; (iii) EE-only and EE+MEOS animals, but not SH rats, showed better recovery at 30 dpi than at 15 dpi; (iv) no differences among all groups in CLV (larger than that at 15 dpi) and CLV-RAP, despite a clear tendency to reduction in the EE-only and EE+MEOS rats. We conclude that EE+MEOS retards, but cannot prevent the increase of lesion volume. This retardation is sufficient for a continuous restoration of neurological functions.

    19. Search for strange-pentaquark production in e+e- annihilation at sqrt[s] = 10.58 GeV.

      PubMed

      Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Buono, L Del; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

      2005-07-22

      We search for strange-pentaquark states that have been previously reported by other experiments--the Theta (1540)(+), Xi(5)(1860)(--), and Xi(5)(1860)(0)--in 123 fb(-1) of data recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage ring. We find no evidence for these states and set 95% confidence level upper limits on the number of Theta(1540)(+) and Xi(5)(1860)(--) pentaquarks produced per e(+)e(-) annihilation into qq and Gamma(4S) decay. For qq events the Theta(1540)(+) [Xi(5)(1860)(--)] limit is about 8 [4] times lower than the rates measured for ordinary baryons of similar mass.

    20. Search for high-mass e+e- resonances in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

      PubMed

      Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, C; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

      2009-01-23

      A search for high-mass resonances in the e+e- final state is presented based on 2.5 fb(-1) of sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV pp collision data from the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The largest excess over the standard model prediction is at an e+e- invariant mass of 240 GeV/c2. The probability of observing such an excess arising from fluctuations in the standard model anywhere in the mass range of 150-1000 GeV/c2 is 0.6% (equivalent to 2.5sigma). We exclude the standard model coupling Z' and the Randall-Sundrum graviton for k/MPl=0.1 with masses below 963 and 848 GeV/c2 at the 95% credibility level, respectively.

      1. Limit on the production of a low-mass vector boson in e+e- → Uγ, U →e+e- with the KLOE experiment

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Anastasi, A.; Babusci, D.; Bencivenni, G.; Berlowski, M.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Cao, B.; Ceradini, F.; Ciambrone, P.; Curciarello, F.; Czerwiński, E.; D'Agostini, G.; Danè, E.; De Leo, V.; De Lucia, E.; De Santis, A.; De Simone, P.; Di Cicco, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Salvo, R.; Domenici, D.; D'Uffizi, A.; Fantini, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, S.; Gajos, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Giardina, G.; Giovannella, S.; Graziani, E.; Happacher, F.; Heijkenskjöld, L.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Johansson, T.; Kamińska, D.; Krzemien, W.; Kupsc, A.; Loffredo, S.; Mandaglio, G.; Martini, M.; Mascolo, M.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Morello, G.; Moricciani, D.; Moskal, P.; Palladino, A.; Papenbrock, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Perez del Rio, E.; Ranieri, A.; Santangelo, P.; Sarra, I.; Schioppa, M.; Silarski, M.; Sirghi, F.; Tortora, L.; Venanzoni, G.; Wiślicki, W.; Wolke, M.

        2015-11-01

        The existence of a new force beyond the Standard Model is compelling because it could explain several striking astrophysical observations which fail standard interpretations. We searched for the light vector mediator of this dark force, the U boson, with the KLOE detector at the DAΦNE e+e- collider. Using an integrated luminosity of 1.54 fb-1, we studied the process e+e- → Uγ, with U →e+e-, using radiative return to search for a resonant peak in the dielectron invariant-mass distribution. We did not find evidence for a signal, and set a 90% CL upper limit on the mixing strength between the Standard Model photon and the dark photon, ε2, at 10-6-10-4 in the 5- 520 MeV /c2 mass range.

      2. Search for the Top Quark in e+e- Annihilation at \\sqrt{s}{=}50 GeV: The First Result from the VENUS Detector at TRISTAN

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Abe, Koya; Amako, Katsuya; Arai, Yasuo; Asano, Yuzo; Boerner, Herbert; Chiba, Masami; Chiba, Yasuo; Daigo, Motomasa; Emura, Tsuneo; Endo, Ichita; Fukawa, Mineo; Fukui, Toru; Fukushima, Yasutaka; Haba, Junji; Hayashibara, Izumi; Hemmi, Yasuo; Higuchi, Masato; Hirose, Tachishige; Hojyo, Yoshifumi; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hoshi, Yoshimoto; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ishihara, Nobuhiro; Kamitani, Takuya; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kikuchi, Ryusaburo; Kondo, Takahiko; Koseki, Tadashi; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kurashige, Hisaya; Maehata, Keisuke; Matsui, Takayuki; Minami, Masayuki; Miyake, Kozo; Mori, Shigeki; Nagashima, Yorikiyo; Nakagawa, Yuji; Nakamura, Teruo; Nakano, Itsuo; Noguchi, Yoshiei; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogawa, Kazuo; Ohama, Taro; Ohsugi, Takashi; Ono, Atsuo; Osabe, Hitoshi; Saito, Hitoshi; Sakae, Hisaharu; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Shizuo; Sakano, Misao; Sakuda, Makoto; Sasao, Noboru; Sato, Minoru; Shioden, Masaomi; Shirai, Junpei; Suekane, Fumihiko; Sugimoto, Shojiro; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yoichiro; Takada, Yoshihisa; Takasaki, Fumihiko; Taketani, Atsushi; Tamura, Norio; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Teramoto, Yoshiki; Tobimatsu, Keijiro; Tsuboyama, Toru; Tsukamoto, Akira; Uehara, Sadaharu; Unno, Yoshinobu; Wakai, Mikio; Wake, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Watase, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Yoshikazu; Yamagata, Taketora; Yamashita, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Hajime

        1987-11-01

        A result of the search for the top quark in e+e- annihilation into hadrons at \\sqrt{s}{=}50 GeV is presented. The experiment has been performed using the VENUS detector at TRISTAN. No evidence has been found for the production of the top quark. From the study using the event shape of the multihadron events, the upper limit of the production cross section is found to be 16 pb at the 95% confidence level.

      3. Inclusive Particle Production Data in E+E- Interactions: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

        DOE Data Explorer

        Lafferty, G. D.; Reeves, P. I.; Whalley, M. R.

        A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on inclusive particle production in e+e- interactions is presented. Data are given in both tabular and graphical form for multiplicities and inclusive differential cross sections from experiments at all of the world`s high energy e+e- colliders. To facilitate comparison between the data sets, curves are also shown from the JETSET 7.4 Monte Carlo program. (Taken from the abstract of A Compilation of Inclusive Particle Production Data in E+E- Annihilation, G.D. Lafferty, P.I. Reeves, and M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 21, Number 12A, 1995.) The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

      4. Hadronic Total Cross Sections (R) in E+E- Interactions: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

        DOE Data Explorer

        Whalley, M. R.

        A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on total hadronic cross sections, and R ratios, in e+e- interactions is presented. Published data from the Novosibirsk, Orsay, Frascati, SLAC, CORNELL, DESY, KEK and CERN e+e- colliders on both exclusive and inclusive final particle states are included from threshold energies to the highest LEP energies. The data are presented in tabular form supplemented by compilation plots of different exclusive final particle states and of different energy regions. (Taken from abstract of paper, A Compilation of Data on Hadronic Total Cross Sections in E+E- Interactions, M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 29, Number 12A, 2003). The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. The data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database, which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

      5. Integration of Long term experiments on terrestrial ecosystem in AnaEE-France Research Infrastructure : concept and adding value

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Chanzy, André; Chabbi, Abad; Houot, Sabine; Lafolie, François; Pichot, Christian; Raynal, Hélène; Saint-André, Laurent; Clobert, Jean; Greiveldinger, Lucile

        2015-04-01

        Continental ecosystems represent a critical zone that provide key ecological services to human populations like biomass production, that participate to the regulation of the global biogeochemical cycles and contribute and contribute to the maintenance of air and water quality. Global changes effects on continental ecosystems are likely to impact the fate of humanity, which is thus facing numerous challenges, such as an increasing demand for food and energy, competition for land and water use, or rapid climate warming. Hence, scientific progress in our understanding of the continental critical zone will come from studies that address how biotic and abiotic processes react to global changes. Long term experiments are required to take into account ecosystem inertia and feedback loops and to characterize trends and threshold in ecosystem dynamics. In France, 20 long-term experiments on terrestrial ecosystems are gathered within a single Research Infrastructure: ANAEE-France (http://www.anaee-s.fr), which is a part of AnaEE-Europe (http://www.anaee.com/). Each experiment consist in applying differentiated pressures on different plot over a long period (>20 years) representative of a range of management options. The originality of such infrastructure is a combination of experimental set up and long-term monitoring of simultaneous measurements of key ecosystem variables and parameters through a multi-disciplinary approach and replications of each treatment that improve the statistical strength of the results. The sites encompass gradients of climate conditions, ecosystem complexity and/or management, and can be used for calibration/validation of ecosystem functioning models as well as for the design of ecosystem management strategies. Gathering those experiments in a single research infrastructure is an important issue to enhance their visibility and increase the number of hosting scientific team by offering a range of services. These are: • Access to the ongoing long

      6. Analysis and Experimentation on Ecosystems (AnaEE): a new research distributed infrastructure to tackle ecosystem complexity.

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Chabbi, Abad; Roy, Jacques; Beier, Claus; Miglietta, Franco

        2013-04-01

        Terrestrial ecosystems represent a critical zone that provide key ecological services to human populations in the form of food, fibre and energy climate protection or nutrient recycling, to name a few. In this critical zone, human activities are directly or indirectly generating major environmental pressures, such as pollution, global warming, and the destruction and alteration of natural habitats. Altogether, these global changes result in a rapid erosion of biodiversity and a major perturbation of ecological systems and services. It is therefore vital to understand how ecological systems respond and adapt to such pressures and perturbations and to test sustainable land use and innovative green technologies in order to address societal challenges. Today, a major focus in ecological and agricultural sciences is on the production of quantitative, experimentally reproducible and testable approaches using advances in our ability to characterize complex ecological systems from genes to ecosystem levels. The need for experimental approaches that require sophisticated equipment and instruments, technological advances, and strong theoretical foundation through conceptualization and modelling of ecosystem functioning is addressed by a new ESFRI FP7 distributed research infrastructures called AnaEE (Analysis and Experimentation on Ecosystems). Such approaches are the mechanistic bases of adaptation and impacts on eco- and agrosystem functioning to be deciphered. ANAEE is setting up and offers a distributed infrastructure of open-access platforms providing facilities to conduct experiments and analyse and model complex ecological systems. ANAEE through its integrated and experimental approach to ecosystem functioning will provide a quantum leap in the quality and availability of data and projections on continental ecosystems responses to global changes and to management, enabling policy makers and stakeholders to sustainably manage ecosystem services for all citizens.

      7. Geologic Cross Section E-E' through the Appalachian Basin from the Findlay Arch, Wood County, Ohio, to the Valley and Ridge Province, Pendleton County, West Virginia

        USGS Publications Warehouse

        Ryder, Robert T.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Crangle, Robert D.; Trippi, Michael H.

        2008-01-01

        Geologic cross section E-E' is the first in a series of cross sections planned by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to document and improve understanding of the geologic framework and petroleum systems of the Appalachian basin. Cross section E-E' provides a regional view of the structural and stratigraphic framework of the basin from the Findlay arch in northwestern Ohio to the Valley and Ridge province in eastern West Virginia, a distance of approximately 380 miles (mi) (fig. 1, on sheet 1). Cross section E-E' updates earlier geologic cross sections through the central Appalachian basin by Renfro and Feray (1970), Bennison (1978), and Bally and Snelson (1980) and a stratigraphic cross section by Colton (1970). Although other published cross sections through parts of the basin show more structural detail (for example, Shumaker, 1985; Kulander and Dean, 1986) and stratigraphic detail (for example, Ryder, 1992; de Witt and others, 1993; Hettinger, 2001), these other cross sections are of more limited extent geographically and stratigraphically. Although specific petroleum systems in the Appalachian basin are not identified on the cross section, many of their key elements (such as source rocks, reservoir rocks, seals, and traps) can be inferred from lithologic units, unconformities, and geologic structures shown on the cross section. Other aspects of petroleum systems (such as the timing of petroleum generation and preferred migration pathways) may be evaluated by burial history, thermal history, and fluid flow models based on information shown on the cross section. Cross section E-E' lacks the detail to illustrate key elements of coal systems (such as paleoclimate, coal quality, and coal rank), but it does provide a general framework (stratigraphic units and general rock types) for the coal-bearing section. Also, cross section E-E' may be used as a reconnaissance tool to identify plausible geologic structures and strata for the subsurface storage of liquid waste (for

      8. EE Technical Review

        SciTech Connect

        Not Available

        1985-12-01

        Brief summaries are given of electronics engineering work, including: laser engineering, engineering research, nuclear energy systems, engineering services, and field test systems. Individual papers are abstracted separately. (LEW)

      9. EE Technical Review

        SciTech Connect

        Not Available

        1985-06-01

        Areas of research reported include: ultrafast gating of microchannel plate x-ray spectrometers, study of power MOS fast switching techniques, lightning vulnerability of nuclear explosive test systems at the Nevada Test Site, and a computer model of the MFTF-B neutral beam accel dc power supply.

      10. Study of the process e+e- → p p bar in the c.m. energy range from threshold to 2 GeV with the CMD-3 detector

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Akhmetshin, R. R.; Amirkhanov, A. N.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Banzarov, V. Sh.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Berkaev, D. E.; Bondar, A. E.; Bragin, A. V.; Eidelman, S. I.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Gribanov, S. S.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Gromov, E. M.; Ignatov, F. V.; Ivanov, V. L.; Karpov, S. V.; Kasaev, A. S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Khazin, B. I.; Kirpotin, A. N.; Koop, I. A.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kozyrev, E. A.; Krokovny, P. P.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Lukin, P. A.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Otboev, A. V.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Pivovarov, S. G.; Popov, A. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Romanov, A. L.; Ruban, A. A.; Ryskulov, N. M.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Shebalin, V. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Shwartz, B. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Sibidanov, A. L.; Shatunov, P. Yu.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Solodov, E. P.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Yudin, Yu. V.; Zharinov, Yu. M.

        2016-08-01

        Using a data sample of 7.7 pb-1 collected with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider we select about 2900 events of the process e+e- → p p bar and measure its cross section at 12 energy points with about 6% systematic uncertainty. From the angular distribution of produced nucleons we obtain the ratio GE /GM.

      11. Study of structural order in porphyrin-fullerene dyad ZnDHD6ee monolayers by electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy

        SciTech Connect

        D'yakova, Yu. A.; Suvorova, E. I.; Orekhov, Andrei S.; Orekhov, Anton S.; Alekseev, A. S.; Gainutdinov, R. V.; Klechkovskaya, V. V. Tereschenko, E. Yu.; Tkachenko, N. V.; Lemmetyinen, H.; Feigin, L. A.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

        2013-11-15

        The structure of porphyrin-fullerene dyad ZnDHD6ee monolayers formed on the surface of aqueous subphase in a Langmuir trough and transferred onto solid substrates has been studied. The data obtained are interpreted using simulation of the structure of isolated molecules and their packing in monolayer and modeling of diffraction patterns from molecular aggregates having different sizes and degrees of order. Experiments on the formation of condensed ZnDHD6ee monolayers are described. The structure of these monolayers on a water surface is analyzed using {pi}-A isotherms. The structure of the monolayers transferred onto solid substrates is investigated by electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The unit-cell parameters of two-dimensional domains, which are characteristic of molecular packing in monolayers and deposited films, are determined. Domains are found to be organized into a texture (the molecular axes are oriented by the [001] direction perpendicular to the substrate). The monolayers contain a limited number of small 3D domains.

      12. A novel laboratory technique demonstrating the influences of RHD zygosity and the RhCcEe phenotype on erythrocyte D antigen expression

        PubMed Central

        McGann, Patrick T.; Despotovic, Jenny M.; Howard, Thad A.; Ware, Russell E.

        2015-01-01

        D antigen is the most immunogenic and clinically relevant antigen within the complex Rh blood group system. Variability of D antigen expression was first described decades ago but has rarely been investigated quantitatively, particularly in the context of RHD zygosity along with RhCcEe serological phenotype. With IRB approval, 107 deidentified blood samples were analyzed. Rh phenotypes were determined serologically by saline technique using monoclonal antibodies against D, C, c, E, and e antigens. RHD zygosity was determined using both PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms and quantitative real-time PCR techniques. A novel and robust method was developed for quantitation of erythrocyte D antigen sites using calibrated microspheres and flow cytometry, allowing correlation of D antigen density with RHD zygosity and expression of Rh CcEe antigens. Subjects homozygous for RHD expressed nearly twice the number of D antigen sites compared with RHD hemizygotes (33,560 ± 8,222 for DD versus 17,720 ± 4,471 for Dd, P < 0.0001). Expression of c or E antigens was associated with significantly increased erythrocyte D antigen expression, whereas presence of C or e antigens reduced expression. These data and this novel quantitation method will be important for future studies investigating the clinical relevance of D antigen variability. PMID:22121029

      13. Identification of (E,E)-2,4-undecadienal from coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) as a highly effective deodorant compound against the offensive odor of porcine large intestine.

        PubMed

        Ikeura, Hiromi; Kohara, Kaori; Li, Xin-Xian; Kobayashi, Fumiyuki; Hayata, Yasuyoshi

        2010-10-27

        The leaves of coriander ( Coriandrum sativum L.) exhibited a strong deodorizing effect against porcine internal organs (large intestine). The effective deodorizing compounds of coriander were identified by separating the volatile component of coriander, testing the effectiveness of each fraction against the offensive odor of porcine large intestine, and then identifying the compounds by GC-MS. The volatile component of coriander was first separated into six fractions (A-F) by preparative gas chromatography, and the deodorizing activity of each of these fractions against the offensive odor was measured. Fraction D, which showed the strongest deodorizing effect, was then separated into 12 subfractions by preparative GC. The deodorant activity of each subfraction was evaluated, and the deodorant compounds were identified by GC-MS. It was discovered that (E,E)-2,4-undecadienal was the most effective deodorizing compound. The deodorizing activity of (E,E)-2,4-undecadienal on the porcine large intestine increased as with concentration, reaching almost complete deodorizing ability at 10 ppb.

      14. Observation of e+e- Annihilation into the C=+1 Hadronic Final States ρ0ρ0 and ϕρ0

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Morgan, S. E.; Watson, A. T.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu; Best, D. S.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Grenier, P.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Bard, D. J.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Lu, M.; Potter, C. T.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Galeazzi, F.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; John, M. J. J.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Panetta, J.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

        2006-09-01

        We report the first observation of e+e- annihilation into states of positive C parity, namely, ρ0ρ0 and ϕρ0. The two states are observed in the π+π-π+π- and K+K-π+π- final states, respectively, in a data sample of 225fb-1 collected by the BABAR experiment at the Positron-Electron Project II e+e- storage rings at energies near s=10.58GeV. The distributions of cos⁡θ*, where θ* is the center-of-mass polar angle of the ϕ meson or the forward ρ0 meson, suggest production by two-virtual-photon annihilation. We measure cross sections within the range |cos⁡θ*|<0.8 of σ(e+e-→ρ0ρ0)=20.7±0.7(stat)±2.7(syst)fb and σ(e+e-→ϕρ0)=5.7±0.5(stat)±0.8(syst)fb.

      15. HLB1 Is a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain-Containing Protein That Operates at the Intersection of the Exocytic and Endocytic Pathways at the TGN/EE in Arabidopsis.

        PubMed

        Sparks, J Alan; Kwon, Taegun; Renna, Luciana; Liao, Fuqi; Brandizzi, Federica; Blancaflor, Elison B

        2016-03-01

        The endomembrane system plays essential roles in plant development, but the proteome responsible for its function and organization remains largely uncharacterized in plants. Here, we identified and characterized the HYPERSENSITIVE TO LATRUNCULIN B1 (HLB1) protein isolated through a forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana for mutants with heightened sensitivity to actin-disrupting drugs. HLB1 is a plant-specific tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein of unknown function encoded by a single Arabidopsis gene. HLB1 associated with the trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosome (EE) and tracked along filamentous actin, indicating that it could link post-Golgi traffic with the actin cytoskeleton in plants. HLB1 was found to interact with the ADP-ribosylation-factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor, MIN7/BEN1 (HOPM INTERACTOR7/BREFELDIN A-VISUALIZED ENDOCYTIC TRAFFICKING DEFECTIVE1) by coimmunoprecipitation. The min7/ben1 mutant phenocopied the mild root developmental defects and latrunculin B hypersensitivity of hlb1, and analyses of ahlb1/ min7/ben1 double mutant showed that hlb1 and min7/ben1 operate in common genetic pathways. Based on these data, we propose that HLB1 together with MIN7/BEN1 form a complex with actin to modulate the function of the TGN/EE at the intersection of the exocytic and endocytic pathways in plants. PMID:26941089

      16. Limit on the production of a new vector boson in e+e- → Uγ, U → π+π- with the KLOE experiment

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Anastasi, A.; Babusci, D.; Bencivenni, G.; Berlowski, M.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Cao, B.; Ceradini, F.; Ciambrone, P.; Curciarello, F.; Czerwiński, E.; D'Agostini, G.; Danè, E.; De Leo, V.; De Lucia, E.; De Santis, A.; De Simone, P.; Di Cicco, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Salvo, R.; Domenici, D.; D'Uffizi, A.; Fantini, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, S.; Gajos, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Giardina, G.; Giovannella, S.; Graziani, E.; Happacher, F.; Heijkenskjöld, L.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Johansson, T.; Kamińska, D.; Krzemien, W.; Kupsc, A.; Loffredo, S.; Mandaglio, G.; Martini, M.; Mascolo, M.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Morello, G.; Moricciani, D.; Moskal, P.; Palladino, A.; Papenbrock, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Perez del Rio, E.; Ranieri, A.; Santangelo, P.; Sarra, I.; Schioppa, M.; Silarski, M.; Sirghi, F.; Tortora, L.; Venanzoni, G.; Wiślicki, W.; Wolke, M.

        2016-06-01

        The recent interest in a light gauge boson in the framework of an extra U(1) symmetry motivates searches in the mass range below 1 GeV. We present a search for such a particle, the dark photon, in e+e- → Uγ, U →π+π- based on 28 million e+e- →π+π- γ events collected at DAΦNE by the KLOE experiment. The π+π- production by initial-state radiation compensates for a loss of sensitivity of previous KLOE U →e+e-, μ+μ- searches due to the small branching ratios in the ρ- ω resonance region. We found no evidence for a signal and set a limit at 90% CL on the mixing strength between the photon and the dark photon, ε2, in the U mass range between 527 and 987MeV. Above 700 MeV this new limit is more stringent than previous ones.

      17. VerdEE: a new tool for the adoption of life-cycle assessment in small- and medium-sized enterprises

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Masoni, Paolo; Scimia, Emanuela; Sara, Balazs

        2001-02-01

        Data and time requirements and complex methodological problems of a detailed Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) are well-known and discussed. Its application has specific difficulties in Italian Small- and Medium- sized Enterprises (SMEs) where environmental information is generally dispersed, a short-term problem-oriented environmental management approach is common and dedicated human resources are usually missing. As a consequence, a new procedure specifically designed for SMEs, VerdEE (Verifica dell'Eco-Efficienza - Verification of Eco-Efficiency), was developed and implemented on an interactive CD-ROM. It is based on the following criteria: relying on a life cycle approach; aimed at evaluating the environmental profile of a product and at identifying improvement opportunities; sufficiently simple to be applied in a limited time; containing as much quantitative information as possible to make it usable by a non-expert user. The VerdEE procedure includes four main steps: "Goal and Scope definition" semi-quantitative "Inventory" "Check-list" visualisation of results in "Matrix" and "Target-plot" form. The procedure is supported by an interconnected informative part about advantages of the life cycle approach for SMEs, principles of eco-design and environmental concerns.

      18. Precision Measurement of the (e^{+}+e^{-}) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

        PubMed

        Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

        2014-11-28

        We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e^{+}+e^{-}) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e^{+}+e^{-}) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=-3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale).

      19. Measurement of d sigma/dM and forward-backward charge asymmetry for high-mass Drell-Yan e(+)e(-) pairs from pp macro collisions at square root of s = 1.8 TeV.

        PubMed

        Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Akopian, A; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bokhari, W; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Connolly, A; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Groer, L; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C Y; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thompson, A S; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tollestrup, A; Tonelli, D; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; de Troconiz, J F; Tseng, J; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wallace, N B; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Webb, R; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Worm, S; Wu, X; Wyss, J; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

        2001-09-24

        We report on a measurement of the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry, A(FB), and production cross section d sigma/dM for e(+)e(-) pairs with mass M(ee)>40 GeV/c(2). The data sample consists of 108 pb(-1) of pp macro collisions at square root of s = 1.8 TeV taken by the Collider Detector at Fermilab during 1992-1995. The measured asymmetry and d sigma/dM are compared with the predictions of the standard model and a model with an extra Z' gauge boson. PMID:11580576

      20. Precision Measurement of the (e^{+}+e^{-}) Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

        PubMed

        Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

        2014-11-28

        We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e^{+}+e^{-}) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e^{+}+e^{-}) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index γ=-3.170±0.008(stat+syst)±0.008(energy scale). PMID:25494065

      1. QCD corrections to J/ψ plus ηc production in e+e- annihilation at s=10.6GeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Gong, Bin; Wang, Jian-Xiong

        2008-03-01

        Next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to J/ψ plus ηc production in e+e- annihilation at s=10.6GeV are calculated in this paper, and an analytic result is obtained. By choosing proper physical parameters, a K factor (ratio of next-to-leading order to LO) of about 2, which is in agreement with the result in Y.-J. Zhang, Y.-j. Gao, and K.-T. Chao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 092001 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.092001, is obtained. The plot of the K factor vs the center-of-mass energy s shows that it is more difficult to obtain a convergent result from the perturbative QCD without resummation of ln⁡(s/mc2) terms as the s becomes larger.

      2. eVerdEE: a web-based screening life-cycle assessment tool for European small and medium-sized enterprises

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Naldesi, Luciano; Buttol, Patrizia; Masoni, Paolo; Misceo, Monica; Sára, Balázs

        2004-12-01

        "eLCA" is a European Commission financed project aimed at realising "On line green tools and services for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs)". Knowledge and use of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) by SMEs are strategic to introduce the Integrated Product Policy (IPP) in Europe, but methodology simplification is needed. LCA requires a large amount of validated general and sector specific data. Since their availability and cost can be insuperable barriers for SMEs, pre-elaborated data/meta-data, use of standards and low cost solutions are required. Within the framework of the eLCA project an LCA software - eVerdEE - based on a simplified methodology and specialised for SMEs has been developed. eVerdEE is a web-based tool with some innovative features. Its main feature is the adaptation of ISO 14040 requirements to offer easy-to-handle functions with solid scientific bases. Complex methodological problems, such as the system boundaries definition, the data quality estimation and documentation, the choice of impact categories, are simplified according to the SMEs" needs. Predefined "Goal and Scope definition" and "Inventory" forms, a user-friendly and well structured procedure are time and cost-effective. The tool is supported by a database containing pre-elaborated environmental indicators of substances and processes for different impact categories. The impact assessment is calculated automatically by using the user"s input and the database values. The results have different levels of interpretation in order to identify the life cycle critical points and the improvement options. The use of a target plot allows the direct comparison of different design alternatives.

      3. Production of Y (4260 ) as a hadronic molecule state of D ¯ D1+c .c . in e+e- annihilations

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Qin, Wen; Xue, Si-Run; Zhao, Qiang

        2016-09-01

        We study the Y (4260 ) production mechanism in e+e- annihilations in the framework of hadronic molecules and investigate the consequence of such a picture in different decay channels. In the hadronic molecule picture the Y (4260 ) is described as a mixture state composed of a long-ranged D ¯ D1(2420 )+c .c . molecule state and a compact c c ¯ component. We show that the compositeness relation can still provide a reasonable constraint on the wave function renormalization parameter due to the dominance of the molecular component. Such a mechanism can be regarded as a natural consequence of the heavy quark spin symmetry (HQSS) breaking. This study elaborates the molecular picture for the Y (4260 ) in the e+e- annihilations and affirms that the cross section line shape of e+e-→D ¯D*π +c .c . in the vicinity of the Y (4260 ) should have a nontrivial behavior. In this framework we predict that the upper limit of the Y (4260 ) leptonic decay width is about 500 eV. We also investigate the coupling for D1(2420 )→D*π in the 3P0 quark model and examine the possible HQSS breaking effects due to the deviation from the |1P1⟩ and |3P1⟩ ideal mixing. This in turn provides a constraint on the HQSS breaking coupling for the Y (4260 ) to D ¯D1(2420 )+c .c . via its c c ¯ component.

      4. What Do I "S"ee? What Do I "T"hink? What Do I "W"onder? (STW): A Visual Literacy Strategy To Help Emergent Readers Focus on Storybook Illustrations.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Richards, Janet C.; Anderson, Nancy A.

        2003-01-01

        Explains a strategy called "What Do I 'S'ee? What Do I 'T'hink? What Do I 'W'onder?" (STW) which helps students look carefully at pictures in storybooks and think about a story's character, setting, and events. Notes that the STW strategy provides opportunities for students with varying reading abilities and diverse experiences to work together…

      5. Challenge with 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) during early development persistently impairs growth, differentiation, and local expression of IGF-I and IGF-II in immune organs of tilapia.

        PubMed

        Shved, Natallia; Berishvili, Giorgi; Häusermann, Eliane; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Eppler, Elisabeth

        2009-03-01

        The enormous expansion of world-wide aquaculture has led to increasing interest in the regulation of fish immune system. Estrogen has recently been shown to inhibit the endocrine (liver-derived) and autocrine/paracrine local insulin-like growth factor-I system in fish. In order to address the potential actions of estrogen on the IGF system in immune organs, tilapia were fed with 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2)-enriched food from 10 to 40 days post fertilization (DPF) to induce functional feminization, an approach commonly used in aquaculture. EE2-treated and control fish were sampled at 75 and 165 DPF. The expression levels of ER-alpha, IGF-I, IGF-II and growth hormone receptor (GH-R) mRNA in spleen and head kidney were determined by real-time PCR and the expressing sites of IGF-I mRNA identified by in situ hybridisation. Ratios of spleen length and weight to body length and weight were determined. At 165 DPF, the length (4.9% vs. 7.6%) and weight (0.084% vs. 0.132%) ratios were significantly lowered in EE2-treated fish and number and size of the melanomacrophage centres were considerably reduced. At 75 DPF, both in spleen and head kidney of EE2-treated fish the expression levels of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA were markedly diminished. The suppression was more pronounced for IGF-I (spleen: -12.071-fold; head kidney: -8.413-fold) than for IGF-II (spleen: -4.102-fold; head kidney: -1.342-fold). In agreement, clearly fewer leucocytes and macrophages in head kidney and spleen of EE2-treated fish contained IGF-I mRNA as shown by in situ hybridisation. ER-alpha mRNA expression in spleen was increased at 75 DPF but unchanged in head kidney. GH-R gene expression showed a mild upregulation at 165 DPF in both tissues. Thus, exposure to EE2 during early development affected distinctly the IGF system in tilapia immune organs. It led to lasting impairment of spleen growth and differentiation that can be attributed to an interaction of EE2 with IGF-I and, less pronouncedly, IGF

      6. Experimental limits on extra-Z bosons from e+e- annihilation data with the VENUS detector at sqrt(s)=50-64 GeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Abe, K.; Amako, K.; Arai, Y.; Asano, Y.; Chiba, M.; Chiba, Y.; Daigo, M.; Emura, T.; Endo, I.; Fukawa, M.; Fukui, T.; Fukushima, Y.; Haba, J.; Hayashibara, I.; Hemmi, Y.; Higuchi, M.; Hirose, T.; Hojyo, Y.; Homma, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Ikegami, Y.; Ishihara, N.; Kamitani, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Kikuchi, R.; Kondo, T.; Koseki, T.; Kubo, K.; Kurashige, H.; Matsui, T.; Minami, M.; Miyake, K.; Mori, S.; Nagashima, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Narita, Y.; Odaka, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ohama, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Okamoto, A.; Ono, A.; Osabe, H.; Oyama, T.; Saito, H.; Sakae, H.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakamoto, S.; Sakano, M.; Sakuda, M.; Sasao, N.; Sato, M.; Shioden, M.; Shirai, J.; Shirakata, M.; Suekane, F.; Sugimoto, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Takada, Y.; Takasaki, F.; Taketani, A.; Takita, M.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, R.; Terunuma, N.; Tobimatsu, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Tsukamoto, A.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Utsumi, M.; Wakai, M.; Watanabe, T.; Watase, Y.; Yabuki, F.; Yamada, Y.; Yamagata, T.; Yamashita, T.; Yonezawa, Y.; Yoshida, H.

        1990-08-01

        We have tested extra Z models in the reactions e+e--->μ+μ-, τ+τ- and hadrons in the energy range 50e+e- storage ring. Our data are in good agreement with the standard model prediction (χ2/NDf=2.9/31)). We have obtained 90% confidence-level lower limits of 105, 125 and 231 GeV for the masses of ZΨ, Zη and Zχ bosons which are expected from the E6 grand unified theory. We also place a 90% confidence-level lower limit of 426 GeV for the mass of an extra-Z boson whose couplings to quarks and leptons are assumed to be the same as those for the standard Z boson. Our results exceed the previous experimental limits from the pp collider experiments, although there have been some combined analyses reporting the limits better than those obtained in the present analysis.

      7. Photoproduction of 7pi0 on hydrogen with CLAS from 1.1 GeV - 5.45 GeV using e+e --gamma decay

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Kunkel, Michael C.

        Photoproduction of the pi0 meson was studied using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using tagged incident photon energies spanning the range Egamma = 1.1 GeV - 5.45 GeV. The measurement is performed on a liquid hydrogen target in the reaction gammap → pe +e--(gamma). The final state of the reaction is the sum of two subprocesses for pi0 decay, the Dalitz decay mode of gamma0 → e +e--gamma and conversion mode where one photon from pi0 → gammagamma decay is converted into a e+e -- pair. This specific final state reaction avoided limitations caused by single prompt track triggering, while the span of incident photon energies allowed for measurements of gamma0 photoproduction to a domain never systematically measured before. We report the measurement of the gamma0 differential cross sections dsigma/dO and dsigma/dt. The angular distributions agree well with the SAID parametrization for incident beam energies below 3 GeV. As a result with this new data, the chi2/p.d.f. of the global fit in the SAID parametrization improved to 3.1 from 3.7. For incident beam energies greater than 3 GeV a comparison of a model based on Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD) with experimental data shows significant discrepancy, requiring further model developments to describe the data.

      8. Measurements of the reaction e/+/e/-/ yielding gamma-gamma at center-of-mass energies in the range 6.2-7.4 GeV

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Hilger, E.; Beron, B. L.; Carrington, R. L.; Ford, R. L.; Hill, W. T.; Hofstadter, R.; Hughes, E. B.; Liberman, A. D.; Martin, T. W.; Oneill, L. H.

        1977-01-01

        The cross section for the pair-annihilation reaction e(+)e(-) yields gamma-gamma were measured at center-of-mass energies in the range 6.2-7.4 GeV and at production angles close to 90 deg. The experimental apparatus consisted of two identical spectrometers which were set to view the luminous region at SPEAR-II from opposite directions at an azimuthal angle of 45 deg. In each spectrometer there was a NaI(TI) crystal 20 radiation lengths thick and 30 in. in diameter to measure the gamma-ray energies. Annihilation events were detected by an electronic trigger which required only the observation in coincidence of more than 0.2 GeV in each NaI(TI) crystal within + or - 15 nsec of the crossing beams. The observed rates of pair-annihilation events were found to be in agreement with those expected from quantum electrodynamics (QED) at all the center-of-mass energies used.

      9. Inclusive cross sections for pairs of identified light charged hadrons and for single protons in e+e- at √{s }=10.58 GeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Seidl, R.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Dash, N.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsu, C.-L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yelton, J.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Belle Collaboration

        2015-11-01

        We report the first double differential cross sections of two charged pions and kaons (e+e-→h h X ) in electron-positron annihilation as a function of the fractional energies of the two hadrons for any charge and hadron combination. The dependence of these dihadron cross sections on the topology (same, opposite hemisphere or anywhere) is also studied with the help of the event shape variable thrust and its axis. The ratios of these dihadron cross sections for different charges and hadron combinations directly shed light on the contributing fragmentation functions. For example, we find that the ratio of same-sign pion pairs over opposite-sign pion pairs drops toward higher fractional energies where disfavored fragmentation is expected to be suppressed. These dihadron results are obtained from a 655 fb-1 data sample collected near the ϒ (4 S ) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. Extending the previously published single-pion and single-kaon cross sections, single-proton (e+e-→p X ) cross sections are extracted from a 159 fb-1 data subsample.

      10. Stellar dynamics in E+E pairs of galaxies. 1: NGC 741/742, 1587/88 and 2672/73. The data

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Bonfanti, P.; Rampazzo, R.; Combes, F.; Prugniel, P.; Sulentic, J. W.

        1995-05-01

        We present a kinematic study ofthree E+E galaxy pairs, NGC, 741/642, 1587/1588 (CPG 99) and 2672/2673 (CPG 175) All three pairs show a similar morpological distortion (i.e. the off-centering of inner versus outer isphototes; Davoust & Prungniel 1988) which is ascribed to the ongoing interaction. The data was obtained at the CFHT equipped with the Herzberg Spectrograph at a resolution of 0.88 A px-1 NGC741 and 2673 show significant rotation along the apparent minor axis. Both components of CPG 99 rotate very fast (with no evidence for rotation along the mirror axis of either component). None of the galaxies show abnormally high central velocity dispersion. We report some of the first clear detections of well defined velocity dispersions curves for interacting pairs. They show a systematic decrease with distance from the center, as expected for normal ellipticals. They do not show obvious heating in the outer parts as was previously reported. NGC 741 and 2672 show, respectively, possible U and inverse U-shaped structure in their velocity profiles.

      11. Single differential projectile ionization cross sections d σ/dEe for 50 AMeV U28+ in the ESR storage ring

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Hagmann, Siegbert; Hillenbrand, Pierre-Michel; Stoehlker, Thomas; Litvinov, Yuri; Appa-Sparc Collaboration

        2013-05-01

        The very high intensity beams of relativistic high Z ions with incident collision energies up to 2.7AGeV requested for experiments using the SIS100 synchrotron of FAIR require that 1.3 1011 ions at 2.6Hz be injected from SIS12/18 into SIS100. The needed luminosity of the beam can only be achieved for such high Z ions when - considering the space charge limit (~A/q2) - a low charge state q of the ion to be accelerated keeps the particle density at the highest feasible level. For a thorough understanding of beam loss it is imperative that the mechanisms active in projectile ionization be understood quantitatively to provide benchmarks for advancedab initio theories beyond first order. We have embarked on an experimental investigation of single differential projectile ionization cross sections d σ/dEe (SDCS) for single and multiple ionization of U28+in the ESR storage ring by measuring the electron loss to continuum (ELC) cusp at 00 with respect to the beam axis employing our imaging forward electron spectrometer. This was motivated by the high relative fraction of multiple ionization estimated to exceed 40%. We report first results for absolute projectile ionization SDCS for U28+. We find a remarkably high asymmetry for the ELC cusp. This is at strong variance with the line shape expected for validity of first order theories.

      12. Determination of preferential molecular orientation in porphyrin-fullerene dyad ZnDHD6ee monolayers by the X-ray standing-wave method and X-ray reflectometry

        SciTech Connect

        Seregin, A. Yu. D'yakova, Yu. A.; Yakunin, S. N.; Makhotkin, I. A.; Alekseev, A. S.; Klechkovskaya, V. V.; Tereschenko, E. Yu.; Tkachenko, N. V.; Lemmetyinen, H.; Feigin, L. A.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

        2013-11-15

        Monolayers of porphyrin-fullerene dyad molecules with zinc atoms incorporated into the porphyrin ring (ZnDHD6ee) on the surface of aqueous subphase and on Si substrates have been investigated by the X-ray standing-wave method and X-ray reflectometry. The experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions and on synchrotron radiation sources (KMC-2 station of BESSY II (Berlin) and Langmuir station at the National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute'). Depth distributions of Zn atoms and electron density in the monolayer film are calculated. On the basis of the analysis of these distributions, it is concluded that ZnDHD6ee dyad molecules in monolayers have preferential orientation. The data obtained indicate that the molecules in monolayer film retain their orientation when the monolayer is transferred from a liquid subphase surface onto a solid substrate.

      13. ee4fγ—A program for e+e-→4f,4f γ with nonzero fermion masses

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Kołodziej, Karol; Jegerlehner, Fred

        2004-05-01

        A computer program ee4fγ for calculating cross-sections of any four fermion final state of e+e--annihilation at high energy and the corresponding bremsstrahlung reaction that is possible in the framework of the Standard Model is presented. As the fermion masses are arbitrary, the cross-sections for channels that do not contain e+ and/or e- in the final state can be computed without any collinear cut, the on-shell top quark production can be studied and the Higgs boson exchange can be incorporated in a consistent way. The program can be used as a Monte Carlo generator of unweighted events as well. Program summaryTitle of program:ee4fγ Version: 1.0 (February 2004) Catalogue identifier: ADTQ Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTQ Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Computers: all Operating systems: Unix/Linux Programming language used:FORTRAN 90 CPC Program Library subprograms used:RANLUX, ACPR RANLUX 79 (1994) 111—a random number generator Memory required to execute with typical data: 4.0 Mb No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 364 490 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 45 278 Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of physical problem: Description of all e+e-→4 fermions and corresponding bremsstrahlung reactions that are possible in the Standard Model (SM) to lowest order and with nonzero fermion masses at center of mass energies typical for next generation linear colliders. Such reactions are relevant, typically, for W-pair or intermediate mass Higgs boson production and decay. Method of solution: Matrix elements are calculated with the helicity amplitude method. The phase space integration is performed numerically utilizing a multi-channel Monte Carlo method. Restrictions on complexity of the problem: No higher order effects are taken into account, except for assuming the fine

      14. Contrasted Fitness Costs of Docking and Antibacterial Constructs in the EE and EVida3 Strains Validates Two-Phase Anopheles gambiae Genetic Transformation System.

        PubMed

        Paton, Doug; Underhill, Anne; Meredith, Janet; Eggleston, Paul; Tripet, Frederic

        2013-01-01

        The deployment of transgenic mosquitoes carrying genes for refractoriness to malaria has long been seen as a futuristic scenario riddled with technical difficulties. The integration of anti-malarial effector genes and a gene-drive system into the mosquito genome without affecting mosquito fitness is recognized as critical to the success of this malaria control strategy. Here we conducted detailed fitness studies of two Anopheles gambiae s.s. transgenic lines recently developed using a two-phase targeted genetic transformation system. In replicated cage-invasion experiments, males and females of the EE Phase-1 docking strain and EVida3 Phase-2 strain loaded with an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) expressed upon blood-feeding, were mixed with individuals of a recently-colonized strain of the Mopti chromosomal form. The experimental design enabled us to detect initial strain reproductive success differences, assortative mating and hybrid vigor that may characterize mosquito release situations. In addition, the potential fitness costs of the unloaded Phase-1 and loaded Phase-2 genetic constructs, independent of the strains' original genetic backgrounds, were estimated between the 1(st) instar larvae, pupae and adult stages over 10 generations. The Phase-1 unloaded docking cassette was found to have significantly lower allelic fitness relative to the wild type allele during larval development. However, overall genotypic fitness was comparable to the wild type allele across all stages leading to stable equilibrium in all replicates. In contrast, the Phase-2 construct expressing EVida3 disappeared from all replicates within 10 generations due to lower fitness of hemi- and homozygous larvae, suggesting costly background AMP expression and/or of the DsRed2 marker. This is the first study to effectively partition independent fitness stage-specific determinants in unloaded and loaded transgenic strains of a Phase-1-2 transformation system. Critically, the high fitness of the

      15. Evidence for e+e- →γχc1,2 at center-of-mass energies from 4.009 to 4.360 GeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Ablikim, M.; N. Achasov, M.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; J. Ambrose, D.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; R. Baldini, Ferroli; Ban, Y.; W. Bennett, D.; V. Bennett, J.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; A. Briere, R.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; A. Cetin, S.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; F. De, Mori; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; P. Guo, Y.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; A. Harris, F.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; C. Ke, B.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; B. Kolcu, O.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; S. Lange, J.; M., Lara; Larin, P.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; X. Lin(Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; L. Liu, C.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhiqing, Liu; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; E. Maas, F.; Maggiora, M.; A. Malik, Q.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; G. Messchendorp, J.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; E. Mitchell, R.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; C. Morales, Morales; Moriya, K.; Yu. Muchnoi, N.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; B. Nikolaev, I.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; H. Rashid, K.; F. Redmer, C.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; R. Shepherd, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; H. Thorndike, E.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; S. Varner, G.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; D. Wang(Yadi, Y.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; A. Zafar, A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

        2015-04-01

        Using data samples collected at center-of-mass energies of √s = 4.009, 4.230, 4.260, and 4.360 GeV with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider, we perform a search for the process e+e- → γχcJ (J=0, 1, 2) and find evidence for e+e- → γχc1 and e+e- → γχc2 with statistical significances of 3.0σ and 3.4σ, respectively. The Born cross sections σB(e+e- → γχcJ), as well as their upper limits at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) are determined at each center-of-mass energy. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079008, 11179007, U1232201, U1332201, U1232107), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (10935007, 11121092, 11125525, 11235011, 11322544, 11335008), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program, CAS (KJCX2-YW-N29, KJCX2-YW-N45), 100 Talents Program of CAS, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology; German Research Foundation DFG (Collaborative Research Center CRC-1044), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (14-07-91152), U. S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, University of Groningen (RuG) and Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt, WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0)

      16. Evidence of a broad structure at an invariant mass of 4.32 GeV/c2 in the reaction e+e- --> pi+pi-psi(2S) measured at BABAR.

        PubMed

        Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P

        2007-05-25

        We present a measurement of the cross section of the process e(+)e(-)-->pi(+)pi(-)psi(2S) from threshold up to 8 GeV center-of-mass energy using events containing initial-state radiation, produced at the SLAC PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage rings. The study is based on 298 fb(-1) of data recorded with the BABAR detector. A structure is observed in the cross section not far above threshold, near 4.32 GeV. We also investigate the compatibility of this structure with the Y(4260) previously reported by this experiment. PMID:17677767

      17. Measurement of the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs using charm-tagged events in e+e- collisions at square root s=10.58 GeV.

        PubMed

        Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M

        2007-04-01

        Using 230.2 fb-1 of e+e- annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at and near the peak of the Upsilon(4S) resonance, 489+/-55 events containing the pure leptonic decay Ds+-->micro;+numicro have been isolated in charm-tagged events. The ratio of partial widths Gamma(D+-->micro+numicro)/Gamma(Ds+-->phipi+) is measured to be 0.143+/-0.018+/-0.006 allowing a determination of the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs=(283+/-17+/-7+/-14) MeV. The errors are statistical, systematic, and from the Ds+-->phipi+ branching ratio, respectively. PMID:17501265

      18. Measurement of the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs using charm-tagged events in e+e- collisions at square root s=10.58 GeV.

        PubMed

        Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

        2007-04-01

        Using 230.2 fb-1 of e+e- annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at and near the peak of the Upsilon(4S) resonance, 489+/-55 events containing the pure leptonic decay Ds+-->micro;+numicro have been isolated in charm-tagged events. The ratio of partial widths Gamma(D+-->micro+numicro)/Gamma(Ds+-->phipi+) is measured to be 0.143+/-0.018+/-0.006 allowing a determination of the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs=(283+/-17+/-7+/-14) MeV. The errors are statistical, systematic, and from the Ds+-->phipi+ branching ratio, respectively.

      19. ZFITTER: a semi-analytical program for fermion pair production in ee annihilation, from version 6.21 to version 6.42

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Arbuzov, A. B.; Awramik, M.; Czakon, M.; Freitas, A.; Grünewald, M. W.; Mönig, K.; Riemann, S.; Riemann, T.

        2006-05-01

        ZFITTER is a Fortran program for the calculation of fermion pair production and radiative corrections at high energy ee colliders; it is also suitable for other applications where electroweak radiative corrections appear. ZFITTER is based on a semi-analytical approach to the calculation of radiative corrections in the Standard Model. We present a summary of new features of the ZFITTER program version 6.42 compared to version 6.21. The most important additions are: (i) some higher-order QED corrections to fermion pair production, (ii) electroweak one-loop corrections to atomic parity violation, (iii) electroweak one-loop corrections to νν production, (iv) electroweak two-loop corrections to the W boson mass and the effective weak mixing angle. Program summaryTitle of program:ZFITTER version 6.42 (18 May 2005) Catalogue identifier:ADMJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADMJ_v2_0 Authors of original program: D. Bardin, P. Christova, M. Jack, L. Kalinovskaya, A. Olshevski, S. Riemann, T. Riemann Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Reference for ZFITTER version 6.21: D. Bardin et al., Comput. Phys. Comm. 133 (2001) 229-395 Operating system:UNIX/LINUX, program tested under, e.g., HP-UX and PC/Linux Programming language used:FORTRAN 77 High speed storage required: <2 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:29 164 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:185 824 Distribution format:tar.gz Does the new version supersede the previous version:Yes Nature of the physical problem: Fermion pair production is an important reaction for precision tests of the Standard Model, at LEP/SLC and future linear colliders at higher energies. For this purpose, QED, electroweak and QCD radiative corrections have to be calculated with high precision, including higher order effects. Multi parameter fits used to extract model parameters from experimental measurements

      20. HLB1 Is a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain-Containing Protein That Operates at the Intersection of the Exocytic and Endocytic Pathways at the TGN/EE in Arabidopsis[OPEN

        PubMed Central

        Sparks, J. Alan; Renna, Luciana; Liao, Fuqi; Brandizzi, Federica

        2016-01-01

        The endomembrane system plays essential roles in plant development, but the proteome responsible for its function and organization remains largely uncharacterized in plants. Here, we identified and characterized the HYPERSENSITIVE TO LATRUNCULIN B1 (HLB1) protein isolated through a forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana for mutants with heightened sensitivity to actin-disrupting drugs. HLB1 is a plant-specific tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein of unknown function encoded by a single Arabidopsis gene. HLB1 associated with the trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosome (EE) and tracked along filamentous actin, indicating that it could link post-Golgi traffic with the actin cytoskeleton in plants. HLB1 was found to interact with the ADP-ribosylation-factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor, MIN7/BEN1 (HOPM INTERACTOR7/BREFELDIN A-VISUALIZED ENDOCYTIC TRAFFICKING DEFECTIVE1) by coimmunoprecipitation. The min7/ben1 mutant phenocopied the mild root developmental defects and latrunculin B hypersensitivity of hlb1, and analyses of a hlb1/ min7/ben1 double mutant showed that hlb1 and min7/ben1 operate in common genetic pathways. Based on these data, we propose that HLB1 together with MIN7/BEN1 form a complex with actin to modulate the function of the TGN/EE at the intersection of the exocytic and endocytic pathways in plants. PMID:26941089

      1. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Charge Asymmetry($A_{FB}$) using $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma*\\rightarrow e^+e^-$ events in $\\sqrt{S} = 1.96$ TeV

        SciTech Connect

        Yin, Hang

        2010-06-01

        This dissertation describes a measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry(AFB) in p$\\bar{p}$ → Z/γ* → ee events using 5.0 fb-1 data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The AFB is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the electron-positron pair. Along with obtaining normalized differential cross section 1/σ x dσ/dM and Z to light quark couplings, we measured the Standard Model(SM) fundamental parameter, the effective weak mixing angle sin2 θ$lept\\atop{eff}$, with an unprecedented precise in light quark sector, namely the single D0 measurement has surpassed the LEP combination of four experiment results of inclusive hadronic charge asymmetry.

      2. Measurement of the shape of the boson-transverse momentum distribution in pp --> Z/gamma* --> e+e- + X events produced at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

        PubMed

        Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

        2008-03-14

        We present a measurement of the shape of the Z/gamma* boson transverse momentum (q(T)) distribution in pp --> Z/gamma* --> e(+)e(-) + X events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using 0.98 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data are found to be consistent with the resummation prediction at low q(T), but above the perturbative QCD calculation in the region of q(T)>30 GeV/c. Using events with q(T)<30 GeV/c, we extract the value of g(2), one of the nonperturbative parameters for the resummation calculation. Data at large boson rapidity y are compared with the prediction of resummation and with alternative models that employ a resummed form factor with modifications in the small Bjorken x region of the proton wave function. PMID:18352175

      3. Determination of αs at NLO*+NNLL from a global fit of the low-z parton-tohadron fragmentation functions in e+e- and DIS collisions

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Pérez-Ramos, Redamy; d'Enterria, David

        2015-03-01

        The QCD coupling αs is determined from a combined analysis of experimental e+e- and e±p jet data confronted to theoretical predictions of the energy evolution of the parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions (FFs) moments -multiplicity, peak, width, skewness- at low fractional hadron momentum z. The impact of approximate next-to-leading order (NLO*) corrections plus next-to-next-to-leading log (NNLL) resummations, compared to previous LO+NLL calculations, is discussed. A global fit of the full set of existing data, amounting to 360 FF moments at collision energies √s ≈ 1-200 GeV, results in αs(mZ2) = 0.1189-0.0014+0.0025 at the Z mass.

      4. First measurement of the angular coefficients of Drell-Yan e(+)e(-) pairs in the Z mass region from pp¯ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV.

        PubMed

        Aaltonen, T; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Griso, S Pagan; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; Stanitzki, M; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

        2011-06-17

        We report on the first measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in pp¯ → γ*/Z → e(+)e(-) + X events produced in the Z boson mass region at √s1.96 TeV. The data sample collected by the CDF II detector for this result corresponds to 2.1  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity. The angular distributions are studied as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair and show good agreement with the Lam-Tung relation, consistent with a spin-1 description of the gluon, and demonstrate that, at high values of the transverse momentum, Z bosons are produced via quark-antiquark annihilation and quark-gluon Compton processes.

      5. Measurement of $d\\sigma/dy$ of Drell-Yan $e^+e^-$ pairs in the $Z$ Mass Region from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

        SciTech Connect

        Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Adelman, Jahred A.; Gonzalez, Barbara Alvarez; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A.; Apresyan, Artur; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

        2010-03-01

        We report on a CDF measurement of the total cross section and rapidity distribution, d{sigma}/dy, for q{bar q} {yields} {gamma}{sup *}/Z {yields} e{sup +} e {sup -} events in the Z boson mass region (66 < M {sub ee} < 116 GeV/c {sub 2}) produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured cross section of 257 {+-} 16pb and d{sigma}/dy distribution are compared with Next-to-Leading-Order (NLO) and Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order (NNLO) QCD theory predictions with CTEQ and MRST/MSTW parton distribution functions (PDFs). There is good agreement between the experimental total cross section and d{sigma}/dy measurements with theoretical calcualtion with the most recent NNLO PDFs.

      6. INDICATIONS OF INTERMEDIATE-SCALE ANISOTROPY OF COSMIC RAYS WITH ENERGY GREATER THAN 57 EeV IN THE NORTHERN SKY MEASURED WITH THE SURFACE DETECTOR OF THE TELESCOPE ARRAY EXPERIMENT

        SciTech Connect

        Abbasi, R. U.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Hanlon, W.; Abe, M.; Azuma, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; and others

        2014-08-01

        We have searched for intermediate-scale anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays with energies above 57 EeV in the northern sky using data collected over a 5 yr period by the surface detector of the Telescope Array experiment. We report on a cluster of events that we call the hotspot, found by oversampling using 20° radius circles. The hotspot has a Li-Ma statistical significance of 5.1σ, and is centered at R.A. = 146.°7, decl. = 43.°2. The position of the hotspot is about 19° off of the supergalactic plane. The probability of a cluster of events of 5.1σ significance, appearing by chance in an isotropic cosmic-ray sky, is estimated to be 3.7 × 10{sup –4} (3.4σ)

      7. Investigation of the effects of subchronic low dose oral exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) on estrogen receptor expression in the juvenile and adult female rat hypothalamus.

        PubMed

        Rebuli, Meghan E; Cao, Jinyan; Sluzas, Emily; Delclos, K Barry; Camacho, Luísa; Lewis, Sherry M; Vanlandingham, Michelle M; Patisaul, Heather B

        2014-07-01

        Concerns have been raised regarding the long-term impacts of early life exposure to the ubiquitous environmental contaminant bisphenol A (BPA) on brain organization. Because BPA has been reported to affect estrogen signaling, and steroid hormones play a critical role in brain sexual differentiation, there is also concern that BPA exposure could alter neural sex differences. Here, we examine the impact of subchronic exposure from gestation to adulthood to oral doses of BPA below the current no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of 5 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day on estrogen receptor (ESR) expression in sexually dimorphic brain regions of prepubertal and adult female rats. The dams were gavaged daily with vehicle (0.3% carboxymethylcellulose), 2.5, 25, 260, or 2700 μg BPA/kg bw/day, or 0.5 or 5.0 μg ethinyl estradiol (EE)/kg bw/day from gestational day 6 until labor began. Offspring were then gavaged directly from the day after birth until the day before scheduled sacrifice on postnatal days 21 or 90. Using in situ hybridization, one or more BPA doses produced significant decreases in Esr1 expression in the juvenile female rat anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) of the hypothalamus and significant decreases in Esr2 expression in the adult female rat AVPV and medial preoptic area (MPOA), relative to vehicle controls. BPA did not simply reproduce EE effects, indicating that BPA is not acting solely as an estrogen mimic. The possible consequences of long-term changes in hypothalamic ESR expression resulting from subchronic low dose BPA exposure on neuroendocrine effects are discussed and being addressed in ongoing, related work.

      8. Investigation of the Effects of Subchronic Low Dose Oral Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) and Ethinyl Estradiol (EE) on Estrogen Receptor Expression in the Juvenile and Adult Female Rat Hypothalamus

        PubMed Central

        Rebuli, Meghan E.; Cao, Jinyan; Sluzas, Emily; Delclos, K. Barry; Camacho, Luísa; Lewis, Sherry M.; Vanlandingham, Michelle M.; Patisaul, Heather B.

        2014-01-01

        Concerns have been raised regarding the long-term impacts of early life exposure to the ubiquitous environmental contaminant bisphenol A (BPA) on brain organization. Because BPA has been reported to affect estrogen signaling, and steroid hormones play a critical role in brain sexual differentiation, there is also concern that BPA exposure could alter neural sex differences. Here, we examine the impact of subchronic exposure from gestation to adulthood to oral doses of BPA below the current no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of 5 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day on estrogen receptor (ESR) expression in sexually dimorphic brain regions of prepubertal and adult female rats. The dams were gavaged daily with vehicle (0.3% carboxymethylcellulose), 2.5, 25, 260, or 2700 μg BPA/kg bw/day, or 0.5 or 5.0 μg ethinyl estradiol (EE)/kg bw/day from gestational day 6 until labor began. Offspring were then gavaged directly from the day after birth until the day before scheduled sacrifice on postnatal days 21 or 90. Using in situ hybridization, one or more BPA doses produced significant decreases in Esr1 expression in the juvenile female rat anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) of the hypothalamus and significant decreases in Esr2 expression in the adult female rat AVPV and medial preoptic area (MPOA), relative to vehicle controls. BPA did not simply reproduce EE effects, indicating that BPA is not acting solely as an estrogen mimic. The possible consequences of long-term changes in hypothalamic ESR expression resulting from subchronic low dose BPA exposure on neuroendocrine effects are discussed and being addressed in ongoing, related work. PMID:24752507

      9. About using wide lens field optics for observations artificial satellites and space surveillance (O primenenii shirokopol'nykh linzovykh ob"yektivov dlya zadach kontrolya kosmicheskogo prostranstva, on Russian)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Sukhov, P. P.; Volkov, S. K.; Karpenko, G. F.; Gubin, E. G.; Titenko, V. V.; Yamnitsky, V. A.; Tkachenko, A. A.

        On base results of the observations in Odessa astronomical observatory (Ukraine), is shown. The possibility of the using domestic wide field lens optics for monitoring high orbital objects. With wide field lens optics "Tair-19 5003", limited mag = 15m.5 per 10 seconds of the accumulation, average square-error (ASE) of the measurements of the coordinates slowly moving GSS not more than 2 arcsec. About 90% measurements has ASE less 1 arcsec. At surveillance of the area of the equator by width 5° areas 500 square deg. are discovered 46 active GSS, 12 passive GSS and 2 high elliptical orbital satellites (HEO). Is shown perspective possibility of the use WFO for monitoring LEO height before of 2 000 km. 90% of 39 objects LEO fixed in mode "beam-park" in current 1 hour, surely are identified using catalog NORAD.

      10. Observation of e+e- → π+π-π(0)(χbJ) and Search for X(b) → ωϒ(1S) at sqrt[s] = 10.867 GeV.

        PubMed

        He, X H; Shen, C P; Yuan, C Z; Ban, Y; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Bansal, V; Bhuyan, B; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Cervenkov, D; Chang, P; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Grzymkowska, O; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hou, W-S; Iijima, T; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kato, E; Kawasaki, T; Kim, D Y; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Li, Y; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nedelkovska, E; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y-S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Thorne, F; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wehle, S; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

        2014-10-01

        The e(+)e(-) → π(+)π(-)π(0)χ(bJ) (J = 0,1,2) processes are studied using a 118 fb(-1) data sample acquired with the Belle detector at a center-of-mass energy of 10.867 GeV. Unambiguous π(+)π(-)π(0)χ(bJ) (J = 1,2), ωχ(b1) signals are observed, and indication for ωχ(b2) is seen, both for the first time, and the corresponding cross section measurements are presented. No significant π(+)π(-)π(0)χ(b0) or ωχ(b0) signals are observed, and 90% confidence level upper limits on the cross sections for these two processes are obtained. In the π(+)π(-)π(0) invariant mass spectrum, significant non-ω signals are also observed. We search for the X(3872)-like state (named X(b)) decaying into ωϒ(1S); no significant signal is observed with a mass between 10.55 and 10.65 GeV/c(2). PMID:25325633

      11. Measurement of the shape of the boson rapidity distribution for $p\\bar{p} \\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^{*} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-} + X$ events produced at $\\sqrt{s} =1.96$ TeV

        SciTech Connect

        Ding, Pengfei

        2013-09-01

        The measurement of the shape of the boson rapidity distribution for p $\\bar{p}$ → Z/γ* → e+e- + X events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is presented in this thesis. Data, with an integrated luminosity of L = 9.86 fb-1, collected with the D0 detector during the whole RunII data taking period of the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider has been used. The measurement is made for events with electron-positron mass 66 < Mee < 111 GeV. The current result gives the best precision of the boson rapidity shape at the Tevatron. It signi cantly reduces the uncertainty in the boson rapidity range |y| > 2:3. Predictions of Next-to- Leading-Order (NLO) QCD theory with CTEQ and MSTW parton distribution functions are found to agree well with the data over the full rapidity range.

      12. The e+e- to to K+ K- \\pi+\\pi-, K+ K- \\pi0\\pi0 and K+ K- K+ K- Cross Sections Measured with Initial-State Radiation

        SciTech Connect

        Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R.N.; /Energy Sci. Network /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Leipzig, Tech. Hochsch. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Concordia U., Montreal /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

        2007-05-04

        We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 34600, 4400 and 2300 fully reconstructed events respectively, are selected from 232 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} data can be compared with direct measurements of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} reaction; no direct measurements exist for the e{sub +}e{sub -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} or e{sub +}e{sub -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -} reactions. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and we extract their cross sections where possible. In particular, we isolate the contribution from e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}(1020)f{sub 0}(980) and study its structure near threshold. In the charmonium region, we observe the J/{psi} in all three final states and several intermediate states, as well as the {psi}/(2S) in some modes, and measure the corresponding branching fractions. We see no signal for the Y(4260) and obtain an upper limit of {Beta}{sub Y(4260){yields}{phi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}} {center_dot} {Lambda}{sub ee}{sup Y} < 0.4 eV at 90% C.L.

      13. Functional group migrations between boron and metal centres within transition metal-borane and -boryl complexes and cleavage of H-H, E-H and E-E' bonds.

        PubMed

        Owen, Gareth R

        2016-08-25

        This feature article examines some of the recent advances in the chemistry of Z-type transition metal-borane and X-type transition metal-boryl complexes. It focuses on the employment of these boron-based functionalities acting as stores and transfer agents for functional groups such as hydrides, alkyl groups and aryl groups which can either be abstracted or delivered to the metal centre. The review also explores the rather novel reactivity involving the cleavage of H-H, E-H and E-E' bonds (where E and E' are a range of groups) across the transition metal-boron bond in such complexes. It explores the early examples of the addition of H-H across transition metal-borane bonds and describes the new transformation in the context of other known modes of hydrogen activation including classic oxidative addition and heterolytic cleavage at transition metal centres as well as Frustrated Lewis Pair chemistry. Similar reactivity involving transition metal-boryl complexes are also described particularly those which undergo both boryl-to-borane and borane-to-borohydride transformations. The delivery of hydride to the metal centre in combination with the potential to regenerate the borohydride functional group via a recharging process is explored in the context of providing a new strategy for catalysis. Finally, a light-hearted look at the analogy of the 'stinging processes' involving Trofimenko type ligands is taken one step further to determine whether it is indeed in the nature of scorpionate ligands to repeatedly 'sting' just as the real life scorpions do. PMID:27489890

      14. The Integrated Reader: Literature and EE.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Hage, Steve; Daniels, Rosalie

        1996-01-01

        Presents a selection of thematic units focusing on the environment that integrate literature, outdoor education, field studies, and research on current environmental issues. These units are part of a program offered at the School of Environmental Studies in Apple Valley, Minnesota. Authors include Thoreau, Camus, Orwell, Hemingway, Sophocles, and…

      15. Modular VO oriented Java EE service deployer

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Molinaro, Marco; Cepparo, Francesco; De Marco, Marco; Knapic, Cristina; Apollo, Pietro; Smareglia, Riccardo

        2014-07-01

        The International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) has produced many standards and recommendations whose aim is to generate an architecture that starts from astrophysical resources, in a general sense, and ends up in deployed consumable services (that are themselves astrophysical resources). Focusing on the Data Access Layer (DAL) system architecture, that these standards define, in the last years a web based application has been developed and maintained at INAF-OATs IA2 (Italian National institute for Astrophysics - Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italian center of Astronomical Archives) to try to deploy and manage multiple VO (Virtual Observatory) services in a uniform way: VO-Dance. However a set of criticalities have arisen since when the VO-Dance idea has been produced, plus some major changes underwent and are undergoing at the IVOA DAL layer (and related standards): this urged IA2 to identify a new solution for its own service layer. Keeping on the basic ideas from VO-Dance (simple service configuration, service instantiation at call time and modularity) while switching to different software technologies (e.g. dismissing Java Reflection in favour of Enterprise Java Bean, EJB, based solution), the new solution has been sketched out and tested for feasibility. Here we present the results originating from this test study. The main constraints for this new project come from various fields. A better homogenized solution rising from IVOA DAL standards: for example the new DALI (Data Access Layer Interface) specification that acts as a common interface system for previous and oncoming access protocols. The need for a modular system where each component is based upon a single VO specification allowing services to rely on common capabilities instead of homogenizing them inside service components directly. The search for a scalable system that takes advantage from distributed systems. The constraints find answer in the adopted solutions hereafter sketched. The development of the new system using Java Enterprise technologies can better benefit from existing libraries to build up the single tokens implementing the IVOA standards. Each component can be built from single standards and each deployed service (i.e. service components instantiations) can consume the other components' exposed methods and services without the need of homogenizing them in dedicated libraries. Scalability can be achieved in an easier way by deploying components or sets of services on a distributed environment and using JNDI (Java Naming and Directory Interface) and RMI (Remote Method Invocation) technologies. Single service configuration will not be significantly different from the VO-Dance solution given that Java class instantiation that benefited from Java Reflection will only be moved to Java EJB pooling (and not, e.g. embedded in bundles for subsequent deployment).

      16. Final Report - DE-EE0000260

        SciTech Connect

        Sullivan, Neal P.

        2013-07-15

        In this program, we are developing next-generation SOFC materials and architectures for use with biomass-derived fuel streams, with a focus on addressing the technical challenges and the required operating windows associated with carbon-deposit formation. We are developing fuel-processing strategies for processing landfill- and anaerobic-digester-derived biomass streams for use in SOFCs. Similarly, we are examining processing of biomass-derived liquid fuels for use in solid-oxide fuel cell systems. We conduct extensive computational modeling work to support the materials-development and fuel-processing tasks. Modeling is conducted across a broad range of length scales, from the microscopic level to examine the fundamental underpinnings of cell operation, to the mesoscopic level to examine and optimize fuel-reformer design, and to the system level to craft optimal integration and dynamic-control solutions.

      17. Final Technical Report - DE-EE0003542

        SciTech Connect

        Haley, James D

        2013-03-31

        Wind has provided energy for thousands of years: some of the earliest windmill engineering designs date back to ancient Babylonia and India where wind would be used as a source of irrigation. Today, wind is the quickest growing resource in Americas expanding energy infrastructure. However, to continue to positively diversify Americas energy portfolio and further reduce the countrys reliance of foreign oil, the industry must grow substantially over the next two decades in both turbine installations and skilled industrial manpower to support. The wind sector is still an emergent industry requiring maturation and development of its labor force: dedicated training is needed to provide the hard and soft skills to support the increasingly complex wind turbine generators as the technology evolves. Furthermore, the American workforce is facing a steep decline in available labor resources as the baby boomer generation enters retirement age. It is therefore vital that a process is quickly created for supporting the next generation of wind technicians. However, the manpower growth must incorporate three key components. First, the safety and technical training curriculum must be standardized across the industry - current wind educational programs are disparate and dedicated standardization programs must be further refined and implemented. Second, it is essential that the wind sector avoid disrupting other energy production industries by cannibalizing workers, which would indirectly affect the rest of Americas energy portfolio. The future wind workforce must be created organically utilizing either young people entering the workforce or train personnel emerging from careers outside of energy production. Third, the training must be quick and efficient as large amounts of wind turbines are being erected each year and this growth is expected to continue until at least 2035. One source that matches these three requirements is personnel transitioning from military service to the civilian sector. Utilizing the labor pool of transitioning military personnel and a dedicated training program specifically tailored to military hard and soft skills, the wind workforce can rapidly expand with highly skilled personnel. A tailored training program also provides career opportunities to an underutilized labor force as the personnel return from active military duty. This projects goal was to create a Wind Workforce Development Program that streamlines the wind technician training process using industry-leading safety programs and building on existing military experience. The approach used was to gather data from the wind industry, develop the curriculum and test the process to ensure it provides adequate training to equip the technicians as they transition from the military into wind. The platform for the curriculum development is called Personal Qualification Standards (PQS), which is based on the program of the same name from the United States Navy. Not only would the program provide multiple delivery methods of training (including classroom, computer-based training and on-the-job training), but it also is a familiar style of training to many military men and women. By incorporating a familiar method of training, it encourages active participation in the training and reduces the time for personnel to grasp the concept and flow of the training requirements. The program was tested for thoroughness, schedule and efficacy using a 5-person pilot phase during the last two years. The results of the training were a reduction in time to complete training and increased customer satisfaction on client project sites. However, there were obstacles that surfaced and required adaptation throughout the project including method of delivery, curriculum development and project schedules and are discussed in detail throughout the report. There are several key recommendations in the report that discuss additional training infrastructure, scalability within additional alternative energy markets and organizational certification through standardization committees.

      18. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EE) or (EoE)

        MedlinePlus

        ... Environmental allergies to substances such as dust mites, animals, pollen and molds can play a role in EoE. For some patients, it may seem like their EoE is worse during pollen seasons. Allergy testing for these common environmental allergies is often part ...

      19. Electronics Engineering Department: EE technical review

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        1984-11-01

        Brief summaries are given of electronics engineering work in the areas of: an automated ultrasonic test bed, design and operation of an ion cyclotron radio frequency system for the TMX-U, high speed solid state switches, and polarizing holographic reflector for electron cyclotron resonant heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade.

      20. What is $$\\Delta m^2_{ee}$$ ?

        DOE PAGES

        Parke, Stephen

        2016-03-09

        Here, the current short baseline reactor experiments, Daya Bay and RENO (Double Chooz) have measured (or are capable of measuring) an effective Δm2 associated with the atmospheric oscillation scale of 0.5 km/MeV in electron antineutrino disappearance. In this paper, I compare and contrast the different definitions of such an effective Δm2 and argue that the simple, L/E independent definition given by Δmee2≡cos2θ12Δm312+sin2θ12Δm322, i.e. “the νe weighted average of Δm312 and Δm322,” is superior to all other definitions and is useful for both short baseline experiments mentioned above and for the future medium baseline experiments JUNO and RENO-50.

      1. Behaviorist EE Research: Environmentalism as Individualism.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Robottom, Ian; Hart, Paul

        1995-01-01

        This article continues a dialogue about the nature of environmental education research by establishing the behaviorist nature of the dominant approach to environmental education research and exploring implications for environmentalism of one aspect of the politics of methods of this dominant behaviorist approach--the tendency to individualize the…

      2. Quasielastic (e,e') sum rule saturation

        SciTech Connect

        C. R. Chinn; A. Picklesimer; Wally Van Orden

        1989-09-01

        A microscopic Green's function doorway formalism is used to study Coulomb sum rule saturation in inclusive quasielastic electron scattering as a function of momentum transfer. Form factor, kinematical restriction, and final-state interaction effects on the approach to saturation are examined in detail, as are the roles of nonhermiticity, energy dependence, and the analytic behavior of the final-state interactions. The implications of relativistic kinematics and dynamics for the approach to saturation at not-too-high values of the momentum transfer are assessed. Because the pair production of relativistic treatments destroys the asymptotic nature of the nonrelativistic Coulomb sum rule, the degree to which a regime of validity can be expected for this sum rule, and its location, is considered. The breakdown of the sum rule as the momentum transfer increases is also examined. Similar theoretical studies of an analogous nonrelativistic transverse sum in its saturation region are developed as well. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental data for {sup 40}Ca both directly and using a variety of theoretical prescriptions and limits. Neutron knockout contributions and associated uncertainties due to ambiguity in the free neutron form factors are examined.

      3. EE&RE; Session: CIGS (Presentation)

        SciTech Connect

        Contreras, M.

        2008-04-01

        This project supports the Solar America Initiative by carrying out work on target topics identified for Photovoltaic Systems: (1) Improving cell and module efficiency of thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se2 materials; (2) Implementing the Science and Technology Facility (S&TF) and the Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) to facilitate laboratory/industry interaction in developing PV manufacturing technologies; (3) Addressing industrial issues in materials and manufacturing processes with the objective to lower the cost of PV power; (4) Providing technology transfer efforts to accelerate transition of thin film PV technology to market and deployment; (5) Assisting R&D efforts to asses and improve reliability and stability of thin film PV products; and (6) Assist the SAI TPPs in technical matters related to CIGS PV technology.

      4. Electronics Engineering Department, EE technical review

        SciTech Connect

        Not Available

        1983-12-01

        Progress is briefly summarized in the following areas: a microprocessor-controlled octopus line-switching network, implementation of CAMAC-based interlocks on the Mirror Fusion Test Facility, fiber optics in the nuclear test program, protection circuits and instrumentation interface for long-pulse MFTF neutral beams, and a high-power pulsed microwave source designated MGX. (LEW)

      5. Electronics Engineering Department EE technical review

        SciTech Connect

        Not Available

        1984-04-01

        This is a technical review of work done by the Electronics Engineering Department of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Titles of papers included in this review are as follows: Motion-Control System for the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine; A New Rotating Turbine Camera Controller that Extends Capability and Improves Reliability; The Ring Seating System and The LGF Data Acquisition System.

      6. Detailed Measurement of the e+e- Pair Continuum in p+p and Au+Au Collisions at s_NN = 200 GeV and Implications for Direct Photon Production

        SciTech Connect

        Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

        2010-01-01

        PHENIX has measured the e{sup +}e{sup -} pair continuum in {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV Au+Au and p+p collisions over a wide range of mass and transverse momenta. The e{sup +}e{sup -} yield is compared to the expectations from hadronic sources, based on PHENIX measurements. In the intermediate-mass region, between the masses of the {phi} and the J/{psi} meson, the yield is consistent with expectations from correlated cc production, although other mechanisms are not ruled out. In the low-mass region, below the {phi}, the p+p inclusive mass spectrum is well described by known contributions from light meson decays. In contrast, the Au+Au minimum bias inclusive mass spectrum in this region shows an enhancement by a factor of 4.7 {+-} 0.4{sup stat} {+-} 1.5{sup syst} {+-} 0.9{sup model}. At low mass (m{sub ee} < 0.3 GeV/c{sup 2}) and high p{sub T} (1 < p{sub T} < 5 GeV/c) an enhanced e{sup +}e{sup -} pair yield is observed that is consistent with production of virtual direct photons. This excess is used to infer the yield of real direct photons. In central Au+Au collisions, the excess of the direct photon yield over the p+p is exponential in p{sub T}, with inverse slope T = 221 {+-} 19{sup stat} {+-} 19{sup syst} MeV. Hydrodynamical models with initial temperatures ranging from T{sub init} = 300-600 MeV at times of 0.6-0.15 fm/c after the collision are in qualitative agreement with the direct photon data in Au+Au. For low p{sub T} < 1 GeV/c the low-mass region shows a further significant enhancement that increases with centrality and has an inverse slope of T = 100 MeV. Theoretical models underpredict the low-mass, low-p{sub T} enhancement.

      7. Improved upper limits on B(K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {mu}e) and B(K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} ee) and a new value for B(K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {mu}{mu})

        SciTech Connect

        Molzon, W.R.

        1998-09-01

        The author gives recent results from E791 at BNL with improved upper limits on the branching fractions B(K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {mu}e) and B(K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} ee) of 8.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} and 11.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} at 90% C.L. He also gives a preliminary result of a new measurement B(K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {mu}{mu}) = 7.6 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 0.4(syst) {times} 10{sup {minus}9}.

      8. An old paper revisited: "a mathematical model of carbohydrate energy metabolism. Interaction between glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the H-transporting shuttles at varying ATPases load" by V.V. Dynnik, R. Heinrich and E.E. Sel'kov.

        PubMed

        Nazaret, Christine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre

        2008-06-01

        We revisit an old Russian paper by V.V. Dynnik, R. Heinrich and E.E. Sel'kov (1980a,b) describing: "A mathematical model of carbohydrate energy metabolism. Interaction between glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the H-transporting shuttles at varying ATPases load". We analyse the model mathematically and calculate the control coefficients as a function of ATPase loads. We also evaluate the structure of the metabolic network in terms of elementary flux modes. We show how this model can respond to an ATPase load as well as to the glucose supply. We also show how this simple model can help in understanding the articulation between the major blocks of energetic metabolism, i.e. glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the H-transporting shuttles.

      9. Measurement of sin2 θℓeff and Z-light quark couplings using the forward-backward charge asymmetry in pp -> Z/gamma* -> e+e- events with L=5.0 fb-1 at √s=1.96 TeV

        DOE PAGES

        Abazov, V. M.

        2011-07-26

        We measure the mass dependence of the forward-backward charge asymmetry in 157,553 pp = Z/γ* = e+e- interactions, corresponding to 5.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV. The effective weak mixing angle (θℓeff) from this process involving predominantly the first generation of quarks is extracted as sin2 θℓeff = 0.2309 ± 0.0008 (stat.) ± 0.0006 (syst.). We also present the most precise direct measurement of the vector and axial-vector couplings of u and d quarks to the Z boson.

      10. Tertiary EE Student Projects: What the Academics Learnt

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Meehan, Barry; Thomas, Ian

        2006-01-01

        Problem solving and teamwork abilities are important skills for graduates entering the environment profession. Through a problem based learning approach small groups of students from the environmental courses at RMIT University have been gaining these professional skills by undertaking projects in Vietnam. With three years experience in running…

      11. BLEMS (award #DE-EE0004019) Final Report

        SciTech Connect

        Orosz, Michael

        2014-04-21

        This project focused on the development and testing of a non-intrusive “bolt-on” solution called the Building Level Energy Management System (BLEMS) which reduces day-to-day electric energy consumption by at least 20% while maintaining or improving occupant comfort. BLEMS learns occupants’ energy usage behavior, and comfort preferences, as well as building system behavior and uses this information to reduce energy consumption and related greenhouse gas emissions, while simultaneously meeting occupants’ comfort and building usage needs (i.e., day-to-day energy usage goals, demand response energy usage levels, etc.). In BLEMS, humans and building systems and devices interact ubiquitously in real time through an integrated sensor and control system for reduced building electricity consumption. The solution enables bidirectional communication between building systems and occupants, obtains occupant input on comfort level preferences, and operates the building based on measured system response, occupant feedback, and predicted occupancy. Although designed to be used in any building, we focused on commercial buildings as they are a major consumer of HVAC power.

      12. DOE F 241.3_DE-EE0006097_FINAL

        SciTech Connect

        Espinoza, Tyler

        2015-11-19

        In this project, Optony deployed the Sustainable Energy for Business Districts (SEBIZ) model to address China’s surging urban energy needs and greenhouse gas emissions via a district-level Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and smart grid technology deployment strategy. The SEBIZ approach built local capacity and demonstrated the opportunities and benefits for ongoing improvements to and investments in energy infrastructure through market-based project development and an innovative, highly-effective applied public policy development model. Furthermore, the SEBIZ program used real-world examples and resources to formulate appropriate policy, program and educational guidance for similar areas and cities around China and internationally.

      13. EE technical review. Special issue: flash x-ray accelerator

        SciTech Connect

        Not Available

        1983-08-01

        Improvements to the pulsed power system of FXR made during the past year have resulted in much better reliability and repeatability. At a current level of 2.2 kA on target, the machine produces a radiation dose of 480 R at 1 m, with a spot size of 3 to 5 mm and with the dose repeatable within +- 10%. With this new capability, researchers have already begun to improve their understanding of material behavior at high pressure and densities, working in a heretofore inaccesible regime of radiographic penetration and resolution.

      14. Final Report for award DE-EE0003955

        SciTech Connect

        2013-05-30

        United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) in collaboration with the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign (UIUC) proposed in 2009 to design, develop and demonstrate a safe, very low global warming potential (GWP) very high performance air-conditioning (VHPAC) residential system. The proposed residential ducted system was targeted to reduce system direct GWP by a factor of approximately 200, and had the potential to achieve a net 4% reduction in overall annual energy consumption of residential buildings.

      15. Absolute beam energy measurements in e+e- storage rings

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Placidi, M.

        1997-01-01

        The CERN Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) was dedicated to the measurement of the mass Mz and the width Γz of the Z0 resonance during the LEP1 phase which terminated in September 1995. The Storage Ring operated in Energy Scan mode during the 1993 and 1995 physics runs by choosing the beam energy Ebeam to correspond to a center-of-mass (CM) energy at the interaction points (IPs) ECMpeak±1762 MeV. After a short review of the techniques usually adopted to set and control the beam energy, this paper describes in more detail two methods adopted at LEP for precise beam energy determination that are essential to reduce the contribution to the systematic error on Mz and Γz. The positron beam momentum was initially determined at the 20-GeV injection energy by measuring the speed of a less relativistic proton beam circulating on the same orbit, taking advantage of the unique opportunity to inject two beams into the LEP at short time intervals. The positron energy at the Z0 peak was in this case derived by extrapolation. Once transverse polarization became reproducible, the Resonant Depolarization (RD) technique was implemented at the Z0 operating energies, providing a ⩽2×10-5 instantaneous accuracy. RD Beam Energy Calibration has been adopted during the LEP Energy Scan campaigns as well as in Accelerator Physics runs for accurate measurement of machine parameters.

      16. Fragmentation and Hadronization in e+e- Collisions

        SciTech Connect

        Muller, David

        2001-11-15

        We present a number of jet fragmentation and hadronization measurements in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} Z{sup 0} {yields} hadrons. The L3 collaboration has searched for pointlike color singlet radiation in multi-jet events, limiting any such contribution to rapidity gap events at the few percent level. ALEPH and SLD have measured production rates of a number of identified hadrons, including precise, full-coverage spectra of B hadrons. L3 and SLD have studied charged track and identified hadron production in heavy- and light-flavor events. OPAL has made a pioneering comparison of charged multiplicities between events of the three light flavors, u{bar u}, d{bar d} and s{bar s}.

      17. FINAL Report LTC-DOE DE-EE0000537

        SciTech Connect

        Gibbs, Michelle

        2013-02-28

        At the time of LTC’s application we were home to a small / mid-sized Wind Energy Research and Teaching Center, funded in part by We Energies, and offered the state of Wisconsin’s first Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree in Wind Energy Technology. With President Obama promising investment in wind, LTC and its partners were uniquely situated to meet the challenge through an organized career pathways approach that utilized industry drivers and occupationally verified curriculum to train the workers who “transform our energy sector.” LTC’s employer partners validated the findings of the “20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply” report by the US Department of Energy which recognized programs like LTC’s as an “excellent beginning,” noting that many more like them are necessary to meet the challenges of the 20% Wind scenario.One of the focuses of the study was the lack of trained technicians to work on installation and maintenance of renewables (and more specifically for our grant application wind turbines). LTC’s goal, made possible with the funding provided in this grant, was to increase the number of skilled graduates to help meet this national objective. LTC was already a leader in wind for the state of Wisconsin but wanted to upscale from a single school to a statewide (and potentially regional) center for wind energy. LTC planned to leverage our facilities, curriculum, and faculty expertise to meet this goal.

      18. EE2 Changes Gene Expression in Fathead Minnow Testis

        EPA Science Inventory

        Environmental estrogens have been implicated in altering reproductive health of aquatic animals. Early studies of sewage treatment effluents attributed the feminization of male fish to exposure to mixtures of natural and synthetic estrogens. One of the most potent estrogens kno...

      19. Beowawe Bottoming Binary Unit - Final Technical Report for EE0002856

        SciTech Connect

        McDonald, Dale Edward

        2013-02-12

        This binary plant is the first high-output refrigeration based waste heat recovery cycle in the industry. Its working fluid is environmentally friendly and as such, the permits that would be required with a butane based cycle are not necessary. The unit is modularized, meaning that the unit’s individual skids were assembled in another location and were shipped via truck to the plant site. This project proves the technical feasibility of using low temperature brine The development of the unit led to the realization of low temperature, high output, and environmentally friendly heat recovery systems through domestic research and engineering. The project generates additional renewable energy for Nevada, resulting in cleaner air and reduced carbon dioxide emissions. Royalty and tax payments to governmental agencies will increase, resulting in reduced financial pressure on local entities. The major components of the unit were sourced from American companies, resulting in increased economic activity throughout the country.

      20. Parent-Child Interactions in Relation to Critical and Emotionally Overinvolved Expressed Emotion (EE): Is EE a Proxy for Behavior?

        PubMed Central

        McCarty, Carolyn A.; Lau, Anna S.; Valeri, Sylvia M.; Weisz, John R.

        2006-01-01

        Expressed emotion measures, encompassing dimensions of criticism (CRIT), and emotional overinvolvement (EOI) are increasingly being used to assess the parent–child relationship in child clinical populations, despite the lack of studies assessing their validity. We examined the correspondence between CRIT, EOI, and parent–child interactions as observed by neutral coders in a sample of 252 clinic-referred children and adolescents, ages 7–17 years. We found support for the validity of the CRIT code, with high critical parents showing more antagonism, negativity, disgust, harshness, and less responsiveness, compared to parents who scored in the low or borderline ranges. In contrast, none of the observed behaviors were found to correspond with parental EOI, suggesting either that this construct lacks validity with juvenile samples or that behaviors that correspond to EOI are difficult to observe. We conclude that high parental CRIT can be used as an index of problematic parent–child interactions. PMID:14998113

      1. From eV to EeV: Neutrino cross sections across energy scales

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Formaggio, J. A.; Zeller, G. P.

        2012-07-01

        Since its original postulation by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930, the neutrino has played a prominent role in our understanding of nuclear and particle physics. In the intervening 80 years, scientists have detected and measured neutrinos from a variety of sources, both man made and natural. Underlying all of these observations, and any inferences we may have made from them, is an understanding of how neutrinos interact with matter. Knowledge of neutrino interaction cross sections is an important and necessary ingredient in any neutrino measurement. With the advent of new precision experiments, the demands on our understanding of neutrino interactions is becoming even greater. The purpose of this article is to survey our current knowledge of neutrino cross sections across all known energy scales: from the very lowest energies to the highest that we hope to observe. The article covers a wide range of neutrino interactions including coherent scattering, neutrino capture, inverse beta decay, low-energy nuclear interactions, quasielastic scattering, resonant pion production, kaon production, deep inelastic scattering, and ultrahigh energy interactions. Strong emphasis is placed on experimental data whenever such measurements are available.

      2. VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSED TO EE2 IN A WHOLE LAKE DOSING EXPERIMENT

        EPA Science Inventory

        A whole-lake endocrine disruption experiment was conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario in 2001 and 2002. This experiment examined population, organism, biochemical and cellular-level effects in lake trout, white sucke...

      3. Relativistic corrections to the pair Bc-meson production in e+e- annihilation

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Karyasov, A. A.; Martynenko, A. P.; Martynenko, F. A.

        2016-10-01

        Relativistic corrections to the pair Bc-meson production in e+e--annihilation are calculated. We investigate a production of pair pseudoscalar, vector and pseudoscalar+vector Bc-mesons in the leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics and relativistic quark model. Relativistic expressions of the pair production cross sections are obtained. Their numerical evaluation shows that relativistic effects in the production amplitudes and bound state wave functions three times reduce nonrelativistic results at the center-of-mass energy s = 22 GeV.

      4. Recent results from the e(+)e(-) colliders Tristan and CESR

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Moneti, Giancarlo

        Preliminary results from 56-GeV electron-positron collision experiments at the Japanese Tristan facility are reported and analyzed. The data are found to be consistent with an electroweak model with boson mass 92.5 GeV and a lower limit of 70 GeV for the EM form factors; 90-percent-confidence lower limits of 25.8 and 27.7 GeV are determined for the masses of the fourth-family bottom quark and the top quark, respectively. Also discussed are plans for experiments aimed at (1) measuring the small elements of the Kobayashi-Maskawa flavor-mixing matrix and (2) observing mixing (the spontaneous transformation of a particle into its own antiparticle) in the B0/anti-B0 system.

      5. Automated Analysis of Renewable Energy Datasets ('EE/RE Data Mining')

        SciTech Connect

        Bush, Brian; Elmore, Ryan; Getman, Dan; Inman, Daniel; Kalendra, Eric

        2013-06-13

        This poster illustrates methods to substantially improve the understanding of renewable energy data sets and the depth and efficiency of their analysis through the application of statistical learning methods ('data mining') in the intelligent processing of these often large and messy information sources. The six examples apply methods for anomaly detection, data cleansing, and pattern mining to time-series data (measurements from metering points in buildings) and spatiotemporal data (renewable energy resource datasets).

      6. Catalytic enantioselective synthesis of chiral organic compounds of ultra-high purity of >99% ee

        PubMed Central

        NEGISHI, Ei-ichi; XU, Shiqing

        2015-01-01

        Shortly after the discovery of Zr-catalyzed carboalumination of alkynes in 1978, we sought expansion of the scope of this reaction so as to develop its alkene version for catalytic asymmetric C–C bond formation, namely the ZACA (Zr-catalyzed asymmetric carboalumination of alkenes). However, this seemingly easy task proved to be quite challenging. The ZACA reaction was finally discovered in 1995 by suppressing three competitive side reactions, i.e., (i) cyclic carbometalation, (ii) β-H transfer hydrometalation, and (iii) alkene polymerization. The ZACA reaction has been used to significantly modernize and improve syntheses of various natural products including deoxypolypropionates and isoprenoids. This review focuses on our recent progress on the development of ZACA–lipase-catalyzed acetylation–transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling processes for highly efficient and enantioselective syntheses of a wide range of chiral organic compounds with ultra-high enantiomeric purities. PMID:26460317

      7. Transverse-momentum-dependent fragmentation functions in e+e- annihilation

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Garzia, Isabella; Giordano, Francesca

        2016-06-01

        Fragmentation functions are non-perturbative functions used to describe the formation of colorless, observable hadrons starting from a colored, partonic initial state. The knowledge of these functions are based on the experimental data, and a good parameterization of the fragmentation processes can shed light on the confining aspect of QCD, and are also a key ingredient in accessing nucleon parton distribution functions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and proton-proton collisions. In the last decade, a strong interest has risen about the transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) fragmentation functions, which can be used as tools to probe the 3D-structure of nucleons, and to investigate the Q2 evolution of TMD objects. In this review we will summarize the existing light-quarks fragmentation related measurements from the BaBar, Belle, and BESIII e + e - experiments; in particular, we will focus on the polarized TMD Collins fragmentation functions, emerging from correlations between the transverse polarization of the fragmenting parton and the direction of the resulting hadrons.

      8. Search for a dark photon in e(+)e(-) collisions at BABAR.

        PubMed

        Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Feng, M; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lee, M J; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Dey, B; Gary, J W; Long, O; Campagnari, C; Franco Sevilla, M; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Lockman, W S; Panduro Vazquez, W; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Miyashita, T S; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Pushpawela, B G; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Martellotti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Prell, S; Ahmed, H; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Bougher, J; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Schubert, K R; Barlow, R J; Lafferty, G D; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Feltresi, E; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Chrzaszcz, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Dittrich, S; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Hess, M; Leddig, T; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Vasseur, G; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Fulsom, B G; Graham, M T; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindemann, D; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wisniewski, W J; Wulsin, H W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; De Mori, F; Filippi, A; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Beaulieu, A; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lueck, T; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

        2014-11-14

        Dark sectors charged under a new Abelian interaction have recently received much attention in the context of dark matter models. These models introduce a light new mediator, the so-called dark photon (A^{'}), connecting the dark sector to the standard model. We present a search for a dark photon in the reaction e^{+}e^{-}→γA^{'}, A^{'}→e^{+}e^{-}, μ^{+}μ^{-} using 514  fb^{-1} of data collected with the BABAR detector. We observe no statistically significant deviations from the standard model predictions, and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the mixing strength between the photon and dark photon at the level of 10^{-4}-10^{-3} for dark photon masses in the range 0.02-10.2  GeV. We further constrain the range of the parameter space favored by interpretations of the discrepancy between the calculated and measured anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

      9. The structure of EAS at E 0.1 EeV

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Steck, D.

        1985-01-01

        The ratio of extensive air showers (EAS) total shower energy in the electromagnetic channel (E em) to the size of the shower at maximum development (N max) from a direct measurement of shower longitudinal development using the air fluorescence technique was calculated. The values are not inconsistent with values based upon track length integrals of the Gaisser-Hillas formula for shower development or the known relation between shower energy and size at maximum for pure electromagnetic cascades. Using Linsley's estimates for undetected shower energy based on an analysis of a wide variety of cosmic ray data, the following relation for total shower energy E vs N max is obtained. The Gaisser Hillas implied undetected shower energy fractions.

      10. Association of Apolipoprotein E-e4 and Dementia Declines with Age

        PubMed Central

        Valerio, Daniel; Raventos, Henriette; Schmeidler, James; Beeri, Michal S.; Villalobos, Lara Mora; Bolaños, Patricia; Carrión-Baralt, José R.; Fornaguera, Jaime; Silverman, Jeremy M.

        2014-01-01

        Objective To study the association of dementia with APOE-e4 and its interaction with age in a nonagenarian Costa Ricans (N-sample) and a general elderly contrast group (GE-sample). Methods In both case-control studies, participants were cognitively intact or demented. The N-sample (N=112) was at least age 90; the GE-sample (N=98) was at least age 65. Results Dementia and APOE-e4 were not significantly associated in the N-sample, but were in the GE-sample. There was a significant interaction of age with APOE-e4 in the N-sample, but not in the GE-sample. Descriptively dividing the N-sample at the median (age 93) showed a group interaction: APOE-e4 was more associated with dementia in the younger N-sample than in the older N-sample, where six of seven APOE-e4 carriers were cognitively intact. Conclusions The results support the reduction in association of APOE-e4 with dementia in extreme old age, consistent with a survivor effect model for successful cognitive aging. PMID:24731780

      11. Generalized top-spin analysis and new physics in e+e- collisions with beam polarization

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Ananthanarayan, B.; Lahiri, Jayita; Patra, Monalisa; Rindani, Saurabh D.

        2012-12-01

        A generalized top-spin analysis proposed some time ago in the context of the standard model and subsequently studied in varying contexts is now applied primarily to the case of e+e-→tt¯ with transversely polarized beams. This extends our recent work with new physics couplings of scalar (S) and tensor (T) types. We carry out a comprehensive analysis assuming only the electron beam to be transversely polarized, which is sufficient to probe these interactions, and also eliminates any azimuthal angular dependence due to the standard model or new physics of the vector (V) and axial-vector (A) type interactions. We then consider new physics of the general four-Fermi type of V and A type with both beams transversely polarized and discuss implications with longitudinal polarization as well. The generalized spin bases are all investigated in the presence of either longitudinal or transverse beam polarization to look for appreciable deviation from the SM prediction in case of the new physics. 90% confidence level limits are obtained on the interactions for the generalized spin bases with realistic integrated luminosity. In order to achieve this we present a general discussion based on helicity amplitudes and derive a general transformation matrix that enables us to treat the spin basis. We find that beamline basis combined with transverse polarization provides an excellent window of opportunity both for S, T and V, A new physics, followed by the off-diagonal basis. The helicity basis is shown to be the best in case of longitudinal polarization to look for new physics effects due to V and A.

      12. Supervivientes de cáncer en EE. UU. ascienden casi a 12 millones

        Cancer.gov

        El número de supervivientes de cáncer en Estados Unidos ascendió a 11,7 millones en 2007, de acuerdo a un informe publicado por los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades, CDC, y el Instituto Nacional del Cáncer, NCI, el cual forma parte

      13. Results of Temperature and Collar Surveys in EE-2 – November 16-17, 1983

        SciTech Connect

        Murhpy, Hugh D.; Dash, Zora V.

        1983-11-21

        The purpose of these surveys was to remove the ambiguities in fracture locations from the Experiment 2035 surveys which were run the previous week without a collar locator. It was confirmed that a major fracture, taking about 50% of the injected water, exists right at, or within 10 to 20 feet below , the casing shoe. Another large fracture, taking about 30% of the flow, occurs at 11,900 feet, 320 feet below the shoe. During these surveys we detected small, about 0.6°C,

      14. [Interstate Clean Transportation]. Final Report for FG02-99EE50591

        SciTech Connect

        Wendt, Lee

        2002-07-19

        The Interstate Clean Transportation (ICTC) purpose is to develop a public-private partnership dedicated to accelerating the market penetration of clean, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in interstate goods movement. In order to foster project development, the ICTC activity sought to increase awareness of heavy-duty AFVs among truck fleet operators.

      15. Search for a Dark Photon in e+e- Collisions at BaBar

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Feng, M.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

        2014-11-01

        Dark sectors charged under a new Abelian interaction have recently received much attention in the context of dark matter models. These models introduce a light new mediator, the so-called dark photon (A'), connecting the dark sector to the standard model. We present a search for a dark photon in the reaction e+e-→γ A' , A'→e+e- , μ+μ- using 514 fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector. We observe no statistically significant deviations from the standard model predictions, and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the mixing strength between the photon and dark photon at the level of 1 0-4-1 0-3 for dark photon masses in the range 0.02 - 10.2 GeV . We further constrain the range of the parameter space favored by interpretations of the discrepancy between the calculated and measured anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

      16. Recent results of gg and e+e- annihilation from the pluto experiment

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Knies, Gerhard

        1981-01-01

        Results of gg→f ° (1270), stot (gg→ hadrons) and gg→ large p⊥ events are presented. The experimental evidence for color and spin of gluons, the first order gluon bremmstrahlung processes and jet evolution as in LLA summations is described.

      17. Search for a dark photon in e(+)e(-) collisions at BABAR.

        PubMed

        Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Feng, M; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lee, M J; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Dey, B; Gary, J W; Long, O; Campagnari, C; Franco Sevilla, M; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Lockman, W S; Panduro Vazquez, W; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Miyashita, T S; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Pushpawela, B G; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Martellotti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Prell, S; Ahmed, H; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Bougher, J; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Schubert, K R; Barlow, R J; Lafferty, G D; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Feltresi, E; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Chrzaszcz, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Dittrich, S; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Hess, M; Leddig, T; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Vasseur, G; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Fulsom, B G; Graham, M T; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindemann, D; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wisniewski, W J; Wulsin, H W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; De Mori, F; Filippi, A; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Beaulieu, A; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lueck, T; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

        2014-11-14

        Dark sectors charged under a new Abelian interaction have recently received much attention in the context of dark matter models. These models introduce a light new mediator, the so-called dark photon (A^{'}), connecting the dark sector to the standard model. We present a search for a dark photon in the reaction e^{+}e^{-}→γA^{'}, A^{'}→e^{+}e^{-}, μ^{+}μ^{-} using 514  fb^{-1} of data collected with the BABAR detector. We observe no statistically significant deviations from the standard model predictions, and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the mixing strength between the photon and dark photon at the level of 10^{-4}-10^{-3} for dark photon masses in the range 0.02-10.2  GeV. We further constrain the range of the parameter space favored by interpretations of the discrepancy between the calculated and measured anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. PMID:25432035

      18. Study of composition of cosmic rays with energy .7 E 3 Ee

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Steck, O.; Gaissner, T. K.

        1985-01-01

        The longitudinal shower development of extensive air showers (EAS) observed in the fly's eye is used to determine the distribution of X sub max, the depth in the atmosphere of the EAS maximum. Data and Monte Carlo simulations of proton and iron primaries are compared. A substantial contribution from light primaries is noted.

      19. 76 FR 66855 - United States Savings Bonds, Series EE, HH and I

        Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

        2011-10-28

        ... Part 351 Bonds, Federal Reserve System, Government Securities. 31 CFR Part 353 Bonds, Federal Reserve System, Government Securities. 31 CFR Part 359 Bonds, Federal Reserve System, Government Securities. 31 CFR Part 360 Bonds, Federal Reserve System, Government Securities. Accordingly, for the reasons...

      20. Aliens in Your Classroom? Plants and EE in the Classroom and in the Field.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Raymond, Stephanie

        1999-01-01

        Finds that many restoration projects have attempted to replace the native species, but project planners often have an imperfect understanding of the plant communities they are trying to re-create. Argues that when students join these projects, they may receive an inaccurate impression of local ecosystems. (Author/CCM)

      1. The process e+e- → barb s in the topcolour-assisted multiscale technicolour model

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Lu, Gongru; Yue, Chongxing; Li, Weibin; Sun, Junfeng

        2000-03-01

        We calculated the contribution of pseudo-Goldstone bosons (technipions, top pions) to the cross-section icons/Journals/Common/sigma" ALT="sigma" ALIGN="TOP"/> of the process e+ e → barb s in the topcolour-assisted multiscale technicolour model at LEPII. Our results show that the cross-section σ is of the order of 10-2 fb, for reasonable values of the parameter. This is larger than that predicted by the standard model by about one order of magnitude. Such enhancement might provide an opportunity to detect the new physics at future colliders.

      2. χc 1 and χc 2 production at e+e- colliders

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        CzyŻ, Henryk; Kühn, Johann H.; Tracz, Szymon

        2016-08-01

        Direct, resonant production of the charmonium states χc 1 and χc 2 in electron-positron annihilation is investigated. Depending on details of the model, a sizeable variation of the prediction for the production cross section is anticipated. It is demonstrated that resonant production could be observed under favorable circumstances.

      3. χc 0ω production in e+e- annihilation through ψ (4160 )

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Li, Xin; Voloshin, M. B.

        2015-02-01

        We argue that the recent BESIII data on the cross section for the process e+e-→χc 0ω in the center-of-mass energy range 4.21-4.42 GeV can be described by the contribution of the known charmoniumlike resonance ψ (4160 ) with the mass of about 4190 MeV. The value of the coupling in the transition ψ (4160 )→χc 0ω needed for this mechanism is comparable to that in another known similar transition, χc 0(2 P )→J /ψ ω . The suggested mechanism also naturally explains the relatively small reported value of the cross section for the final states χc 1ω and χc 2ω above their respective thresholds.

      4. All Mixed Up? Instrumental and Emancipatory Learning toward a More Sustainable World: Considerations for EE Policymakers

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Wals, Arjen E. J.; Geerling-Eijff, Floor; Hubeek, Francisca; van der Kroon, Sandra; Vader, Janneke

        2008-01-01

        World wide, policymakers are looking for ways to use education and communication strategies to create a world that is more sustainable than the one currently in prospect. They often find themselves trapped between instrumental (behavior change) and emancipatory (human development) uses of such strategies. This study sheds light on this apparent…

      5. Top pair production in e+e- and {gamma}{gamma} processes

        SciTech Connect

        Hori, M.; Kiyo, Y.; Kodaira, J.; Nasuno, T.; Parke, S.

        1998-02-01

        We analyze spin correlations between top quark and anti-top quark produced at polarized e{sup +} e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} colliders. We consider a generic spin basis to find a strong spin correlation. Optimal spin decompositions for top quark pair are presented for e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} colliders. We show the cross- section in these bases and discuss the characteristics of results.

      6. The LEP e+e- ring at the energy frontier of circular lepton colliders

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Hofmann, Albert; Wenninger, Jörg

        The Large Electron Positron ring (LEP) was a circular lepton collider at CERN. It operated at beam energies around 47GeV to produce the neutral Z0 particle and above 80 GeV to create pairs of the charged W± bosons. At these high energies the emission of synchrotron radiation was important and demanded a very high voltage of the RF-system. It also influenced the choice of many other machine parameters. This presentation tries to show how the basic accelerator physics was used to optimize the machine and to find innovative solutions for some problems: magnets with concrete between the laminations, modulated cavities, Nb-Cu superconducting cavities, non-evaporable getter pumps, optics analysis from multi-turn data and many more.

      7. Electron/muon specific two Higgs doublet model at e+e- colliders

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Johansen, Aria R.; Sher, Marc

        2015-03-01

        Recently, Kajiyama, Okada and Yagyu proposed an electron/muon specific two Higgs doublet model. In this model, an S3 symmetry suppresses flavor-changing neutral currents instead of a Z2 symmetry. In the "Type I" version of the model, the heavy Higgs bosons have a greatly enhanced coupling to electrons and muons. Kajiyama, Okada and Yagyu studied the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons at the LHC. In this paper, the phenomenology at electron-positron colliders is studied. For the heavy Higgs mass range between 150 and 210 GeV, bounds from Large Electron Positron (LEP-200) Collider are stronger than those from the LHC. The model allows for the interesting possibility that muon pair production at the International Linear Collider can be mediated by s-channel Higgs exchange. This requires an energy scan. The scanning rate and necessary resolution are discussed.

      8. The effect of concentrator field layout on the EE-1 small community solar power system

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Pons, R. L.; Irwin, R. E.

        1981-01-01

        The point-focusing distributed receiver (PFDR) concept is employed by a number of solar thermal power systems currently under development. One type of PFDR system which shows particular promise incorporates distributed energy generation. According to this concept each parabolic dish collector is a self-contained power generation module, and a conventional electrical system is used to interconnect the modules. The concept is thus modular, and any number of power modules can be combined to achieve the required plant size. Given the benefits of mass production, it appears that this type of system can produce electricity at lower cost than is projected for conventional (fossil) power systems over the next decade. An employment of organic Rankine cycle heat engines is considered.

      9. SuperB: A High-Luminosity Asymmetric e+e- Super Flavor Factory

        SciTech Connect

        Bona, M.; /et al.

        2007-05-18

        We discuss herein the exciting physics program that can be accomplished with a very large sample of heavy quark and heavy lepton decays produced in the very clean environment of an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider; a program complementary to that of an experiment such as LHCb at a hadronic machine. It then presents the conceptual design of a new type of e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that produces a nearly two-order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity over the current generation of asymmetric B Factories. The key idea is the use of low emittance beams produced in an accelerator lattice derived from the ILC Damping Ring Design, together with a new collision region, again with roots in the ILC final focus design, but with important new concepts developed in this design effort. Remarkably, SuperB produces this very large improvement in luminosity with circulating currents and wallplug power similar to those of the current B Factories. There is clear synergy with ILC R&D; design efforts have already influenced one another, and many aspects of the ILC Damping Rings and Final Focus would be operationally tested at SuperB. Finally, the design of an appropriate detector, based on an upgrade of BABAR as an example, is discussed in some detail. A preliminary cost estimate is presented, as is an example construction timeline.

      10. Sistemas Eolicos Pequenos para Generacion de Electricidad; Una guia para consumidores en los EE.UU.

        SciTech Connect

        Not Available

        2007-09-01

        This Spanish version of the popular Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

      11. EE&RE, Session: CdTe - Progress and Roadmap Alignment (Presentation)

        SciTech Connect

        Gessert, T.

        2008-04-01

        This project supports the Solar America Initiative by: (1) assistance to SAI Incubators (Primestar Solar, AvA Solar); (2) providing industry with baseline understanding of CdS/CdTe device formation and reliability--incorporation of low-cost, high quality TCOs, functionality and options for buffer layers, effect of various CdS options, effect of and importance CdSTe alloy formation, effect and options for CdCl{sub 2} treatment, effect and options for back contact, and effect of residual impurities during all stages of device formation; (3) understanding modes and mechanisms of cell-level stability; and (4) establishment of CdTe PDIL Tool for rapid material and process screening.

      12. Exclusive e+e-, di-photon and di-jet production at the Tevatron

        SciTech Connect

        Terashi, Koji; /Rockefeller U.

        2007-05-01

        Results from studies on exclusive production of electron-position pair, di-photon, and dijet production at CDF in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. THe first observation and cross section measurements of exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and di-jet production in hadron-hadron collisions are emphasized.

      13. Contributions to the Workshop on an e+e- collider in the VLHC tunnel

        SciTech Connect

        E Keil et al.

        2001-07-16

        This Workshop was extremely useful in fleshing out many of the details related to the VLLC. For example, at the workshop it became very clear that the large machine could not provide high luminosity polarized beams at both the Z0 pole and at high energy, and it would be best to provide the Z0 factory function in the injector. In addition, the workshop identified a number of topics for further R and D. A list of some of these topics follows: What is the lower limit on {beta}{sub y}* in the high energy collider? What is a reasonable upper limit on the beam-beam parameter at 183 GeV? Is there a way to coalesce electron bunches at high energy to finesse the TMCI current limit at injection, allowing a smaller beam pipe aperture to be used? Can feedback systems be useful to combat the TMCI instability at injection? In the 45 GeV Z{sup 0} factory, are two rings essential? Are wigglers essential for polarization in the Z{sup 0} factory? How can polarization at high energies be optimized? What is the optimum method of pumping the long vacuum chamber sections? How much cost and power minimization is possible in the complete design? What is the cost of the final system? How can the low field magnets be optimized (alloys, lamination shapes, etc.)? How do we get adequate shielding of the beam from the environment? How can we eliminate the Q-slope in superconducting rf cavities using sputtered niobium on copper? It is hoped the VLLC concept will be explored further, and some of these questions will be addressed, at the Snowmass 2001 Workshop.

      14. Light Squarks and Gluinos at TeV-scale $e^+e^-$ Colliders

        SciTech Connect

        Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

        2011-08-19

        In the general MSSM, first and second generation squarks and gluinos may be sufficiently light to be produced and studied at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders operating in the 0.5-1 TeV energy range. After a reminder that the MSSM is not the same as mSUGRA, we provide a brief overview of these possibilities within this more general framework. Squarks and gluinos may be light enough to be produced at an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating in the 0.5-1 TeV energy range in non-mSUGRA SUSY breaking scenarios. The decays of such particles, though always leading to jets, may or may not produce ME depending on the nature of the SUSY spectrum. The electroweak properties of the squarks can be determined using polarized beams and production cross section measurements. The simultaneous production of essentially degenerate 1st and 2nd generation squarks can be problematic although efficient charm tagging would be helpful. If (some) squarks are heavier than gluinos then gluinos may be best studied as squark decay products. If gluinos are heavier than squarks, associated production can lead to an unambiguous, although small, production cross section somewhat below {approx} 1 fb. Gluino pair production is perhaps more interesting as the cross section for this process involves the entire strongly interacting sector of the MSSM. The rate is expected to be rather small for this process in the case of mSUGRA but has not been well-studied in the more general MSSM.

      15. Quantum suppression of beamstrahlung for future e+e- linear colliders

        SciTech Connect

        Xie, Ming

        1998-05-01

        Beamstrahlung at interaction point may present severe limitations on linear collider performance. The approach to reduce this effect adopted for all current designs at a center-of-mass energy of 0.5 TeV will become more difficult and less effective at higher energy. We discuss the feasibility of an alternative approach, based on an effect known as quantum suppression of beamstrahlung, for future linear colliders at multi-TeV energy.

      16. International Programme Review, Electrical Engineering. [Report of the] IPR-EE Committee.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Vroeijenstijn, A. I.; And Others

        This report presents details from an examination of the curricula and diplomas of the Electrical Engineering departments of several major European technical universities (in the Netherlands, Sweden, Germany, Switzerland, and Belgium). The examination, a process involving department representatives of the various schools who came together to…

      17. Ilustres hispanos de los EE. UU. (Famous Hispanics of the U.S.).

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Mardenborough, Teresa; St. Sauver, Dennis

        A teacher's guide and black line masters for student activity sheets for Hispanic cultural enrichment education are presented. Designed for students from elementary school through high school, the materials concern 12 short biographies of Americans of Hispanic descent. The subjects are successful contemporary personalities who have become famous…

      18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Dynamics in E+E pairs of galaxies (Bonfanti+, 1995)

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Bonfanti, P.; Rampazzo, R.; Combes, F.; Prugniel, P.; Sulentic, J. W.

        1994-10-01

        NGC 741/742, 1587/1588 (CPG 99) and 2672/2673 (CPG 175). All three pairs show a similar morphological distortion (i.e. the off-centering of inner versus outer isophotes; Davoust & Prugniel 1988) which is ascribed to the ongoing interaction. The data was obtained at the CFHT equipped with the Herzberg Spectrograph at a resolution of 0.88 Apx-1. NGC 741 and 2673 show significant rotation along the apparent minor axis. Both components of CPG 99 rotate very fast (with no evidence for rotation along the minor axis of either component). None of the galaxies show abnormally high central velocity dispersion. We report some of the first clear detections of well defined velocity dispersion curves for interacting pairs. They show a systematic decrease with distance from the center, as expected for normal ellipticals. They do not show obvious heating in the outer parts as was previously reported. NGC 741 and 2672 show, respectively, possible U and inverse U-shaped structure in their velocity profiles. (1 data file).

      19. Prototype Power and Communications System for EeV Cosmic Rays Studies

        SciTech Connect

        Russ, James S.

        2010-08-31

        An analysis of improving the power output of small wind turbines by adding a venturi housing was done. Including the effects of back pressure developed at the input to the housing lowers the efficiency gain from a factor of 5 to a factor of 2 for a turbine blade radius of 24 inches. The gain is small enough that only large systems could profit from the application.

      20. Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials

        SciTech Connect

        Shackson, R.H.

        1991-10-09

        This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

      1. Synchrotron cooling and annihilation of an E(+)-E(-) plasma: The radiation mechanism for the March 5, 1979 transient

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Bussard, R. W.

        1980-01-01

        Positron-electron pair radiation is examined as a mechanism that could be responsible for the impulsive phase emission of the March 5, 1979 transient. Synchrotron cooling and subsequent annihilation of the pairs can account for the energy spectrum, the very high brightness, and the approximately 0.4 MeV feature observed from this transient, whose source is likely to be a neutron star in the supernova remnant N49 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. In this model, the observed radiation is produced in the skin layer of a hot, radiation dominated pair atmosphere, probably confined to the vicinity of the neutron star by a strong magnetic field. The width of this layer is only about 0.1 mm. In this layer, approximately 10 to the 12th power generations of pairs are formed (by photon-photon collisions), cooled and annihilated during the approximately 0.15 sec duration of the impulsive phase. The very large burst energy implied by the distance of the Large Magellanic Cloud, and its very rapid release, are unsolved problems. Nonetheless, the possibility of neutron star vibrations, which could transport the energy coherently to the surface, heat the atmosphere mechanically to a hot, pair-producing temperature, and have a characteristic damping time roughly equal to the duration of the impulsive phase are addressed.

      2. An Electron Fixed Target Experiment to Search for a New Vector Boson A' Decaying to e+e-

        SciTech Connect

        Essig, Rouven; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; /Jefferson Lab

        2010-06-11

        We describe an experiment to search for a new vector boson A' with weak coupling {alpha}' {approx}> 6 x 10{sup -8} {alpha} to electrons ({alpha} = e{sup 2}/4{pi}) in the mass range 65 MeV < m{sub A'} < 550 MeV. New vector bosons with such small couplings arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing of the 'dark photon' A' with the photon - one of the very few ways in which new forces can couple to the Standard Model - and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. A' bosons are produced by radiation off an electron beam, and could appear as narrow resonances with small production cross-section in the trident e{sup +}e{sup -} spectrum. We summarize the experimental approach described in a proposal submitted to Jefferson Laboratory's PAC35, PR-10-009. This experiment, the A' Experiment (APEX), uses the electron beam of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory (CEBAF) at energies of {approx} 1-4 GeV incident on 0.5-10% radiation length Tungsten wire mesh targets, and measures the resulting e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs to search for the A' using the High Resolution Spectrometer and the septum magnet in Hall A. With a {approx} 1 month run, APEX will achieve very good sensitivity because the statistics of e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs will be {approx} 10,000 times larger in the explored mass range than any previous search for the A' boson. These statistics and the excellent mass resolution of the spectrometers allow sensitivity to {alpha}'/{alpha} one to three orders of magnitude below current limits, in a region of parameter space of great theoretical and phenomenological interest. Similar experiments could also be performed at other facilities, such as the Mainz Microtron.

      3. Gauging the Potential of Socially Critical Environmental Education (EE): Examining Local Environmental Problems through Children's Perspective

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Tsoubaris, Dimitris; Georgopoulos, Aleksandros

        2013-01-01

        The objective of this qualitative research work is to detect the needs, aspirations and feelings of pupils experiencing local environmental problems and elaborate them through the prism of a socially critical educational approach. Semi-structured focus group interviews are used as a research method applied to four primary schools located near…

      4. Marine High Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Storage DE-EE0003640 Final Report

        SciTech Connect

        Frank Hoffmann, PhD; Aspinall, Rik

        2012-12-10

        Design, Development, and test of the three-port power converter for marine hydrokinetic power transmission. Converter provides ports for AC/DC conversion of hydrokinetic power, battery storage, and a low voltage to high voltage DC port for HVDC transmission to shore. The report covers the design, development, implementation, and testing of a prototype built by PPS.

      5. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems (DE-EE0002961)

        SciTech Connect

        Spitler, J. D.; Culling, J. R.; Conjeevaram, K.; Ramesh, M.; Selvakumar, M.

        2012-11-30

        Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems are perhaps the most widely used “sustainable” heating and cooling systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order of 18 GW. They are widely used in residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Standing column wells (SCW) are one form of ground heat exchanger that, under the right geological conditions, can provide excellent energy efficiency at a relatively low capital cost. Closed-loop surface water heat pump (SWHP) systems utilize surface water heat exchangers (SWHE) to reject or extract heat from nearby surface water bodies. For building near surface water bodies, these systems also offer a high degree of energy efficiency at a low capital cost. However, there have been few design tools available for properly sizing standing column wells or surface water heat exchangers. Nor have tools for analyzing the energy consumption and supporting economics-based design decisions been available. The main contributions of this project lie in providing new tools that support design and energy analysis. These include a design tool for sizing surface water heat exchangers, a design tool for sizing standing column wells, a new model of surface water heat pump systems implemented in EnergyPlus and a new model of standing column wells implemented in EnergyPlus. These tools will better help engineers design these systems and determine the economic and technical feasibility.

      6. 77 FR 19654 - Notice of Petition for Waiver of Sanyo E&E Corporation from the Department of Energy Residential...

        Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

        2012-04-02

        ... refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers. The waiver request pertains to the hybrid wine chiller/beverage center... to test the wine chiller compartment at 55 F instead of the prescribed temperature of 38 F. DOE... consist of single-cabinet units with ] a refrigerated beverage compartment in the top portion and a...

      7. 31 CFR 351.81 - Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds?

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

        2012-07-01

        ... bonds) must have paid qualified higher education expenses during the same year. You also must have... 970, “Tax Benefits for Higher Education.”) These publications are available on the IRS Web site at... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Is the Education Savings Bond...

      8. 31 CFR 351.81 - Is the Education Savings Bond Program available for Series EE savings bonds?

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

        2013-07-01

        ... bonds) must have paid qualified higher education expenses during the same year. You also must have... 970, “Tax Benefits for Higher Education.”) These publications are available on the IRS Web site at... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Is the Education Savings Bond...

      9. 31 CFR 321.8 - Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE savings bonds and savings notes.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

        2010-07-01

        ... savings bonds and savings notes. (a) General. Subject to the provisions of Circular No. 2-80 (31 CFR part... defined in § 352.7(e)(2) in 31 CFR part 352 (Circular No. 2-80)) of the securities presented for exchange.... If the agent is authorized and elects to use the special endorsement procedure, set out in 31...

      10. 31 CFR 321.8 - Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE savings bonds and savings notes.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

        2011-07-01

        ... and savings notes. (a) General. Subject to the provisions of Circular No. 2-80 (31 CFR part 352), the... coowner or beneficiary, or the principal coowner (as defined in § 352.7(e)(2) in 31 CFR part 352 (Circular... use the special endorsement procedure, set out in 31 CFR part 330 (Circular No. 888, current...

      11. 31 CFR 321.8 - Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE savings bonds and savings notes.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

        2012-07-01

        ... savings bonds and savings notes. (a) General. Subject to the provisions of Circular No. 2-80 (31 CFR part... defined in § 352.7(e)(2) in 31 CFR part 352 (Circular No. 2-80)) of the securities presented for exchange.... If the agent is authorized and elects to use the special endorsement procedure, set out in 31...

      12. 31 CFR 321.8 - Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE savings bonds and savings notes.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

        2013-07-01

        ... savings bonds and savings notes. (a) General. Subject to the provisions of Circular No. 2-80 (31 CFR part... defined in § 352.7(e)(2) in 31 CFR part 352 (Circular No. 2-80)) of the securities presented for exchange.... If the agent is authorized and elects to use the special endorsement procedure, set out in 31...

      13. 31 CFR 321.8 - Redemption-exchange of Series E and EE savings bonds and savings notes.

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

        2014-07-01

        ... (31 CFR part 352), the governing regulations, and the provisions of this part and its appendix, an... defined in § 352.7(e)(2) in 31 CFR part 352 (Circular No. 2-80)) of the securities presented for exchange.... If the agent is authorized and elects to use the special endorsement procedure, set out in 31...

      14. Constraints on neutrino-nucleon interactions at energies of 1 EeV with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

        SciTech Connect

        Yoshida, Shigeru

        2010-11-15

        A search for extremely high energy cosmic neutrinos has been carried out with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. The main signals in the search are neutrino-induced energetic charged leptons and their rate depends on the neutrino-nucleon cross section. The upper limit on the neutrino flux has implications for possible new physics beyond the standard model such as the extra space-time dimension scenarios which lead to a cross section much higher than the standard particle physics prediction. In this study we constrain the neutrino-nucleon cross section at energies beyond 10{sup 9} GeV with the IceCube observation. The constraints are obtained as a function of the extraterrestrial neutrino flux in the relevant energy range, which accounts for the astrophysical uncertainty of neutrino production models.

      15. Measurement of Collins asymmetries in inclusive production of charged pion pairs in e+e- annihilation at BABAR

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

        2014-09-01

        We present measurements of Collins asymmetries in the inclusive process e+e-→ππX, where π stands for charged pions, at a center-of-mass energy of 10.6 GeV. We use a data sample of 468 fb-1 collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC, and consider pairs of charged pions produced in opposite hemispheres of hadronic events. We observe clear asymmetries in the distributions of the azimuthal angles in two distinct reference frames. We study the dependence of the asymmetry on several kinematic variables, finding that it increases with increasing pion momentum and momentum transverse to the analysis axis, and with increasing angle between the thrust and beam axis.

      16. The Effect of Diet on Protein Concentration, Hypopharyngeal Gland Development and Virus Load in Worker Honey ees (Apis mellifera L.)

        Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

        Elucidating the mechanisms by which honey bees process pollen vs. protein supplements are important in the generation of artificial diets needed to sustain managed honey bees. We measured the effects of diet on protein concentration, hypopharyngeal gland development and virus titers in worker honey...

      17. Alpha{sub s} at Low Q{sup 2} from e+e- and tau Data

        SciTech Connect

        Menke, Sven

        2001-06-04

        It has been shown in recent analyses by ALEPH [1] and OPAL [2] that precision QCD tests are possible with hadronic {tau} decays by comparing spectral moments of the hadronic decay ratio of the {tau} with QCD calculations. In principle e{sup +}e{sup -} data can be used in a similar manner by evaluating spectral moments of R. The current e{sup +}e{sup -} data is compared with the OPAL {tau} data and a prediction is made on the achievable accuracy of QCD tests with the projected precision of PEP-N [3].

      18. 31 CFR 351.20 - What is the investment yield (interest) during the original maturity period of Series EE savings...

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

        2013-07-01

        ... 1, 1982, by downloading from our website at www.savingsbonds.gov, contacting us by email at savbonds@bpd.treas.gov, or by writing us at the following address: Bureau of the Public Debt, Parkersburg, West... Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING...

      19. 31 CFR 351.20 - What is the investment yield (interest) during the original maturity period of Series EE savings...

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

        2012-07-01

        ... 1, 1982, by downloading from our website at www.savingsbonds.gov, contacting us by email at savbonds@bpd.treas.gov, or by writing us at the following address: Bureau of the Public Debt, Parkersburg, West... Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING...

      20. Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project), DOE Award: DE-EE0002839, Phase 1 Report

        SciTech Connect

        Oski Energy, LLC,

        2013-03-28

        A five-line (23 mile) reflection- seismic survey was conducted at the Hot Pot geothermal prospect area in north-central Nevada under the USDOE (United States Department of Energy) Geothermal Technologies Program. The project objective was to utilize innovative seismic data processing, integrated with existing geological, geophysical and geochemical information, to identify high-potential drilling targets and to reduce drilling risk. Data acquisition and interpretation took place between October 2010 and April 2011. The first round of data processing resulted in large areas of relatively poor data, and obvious reflectors known from existing subsurface information either did not appear on the seismic profiles or appeared at the wrong depth. To resolve these issues, the velocity model was adjusted to include geologic input, and the lines were reprocessed. The resulting products were significantly improved, and additional detail was recovered within the high-velocity and in part acoustically isotropic basement. Features visible on the improved seismic images include interpreted low angle thrust faults within the Paleozoic Valmy Formation, which potentially are reactivated in the current stress field. Intermediate-depth wells are currently targeted to test these features. The seismic images also suggest the existence of Paleogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks which potentially may function as a near- surface reservoir, charged by deeper structures in Paleozoic rocks.

      1. The Virtual Correction to Bremsstrahlung in Results High-Energy e+e- Annihilation:. Comparison of Exact Results

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Yost, S. A.; Glosser, C.; Jadach, S.; Ward, B. F. L.

        2005-04-01

        We have compared the virtual corrections to single hard bremsstrahlung as calculated by S. Jadach, M. Melles, B.F.L. Ward and S.A. Yost to several other expressions. The most recent of these comparisons is to the leptonic tensor calculated by J.H. Kühn and G. Rodrigo for radiative return. Agreement is found to within 10-5 or better, as a fraction of the Born cross section, for most of the range of photon energies. The massless limits have been shown to agree analytically to NLL order.

      2. Lichnost' i ee formirovanie v detskom vozraste: psihologiceskoe issledovanie (Personality and Its Development in Childhood: A Psychological Investigation).

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Bozovic, L. I.

        This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a three-part volume on the psychology of child personality development. In part one, the author shows that psychology is one of the most important scientific disciplines on which education is based, particularly because of its contribution to the scientific planning of…

      3. Search for charged Higgs bosons in e+e- collisions at s=189-202 GeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Bellunato, T.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Brodzicka, J.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carimalo, C.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, Ch.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kurowska, J.; Laforge, B.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nygren, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, Ph.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

        2002-01-01

        A search for pair-produced charged Higgs bosons was performed in the high energy data collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP II at centre-of-mass energies from 189 GeV to 202 GeV. The three different final states, τντν, cs¯c¯s and cs¯τν were considered. New methods were applied to reject wrong hadronic jet pairings and for the tau identification, where a discriminator based on tau polarisation and polar angles was used. No excess of data compared to the expected Standard Model processes was observed and the existence of a charged Higgs boson with mass lower than 71.5 GeV/c2 is excluded at the 95% confidence level.

      4. Search for charged Higgs bosons in e+e- collisions at /sqrt(s)=189-202 GeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        DELPHI Collaboration; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Bellunato, T.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Brodzicka, J.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carimalo, C.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Hansen, J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, Ch.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kurowska, J.; Laforge, B.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nygren, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, Ph.; Zupan, M.

        2002-01-01

        A search for pair-produced charged Higgs bosons was performed in the high energy data collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP II at centre-of-mass energies from 189 GeV to 202 GeV. The three different final states, /τντν, /cs¯c¯s and /cs¯τν were considered. New methods were applied to reject wrong hadronic jet pairings and for the tau identification, where a discriminator based on tau polarisation and polar angles was used. No excess of data compared to the expected Standard Model processes was observed and the existence of a charged Higgs boson with mass lower than 71.5 GeV/c2 is excluded at the 95% confidence level.

      5. Observation of e^+e^- to \\rho^+\\rho^- near \\sqrt{s}=10.58\\gev

        SciTech Connect

        Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

        2008-06-26

        The authors report the first observation of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -}, in a data sample of 379 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at center-of-mass energies near {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. The authors measure a cross section of {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -}) = 19.5 {+-} 1.6(stat) {+-} 3.2(syst) fb. Assuming production through single-photon annihilation, there are three independent helicity amplitudes. They measure the ratios of their squared moduli to be |F{sub 00}|{sup 2} : |F{sub 10}|{sup 2} : |F{sub 11}|{sup 2} = 0.51 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst) : 0.10 {+-} 0.04(stat) {+-} 0.01(syst) : 0.04 {+-} 0.03(stat) {+-} 0.01(syst). The |F{sub 00}|{sup 2} result is inconsistent with the prediction of 1.0 made by QCD models with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties.

      6. MOLECULAR, PROTEIN AND HISTOLOGICAL INDICATORS IN FATHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSEDF TO EE2 IN A WHOLE-LAKE DOSING EXPERIMENT

        EPA Science Inventory

        A whole-lake endocrine disruption experiment was conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario from 2001 to 2003. This experiment examined population, organism, biochemical and cellular-level effects in lake trout, white suck...

      7. Performance Results of Assembled Sensor Plane Prototypes for Special Forward Calorimeters at Future E+E Colliders

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Novgorodova, O.; Aguilar, J. A.; Kulis, S.; Zawiejski, L.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Henschel, H.; Lohmann, W.; Schuwalow, S.; Afanaciev, K.; Ignatenko, A.; Kollowa, S.; Levy, I.; Idzik, M.

        2012-08-01

        The FCAL Collaboration prepared two sensor plane prototypes for the Luminosity Calorimeter (LumiCal) and Beam Calorimeter (BeamCal) for a future linear collider detector. For both several challenges appeared. The luminosity measurement has to be done with a precision of 10-3, requiring LumiCal to be a precision device. BeamCal has to operate in a harsh radiation environment and needs radiation hard sensors. Two sensor technologies are considered - Si sensors for LumiCal and GaAs:Cr for BeamCal. A full chain comprising a sensor, fan-out and front-end ASIC was successfully studied in the lab and in a 4.5 GeV electron beam at DESY. Performance parameters like Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE), the Signal to Noise ratio (SIN) were measured. In a second beam test the readout is completed by a multi-channel ADC chip and data concentrator.

      8. 77 FR 41475 - El Expreso Group, LLC-Asset Acquisition-CUSA EE, LLC D/B/A El Expreso

        Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

        2012-07-13

        ..., Inc. (Coach America).\\1\\ On June 13, 2012, Michael Yusim, an individual, filed a letter in opposition... the United States and between the United States and Mexico. As indicated, Michael Yusim has filed a...; and (5) Michael Yusim, 7499 Eagle Point Drive, Delray Beach, FL 33446. Decided: July 6, 2012. By...

      9. Triclosan Exposure enhances the Uterotrophic Response to Low Doses of Ethinyl Estradiol (EE) in the Female Wistar Rat

        EPA Science Inventory

        Triclosan [TCS; (5-cbloro-2-(2, 4-dichlorophenoxy) phenol)] is an antimicrobial agent commonly found in personal care and sanitizing products, such as soaps, toothpaste and hair products. Recent studies have identified TCS in human breast milk, blood and urine. TCS has also been ...

      10. Experimental Study of Crossing-Angle and Parasitic Effects at the PEP-II e+e- Collider

        SciTech Connect

        Kozanecki, W.; Narsky, Ilya V.; Cai, Y.; Seeman, J.T.; Sullivan, M.; /SLAC

        2005-10-07

        In a series of dedicated accelerator experiments, we measure the dependence of the PEP-II luminosity performance on small horizontal crossing angles and on the horizontal separation at the first parasitic crossing. The experiment is carried out by varying the IP angle of one of the beams in two different bunch patterns, one with and one without parasitic crossings. The measurements show satisfactory agreement with three-dimensional beam-beam simulations.

      11. 31 CFR 351.20 - What is the investment yield (interest) during the original maturity period of Series EE savings...

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

        2014-07-01

        ... variable investment yield. (a) Guaranteed minimum investment yield—(1) Bonds bearing issue dates prior to... (b) Market-based variable investment yield. If a bond is held for a period of 5 years after its first... later, its market-based variable investment yield for such period, and to each successive...

      12. 31 CFR 351.21 - How are redemption values determined during any extended maturity period of Series EE savings...

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

        2011-07-01

        ... yield or the appropriate market-based variable investment yield. The calculation of these yields and the... corresponding values determined using only the applicable market-based variable investment yields. (b) Market-based variable investment yield and resulting values during an extended maturity period. For a...

      13. 31 CFR 351.21 - How are redemption values determined during any extended maturity period of Series EE savings...

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

        2014-07-01

        ... yield or the appropriate market-based variable investment yield. The calculation of these yields and the... corresponding values determined using only the applicable market-based variable investment yields. (b) Market-based variable investment yield and resulting values during an extended maturity period. For a...

      14. 31 CFR 351.20 - What is the investment yield (interest) during the original maturity period of Series EE savings...

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

        2011-07-01

        ... minimum investment yield or the value produced using the appropriate market-based variable investment...-October 1, 1986 7.5 Nov. 1, 1986-Feb. 1, 1993 6 Mar. 1, 1993-Apr. 1, 1995 4 (b) Market-based variable... variable investment yield for such period, and to each successive semiannual interest accrual date up...

      15. BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE, DR and PV in Existing California Homes

        SciTech Connect

        Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.; Maguire, J.; Tabares-Velasco, P.; Springer, D.; Coates, P.; Bell, C.; Price, S.; Sreedharan, P.; Pickrell, K.

        2014-04-01

        Opportunities for combining energy efficiency, demand response, and energy storage with PV are often missed, because the required knowledge and expertise for these different technologies exist in separate organizations or individuals. Furthermore, there is a lack of quantitative tools to optimize energy efficiency, demand response and energy storage with PV, especially for existing buildings. As technology costs evolve (e.g., the ongoing reduction in the cost of PV), design strategies need to be adjusted accordingly based on quantitative analysis.

      16. Production of e+e- Pairs Accompanied by Nuclear Dissociation in Ultra-peripheral Heavy Ion Collisions

        SciTech Connect

        Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Deng, W.S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J.E.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.K.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C.P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; et al.

        2004-04-07

        We present the first data on e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production accompanied by nuclear breakup in ultra-peripheral gold-gold collisions at a center of mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon pair. The nuclear breakup requirement selects events at small impact parameters, where higher-order corrections to the pair production cross section should be enhanced. We compare the pair kinematic distributions with two calculations: one based on the equivalent photon approximation, and the other using lowest-order quantum electrodynamics (QED); the latter includes the photon virtuality. The cross section, pair mass, rapidity and angular distributions are in good agreement with both calculations. The pair transverse momentum, p{sub T}, spectrum agrees with the QED calculation, but not with the equivalent photon approach. We set limits on higher-order contributions to the cross section. The e{sup +} and e{sup -} p{sub T} spectra are similar, with no evidence for interference effects due to higher-order diagrams.

      17. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

        SciTech Connect

        Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

        2012-10-28

        The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

      18. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

        SciTech Connect

        Ling, Hao; Hamilton, Mark F.; Bhalla, Rajan; Brown, Walter E.; Hay, Todd A.; Whitelonis, Nicholas J.; Yang, Shang-Te; Naqvi, Aale R.

        2013-09-30

        Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

      19. 31 CFR 351.20 - What is the investment yield (interest) during the original maturity period of Series EE savings...

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

        2010-07-01

        ... email at savbonds@bpd.treas.gov, or by writing us at the following address: Bureau of the Public Debt... prior to 5 years from issue date at our website at www.savingsbonds.gov, by contacting us by email...

      20. Search for dark Higgsstrahlung in e+e- → μ+μ- and missing energy events with the KLOE experiment

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Anastasi, A.; Babusci, D.; Bencivenni, G.; Berlowski, M.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Cao, B.; Ceradini, F.; Ciambrone, P.; Curciarello, F.; Czerwiński, E.; D'Agostini, G.; Danè, E.; De Leo, V.; De Lucia, E.; De Santis, A.; De Simone, P.; Di Cicco, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Salvo, R.; Domenici, D.; D'Uffizi, A.; Fantini, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, S.; Gajos, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Giardina, G.; Giovannella, S.; Graziani, E.; Happacher, F.; Heijkenskjöld, L.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Johansson, T.; Kamińska, D.; Krzemien, W.; Kupsc, A.; Loffredo, S.; Mandaglio, G.; Martini, M.; Mascolo, M.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Morello, G.; Moricciani, D.; Moskal, P.; Nguyen, F.; Palladino, A.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Perez del Rio, E.; Ranieri, A.; Santangelo, P.; Sarra, I.; Schioppa, M.; Silarski, M.; Sirghi, F.; Tortora, L.; Venanzoni, G.; Wiślicki, W.; Wolke, M.

        2015-07-01

        We searched for evidence of a Higgsstrahlung process in a secluded sector, leading to a final state with a dark photon U and a dark Higgs boson h‧, with the KLOE detector at DAΦNE. We investigated the case of h‧ lighter than U, with U decaying into a muon pair and h‧ producing a missing energy signature. We found no evidence of the process and set upper limits to its parameters in the range 2mμ

      1. VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS AND PEARL DACE FROM CONTROL (NON-DOSED) AND LAKES DOSED WITH EE2 IN THE CANADIAN EXPERIMENTAL LAKES AREA

        EPA Science Inventory

        A whole-lake endocrine disruption experiment was conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in northwestern Ontario for three years beginning in 2001. This experiment examined population, organismal, biochemical and cellular-level effects in la...

      2. Recovery Act: Geothermal Data Aggregation: Submission of Information into the National Geothermal Data System, Final Report DOE Project DE-EE0002852 June 24, 2014

        SciTech Connect

        Blackwell, David D.; Chickering Pace, Cathy; Richards, Maria C.

        2014-06-24

        The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is a Department of Energy funded effort to create a single cataloged source for a variety of geothermal information through a distributed network of databases made available via web services. The NGDS will help identify regions suitable for potential development and further scientific data collection and analysis of geothermal resources as a source for clean, renewable energy. A key NGDS repository or ‘node’ is located at Southern Methodist University developed by a consortium made up of: • SMU Geothermal Laboratory • Siemens Corporate Technology, a division of Siemens Corporation • Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas at Austin • Cornell Energy Institute, Cornell University • Geothermal Resources Council • MLKay Technologies • Texas Tech University • University of North Dakota. The focus of resources and research encompass the United States with particular emphasis on the Gulf Coast (on and off shore), the Great Plains, and the Eastern U.S. The data collection includes the thermal, geological and geophysical characteristics of these area resources. Types of data include, but are not limited to, temperature, heat flow, thermal conductivity, radiogenic heat production, porosity, permeability, geological structure, core geophysical logs, well tests, estimated reservoir volume, in situ stress, oil and gas well fluid chemistry, oil and gas well information, and conventional and enhanced geothermal system related resources. Libraries of publications and reports are combined into a unified, accessible, catalog with links for downloading non-copyrighted items. Field notes, individual temperature logs, site maps and related resources are included to increase data collection knowledge. Additional research based on legacy data to improve quality increases our understanding of the local and regional geology and geothermal characteristics. The software to enable the integration, analysis, and dissemination of this team’s NGDS contributions was developed by Siemens Corporate Technology. The SMU Node interactive application is accessible at http://geothermal.smu.edu. Additionally, files may be downloaded from either http://geothermal.smu.edu:9000/geoserver/web/ or through http://geothermal.smu.edu/static/DownloadFilesButtonPage.htm. The Geothermal Resources Council Library is available at https://www.geothermal-library.org/.

      3. El Instituto Nacional del Cáncer de EE. UU. y Perú firman una Declaración de Intención

        Cancer.gov

        El Instituto Nacional del Cáncer y la República del Perú firmaron una declaración de intención para compartir el interés en fomentar la investigación biomédica de oncología, basándose en la colaboración mutua de ambas entidades, así como el objetivo común

      4. Measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings /WWV, (/V≡Z,γ) in e+e- collisions at 189 GeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        DELPHI Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G. D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Åsman, B.; Augustin, J.-E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Belokopytov, Y.; Belous, K.; Benekos, N. C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bilenky, M. S.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H. M.; Bol, L.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R. A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.-M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M. V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Croix, J.; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.-P.; Espirito Santo, M.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, E. N.; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil, I.; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gouz, Y.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F. J.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J. J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hertz, O.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Hughes, G. J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Khokhlov, Y.; Khomenko, B. A.; Khovanski, N. N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N. J.; Klapp, O.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumstein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kurowska, J.; Lamsa, J. W.; Laugier, J.-P.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loken, J. G.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J. R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Cubbin, M.; Mc Kay, R.; Mc Nulty, R.; Mc Pherson, G.; Merle, E.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L. M.; Murray, W. J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F. L.; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Nemecek, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A. G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H. T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Ratoff, P. N.; Read, A. L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, N. G.; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P. B.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, F.; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Y.; Segar, A. M.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A. N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G. R.; Solovianov, O.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tchikilev, O.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, P.; Van den Boeck, W.; Van Doninck, W. K.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J. H.; Wilkinson, G. R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zumerle, G.; Zupan, M.

        2001-03-01

        Measurements of the trilinear gauge boson couplings /WWγ and /WWZ are presented using the data taken by DELPHI in 1998 at a centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV and combined with DELPHI data at 183 GeV. Values are determined for Δg1Z and Δκγ, the differences of the /WWZ charge coupling and of the /WWγ dipole coupling from their Standard Model values, and for λγ, the /WWγ quadrupole coupling. A measurement of the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moment of the /W is extracted from the results for Δκγ and λγ. The study uses data from the final states /jjlν, /jjjj, /lX, /jjX and /γX, where /j represents a quark jet, /l an identified lepton and /X missing four-momentum. The observations are consistent with the predictions of the Standard Model.

      5. Measurements of CP-conserving trilinear gauge boson couplings WWV (V≡ γ,Z) in e+e- collisions at LEP2

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; DELPHI Collaboration

        2010-03-01

        The data taken by Delphi at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV are used to place limits on the CP-conserving trilinear gauge boson couplings Δ gZ1, λ γ and Δ κ γ associated to W + W - and single W production at Lep2. Using data from the jj ℓ ν, jjjj, jjX and ℓ X final states, where j, ℓ and X represent a jet, a lepton and missing four-momentum, respectively, the following limits are set on the couplings when one parameter is allowed to vary and the others are set to their Standard Model values of zero: begin{array}{l}Δ g^Z_1=-0.025^{+0.033}_{-0.030}, noalign{}λ_γ =0.002^{+0.035}_{-0.035}qquadand noalign{}Δkappa_γ =0.024^{+0.077}_{-0.081}. Results are also presented when two or three parameters are allowed to vary. All observations are consistent with the predictions of the Standard Model and supersede the previous results on these gauge coupling parameters published by Delphi.

      6. Observation of the Exclusive Reaction e^+e^-\\ to \\phi\\eta at \\sqrt{s}=10.58 GeV

        SciTech Connect

        Aubert, B.

        2006-11-17

        The authors report the observation of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}{eta} near {radical}s = 10.58 GeV with 6.5 {sigma} significance in the K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}{gamma} final state in a data sample of 224 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. They measure the restricted radiation-corrected cross section to be {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}{eta}) = 2.1 {+-} 0.4(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst) fb within the range |cos{theta}*| < 0.8, where {theta}* is the center-of-mass polar angle of the {phi} meson. The {phi} meson is required to be in the invariant mass range of 1.008 < m{sub {phi}} < 1.035 GeV/c{sup 2}. The radiation corrected cross section in the full cos {theta}* range is extrapolated to be 2.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst) fb.

      7. A scanning electron microscopy and histological study on the effects of the mutant eyeless (e/e) gene upon the hypothalamus in the Mexican axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum Shaw.

        PubMed

        Eagleson, G W; Malacinski, G M

        1986-07-01

        A scanning electron microscopy, histological, and immunochemical investigation examined the effects of the mutant gene (e) upon hypothalamic development in the Mexican axolotl. The adult eyeless mutant is sterile. Previous studies indicated that this reproductive defect was due to the mutation's effect upon the hypothalamus. The present study demonstrated the pleiotropic effects of the eyeless gene upon development of the hypothalamus. Scanning electron microscopy studies looked at the early ontogeny of the hypothalamohypophyseal system. The major morphological difference observed in the hypothalamus of normals compared to eyeless mutants was the reduced nature or complete lack of a preoptic recess in eyeless mutants. Early embryonic tissue movements also differed when normal siblings were compared to eyeless mutant axolotls. Histological examination looking for paraldehyde-fuchsin-positive secretory neurons revealed a paired nucleus preopticus in both normals and eyeless mutants, but this region lacked the emanating paraldehyde-fuchsin-positive fiber tracts in eyeless mutants. The neurohypophysis of the eyeless mutants was atrophied and contained far less paraldehyde-fuchsin-positive material when compared to normal axolotls. Immunochemical studies were done to look at the distribution of immunoreactive luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (ir-LHRH) in brains of eyed and eyeless mutant axolotls of different stages. This study detected deficiencies in ir-LHRH in the anterior hypothalamus of eyeless mutants. In general in the eyeless mutant axolotl, the observed anterior hypothalamic deficiencies are comparable to those observed in anurans which have had their optic vesicles removed. These observations suggest a possible utility of the eyeless mutant axolotl for studies concerned with endocrine development in the absence of hypothalamic modulation.

      8. Correlated Leading Baryon-antibaryon Production in e+e- to ccbar to Lambda_c+ antiLambda_c- X

        SciTech Connect

        Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

        2011-08-22

        We present a study of 649 {+-} 35 e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events produced at {radical}s {approx} 10.6 GeV containing both a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon and a {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} antibaryon. The number observed is roughly four times that expected if the leading charmed hadron types are uncorrelated, confirming an observation by the CLEO Collaboration. We find a 2-jet topology in these events but very few additional baryons, demonstrating that the primary c and {bar c} are predominantly contained in a correlated baryon-antibaryon system. In addition to the charmed baryons we observe on average 2.6 {+-} 0.2 charged intermediate mesons, predominantly pions, carrying 65% of the remaining energy.

      9. Observation of B→D(*) π^(+)π^(-)ℓ^(-)ν Decays in e^(+)e^(-) Collisions at the Υ(4S) Resonance.

        PubMed

        Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lee, M J; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Lankford, A J; Gary, J W; Long, O; Franco Sevilla, M; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Lockman, W S; Panduro Vazquez, W; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Kim, J; Miyashita, T S; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Röhrken, M; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Pushpawela, B G; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Ford, W T; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Santoro, V; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Martellotti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Prell, S; Ahmed, H; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Schubert, K R; Barlow, R J; Lafferty, G D; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Cowan, R; Cheaib, R; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Dey, B; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Summers, D J; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Chrzaszcz, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Dittrich, S; Grünberg, O; Hess, M; Leddig, T; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Vasseur, G; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Fulsom, B G; Graham, M T; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wisniewski, W J; Wulsin, H W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; De Mori, F; Filippi, A; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Beaulieu, A; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lueck, T; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

        2016-01-29

        We report on measurements of the decays of B¯ mesons into the semileptonic final states B¯→D^(*)π^(+)π^(-)ℓ^(-)ν¯, where D^(*) represents a D or D^(*) meson and ℓ^(-) is an electron or a muon. These measurements are based on 471×10^(6) BB ¯ pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC asymmetric B factory PEP-II. We determine the branching fraction ratios R_{π^{+}π^{-}}^{(*)}=B(B[over ¯]→D^{(*)}π^{+}π^{-}ℓ^{-}ν[over ¯])/B(B[over ¯]→D^{(*)}ℓ^{-}ν[over ¯]) using events in which the second B meson is fully reconstructed. We find R_{π^{+}π^{-}}=0.067±0.010±0.008 and R_{π^{+}π^{-}}^{*}=0.019±0.005±0.004, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. Based on these results and assuming isospin invariance, we estimate that B[over ¯]→D^{(*)}ππℓ^{-}ν[over ¯] decays, where π denotes either a π^{±} and π^{0} meson, account for up to half the difference between the measured inclusive semileptonic branching fraction to charm hadrons and the corresponding sum of previously measured exclusive branching fractions.

      10. Observation of B→D(*) π^(+)π^(-)ℓ^(-)ν Decays in e^(+)e^(-) Collisions at the Υ(4S) Resonance.

        PubMed

        Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lee, M J; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Lankford, A J; Gary, J W; Long, O; Franco Sevilla, M; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Lockman, W S; Panduro Vazquez, W; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Kim, J; Miyashita, T S; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Röhrken, M; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Pushpawela, B G; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Ford, W T; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Santoro, V; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Martellotti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Prell, S; Ahmed, H; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Schubert, K R; Barlow, R J; Lafferty, G D; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Cowan, R; Cheaib, R; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Dey, B; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Summers, D J; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Chrzaszcz, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Dittrich, S; Grünberg, O; Hess, M; Leddig, T; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Vasseur, G; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Fulsom, B G; Graham, M T; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wisniewski, W J; Wulsin, H W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; De Mori, F; Filippi, A; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Beaulieu, A; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lueck, T; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

        2016-01-29

        We report on measurements of the decays of B¯ mesons into the semileptonic final states B¯→D^(*)π^(+)π^(-)ℓ^(-)ν¯, where D^(*) represents a D or D^(*) meson and ℓ^(-) is an electron or a muon. These measurements are based on 471×10^(6) BB ¯ pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC asymmetric B factory PEP-II. We determine the branching fraction ratios R_{π^{+}π^{-}}^{(*)}=B(B[over ¯]→D^{(*)}π^{+}π^{-}ℓ^{-}ν[over ¯])/B(B[over ¯]→D^{(*)}ℓ^{-}ν[over ¯]) using events in which the second B meson is fully reconstructed. We find R_{π^{+}π^{-}}=0.067±0.010±0.008 and R_{π^{+}π^{-}}^{*}=0.019±0.005±0.004, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. Based on these results and assuming isospin invariance, we estimate that B[over ¯]→D^{(*)}ππℓ^{-}ν[over ¯] decays, where π denotes either a π^{±} and π^{0} meson, account for up to half the difference between the measured inclusive semileptonic branching fraction to charm hadrons and the corresponding sum of previously measured exclusive branching fractions. PMID:26871322

      11. Prediction of fetal Rh D and Rh CcEe phenotype from maternal plasma with real-time polymerase chain reaction.

        PubMed

        Legler, Tobias J; Lynen, Rainer; Maas, Jens-Holger; Pindur, Gerhard; Kulenkampff, Dietrich; Suren, Anette; Osmers, Rüdiger; Köhler, Michael

        2002-12-01

        Real-time PCR methods for the detection of RHD and the C, c, and E allele of RHCE were applied for the prediction of fetal Rh phenotype using maternal plasma. In one of 36 samples investigated the DNA extraction failed. When we tested the remaining 35 samples for Rh antigens which were absent on the mother's red cells, the fetal D-status was correctly determined in 26 of 27 cases (1 false negative). Fetal C was tested correctly in 23 samples, c was true positive in the only c-negative woman and the fetal E-status was correctly determined in 35 cases. In conclusion real-time PCR of maternal plasma is a non-invasive method to determine fetal RH genotype. However, more studies are required for routine applications because the method is not 100% sensitive.

      12. Final Technical Report Advanced Anchoring Technology DOE Award Number DE-EE0003632 Project Period 09/10 - 09/12

        SciTech Connect

        Meggitt, Dallas J

        2012-11-09

        It is generally conceded that the costs associated with current practices for the mooring, anchoring, or foundation systems of Marine HydroKinetic (MHK) and Deepwater Floating Wind systems are a disproportionate portion of the total cost of an installed system. Reducing the cost of the mooring and anchoring components for MHK systems can contribute substantially to reducing the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Micropile anchors can reduce the LCOE both directly, because the anchors, associated mooring hardware and installation costs are less than conventional anchor and mooring systems, but also because micropile anchors require less extensive geotechnical surveys for confident design and proper implementation of an anchor or foundation system. This report presents the results of the development of critical elements of grouted marine micropile anchor (MMA) technology for application to MHK energy conversion systems and other ocean engineering applications that require fixing equipment to the seafloor. Specifically, this project identified grout formulations and developed designs for grout dispensing systems suitable for use in a seawater environment as a critical development need for successful implementation of practical MMA systems. The project conducted a thorough review of available information on the use of cement-based grouts in seawater. Based on this review and data available from commercial sources, the project selected a range of grout formulations for testing as part of a micropile system. The project also reviewed instrumentation for measuring grout density, pressure and flow rate, and integrated an instrumentation system suitable for use with micropile installation. The grout formulations and instrumentation system were tested successfully and demonstrated the suitability of MMA technology for implementation into anchor systems for MHK and other marine renewable energy systems. In addition, this project developed conceptual designs for micropile anchor systems and the associated drilling and grouting systems to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of micropile anchors. This report presents several conceptual system designs for different applications. This project has concluded that grouted marine micropile anchor technology is practical and very attractive technically and financially for marine renewable energy applications. This technology is considered to be at a Technology Readiness Level 5.

      13. A Measurement of the Pseudoscalar DecayConstant fDs using Charm-Tagged Events in e+e- Collisions at the Y(4S)

        SciTech Connect

        Stelzer, Jorg; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

        2006-10-10

        The decay constant f{sub D{sub s}} of the pseudoscalar strange charm meson D{sub s}{sup +} is an important benchmark test of the theoretical methods that quantitatively describe the nonperturbative low-energy regime of QCD, the theory of the strong interaction. A confirmation of the validity of these predictive methods, foremost lattice QCD, in the sector of heavy-light meson decay constants increases trust in the calculation of f{sub B}, which is an important number for the measurement of the CKM matrix element V{sub td} in B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0}-mixing events. From October 1999 through July 2004, the BABAR experiment, located at the PEP-II storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, collected 230.2 fb{sup -1} of data in e{sup +}e{sup -} collision at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. In this thesis, these data are searched for e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events by identifying sets of charged and neutral pions and charged kaons, consistent with the decay of a charm meson, D{sup 0}, D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +}, or D*{sup +}. A sample of 510,000 charmed mesons with a momentum consistent with e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events is identified.

      14. Observation of B ¯ →D(*) π+π-ℓ-ν ¯ Decays in e+e- Collisions at the Υ (4 S ) Resonance

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Ford, W. T.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

        2016-01-01

        We report on measurements of the decays of B ¯ mesons into the semileptonic final states B ¯ →D(*)π+π-ℓ-ν¯, where D(*) represents a D or D* meson and ℓ- is an electron or a muon. These measurements are based on 471 ×106 B B ¯ pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC asymmetric B factory PEP-II. We determine the branching fraction ratios Rπ+π-(*)=B (B ¯ →D(*)π+π-ℓ-ν¯)/B (B ¯ →D(*)ℓ-ν¯) using events in which the second B meson is fully reconstructed. We find Rπ+π-=0.067 ±0.010 ±0.008 and Rπ+π-*=0.019±0.005 ±0.004 , where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. Based on these results and assuming isospin invariance, we estimate that B ¯ →D(*)π π ℓ-ν¯ decays, where π denotes either a π± and π0 meson, account for up to half the difference between the measured inclusive semileptonic branching fraction to charm hadrons and the corresponding sum of previously measured exclusive branching fractions.

      15. Measurement of Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan $e^+e^-$ pairs in $p \\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

        SciTech Connect

        Bhatia, Sudeep Singh

        2013-01-01

        In this thesis we present the status of the measurement of angular distributions of final state electrons in $p \\bar{p} \\to \\gamma^* Z \\to e^+ e^- + X$ events produced in the Z boson mass region at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron. For this analysis, we are using the full Run II dataset corresponding to 9.7$\\,fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector. The angular distributions as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair are studied, and the Lam-Tung relation, valid only for a spin-1 description of the gluon is investigated. The final result will also describe the details of the production mechanism of Z bosons via quark anti-quark annihilation or quark-gluon Compton scattering.

      16. Trends and Issues in Environmental Education: EE in School Curricula. Reports of a Symposium and a Survey. Environmental Education Information Reports.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Disinger, John F., Comp.

        Charting the curricular institutionalization of environmental education, particularly as it seeks to establish an appropriate niche in the K-12 curriculum, was the focus of a recent symposium held at the annual conference of the North American Association for Environmental Education in October, 1987. Contained in this document are the papers…

      17. Autophosphorylation affects protein complex formation and activity of CDK-activating kinase (Ee;CDKF;1) in leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula)

        Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

        Leafy spurge is a deep rooted perennial weed that propagates both by seeds and underground adventitious buds located on the crown and roots (crown and root buds). As buds develop during the normal growing season, they are maintained in a quiescent state through correlative inhibition. To enhance our...

      18. CDK-activating kinase (Ee;CDKF;1) of leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula) forms both homo-dimers and homo-trimers in its native state

        Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

        Leafy spurge is a deep rooted perennial weed that propagates both by seeds and underground adventitious buds located on the crown and roots (crown and root buds). As buds develop during the normal growing season, they are maintained in a quiescent state through correlative inhibition. To enhance our...

      19. The dipion mass spectrum in e+e- annihilation and tau decay: Isospin symmetry breaking effects from the (rho, omega, phi) mixing

        SciTech Connect

        Benayoun, M.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Leitner, O.; O'Connell, H.B.; /Fermilab

        2008-01-01

        A way to explain the puzzling difference between the pion form factor as measured in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations and in {tau} decays is discussed. We show that isospin symmetry breaking, beside the already identified effects, produces also a full mixing between the {rho}{sup 0}, {omega} and {phi} mesons which generates an isospin 0 component inside the {rho}{sup 0} meson. This effect, not accounted for in current treatments of the problem, seems able to account for the apparent mismatch between e{sup +}e{sup -} and {tau} data below the {phi} mass.

      20. Measurement of Azimuthal Asymmetries in Inclusive Charged Dipion Production in e^{+}e^{-} Annihilations at sqrt[s]=3.65  GeV.

        PubMed

        Ablikim, M; Achasov, M N; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Eren, E E; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, X Q; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kühn, W; Kupsc, A; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

        2016-01-29

        We present a measurement of the azimuthal asymmetries of two charged pions in the inclusive process e^{+}e^{-}→ππX, based on a data set of 62  pb^{-1} at the center-of-mass energy of 3.65 GeV collected with the BESIII detector. These asymmetries can be attributed to the Collins fragmentation function. We observe a nonzero asymmetry, which increases with increasing pion momentum. As our energy scale is close to that of the existing semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering experimental data, the measured asymmetries are important inputs for the global analysis of extracting the quark transversity distribution inside the nucleon and are valuable to explore the energy evolution of the spin-dependent fragmentation function. PMID:26871323

      1. Effects of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) on reproductive endocrine status in mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) under differing salinity and temperature conditions.

        PubMed

        Gillio Meina, Esteban; Lister, Andrea; Bosker, Thijs; Servos, Mark; Munkittrick, Kelly; MacLatchy, Deborah

        2013-06-15

        Exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE₂), a synthetic estrogen, has previously been shown to decrease reproductive endocrine status and egg production in northern mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus macrolepidotus). The objective of this study was to evaluate if variations in salinity or temperature conditions of EE₂-exposed mummichog modify the effect on whole organism reproductive endocrine status and gonadal steroidogenesis. Mummichog were exposed in vivo for 14 days to 0, 50 and 250 ng/L EE₂ in 0, 16 and 32 ppt salinity at 18 °C and to 0 and 250 ng/L EE₂ at 10, 18 and 26 °C at 16 ppt. There was a little overall effect of salinity on measured endpoints. In the salinity exposure, 250 ng/L EE₂-exposed females had significantly reduced 17β-estradiol (E₂) levels. Increased temperature triggered gonadal growth in both sexes and increased plasma E₂ and E₂ production and decreased 11-KT (11-ketotestosterone) production. EE₂ counteracted the effect of temperature by depressing gonadal growth in males. In both exposures, EE₂ effects on testosterone (T) production were variable. The use of steroidogenic precursors (25-OH-cholesterol, and/or pregnenolone and/or testosterone) in the in vitro gonadal incubations indicated decreased E₂ production in females and 11-KT production in males were predominately due to suppression of the terminal conversion step between T and E₂ or 11-KT. Ovarian aromatase A (cyp19a) gene expression at 16 ppt and 18 °C was not affected by 250 ng/L EE₂ (the only treatment combinations tested). Overall, temperature is a factor regulating northern mummichog reproduction; EE₂ overrides its effects and disrupts the terminal step of steroidogenesis. Our results should be considered in designing future estuarine fish bioassays and in understanding effects of estrogenic endocrine disruptors in estuaries. PMID:23608699

      2. "EE in Cyberspace, Why Not?" Teaching, Learning and Researching Tertiary Pre-Service and In-Service Teacher Environmental Education Online

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Whitehouse, Hilary

        2008-01-01

        Information communication technologies (ICTs) have the potential to enable intending and in-service teachers in regional, rural and remote regions greater access to tertiary education. This paper describes how a fourth year environmental education subject has been successfully delivered wholly online for several years and how pre-service and…

      3. Atomic Parity Violation, Muon Pair Production in e+e - Collisions and Detection of CDM WIMP-Physics Related to Neutral Vector Boson D1

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Senju, H.

        1999-11-01

        In our preon model there exists a neutral vector boson D1 which is an isoscalar partner of W(Z) in the vector boson octet. It is shown that the exchange of a D1 of about 1 TeV mass naturally explains a positive excess of the weak charge of atomic cesium recently observed. Other processes occurring through the D1 exchange are discussed, including the detection of CDM WIMP.

      4. Exposure to mobile telecommunication networks assessed using personal dosimetry and well-being in children and adolescents: the German MobilEe-study

        PubMed Central

        Thomas, Silke; Kühnlein, Anja; Heinrich, Sabine; Praml, Georg; von Kries, Rüdiger; Radon, Katja

        2008-01-01

        Background Despite the increase of mobile phone use in the last decade and the growing concern whether mobile telecommunication networks adversely affect health and well-being, only few studies have been published that focussed on children and adolescents. Especially children and adolescents are important in the discussion of adverse health effects because of their possibly higher vulnerability to radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Methods We investigated a possible association between exposure to mobile telecommunication networks and well-being in children and adolescents using personal dosimetry. A population-based sample of 1.498 children and 1.524 adolescents was assembled for the study (response 52%). Participants were randomly selected from the population registries of four Bavarian (South of Germany) cities and towns with different population sizes. During a Computer Assisted Personal Interview data on participants' well-being, socio-demographic characteristics and potential confounder were collected. Acute symptoms were assessed three times during the study day (morning, noon, evening). Using a dosimeter (ESM-140 Maschek Electronics), we obtained an exposure profile over 24 hours for three mobile phone frequency ranges (measurement interval 1 second, limit of determination 0.05 V/m) for each of the participants. Exposure levels over waking hours were summed up and expressed as mean percentage of the ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection) reference level. Results In comparison to non-participants, parents and adolescents with a higher level of education who possessed a mobile phone and were interested in the topic of possible adverse health effects caused by mobile telecommunication network frequencies were more willing to participate in the study. The median exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields of children and adolescents was 0.18% and 0.19% of the ICNIRP reference level respectively. Conclusion In comparison to previous studies this is one of the first to assess the individual level of exposure to mobile telecommunication networks using personal dosimetry, enabling objective assessment of exposure from all sources and longer measurement periods. In total, personal dosimetry was proofed to be a well accepted tool to study exposure to mobile phone frequencies in epidemiologic studies including health effects on children and adolescents. PMID:18983641

      5. Study of neutral-current four-fermion and ZZ production in e+e- collisions at sqrt(s)= 183 GeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        L3 Collaboration; Acciarri, M.; Achard, P.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banicz, K.; Barczyk, A.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Böhm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Button, A.; Cai, X. D.; Campanelli, M.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chereau, X.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A. P.; Colino, N.; Conventi, F.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de La Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Dai, T. S.; van Dalen, J. A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Denes, P.; Denotaristefani, F.; de Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournand, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falagan, M. A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S. S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Gruenewald, M. W.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberría, I.; Khan, R. A.; Kamrad, D.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, J.; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Kopp, A.; Korolko, I.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraemer, R. W.; Krenz, W.; Kunin, A.; Lacentre, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lapoint, C.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurikainen, P.; Lavorato, A.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H. J.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Lin, C. H.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mangeol, D.; Marchesini, P.; Marian, G.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R. R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; von der Mey, M.; Migani, D.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Molnar, P.; Monteleoni, B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Muheim, F.; Muijs, A. J. M.; Nahn, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nippe, A.; Nisati, A.; Nowak, H.; Oh, Y. D.; Organtini, G.; Ostonen, R.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Park, H. K.; Park, I. H.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Peach, D.; Pedace, M.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Petrak, S.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Produit, N.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Raja, N.; Rancoita, P. G.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riles, K.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Roe, B. P.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Ruschmeier, D.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M. P.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shukla, J.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.

        1999-03-01

        A study of neutral-current four-fermion processes is performed using a data sample corresponding to 55.3 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the L3 detector at LEP at an average centre-of-mass energy of 183 GeV. The neutral-current four-fermion cross sections for final states with a pair of charged leptons plus jets and with four charged leptons are measured to be consistent with the Standard Model predictions. Events with fermion pair masses close to the Z boson mass are selected in all observable final states and the ZZ production cross section is measured to be σZZ=0.30+0.22 +0.07-0.16 -0.03 pb, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. No evidence for the existence of anomalous triple gauge boson ZZZ and ZZγ couplings is found and limits on these couplings are set.

      6. 31 CFR 351.30 - What are interest rates and monthly accruals for Series EE bonds with issue dates of May 1, 1997...

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

        2010-07-01

        .... through Jan. Feb. or Aug May 1 Aug. through Jan Sep. through Feb. Mar. or Sep May 1 Sep. through Feb Oct.... through Jul. Feb. or Aug Nov. 1 Feb. through Jul Mar. through Aug. Mar. or Sep Nov. 1 Mar. through Aug Apr. through Sep. Apr. or Oct Nov. 1 Apr. through Sep May through Oct. May or Nov Nov. 1 Nov. through Apr...

      7. Search for the Charmed Pentaquark Candidate Theta_c(3100)^0 in e^+e^- Annihilations at \\sqrt{s}=10.58 GeV

        SciTech Connect

        Aubert, B.

        2006-04-07

        We search for the charmed pentaquark candidate reported by the H1 collaboration, the {Theta}{sub c}(3100){sup o}, in e{sup +}e{sup -} interactions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 10.58 GeV, using 124 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} facility at SLAC. We find no evidence for such a state in the same pD*{sup -} decay mode reported by H1, and we set limits on its production cross section times branching fraction into pD*{sup -} as a function of c.m. momentum. The corresponding limit on its total rate per e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} q{bar q} event, times branching fraction, is about three orders of magnitude lower than rates measured for the charmed {Lambda}{sub c} and {Sigma}{sub c} baryons in such events.

      8. Inclusive Lambda_c Production in e+e- Annihilations at sqrt{s}=10.54 GeV and in Upsilon(4S) Decays

        SciTech Connect

        Aubert, B.

        2006-09-07

        We present measurements of the total production rates and momentum distributions of the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} hadrons at a center-of-mass energy of 10.54 GeV and in {Upsilon}(4S) decays. In hadronic events at 10.54 GeV, charmed hadrons are almost exclusively leading particles in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events, allowing direct studies of c-quark fragmentation. We measure a momentum distribution for {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons that differs significantly from those measured previously for charmed mesons. Comparing with a number of models, we find none that can describe the distribution completely. We measure an average scaled momentum of (x{sub p}) = 0.574 {+-} 0.009 and a total rate of N{sub {Lambda}{sub c}}{sup q{bar q}} = 0.057 {+-} 0.002(exp.) {+-} 0.015(BF) {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} per hadronic event, where the experimental error is much smaller than that due to the branching fraction into the reconstructed decay mode, pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}. In {Upsilon}(4S) decays we measure a total rate of N{sub {Lambda}{sub c}}{sup {Upsilon}} = 0.091 {+-} 0.006(exp.) {+-} 0.024(BF) per {Upsilon}(4S) decay, and find a much softer momentum distribution than expected from B decays into a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} plus an antinucleon and one to three pions.

      9. Energy Keepers Incorporated, U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Award #DE-EE0005040 Final Report December 2014

        SciTech Connect

        Gillin, Charmel; Lipscomb, Brian

        2014-12-23

        This project aimed at supporting one key component of a major multi-step undertaking on the part of the CSKT: the acquisition of the Kerr Hydroelectric project and its subsequent operation as a wholesale power generation facility. This project provided support to kick-start the development of the organizational structure to acquire and operate the facility by acquiring critical expertise necessary for the acquisition by funding in part two key personnel for the first two years of the four-year organizational development process. These individuals provided the Tribes with expert knowledge in the highly specialized areas of resource balancing, power marketing, and hydro-engineering; essential prerequisites to the Tribes' ability to build an organization for the operation of the Kerr Project and to securing financial backing for the acquisition. Goals achieved:   • Establishing an efficient and economic conveyance process, and transition plans • Establishing an efficient and effective Tribal wholesale power generation corporation to manage the plant, balance the resources, and market the power from the Kerr Project. The success of this project, which is essential to the Tribes' acquisition of the Kerr Hydroelectric facility, helps to address poverty and unemployment among Tribal members by generating a number of highly skilled and specialized, high-paying Tribal member jobs and providing a stream of income from power sales that will be used for Tribal economic development. Objectives achieved: The project supported the position of Power Plant Operations and Maintenance engineer and power marketing coordinator positions. These are key, in part, to the Tribes' successful acquisition and operation of the facility because they will enable to the Tribes to gain the very specialized expertise required to operate a large wholesale power generation facility. Specific objectives include: Objective 1: Hire a power marketing coordinator to develop and coordinate the appropriate power marketing strategy for the sale of power generated by the operation of Kerr Dam. Objective 2: Hire a staff engineer.

      10. 1H-NMR METABOLOMICS ANALYIS OF ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO) EXPOSED TO THE ENVIRONMENTALLY-RELEVANT EDC 17 ALPHA-ETHINYLESTRADIOL (EE2)

        EPA Science Inventory

        Elevated levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been reported in waterways worldwide and have been shown to affect numerous aspects of development, behavior, reproduction, and survival in various fish species. We have examined the effects of the synthetic steroid 1...

      11. Pursuing the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking: a 'Bayesian Physics' argument for sqrt(s) <~; 600 GeV e+e- collider

        SciTech Connect

        Kane, G.L.; Wells, James D.

        2000-08-09

        High-energy data has been accumulating over the last ten years, and it should not be ignored when making decisions about the future experimental program. In particular, we argue that the electroweak data collected at LEP, SLC and Tevatron indicate a light scalar particle with mass less than 500 GeV. This result is based on considering a wide variety of theories including the Standard Model, supersymmetry, large extra dimensions, and composite models. We argue that a high luminosity, 600 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider would then be the natural choice to feel confident about finding and studying states connected to electroweak symmetry breaking. We also argue from the data that worrying about resonances at multi-TeV energies as the only signal for electroweak symmetry breaking is not as important a discovery issue for the next generation of colliders. Such concerns should perhaps be replaced with more relevant discovery issues such as a Higgs boson that decays invisibly, and ''new physics'' that could conspire with a heavier Higgs boson to accommodate precision electroweak data. An e{sup +}e{sup -} collider with {radical}s {approx}< 600 GeV is ideally suited to cover these possibilities.

      12. USING 1H-NMR METABOLOMICS TO CHARACTERIZE ALTERED METABOLIC PROFILES IN ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO) EXPOSED TO THE MODEL EDCS 17 ALPHA-ETHINYLESTRADIOL (EE2) AND FADROZOLE

        EPA Science Inventory

        Elevated levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been reported in waterways worldwide and have been shown to affect numerous aspects of development, behavior, reproduction, and survival in various fish species. We have examined the effects of the synthetic steroid 17...

      13. 78 FR 40513 - Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing...

        Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

        2013-07-05

        ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...: Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Forms (Forms EE-1, EE-2, EE-3, EE-4, EE-7... agency ] responsible for the administration of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

      14. Cross Sections for the Reactions e+e to K+ K- pi+pi-, K+ K- pi0pi0, and K+ K- K+ K- Measured Using Initial-State Radiation

        SciTech Connect

        Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

        2011-08-19

        We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}-{gamma}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 84000, 8000, and 4200 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 454 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} data can be compared with direct measurements of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} reaction. No direct measurements exist for the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} or e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -} reactions, and we present an update of our previous result with doubled statistics. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and extract their cross sections. In particular, we perform a more detailed study of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{pi}{gamma} reaction, and confirm the presence of the Y (2175) resonance in the {phi}(1020)f{sub 0}(980) and K{sup +}K{sup -} f{sub 0}(980) modes. In the charmonium region, we observe the J/{psi} in all three final states and in several intermediate states, as well as the {phi}(2S) in some modes, and measure the corresponding branching fractions.

      15. The Angular Coefficients and $A_{fb}$ of Drell-Yan $e^{+}e^{-}$ Pairs in the Z Mass Region from $p\\bar{p}$ Collision at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

        SciTech Connect

        Han, Jiyeon; /Rochester U.

        2011-10-01

        We report on the measurement of angular coefficients and the forward and backward asymmetry (A{sub fb}) of Drell-Yan dielectron pairs from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The angular distributions are studied as a function of the transverse momentum of dielectron pair and A{sub fb} is measured using the event counting method. The Lam-Tung (A{sub 0} - A{sub 2} = 0) relation which is only valid for a spin-1 description of the gluon is also tested.

      16. First Measurement of the Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan e+e- Pairs in the Z Mass Region from pp¯ Collisions at s=1.96TeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

        2011-06-01

        We report on the first measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in pp¯→γ*/Z→e+e-+X events produced in the Z boson mass region at s=1.96TeV. The data sample collected by the CDF II detector for this result corresponds to 2.1fb-1 of integrated luminosity. The angular distributions are studied as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair and show good agreement with the Lam-Tung relation, consistent with a spin-1 description of the gluon, and demonstrate that, at high values of the transverse momentum, Z bosons are produced via quark-antiquark annihilation and quark-gluon Compton processes.

      17. Final report. Geothermal Energy Program: Information dissemination, public outreach, and technical analysis activities. April 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. USDOE Grant No. DE-FG01-99-EE35098

        SciTech Connect

        Lund, John W.

        2002-03-22

        This is the final report of the accomplishments of the geothermal energy program: information dissemination, public outreach, and technical analysis activities by the project team consisting of the Geo-Heat Center, Geothermal Resources Council, Geothermal Education Office, Geothermal Energy Association, and the Washington State University Energy Program.

      18. Peterburgskaya akademiya nauk v XVIII v. i ee pol' v rasprostranenii N'yutonianstva na kontinente Evropy %t Petersburg Academy of Sciences of 18th century and its role in the dissemination of Newtonianism in teh continental Europe

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Nevskaya, N. I.

        "Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica" by I. Newton were published and immediately recognized in England in 1687. However in countries of the continental Europe up to 1744 dominated the Cartesianism. Few newtonians were exposed to persecutions. Under such circumstances in 1724 Peter The Great decided to found an Academy of sciences in Russia. Since in this country there were no scientists, it was decided to invite them from the continental Europe. Two scientists arrived to Russia were newtonians. Other just were graduated from universities and had no hope for scientific work in their native lands. This situation turned out to be rather happy. The newtonians - J. N. Delisle and J. Hermann - trained the youth (D. Bernoulli, L. Euler, F. Ch. Mayer, G. W. Krafft, A. D. Kantemir, G. W. Richmann, M. V. Lomonosov, N. I. Popov, V. K. Trediakovskij, A. D. Krasilnikov etc.). They created the science of Russia and enhanced the doctrine of Newton. Their scientific works were printed in "Commentarii" in Latin. The newspaper "St.-Petersburg sheets" and its appendix, the magazine "Notes on the Sheet" (issued in Russian and German) - published the works of Petersburg Academy of sciences and promoted the Newtonianism. Everyone, who could read in German, used these materials. One of the readers was I. Kant. He relied upon these publications in preparing his lectures at Königsberg University, and then later, in working out the cosmogony theory. The works of J. N. Delisle, L. Euler and A. C. Clairaut on the theory of comets' and planets' movement justified Newtons doctrine. They also forced J. Cassini to accept the doctrine as well. Delisle's papers on the history of astronomy published there are helpful for understanding of the history of development the astronomy. The books of J. F. Weidler "A history of astronomy" (1741) and "Astronomical bibliography" (1755) formed the basis for all histories of astronomy in the XVIII-XIX centuries.

      19. Observation of a Broad Structure at an Invariant Massof 4.32 GeV in the Reaction e+e- to pi+pi-psi(2S) Measured at BaBar

        SciTech Connect

        Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /Basilicata U., Potenza

        2006-10-31

        The authors measure the cross section for the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{psi}(2S) from threshold up to 8 GeV center-of-mass energy using events containing initial-state radiation, produced at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The study is based on 298 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector. A structure is observed in the cross-section not far above threshold, near 4.32 GeV. This structure is not compatible with the Y(4260) previously reported by this experiment. A single resonance is adequate to describe the cross-section in the low-energy region (< 5.7 GeV).

      20. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT, U.S. Department of Energy: Award No. DE-EE0002855 "Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field - Cameron Parish, Louisiana"

        SciTech Connect

        Gayle, Phillip A., Jr.

        2012-01-13

        The goal of the project was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of geopressured-geothermal power development by exploiting the extraordinarily high pressured hot brines know to exist at depth near the Sweet Lake oil and gas field in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The existence of a geopressured-geothermal system at Sweet Lake was confirmed in the 1970's and 1980's as part of DOE's Geopressured-Geothermal Program. That program showed that the energy prices at the time could not support commercial production of the resource. Increased electricity prices and technological advancements over the last two decades, combined with the current national support for developing clean, renewable energy and the job creation it would entail, provided the justification necessary to reevaluate the commercial feasibility of power generation from this vast resource.

      1. Photoproduction of J/psi and of High Mass e+e- in Ultra-Peripheral Au+Au Collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

        SciTech Connect

        Afanasiev, S.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

        2009-01-01

        We present the first measurement of photoproduction of J/{Psi} and of two-photon production of high-mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs in electromagnetic (or ultra-peripheral) nucleus-nucleus interactions, using Au + Au data at {radical}S{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The events are tagged with forward neutrons emitted following Coulomb excitation of one or both Au* nuclei. The event sample consists of 28 events with m{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}} > 2 GeV/c{sup 2} with zero like-sign background. The measured cross sections at midrapidity of d{sigma}/dy (J/{Psi} + Xn,y = 0) = 76 {+-} 33(stat) {+-} 11(syst) {micro}b and d{sup 2}{sigma}/dm dy(e{sup +}e{sup -} + Xn, y = 0) = 86 {+-} 23(stat) {+-} 16(syst) {micro}b/(GeV/c{sup 2}) for m{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}} {element_of} [2.0,2.8] GeV/c{sup 2} have been compared and found to be consistent with models for photoproduction of J/{Psi} and QED based calculations of two-photon production of e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs.

      2. Improved determination of the D → K-π+π+π- coherence factor and associated hadronic parameters from a combination of e+e- → ψ (3770) → c c bar and pp → c c bar X data

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Evans, T.; Harnew, S. T.; Libby, J.; Malde, S.; Rademacker, J.; Wilkinson, G.

        2016-06-01

        Measurements of the coherence factor RK3π, the average strong-phase difference δDK3π and mean amplitude ratio rDK3π for the decay D →K-π+π+π- are presented. These parameters are important inputs to the determination of the unitarity triangle angle γ in B- → DK- decays, where D designates a superposition of D0 and Dbar0 mesons decaying to a common final state. The results are based on a combined fit to observables obtained from a re-analysis of the CLEO-c ψ (3770) data set and those measured in a D0Dbar0 mixing study performed by the LHCb Collaboration.

      3. Final report to the Department of Energy: Green Schools Project DE-FC01-99EE10685. Schools for the 21st century: Transferring the Green Schools experience

        SciTech Connect

        Harrigan, Merrilee

        2002-01-15

        This report describes five major activities that the Alliance to Save Energy performed for the years 2000 and 2001 to support and compliment DOE's Energy Smart Schools Partnership. The major tasks under this project were to: (1) Promote the School Efficiency Peer Exchange program for school personnel; (2) develop the Earth Apple Awards program and disseminate the best award-winning ideas; (3) link Green Schools with Rebuilt with at least one metropolitan area such as Philadelphia or Buffalo; (4) support Rebuild/Energy Smart Schools through working at the state level to develop business, state, and local government and through making presentations in support of school efficiency; (5) update the curriculum search originally conducted in 1995.

      4. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF GESTATIONAL AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHINYL ESTRADIOL (EE) AND BISPHENOL A (BPA) ON REPRODUCTIVE MORPHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR IN THE FEMALE LONG EVANS HOODED RAT

        EPA Science Inventory

        Anthropogenic estrogens are pervasive in the environment. The effects of these 'xenoestrogens' are controversial in humans, although there is a clear indication that some fish species are adversely affected in contaminated ecosystems. The current project focuses on the effects ...

      5. Final Scientific/Technical Report – DE-EE0002960 Recovery Act. Detachment faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation of Pearl Hot Spring, Nevada

        SciTech Connect

        Stockli, Daniel F.

        2015-11-30

        The Pearl Host Spring Geothermal Project funded by the DoE Geothermal Program was a joint academic (KU/UT & OU) and industry collaboration (Sierra and Ram Power) to investigate structural controls and the importance of low-angle normal faults on geothermal fluid flow through a multifaceted geological, geophysical, and geochemical investigation in west-central Nevada. The study clearly showed that the geothermal resources in Clayton Valley are controlled by the interplay between low-angle normal faults and active deformation related to the Walker Lane. The study not only identified potentially feasible blind geothermal resource plays in eastern Clayton Valley, but also provide a transportable template for exploration in the area of west-central Nevada and other regional and actively-deforming releasing fault bends. The study showed that deep-seated low-angle normal faults likely act as crustal scale permeability boundaries and could play an important role in geothermal circulation and funneling geothermal fluid into active fault zones. Not unique to this study, active deformation is viewed as an important gradient to rejuvenated fracture permeability aiding the long-term viability of blind geothermal resources. The technical approach for Phase I included the following components, (1) Structural and geological analysis of Pearl Hot Spring Resource, (2) (U-Th)/He thermochronometry and geothermometry, (3) detailed gravity data and modeling (plus some magnetic and resistivity), (4) Reflection and Refraction Seismic (Active Source), (5) Integration with existing and new geological/geophysical data, and (6) 3-D Earth Model, combining all data in an innovative approach combining classic work with new geochemical and geophysical methodology to detect blind geothermal resources in a cost-effective fashion.

      6. Weatherization Partnerships Project, Grant No. DE FG 0299EE27594, October 1, 1999 - December 31, 2000. Final Technical Report and FY 1999 version of 'Lessons learned the long way: Integrating utility, energy efficiency tasks with weatherization'

        SciTech Connect

        Power, Meg

        2002-11-01

        Includes reports on (1) the results of focus groups on managing utility residential efficiency [attitudes?] for low-income housing, and (2) low-income household energy consumption and expenditures patterns and weatherization opportunities 1987-1997, intensive analysis of R.E.C.S. data.

      7. Cesium-containing triple cation perovskite solar cells: improved stability, reproducibility and high efficiency† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ee03874j Click here for additional data file.

        PubMed Central

        Matsui, Taisuke; Seo, Ji-Youn; Domanski, Konrad; Correa-Baena, Juan-Pablo; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.; Tress, Wolfgang; Abate, Antonio; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael

        2016-01-01

        Today's best perovskite solar cells use a mixture of formamidinium and methylammonium as the monovalent cations. With the addition of inorganic cesium, the resulting triple cation perovskite compositions are thermally more stable, contain less phase impurities and are less sensitive to processing conditions. This enables more reproducible device performances to reach a stabilized power output of 21.1% and ∼18% after 250 hours under operational conditions. These properties are key for the industrialization of perovskite photovoltaics. PMID:27478500

      8. Measurement of sin2θefflept using e+e- pairs from γ*/Z bosons produced in p p ¯ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

        2016-06-01

        At the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton (p p ¯) collider, Drell-Yan lepton pairs are produced in the process p p ¯→e+e-+X through an intermediate γ*/Z boson. The forward-backward asymmetry in the polar-angle distribution of the e- as a function of the e+e--pair mass is used to obtain sin2θefflept, the effective leptonic determination of the electroweak-mixing parameter sin2θW. The measurement sample, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponds to 9.4 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from p p ¯ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV, and is the full CDF Run II data set. The value of sin2θefflept is found to be 0.23248 ±0.00053 . The combination with the previous CDF measurement based on μ+μ- pairs yields sin2θefflept=0.23221±0.00046 . This result, when interpreted within the specified context of the standard model assuming sin2θW=1 - MW2/MZ2 and that the W - and Z -boson masses are on-shell, yields sin2θW=0.22400 ±0.00045 , or equivalently a W -boson mass of 80.328 ±0.024 GeV /c2 .

      9. First Measurement of the Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan $e^{+}e^{-}$ pairs in the Z Mass Region from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

        SciTech Connect

        Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

        2011-03-01

        We report on the first measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in p{bar p} {yields} {gamma}*/Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + X events produced in the Z boson mass region at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample collected by the CDF II detector for this result corresponds to 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The angular distributions are studied as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair and show good agreement with the Lam-Tung relation, consistent with a spin-1 description of the gluon, and demonstrate that at high values of the transverse momentum, Z bosons are produced via quark anti-quark annihilation and quark-gluon Compton processes.

      10. Indirect measurement of sin⁡2θW (MW) using e+e- pairs in the Z-boson region with pp¯ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucà, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

        2013-10-01

        Drell-Yan lepton pairs are produced in the process pp¯→e+e-+X through an intermediate γ*/Z boson. The lepton angular distributions are used to provide information on the electroweak-mixing parameter sin⁡2θW via its observable effective-leptonic sin⁡2θW, or sin⁡2θefflept. A new method to infer sin⁡2θW or, equivalently, the W-boson mass MW in the on-shell scheme, is developed and tested using a previous CDF Run II measurement of angular distributions from electron pairs in a sample corresponding to 2.1fb-1 of integrated luminosity from pp¯ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV. The value of sin⁡2θefflept is found to be 0.2328±0.0011. Within a specified context of the standard model, this results in sin⁡2θW=0.2246±0.0011, which corresponds to a W-boson mass of 80.297±0.055GeV/c2, in agreement with previous determinations in electron-position collisions and at the Tevatron collider.

      11. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF GESTATIONAL AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHINYL ESTRADIOL (EE) AND BISPHENOL A (BPA) ON REPRODUCTIVE MORPHOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR IN FEMALE AND MALE LONG EVANS HOODED RAT

        EPA Science Inventory

        Anthropogenic estrogens are pervasive in the environment. Although the effects of these 'xenoestrogens' are controversial in humans, some fish species are adversely affected in contaminated ecosystems. The current project focuses on the effects of developmental exposure to two ...

      12. Study of short-range correlation in nuclei via measurement of the 4He(,ee'pp) and 4He(e,e'pn) reaction

        SciTech Connect

        Korover, Igor

        2015-04-01

        This thesis reports on a simultaneous measurement of the 4He(e,e'p), 4He(e,e'pp), and 4He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q2 = 2 (GeV/c)2 and xB > 1 for an (e,e'p) missing momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c.

      13. The ηcγ γ* transition form factor in the decay ηc-> γ ℓ+ℓ- and in the crossed channels γ e--> ηc e- and e+e--> ηcγ

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        di Salvo, E.; Rekalo, M. P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

        2000-08-01

        The Dalitz distribution and the effective mass spectrum of the lepton pair produced in the decay η_cto γ ell^+ ell^-, as well as the differential cross sections for the crossed channels γ e^-to η_c e^- and e^+ e^-to η_c γ, are calculated in terms of the sole electromagnetic transition form factor for the vertex η_ctoγ γ^*, where γ^* is a virtual photon with a space-like (for γ e^- to η_c e^- ) or a time-like (for e^+ e^-to η_c γ and η_ctoγ ell^+ell^-) four-momentum. Explicit parameterizations of the transition form factor are found in two different approaches, namely in the vector dominance model and in a QCD-inspired consideration on the basis of the process c overline cto γ ell^+ ell^-, with zero relative three-momentum of the annihilating quarks.

      14. Alteration of Cingulate Long-Term Plasticity and Behavioral Sensitization to Inflammation by Environmental Enrichment

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Shum, Fanny W. F.; Wu, Long-Jun; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Toyoda, Hiroki; Xu, Hui; Ren, Ming; Pinaud, Raphael; Ko, Shanelle W.; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Zhuo, Min

        2007-01-01

        Exposure to an enriched environment (EE) has been shown to induce cortical plasticity. Considerable amount of research is focused on the effects of EE in the hippocampus; however, effects of EE on other brain regions and the mechanisms involved are not well known. To investigate this, we induced cortical plasticity by placing mice in an EE for one…

      15. An Acceptance-Based Psychoeducation Intervention to Reduce Expressed Emotion in Relatives of Bipolar Patients

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Eisner, Lori R.; Johnson, Sheri L.

        2008-01-01

        Expressed emotion (EE) is a robust predictor of outcome in bipolar disorder. Despite decades of research, interventions to reduce EE levels have had only modest effects. This study used an expanded model of EE to develop an intervention. Research has demonstrated a strong link between attributions and EE in families of patients with psychiatric…

      16. Improving energy expenditure estimation by using a triaxial accelerometer.

        PubMed

        Chen, K Y; Sun, M

        1997-12-01

        In our study of 125 subjects (53 men and 72 women) for two 24-h periods, we validated energy expenditure (EE), estimated by a triaxial accelerometer (Tritrac-R3D), by using a whole-room indirect calorimeter under close-to-normal living conditions. The estimated EE was correlated with the measured total EE for the 2 days (r = 0. 925 and r = 0.855; P < 0.001) and in minute-by-minute EE (P < 0.01). Resting EE formulated by the Tritrac was found to be similar to the measured values [standard errors of estimation (SEE) = 0.112 W/kg; P = 0.822]. The Tritrac significantly underestimated total EE, EE for physical activities, EE of sedentary and light-intensity activities, and EE for exercise such as stepping (all P < 0.001). We developed a linear and a nonlinear model to predict EE by using the acceleration components from the Tritrac. Predicted EE was significantly improved with both models in estimating total EE, total EE for physical activities, EE in low-intensity activities, minute-by-minute averaged relative difference, and minute-by-minute SEE (all P < 0. 05). Furthermore, with our generalized models and by using subjects' physical characteristics and body acceleration, EE can be estimated with higher accuracy (averaged SEE = 0.418 W/kg) than with the Tritrac model.

      17. [Endogenous ethanol and its possible participation in the activity of the central nervous system in healthy subjects and alcoholics].

        PubMed

        Kudriavtsev, R V; Ushakova, M M; Nebarakova, T P; Valentik, Iu V; Ionova, K P

        1987-01-01

        Blood concentrations of endogenous ethanol (EE) reflects the effects of various psychic and medicinal impacts. EE levels in alcoholic patients depend on the severity of alcoholism, emotional status and efficacy of treatment. Actualization of the pathologic craving for alcohol and other types of emotional excitement are attended by reduced EE concentrations whereas the disactualization of the pathological craving for alcohol and relaxation increase the EE levels. Stabilization of alcoholic patients' clinical status is attended by stabilization of EE values. It is suggested that acetaldehyde acts as a modulator of catecholamine levels both in normal subjects and alcoholics ensuring connection between EE levels and the status of the central nervous system.

      18. Impairment of vocal expression of negative emotions in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

        PubMed

        Han, Kyung-Hun; Zaytseva, Yuliya; Bao, Yan; Pöppel, Ernst; Chung, Sun Yong; Kim, Jong Woo; Kim, Hyun Taek

        2014-01-01

        Vocal expression of emotions (EE) in retrieval of events from autobiographical memory was investigated in patients in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Twenty-one AD patients and 19 controls were interviewed, and EE of the reported memories was rated by 8 independent evaluators. The AD group had lower EE of both recent and remote memory than controls, although EE in remote memories was better preserved in both groups. We observed positive correlations between EE and indicators of cognitive competence in AD patients. AD Patients are impaired in the ability to express emotions already at early stages of the disease, and EE seems to deteriorate along with the progression of cognitive impairment.

      19. Exposure to an enriched environment up to middle age allows preservation of spatial memory capabilities in old age.

        PubMed

        Fuchs, Fanny; Cosquer, Brigitte; Penazzi, Lorène; Mathis, Chantal; Kelche, Christian; Majchrzak, Monique; Barbelivien, Alexandra

        2016-02-15

        In rats, some cognitive capabilities, like spatial learning and memory, are preserved from age-related decline by whole adult life enriched environment (EE) exposure. However, to which extent late EE contributes to such maintenance remains to be investigated. Here we assessed the impact of late housing condition (e.g., from the age of 18 months) on spatial learning and memory of aged rats (24 months) previously exposed or unexposed to EE from young adulthood. The results showed that late EE was not required for spatial memory maintenance in aged rats previously housed in EE. In contrast, late EE mitigates spatial memory deficit in aged rats previously unexposed to EE. These outcomes suggest that EE exposure up to middle age provides a "reserve"-like advantage which supports an enduring preservation of spatial capabilities in old age.

      20. HETEROGENEITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

        SciTech Connect

        Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels, Neil

        2011-07-01

        We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample is comprised of 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales-durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals-for EE bursts are factors of {approx}2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts-the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width-continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition, we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts ({approx}6x10{sup -10} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) is {approx}>20x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts ({approx}60,000 s) is {approx}30x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into denser environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently powers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

      1. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

        NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

        Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

        2011-01-01

        We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

      2. Everolimus-induced Pneumonitis after Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Case Report

        SciTech Connect

        Sakamoto, Susumu Kikuchi, Naoshi; Ichikawa, Atsuo; Sano, Go; Satoh, Keita; Sugino, Keishi; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Takai, Yujiro; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Homma, Sakae

        2013-08-01

        Despite the wide use of everolimus as an antineoplastic coating agent for coronary stents to reduce the rate of restenosis, little is known about the health hazards of everolimus-eluting stents (EES). We describe a case of pneumonitis that developed 2 months after EES implantation for angina. Lung pathology demonstrated an organizing pneumonia pattern that responded to corticosteroid therapy. Although the efficacy of EES for ischemic heart disease is well established, EES carries a risk of pneumonitis.

      3. Electron-electron collisions at TESLA

        NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

        Schreiber, Siegfried; Reyzl, Ingrid

        2001-07-01

        Electron-electron collisions at the future TESLA linear collider is a promising complement to e+e- collisions. A critical issue for the physics potential of this option is the achievable luminosity. For e+e- collisions, the pinch effect enhances the luminosity, while due to the repelling forces for e-e- collisions, the luminosity is significantly reduced and is more sensitive to beam separations. This report discusses the e-e- option for TESLA and the expected luminosity.

      4. Subregional Training Seminar on the Incorporation of Environmental Education Into Industrial Education for the Caribbean (Kingston, Jamaica, May 9-16, 1988). Final Report.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        College of Arts, Science and Technology, Kingston (Jamaica).

        This seminar was organized to: (1) study the place and need of environmental education (EE) in the context of technical and vocational education; (2) develop strategies for the incorporation of EE into the curriculum and teacher-training for pre-university industrial schools; (3) develop prototype EE materials for incorporation into the curriculum…

      5. A Study on Environmental Knowledge Level of Primary Students in Turkey

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Gökdere, Murat

        2005-01-01

        The education system in Turkey has responded promptly to the need for environmental education (EE). However, the existing lack of relevant research may limit the functionality of EE programs in Turkey. In this study, the goal was to develop an environmental conscious database that would allow effective planning of EE. Specifically, the study was…

      6. Entrepreneurship Education and Academic Performance

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Johansen, Vegard

        2014-01-01

        The significant increase of entrepreneurship education (EE) is a trend in Europe. Entrepreneurship education is supposed to promote general and specific entrepreneurial abilities and improve academic performance. This paper evaluates whether EE influences academic performance, measured by Grade Point Average. The main indicator used for EE is the…

      7. The Influence of School Culture on Environmental Education Integration: A Case Study of an Urban Private School System

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Shumacher, Stephanie L.; Fuhrman, Nicholas E.; Duncan, Dennis W.

        2012-01-01

        As a discipline, environmental education (EE) has been criticized for lacking empirical evidence on the behavioral outcomes of its programs. While the behavioral outcomes of EE activities are often associated with the youth learner, teachers are one target audience of EE training programs who have received increasing attention with regards to…

      8. Connect: UNESCO-UNEP Environmental Education Newsletter, 1993.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Connect, 1993

        1993-01-01

        Continued communication about environmental education (EE) issues is a goal of UNESCO. This document consists of the four issues of the UNESCO-UNEP Environmental Education Newsletter published in 1993. Each issue contains a lead story, followed by regular sections that report EE activities in participating countries and regions, new EE centers,…

      9. A Longitudinal Study of Environmental and Outdoor Education: A Cultural Change

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Tal, Tali; Morag, Orly

        2013-01-01

        In this case-study, we present a longitudinal study of one elementary (grades 1-6) school's environmental education (EE) in order to understand the ways in which the school culture supports outdoor EE as a critical component of their science education program. The school, which was known for its school-based EE curriculum that encompasses an…

      10. 31 CFR 351.43 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series...

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

        2010-07-01

        ... (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series EE savings bond? 351.43 Section 351.43 Money... OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.43 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for...

      11. 31 CFR 351.43 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series...

        Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

        2011-07-01

        ... (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series EE savings bond? 351.43 Section 351.43 Money... OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES EE Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.43 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for...

      12. Contemporary Challenges and Opportunities in Environmental Education: Where Are We Headed and What Deserves Our Attention?

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Marcinkowski, Thomas J.

        2009-01-01

        Over the past four decades, numerous professionals in the field of environmental education (EE) have attempted to take stock of conditions within and outside of EE. In turn, many used the results of their analyses to describe challenges to and opportunities for EE. Many of these challenges and opportunities continue to ring true today, although…

      13. Audience Involvement with Entertainment-Education Programs: Explicating Processes and Outcomes

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Quintero Johnson, Jessie Marguerite

        2011-01-01

        One area of health promotion research rich with potential for both theoretical and empirical investigation is the "entertainment-education" (EE) strategy. Though a growing body of evidence points to the effectiveness of the EE strategy, further investigation is needed to explore the underlying cognitive and affective processes that make EE an…

      14. Maternal and Child Expressed Emotion as Predictors of Treatment Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Przeworski, Amy; Zoellner, Lori A.; Franklin, Martin E.; Garcia, Abbe; Freeman, Jennifer; March, John S.; Foa, Edna B.

        2012-01-01

        Expressed emotion (EE) is associated with symptoms and treatment outcome in various disorders. Few studies have examined EE in pediatric OCD and none of these has assessed the child's perspective. This study examined the relationship among maternal and child EE, child OCD severity, and OCD-related functioning pre- and post-treatment. At…

      15. An Exploration of Future Trends in Environmental Education Research

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Ardoin, Nicole M.; Clark, Charlotte; Kelsey, Elin

        2013-01-01

        This article describes future trends in environmental education (EE) research based on a mixed-methods study where data were collected through a content analysis of peer-reviewed articles published in EE journals between 2005 and 2010; interviews with experts engaged in EE research and sustainability-related fields; surveys with current EE…

      16. Ecological Mindedness across the Curriculum

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Moroye, Christy M.; Ingman, Benjamin C.

        2013-01-01

        This article suggests a framework for evaluating and implementing environmental education (EE) curricula in hopes of furthering EE as a mode of living to be embodied, rather than as a subject to be learned. We argue that the current iterations of EE in K-12 schools stand to benefit by attending to Dewey's criteria for educative experience:…

      17. Environment, Education, Action: An Alliance of Hope. Proceedings of the National Conservation Education Association Conference (26th).

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Conservation Education Association, Madison, WI.

        This document includes papers and speeches presented at the National Conservation Education Association Conference. The papers are arrayed under the major topics of the conference: centers for environmental education (EE), energy, land use, leisure pursuits, natural history, networking, ongoing EE, special populations, and urban EE. Keynote…

      18. In Praise of Environmental Education

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Cartea, Pablo Angel Meira

        2005-01-01

        Environmental education (EE) is going through a critical stage. The wide acceptance of education for sustainable development (ESD) as a reference guiding the educational response to the environmental crisis has strengthened the critical views of EE. This article tries to refute the arguments put forward by those who criticize EE and advocate its…

      19. Science Teachers' and Senior Secondary Schools Students' Perceptions of Earth and Environmental Science Topics

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Dawson, Vaille; Carson, Katherine

        2013-01-01

        This article presents an evaluation of a new upper secondary Earth and Environmental Science (EES) course in Western Australia. Twenty-seven EES teachers were interviewed and 243 students were surveyed about the degree of difficulty, relevance and interest of EES topics in the course. The impact of the course on students' views about EES…

      20. Environmental Education in Italy: Proposals for an Evaluation Strategy.

        ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

        Mayer, Michela

        1991-01-01

        The evolution of environmental education (EE) in elementary, secondary, and higher education in Italy is described, focusing on its role in curricula, trends in awareness, an international agency's research program on EE, values underlying EE, a suggested educational model, and use of an indicator system for evaluating educational quality. (MSE)