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Sample records for program influences gene

  1. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    PubMed

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  2. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E.; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  3. Radiopharmaceutical and Gene Therapy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2006-02-09

    The objective of our research program was to determine whether novel receptors can be induced in solid cancers as a target for therapy with radiolabeled unmodified peptides that bind to the receptors. The hypothesis was that induction of a high number of receptors on the surface of these cancer cells would result in an increased uptake of the radiolabeled monomeric peptides as compared to published results with radiolabeled antibodies or peptides to naturally expressed antigens or receptors, and therefore a better therapeutic outcome. The following is a summary of published results.

  4. "Programmed packaging" for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, M; Sakurai, Y; Akita, H; Harashima, H

    2014-11-10

    We report on the development of a multifunctional envelope-type nano device (MEND) based on our packaging concept "Programmed packaging" to control not only intracellular trafficking but also the biodistribution of encapsulated compounds such as nucleic acids/proteins/peptides. Our strategy for achieving this is based on molecular mechanisms of cell biology such as endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, etc. In this review, we summarize the concept of programmed packaging and discuss some of our recent successful examples of using MENDs. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was applied as a new methodology for identifying a new ligand toward cell or mitochondria. The delivery of siRNA to tumors and the tumor vasculature was achieved using pH sensitive lipid (YSK05), which was newly designed and optimized under in vivo conditions. The efficient delivery of pDNA to immune cells such as dendritic cells has also been developed using the KALA ligand, which can be a breakthrough technology for DNA vaccine. Finally, ss-cleavable and pH-activated lipid-like surfactant (ssPalm) which is a lipid like material with pH-activatable and SS-cleavable properties is also introduced as a proof of our concept. PMID:24780263

  5. The influence of assortativity on the robustness and evolvability of gene regulatory networks upon gene birth

    PubMed Central

    Pechenick, Dov A.; Moore, Jason H.; Payne, Joshua L.

    2013-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) represent the interactions between genes and gene products, which drive the gene expression patterns that produce cellular phenotypes. GRNs display a number of characteristics that are beneficial for the development and evolution of organisms. For example, they are often robust to genetic perturbation, such as mutations in regulatory regions or loss of gene function. Simultaneously, GRNs are often evolvable as these genetic perturbations are occasionally exploited to innovate novel regulatory programs. Several topological properties, such as degree distribution, are known to influence the robustness and evolvability of GRNs. Assortativity, which measures the propensity of nodes of similar connectivity to connect to one another, is a separate topological property that has recently been shown to influence the robustness of GRNs to point mutations in cis-regulatory regions. However, it remains to be seen how assortativity may influence the robustness and evolvability of GRNs to other forms of genetic perturbation, such as gene birth via duplication or de novo origination. Here, we employ a computational model of genetic regulation to investigate whether the assortativity of a GRN influences its robustness and evolvability upon gene birth. We find that the robustness of a GRN generally increases with increasing assortativity, while its evolvability generally decreases. However, the rate of change in robustness outpaces that of evolvability, resulting in an increased proportion of assortative GRNs that are simultaneously robust and evolvable. By providing a mechanistic explanation for these observations, this work extends our understanding of how the assortativity of a GRN influences its robustness and evolvability upon gene birth. PMID:23542384

  6. Genes that influence yield in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Ariizumi, Tohru; Shinozaki, Yoshihito; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Yield is the most important breeding trait of crops. For fruit-bearing plants such as Solanum lycopersicum (tomato), fruit formation directly affects yield. The final fruit size depends on the number and volume of cell layers in the pericarp of the fruit, which is determined by the degree of cell division and expansion in the fertilized ovaries. Thus, fruit yield in tomato is predominantly determined by the efficiency of fruit set and the final cell number and size of the fruits. Through domestication, tomato fruit yield has been markedly increased as a result of mutations associated with fruit size and genetic studies have identified the genes that influence the cell cycle, carpel number and fruit set. Additionally, several lines of evidence have demonstrated that plant hormones control fruit set and size through the delicate regulation of genes that trigger physiological responses associated with fruit expansion. In this review, we introduce the key genes involved in tomato breeding and describe how they affect the physiological processes that contribute to tomato yield. PMID:23641176

  7. Genes that influence yield in tomato.

    PubMed

    Ariizumi, Tohru; Shinozaki, Yoshihito; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    Yield is the most important breeding trait of crops. For fruit-bearing plants such as Solanum lycopersicum (tomato), fruit formation directly affects yield. The final fruit size depends on the number and volume of cell layers in the pericarp of the fruit, which is determined by the degree of cell division and expansion in the fertilized ovaries. Thus, fruit yield in tomato is predominantly determined by the efficiency of fruit set and the final cell number and size of the fruits. Through domestication, tomato fruit yield has been markedly increased as a result of mutations associated with fruit size and genetic studies have identified the genes that influence the cell cycle, carpel number and fruit set. Additionally, several lines of evidence have demonstrated that plant hormones control fruit set and size through the delicate regulation of genes that trigger physiological responses associated with fruit expansion. In this review, we introduce the key genes involved in tomato breeding and describe how they affect the physiological processes that contribute to tomato yield. PMID:23641176

  8. Return to the fetal gene program

    PubMed Central

    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Sen, Shiraj; Vela, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark of cardiac metabolism before birth is the predominance of carbohydrate use for energy provision. After birth, energy substrate metabolism rapidly switches to the oxidation of fatty acids. This switch accompanies the expression of “adult” isoforms of metabolic enzymes and other proteins. However, in a variety of pathophysiologic conditions, including hypoxia, ischemia, hypertrophy, atrophy, diabetes, and hypothyroidism, the postnatal heart returns to the “fetal” gene program. These adaptive mechanisms are also a feature of the failing heart muscle, where at a certain point this fetal-like reprogramming no longer suffices to support cardiac structure and function. We advance the hypothesis that in the postnatal heart, metabolic remodeling triggers the process through glycosylation of transcription factors, potentially protecting the stressed heart from irreversible functional impairment and programmed cell death. In other words, we propose a metabolic link to gene expression in the heart. PMID:20201903

  9. More than genes: the advanced fetal programming hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hocher, Berthold

    2014-10-01

    Many lines of data, initial epidemiologic studies as well as subsequent extensive experimental studies, indicate that early-life events play a powerful role in influencing later suceptibility to certain chronic diseases. Such events might be over- or undernutrition, exposure to environmental toxins, but also changes in hormones, in particular stress hormones. Typically, those events are triggered by the environmental challenges of the mother. However, recent studies have shown that paternal environmental or nutritional factors affect the phenotype of the offspring as well. The maternal and paternal environmental factors act on the phenotype of the offspring via epigenetic modification of its genome. The advanced fetal programming hypothesis proposes an additional non-environmentally driven mechanism: maternal and also paternal genes may influence the maturating sperm, the oocyte, and later the embryo/fetus, leading to their epigenetic alteration. Thus, the observed phenotype of the offspring may be altered by maternal/paternal genes independent of the fetal genome. Meanwhile, several independent association studies in humans dealing with metabolic and neurological traits also suggest that maternal genes might affect the offspring phenotype independent of the transmission of that particular gene to the offspring. Considering the implications of this hypothesis, some conclusions drawn from transgenic or knockout animal models and based on the causality between a genetic alteration and a phenotype, need to be challenged. Possible implications for the development, diagnostic and therapy of human genetic diseases have to be investigated.

  10. Influence of rol genes in floriculture.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Eva; Trillas, Maria Isabel; Moysset, Lluïsa; Vainstein, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, new traits have been introduced into ornamental plants through classical breeding. However, genetic engineering now enables specific alterations of single traits in already successful varieties. New or improved varieties of floricultural crops can be obtained by acting on floral traits, such as color, shape or fragrance, on vase life in cut-flower species, and on rooting potential or overall plant morphology. Overexpression of the rol genes of the Ri plasmid of Agrobacterium rhizogenes in plants alters several of the plant's developmental processes and affects their architecture. Both A. rhizogenes- and rol-transgenic plants display the "hairy-root phenotype", although specific differences are found between species and between transgenic lines. In general, these plants show a dwarfed phenotype, reduced apical dominance, smaller, wrinkled leaves, increased rooting, altered flowering and reduced fertility. Among the rol genes, termed rolA, B, C and D, rolC has been the most widely studied because its effects are the most advantageous in terms of improving ornamental and horticultural traits. In addition to the dwarfness and the increase in lateral shoots that lead to a bushy phenotype, rolC-plants display more, smaller flowers, and advanced flowering; surprisingly, these plants may have better rooting capacity and they show almost no undesirable traits. rolD, the least studied among the rol genes, offers promising applications due to its promotion of flowering. Although the biochemical functions of rol genes remain poorly understood, they are useful tools for improving ornamental flowers, as their expression in transgenic plants yields many beneficial traits.

  11. Influence of Remedial Professional Development Programs for Poorly Performing Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulet, Francois; Gagnon, Robert; Gingras, Marie-Eve

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The College des medecins du Quebec (CMQ) offers an individualized remedial professional development program to help physicians overcome selected clinical shortcomings. To measure the influence of the remedial professional development program, physicians who completed the program between 1993 and 2004 and who were assessed by peer…

  12. Factors Influencing "Learning Difficulty" in Programmed Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, Owen J.; Morasky, Robert L.

    Based on the assumption that learning difficulty in programed instruction is related to completion time and program response error-rates, an attempt was made to demonstrate that deletion of knowledge of results (KR) and first example (E) in the Rule-Example-Positive/Negative Example teaching frame paradigm would increase learning difficulty. Four…

  13. Factors Influencing Student Participation in College Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandyopadhyay, Soumava; Bandyopadhyay, Kakoli

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework to investigate the factors that influence student participation in college study abroad programs. The authors posit that students' general perceptions regarding the study abroad experience and their expectations of intercultural awareness from study abroad programs will impact their perceptions of…

  14. Influence of mitochondria on gene expression in a citrus cybrid.

    PubMed

    Bassene, Jean-Baptiste; Froelicher, Yann; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick; Ancillo, Gema

    2011-06-01

    The production of cybrids, combining nucleus of a species with alien cytoplasmic organelles, is a valuable method used for improvement of various crops. Several citrus cybrids have been created by somatic hybridization. These genotypes are interesting models to analyze the impact of cytoplasmic genome change on nuclear genome expression. Herein, we report genome-wide gene expression analysis in leaves of a citrus cybrid between C. reticulata cv 'Willowleaf mandarin' and C. limon cv 'Eureka lemon' compared with its lemon parent, using a Citrus 20K cDNA microarray. Molecular analysis showed that this cybrid possesses nuclear and chloroplast genomes of Eureka lemon plus mitochondria from Willowleaf mandarin and, therefore, can be considered as a lemon bearing foreign mitochondria. Mandarin mitochondria influenced the expression of a large set of lemon nuclear genes causing an over-expression of 480 of them and repression of 39 genes. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR further confirmed the credibility of microarray data. Genes over-expressed in cybrid leaves are predominantly attributed to the functional category "cellular protein metabolism" whereas in the down-regulated none functional category was enriched. Overall, mitochondria replacement affected different nuclear genes including particularly genes predicted to be involved in mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Mitochondria regulate all cell structures even chloroplast status. These results suggest that nuclear gene expression is modulated with respect to new information received from the foreign organelle, with the final objective to suit specific needs to ensure better cell physiological balance.

  15. Network Analysis of Human Genes Influencing Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Lipner, Ettie M; Garcia, Benjamin J; Strong, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections constitute a high burden of pulmonary disease in humans, resulting in over 1.5 million deaths per year. Building on the premise that genetic factors influence the instance, progression, and defense of infectious disease, we undertook a systems biology approach to investigate relationships among genetic factors that may play a role in increased susceptibility or control of mycobacterial infections. We combined literature and database mining with network analysis and pathway enrichment analysis to examine genes, pathways, and networks, involved in the human response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. This approach allowed us to examine functional relationships among reported genes, and to identify novel genes and enriched pathways that may play a role in mycobacterial susceptibility or control. Our findings suggest that the primary pathways and genes influencing mycobacterial infection control involve an interplay between innate and adaptive immune proteins and pathways. Signaling pathways involved in autoimmune disease were significantly enriched as revealed in our networks. Mycobacterial disease susceptibility networks were also examined within the context of gene-chemical relationships, in order to identify putative drugs and nutrients with potential beneficial immunomodulatory or anti-mycobacterial effects.

  16. Network Analysis of Human Genes Influencing Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lipner, Ettie M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Strong, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections constitute a high burden of pulmonary disease in humans, resulting in over 1.5 million deaths per year. Building on the premise that genetic factors influence the instance, progression, and defense of infectious disease, we undertook a systems biology approach to investigate relationships among genetic factors that may play a role in increased susceptibility or control of mycobacterial infections. We combined literature and database mining with network analysis and pathway enrichment analysis to examine genes, pathways, and networks, involved in the human response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. This approach allowed us to examine functional relationships among reported genes, and to identify novel genes and enriched pathways that may play a role in mycobacterial susceptibility or control. Our findings suggest that the primary pathways and genes influencing mycobacterial infection control involve an interplay between innate and adaptive immune proteins and pathways. Signaling pathways involved in autoimmune disease were significantly enriched as revealed in our networks. Mycobacterial disease susceptibility networks were also examined within the context of gene-chemical relationships, in order to identify putative drugs and nutrients with potential beneficial immunomodulatory or anti-mycobacterial effects. PMID:26751573

  17. Plant DNA barcodes and the influence of gene flow.

    PubMed

    Naciri, Yamama; Caetano, Sofia; Salamin, Nicolas

    2012-07-01

    Success of species assignment using DNA barcodes has been shown to vary among plant lineages because of a wide range of different factors. In this study, we confirm the theoretical prediction that gene flow influences species assignment with simulations and a literature survey. We show that the genome experiencing the highest gene flow is, in the majority of the cases, the best suited for species delimitation. Our results clearly suggest that, for most angiosperm groups, plastid markers will not be the most appropriate for use as DNA barcodes. We therefore advocate shifting the focus from plastid to nuclear markers to achieve an overall higher success using DNA barcodes.

  18. Factors influencing nursing career choices and choice of study program.

    PubMed

    Haron, Yafa; Reicher, Sima; Riba, Shoshana

    2014-01-01

    In advance of a recruitment campaign, Israeli first-year nursing students of all ethnicities were surveyed to elucidate what factors had influenced them to make nursing their career and what sort of training track they preferred. The responses made it clear that different factors influence different groups differently. There were noticeable differences by gender, age, and ethnicity. Overall, training institutions were chosen for their closeness to the student's home but other factors also operated among particular groups, such as institutional prestige and flexible entry criteria. There was a blatant preference for academic, particularly university-sited, programs over diploma programs.

  19. Factors influencing nursing career choices and choice of study program.

    PubMed

    Haron, Yafa; Reicher, Sima; Riba, Shoshana

    2014-01-01

    In advance of a recruitment campaign, Israeli first-year nursing students of all ethnicities were surveyed to elucidate what factors had influenced them to make nursing their career and what sort of training track they preferred. The responses made it clear that different factors influence different groups differently. There were noticeable differences by gender, age, and ethnicity. Overall, training institutions were chosen for their closeness to the student's home but other factors also operated among particular groups, such as institutional prestige and flexible entry criteria. There was a blatant preference for academic, particularly university-sited, programs over diploma programs. PMID:24878405

  20. Factors influencing perceived sustainability of Dutch community health programs.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, A J M; Van Assema, P; Hesdahl, B; Harting, J; De Vries, N K

    2015-09-01

    We assessed the perceived sustainability of community health programs organized by local intersectoral coalitions, as well as the factors that collaborating partners think might influence sustainability. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 31 collaborating partners of 5 community health programs in deprived neighborhoods in the southern part of the Netherlands. The interview guide was based on a conceptual framework that includes factors related to the context, the leading organization, leadership, the coalition, collaborating partners, interventions and outcomes. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and content analyzed using NVivo 8.0. Participants in each of the programs varied in their perceptions of the sustainability of the program, but those people collaborating in pre-existing neighborhood structures expressed relatively high faith in their continuation. The participating citizens in particular believed that these structures would continue to address the health of the community in the future. We found factors from all categories of the conceptual framework that were perceived to influence sustainability. The program leaders appeared to be crucial to the programs, as they were frequently mentioned in close interaction with other factors. Program leaders should use a motivating and supportive leadership style and should act as 'program champions'.

  1. Garlic Influences Gene Expression In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Charron, Craig S; Dawson, Harry D; Novotny, Janet A

    2016-02-01

    There is a large body of preclinical research aimed at understanding the roles of garlic and garlic-derived preparations in the promotion of human health. Most of this research has targeted the possible functions of garlic in maintaining cardiovascular health and in preventing and treating cancer. A wide range of outcome variables has been used to investigate the bioactivity of garlic, ranging from direct measures of health status such as cholesterol concentrations, blood pressure, and changes in tumor size and number, to molecular and biochemical measures such as mRNA gene expression, protein concentration, enzyme activity, and histone acetylation status. Determination of how garlic influences mRNA gene expression has proven to be a valuable approach to elucidating the mechanisms of garlic bioactivity. Preclinical studies investigating the health benefits of garlic far outnumber human studies and have made frequent use of mRNA gene expression measurement. There is an immediate need to understand mRNA gene expression in humans as well. Although safety and ethical constraints limit the types of available human tissue, peripheral whole blood is readily accessible, and measuring mRNA gene expression in whole blood may provide a unique window to understanding how garlic intake affects human health. PMID:26764328

  2. Garlic Influences Gene Expression In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Charron, Craig S; Dawson, Harry D; Novotny, Janet A

    2016-02-01

    There is a large body of preclinical research aimed at understanding the roles of garlic and garlic-derived preparations in the promotion of human health. Most of this research has targeted the possible functions of garlic in maintaining cardiovascular health and in preventing and treating cancer. A wide range of outcome variables has been used to investigate the bioactivity of garlic, ranging from direct measures of health status such as cholesterol concentrations, blood pressure, and changes in tumor size and number, to molecular and biochemical measures such as mRNA gene expression, protein concentration, enzyme activity, and histone acetylation status. Determination of how garlic influences mRNA gene expression has proven to be a valuable approach to elucidating the mechanisms of garlic bioactivity. Preclinical studies investigating the health benefits of garlic far outnumber human studies and have made frequent use of mRNA gene expression measurement. There is an immediate need to understand mRNA gene expression in humans as well. Although safety and ethical constraints limit the types of available human tissue, peripheral whole blood is readily accessible, and measuring mRNA gene expression in whole blood may provide a unique window to understanding how garlic intake affects human health.

  3. Role of Energy Metabolism in the Brown Fat Gene Program

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Minwoo; Cooper, Marcus P.

    2015-01-01

    In murine and human brown adipose tissue (BAT), mitochondria are powerful generators of heat that safely metabolize fat, a feature that has great promise in the fight against obesity and diabetes. Recent studies suggest that the actions of mitochondria extend beyond their conventional role as generators of heat. There is mounting evidence that impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity is accompanied by attenuated expression of Ucp1 and other BAT-selective genes, implying that mitochondria exert transcriptional control over the brown fat gene program. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of brown fat mitochondria, their potential role in transcriptional control of the brown fat gene program, and potential strategies to treat obesity in humans by leveraging thermogenesis in brown adipocytes. PMID:26175716

  4. Attendees' Perceptions of Commercial Influence in Noncommercially Funded CME Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Elizabeth; Baer, Lee; Fromson, John A.; Gorrindo, Tristan; Iodice, Kristin E.; Birnbaum, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The controversy surrounding commercial support for continuing medical education (CME) programs has led to policy changes, but data show no significant difference in perceived bias between commercial and noncommercial CME. Indeed, what attendees perceive as commercial influence is not fully understood. We sought to clarify what…

  5. Influence of Funding Cuts on Texas School Tobacco Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingiss, Phyllis M.; Boerm, Melynda

    2009-01-01

    Background: Following the Master Settlement Agreement, state tobacco prevention spending peaked in 2002, but has subsequently been diminishing annually. This study compared the influence of 2004 Texas tobacco program budget cuts on school practices a year after funding loss. Methods: Three school groups were compared: continuously funded for a…

  6. The Learning Context: Influence on Learning to Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Govender, Irene

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the influence of the learning context is considered when learning to program. For the purposes of this study, the lectures, study process, previous knowledge or teaching experience and tests comprised the learning context. The article argues that students' experiences of the learning context have important implications for teaching…

  7. A Metacognitive Approach to Pair Programming: Influence on Metacognitive Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breed, Betty; Mentz, Elsa; van der Westhuizen, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The research focused on metacognition in a collaborative learning setting. Based on a comprehensive literature study the researchers designed a metacognitive teaching-learning strategy for pair programmers. Our purpose was to investigate the influence of this metacognitive teaching-learning strategy during pair programming in an…

  8. Factors that Influence the Effectiveness of Sanitation Programs.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Haddad, Marilu; Ingram, Maia

    2015-01-01

    Local governments in both Mexico and the U.S. spend considerable money on public services, which do not always bring the expected results. For instance, a large part of the public budget is destined to solve social and health problems, such as public sanitation. Government has attacked the problem by providing public sanitation infrastructure (such as garbage and recycling receptacles) and by using social ad campaigns. However, these efforts do not always affect the habits of residents and bring the desired changes in city sanitation. This article presents a case study that used a participatory method to address an innovative city sanitation effort: The Clean City Program in Puebla, Mexico. This program adopted social marketing techniques, a discipline born in the 70s when the principles and practices developed to sell products and services started to be applied to sell ideas, attitudes, or behaviors. Social marketing programs have been adopted by governments to change attitudes and behavior in areas such as public services. The article first describes the context and strategies of the program, which included the use of the promotora model to engage community members. The researchers then make use of qualitative data gathered throughout program planning and implementation to evaluate the impact of the social marketing programs and its effectiveness. The article analyzes social, educational, economic, demographic, and cultural factors that influence the effectiveness of sanitation programs and presents recommendations for strategies to engage community members in community sanitation programs. PMID:26389106

  9. Factors that Influence the Effectiveness of Sanitation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Haddad, Marilu; Ingram, Maia

    2015-01-01

    Local governments in both Mexico and the U.S. spend considerable money on public services, which do not always bring the expected results. For instance, a large part of the public budget is destined to solve social and health problems, such as public sanitation. Government has attacked the problem by providing public sanitation infrastructure (such as garbage and recycling receptacles) and by using social ad campaigns. However, these efforts do not always affect the habits of residents and bring the desired changes in city sanitation. This article presents a case study that used a participatory method to address an innovative city sanitation effort: The Clean City Program in Puebla, Mexico. This program adopted social marketing techniques, a discipline born in the 70s when the principles and practices developed to sell products and services started to be applied to sell ideas, attitudes, or behaviors. Social marketing programs have been adopted by governments to change attitudes and behavior in areas such as public services. The article first describes the context and strategies of the program, which included the use of the promotora model to engage community members. The researchers then make use of qualitative data gathered throughout program planning and implementation to evaluate the impact of the social marketing programs and its effectiveness. The article analyzes social, educational, economic, demographic, and cultural factors that influence the effectiveness of sanitation programs and presents recommendations for strategies to engage community members in community sanitation programs. PMID:26389106

  10. Perspectives on Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs

    PubMed Central

    Cheever, Thomas R.; Berkley, Dale; Braun, Serge; Brown, Robert H.; Byrne, Barry J.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Cwik, Valerie; Duan, Dongsheng; Federoff, Howard J.; High, Katherine A.; Kaspar, Brian K.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Larkindale, Jane; Lincecum, John; Mavilio, Fulvio; McDonald, Cheryl L.; McLaughlin, James; Weiss McLeod, Bonnie; Mendell, Jerry R.; Nuckolls, Glen; Stedman, Hansell H.; Tagle, Danilo A.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Wang, Hao; Wernett, Pamela J.; Wilson, James M.; Porter, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With recent successes in gene therapy trials for hemophilia and retinal diseases, the promise and prospects for gene therapy are once again garnering significant attention. To build on this momentum, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Muscular Dystrophy Association jointly hosted a workshop in April 2014 on “Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs,” with a focus on neuromuscular disorders. Workshop participants included researchers from academia and industry as well as representatives from the regulatory, legal, and patient advocacy sectors to cover the gamut from preclinical optimization to intellectual property concerns and regulatory approval. The workshop focused on three key issues in the field: (1) establishing adequate scientific premise for clinical trials in gene therapy, (2) addressing regulatory process issues, and (3) intellectual property and commercialization issues as they relate to gene therapy. The outcomes from the discussions at this workshop are intended to provide guidance for researchers and funders in the gene therapy field. PMID:25654329

  11. Modeling dietary influences on offspring metabolic programming in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Brookheart, Rita T; Duncan, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    The influence of nutrition on offspring metabolism has become a hot topic in recent years owing to the growing prevalence of maternal and childhood obesity. Studies in mammals have identified several factors correlating with parental and early offspring dietary influences on progeny health; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these factors remain undiscovered. Mammalian metabolic tissues and pathways are heavily conserved in Drosophila melanogaster, making the fly an invaluable genetic model organism for studying metabolism. In this review, we discuss the metabolic similarities between mammals and Drosophila and present evidence supporting its use as an emerging model of metabolic programming.

  12. Conserved Gene Expression Programs in Developing Roots from Diverse Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-08-01

    The molecular basis for the origin and diversification of morphological adaptations is a central issue in evolutionary developmental biology. Here, we defined temporal transcript accumulation in developing roots from seven vascular plants, permitting a genome-wide comparative analysis of the molecular programs used by a single organ across diverse species. The resulting gene expression maps uncover significant similarity in the genes employed in roots and their developmental expression profiles. The detailed analysis of a subset of 133 genes known to be associated with root development in Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that most of these are used in all plant species. Strikingly, this was also true for root development in a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii), which forms morphologically different roots and is thought to have evolved roots independently. Thus, despite vast differences in size and anatomy of roots from diverse plants, the basic molecular mechanisms employed during root formation appear to be conserved. This suggests that roots evolved in the two major vascular plant lineages either by parallel recruitment of largely the same developmental program or by elaboration of an existing root program in the common ancestor of vascular plants.

  13. Factors Influencing Learning Environments in an Integrated Experiential Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koci, Peter

    The research conducted for this dissertation examined the learning environment of a specific high school program that delivered the explicit curriculum through an integrated experiential manner, which utilized field and outdoor experiences. The program ran over one semester (five months) and it integrated the grade 10 British Columbian curriculum in five subjects. A mixed methods approach was employed to identify the students' perceptions and provide richer descriptions of their experiences related to their unique learning environment. Quantitative instruments were used to assess changes in students' perspectives of their learning environment, as well as other supporting factors including students' mindfulness, and behaviours towards the environment. Qualitative data collection included observations, open-ended questions, and impromptu interviews with the teacher. The qualitative data describe the factors and processes that influenced the learning environment and give a richer, deeper interpretation which complements the quantitative findings. The research results showed positive scores on all the quantitative measures conducted, and the qualitative data provided further insight into descriptions of learning environment constructs that the students perceived as most important. A major finding was that the group cohesion measure was perceived by students as the most important attribute of their preferred learning environment. A flow chart was developed to help the researcher conceptualize how the learning environment, learning process, and outcomes relate to one another in the studied program. This research attempts to explain through the consideration of this case study: how learning environments can influence behavioural change and how an interconnectedness among several factors in the learning process is influenced by the type of learning environment facilitated. Considerably more research is needed in this area to understand fully the complexity learning

  14. In Vivo Programmed Gene Expression Based on Artificial Quorum Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Teng; Huang, Yajun; Hou, Mingyu; Wang, Qiyao; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-01-01

    The quorum sensing (QS) system, as a well-functioning population-dependent gene switch, has been widely applied in many gene circuits in synthetic biology. In our work, an efficient cell density-controlled expression system (QS) was established via engineering of the Vibrio fischeri luxI-luxR quorum sensing system. In order to achieve in vivo programmed gene expression, a synthetic binary regulation circuit (araQS) was constructed by assembling multiple genetic components, including the quorum quenching protein AiiA and the arabinose promoter ParaBAD, into the QS system. In vitro expression assays verified that the araQS system was initiated only in the absence of arabinose in the medium at a high cell density. In vivo expression assays confirmed that the araQS system presented an in vivo-triggered and cell density-dependent expression pattern. Furthermore, the araQS system was demonstrated to function well in different bacteria, indicating a wide range of bacterial hosts for use. To explore its potential applications in vivo, the araQS system was used to control the production of a heterologous protective antigen in an attenuated Edwardsiella tarda strain, which successfully evoked efficient immune protection in a fish model. This work suggested that the araQS system could program bacterial expression in vivo and might have potential uses, including, but not limited to, bacterial vector vaccines. PMID:25979894

  15. A Gene Regulatory Program in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Renhua; Campos, John; Iida, Joji

    2015-12-01

    Molecular heterogeneity in human breast cancer has challenged diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical treatment. It is well known that molecular subtypes of breast tumors are associated with significant differences in prognosis and survival. Assuming that the differences are attributed to subtype-specific pathways, we then suspect that there might be gene regulatory mechanisms that modulate the behavior of the pathways and their interactions. In this study, we proposed an integrated methodology, including machine learning and information theory, to explore the mechanisms. Using existing data from three large cohorts of human breast cancer populations, we have identified an ensemble of 16 master regulator genes (or MR16) that can discriminate breast tumor samples into four major subtypes. Evidence from gene expression across the three cohorts has consistently indicated that the MR16 can be divided into two groups that demonstrate subtype-specific gene expression patterns. For example, group 1 MRs, including ESR1, FOXA1, and GATA3, are overexpressed in luminal A and luminal B subtypes, but lowly expressed in HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes. In contrast, group 2 MRs, including FOXM1, EZH2, MYBL2, and ZNF695, display an opposite pattern. Furthermore, evidence from mutual information modeling has congruently indicated that the two groups of MRs either up- or down-regulate cancer driver-related genes in opposite directions. Furthermore, integration of somatic mutations with pathway changes leads to identification of canonical genomic alternations in a subtype-specific fashion. Taken together, these studies have implicated a gene regulatory program for breast tumor progression.

  16. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control.

  17. Evolution of the CNS myelin gene regulatory program.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiliang; Richardson, William D

    2016-06-15

    Myelin is a specialized subcellular structure that evolved uniquely in vertebrates. A myelinated axon conducts action potentials many times faster than an unmyelinated axon of the same diameter; for the same conduction speed, the unmyelinated axon would need a much larger diameter and volume than its myelinated counterpart. Hence myelin speeds information transfer and saves space, allowing the evolution of a powerful yet portable brain. Myelination in the central nervous system (CNS) is controlled by a gene regulatory program that features a number of master transcriptional regulators including Olig1, Olig2 and Myrf. Olig family genes evolved from a single ancestral gene in non-chordates. Olig2, which executes multiple functions with regard to oligodendrocyte identity and development in vertebrates, might have evolved functional versatility through post-translational modification, especially phosphorylation, as illustrated by its evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine phospho-acceptor sites and its accumulation of serine residues during more recent stages of vertebrate evolution. Olig1, derived from a duplicated copy of Olig2 in early bony fish, is involved in oligodendrocyte development and is critical to remyelination in bony vertebrates, but is lost in birds. The origin of Myrf orthologs might be the result of DNA integration between an invading phage or bacterium and an early protist, producing a fusion protein capable of self-cleavage and DNA binding. Myrf seems to have adopted new functions in early vertebrates - initiation of the CNS myelination program as well as the maintenance of mature oligodendrocyte identity and myelin structure - by developing new ways to interact with DNA motifs specific to myelin genes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution.

  18. Maternal influences on the transmission of leukocyte gene expression profiles in population samples from Brisbane, Australia.

    PubMed

    Mason, Elizabeth; Tronc, Graham; Nones, Katia; Matigian, Nick; Kim, Jinhee; Aronow, Bruce J; Wolfinger, Russell D; Wells, Christine; Gibson, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Two gene expression profiling studies designed to identify maternal influences on development of the neonate immune system and to address the population structure of the leukocyte transcriptome were carried out in Brisbane, Australia. In the first study, a comparison of 19 leukocyte samples obtained from mothers in the last three weeks of pregnancy with 37 umbilical cord blood samples documented differential expression of 7,382 probes at a false discovery rate of 1%, representing approximately half of the expressed transcriptome. An even larger component of the variation involving 8,432 probes, notably enriched for Vitamin E and methotrexate-responsive genes, distinguished two sets of individuals, with perfect transmission of the two profile types between each of 16 mother-child pairs in the study. A minor profile of variation was found to distinguish the gene expression profiles of obese mothers and children of gestational diabetic mothers from those of children born to obese mothers. The second study was of adult leukocyte profiles from a cross-section of Red Cross blood donors sampled throughout Brisbane. The first two axes in this study are related to the third and fourth axes of variation in the first study and also reflect variation in the abundance of CD4 and CD8 transcripts. One of the profiles associated with the third axis is largely excluded from samples from the central portion of the city. Despite enrichment of insulin signaling and aspects of central metabolism among the differentially expressed genes, there was little correlation between leukocyte expression profiles and body mass index overall. Our data is consistent with the notion that maternal health and cytokine milieu directly impact gene expression in fetal tissues, but that there is likely to be a complex interplay between cultural, genetic, and other environmental factors in the programming of gene expression in leukocytes of newborn children.

  19. Simulated microgravity influenced the expression of DNA damage repair genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Jiawei, Liu; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation and microgravity were considered to be the most important stress factors of space environmental the respective study of the biological effects of the radiation and microgravity carried out earlier, but the interaction of the effects of radiation with microgravity started later, and due to difference of the materials and methods the result of this experiment were not consistent. To further investigate the influence of microgravity on the expression of the radiation damage repair genes, the seed of Arabidopsis (Col) and its gravity-insensitive mutant (PIN2) were exposed to 0.1Gy of the dose of energetic carbon-ion beam radiation (LET = 30KeV / μm), and the germinated seed were than fixed in the 3D random positioning apparatus immediately for a 10-day simulated microgravity. By measuring the deflection angle of root tip and the changes of the expression of Ku70 and RAD51 protein, we investigated the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems. The results shown that radiation, microgravity and microgravity with radiation could increase the angle of the root of the Col significantly, but no obvious effect on PIN2 type. The radiation could increase the expression of Ku70 significantly in both Col and PIN2, microgravity does not affect the expression, but the microgravity with radiation could decrease the expression of Ku70. This result shown that the microgravity could influence the radiation damage repair systems in molecular level. Moreover, our findings were important to understand the molecular mechanism of the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems in vivo.

  20. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  1. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  2. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G

    2016-01-29

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentally-dynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ∼50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclear-localized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. We conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease.

  3. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2015-11-03

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentallydynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ~50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclearlocalized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. Finally, we conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease.

  4. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentally-dynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ∼50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclear-localized. Splice site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. We conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease. PMID:26531823

  5. A dynamic intron retention program enriched in RNA processing genes regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    DOE PAGES

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry L.; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2015-11-03

    Differentiating erythroblasts execute a dynamic alternative splicing program shown here to include extensive and diverse intron retention (IR) events. Cluster analysis revealed hundreds of developmentallydynamic introns that exhibit increased IR in mature erythroblasts, and are enriched in functions related to RNA processing such as SF3B1 spliceosomal factor. Distinct, developmentally-stable IR clusters are enriched in metal-ion binding functions and include mitoferrin genes SLC25A37 and SLC25A28 that are critical for iron homeostasis. Some IR transcripts are abundant, e.g. comprising ~50% of highly-expressed SLC25A37 and SF3B1 transcripts in late erythroblasts, and thereby limiting functional mRNA levels. IR transcripts tested were predominantly nuclearlocalized. Splicemore » site strength correlated with IR among stable but not dynamic intron clusters, indicating distinct regulation of dynamically-increased IR in late erythroblasts. Retained introns were preferentially associated with alternative exons with premature termination codons (PTCs). High IR was observed in disease-causing genes including SF3B1 and the RNA binding protein FUS. Comparative studies demonstrated that the intron retention program in erythroblasts shares features with other tissues but ultimately is unique to erythropoiesis. Finally, we conclude that IR is a multi-dimensional set of processes that post-transcriptionally regulate diverse gene groups during normal erythropoiesis, misregulation of which could be responsible for human disease.« less

  6. Single-gene influences on brain and behavior.

    PubMed

    Wahlsten, D

    1999-01-01

    As traditional behavioral genetics analysis merges with neurogenetics, the field of neurobehavioral genetics, focusing on single-gene effects, comes into being. New biotechnology has greatly accelerated gene discovery and the study of gene function in relation to brain and behavior. More than 7,000 genes in mice and 10,000 in humans have now been documented, and extensive information about the genetics of several species is readily available on the World Wide Web. Based on knowledge of the DNA sequence of a gene, a targeted mutation with the capacity to disable it can be created. These knockouts--also called null mutants--are employed in the study of a wide range of phenotypes, including learning and memory, appetite and obesity, and circadian rhythms. The era of examining single-gene effects from a reductionistic perspective is waning, and research with interacting arrays of genes in various environmental contexts is demonstrating a need for systems-oriented theory. PMID:10074687

  7. Characterizing bacterial gene circuit dynamics with optically programmed gene expression signals.

    PubMed

    Olson, Evan J; Hartsough, Lucas A; Landry, Brian P; Shroff, Raghav; Tabor, Jeffrey J

    2014-04-01

    Gene circuits are dynamical systems that regulate cellular behaviors, often using protein signals as inputs and outputs. Here we have developed an optogenetic 'function generator' method for programming tailor-made gene expression signals in live bacterial cells. We designed precomputed light sequences based on experimentally calibrated mathematical models of light-switchable two-component systems and used them to drive intracellular protein levels to match user-defined reference time courses. We used this approach to generate accelerated and linearized dynamics, sinusoidal oscillations with desired amplitudes and periods, and a complex waveform, all with unprecedented accuracy and precision. We also combined the function generator with a dual fluorescent protein reporter system, analogous to a dual-channel oscilloscope, to reveal that a synthetic repressible promoter linearly transforms repressor signals with an approximate 7-min delay. Our approach will enable a new generation of dynamical analyses of synthetic and natural gene circuits, providing an essential step toward the predictive design and rigorous understanding of biological systems.

  8. Effects of Metabolic Programming on Juvenile Play Behavior and Gene Expression in the Prefrontal Cortex of Rats.

    PubMed

    Hehar, Harleen; Ma, Irene; Mychasiuk, Richelle

    2016-01-01

    Early developmental processes, such as metabolic programming, can provide cues to an organism, which allow it to make modifications that are predicted to be beneficial for survival. Similarly, social play has a multifaceted role in promoting survival and fitness of animals. Play is a complex behavior that is greatly influenced by motivational and reward circuits, as well as the energy reserves and metabolism of an organism. This study examined the association between metabolic programming and juvenile play behavior in an effort to further elucidate insight into the consequences that early adaptions have on developmental trajectories. The study also examined changes in expression of four genes (Drd2, IGF1, Opa1, and OxyR) in the prefrontal cortex known to play significant roles in reward, bioenergetics, and social-emotional functioning. Using four distinct variations in developmental programming (high-fat diet, caloric restriction, exercise, or high-fat diet combined with exercise), we found that dietary programming (high-fat diet vs. caloric restriction) had the greatest impact on play behavior and gene expression. However, exercise also induced changes in both measures. This study demonstrates that metabolic programming can alter neural circuits and bioenergetics involved in play behavior, thus providing new insights into mechanisms that allow programming to influence the evolutionary success of an organism.

  9. How the Number of Alleles Influences Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hat, Beata; Paszek, Pawel; Kimmel, Marek; Piechor, Kazimierz; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2007-07-01

    The higher organisms, eukaryotes, are diploid and most of their genes have two homological copies (alleles). However, the number of alleles in a cell is not constant. In the S phase of the cell cycle all the genome is duplicated and then in the G2 phase and mitosis, which together last for several hours, most of the genes have four copies instead of two. Cancer development is, in many cases, associated with a change in allele number. Several genetic diseases are caused by haploinsufficiency: Lack of one of the alleles or its improper functioning. In the paper we consider the stochastic expression of a gene having a variable number of copies. We applied our previously developed method in which the reaction channels are split into slow (connected with change of gene state) and fast (connected with mRNA/protein synthesis/decay), the later being approximated by deterministic reaction rate equations. As a result we represent gene expression as a piecewise deterministic time-continuous Markov process, which is further related with a system of partial differential hyperbolic equations for probability density functions (pdfs) of protein distribution. The stationary pdfs are calculated analytically for haploidal gene or numerically for diploidal and tetraploidal ones. We distinguished nine classes of simultaneous activation of haploid, diploid and tetraploid genes. This allows for analysis of potential consequences of gene duplication or allele loss. We show that when gene activity is autoregulated by a positive feedback, the change in number of gene alleles may have dramatic consequences for its regulation and may not be compensated by the change of efficiency of mRNA synthesis per allele.

  10. The influence of growth hormone on bone and adipose programming.

    PubMed

    Oberbauer, Anita M

    2014-01-01

    In utero growth hormone exposure is associated with distinct immediate growth responses and long term impacts on adult physiological parameters that include obesity, insulin resistance, and bone function. Growth hormone accelerates cellular proliferation in many tissues but is exemplified by increases in the number of cells within the cartilaginous growth plate of bone. In some cases growth hormone also potentiates differentiation as seen in the differentiation of adipocytes that rapidly fill upon withdrawal of growth hormone. Growth hormone provokes these changes either by direct action or through intermediaries such as insulin-like growth factor-I and other downstream effector molecules. The specific mechanism used by growth hormone in programming tissues is not yet fully characterized and likely represents a multipronged approach involving DNA modification, altered adult hormonal milieu, and the development of an augmented stem cell pool capable of future engagement as is seen in adipose accrual. This review summarizes findings of growth hormone's influence on in utero and neonatal cellular and metabolic profiles related to bone and adipose tissue.

  11. Perinatal environment and its influences on metabolic programming of offspring.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Moran, Timothy H

    2010-07-14

    The intrauterine environment supports the development and health of offspring. Perturbations to this environment can have detrimental effects on the fetus that have persistent pathological consequences through adolescence and adulthood. The developmental origins of the health and disease concept, also known as the "Barker Hypothesis", has been put forth to describe the increased incidence of chronic disease such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes in humans and animals exposed to a less than ideal intrauterine environment. Maternal infection, poor or excess nutrition, and stressful events can negatively influence the development of different cell types, tissues and organ systems ultimately predisposing the organism to pathological conditions. Although there are a variety of conditions associated to exposure to altered intrauterine environments, the focus of this review will be on the consequences of stress and high fat diet during the pre- and perinatal periods and associated outcomes related to obesity and other metabolic conditions. We further discuss possible neuroendocrine and epigenetic mechanisms responsible for the metabolic programming of offspring. The paper represents an invited review by a symposium, award winner or keynote speaker at the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior [SSIB] Annual Meeting in Portland, July 2009.

  12. Network activity-independent coordinated gene expression program for synapse assembly

    PubMed Central

    Valor, Luis M.; Charlesworth, Paul; Humphreys, Lawrence; Anderson, Chris N. G.; Grant, Seth G. N.

    2007-01-01

    Global biological datasets generated by genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics provide new approaches to understanding the relationship between the genome and the synapse. Combined transcriptome analysis and multielectrode recordings of neuronal network activity were used in mouse embryonic primary neuronal cultures to examine synapse formation and activity-dependent gene regulation. Evidence for a coordinated gene expression program for assembly of synapses was observed in the expression of 642 genes encoding postsynaptic and plasticity proteins. This synaptogenesis gene expression program preceded protein expression of synapse markers and onset of spiking activity. Continued expression was followed by maturation of morphology and electrical neuronal networks, which was then followed by the expression of activity-dependent genes. Thus, two distinct sequentially active gene expression programs underlie the genomic programs of synapse function. PMID:17360580

  13. Influence of Gene Expression on Hardness in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Nirmal, Ravi C.; Wrigley, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Puroindoline (Pina and Pinb) genes control grain texture or hardness in wheat. Wild-type/soft alleles lead to softer grain while a mutation in one or both of these genes results in a hard grain. Variation in hardness in genotypes with identical Pin alleles (wild-type or mutant) is known but the molecular basis of this is not known. We now report the identification of wheat genotypes with hard grain texture and wild-type/soft Pin alleles indicating that hardness in wheat may be controlled by factors other than mutations in the coding region of the Pin genes. RNA-Seq analysis was used to determine the variation in the transcriptome of developing grains of thirty three diverse wheat genotypes including hard (mutant Pin) and soft (wild type) and those that were hard without having Pin mutations. This defined the role of pin gene expression and identified other candidate genes associated with hardness. Pina was not expressed in hard wheat with a mutation in the Pina gene. The ratio of Pina to Pinb expression was generally lower in the hard non mutant genotypes. Hardness may be associated with differences in Pin expression and other factors and is not simply associated with mutations in the PIN protein coding sequences. PMID:27741295

  14. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Beilin; Gao, Yanxia; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis. PMID:27413249

  15. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis. PMID:27413249

  16. KIR Gene Content in Amerindians Indicates Influence of Demographic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Augusto, Danillo Gardenal; Piovezan, Bruno Zagonel; Tsuneto, Luiza Tamie; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia Maria; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza

    2013-01-01

    Although the KIR gene content polymorphism has been studied worldwide, only a few isolated or Amerindian populations have been analyzed. This extremely diverse gene family codifies receptors that are expressed mainly in NK cells and bind HLA class I molecules. KIR-HLA combinations have been associated to several diseases and population studies are important to comprehend their evolution and their role in immunity. Here we analyzed, by PCR-SSP (specific sequencing priming), 327 individuals from four isolated groups of two of the most important Brazilian Amerindian populations: Kaingang and Guarani. The pattern of KIR diversity among these and other ten Amerindian populations disclosed a wide range of variation for both KIR haplotypes and gene frequencies, indicating that demographic factors, such as bottleneck and founder effects, were the most important evolutionary factors in shaping the KIR polymorphism in these populations. PMID:23451080

  17. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  18. The Influence of Programming Skills on Learning and Study Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Younghee

    The relationship between learning to program at a construct level and learning and study strategies was studied for college students enrolled in a beginning Pascal programing course and a calculus course (four sections of the programing course and two of the mathematics course). For both the experimental group (n=42) and the first control group…

  19. Influence of gene copy number on self-regulated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jędrak, Jakub; Ochab-Marcinek, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Using an analytically solvable stochastic model, we study the properties of a simple genetic circuit consisting of multiple copies of a self-regulating gene. We analyse how the variation in gene copy number and the mutations changing the auto-regulation strength affect the steady-state distribution of protein concentration. We predict that one-reporter assay, an experimental method where the extrinsic noise level is inferred from the comparison of expression variance of a single and duplicated reporter gene, may give an incorrect estimation of the extrinsic noise contribution when applied to self-regulating genes. We also show that an imperfect duplication of an auto-activated gene, changing the regulation strength of one of the copies, may lead to a hybrid, binary+graded response of these genes to external signal. The analysis of relative changes in mean gene expression before and after duplication suggests that evolutionary accumulation of gene duplications may, at a given mean burst size, non-trivially depend on the inherent noisiness of a given gene, quantified by the inverse of the maximal mean frequency of bursts. Moreover, we find that the dependence of gene expression noise on gene copy number and auto-regulation strength may qualitatively differ, e.g. in monotonicity, depending on whether the noise is measured by Fano factor or coefficient of variation. Thus, experimentally-based hypotheses linking gene expression noise and evolutionary optimisation in the context of gene copy number variation may be ambiguous as they are dependent on the particular function chosen to quantify noise. PMID:27528448

  20. Assembling genes from predicted exons in linear time with dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Guigó, R

    1998-01-01

    In a number of programs for gene structure prediction in higher eukaryotic genomic sequences, exon prediction is decoupled from gene assembly: a large pool of candidate exons is predicted and scored from features located in the query DNA sequence, and candidate genes are assembled from such a pool as sequences of nonoverlapping frame-compatible exons. Genes are scored as a function of the scores of the assembled exons, and the highest scoring candidate gene is assumed to be the most likely gene encoded by the query DNA sequence. Considering additive gene scoring functions, currently available algorithms to determine such a highest scoring candidate gene run in time proportional to the square of the number of predicted exons. Here, we present an algorithm whose running time grows only linearly with the size of the set of predicted exons. Polynomial algorithms rely on the fact that, while scanning the set of predicted exons, the highest scoring gene ending in a given exon can be obtained by appending the exon to the highest scoring among the highest scoring genes ending at each compatible preceding exon. The algorithm here relies on the simple fact that such highest scoring gene can be stored and updated. This requires scanning the set of predicted exons simultaneously by increasing acceptor and donor position. On the other hand, the algorithm described here does not assume an underlying gene structure model. Indeed, the definition of valid gene structures is externally defined in the so-called Gene Model. The Gene Model specifies simply which gene features are allowed immediately upstream which other gene features in valid gene structures. This allows for great flexibility in formulating the gene identification problem. In particular it allows for multiple-gene two-strand predictions and for considering gene features other than coding exons (such as promoter elements) in valid gene structures.

  1. The relative influence of natural selection and geography on gene flow in guppies.

    PubMed

    Crispo, Erika; Bentzen, Paul; Reznick, David N; Kinnison, Michael T; Hendry, Andrew P

    2006-01-01

    Two general processes may influence gene flow among populations. One involves divergent selection, wherein the maladaptation of immigrants and hybrids impedes gene flow between ecological environments (i.e. ecological speciation). The other involves geographic features that limit dispersal. We determined the relative influence of these two processes in natural populations of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata). If selection is important, gene flow should be reduced between different selective environments. If geography is important, gene flow should be impeded by geographic distance and physical barriers. We examined how genetic divergence, long-term gene flow, and contemporary dispersal within a watershed were influenced by waterfalls, geographic distance, predation, and habitat features. We found that waterfalls and geographic distance increased genetic divergence and reduced dispersal and long-term gene flow. Differences in predation or habitat features did not influence genetic divergence or gene flow. In contrast, differences in predation did appear to reduce contemporary dispersal. We suggest that the standard predictions of ecological speciation may be heavily nuanced by the mating behaviour and life history strategies of guppies. PMID:16367829

  2. The relative influence of natural selection and geography on gene flow in guppies.

    PubMed

    Crispo, Erika; Bentzen, Paul; Reznick, David N; Kinnison, Michael T; Hendry, Andrew P

    2006-01-01

    Two general processes may influence gene flow among populations. One involves divergent selection, wherein the maladaptation of immigrants and hybrids impedes gene flow between ecological environments (i.e. ecological speciation). The other involves geographic features that limit dispersal. We determined the relative influence of these two processes in natural populations of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata). If selection is important, gene flow should be reduced between different selective environments. If geography is important, gene flow should be impeded by geographic distance and physical barriers. We examined how genetic divergence, long-term gene flow, and contemporary dispersal within a watershed were influenced by waterfalls, geographic distance, predation, and habitat features. We found that waterfalls and geographic distance increased genetic divergence and reduced dispersal and long-term gene flow. Differences in predation or habitat features did not influence genetic divergence or gene flow. In contrast, differences in predation did appear to reduce contemporary dispersal. We suggest that the standard predictions of ecological speciation may be heavily nuanced by the mating behaviour and life history strategies of guppies.

  3. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Patrick CA; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Hunt, Karen A; Romanos, Jihane; Curtotti, Alessandra; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Heap, Graham AR; Ádány, Róza; Aromaa, Arpo; Bardella, Maria Teresa; van den Berg, Leonard H; Bockett, Nicholas A; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Dema, Bárbara; Fehrmann, Rudolf SN; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Fiatal, Szilvia; Grandone, Elvira; Green, Peter M; Groen, Harry JM; Gwilliam, Rhian; Houwen, Roderick HJ; Hunt, Sarah E; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelleher, Dermot; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kurppa, Kalle; MacMathuna, Padraic; Mäki, Markku; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; McCann, Owen T; Mearin, M Luisa; Mein, Charles A; Mirza, Muddassar M; Mistry, Vanisha; Mora, Barbara; Morley, Katherine I; Mulder, Chris J; Murray, Joseph A; Núñez, Concepción; Oosterom, Elvira; Ophoff, Roel A; Polanco, Isabel; Peltonen, Leena; Platteel, Mathieu; Rybak, Anna; Salomaa, Veikko; Schweizer, Joachim J; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tack, Greetje J; Turner, Graham; Veldink, Jan H; Verbeek, Wieke HM; Weersma, Rinse K; Wolters, Victorien M; Urcelay, Elena; Cukrowska, Bozena; Greco, Luigi; Neuhausen, Susan L.; McManus, Ross; Barisani, Donatella; Deloukas, Panos; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Saavalainen, Paivi; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A

    2010-01-01

    We performed a second-generation genome wide association study of 4,533 celiac disease cases and 10,750 controls. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with PGWAS<10−4, and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci, in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions reached genome wide significance (Pcombined<5×10−8), most contain immune function genes (BACH2, CCR4, CD80, CIITA/SOCS1/CLEC16A, ICOSLG, ZMIZ1) with ETS1, RUNX3, THEMIS and TNFRSF14 playing key roles in thymic T cell selection. A further 13 regions had suggestive association evidence. In an expression quantitative trait meta-analysis of 1,469 whole blood samples, 20 of 38 (52.6%) tested loci had celiac risk variants correlated (P<0.0028, FDR 5%) with cis gene expression. PMID:20190752

  4. The Limits of Family Influence: Genes, Experience, and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, David C.

    This book examines socialization science, which is the empirical effort to understand how children acquire traits from their families and cultures. This work proposes that one part of the family influence process--broad differences in family environments, except for those that are neglectful, abusive, or without opportunity--may exert little…

  5. Cystic gene dosage influences kidney lesions after nephron reduction.

    PubMed

    Le Corre, Stéphanie; Viau, Amandine; Burtin, Martine; El-Karoui, Khalil; Cnops, Yvette; Terryn, Sara; Debaix, Huguette; Bérissi, Sophie; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Devuyst, Olivier; Terzi, Fabiola

    2015-01-01

    Cystic kidney disease is characterized by the progressive development of multiple fluid-filled cysts. Cysts can be acquired, or they may appear during development or in postnatal life due to specific gene defects and lead to renal failure. The most frequent form of this disease is the inherited polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Experimental models of PKD showed that an increase of cellular proliferation and apoptosis as well as defects in apico-basal and planar cell polarity or cilia play a critical role in cyst development. However, little is known about the mechanisms and the mediators involved in acquired cystic kidney diseases (ACKD). In this study, we used the nephron reduction as a model to study the mechanisms underlying cyst development in ACKD. We found that tubular dilations after nephron reduction recapitulated most of the morphological features of ACKD. The development of tubular dilations was associated with a dramatic increase of cell proliferation. In contrast, the apico-basal polarity and cilia did not seem to be affected. Interestingly, polycystin 1 and fibrocystin were markedly increased and polycystin 2 was decreased in cells lining the dilated tubules, whereas the expression of several other cystic genes did not change. More importantly, Pkd1 haploinsufficiency accelerated the development of tubular dilations after nephron reduction, a phenotype that was associated to a further increase of cell proliferation. These data were relevant to humans ACKD, as cystic genes expression and the rate of cell proliferation were also increased. In conclusion, our study suggests that the nephron reduction can be considered a suitable model to study ACKD and that dosage of genes involved in PKD is also important in ACKD.

  6. The Influence of Perceived Characteristics of Management Development Programs on Employee Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardts, Joost C. A.; van der Velde, Mandy E. G.; Maurer, Todd J.

    2010-01-01

    Employees' perceptions of Management Development (MD) programs is the topic of this study. The purpose is to examine the influence of three important perceived characteristics of MD programs on relevant MD outcomes. The MD characteristics are: availability of role models, perceived control, and understanding the MD program. Outcomes are:…

  7. Common genetic variants in the PSCA gene influence gene expression and bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Kohaar, Indu; Rothman, Nathaniel; Earl, Julie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Ye, Yuanqing; Malats, Núria; Tang, Wei; Liu, Luyang; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Muchmore, Brian; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Tarway, McAnthony; Kogevinas, Manolis; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Baris, Dalsu; Mumy, Adam; Albanes, Demetrius; Purdue, Mark P.; Hutchinson, Amy; Carrato, Alfredo; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Schned, Alan; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Thun, Michael J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Chanock, Stephen J.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Silverman, Debra T.; Wu, Xifeng; Real, Francisco X.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified a SNP, rs2294008, on 8q24.3 within the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene, as a risk factor for bladder cancer. To fine-map this region, we imputed 642 SNPs within 100 Kb of rs2294008 in addition to 33 markers genotyped in one of the reported genome-wide association study in 8,652 subjects. A multivariable logistic regression model adjusted for rs2294008 revealed a unique signal, rs2978974 (r2 = 0.02, D′ = 0.19 with rs2294008). In the combined analysis of 5,393 cases and 7,324 controls, we detected a per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.11 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06–1.17, P = 5.8 × 10−5] for rs2294008 and OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.02–1.13, P = 9.7 × 10−3) for rs2978974. The effect was stronger in carriers of both risk variants (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.08–1.41, P = 1.8 × 10−3) and there was a significant multiplicative interaction (P = 0.035) between these two SNPs, which requires replication in future studies. The T risk allele of rs2294008 was associated with increased PSCA mRNA expression in two sets of bladder tumor samples (n = 36, P = 0.0007 and n = 34, P = 0.0054) and in normal bladder samples (n = 35, P = 0.0155), but rs2978974 was not associated with PSCA expression. SNP rs2978974 is located 10 Kb upstream of rs2294008, within an alternative untranslated first exon of PSCA. The non-risk allele G of rs2978974 showed strong interaction with nuclear proteins from five cell lines tested, implying a regulatory function. In conclusion, a joint effect of two PSCA SNPs, rs2294008 and rs2978974, suggests that both variants may be important for bladder cancer susceptibility, possibly through different mechanisms that influence the control of mRNA expression and interaction with regulatory factors. PMID:22416122

  8. Transcriptome Analysis in Rat Kidneys: Importance of Genes Involved in Programmed Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tain, You-Lin; Huang, Li-Tung; Chan, Julie Y. H.; Lee, Chien-Te

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal conditions in pregnancy can elicit long-term effects on the health of offspring. The most common outcome is programmed hypertension. We examined whether there are common genes and pathways in the kidney are responsible for generating programmed hypertension among three different models using next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received dexamethasone (DEX, 0.1 mg/kg) from gestational day 16 to 22, 60% high-fructose (HF) diet, or NG-nitro-l-arginine-methyester (l-NAME, 60 mg/kg/day) to conduct DEX, HF, or l-NAME model respectively. All three models elicited programmed hypertension in adult male offspring. We observed five shared genes (Bcl6, Dmrtc1c, Egr1, Inmt, and Olr1668) among three different models. The identified differential genes (DEGs) that are related to regulation of blood pressure included Aqp2, Ptgs1, Eph2x, Hba-a2, Apln, Guca2b, Hmox1, and Npy. RNA-Seq identified genes in arachidonic acid metabolism are potentially gatekeeper genes contributing to programmed hypertension. In addition, HF and DEX increased expression and activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2 gene encoding protein). Conclusively, the DEGs in arachidonic acid metabolism are potentially gatekeeper genes in programmed hypertension. The roles of DEGs identified by the RNA-Seq in this study deserve further clarification, to develop the potential interventions in the prevention of programmed hypertension. PMID:25739086

  9. Learning to Program with Personal Robots: Influences on Student Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, Monica M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of using robots in introductory programming courses is to increase motivation among learners. There have been several types of robots that have been used extensively in the classroom to teach a variety of computer science concepts. A more recently introduced robot designed to teach programming to novice students is the Institute…

  10. Modelling Programming Performance: Beyond the Influence of Learner Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Wilfred W. F.; Yuen, Allan H. K.

    2011-01-01

    In the 21st century, the ubiquitous nature of technology today is evident and to a large extent, most of us benefit from the modern convenience brought about by technology. Yet to be technology literate, it is argued that learning to program still plays an important role. One area of research in programming concerns the identification of…

  11. The Influence of Advertising on Attendance at Park Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyburn, Jerry H.; Knudson, Douglas M.

    1975-01-01

    Investigated were the effects on attendance of four types of pre-program advertising: no advertising, personal invitation, signs, and innovation. All three advertising treatments increased program attendance over no advertising. Each advertising technique has advantages and disadvantages. Signs are impersonal, but effective. Personal invitation is…

  12. Discovery and Replication of Gene Influences on Brain Structure Using LASSO Regression

    PubMed Central

    Kohannim, Omid; Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Jahanshad, Neda; Hua, Xue; Rajagopalan, Priya; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie L.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    We implemented least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression to evaluate gene effects in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of brain images, using an MRI-derived temporal lobe volume measure from 729 subjects scanned as part of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Sparse groups of SNPs in individual genes were selected by LASSO, which identifies efficient sets of variants influencing the data. These SNPs were considered jointly when assessing their association with neuroimaging measures. We discovered 22 genes that passed genome-wide significance for influencing temporal lobe volume. This was a substantially greater number of significant genes compared to those found with standard, univariate GWAS. These top genes are all expressed in the brain and include genes previously related to brain function or neuropsychiatric disorders such as MACROD2, SORCS2, GRIN2B, MAGI2, NPAS3, CLSTN2, GABRG3, NRXN3, PRKAG2, GAS7, RBFOX1, ADARB2, CHD4, and CDH13. The top genes we identified with this method also displayed significant and widespread post hoc effects on voxelwise, tensor-based morphometry (TBM) maps of the temporal lobes. The most significantly associated gene was an autism susceptibility gene known as MACROD2. We were able to successfully replicate the effect of the MACROD2 gene in an independent cohort of 564 young, Australian healthy adult twins and siblings scanned with MRI (mean age: 23.8 ± 2.2 SD years). Our approach powerfully complements univariate techniques in detecting influences of genes on the living brain. PMID:22888310

  13. Multi-Vendor Loyalty Programs: Influencing Customer Behavioral Loyalty?

    PubMed Central

    Villacé-Molinero, Teresa; Reinares-Lara, Pedro; Reinares-Lara, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Loyalty programs are a consolidated marketing instrument whose adoption in many sectors has not been associated with appropriate comprehension of either their management elements or their effects. The purpose of this research is to contribute to knowledge about the effect of loyalty programs on repeat purchase behavior. More specifically, it seeks to discover whether joining a program changes the buying behavior of its members, and, if so, to study the profile of those whose behavior changes most. The intention was also to provide new study variables pertaining to multi-vendor loyalty programs, such as where they are joined or purchases in associated outlets as a result of behavioral loyalty. Research was carried out using a sample of 1200 individuals (31,746 purchases) belonging to a multi-vendor loyalty program. The study period was 13 years, 4 months, and split into two phases: before and after the joining the program. Different methodological approaches, such as the use of transactional databases that included pre-program-enrollment data and of the same sampling units throughout the study, were incorporated into the research with the aim of advancing academic knowledge regarding multi-vendor loyalty programs. Moreover, a type of program and market hardly dealt with in the relevant literature was analyzed. The results showed while the loyalty program had managed to reduce the time between purchases, it had not affected purchase volume or average expenditure. They also demonstrated the existence of a differential profile of customers who had changed their buying behavior to a greater extent. Finally, recency was identified as being the decisive variable in behavioral change. PMID:26941677

  14. Data and programs in support of network analysis of genes and their association with diseases.

    PubMed

    Kontou, Panagiota I; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Dimou, Niki L; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Bagos, Pantelis G

    2016-09-01

    The network-based approaches that were employed in order to depict the relationships between human genetic diseases and their associated genes are described. Towards this direction, monopartite disease-disease and gene-gene networks were constructed from bipartite gene-disease association networks. The latter were created by collecting and integrating data from three diverse resources, each one with different content, covering from rare monogenic disorders to common complex diseases. Moreover, topological and clustering graph analyses were performed. The methodology and the programs presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Network analysis of genes and their association with diseases" [1]. PMID:27508260

  15. Influence of photoperiodic history on clock genes and the circadian pacemaker in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Rohleder, Nils; Langer, Christina; Maus, Christian; Spiwoks-Becker, Isabella; Emser, Angela; Engel, Lydia; Spessert, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    The influence of seasonal lighting conditions on expression of clock genes and the circadian pacemaker was investigated in the rat retina. For this purpose, the 24-h profiles of nine clock genes (bmal1, clock, per1, per2, per3, dec1, dec2, cry1 and cry 2) and the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene as an indicator of the circadian pacemaker output were compared between light-dark periods of 8 : 16 and 16 : 8 h. The photoperiod influenced the daily patterns of the amount of transcript for per1, per3, dec2 and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase. This indicates that photoperiodic information modulates clock gene expression in addition to the circadian pacemaker of the retina. Under constant darkness, photoperiod-dependent changes in the daily profile of the level of transcript persisted for the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene but not for any of the clock genes. Hence, quantitative expression of each clock gene is influenced by the photoperiod only under the acute light-dark cycle, whereas the pacemaker is capable of storing photoperiodic information from past cycles.

  16. Measuring the Influence of Television Programs and Campaigns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belson, William A.

    1970-01-01

    The director of the Survey Research Center at the London School of Economics and Political Science discusses the need to assess the effects on the public of television programs and outlines some of the methods for conducting such research. (AA)

  17. Examination of a Palatogenic Gene Program in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Mary E.; Sheehan-Rooney, Kelly; Dixon, Michael J.; Eberhart, Johann K.

    2011-01-01

    Human palatal clefting is debilitating and difficult to rectify surgically. Animal models enhance our understanding of palatogenesis and are essential in strategies designed to ameliorate palatal malformations in humans. Recent studies have shown that the zebrafish palate, or anterior neurocranium, is under similar genetic control to the amniote palatal skeleton. We extensively analyzed palatogenesis in zebrafish to determine the similarity of gene expression and function across vertebrates. By 36 hpf palatogenic cranial neural crest cells reside in homologous regions of the developing face compared to amniote species. Transcription factors and signaling molecules regulating mouse palatogenesis are expressed in similar domains during palatogenesis in zebrafish. Functional investigation of a subset of these genes, fgf10a, tgfb2, pax9 and smad5 revealed their necessity in zebrafish palatogenesis. Collectively, these results suggest that the gene regulatory networks regulating palatogenesis may be conserved across vertebrate species, demonstrating the utility of zebrafish as a model for palatogenesis. PMID:22016187

  18. Influence of Isoflurane on Immediate-Early Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bunting, Kristopher M.; Nalloor, Rebecca I.; Vazdarjanova, Almira

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterograde amnesia is a hallmark effect of volatile anesthetics. Isoflurane is known to affect both the translation and transcription of plasticity-associated genes required for normal memory formation in many brain regions. What is not known is whether isoflurane anesthesia prevents the initiation of transcription or whether it halts transcription already in progress. We tested the hypothesis that general anesthesia with isoflurane prevents learning-induced initiation of transcription of several memory-associated immediate-early genes (IEGs) correlated with amnesia; we also assessed whether it stops transcription initiated prior to anesthetic administration. Methods: Using a Tone Fear Conditioning paradigm, rats were trained to associate a tone with foot-shock. Animals received either no anesthesia, anesthesia immediately after training, or anesthesia before, during, and after training. Animals were either sacrificed after training or tested 24 h later for long-term memory. Using Cellular Compartment Analysis of Temporal Activity by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (catFISH), we examined the percentage of neurons expressing the IEGs Arc/Arg3.1 and Zif268/Egr1/Ngfi-A/Krox-24 in the dorsal hippocampus, primary somatosensory cortex, and primary auditory cortex. Results: On a cellular level, isoflurane administered at high doses (general anesthesia) prevented initiation of transcription, but did not stop transcription of Arc and Zif268 mRNA initiated prior to anesthesia. On a behavioral level, the same level of isoflurane anesthesia produced anterograde amnesia for fear conditioning when administered before and during training, but did not produce retrograde amnesia when administered immediately after training. Conclusion: General anesthesia with isoflurane prevents initiation of learning-related transcription but does not stop ongoing transcription of two plasticity-related IEGs, Arc and Zif268, a pattern of disruption that parallels the effects of

  19. Nutritional influences on epigenetic programming: asthma, allergy, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Debra J; Huang, Rae-Chi; Craig, Jeffrey M; Prescott, Susan L

    2014-11-01

    Observational studies show consistent links between early-life nutritional exposures as important risk factors for the development of asthma, allergy, and obesity. Reliance on increasing use of dietary supplementation and fortification (eg, with folate) to compensate for increased consumption of processed foods is also influencing immune and metabolic outcomes. Epigenetics is providing substantial advances in understanding how early-life nutritional exposures can effect disease development. This article summarizes current evidence linking the influence of early-life nutritional exposures on epigenetic regulation with a focus on the disease outcomes of asthma, allergy, and obesity.

  20. Number of X-chromosome genes influences social behavior and vasopressin gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kimberly H; Quinnies, Kayla M; Eschendroeder, Alex; Didrick, Paula M; Eugster, Erica A; Rissman, Emilie F

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in behavior are widespread and often caused by hormonal differences between the sexes. In addition to hormones, the composition and numbers of the sex chromosomes also affect a variety of sex differences. In humans, X-chromosome genes are implicated in neurobehavioral disorders (i.e. fragile-X, autism). To investigate the role of X-chromosome genes in social behavior, we used a mouse model that has atypical sex chromosome configurations resembling Turner (45, XO) and Klinefelter syndromes (47, XXY). We examined a number of behaviors in juvenile mice. Mice with only one copy of most X-chromosome genes, regardless of gonadal sex, were less social in dyadic interaction and social preference tasks. In the elevated plus maze, mice with one X-chromosome spent less time in the distal ends of the open arms as compared to mice with two copies of X-chromosome genes. Using qRTPCR, we noted that amygdala from female mice with one X-chromosome had higher expression levels of vasopressin (Avp) as compared to mice in the other groups. Finally, in plasma from girls with Turner syndrome we detected reduced vasopressin (AVP) concentrations as compared to control patients. These novel findings link sex chromosome genes with social behavior via concentrations of AVP in brain, adding to our understanding of sex differences in neurobehavioral disorders.

  1. Influences of Globalization on K-12 Language Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Navin Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of globalization on K-12 language teacher education at Northern Arizona University (NAU) in terms of multilingual practices in the US, with reference to an English-only-state, Arizona. This study explored influences of globalization on K-12 language education practices in the US through teacher…

  2. Advancing Translational Research Through the NHLBI Gene Therapy Resource Program (GTRP)

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Janet; Cornetta, Kenneth; Diggins, Margaret; Johnston, Julie C.; Sepelak, Susan; Wang, Gensheng; Wilson, James M.; Wright, J. Fraser; Skarlatos, Sonia I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Translational research is a lengthy, complex, and necessary endeavor in order to bring basic science discoveries to clinical fruition. The NIH offers several programs to support translational research including an important resource established specifically for gene therapy researchers—the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Gene Therapy Resource Program (GTRP). This paper reviews the core components of the GTRP and describes how the GTRP provides researchers with resources that are critical to advancing investigational gene therapy products into clinical testing. PMID:23692378

  3. Beyond the single gene: How epistasis and gene-by-environment effects influence crop domestication.

    PubMed

    Doust, Andrew N; Lukens, Lewis; Olsen, Kenneth M; Mauro-Herrera, Margarita; Meyer, Ann; Rogers, Kimberly

    2014-04-29

    Domestication is a multifaceted evolutionary process, involving changes in individual genes, genetic interactions, and emergent phenotypes. There has been extensive discussion of the phenotypic characteristics of plant domestication, and recent research has started to identify the specific genes and mutational mechanisms that control domestication traits. However, there is an apparent disconnect between the simple genetic architecture described for many crop domestication traits, which should facilitate rapid phenotypic change under selection, and the slow rate of change reported from the archeobotanical record. A possible explanation involves the middle ground between individual genetic changes and their expression during development, where gene-by-gene (epistatic) and gene-by-environment interactions can modify the expression of phenotypes and opportunities for selection. These aspects of genetic architecture have the potential to significantly slow the speed of phenotypic evolution during crop domestication and improvement. Here we examine whether epistatic and gene-by-environment interactions have shaped how domestication traits have evolved. We review available evidence from the literature, and we analyze two domestication-related traits, shattering and flowering time, in a mapping population derived from a cross between domesticated foxtail millet and its wild progenitor. We find that compared with wild progenitor alleles, those favored during domestication often have large phenotypic effects and are relatively insensitive to genetic background and environmental effects. Consistent selection should thus be able to rapidly change traits during domestication. We conclude that if phenotypic evolution was slow during crop domestication, this is more likely due to cultural or historical factors than epistatic or environmental constraints.

  4. Management factors influencing fertility in synchronized and natural breeding programs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms involved in pregnancy establishment and maintenance in cattle are complex. This review has focused on some of the factors that affect pregnancy rates in both natural service and AI and synchronized and non-synchronized breeding programs. One of the best methods to look at factors influen...

  5. Deviant Peer Influences in Programs for Youth Problems and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Kenneth A., Ed.; Dishion, Thomas J., Ed.; Lansford, Jennifer E., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Most interventions for at-risk youth are group based. Yet, emerging research indicates that young people often learn to become deviant by interacting with deviant peers. In this important volume, leading intervention and prevention experts from psychology, education, criminology, and related fields analyze how, and to what extent, programs that…

  6. Genome size diversity in angiosperms and its influence on gene space.

    PubMed

    Dodsworth, Steven; Leitch, Andrew R; Leitch, Ilia J

    2015-12-01

    Genome size varies c. 2400-fold in angiosperms (flowering plants), although the range of genome size is skewed towards small genomes, with a mean genome size of 1C=5.7Gb. One of the most crucial factors governing genome size in angiosperms is the relative amount and activity of repetitive elements. Recently, there have been new insights into how these repeats, previously discarded as 'junk' DNA, can have a significant impact on gene space (i.e. the part of the genome comprising all the genes and gene-related DNA). Here we review these new findings and explore in what ways genome size itself plays a role in influencing how repeats impact genome dynamics and gene space, including gene expression. PMID:26605684

  7. Genome size diversity in angiosperms and its influence on gene space.

    PubMed

    Dodsworth, Steven; Leitch, Andrew R; Leitch, Ilia J

    2015-12-01

    Genome size varies c. 2400-fold in angiosperms (flowering plants), although the range of genome size is skewed towards small genomes, with a mean genome size of 1C=5.7Gb. One of the most crucial factors governing genome size in angiosperms is the relative amount and activity of repetitive elements. Recently, there have been new insights into how these repeats, previously discarded as 'junk' DNA, can have a significant impact on gene space (i.e. the part of the genome comprising all the genes and gene-related DNA). Here we review these new findings and explore in what ways genome size itself plays a role in influencing how repeats impact genome dynamics and gene space, including gene expression.

  8. Venom of the ectoparasitoid, Nasonia vitripennis, influences gene expression in Musca domestica hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Cen; Liu, Yang; Fang, Qi; Min-Li, Yan; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Li, Yan-Min

    2013-08-01

    Insect hosts have evolved potent innate immunity against invasion by parasitoid wasps. Host/parasitoids live in co-evolutionary relationships. Nasonia vitripennis females inject venom into their dipteran hosts just prior to laying eggs on the host's outer integument. The parasitoid larvae are ectoparasitoids because they feed on their hosts within the puparium, but do not enter the host body. We investigated the influence of N. vitripennis venom on the gene expression profile of hemocytes of their hosts, pupae of the housefly, Musca domestica. We prepared venom by isolating venom glands and treated experimental host pupae with venom. We used suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to determine the influence of venom on hemocyte gene expression. At 1 h post treatment, we recorded decreases in transcript levels of 133 EST clones derived from forward a subtractive library of host hemocytes and upregulation in transcript levels of 111 EST clones from the reverse library. These genes are related to immune and stress response, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and apoptosis, metabolism, transport, and transcription/translation regulation. We verified the reliability of our data with reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR analysis of randomly selected genes, and with assays of enzyme activities. These analyses showed that the expression level of all selected genes were downregulated after venom treatment. Outcomes of our experiments support the hypothesis that N. vitripennis venom influences the gene expression in host hemocytes. We conclude that the actions of venom on host gene expression influence host biology in ways that benefit the development and emergence of the next generation of parasitoids.

  9. Saving the Seneca Outdoor Recreation Program: A Case Study in Exerting Political Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Clare

    1998-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the process of exerting political influence in faculty's systematic efforts to save the outdoor recreation program at Seneca College (Ontario). A chart and explanatory list present a seven-stage plan for influencing political decision-making. (SAS)

  10. The Influence of the CAS Standards on Academic Advisors and Advising Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Research on the influence of the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) on academic advising is limited. Using a comparative case study method, I respond to this research gap by exploring how the standards influence practices of academic advising programs. Study results indicate that participating advisors knew little…

  11. The Influence of Personal Characteristics on Secondary School Teachers' Beliefs about School Guidance and Counselling Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aluede, Oyaziwo; Egbochuku, ELizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigated how personal characteristics of secondary school teachers influence their beliefs about their school guidance and counselling programs. Two hundred and sixteen senior secondary school teachers responded to the "Teachers Beliefs about School Guidance and Counselling Programs Inventory (TBSG &CI)". When teachers' opinion…

  12. Socio-Cultural Influences in Eating Disorders: Focus on Sports/Fitness Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Moriarty, Mary

    This report notes that eating disorders are frequently described as a diet and fitness program gone wild. It outlines and describes five sociocultural influences which have been identified for eating disorders: (1) emphasis on thinness; (2) glorification of youth; (3) changing roles of women; (4) emphasis on fitness and sport programs; and (5) the…

  13. Response to "Exploring the Influence of the ROC Integrated High School Program"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrick, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author provides a response to Scott Caspell's article "Exploring the Influence of the ROC Integrated High School Program." The author states that Caspell picked an excellent time frame to interview former students as they had participated in the integrated program between 10 and 13 years ago. Ideally, then, participants would…

  14. Effects of Creativity Training Programs and Teacher Influence on Pupil's Creative Thinking Abilities and Related Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; And Others

    This study is concerned with the effects of creativity training programs and teacher influence on the development of creativity. An attempt was made to answer the following questions: (1) are two programs equally effective in developing divergent thinking and in fostering positive attitudes about creativity and a self-concept as a creative…

  15. The Influence of Christian Programs on the Academic Achievement of Low-Literate Male Inmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messemer, Jonathan E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure whether Christian programs had a positive influence on the academic achievement of low-literate male inmates. The sample consisted of 124 male inmates in a closed security prison in the southeastern United States who were participating in an Adult Basic Education (ABE) program. The researcher grouped the…

  16. The Life Skills Program IPSY: Positive Influences on School Bonding and Prevention of Substance Misuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Victoria; Weichold, Karina; Silbereisen, Rainer K.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated whether a life skills program (LSP) for the prevention of adolescent substance misuse can have positive influences on a school context and on school bonding. The study also explored whether effects on alcohol use are mediated by positive effects on school bonding resulting from program participation. The LSP IPSY…

  17. Genetic Influences on Brain Gene Expression in Rats Selected for Tameness and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Henrike O.; Lautenschläger, Susann; Nelson, Ronald; Besnier, François; Rotival, Maxime; Cagan, Alexander; Kozhemyakina, Rimma; Plyusnina, Irina Z.; Trut, Lyudmila; Carlborg, Örjan; Petretto, Enrico; Kruglyak, Leonid; Pääbo, Svante; Schöneberg, Torsten; Albert, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    Interindividual differences in many behaviors are partly due to genetic differences, but the identification of the genes and variants that influence behavior remains challenging. Here, we studied an F2 intercross of two outbred lines of rats selected for tame and aggressive behavior toward humans for >64 generations. By using a mapping approach that is able to identify genetic loci segregating within the lines, we identified four times more loci influencing tameness and aggression than by an approach that assumes fixation of causative alleles, suggesting that many causative loci were not driven to fixation by the selection. We used RNA sequencing in 150 F2 animals to identify hundreds of loci that influence brain gene expression. Several of these loci colocalize with tameness loci and may reflect the same genetic variants. Through analyses of correlations between allele effects on behavior and gene expression, differential expression between the tame and aggressive rat selection lines, and correlations between gene expression and tameness in F2 animals, we identify the genes Gltscr2, Lgi4, Zfp40, and Slc17a7 as candidate contributors to the strikingly different behavior of the tame and aggressive animals. PMID:25189874

  18. Major Histocompatibility Complex and Background Genes in Chickens Influence Susceptibility to High Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chicken’s major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype has profound influence on the resistance or susceptibility to certain pathogens such as B21 MHC haplotype confers resistance to Marek’s disease (MD). However, non-MHC genes are also important in disease resistance. For example, both line...

  19. The Influence of the Global Gene Expression Shift on Downstream Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qifeng; Zhang, Xuegong

    2016-01-01

    The assumption that total abundance of RNAs in a cell is roughly the same in different cells is underlying most studies based on gene expression analyses. But experiments have shown that changes in the expression of some master regulators such as c-MYC can cause global shift in the expression of almost all genes in some cell types like cancers. Such shift will violate this assumption and can cause wrong or biased conclusions for standard data analysis practices, such as detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes and molecular classification of tumors based on gene expression. Most existing gene expression data were generated without considering this possibility, and are therefore at the risk of having produced unreliable results if such global shift effect exists in the data. To evaluate this risk, we conducted a systematic study on the possible influence of the global gene expression shift effect on differential expression analysis and on molecular classification analysis. We collected data with known global shift effect and also generated data to simulate different situations of the effect based on a wide collection of real gene expression data, and conducted comparative studies on representative existing methods. We observed that some DE analysis methods are more tolerant to the global shift while others are very sensitive to it. Classification accuracy is not sensitive to the shift and actually can benefit from it, but genes selected for the classification can be greatly affected. PMID:27092944

  20. Genetic background influences murine prostate gene expression: implications for cancer phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi-Frias, Daniella; Pritchard, Colin; Mecham, Brigham H; Coleman, Ilsa M; Nelson, Peter S

    2007-01-01

    Background Cancer of the prostate is influenced by both genetic predisposition and environmental factors. The identification of genes capable of modulating cancer development has the potential to unravel disease heterogeneity and aid diagnostic and prevention strategies. To this end, mouse models have been developed to isolate the influences of individual genetic lesions in the context of consistent genotypes and environmental exposures. However, the normal prostatic phenotypic variability dictated by a genetic background that is potentially capable of influencing the process of carcinogenesis has not been established. Results In this study we used microarray analysis to quantify transcript levels in the prostates of five commonly studied inbred mouse strains. We applied a multiclass response t-test and determined that approximately 13% (932 genes) exhibited differential expression (range 1.3-190-fold) in any one strain relative to other strains (false discovery rate ≤10%). Expression differences were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, or immunohistochemistry for several genes previously shown to influence cancer progression, such as Psca, Mmp7, and Clusterin. Analyses of human prostate transcripts orthologous to variable murine prostate genes identified differences in gene expression in benign epithelium that correlated with the differentiation state of adjacent tumors. For example, the gene encoding apolipoprotein D, which is known to enhance resistance to cell stress, was expressed at significantly greater levels in benign epithelium associated with high-grade versus low-grade cancers. Conclusion These studies support the concept that the cellular, tissue, and organismal context contribute to oncogenesis and suggest that a predisposition to a sequence of events leading to pathology may exist prior to cancer initiation. PMID:17577413

  1. Phosphorylation Events in the Multiple Gene Regulator of Group A Streptococcus Significantly Influence Global Gene Expression and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sanson, Misu; Makthal, Nishanth; Gavagan, Maire; Cantu, Concepcion; Olsen, Randall J.; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing analysis of ∼800 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) found that the gene encoding the multiple virulence gene regulator of GAS (mga) is highly polymorphic in serotype M59 strains but not in strains of other serotypes. To help understand the molecular mechanism of gene regulation by Mga and its contribution to GAS pathogenesis in serotype M59 GAS, we constructed an isogenic mga mutant strain. Transcriptome studies indicated a significant regulatory influence of Mga and altered metabolic capabilities conferred by Mga-regulated genes. We assessed the phosphorylation status of Mga in GAS cell lysates with Phos-tag gels. The results revealed that Mga is phosphorylated at histidines in vivo. Using phosphomimetic and nonphosphomimetic substitutions at conserved phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase regulation domain (PRD) histidines of Mga, we demonstrated that phosphorylation-mimicking aspartate replacements at H207 and H273 of PRD-1 and at H327 of PRD-2 are inhibitory to Mga-dependent gene expression. Conversely, non-phosphorylation-mimicking alanine substitutions at H273 and H327 relieved inhibition, and the mutant strains exhibited a wild-type phenotype. The opposing regulatory profiles observed for phosphorylation- and non-phosphorylation-mimicking substitutions at H273 extended to global gene regulation by Mga. Consistent with these observations, the H273D mutant strain attenuated GAS virulence, whereas the H273A strain exhibited a wild-type virulence phenotype in a mouse model of necrotizing fasciitis. Together, our results demonstrate phosphoregulation of Mga and its direct link to virulence in M59 GAS strains. These data also lay a foundation toward understanding how naturally occurring gain-of-function variations in mga, such as H201R, may confer an advantage to the pathogen and contribute to M59 GAS pathogenesis. PMID:25824840

  2. Array data extractor (ADE): a LabVIEW program to extract and merge gene array data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Large data sets from gene expression array studies are publicly available offering information highly valuable for research across many disciplines ranging from fundamental to clinical research. Highly advanced bioinformatics tools have been made available to researchers, but a demand for user-friendly software allowing researchers to quickly extract expression information for multiple genes from multiple studies persists. Findings Here, we present a user-friendly LabVIEW program to automatically extract gene expression data for a list of genes from multiple normalized microarray datasets. Functionality was tested for 288 class A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and expression data from 12 studies comparing normal and diseased human hearts. Results confirmed known regulation of a beta 1 adrenergic receptor and further indicate novel research targets. Conclusions Although existing software allows for complex data analyses, the LabVIEW based program presented here, “Array Data Extractor (ADE)”, provides users with a tool to retrieve meaningful information from multiple normalized gene expression datasets in a fast and easy way. Further, the graphical programming language used in LabVIEW allows applying changes to the program without the need of advanced programming knowledge. PMID:24289243

  3. Development of Genomic Resources for a thraustochytrid Pathogen and Investigation of Temperature Influences on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Vedrenne, Ana Elisa; Groner, Maya; Page-Karjian, Annie; Siegmund, Gregor-Fausto; Singhal, Sonia; Sziklay, Jamie; Roberts, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how environmental changes influence the pathogenicity and virulence of infectious agents is critical for predicting epidemiological patterns of disease. Thraustochytrids, part of the larger taxonomic class Labyrinthulomycetes, contain several highly pathogenic species, including the hard clam pathogen quahog parasite unknown (QPX). QPX has been associated with large-scale mortality events along the northeastern coast of North America. Growth and physiology of QPX is temperature-dependent, and changes in local temperature profiles influence pathogenicity. In this study we characterize the partial genome of QPX and examine the influence of temperature on gene expression. Genes involved in several biological processes are differentially expressed upon temperature change, including those associated with altered growth and metabolism and virulence. The genomic and transcriptomic resources developed in this study provide a foundation for better understanding virulence, pathogenicity and life history of thraustochytrid pathogens. PMID:24069279

  4. Tobacco industry sociological programs to influence public beliefs about smoking

    PubMed Central

    Glantz, Stanton; Landman, Anne; Cortese, Daniel K

    2008-01-01

    The multinational tobacco companies responded to arguments about the social costs of smoking and hazards of secondhand smoke by quietly implementing the Social Costs/Social Values project (1979–1989), which relied upon the knowledge and authoritative power of social scientists to construct an alternate cultural repertoire of smoking. Social scientists created and disseminated non-health based, pro-tobacco arguments without fully acknowledging their relationship with the industry. After the U.S. Surgeon General concluded that nicotine was addictive in 1988, the industry responded by forming “Associates for Research in the Science of Enjoyment” (c.1988–1999), whose members toured the world promoting the health benefits of the use of legal substances, including tobacco, for stress relief and relaxation, without acknowledging the industry’s role. In this paper we draw on previously secret tobacco industry documents, now available on the internet to show how both of these programs utilized academic sociologists, political scientists, anthropologists, psychologists, philosophers and economists, and allowed the industry to develop and widely disseminate friendly research through credible channels. Strategies included creating favorable surveys and opinions, infusing them into the lay press and media through press releases, articles and conferences, publishing, promoting and disseminating books, commissioning and placing favorable book reviews, providing media training for book authors and organizing media tours. These programs allowed the tobacco industry to affect public and academic discourse on the social acceptability of smoking. PMID:18164524

  5. Random transposon mutagenesis of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome reveals additional genes influencing erythromycin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fedashchin, Andrij; Cernota, William H; Gonzalez, Melissa C; Leach, Benjamin I; Kwan, Noelle; Wesley, Roy K; Weber, J Mark

    2015-11-01

    A single cycle of strain improvement was performed in Saccharopolyspora erythraea mutB and 15 genotypes influencing erythromycin production were found. Genotypes generated by transposon mutagenesis appeared in the screen at a frequency of ~3%. Mutations affecting central metabolism and regulatory genes were found, as well as hydrolases, peptidases, glycosyl transferases and unknown genes. Only one mutant retained high erythromycin production when scaled-up from micro-agar plug fermentations to shake flasks. This mutant had a knockout of the cwh1 gene (SACE_1598), encoding a cell-wall-associated hydrolase. The cwh1 knockout produced visible growth and morphological defects on solid medium. This study demonstrated that random transposon mutagenesis uncovers strain improvement-related genes potentially useful for strain engineering. PMID:26468041

  6. Creating Programs to Help Latino Youth Thrive at School: The Influence of Latino Parent Involvement Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behnke, Andrew O.; Kelly, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Parent involvement programs can play an essential role in the academic success of Latino youth. This article reports the effectiveness and evaluation of two new Extension programs that help Latino parents become more involved in their youths' academics. The Latino Parent and Family Advocacy and Support Training (LPFAST) targets parents of K- 8th…

  7. The Tibetan medicine Zuotai influences clock gene expression in the liver of mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huan; Li, Wen-Kai; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Wei, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The circadian clock is involved in drug metabolism, efficacy and toxicity. Drugs could in turn affect the biological clock as a mechanism of their actions. Zuotai is an essential component of many popular Tibetan medicines for sedation, tranquil and “detoxification,” and is mainly composed of metacinnabar (β-HgS). The pharmacological and/or toxicological basis of its action is unknown. This study aimed to examine the effect of Zuotai on biological clock gene expression in the liver of mice. Materials and methods. Mice were orally given Zuotai (10 mg/kg, 1.5-fold of clinical dose) daily for 7 days, and livers were collected every 4 h during the 24 h period. Total RNA was extracted and subjected to real-time RT-PCR analysis of circadian clock gene expression. Results. Zuotai decreased the oscillation amplitude of the clock core gene Clock, neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (Npas2), Brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (Bmal1) at 10:00. For the clock feedback negative control genes, Zuotai had no effect on the oscillation of the clock gene Cryptochrome (Cry1) and Period genes (Per1–3). For the clock-driven target genes, Zuotai increased the oscillation amplitude of the PAR-bZip family member D-box-binding protein (Dbp), decreased nuclear factor interleukin 3 (Nfil3) at 10:00, but had no effect on thyrotroph embryonic factor (Tef); Zuotai increased the expression of nuclear receptor Rev-Erbα (Nr1d1) at 18:00, but had little influence on the nuclear receptor Rev-Erbβ (Nr1d2) and RORα. Conclusion. The Tibetan medicine Zuotai could influence the expression of clock genes, which could contribute to pharmacological and/or toxicological effects of Zuotai. PMID:26855871

  8. Influence of sex on gene expression in human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tomo; Richards, Stephen M.; Liu, Shaohui; Jensen, Roderick V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Sex-associated differences have been identified in the anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the human cornea. We hypothesize that many of these differences are due to fundamental variations in gene expression. Our objective in this study was to determine whether such differences exist in human corneal epithelial cells both in vivo and in vitro. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells were isolated from the corneoscleral rims of male and female donors. Cells were processed either directly for RNA extraction, or first cultured in phenol red-free keratinocyte serum-free media. The RNA samples were examined for differentially expressed mRNAs by using of CodeLink Bioarrays and Affymetrix GeneChips. Data were analyzed with GeneSifter.Net software. Results Our results demonstrate that sex significantly influences the expression of over 600 genes in human corneal epithelial cells in vivo. These genes are involved in a broad spectrum of biologic processes, molecular functions and cellular components, such as metabolic processes, DNA replication, cell migration, RNA binding, oxidoreductase activity and nucleoli. We also identified significant, sex-related effects on gene expression in human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. However, with few exceptions (e.g., X- and Y-linked genes), these sex-related differences in gene expression in vitro were typically different than those in vivo. Conclusions Our findings support our hypothesis that sex-related differences exist in the gene expression of human corneal epithelial cells. Variations in gene expression may contribute to sex-related differences in the prevalence of certain corneal diseases. PMID:20011627

  9. Gene trapping identifies transiently induced survival genes during programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wempe, Frank; Yang, Ji-Yeon; Hammann, Joanna; Melchner, Harald von

    2001-01-01

    Background The existence of a constitutively expressed machinery for death in individual cells has led to the notion that survival factors repress this machinery and, if such factors are unavailable, cells die by default. In many cells, however, mRNA and protein synthesis inhibitors induce apoptosis, suggesting that in some cases transcriptional activity might actually impede cell death. To identify transcriptional mechanisms that interfere with cell death and survival, we combined gene trap mutagenesis with site-specific recombination (Cre/loxP system) to isolate genes from cells undergoing apoptosis by growth factor deprivation. Results From an integration library consisting of approximately 2 × 106 unique proviral integrations obtained by infecting the interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent hematopoietic cell line - FLOXIL3 - with U3Cre gene trap virus, we have isolated 125 individual clones that converted to factor independence upon IL-3 withdrawal. Of 102 cellular sequences adjacent to U3Cre integration sites, 17% belonged to known genes, 11% matched single expressed sequence tags (ESTs) or full cDNAs with unknown function and 72% had no match within the public databases. Most of the known genes recovered in this analysis encoded proteins with survival functions. Conclusions We have shown that hematopoietic cells undergoing apoptosis after withdrawal of IL-3 activate survival genes that impede cell death. This results in reduced apoptosis and improved survival of cells treated with a transient apoptotic stimulus. Thus, apoptosis in hematopoietic cells is the end result of a conflict between death and survival signals, rather than a simple death by default. PMID:11516336

  10. Structural influence of gene networks on their inference: analysis of C3NET

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The availability of large-scale high-throughput data possesses considerable challenges toward their functional analysis. For this reason gene network inference methods gained considerable interest. However, our current knowledge, especially about the influence of the structure of a gene network on its inference, is limited. Results In this paper we present a comprehensive investigation of the structural influence of gene networks on the inferential characteristics of C3NET - a recently introduced gene network inference algorithm. We employ local as well as global performance metrics in combination with an ensemble approach. The results from our numerical study for various biological and synthetic network structures and simulation conditions, also comparing C3NET with other inference algorithms, lead a multitude of theoretical and practical insights into the working behavior of C3NET. In addition, in order to facilitate the practical usage of C3NET we provide an user-friendly R package, called c3net, and describe its functionality. It is available from https://r-forge.r-project.org/projects/c3net and from the CRAN package repository. Conclusions The availability of gene network inference algorithms with known inferential properties opens a new era of large-scale screening experiments that could be equally beneficial for basic biological and biomedical research with auspicious prospects. The availability of our easy to use software package c3net may contribute to the popularization of such methods. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Lev Klebanov, Joel Bader and Yuriy Gusev. PMID:21696592

  11. Factors influencing overweight children's commencement of and continuation in a resistance training program

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In light of the child overweight and obesity problem in Australia, resistance training programs have been trialled as an innovative way of assisting children increase lean body mass and reduce body fat. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing overweight children's participation in a resistance training trial program. Method Parent-child pairs who participated in the trial program were invited to take part in a follow-up individual interview to discuss their program experiences. In total, 22 semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 parent-child pairs. Results The factors found to be most relevant to program commencement among parents were a desire for their child to lose weight and gain confidence, the proximity of the venue, and no cost for participation. For children, the most relevant factors were the opportunity to build strength and improve fitness and having supportive parents who facilitated program initiation. The factors most relevant to continuation for parents were the quality of the program management, being able to stay for the sessions, the child's improved weight status, coordination, and confidence, and no cost for participation. Weight loss and improved confidence were also motivators for continuation among the children, along with pleasant social interaction with peers and trainers and ongoing parental support. Conclusion Different factors variably influence program commencement and program continuation in both parents and children. This has important implications for future interventions that aim to successfully recruit and retain intervention participants. PMID:21083936

  12. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  13. Phylogenetic inference in Rafflesiales: the influence of rate heterogeneity and horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nickrent, Daniel L; Blarer, Albert; Qiu, Yin-Long; Vidal-Russell, Romina; Anderson, Frank E

    2004-01-01

    Background The phylogenetic relationships among the holoparasites of Rafflesiales have remained enigmatic for over a century. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies using the mitochondrial matR gene placed Rafflesia, Rhizanthes and Sapria (Rafflesiaceae s. str.) in the angiosperm order Malpighiales and Mitrastema (Mitrastemonaceae) in Ericales. These phylogenetic studies did not, however, sample two additional groups traditionally classified within Rafflesiales (Apodantheaceae and Cytinaceae). Here we provide molecular phylogenetic evidence using DNA sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear genes for representatives of all genera in Rafflesiales. Results Our analyses indicate that the phylogenetic affinities of the large-flowered clade and Mitrastema, ascertained using mitochondrial matR, are congruent with results from nuclear SSU rDNA when these data are analyzed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. The relationship of Cytinaceae to Malvales was recovered in all analyses. Relationships between Apodanthaceae and photosynthetic angiosperms varied depending upon the data partition: Malvales (3-gene), Cucurbitales (matR) or Fabales (atp1). The latter incongruencies suggest that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) may be affecting the mitochondrial gene topologies. The lack of association between Mitrastema and Ericales using atp1 is suggestive of HGT, but greater sampling within eudicots is needed to test this hypothesis further. Conclusions Rafflesiales are not monophyletic but composed of three or four independent lineages (families): Rafflesiaceae, Mitrastemonaceae, Apodanthaceae and Cytinaceae. Long-branch attraction appears to be misleading parsimony analyses of nuclear small-subunit rDNA data, but model-based methods (maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses) recover a topology that is congruent with the mitochondrial matR gene tree, thus providing compelling evidence for organismal relationships. Horizontal gene transfer appears to be influencing only

  14. Genetic influences on insight problem solving: the role of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weili; Shang, Siyuan; Su, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    People may experience an “aha” moment, when suddenly realizing a solution of a puzzling problem. This experience is called insight problem solving. Several findings suggest that catecholamine-related genes may contribute to insight problem solving, among which the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is the most promising candidate. The current study examined 753 healthy individuals to determine the associations between 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms on the COMT gene and insight problem-solving performance, while considering gender differences. The results showed that individuals carrying A allele of rs4680 or T allele of rs4633 scored significantly higher on insight problem-solving tasks, and the COMT gene rs5993883 combined with gender interacted with correct solutions of insight problems, specifically showing that this gene only influenced insight problem-solving performance in males. This study presents the first investigation of the genetic impact on insight problem solving and provides evidence that highlights the role that the COMT gene plays in insight problem solving. PMID:26528222

  15. Genetic influences on insight problem solving: the role of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weili; Shang, Siyuan; Su, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    People may experience an "aha" moment, when suddenly realizing a solution of a puzzling problem. This experience is called insight problem solving. Several findings suggest that catecholamine-related genes may contribute to insight problem solving, among which the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is the most promising candidate. The current study examined 753 healthy individuals to determine the associations between 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms on the COMT gene and insight problem-solving performance, while considering gender differences. The results showed that individuals carrying A allele of rs4680 or T allele of rs4633 scored significantly higher on insight problem-solving tasks, and the COMT gene rs5993883 combined with gender interacted with correct solutions of insight problems, specifically showing that this gene only influenced insight problem-solving performance in males. This study presents the first investigation of the genetic impact on insight problem solving and provides evidence that highlights the role that the COMT gene plays in insight problem solving.

  16. IL8 gene as modifier of cystic fibrosis: unraveling the factors which influence clinical variability.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Larissa Lazzarini; Marson, Fernando Augusto Lima; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Sílvia; Salomão Junior, João Batista; Souza, Dorotéia Rossi Silva

    2016-08-01

    The severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with classes of mutations in the CFTR gene (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator), physical environment and modifier genes interaction. The IL8 gene (interleukin 8), according to its respective polymorphisms, influences inflammatory responses. This study analyzed IL8 gene polymorphisms (rs4073, rs2227306 and rs2227307), by means of PCR/RFLP, and their association with pulmonary function markers and clinical severity scores in 186 patients with CF, considering the CFTR genotype. There was an association between rs2227307 and precocity of the disease. The severity of lung disease was associated with the following markers: transcutaneous arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SaO2) (regardless of CFTR genotype, for the polymorphisms rs4073, rs2227306 and rs2227307); mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa (regardless of CFTR genotype, for the polymorphisms rs2227306 and rs2227307). Pulmonary function markers (SaO2 and spirometric variables) and clinical severity scores were also associated with IL8 gene polymorphisms. This study identified the IL8 gene, represented by rs4073 and rs2227306 polymorphisms, and particularly the rs2227307 polymorphism, as potentiating factors for the degree of variability in the severity of CF, especially in pulmonary clinical manifestation correlated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:27209008

  17. Global genomic and transcriptomic analysis of human pancreatic islets reveals novel genes influencing glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fadista, João; Vikman, Petter; Laakso, Emilia Ottosson; Mollet, Inês Guerra; Esguerra, Jonathan Lou; Taneera, Jalal; Storm, Petter; Osmark, Peter; Ladenvall, Claes; Prasad, Rashmi B.; Hansson, Karin B.; Finotello, Francesca; Uvebrant, Kristina; Ofori, Jones K.; Di Camillo, Barbara; Krus, Ulrika; Cilio, Corrado M.; Hansson, Ola; Eliasson, Lena; Rosengren, Anders H.; Renström, Erik; Wollheim, Claes B.; Groop, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation can modulate gene expression, and thereby phenotypic variation and susceptibility to complex diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Here we harnessed the potential of DNA and RNA sequencing in human pancreatic islets from 89 deceased donors to identify genes of potential importance in the pathogenesis of T2D. We present a catalog of genetic variants regulating gene expression (eQTL) and exon use (sQTL), including many long noncoding RNAs, which are enriched in known T2D-associated loci. Of 35 eQTL genes, whose expression differed between normoglycemic and hyperglycemic individuals, siRNA of tetraspanin 33 (TSPAN33), 5′-nucleotidase, ecto (NT5E), transmembrane emp24 protein transport domain containing 6 (TMED6), and p21 protein activated kinase 7 (PAK7) in INS1 cells resulted in reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In addition, we provide a genome-wide catalog of allelic expression imbalance, which is also enriched in known T2D-associated loci. Notably, allelic imbalance in paternally expressed gene 3 (PEG3) was associated with its promoter methylation and T2D status. Finally, RNA editing events were less common in islets than previously suggested in other tissues. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the complexity of gene regulation in human pancreatic islets and better understanding of how genetic variation can influence glucose metabolism. PMID:25201977

  18. Global genomic and transcriptomic analysis of human pancreatic islets reveals novel genes influencing glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fadista, João; Vikman, Petter; Laakso, Emilia Ottosson; Mollet, Inês Guerra; Esguerra, Jonathan Lou; Taneera, Jalal; Storm, Petter; Osmark, Peter; Ladenvall, Claes; Prasad, Rashmi B; Hansson, Karin B; Finotello, Francesca; Uvebrant, Kristina; Ofori, Jones K; Di Camillo, Barbara; Krus, Ulrika; Cilio, Corrado M; Hansson, Ola; Eliasson, Lena; Rosengren, Anders H; Renström, Erik; Wollheim, Claes B; Groop, Leif

    2014-09-23

    Genetic variation can modulate gene expression, and thereby phenotypic variation and susceptibility to complex diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Here we harnessed the potential of DNA and RNA sequencing in human pancreatic islets from 89 deceased donors to identify genes of potential importance in the pathogenesis of T2D. We present a catalog of genetic variants regulating gene expression (eQTL) and exon use (sQTL), including many long noncoding RNAs, which are enriched in known T2D-associated loci. Of 35 eQTL genes, whose expression differed between normoglycemic and hyperglycemic individuals, siRNA of tetraspanin 33 (TSPAN33), 5'-nucleotidase, ecto (NT5E), transmembrane emp24 protein transport domain containing 6 (TMED6), and p21 protein activated kinase 7 (PAK7) in INS1 cells resulted in reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In addition, we provide a genome-wide catalog of allelic expression imbalance, which is also enriched in known T2D-associated loci. Notably, allelic imbalance in paternally expressed gene 3 (PEG3) was associated with its promoter methylation and T2D status. Finally, RNA editing events were less common in islets than previously suggested in other tissues. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the complexity of gene regulation in human pancreatic islets and better understanding of how genetic variation can influence glucose metabolism.

  19. Blushing propensity in social anxiety disorder: influence of serotonin transporter gene variation.

    PubMed

    Domschke, Katharina; Stevens, Stephan; Beck, Beate; Baffa, Anna; Hohoff, Christa; Deckert, Jürgen; Gerlach, Alexander L

    2009-06-01

    Blushing is considered to be one of the prime pathophysiological markers of social anxiety disorder, potentially mediated by serotonergic function. Therefore, in the present study 62 patients with social anxiety disorder and 62 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were investigated for the influence of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene variation (5-HTTLPR, rs25531) on blushing propensity as measured by the blushing propensity scale (BPS). The less active 5-HTTLPR genotypes were nominally significantly associated with increased blushing propensity in patients with social anxiety disorder as compared to controls with an equidirectional trend for the less active 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 haplotypes. Even when statistically controlled for influence of depression, this association remained significant. In summary, the present pilot study suggests a potential role of functional serotonin transporter gene variation in blushing propensity warranting replication and encouraging genetic analyses of further intermediate phenotypes of social anxiety disorder. PMID:18629430

  20. Factors influencing law enforcement decisions to adopt an evidence-based robbery prevention program.

    PubMed

    Cabell, A; Casteel, C; Chronister, T; Nocera, M; Vladutiu, C J; Peek-Asa, C

    2013-12-01

    Homicide is the leading cause of workplace death among small retail and service businesses in the United States. Evidence-based programs have been shown to reduce robbery and robbery-related crimes in small retail businesses; however, reaching small businesses with programs has been difficult. As small businesses typically have no corporate backing or trade affiliation, police departments have been identified as potential vehicles for program dissemination. A national sample of 300 law enforcement agencies was surveyed to identify facilitators and barriers to adoption and sustainability of an evidence-based program. The questionnaire was developed using behavioral theory concepts and administered via telephone. Preliminary findings suggest the primary facilitators to program adoption included organizational capacity factors such as staff buy-in, dedicated personnel and financial support. Competing responsibilities was the primary barrier identified by agencies. Agency size and program complexity were identified as potential predictors of program adoption. Identifying agency and program-specific characteristics that influence program adoption by law enforcement agencies will be valuable for marketing programs to agencies that have the infrastructure to support and sustain program dissemination. Understanding these factors will optimize the reach of evidence-based strategies to small businesses. PMID:24057272

  1. The Influence of Assortativity on the Robustness of Signal-Integration Logic in Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pechenick, Dov A.; Payne, Joshua L.; Moore, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) drive the cellular processes that sustain life. To do so reliably, GRNs must be robust to perturbations, such as gene deletion and the addition or removal of regulatory interactions. GRNs must also be robust to genetic changes in regulatory regions that define the logic of signal-integration, as these changes can affect how specific combinations of regulatory signals are mapped to particular gene expression states. Previous theoretical analyses have demonstrated that the robustness of a GRN is influenced by its underlying topological properties, such as degree distribution and modularity. Another important topological property is assortativity, which measures the propensity with which nodes of similar connectivity are connected to one another. How assortativity influences the robustness of the signal-integration logic of GRNs remains an open question. Here, we use computational models of GRNs to investigate this relationship. We separately consider each of the three dynamical regimes of this model for a variety of degree distributions. We find that in the chaotic regime, robustness exhibits a pronounced increase as assortativity becomes more positive, while in the critical and ordered regimes, robustness is generally less sensitive to changes in assortativity. We attribute the increased robustness to a decrease in the duration of the gene expression pattern, which is caused by a reduction in the average size of a GRN’s in-components. This study provides the first direct evidence that assortativity influences the robustness of the signal-integration logic of computational models of GRNs, illuminates a mechanistic explanation for this influence, and furthers our understanding of the relationship between topology and robustness in complex biological systems. PMID:22155134

  2. Internal and External Influences on Program-Level Curriculum Development in Higher Education Fashion Merchandising Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Janice E.

    2010-01-01

    In an ever changing global economy, higher education experiences accountability issues in educating the workforce. Graduates require the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in the global workplace. For graduates to have the opportunity to attain this understanding and expertise, it is critical to identify what influences curriculum…

  3. Identification of landscape features influencing gene flow: How useful are habitat selection models?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffler, Gretchen H.; Schwartz, Michael K.; Pilgrim, Kristy L.; Talbot, Sandra; Sage, Kevin; Adams, Layne G.; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how dispersal patterns are influenced by landscape heterogeneity is critical for modeling species connectivity. Resource selection function (RSF) models are increasingly used in landscape genetics approaches. However, because the ecological factors that drive habitat selection may be different from those influencing dispersal and gene flow, it is important to consider explicit assumptions and spatial scales of measurement. We calculated pairwise genetic distance among 301 Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) in southcentral Alaska using an intensive noninvasive sampling effort and 15 microsatellite loci. We used multiple regression of distance matrices to assess the correlation of pairwise genetic distance and landscape resistance derived from an RSF, and combinations of landscape features hypothesized to influence dispersal. Dall's sheep gene flow was positively correlated with steep slopes, moderate peak normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVI), and open land cover. Whereas RSF covariates were significant in predicting genetic distance, the RSF model itself was not significantly correlated with Dall's sheep gene flow, suggesting that certain habitat features important during summer (rugged terrain, mid-range elevation) were not influential to effective dispersal. This work underscores that consideration of both habitat selection and landscape genetics models may be useful in developing management strategies to both meet the immediate survival of a species and allow for long-term genetic connectivity.

  4. Identification of landscape features influencing gene flow: How useful are habitat selection models?

    PubMed

    Roffler, Gretchen H; Schwartz, Michael K; Pilgrim, Kristy L; Talbot, Sandra L; Sage, George K; Adams, Layne G; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how dispersal patterns are influenced by landscape heterogeneity is critical for modeling species connectivity. Resource selection function (RSF) models are increasingly used in landscape genetics approaches. However, because the ecological factors that drive habitat selection may be different from those influencing dispersal and gene flow, it is important to consider explicit assumptions and spatial scales of measurement. We calculated pairwise genetic distance among 301 Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) in southcentral Alaska using an intensive noninvasive sampling effort and 15 microsatellite loci. We used multiple regression of distance matrices to assess the correlation of pairwise genetic distance and landscape resistance derived from an RSF, and combinations of landscape features hypothesized to influence dispersal. Dall's sheep gene flow was positively correlated with steep slopes, moderate peak normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVI), and open land cover. Whereas RSF covariates were significant in predicting genetic distance, the RSF model itself was not significantly correlated with Dall's sheep gene flow, suggesting that certain habitat features important during summer (rugged terrain, mid-range elevation) were not influential to effective dispersal. This work underscores that consideration of both habitat selection and landscape genetics models may be useful in developing management strategies to both meet the immediate survival of a species and allow for long-term genetic connectivity.

  5. Identification of landscape features influencing gene flow: How useful are habitat selection models?

    PubMed

    Roffler, Gretchen H; Schwartz, Michael K; Pilgrim, Kristy L; Talbot, Sandra L; Sage, George K; Adams, Layne G; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how dispersal patterns are influenced by landscape heterogeneity is critical for modeling species connectivity. Resource selection function (RSF) models are increasingly used in landscape genetics approaches. However, because the ecological factors that drive habitat selection may be different from those influencing dispersal and gene flow, it is important to consider explicit assumptions and spatial scales of measurement. We calculated pairwise genetic distance among 301 Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) in southcentral Alaska using an intensive noninvasive sampling effort and 15 microsatellite loci. We used multiple regression of distance matrices to assess the correlation of pairwise genetic distance and landscape resistance derived from an RSF, and combinations of landscape features hypothesized to influence dispersal. Dall's sheep gene flow was positively correlated with steep slopes, moderate peak normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVI), and open land cover. Whereas RSF covariates were significant in predicting genetic distance, the RSF model itself was not significantly correlated with Dall's sheep gene flow, suggesting that certain habitat features important during summer (rugged terrain, mid-range elevation) were not influential to effective dispersal. This work underscores that consideration of both habitat selection and landscape genetics models may be useful in developing management strategies to both meet the immediate survival of a species and allow for long-term genetic connectivity. PMID:27330556

  6. Encoding four gene expression programs in the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders S; O'Shea, Erin K

    2016-04-01

    Cellular signaling response pathways often exhibit a bow-tie topology [1,2]: multiple upstream stress signals converge on a single shared transcription factor, which is thought to induce different downstream gene expression programs (Figure 1A). However, if several different signals activate the same transcription factor, can each signal then induce a specific gene expression response? A growing body of literature supports a temporal coding theory where information about environmental signals can be encoded, at least partially, in the temporal dynamics of the shared transcription factor [1,2]. For example, in the case of the budding yeast transcription factor Msn2, different stresses induce distinct Msn2 activation dynamics: Msn2 shows pulsatile nuclear activation with dose-dependent frequency under glucose limitation, but sustained nuclear activation with dose-dependent amplitude under oxidative stress [3]. These dynamic patterns can then lead to differential gene expression responses [3-5], but it is not known how much specificity can be obtained. Thus, a major question of this temporal coding theory is how many gene response programs or cellular functions can be robustly encoded by dynamic control of a single transcription factor. Here we provide the first direct evidence that, simply by regulating the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor, it is possible to preferentially induce four distinct gene expression programs. PMID:27046808

  7. Pasture-feeding of Charolais steers influences skeletal muscle metabolism and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cassar-Malek, I; Jurie, C; Bernard, C; Barnola, I; Micol, D; Hocquette, J-F

    2009-10-01

    Extensive beef production systems on pasture are promoted to improve animal welfare and beef quality. This study aimed to compare the influence on muscle characteristics of two management approaches representative of intensive and extensive production systems. One group of 6 Charolais steers was fed maize-silage indoors and another group of 6 Charolais steers grazed on pasture. Activities of enzymes representative of glycolytic and oxidative (Isocitrate dehydrogenase [ICDH], citrate synthase [CS], hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase [HAD]) muscle metabolism were assessed in Rectus abdominis (RA) and Semitendinosus (ST) muscles. Activities of oxidative enzymes ICDH, CS and HAD were higher in muscles from grazing animals demonstrating a plasticity of muscle metabolism according to the production and feeding system. Gene expression profiling in RA and ST muscles was performed on both production groups using a multi-tissue bovine cDNA repertoire. Variance analysis showed an effect of the muscle type and of the production system on gene expression (P<0.001). A list of the 212 most variable genes according to the production system was established, of which 149 genes corresponded to identified genes. They were classified according to their gene function annotation mainly in the "protein metabolism and modification", "signal transduction", "cell cycle", "developmental processes" and "muscle contraction" biological processes. Selenoprotein W was found to be underexpressed in pasture-fed animals and could be proposed as a putative gene marker of the grass-based system. In conclusion, enzyme-specific adaptations and gene expression modifications were observed in response to the production system and some of them could be candidates for grazing or grass-feeding traceability. PMID:19996487

  8. Pasture-feeding of Charolais steers influences skeletal muscle metabolism and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cassar-Malek, I; Jurie, C; Bernard, C; Barnola, I; Micol, D; Hocquette, J-F

    2009-10-01

    Extensive beef production systems on pasture are promoted to improve animal welfare and beef quality. This study aimed to compare the influence on muscle characteristics of two management approaches representative of intensive and extensive production systems. One group of 6 Charolais steers was fed maize-silage indoors and another group of 6 Charolais steers grazed on pasture. Activities of enzymes representative of glycolytic and oxidative (Isocitrate dehydrogenase [ICDH], citrate synthase [CS], hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase [HAD]) muscle metabolism were assessed in Rectus abdominis (RA) and Semitendinosus (ST) muscles. Activities of oxidative enzymes ICDH, CS and HAD were higher in muscles from grazing animals demonstrating a plasticity of muscle metabolism according to the production and feeding system. Gene expression profiling in RA and ST muscles was performed on both production groups using a multi-tissue bovine cDNA repertoire. Variance analysis showed an effect of the muscle type and of the production system on gene expression (P<0.001). A list of the 212 most variable genes according to the production system was established, of which 149 genes corresponded to identified genes. They were classified according to their gene function annotation mainly in the "protein metabolism and modification", "signal transduction", "cell cycle", "developmental processes" and "muscle contraction" biological processes. Selenoprotein W was found to be underexpressed in pasture-fed animals and could be proposed as a putative gene marker of the grass-based system. In conclusion, enzyme-specific adaptations and gene expression modifications were observed in response to the production system and some of them could be candidates for grazing or grass-feeding traceability.

  9. Ancestry Influences the Fate of Duplicated Genes Millions of Years After Polyploidization of Clawed Frogs (Xenopus)

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ben J.

    2007-01-01

    Allopolyploid species form through the fusion of two differentiated genomes and, in the earliest stages of their evolution, essentially all genes in the nucleus are duplicated. Because unique mutations occur in each ancestor prior to allopolyploidization, duplicate genes in these species potentially are not interchangeable, and this could influence their genetic fates. This study explores evolution and expression of a simple duplicated complex—a heterodimer between RAG1 and RAG2 proteins in clawed frogs (Xenopus). Results demonstrate that copies of RAG1 degenerated in different polyploid species in a phylogenetically biased fashion, predominately in only one lineage of closely related paralogs. Surprisingly, as a result of an early deletion of one RAG2 paralog, it appears that in many species RAG1/RAG2 heterodimers are composed of proteins that were encoded by unlinked paralogs. If the tetraploid ancestor of extant species of Xenopus arose through allopolyploidization and if recombination between paralogs was rare, then the genes that encode functional RAG1 and RAG2 proteins in many polyploid species were each ultimately inherited from different diploid progenitors. These observations are consistent with the notion that ancestry can influence the fate of duplicate genes millions of years after duplication, and they uncover a dimension of natural selection in allopolyploid genomes that is distinct from other genetic phenomena associated with polyploidization or segmental duplication. PMID:17435227

  10. Common genetic variants in NEFL influence gene expression and neuroblastoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Mario; Diskin, Sharon; Cimmino, Flora; Acierno, Giovanni; Totaro, Francesca; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Pezone, Lucia; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Hakonarson, Hakon; Iolascon, Achille; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2014-01-01

    The genetic etiology of sporadic neuroblastoma is still largely obscure. In a genome-wide association study, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with neuroblastoma at the LINC00340, BARD1, LMO1, DUSP12, HSD17B12, HACE1 and LIN28B gene loci, but these explain only a small fraction of neuroblastoma heritability. Other neuroblastoma susceptibility genes are likely hidden among signals discarded by the multiple testing corrections. In this study, we evaluated 8 additional genes selected as candidates for further study based on proven involvement in neuroblastoma differentiation. SNP at these candidate genes were tested for association with disease susceptibility in 2101 cases and 4202 controls, with the associations found replicated in an independent cohort of 459 cases and 809 controls. Replicated associations were further studied for cis-effect using gene expression, transient overexpression, silencing and cellular differentiation assays. The neurofilament gene NEFL harbored three SNP associated with neuroblastoma (rs11994014; Pcombined=0.0050; OR=0.88, rs2979704; Pcombined=0.0072; OR=0.87, rs105911; Pcombined=0.0049; OR=0.86). The protective allele of rs1059111 correlated with increased NEFL expression. Biological investigations showed that ectopic overexpression of NEFL inhibited cell growth specifically in neuroblastoma cells carrying the protective allele. NEFL overexpression also enhanced differentiation and impaired the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of cells with protective allele and basal NEFL expression, while impairing invasiveness and proliferation of cells homozygous for the risk genotype. Clinically, high levels of NEFL expression in primary neuroblastoma specimens was associated with better overall survival (P=0.03; HR=0.68). Our results show that common variants of NEFL influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and they establish that NEFL expression influences disease initiation and progression. PMID:25312269

  11. Transcriptional program controlled by the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS during early organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mena, Concepción; de Folter, Stefan; Costa, Maria Manuela R; Angenent, Gerco C; Sablowski, Robert

    2005-02-01

    Floral organs, whose identity is determined by specific combinations of homeotic genes, originate from a group of undifferentiated cells called the floral meristem. In Arabidopsis, the homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG) terminates meristem activity and promotes development of stamens and carpels. To understand the program of gene expression activated by AG, we followed genome-wide expression during early stamen and carpel development. The AG target genes included most genes for which mutant screens revealed a function downstream of AG. Novel targets were validated by in situ hybridisation and binding to AG in vitro and in vivo. Transcription factors formed a large fraction of AG targets, suggesting that during early organogenesis, much of the genetic program is concerned with elaborating gene expression patterns. The results also suggest that AG and other homeotic proteins with which it interacts (SEPALLATA3, APETALA3, PISTILLATA) are coordinately regulated in a positive-feedback loop to maintain their own expression, and that AG activates biosynthesis of gibberellin, which has been proposed to promote the shift from meristem identity to differentiation. PMID:15634696

  12. Influence of maternal health literacy on child participation in social welfare programs: the Philadelphia experience.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Mohamad, Zeinab; Cnaan, Avital; Kavanagh, Jane; Shea, Judy A

    2010-09-01

    We examined the influence of maternal health literacy on child participation in social welfare programs. In this cohort, 20% of the mothers had inadequate or marginal health literacy. Initially, more than 50% of the families participated in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the Food Stamp Program, and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, whereas fewer than 15% received child care subsidies or public housing. In multivariate regression, TANF participation was more than twice as common among children whose mothers had adequate health literacy compared with children whose mothers had inadequate health literacy.

  13. Metabolic syndrome influences cardiac gene expression pattern at the transcript level in male ZDF rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    18. Gene ontology analysis revealed several significantly enriched functional inter-relationships between genes influenced by metabolic syndrome. Conclusions Metabolic syndrome significantly alters cardiac gene expression profile which may be involved in development of cardiac pathologies in the presence of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23320804

  14. Language impairment and dyslexia genes influence language skills in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Eicher, John D; Gruen, Jeffrey R

    2015-04-01

    Language and communication development is a complex process influenced by numerous environmental and genetic factors. Many neurodevelopment disorders include deficits in language and communication skills in their diagnostic criteria, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD), language impairment (LI), and dyslexia. These disorders are polygenic and complex with a significant genetic component contributing to each. The similarity of language phenotypes and comorbidity of these disorders suggest that they may share genetic contributors. To test this, we examined the association of genes previously implicated in dyslexia, LI, and/or language-related traits with language skills in children with ASD. We used genetic and language data collected in the Autism Genome Research Exchange (AGRE) and Simons Simplex Collection (SSC) cohorts to perform a meta-analysis on performance on a receptive vocabulary task. There were associations with LI risk gene ATP2C2 and dyslexia risk gene MRPL19. Additionally, we found suggestive evidence of association with CMIP, GCFC2, KIAA0319L, the DYX2 locus (ACOT13, GPLD1, and FAM65B), and DRD2. Our results show that LI and dyslexia genes also contribute to language traits in children with ASD. These associations add to the growing literature of generalist genes that contribute to multiple related neurobehavioral traits. Future studies should examine whether other genetic contributors may be shared among these disorders and how risk variants interact with each other and the environment to modify clinical presentations.

  15. Language impairment and dyslexia genes influence language skills in children with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, John D.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Language and communication development is a complex process influenced by numerous environmental and genetic factors. Many neurodevelopment disorders include deficits in language and communication skills in their diagnostic criteria, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD), language impairment (LI), and dyslexia. These disorders are polygenic and complex with a significant genetic component contributing to each. The similarity of language phenotypes and comorbidity of these disorders suggest that they may share genetic contributors. To test this, we examined the association of genes previously implicated in dyslexia, LI, and/or language-related traits with language skills in children with ASD. We used genetic and language data collected in the Autism Genome Research Exchange (AGRE) and Simons Simplex Collection (SSC) cohorts to perform a meta-analysis on performance on a receptive vocabulary task. There were associations with LI risk gene ATP2C2 and dyslexia risk gene MRPL19. Additionally, we found suggestive evidence of association with CMIP, GCFC2, KIAA0319L, the DYX2 locus (ACOT13, GPLD1, and FAM65B), and DRD2. Our results show that LI and dyslexia genes also contribute to language traits in children with ASD. These associations add to the growing literature of generalist genes that contribute to multiple related neurobehavioral traits. Future studies should examine whether other genetic contributors may be shared among these disorders and how risk variants interact with each other and the environment to modify clinical presentations. PMID:25448322

  16. The Transcription Factor Ultraspiracle Influences Honey Bee Social Behavior and Behavior-Related Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Chun; Blatti, Charles A.; Hong, Feng; Liang, Zhengzheng S.; Negre, Nicolas; White, Kevin P.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Mizzen, Craig A.; Sinha, Saurabh; Zhong, Sheng; Robinson, Gene E.

    2012-01-01

    Behavior is among the most dynamic animal phenotypes, modulated by a variety of internal and external stimuli. Behavioral differences are associated with large-scale changes in gene expression, but little is known about how these changes are regulated. Here we show how a transcription factor (TF), ultraspiracle (usp; the insect homolog of the Retinoid X Receptor), working in complex transcriptional networks, can regulate behavioral plasticity and associated changes in gene expression. We first show that RNAi knockdown of USP in honey bee abdominal fat bodies delayed the transition from working in the hive (primarily “nursing” brood) to foraging outside. We then demonstrate through transcriptomics experiments that USP induced many maturation-related transcriptional changes in the fat bodies by mediating transcriptional responses to juvenile hormone. These maturation-related transcriptional responses to USP occurred without changes in USP's genomic binding sites, as revealed by ChIP–chip. Instead, behaviorally related gene expression is likely determined by combinatorial interactions between USP and other TFs whose cis-regulatory motifs were enriched at USP's binding sites. Many modules of JH– and maturation-related genes were co-regulated in both the fat body and brain, predicting that usp and cofactors influence shared transcriptional networks in both of these maturation-related tissues. Our findings demonstrate how “single gene effects” on behavioral plasticity can involve complex transcriptional networks, in both brain and peripheral tissues. PMID:22479195

  17. Renin-Angiotensin System Gene Variants and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Influence of Angiotensinogen

    PubMed Central

    Joyce-Tan, Siew Mei; Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Abdul Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successfully used to call for variants associated with diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, some variants are not included in the GWAS to avoid penalty in multiple hypothetic testing. Thus, candidate gene approach is still useful even at GWAS era. This study attempted to assess whether genetic variations in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and their gene interactions are associated with T2DM risk. We genotyped 290 T2DM patients and 267 controls using three genes of the RAS, namely, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). There were significant differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls for AGT variants (P = 0.05) but not for ACE and AGTR1. Haplotype TCG of the AGT was associated with increased risk of T2DM (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.15–3.20, permuted P = 0.012); however, no evidence of significant gene-gene interactions was seen. Nonetheless, our analysis revealed that the associations of the AGT variants with T2DM were independently associated. Thus, this study suggests that genetic variants of the RAS can modestly influence the T2DM risk. PMID:26682227

  18. Factors Influencing Rural Elementary School Principals' Decisions Concerning Building-Based Special Education Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voss, Terri B.

    2009-01-01

    The decisions rural elementary school principals make related to special education programming at their building sites are influenced by a variety of factors. This study employed a qualitative research methodology to investigate the perspectives of four rural elementary school principals concerning the decision-making processes they use as they…

  19. The Transactional Influence of Parents and Children in a Parent-Administered School Readiness Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathis, Erin T.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines changes in parent support and child emergent literacy skills over time as children moved from Head Start into kindergarten. It compares the transactional parent-child influences in families randomly assigned in Head Start to receive an enriched home visiting program that emphasized parents as teachers relative to a control…

  20. Examining the Influence of Campus Leadership Programs at a Catholic University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Rich; Meents-DeCaigny, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    This study uses the socially responsible leadership and leadership efficacy scales in the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL) to examine leadership programs at one Catholic campus, and their influence on socially responsible leadership and leadership efficacy. Examining students that identified as involved in 14 campus leadership…

  1. The Influence of Leadership Practices on Faculty Job Satisfaction in Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afam, Clifford C.

    2012-01-01

    Using a correlational, cross-sectional study design with self-administered questionnaires, this study explored the extent to which leadership practices of deans and department heads influence faculty job satisfaction in baccalaureate degree nursing programs. Using a simple random sampling technique, the study survey was sent to 400 faculty…

  2. Influence of Multiculturalism on the Study Programs in Malaysian Public Universities: International Students' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandian, Ambigapathy; Baboo, Shanthi Balraj; Mahfoodh, Omer Hassan Ali

    2016-01-01

    In response to the emphasis on the benefits of enhanced multicultural educational experiences of international students in higher education, this study examined international students' perceptions of the influence of multiculturalism on the study programs in Malaysian public universities. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The…

  3. Government Influence and Community Involvement on Abstinence-Only Programs in 1999 and 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusrang, Jamie L.; Cheng, Simon

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we compare federal government influence on abstinence-only programs in 1999 and 2003 to better see how shifts in the federal government's sex education polices impacted other government and community actors. Using data from the Sex Education in America Surveys (SEAS), we find that changes in federal policy, particularly after the…

  4. Network Influences on Dissemination of Evidence-Based Guidelines in State Tobacco Control Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Douglas A.; Wald, Lana M.; Carothers, Bobbi J.; Bach, Laura E.; Harris, Jenine K.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known regarding the social network relationships that influence dissemination of evidence-based public health practices and policies. In public health, it is critical that evidence-based guidelines, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's "Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs," are…

  5. Assessing the Positive Influence of Music Activities in Community Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Steve

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a framework for assessing the positive influence of music activities in community development programs. It examines hybrid music, health and rich media approaches to creative case study with the purpose of developing more compelling evidence based advocacy that examines the claims of a causal link. This preliminary study…

  6. The Influence of Precollege Access Programs on Postsecondary Enrollment and Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennie, Elizabeth J.; Dalton, Ben W.; Knapp, Laura G.

    2015-01-01

    Using a nationally representative longitudinal data-set, we examine the influence of precollege access programs on high school achievement, college preparation, postsecondary enrollment, and postsecondary persistence. Results do not show much difference in the level of academic preparation between participants and non-participants. However,…

  7. Limitations on Change: Current Conditions Influencing Academic Intransigence in Educational Administration Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Connie Stokes; Pounder, Diana G.

    An analysis of academic intransigence (resistance to change) in educational administrative preparation programs is presented in this paper. Drawing upon two conceptual frameworks, the stakeholder perspective and Porter's (1980) five-force model of industry structure and competitive influence, two factors contributing to academic intransigence are…

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Intervention Program to Influence Attitudes of Students towards Peers with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Boer, Anke; Pijl, Sip Jan; Minnaert, Alexander; Post, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examine the effectiveness of an intervention program to influence attitudes of elementary school students towards peers with intellectual, physical and severe physical and intellectual disabilities. A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was designed with an experimental group and a control group, both comprising two rural…

  9. The Possible Influence of Impulsivity and Dietary Restraint on Associations between Serotonin Genes and Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Sarah E.; Culbert, Kristen M.; Larson, Christine L.; Klump, Kelly L.

    2009-01-01

    Although serotonin (5-HT) genes are thought to be involved in the etiology of bulimia nervosa and binge eating, findings from molecular genetic studies are inconclusive. This may be due to limitations of past research, such as a failure to consider the influence of quantitative traits and gene-environment interactions. The current study investigated these issues by examining whether quantitative traits (i.e., impulsivity) and environmental exposure factors (i.e., dietary restraint) moderate 5-HT gene/binge eating associations in a sample of young women (N = 344). Binge eating was assessed using the Minnesota Eating Behaviors Survey and the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ). Impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-Version 11. Dietary restraint was measured with a factor score derived from common restraint scales. Saliva samples were genotyped for the 5-HT2a receptor T102C polymorphism and 5-HT transporter promoter polymorphism. As expected, impulsivity and dietary restraint were associated with binge eating. Although the T allele of the 5-HT2a receptor gene and the s allele of the 5-HTT gene were associated with higher levels of impulsivity, there were no main effects of 5-HT genotypes on any binge eating measure, and interactions between genotypes, impulsivity, and dietary restraint were non-significant. In conclusion, we found no evidence to suggest that dietary restraint or impulsivity moderate associations between binge eating and these 5-HT genes. Future research should continue to explore interaction effects by examining larger samples, assessing dietary intake directly, and investigating other genes, traits, and environmental factors that may be related to binge eating and bulimia nervosa. PMID:19493540

  10. Common Variants within Oxidative Phosphorylation Genes Influence Risk of Ischemic Stroke and Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher D.; Biffi, Alessandro; Nalls, Michael A.; Devan, William J.; Schwab, Kristin; Ayres, Alison M.; Valant, Valerie; Ross, Owen A.; Rost, Natalia S.; Saxena, Richa; Viswanathan, Anand; Worrall, Bradford B.; Brott, Thomas G.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Brown, Devin; Broderick, Joseph P.; Norrving, Bo; Greenberg, Steven M.; Silliman, Scott L.; Hansen, Björn M.; Tirschwell, David L.; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Selim, Magdy; Roquer, Jaume; Montaner, Joan; Singleton, Andrew B.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Woo, Daniel; Furie, Karen L.; Meschia, James F.; Rosand, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prior studies demonstrated association between mitochondrial DNA variants and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated whether variants within a larger set of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) genes encoded by both autosomal and mitochondrial DNA were associated with risk of IS and, based on our results, extended our investigation to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods This association study employed a discovery cohort of 1643 individuals, a validation cohort of 2432 individuals for IS, and an extension cohort of 1476 individuals for ICH. Gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed on all structural OXPHOS genes, as well as genes contributing to individual respiratory complexes. Gene-sets passing GSEA were tested by constructing genetic scores using common variants residing within each gene. Associations between each variant and IS that emerged in the discovery cohort were examined in validation and extension cohorts. Results IS was associated with genetic risk scores in OXPHOS as a whole (odds ratio (OR)=1.17, p=0.008) and Complex I (OR=1.06, p=0.050). Among IS subtypes, small vessel (SV) stroke showed association with OXPHOS (OR=1.16, p=0.007), Complex I (OR=1.13, p=0.027) and Complex IV (OR 1.14, p=0.018). To further explore this SV association, we extended our analysis to ICH, revealing association between deep hemispheric ICH and Complex IV (OR=1.08, p=0.008). Conclusions This pathway analysis demonstrates association between common genetic variants within OXPHOS genes and stroke. The associations for SV stroke and deep ICH suggest that genetic variation in OXPHOS influences small vessel pathobiology. Further studies are needed to identify culprit genetic variants and assess their functional consequences. PMID:23362085

  11. Evidence for a major gene influencing 7-year increases in diastolic blood pressure with age

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shu-Chuan Cheng; Carmelli, D.; Hunt, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to blood pressure levels is well established. The contribution of genes to the longitudinal change in blood pressure has been less well studied, because of the lack of longitudinal family data. The present study investigated a possible major-gene effect on the observed increase with age in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels. Subjects included 965 unmedicated adults (age {ge}18 years) in 73 pedigrees collected in Utah as part of a longitudinal cardiovascular family study. Segregation analysis of DBP change over 7.2 years of follow-up identified a recessive major-gene effect with a gene frequency of p = .23. There was also a significant age effect on the genotypic means, which decreased expression of the major gene at older ages. For those inferred to have the genotype responsible for large DBP increases, DBP increased 32.3%, compared with a 1.5% increase in the nonsusceptible group (P < .0001). The relative risk of developing hypertension between the susceptible and nonsusceptible groups after 7.2 years was 2.4 (P = .006). Baseline DBP reactivities to mental arithmetic (P < .0001) and isometric hand-grip (P < .0001) stress tests were greatest in those assigned to the susceptible genotype. We conclude that age-related changes in DBP are influenced by a major gene. Characteristics of this major-gene effect for greater age-related blood pressure increases include greater reactivity to mental and physical stressors. The present study thus provides evidence for genetic control of changes in blood pressure, in addition to the previously suggested genetic control of absolute blood pressure level. 28 refs., 6 tabs.

  12. Role of passive and adaptive immunity in influencing enterocyte-specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Shannon L; Wang, Jiafang; Vazir, Mukta; Vela, Jose; Sahagun, Omar; Gabbay, Peter; Hoang, Lisa; Diaz, Rosa L; Aranda, Richard; Martín, Martín G

    2003-10-01

    Numerous genes expressed by intestinal epithelial cells are developmentally regulated, and the influence that adaptive (AI) and passive (PI) immunity have in controlling their expression has not been evaluated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that both PI and AI influenced enterocyte gene expression by developing a breeding scheme that used T and B cell-deficient recombination-activating gene (RAG) mice. RNA was isolated from the liver and proximal/distal small intestine at various ages, and the steady-state levels of six different transcripts were evaluated by RNase protection assay. In wild-type (WT) pups, all transcripts [Fc receptor of the neonate (FcRn), polymeric IgA receptor (pIgR), GLUT5, lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (lactase), apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT), and Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1)] studied were developmentally regulated at the time of weaning, and all transcripts except ASBT had the highest levels of expression in the proximal small intestine. In WT suckling pups reared in the absence of PI, pIgR mRNA levels were increased 100% during the early phase of development. In mice lacking AI, the expression of pIgR and lactase were significantly attenuated, whereas FcRn and GLUT5 levels were higher compared with WT mice. Finally, in the absence of both passive and active immunity, expression levels of pIgR and lactase were significantly lower than similarly aged WT mice. In summary, we report that the adaptive and passive immune status of mice influences steady-state mRNA levels of several important, developmentally regulated enterocyte genes during the suckling and weaning periods of life.

  13. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  14. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity.

    PubMed

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Weiner, Michael W; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Hansell, Narelle K; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-03-19

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain's connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain's wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases.

  15. Influence of the Monitored Youth Mentoring Program for adolescents with behavioural problems and behavioural disorders.

    PubMed

    Boras, Sofija; Zuckerman, Zora Itković

    2008-09-01

    This aimed to measure the influence of the Monitored Youth Mentoring Program (MYMP) for adolescents with behavioural problems and behavioural disorders. The MYMP commenced in 1997 and was completed in 2003. The model of the program was for one university student of Pedagogy to mentor one pupil between the ages of 13 and 17 years, demonstrating risk seeking behaviours for a whole school year. The specimen group was made up of 141 pupils, approximately 20 pupils from each year level. The short-term goal was to influence positive change in participants demonstrating risk seeking behaviour. The long-term goal was to enhance the respective school's programs to enable preventative approaches to lessen negative and risk seeking behaviours amongst pupils with behavioural problems and behavioural disorders. The research results demonstrate statistically significant success of the applied program in two measured variables. Firstly, learning success (p < 0.05), and secondly a decrease in truancy and disciplinary misdemeanours (p < 0.05). Both of which were observed in participants with behavioural problems. The program was not as successful for participants with behavioural disorders, but not without some effect. Although the program can be generally described as achieving a medium level of success, the fact that there was a lack of progressive worsening in participant's behaviour is a substantial bi-product of the program. The mentors involved in the program made it extremely clear by their feedback that, MYMP positively enhanced their formal Pedagogy training, through hands-on practise that they otherwise would not have received through their academic programs. They were provided with vital exposure to a preventative program and managed to gain insight into the possibilities of introducing early intervention and prevention into Croatian schools. PMID:18982754

  16. The Gene Expression Program for the Formation of Wing Cuticle in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Paul N.

    2016-01-01

    The cuticular exoskeleton of insects and other arthropods is a remarkably versatile material with a complex multilayer structure. We made use of the ability to isolate cuticle synthesizing cells in relatively pure form by dissecting pupal wings and we used RNAseq to identify genes expressed during the formation of the adult wing cuticle. We observed dramatic changes in gene expression during cuticle deposition, and combined with transmission electron microscopy, we were able to identify candidate genes for the deposition of the different cuticular layers. Among genes of interest that dramatically change their expression during the cuticle deposition program are ones that encode cuticle proteins, ZP domain proteins, cuticle modifying proteins and transcription factors, as well as genes of unknown function. A striking finding is that mutations in a number of genes that are expressed almost exclusively during the deposition of the envelope (the thin outermost layer that is deposited first) result in gross defects in the procuticle (the thick chitinous layer that is deposited last). An attractive hypothesis to explain this is that the deposition of the different cuticle layers is not independent with the envelope instructing the formation of later layers. Alternatively, some of the genes expressed during the deposition of the envelope could form a platform that is essential for the deposition of all cuticle layers. PMID:27232182

  17. The Gene Expression Program for the Formation of Wing Cuticle in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sobala, Lukasz F; Adler, Paul N

    2016-05-01

    The cuticular exoskeleton of insects and other arthropods is a remarkably versatile material with a complex multilayer structure. We made use of the ability to isolate cuticle synthesizing cells in relatively pure form by dissecting pupal wings and we used RNAseq to identify genes expressed during the formation of the adult wing cuticle. We observed dramatic changes in gene expression during cuticle deposition, and combined with transmission electron microscopy, we were able to identify candidate genes for the deposition of the different cuticular layers. Among genes of interest that dramatically change their expression during the cuticle deposition program are ones that encode cuticle proteins, ZP domain proteins, cuticle modifying proteins and transcription factors, as well as genes of unknown function. A striking finding is that mutations in a number of genes that are expressed almost exclusively during the deposition of the envelope (the thin outermost layer that is deposited first) result in gross defects in the procuticle (the thick chitinous layer that is deposited last). An attractive hypothesis to explain this is that the deposition of the different cuticle layers is not independent with the envelope instructing the formation of later layers. Alternatively, some of the genes expressed during the deposition of the envelope could form a platform that is essential for the deposition of all cuticle layers. PMID:27232182

  18. A dynamic alternative splicing program regulates gene expression during terminal erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Harold; Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Ghanem, Dana; An, Xiuli; Li, Jie; Mohandas, Narla; Pachter, Lior; Conboy, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing remodels the human transcriptome in a spatiotemporal manner during normal development and differentiation. Here we explored the landscape of transcript diversity in the erythroid lineage by RNA-seq analysis of five highly purified populations of morphologically distinct human erythroblasts, representing the last four cell divisions before enucleation. In this unique differentiation system, we found evidence of an extensive and dynamic alternative splicing program encompassing genes with many diverse functions. Alternative splicing was particularly enriched in genes controlling cell cycle, organelle organization, chromatin function and RNA processing. Many alternative exons exhibited differentiation-associated switches in splicing efficiency, mostly in late-stage polychromatophilic and orthochromatophilic erythroblasts, in concert with extensive cellular remodeling that precedes enucleation. A subset of alternative splicing switches introduces premature translation termination codons into selected transcripts in a differentiation stage-specific manner, supporting the hypothesis that alternative splicing-coupled nonsense-mediated decay contributes to regulation of erythroid-expressed genes as a novel part of the overall differentiation program. We conclude that a highly dynamic alternative splicing program in terminally differentiating erythroblasts plays a major role in regulating gene expression to ensure synthesis of appropriate proteome at each stage as the cells remodel in preparation for production of mature red cells. PMID:24442673

  19. Epigenetic Influence of Dam Methylation on Gene Expression and Attachment in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Stacy Ann-Marie; Brown, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequently encountered infections in clinical practice globally. Predominantly a burden among female adults and infants, UTIs primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) results in high morbidity and fiscal health strains. During pathogenesis, colonization of the urinary tract via fimbrial adhesion to mucosal cells is the most critical point in infection and has been linked to DNA methylation. Furthermore, with continuous exposure to antibiotics as the standard therapeutic strategy, UPEC has evolved to become highly adaptable in circumventing the effect of antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Hence, the need for alternative treatment strategies arises. Since differential DNA methylation is observed as a critical precursor to virulence in various pathogenic bacteria, this body of work sought to assess the influence of the DNA adenine methylase (dam) gene on gene expression and cellular adhesion in UPEC and its potential as a therapeutic target. To monitor the influence of dam on attachment and FQ resistance, selected UPEC dam mutants created via one-step allelic exchange were transformed with cloned qnrA and dam complement plasmid for comparative analysis of growth rate, antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm formation, gene expression, and mammalian cell attachment. The absence of DNA methylation among dam mutants was apparent. Varying deficiencies in cell growth, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, alongside low-level increases in gene expression (recA and papI), and adherence to HEK-293 and HTB-9 mammalian cells were also detected as a factor of SOS induction to result in increased mutability. Phenotypic characteristics of parental strains were restored in dam complement strains. Dam's vital role in DNA methylation and gene expression in local UPEC isolates was confirmed. Similarly to dam-deficient Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), these findings suggest unsuccessful therapeutic use of

  20. Epigenetic Influence of Dam Methylation on Gene Expression and Attachment in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Stacy Ann-Marie; Brown, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequently encountered infections in clinical practice globally. Predominantly a burden among female adults and infants, UTIs primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) results in high morbidity and fiscal health strains. During pathogenesis, colonization of the urinary tract via fimbrial adhesion to mucosal cells is the most critical point in infection and has been linked to DNA methylation. Furthermore, with continuous exposure to antibiotics as the standard therapeutic strategy, UPEC has evolved to become highly adaptable in circumventing the effect of antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Hence, the need for alternative treatment strategies arises. Since differential DNA methylation is observed as a critical precursor to virulence in various pathogenic bacteria, this body of work sought to assess the influence of the DNA adenine methylase (dam) gene on gene expression and cellular adhesion in UPEC and its potential as a therapeutic target. To monitor the influence of dam on attachment and FQ resistance, selected UPEC dam mutants created via one-step allelic exchange were transformed with cloned qnrA and dam complement plasmid for comparative analysis of growth rate, antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm formation, gene expression, and mammalian cell attachment. The absence of DNA methylation among dam mutants was apparent. Varying deficiencies in cell growth, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, alongside low-level increases in gene expression (recA and papI), and adherence to HEK-293 and HTB-9 mammalian cells were also detected as a factor of SOS induction to result in increased mutability. Phenotypic characteristics of parental strains were restored in dam complement strains. Dam’s vital role in DNA methylation and gene expression in local UPEC isolates was confirmed. Similarly to dam-deficient Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), these findings suggest unsuccessful therapeutic use

  1. Social environment influences the relationship between genotype and gene expression in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Runcie, Daniel E; Wiedmann, Ralph T; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Wray, Gregory A; Alberts, Susan C; Tung, Jenny

    2013-05-19

    Variation in the social environment can have profound effects on survival and reproduction in wild social mammals. However, we know little about the degree to which these effects are influenced by genetic differences among individuals, and conversely, the degree to which social environmental variation mediates genetic reaction norms. To better understand these relationships, we investigated the potential for dominance rank, social connectedness and group size to modify the effects of genetic variation on gene expression in the wild baboons of the Amboseli basin. We found evidence for a number of gene-environment interactions (GEIs) associated with variation in the social environment, encompassing social environments experienced in adulthood as well as persistent effects of early life social environment. Social connectedness, maternal dominance rank and group size all interacted with genotype to influence gene expression in at least one sex, and either in early life or in adulthood. These results suggest that social and behavioural variation, akin to other factors such as age and sex, can impact the genotype-phenotype relationship. We conclude that GEIs mediated by the social environment are important in the evolution and maintenance of individual differences in wild social mammals, including individual differences in responses to social stressors.

  2. Influence of the spxB gene on competence in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bättig, Patrick; Mühlemann, Kathrin

    2008-02-01

    In Streptococcus pneumoniae expression of pyruvate oxidase (SpxB) peaks during the early growth phase, coincident with the time of natural competence. This study investigated whether SpxB influences parameters of competence, such as spontaneous transformation frequency, expression of competence genes, and DNA release. Knockout of the spxB gene in strain D39 abolished spontaneous transformation (compared to a frequency of 6.3 x 10(-6) in the parent strain [P < 0.01]). It also reduced expression levels of comC and recA as well as DNA release from bacterial cells significantly during the early growth phase, coincident with the time of spontaneous competence in the parent strain. In the spxB mutant, supplementation with competence-stimulating peptide 1 (CSP-1) restored transformation (rate, 1.8 x 10(-2)). This speaks against the role of SpxB as a necessary source of energy for competence. Neither supplementation with CSP-1 nor supplementation with the SpxB products H2O2 and acetate altered DNA release. Supplementation of the parent strain with catalase did not reduce DNA release significantly. In conclusion, the pneumococcal spxB gene influences competence; however, the mechanism remains elusive. PMID:18065543

  3. Influence of light on growth, fumonisin biosynthesis and FUM1 gene expression by Fusarium proliferatum.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Francesca; Schmidt-Heydt, Markus; Haidukowski, Miriam; Geisen, Rolf; Logrieco, Antonio; Mulè, Giuseppina

    2012-02-01

    Fumonisins are a group of mycotoxins, mainly found in maize and maize-based food and feed, associated with several diseases in animals. The impact of these toxins on the economy and health worldwide has driven several efforts to clarify the role of environmental factors that can influence fumonisin biosynthesis by the toxigenic species. We analyzed the influence of light of varying wavelength on growth and fumonisin biosynthesis by the fungus Fusarium proliferatum ITEM 1719. Light in general had a positive influence on growth, with a mean increase of the grow rate of about 40% under light exposure in comparison to the dark incubation. Wavelengths from both sides of the spectrum, from long (627 nm) to short wavelength (470-455 nm) had a stimulating effect on fumonisin biosynthesis compared to the dark incubation: fumonisins B(1) (FB(1)) and B(2) (FB(2)) production increased of about 40 fold under red, 35 fold under blue, 20 fold under royal blue, 10 fold under green, 5 fold under yellow and 3 fold under white light in comparison to the dark incubation. The transcriptional regulation of the FUM1 fumonisin biosynthesis gene was analyzed by Real time reverse transcriptase PCR quantification, revealing a correlation between fumonisin biosynthesis and gene expression. These findings show a role of light on the growth and the modulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and provide new information on the physiology of an important toxigenic maize pathogen.

  4. Determinants of nucleosome positioning and their influence on plant gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Jung; Seddon, Alexander E; Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Major, Ian T; Floer, Monique; Howe, Gregg A; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2015-08-01

    Nucleosome positioning influences the access of transcription factors (TFs) to their binding sites and gene expression. Studies in plant, animal, and fungal models demonstrate similar nucleosome positioning patterns along genes and correlations between occupancy and expression. However, the relationships among nucleosome positioning, cis-regulatory element accessibility, and gene expression in plants remain undefined. Here we showed that plant nucleosome depletion occurs on specific 6-mer motifs and this sequence-specific nucleosome depletion is predictive of expression levels. Nucleosome-depleted regions in Arabidopsis thaliana tend to have higher G/C content, unlike yeast, and are centered on specific G/C-rich 6-mers, suggesting that intrinsic sequence properties, such as G/C content, cannot fully explain plant nucleosome positioning. These 6-mer motif sites showed higher DNase I hypersensitivity and are flanked by strongly phased nucleosomes, consistent with known TF binding sites. Intriguingly, this 6-mer-specific nucleosome depletion pattern occurs not only in promoter but also in genic regions and is significantly correlated with higher gene expression level, a phenomenon also found in rice but not in yeast. Among the 6-mer motifs enriched in genes responsive to treatment with the defense hormone jasmonate, there are no significant changes in nucleosome occupancy, suggesting that these sites are potentially preconditioned to enable rapid response without changing chromatin state significantly. Our study provides a global assessment of the joint contribution of nucleosome occupancy and motif sequences that are likely cis-elements to the control of gene expression in plants. Our findings pave the way for further understanding the impact of chromatin state on plant transcriptional regulatory circuits.

  5. Genetic Influences on Adolescent Sexual Behavior: Why Genes Matter for Environmentally-Oriented Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Harden, K. Paige

    2013-01-01

    There are dramatic individual differences among adolescents in how and when they become sexually active adults, and “early” sexual activity is frequently cited as a cause of concern for scientists, policymakers, and the general public. Understanding the causes and developmental impact of adolescent sexual activity can be furthered by considering genes as a source of individual differences. Quantitative behavioral genetics (i.e., twin and family studies) and candidate gene association studies now provide clear evidence for the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in adolescent sexual behavior and related phenotypes. Genetic influences on sexual behavior may operate through a variety of direct and indirect mechanisms, including pubertal development, testosterone levels, and dopaminergic systems. Genetic differences may be systematically associated with exposure to environments that are commonly treated as causes of sexual behavior (gene-environment correlation). Possible gene-environment correlations pose a serious challenge for interpreting the results of much behavioral research. Multivariate, genetically-informed research on adolescent sexual behavior compares twins and family members as a form of “quasi-experiment”: How do twins who differ in their sexual experiences differ in their later development? The small but growing body of genetically-informed research has already challenged dominant assumptions regarding the etiology and sequelae of adolescent sexual behavior, with some studies indicating possible positive effects of teenage sexuality. Studies of gene × environment interaction may further elucidate the mechanisms by which genes and environments combine to shape the development of sexual behavior and its psychosocial consequences. Overall, the existence of heritable variation in adolescent sexual behavior has profound implications for environmentally-oriented theory and research. PMID:23855958

  6. Genetic influences on adolescent sexual behavior: Why genes matter for environmentally oriented researchers.

    PubMed

    Harden, K Paige

    2014-03-01

    There are dramatic individual differences among adolescents in how and when they become sexually active adults, and early sexual activity is frequently cited as a cause of concern for scientists, policymakers, and the general public. Understanding the causes and developmental impact of adolescent sexual activity can be furthered by considering genes as a source of individual differences. Quantitative behavioral genetics (i.e., twin and family studies) and candidate gene association studies now provide clear evidence for the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in adolescent sexual behavior and related phenotypes. Genetic influences on sexual behavior may operate through a variety of direct and indirect mechanisms, including pubertal development, testosterone levels, and dopaminergic systems. Genetic differences may be systematically associated with exposure to environments that are commonly treated as causes of sexual behavior (gene-environment correlation). Possible gene-environment correlations pose a serious challenge for interpreting the results of much behavioral research. Multivariate, genetically informed research on adolescent sexual behavior compares twins and family members as a form of quasi experiment: How do twins who differ in their sexual experiences differ in their later development? The small but growing body of genetically informed research has already challenged dominant assumptions regarding the etiology and sequelae of adolescent sexual behavior, with some studies indicating possible positive effects of teenage sexuality. Studies of Gene × Environment interaction may further elucidate the mechanisms by which genes and environments combine to shape the development of sexual behavior and its psychosocial consequences. Overall, the existence of heritable variation in adolescent sexual behavior has profound implications for environmentally oriented theory and research.

  7. Influence of Populus genotype on gene expression by the wood decay fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, Jill; Marty, Amber; Mozuch, Michael; Kersten, Philip J; Splinter BonDurant, Sandra; Sabat, Grzegorz; Azarpira, Ali; Ralph, John; Skyba, Oleksandr; Mansfield, Shawn D; Blanchette, Robert A; Cullen, Dan

    2014-09-01

    We examined gene expression patterns in the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium when it colonizes hybrid poplar (Populus alba × tremula) and syringyl (S)-rich transgenic derivatives. A combination of microarrays and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed detection of a total of 9,959 transcripts and 793 proteins. Comparisons of P. chrysosporium transcript abundance in medium containing poplar or glucose as a sole carbon source showed 113 regulated genes, 11 of which were significantly higher (>2-fold, P < 0.05) in transgenic line 64 relative to the parental line. Possibly related to the very large amounts of syringyl (S) units in this transgenic tree (94 mol% S), several oxidoreductases were among the upregulated genes. Peptides corresponding to a total of 18 oxidoreductases were identified in medium consisting of biomass from line 64 or 82 (85 mol% S) but not in the parental clone (65 mol% S). These results demonstrate that P. chrysosporium gene expression patterns are substantially influenced by lignin composition.

  8. Up-regulation in the expression of renin gene by the influence of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Ezomo, Ojeiru F; Matsushima, Fumiko; Meshitsuka, Shunsuke

    2009-11-01

    The excretion of aluminium in urine was significantly increased after intake of analgesics containing aluminium, confirming increased absorption and hence exposure to aluminium with such medication. The effect of aluminium on the kidney was further investigated by study of gene expression in mice. After a single dose of aluminium, an up-regulation of renin gene was found by DNA sequencing of the products of differential display analysis. The up-regulation of renin was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting experiments in the dose dependent treatments and the time course observation after aluminium citrate injection. The up-regulation of the renin expression by aluminium is a strong indication of the influence of aluminium on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system, resulting in possible induction of essential hypertension.

  9. A single dose of lysergic acid diethylamide influences gene expression patterns within the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Charles D; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2002-05-01

    Hallucinogenic drugs such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) have profound effects on humans including hallucinations and detachment from reality. These remarkable behavioral effects have many similarities to the debilitating symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. The effects of hallucinogens are thought to be mediated by serotonin receptor activation; however, how these drugs elicit the unusual behavioral effects remains largely a mystery, despite much research. We have undertaken the first comprehensive analysis of gene expression influenced by acute LSD administration in the mammalian brain. These studies represent a novel approach to elucidate the mechanism of action of this class of drugs. We have identified a number of genes that are predicted to be involved in the processes of synaptic plasticity, glutamatergic signaling and cytoskeletal architecture. Understanding these molecular events will lead to new insights into the etiology of disorders whose behavioral symptoms resemble the temporary effects of hallucinogenic drugs, and also may ultimately result in new therapies.

  10. DNA thermodynamic stability and supercoil dynamics determine the gene expression program during the bacterial growth cycle.

    PubMed

    Sobetzko, Patrick; Glinkowska, Monika; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2013-07-01

    The chromosomal DNA polymer constituting the cellular genetic material is primarily a device for coding information. Whilst the gene sequences comprise the digital (discontinuous) linear code, physiological alterations of the DNA superhelical density generate in addition analog (continuous) three-dimensional information essential for regulation of both chromosome compaction and gene expression. Insight into the relationship between the DNA analog information and the digital linear code is of fundamental importance for understanding genetic regulation. Our previous study in the model organism Escherichia coli suggested that the chromosomal gene order and a spatiotemporal gradient of DNA superhelicity associated with DNA replication determine the growth phase-dependent gene transcription. In this study we reveal a general gradient of DNA thermodynamic stability correlated with the polarity of chromosomal replication and manifest in the spatiotemporal pattern of gene transcription during the bacterial growth cycle. Furthermore, by integrating the physical and dynamic features of the transcribed sequences with their functional content we identify spatiotemporal domains of gene expression encompassing different functions. We thus provide both an insight into the organisational principle of the bacterial growth program and a novel holistic methodology for exploring chromosomal dynamics.

  11. A Conserved Core of Programmed Cell Death Indicator Genes Discriminates Developmentally and Environmentally Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Van Bel, Michiel; Van Hautegem, Tom; Fendrych, Matyáš; Huysmans, Marlies; Simaskova, Maria; van Durme, Matthias; Buscaill, Pierre; Rivas, Susana; S Coll, Nuria; Coppens, Frederik; Maere, Steven; Nowack, Moritz K

    2015-12-01

    A plethora of diverse programmed cell death (PCD) processes has been described in living organisms. In animals and plants, different forms of PCD play crucial roles in development, immunity, and responses to the environment. While the molecular control of some animal PCD forms such as apoptosis is known in great detail, we still know comparatively little about the regulation of the diverse types of plant PCD. In part, this deficiency in molecular understanding is caused by the lack of reliable reporters to detect PCD processes. Here, we addressed this issue by using a combination of bioinformatics approaches to identify commonly regulated genes during diverse plant PCD processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Our results indicate that the transcriptional signatures of developmentally controlled cell death are largely distinct from the ones associated with environmentally induced cell death. Moreover, different cases of developmental PCD share a set of cell death-associated genes. Most of these genes are evolutionary conserved within the green plant lineage, arguing for an evolutionary conserved core machinery of developmental PCD. Based on this information, we established an array of specific promoter-reporter lines for developmental PCD in Arabidopsis. These PCD indicators represent a powerful resource that can be used in addition to established morphological and biochemical methods to detect and analyze PCD processes in vivo and in planta.

  12. Factors that influence exercise activity among women post hip fracture participating in the Exercise Plus Program

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; D’Adamo, Christopher; Yu-Yahiro, Janet; Hawkes, William; Shardell, Michelle; Golden, Justine; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Magaziner, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Using a social ecological model, this paper describes selected intra- and interpersonal factors that influence exercise behavior in women post hip fracture who participated in the Exercise Plus Program. Model testing of factors that influence exercise behavior at 2, 6 and 12 months post hip fracture was done. The full model hypothesized that demographic variables; cognitive, affective, physical and functional status; pain; fear of falling; social support for exercise, and exposure to the Exercise Plus Program would influence self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and stage of change both directly and indirectly influencing total time spent exercising. Two hundred and nine female hip fracture patients (age 81.0 ± 6.9), the majority of whom were Caucasian (97%), participated in this study. The three predictive models tested across the 12 month recovery trajectory suggest that somewhat different factors may influence exercise over the recovery period and the models explained 8 to 21% of the variance in time spent exercising. To optimize exercise activity post hip fracture, older adults should be helped to realistically assess their self-efficacy and outcome expectations related to exercise, health care providers and friends/peers should be encouraged to reinforce the positive benefits of exercise post hip fracture, and fear of falling should be addressed throughout the entire hip fracture recovery trajectory. PMID:18044192

  13. Inside the Black Box of Doctoral Education: What Program Characteristics Influence Doctoral Students' Attrition and Graduation Probabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Jakubson, George H.; Groen, Jeffrey A.; So, Eric; Price, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's Graduate Education Initiative (GEI) provided funding to 54 departments in the humanities and related social sciences during the 1990s to improve their PhD programs. This article estimates the aspects of PhD programs the GEI influenced and how these aspects influenced attrition and graduation probabilities. It uses…

  14. Influence factors and gene expression patterns during MeJa-induced gummosis in peach.

    PubMed

    Li, Minji; Liu, Meiyan; Peng, Futian; Fang, Long

    2015-06-15

    Jasmonates (JAs) play important roles in gummosis in peach. Mechanical damage, methyl jasmonate (MeJa), and ethylene can induce gummosis on peach shoots in the field. In this study, we used MeJa (2%, w/w) to induce gummosis on current-year shoots in peach on high temperature (35°C). Based on the experimental model, we studied the influence of factors on the development of peach gummosis. Our experimental results showed that high temperature could promote gummosis development induced by MeJa. Exogenous CaCl2 treatment reduced the degree of gummosis by increasing the calcium content in shoots, which is conducive to the synthesis and maintenance of the cell wall. Using digital gene expression (DGE), 3831 differentially expressed genes were identified in the MeJa treatment versus the control. By analyzing changes in gene expression associated with cell wall degradation, genes encoding pectin methylesterase (PME) and endo-polygalacturonase (PG) were found to be significantly induced, suggesting that they are key enzymes in cell wall degradation that occurs during MeJa-induced gummosis. Genes for glycosyltransferase (GT) and cellulose synthase (CS) were also significantly upregulated by MeJa. This result suggests that MeJa treatment not only promotes the degradation of polysaccharides to destroy the cell wall, but also promotes the synthesis of new polysaccharides. We also analyzed changes in gene expression associated with sugar metabolism, senescence, and defense. MeJa treatment affected the expression of genes related to sugar metabolism and promoted plant senescence. Among the defense genes, the expression pattern of phenylalanine ammonium lyase (PAL) suggested that PAL may play an important role in protecting against the effects of MeJa treatment. Our experimental results showed that MeJa treatment can promote the biosynthesis and signal transduction of ethylene in peach shoots; they can induce gummosis on peach shoots respectively, and there are overlaps between

  15. Influences on family planning acceptance: an analysis of background and program factors in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J T

    1979-01-01

    Which factors have the greater influence on family planning performance: fixed background variables such as racial composition, urbanization, and mortality, which are affected by level of development, or program inputs such as assignment of personnel and location of clinics, which are subject to manipulation by administrators? An analysis of differences in family planning acceptance among 70 districts of Malaysia shows that two main program-manipulable variables--level of personnel deployment and accessibility of clinics--have the largest direct effect upon acceptance levels. Variations in background factors explain a smaller proportion.

  16. Thrap3 docks on phosphoserine 273 of PPARγ and controls diabetic gene programming.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Hyun; Choi, Sun-Sil; Kim, Eun Sun; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Banks, Alexander S; Gygi, Steven P; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2014-11-01

    Phosphorylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) at Ser273 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in adipose tissue stimulates insulin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. We show here that Thrap3 (thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein 3) can directly interact with PPARγ when it is phosphorylated at Ser273, and this interaction controls the diabetic gene programming mediated by the phosphorylation of PPARγ. Knockdown of Thrap3 restores most of the genes dysregulated by CDK5 action on PPARγ in cultured adipocytes. Importantly, reduced expression of Thrap3 in fat tissue by antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) regulates a specific set of genes, including the key adipokines adiponectin and adipsin, and effectively improves hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in high-fat-fed mice without affecting body weight. These data indicate that Thrap3 plays a crucial role in controlling diabetic gene programming and may provide opportunities for the development of new therapeutics for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25316675

  17. Distributed Function Mining for Gene Expression Programming Based on Fast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Deng, Song; Yue, Dong; Yang, Le-chan; Fu, Xiong; Feng, Ya-zhou

    2016-01-01

    For high-dimensional and massive data sets, traditional centralized gene expression programming (GEP) or improved algorithms lead to increased run-time and decreased prediction accuracy. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new improved algorithm called distributed function mining for gene expression programming based on fast reduction (DFMGEP-FR). In DFMGEP-FR, fast attribution reduction in binary search algorithms (FAR-BSA) is proposed to quickly find the optimal attribution set, and the function consistency replacement algorithm is given to solve integration of the local function model. Thorough comparative experiments for DFMGEP-FR, centralized GEP and the parallel gene expression programming algorithm based on simulated annealing (parallel GEPSA) are included in this paper. For the waveform, mushroom, connect-4 and musk datasets, the comparative results show that the average time-consumption of DFMGEP-FR drops by 89.09%%, 88.85%, 85.79% and 93.06%, respectively, in contrast to centralized GEP and by 12.5%, 8.42%, 9.62% and 13.75%, respectively, compared with parallel GEPSA. Six well-studied UCI test data sets demonstrate the efficiency and capability of our proposed DFMGEP-FR algorithm for distributed function mining. PMID:26751200

  18. Distributed Function Mining for Gene Expression Programming Based on Fast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Deng, Song; Yue, Dong; Yang, Le-chan; Fu, Xiong; Feng, Ya-zhou

    2016-01-01

    For high-dimensional and massive data sets, traditional centralized gene expression programming (GEP) or improved algorithms lead to increased run-time and decreased prediction accuracy. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new improved algorithm called distributed function mining for gene expression programming based on fast reduction (DFMGEP-FR). In DFMGEP-FR, fast attribution reduction in binary search algorithms (FAR-BSA) is proposed to quickly find the optimal attribution set, and the function consistency replacement algorithm is given to solve integration of the local function model. Thorough comparative experiments for DFMGEP-FR, centralized GEP and the parallel gene expression programming algorithm based on simulated annealing (parallel GEPSA) are included in this paper. For the waveform, mushroom, connect-4 and musk datasets, the comparative results show that the average time-consumption of DFMGEP-FR drops by 89.09%%, 88.85%, 85.79% and 93.06%, respectively, in contrast to centralized GEP and by 12.5%, 8.42%, 9.62% and 13.75%, respectively, compared with parallel GEPSA. Six well-studied UCI test data sets demonstrate the efficiency and capability of our proposed DFMGEP-FR algorithm for distributed function mining.

  19. Distributed Function Mining for Gene Expression Programming Based on Fast Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Song; Yue, Dong; Yang, Le-chan; Fu, Xiong; Feng, Ya-zhou

    2016-01-01

    For high-dimensional and massive data sets, traditional centralized gene expression programming (GEP) or improved algorithms lead to increased run-time and decreased prediction accuracy. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new improved algorithm called distributed function mining for gene expression programming based on fast reduction (DFMGEP-FR). In DFMGEP-FR, fast attribution reduction in binary search algorithms (FAR-BSA) is proposed to quickly find the optimal attribution set, and the function consistency replacement algorithm is given to solve integration of the local function model. Thorough comparative experiments for DFMGEP-FR, centralized GEP and the parallel gene expression programming algorithm based on simulated annealing (parallel GEPSA) are included in this paper. For the waveform, mushroom, connect-4 and musk datasets, the comparative results show that the average time-consumption of DFMGEP-FR drops by 89.09%%, 88.85%, 85.79% and 93.06%, respectively, in contrast to centralized GEP and by 12.5%, 8.42%, 9.62% and 13.75%, respectively, compared with parallel GEPSA. Six well-studied UCI test data sets demonstrate the efficiency and capability of our proposed DFMGEP-FR algorithm for distributed function mining. PMID:26751200

  20. Factors Influencing Engagement, Perceived Usefulness and Behavioral Mechanisms Associated with a Text Message Support Program

    PubMed Central

    Redfern, Julie; Santo, Karla; Coorey, Genevieve; Thakkar, Jay; Hackett, Maree; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Chow, Clara K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many studies have now demonstrated the efficacy of text messaging in positively changing behaviours. We aimed to identify features and factors that explain the effectiveness of a successful text messaging program in terms of user engagement, perceived usefulness, behavior change and program delivery preferences. Methods Mixed methods qualitative design combining four data sources; (i) analytic data extracted directly from the software system, (ii) participant survey, (iii) focus groups to identify barriers and enablers to implementation and mechanisms of effect and (iv) recruitment screening logs and text message responses to examine engagement. This evaluation was conducted within the TEXT ME trial—a parallel design, single-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) of 710 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Qualitative data were interpreted using inductive thematic analysis. Results 307/352 (87% response rate) of recruited patients with CHD completed the program evaluation survey at six months and 25 participated in a focus group. Factors increasing engagement included (i) ability to save and share messages, (ii) having the support of providers and family, (iii) a feeling of support through participation in the program, (iv) the program being initiated close to the time of a cardiovascular event, (v) personalization of the messages, (vi) opportunity for initial face-to-face contact with a provider and (vii) that program and content was perceived to be from a credible source. Clear themes relating to program delivery were that diet and physical activity messages were most valued, four messages per week was ideal and most participants felt program duration should be provided for at least for six months or longer. Conclusions This study provides context and insight into the factors influencing consumer engagement with a text message program aimed at improving health-related behavior. The study suggests program components that may enhance

  1. Gestational environment programs adult depression-like behavior through methylation of the calcitonin gene-related peptide gene

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jianwei; Opal, Mark D.; Dulawa, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    Early life exposure to specific environmental factors can increase risk for developing psychopathology including major depression in adulthood. However, the molecular pathways and epigenetic mechanisms that mediate the effects of early environments on adult mood remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of different gestational and rearing conditions on adult anxiety- and depression-like behavior using a combined reciprocal out-crossing and cross-fostering design in Balb/cJ (cJ) and C57BL/6J (B6) mouse strains. First filial (F1) hybrid offspring, which were gestated by B6 or cJ dams and then reared by either strain, were evaluated for behavior and whole-genome hippocampal gene expression during adulthood. Adult hybrid mice gestated by B6 dams showed increased depression-like behavior in the forced swim and sucrose preference tests, increased hippocampal expression of alpha calcitonin gene-related peptide (αCGRP) transcripts, and decreased methylation of the αCGRP promoter compared to those gestated by cJ dams. Differential expression of αCGRP in adulthood did not result from genomic imprinting, and differences between B6 and cJ mitochondrial DNA were not responsible for behavioral phenotypes observed. Lastly, central administration of αCGRP to adult hybrid mice increased depression-like behavior, while the CGRP1 receptor antagonist CGRP8–37 reduced depression-like behavior in the FST. Our findings suggest that gestational factors influence adult depression-like behavior through methylation of the αCGRP gene. PMID:23044705

  2. C-reactive protein levels are influenced by common IL-1 gene variations.

    PubMed

    Berger, Peter; McConnell, Joseph P; Nunn, Martha; Kornman, Kenneth S; Sorrell, Julian; Stephenson, Katherine; Duff, Gordon W

    2002-02-21

    Elevated markers of systemic inflammation are associated with the development of acute coronary syndromes, but there is no current explanation for increased inflammation in overtly healthy individuals. The influence of genetic control of the inflammatory response on the observed variability is unknown. We studied the frequency of four polymorphisms in interleukin (IL) 1 genes, known to modulate inflammation, in 454 individuals undergoing coronary angiography and analysed their influence on plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen levels. Females and smokers had higher levels of CRP than males (Pi = 0.001) and non-smokers (Pi = 0.001). Patients with genotype 2.2 for the IL-1B(+3954) polymorphism had twice the median CRP levels of patients who were genotype 1.1 (4.33 vs 2.01 mg/l; P = 0.001). Patients with genotype 1.2 or 2.2 at the IL-1A(+4845) polymorphism also had higher median CRP (2.92 vs 2.05 mg/l, Pi = 0.023). In multivariate analyses, CRP levels remained significantly associated with IL-1 polymorphisms after adjustment for smoking, gender and age. Fibrinogen levels had similar associations with the IL-1 genotypes. These data indicate that IL-1 gene polymorphisms known to affect the inflammatory response are highly related to plasma levels of CRP and fibrinogen in patients referred for coronary angiography.

  3. Sirolimus and Everolimus Pathway: Reviewing Candidate Genes Influencing Their Intracellular Effects

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Simona; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Carraro, Amedeo; Brunelli, Matteo; Stallone, Giovanni; Lupo, Antonio; Zaza, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Sirolimus (SRL) and everolimus (EVR) are mammalian targets of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR-I) largely employed in renal transplantation and oncology as immunosuppressive/antiproliferative agents. SRL was the first mTOR-I produced by the bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus and approved for several medical purposes. EVR, derived from SRL, contains a 2-hydroxy-ethyl chain in the 40th position that makes the drug more hydrophilic than SRL and increases oral bioavailability. Their main mechanism of action is the inhibition of the mTOR complex 1 and the regulation of factors involved in a several crucial cellular functions including: protein synthesis, regulation of angiogenesis, lipid biosynthesis, mitochondrial biogenesis and function, cell cycle, and autophagy. Most of the proteins/enzymes belonging to the aforementioned biological processes are encoded by numerous and tightly regulated genes. However, at the moment, the polygenic influence on SRL/EVR cellular effects is still not completely defined, and its comprehension represents a key challenge for researchers. Therefore, to obtain a complete picture of the cellular network connected to SRL/EVR, we decided to review major evidences available in the literature regarding the genetic influence on mTOR-I biology/pharmacology and to build, for the first time, a useful and specific “SRL/EVR genes-focused pathway”, possibly employable as a starting point for future in-depth research projects. PMID:27187382

  4. Interaction of major genes predisposing to hepatocellular carcinoma with genes encoding signal transduction pathways influences tumor phenotype and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Feo, Francesco; Frau, Maddalena; Pascale, Rosa Maria

    2008-01-01

    Studies on rodents and humans demonstrate an inherited predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Analysis of the molecular alterations involved in the acquisition of a phenotype resistant or susceptible to hepatocarcinogenesis showed a deregulation of G1 and S phases in HCC of genetically susceptible F344 rats and a G1-S block in lesions of resistant Brown norway (BN) rats. Unrestrained extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity linked to proteasomal degradation of dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), a specific ERK inhibitor, by the CKS1-SKP2 ubiquitin ligase complex occurs in more aggressive HCC of F344 rats and humans. This mechanism is less active in HCC of BN rats and human HCC with better prognosis. Upregulation of iNos cross-talk with IKK/NF-κB and RAS/ERK pathways occurs in rodent liver lesions at higher levels in the most aggressive models represented by HCC of F344 rats and c-Myc-TGF-α transgenic mice. iNOS, IKK/NF-κB, and RAS/ERK upregulation is highest in human HCC with a poorer prognosis and positively correlates with tumor proliferation, genomic instability and microvascularization, and negatively with apoptosis. Thus, cell cycle regulation and the activity of signal transduction pathways seem to be modulated by HCC modifier genes, and differences in their efficiency influence the susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenesis and probably the prognosis of human HCC. PMID:19034960

  5. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1)

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T.; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K.; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.; Buck, Michael J.; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development. PMID:25923916

  6. Lithium and GSK3-β Promoter Gene Variants Influence White Matter Microstructure in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Francesco; Bollettini, Irene; Barberi, Ignazio; Radaelli, Daniele; Poletti, Sara; Locatelli, Clara; Pirovano, Adele; Lorenzi, Cristina; Falini, Andrea; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Lithium is the mainstay for the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) and inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK3-β). The less active GSK3-β promoter gene variants have been associated with less detrimental clinical features of BD. GSK3-β gene variants and lithium can influence brain gray matter structure in psychiatric conditions. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of white matter (WM) integrity showed widespred disruption of WM structure in BD. In a sample of 70 patients affected by a major depressive episode in course of BD, we investigated the effect of ongoing long-term lithium treatment and GSK3-β promoter rs334558 polymorphism on WM microstructure, using DTI and tract-based spatial statistics with threshold-free cluster enhancement. We report that the less active GSK3-β rs334558*C gene-promoter variants, and the long-term administration of the GSK3-β inhibitor lithium, were associated with increases of DTI measures of axial diffusivity (AD) in several WM fiber tracts, including corpus callosum, forceps major, anterior and posterior cingulum bundle (bilaterally including its hippocampal part), left superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, left posterior thalamic radiation, bilateral superior and posterior corona radiata, and bilateral corticospinal tract. AD reflects the integrity of axons and myelin sheaths. We suggest that GSK3-β inhibition and lithium could counteract the detrimental influences of BD on WM structure, with specific benefits resulting from effects on specific WM tracts contributing to the functional integrity of the brain and involving interhemispheric, limbic, and large frontal, parietal, and fronto-occipital connections. PMID:22990942

  7. Lithium and GSK3-β promoter gene variants influence white matter microstructure in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Bollettini, Irene; Barberi, Ignazio; Radaelli, Daniele; Poletti, Sara; Locatelli, Clara; Pirovano, Adele; Lorenzi, Cristina; Falini, Andrea; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Lithium is the mainstay for the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) and inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK3-β). The less active GSK3-β promoter gene variants have been associated with less detrimental clinical features of BD. GSK3-β gene variants and lithium can influence brain gray matter structure in psychiatric conditions. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of white matter (WM) integrity showed widespred disruption of WM structure in BD. In a sample of 70 patients affected by a major depressive episode in course of BD, we investigated the effect of ongoing long-term lithium treatment and GSK3-β promoter rs334558 polymorphism on WM microstructure, using DTI and tract-based spatial statistics with threshold-free cluster enhancement. We report that the less active GSK3-β rs334558*C gene-promoter variants, and the long-term administration of the GSK3-β inhibitor lithium, were associated with increases of DTI measures of axial diffusivity (AD) in several WM fiber tracts, including corpus callosum, forceps major, anterior and posterior cingulum bundle (bilaterally including its hippocampal part), left superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, left posterior thalamic radiation, bilateral superior and posterior corona radiata, and bilateral corticospinal tract. AD reflects the integrity of axons and myelin sheaths. We suggest that GSK3-β inhibition and lithium could counteract the detrimental influences of BD on WM structure, with specific benefits resulting from effects on specific WM tracts contributing to the functional integrity of the brain and involving interhemispheric, limbic, and large frontal, parietal, and fronto-occipital connections.

  8. Influence of a quality improvement learning collaborative program on team functioning in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Jyoti; Brown, Judith Belle; Han, Han; Harris, Stewart B; Green, Michael; Russell, Grant; Roberts, Sharon; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Fournie, Meghan; Thind, Amardeep; Reichert, Sonja M; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Quality improvement (QI) programs are frequently implemented to support primary healthcare (PHC) team development and to improve care outcomes. In Ontario, Canada, the Quality Improvement and Innovation Partnership (QIIP) offered a learning collaborative (LC) program to support the development of interdisciplinary team function and improve chronic disease management, disease prevention, and access to care. A qualitative study using a phenomenological approach was conducted as part of a mixed-method evaluation to explore the influence of the program on team functioning in participating PHC teams. A purposive sampling strategy was used to identify PHC teams (n = 10), from which participants of different professional roles were selected through a purposeful recruitment process to reflect maximum variation of team roles. Additionally, QI coaches working with the interview participants and the LC administrators were also interviewed. Data were collected through semistructured telephone interviews that were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was conducted through an iterative and interpretive approach. The shared experience of participating in the program appeared to improve team functioning. Participants described increased trust and respect for each other's clinical and administrative roles and were inspired by learning about different approaches to interdisciplinary care. This appeared to enhance collegial relationships, collapse professional silos, improve communication, and increase interdisciplinary collaboration. Teamwork involves more than just physically grouping healthcare providers from multiple disciplines and mandating them to work together. The LC program provided opportunities for participants to learn how to work collaboratively, and participation in the LC program appeared to enhance team functioning.

  9. LncRNA-Dependent Mechanisms of Androgen Receptor-regulated Gene Activation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunyu; Yang, Joy C.; Tanasa, Bogdan; Li, Wenbo; Merkurjev, Daria; Ohgi, Kenneth A.; Meng, Da; Zhang, Jie; Evans, Christopher P.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    While recent studies indicated roles of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in physiologic aspects of cell-type determination and tissue homeostasis1 yet their potential involvement in regulated gene transcription programs remain rather poorly understood. Androgen receptor (AR) regulates a large repertoire of genes central to the identity and behavior of prostate cancer cells2, and functions in a ligand-independent fashion in many prostate cancers when they become hormone refractory after initial androgen deprivation therapy3. Here, we report that two lncRNAs highly overexpressed in aggressive prostate cancer, PRNCR1 and PCGEM1, bind successively to the AR and strongly enhance both ligand-dependent and ligand-independent AR-mediated gene activation programs and proliferation in prostate cancer cells. Binding of PRNCR1 to the C-terminally acetylated AR on enhancers and its association with DOT1L appear to be required for recruitment of the second lncRNA, PCGEM1, to the DOT1L-mediated methylated AR N-terminus. Unexpectedly, recognition of specific protein marks by PCGEM1-recruited Pygopus2 PHD domain proves to enhance selective looping of AR-bound enhancers to target gene promoters in these cells. In “resistant” prostate cancer cells, these overexpressed lncRNAs can interact with, and are required for, the robust activation of both truncated and full length AR, causing ligand-independent activation of the AR transcriptional program and cell proliferation. Conditionally-expressed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting of these lncRNAs in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines strongly suppressed tumor xenograft growth in vivo. Together, these results suggest that these overexpressed lncRNAs can potentially serve as a required component of castration-resistance in prostatic tumors. PMID:23945587

  10. Novel candidate genes influencing natural variation in potato tuber cold sweetening identified by comparative proteomics and association mapping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Higher plants evolved various strategies to adapt to chilling conditions. Among other transcriptional and metabolic responses to cold temperatures plants accumulate a range of solutes including sugars. The accumulation of the reducing sugars glucose and fructose in mature potato tubers during exposure to cold temperatures is referred to as cold induced sweetening (CIS). The molecular basis of CIS in potato tubers is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation to environmental stress but also in applied research, since high amounts of reducing sugars affect negatively the quality of processed food products such as potato chips. CIS-tolerance varies considerably among potato cultivars. Our objective was to identify by an unbiased approach genes and cellular processes influencing natural variation of tuber sugar content before and during cold storage in potato cultivars used in breeding programs. We compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the tuber proteomes of cultivars highly diverse for CIS. DNA polymorphisms in genomic sequences encoding differentially expressed proteins were tested for association with tuber starch content, starch yield and processing quality. Results Pronounced natural variation of CIS was detected in tubers of a population of 40 tetraploid potato cultivars. Significant differences in protein expression were detected between CIS-tolerant and CIS-sensitive cultivars before the onset as well as during cold storage. Identifiable differential proteins corresponded to protease inhibitors, patatins, heat shock proteins, lipoxygenase, phospholipase A1 and leucine aminopeptidase (Lap). Association mapping based on single nucleotide polymorphisms supported a role of Lap in the natural variation of the quantitative traits tuber starch and sugar content. Conclusions The combination of comparative proteomics and association genetics led to the discovery of novel candidate genes for influencing the natural

  11. Animal models of programming: early life influences on appetite and feeding behaviour.

    PubMed

    Langley-Evans, Simon C; Bellinger, Leanne; McMullen, Sarah

    2005-07-01

    Epidemiological observations of associations between early life nutrition and long-term disease risk have prompted detailed experimental investigation of the biological basis of programming. Studies using rodent or large animal models have clearly established the biological plausibility of nutritional programming and are now yielding important information on underlying mechanisms. Nutritional interventions in pregnancy, including global food restriction, protein restriction, micronutrient restriction and excess fat feeding, determine a consistent cluster of disorders in the resulting offspring. The common association of such diverse nutritional disturbances with hypertension, glucose intolerance and adiposity suggests that a small number of simple common mechanisms are active in response to fetal nutrient imbalance. Studies of rodent models indicate that fetal undernutrition determines adult adiposity. It is unclear whether the increase in central adiposity is related to increased food intake or reduced energy expenditure, although evidence exists to suggest that both may act together. Rats subject to intrauterine protein restriction exhibit increased preference for high fat foods. Feeding of energy dense foods to rats that were undernourished in utero promotes a greater degree of obesity than is noted in animals subject to adequate nutrition in fetal life. There is evidence to suggest that programming of appetite may stem from remodelling of hypothalamic structures that control feeding and programming of the expression of genes involved in responses to orexogenic hormones. The early life programming of appetite and obesity is a complex phenomenon and our understanding of how maternal nutrition determines later energy balance is at a very early stage.

  12. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene influences ERP old/new effects during recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Ross, Robert S; Medrano, Paolo; Boyle, Kaitlin; Smolen, Andrew; Curran, Tim; Nyhus, Erika

    2015-11-01

    Recognition memory is defined as the ability to recognize a previously encountered stimulus and has been associated with spatially and temporally distinct event-related potentials (ERPs). Allelic variations of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) have recently been shown to impact memory performance. Common variants of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) of the SLC6A4 gene result in long (l) and short (s) allelic variants with carriers of the s allele having lowered transcriptional efficiency. Thus, the current study examines the effects polymorphisms of the SLC6A4 gene have on performance and ERP amplitudes commonly associated with recognition memory. Electroencephalogram (EEG), genetic, and behavioral data were collected from sixty participants as they performed an item and source memory recognition task. In both tasks, participants studied and encoded 200 words, which were then mixed with 200 new words during retrieval. Participants were monitored with EEG during the retrieval portion of each memory task. EEG electrodes were grouped into four ROIs, left anterior superior, right anterior superior, left posterior superior, and right posterior superior. ERP mean amplitudes during hits in the item and source memory task were compared to correctly recognizing new items (correct rejections). Results show that s-carriers have decreased mean hit amplitudes in both the right anterior superior ROI 1000-1500ms post stimulus during the source memory task and the left anterior superior ROI 300-500ms post stimulus during the item memory task. These results suggest that individual differences due to genetic variation of the serotonin transporter gene influences recognition memory.

  13. The influence of horizontal gene transfer on the mean fitness of unicellular populations in static environments.

    PubMed

    Raz, Yoav; Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2010-05-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is believed to be a major source of genetic variation, particularly for prokaryotes. It is believed that horizontal gene transfer plays a major role in shaping bacterial genomes and is also believed to be responsible for the relatively rapid dissemination and acquisition of new, adaptive traits across bacterial strains. Despite the importance of horizontal gene transfer as a major source of genetic variation, the bulk of research on theoretical evolutionary dynamics and population genetics has focused on point mutations (sometimes coupled with gene duplication events) as the main engine of genomic change. Here, we seek to specifically model HGT processes in bacterial cells, by developing a mathematical model describing the influence that conjugation-mediated HGT has on the mutation-selection balance in an asexually reproducing population of unicellular, prokaryotic organisms. It is assumed that mutation-selection balance is reached in the presence of a fixed background concentration of antibiotic, to which the population must become resistant to survive. We find that HGT has a nontrivial effect on the mean fitness of the population. However, one of the central results that emerge from our analysis is that, at mutation-selection balance, conjugation-mediated HGT has a slightly deleterious effect on the mean fitness of a population. Therefore, we conclude that HGT does not confer a selection advantage in static environments. Rather, its advantage must lie in its ability to promote faster adaptation in dynamic environments, an interpretation that is consistent with the observation that HGT can be promoted by environmental stresses on a population. PMID:20194966

  14. Undernutrition and stage of gestation influence fetal adipose tissue gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Jacqueline M.; Milne, John S.; Aitken, Raymond P.; Redmer, Dale A.; Reynolds, Lawrence P.; Luther, Justin S.; Horgan, GW; Adam, Clare L.

    2015-01-01

    Low birthweight is a risk factor for neonatal mortality and adverse metabolic health, both associated with inadequate prenatal adipose tissue development. Here we investigated the impact of maternal undernutrition on expression of genes regulating fetal perirenal adipose tissue (PAT) development and function at gestation days 89 and 130 (term=145d). Singleton fetuses were taken from adolescent ewes fed control (C) intake to maintain adiposity throughout pregnancy or undernourished (UN) to maintain conception weight but deplete maternal reserves (n=7/group). Fetal weight was independent of maternal intake at day 89 but by day 130 fetuses from UN dams were 17% lighter with lower PAT mass containing fewer unilocular adipocytes. Relative PAT expression of IGF1, IGF2, IGF2R and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARG) mRNA was lower in UN than in C, predominantly at day 89. Independent of maternal nutrition, PAT gene expression of PPARG, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hormone sensitive lipase, leptin, uncoupling protein-1 and prolactin receptor increased and IGF1, IGF2, IGF1R, IGF2R decreased between 89 and 130 days. Fatty acid synthase and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNAs were not influenced by nutrition or stage of pregnancy. Females had greater LPL and leptin mRNA than males, and LPL, leptin and PPARG mRNAs were decreased by UN at day 89 in females only. PAT gene expression correlations with PAT mass were stronger at day 89 than day 130. These data suggest that key genes regulating adipose tissue development and function are active from mid-gestation when they are sensitive to maternal undernutrition. This leads to reduced fetal adiposity by late pregnancy. PMID:25917833

  15. IL1B gene polymorphisms influence the course and severity of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nemetz, A; Nosti-Escanilla, M P; Molnár, T; Köpe, A; Kovács, A; Fehér, J; Tulassay, Z; Nagy, F; García-González, M A; Peña, A S

    1999-06-01

    There is evidence of a disbalance in the inflammatory regulation of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Interleukin-1 beta plays an important role in the pro-inflammatory response. Our aim was to study the influence which IL1B gene polymorphisms may have on the severity and course of these diseases. Ninety-six patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 98 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), and 132 ethnically matched healty individuals (HC) were typed for the polymorphic sites in the promoter region (position -511) and in exon 5 (position +3953) of the IL1B gene, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. In the CD group a significant association (P = 0.009) was found in this pair of genes. Homozygotes for allele 1 at position +3953 were more often present (69% vs 31%) in the subgroup of patients carrying at least one copy of allele 2 at position -511. This association was significant in patients with non-perforating disease (P = 0.002), but was not present in patients with perforating-fistulizing disease. The distribution of both allelic pairs in the non-fistulizing group proved to be significantly different from HC (P < 0.05), UC (P < 0.03), and the fistulizing group (P < 0.05). There was a similar association in non-operated patients (P = 0.024), whereas no such association was found in surgically treated patients. Among carriers of allele 2 at position -511, UC patients with more severe bleeding symptoms (P = 0.006) were less frequently found. These results suggest that IL1B gene polymorphisms participate in determining the course and severity of inflammatory bowel disease and contribute to explain the heterogeneity of these diseases.

  16. Influence of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene polymorphism on cognitive function in schizophrenia✰,✰✰

    PubMed Central

    Wonodi, Ikwunga; McMahon, Robert P.; Krishna, Nithin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Liu, Judy; Glassman, Matthew; Hong, L. Elliot; Gold, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive deficits compromise quality of life and productivity for individuals with schizophrenia and have no effective treatments. Preclinical data point to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism as a potential target for pro-cognitive drug development. We have previously demonstrated association of a kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) gene variant with reduced KMO gene expression in postmortem schizophrenia cortex, and neurocognitive endophenotypic deficits in a clinical sample. KMO encodes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), the rate-limiting microglial enzyme of cortical kynurenine metabolism. Aberration of the KMO gene might be the proximal cause of impaired cortical kynurenine metabolism observed in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between KMO variation and cognitive function in schizophrenia is unknown. This study examined the effects of the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele on cognitive function in schizophrenia. Methods We examined the association of KMO polymorphisms with general neuropsychological performance and P50 gating in a sample of 150 schizophrenia and 95 healthy controls. Results Consistent with our original report, the KMO rs2275163C>T C (risk) allele was associated with deficits in general neuropsychological performance, and this effect was more marked in schizophrenia compared with controls. Additionally, the C (Arg452) allele of the missense rs1053230C>T variant (KMO Arg452Cys) showed a trend effect on cognitive function. Neither variant affected P50 gating. Conclusions These data suggest that KMO variation influences a range of cognitive domains known to predict functional outcome. Extensive molecular characterization of this gene would elucidate its role in cognitive function with implications for vertical integration with basic discovery. PMID:25464917

  17. Influence of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms in pain sensibility of Brazilian fibromialgia patients.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Flávia Regina; Matsuda, Josie Budag; Mazucato, Mendelson; de Castro França, Suzelei; Zingaretti, Sônia Marli; da Silva, Lucienir Maria; Martinez-Rossi, Nilce Maria; Júnior, Milton Faria; Marins, Mozart; Fachin, Ana Lúcia

    2012-02-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) is a rheumatic syndrome affecting to 2-3% of individuals of productive age, mainly women. Neuroendocrine and genetic factors may play a significant role in development of the disease which is characterized by diffuse chronic pain and presence of tender points. Several studies have suggested an association between FS, especially pain sensitivity, and polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene. The aim of the present study was to characterize the SNPs rs4680 and rs4818 of the COMT gene and assess its influence in pain sensitivity of patients with fibromyalgia screened by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 112 patients with fibromyalgia and 110 healthy individuals and was used as template in PCR for amplification of a 185-bp fragment of the COMT gene. The amplified fragment was sequenced for analyses of the SNPs rs4680 and rs4818. The frequency of mutant genotype AA of SNP rs6860 was 77.67% in patients with FS and 28.18% for the control group. For the SNP rs4818, the frequency of mutant genotype CC was 73.21 and 39.09% for patients with FS and controls, respectively. Moreover, the FIQ score was higher in patients with the homozygous mutant genotype for SNPs rs4680 (87.92 points) and rs4818 (86.14 points). These results suggest that SNPs rs4680 and rs4818 of the COMT gene may be associated with fibromyalgia and pain sensitivity in FS Brazilian patients.

  18. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene influences ERP old/new effects during recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Ross, Robert S; Medrano, Paolo; Boyle, Kaitlin; Smolen, Andrew; Curran, Tim; Nyhus, Erika

    2015-11-01

    Recognition memory is defined as the ability to recognize a previously encountered stimulus and has been associated with spatially and temporally distinct event-related potentials (ERPs). Allelic variations of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) have recently been shown to impact memory performance. Common variants of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) of the SLC6A4 gene result in long (l) and short (s) allelic variants with carriers of the s allele having lowered transcriptional efficiency. Thus, the current study examines the effects polymorphisms of the SLC6A4 gene have on performance and ERP amplitudes commonly associated with recognition memory. Electroencephalogram (EEG), genetic, and behavioral data were collected from sixty participants as they performed an item and source memory recognition task. In both tasks, participants studied and encoded 200 words, which were then mixed with 200 new words during retrieval. Participants were monitored with EEG during the retrieval portion of each memory task. EEG electrodes were grouped into four ROIs, left anterior superior, right anterior superior, left posterior superior, and right posterior superior. ERP mean amplitudes during hits in the item and source memory task were compared to correctly recognizing new items (correct rejections). Results show that s-carriers have decreased mean hit amplitudes in both the right anterior superior ROI 1000-1500ms post stimulus during the source memory task and the left anterior superior ROI 300-500ms post stimulus during the item memory task. These results suggest that individual differences due to genetic variation of the serotonin transporter gene influences recognition memory. PMID:26423665

  19. Influence of EARLI1-like genes on flowering time and lignin synthesis of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Zhang, X; Xu, Z-Y; Li, L; Zhang, C; Schläppi, M; Xu, Z-Q

    2011-09-01

    EARLI1 encodes a 14.7 kDa protein in the cell wall, is a member of the PRP (proline-rich protein) family and has multiple functions, including resistance to low temperature and fungal infection. RNA gel blot analyses in the present work indicated that expression of EARLI1-like genes, EARLI1, At4G12470 and At4G12490, was down-regulated in Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants derived from transformation with Agrobacterium strain ABI, which contains a construct encoding a double-strand RNA targeting 8CM of EARLI1. Phenotype analyses revealed that Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants of EARLI1 flowered earlier than Col-FRI-Sf2 wild-type plants. The average bolting time of Col-FRI-Sf2 and Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants was 39.7 and 19.4 days, respectively, under a long-day photoperiod. In addition, there were significant differences in main stem length, internode number and rosette leaf number between Col-FRI-Sf2 and Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants. RT-PCR showed that EARLI1-like genes might delay flowering time through the autonomous and long-day photoperiod pathways by maintaining the abundance of FLC transcripts. In Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants, transcription of FLC was repressed, while expression of SOC1 and FT was activated. Microscopy observations showed that EARLI1-like genes were also associated with morphogenesis of leaf cells in Arabidopsis. Using histochemical staining, EARLI1-like genes were found to be involved in regulation of lignin synthesis in inflorescence stems, and Col-FRI-Sf2 and Col-FRI-Sf2 RNAi plants had 9.67% and 8.76% dry weight lignin, respectively. Expression analysis revealed that cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, a key enzyme in lignin synthesis, was influenced by EARLI1-like genes. These data all suggest that EARLI1-like genes could control the flowering process and lignin synthesis in Arabidopsis.

  20. DNASynth: A Computer Program for Assembly of Artificial Gene Parts in Decreasing Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert M.; Wojtowicz-Krawiec, Anna; Plucienniczak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Artificial gene synthesis requires consideration of nucleotide sequence development as well as long DNA molecule assembly protocols. The nucleotide sequence of the molecule must meet many conditions including particular preferences of the host organism for certain codons, avoidance of specific regulatory subsequences, and a lack of secondary structures that inhibit expression. The chemical synthesis of DNA molecule has limitations in terms of strand length; thus, the creation of artificial genes requires the assembly of long DNA molecules from shorter fragments. In the approach presented, the algorithm and the computer program address both tasks: developing the optimal nucleotide sequence to encode a given peptide for a given host organism and determining the long DNA assembly protocol. These tasks are closely connected; a change in codon usage may lead to changes in the optimal assembly protocol, and the lack of a simple assembly protocol may be addressed by changing the nucleotide sequence. The computer program presented in this study was tested with real data from an experiment in a wet biological laboratory to synthesize a peptide. The benefit of the presented algorithm and its application is the shorter time, compared to polymerase cycling assembly, needed to produce a ready synthetic gene. PMID:25629047

  1. Rapid gene expression changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes upon practice of a comprehensive yoga program.

    PubMed

    Qu, Su; Olafsrud, Solveig Mjelstad; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Saatcioglu, Fahri

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common integrative medicine (IM) modalities is yoga and related practices. Previous work has shown that yoga may improve wellness in healthy people and have benefits for patients. However, the mechanisms of how yoga may positively affect the mind-body system are largely unknown. Here we have assessed possible rapid changes in global gene expression profiles in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in healthy people that practiced either a comprehensive yoga program or a control regimen. The experimental sessions included gentle yoga postures, breathing exercises, and meditation (Sudarshan Kriya and Related Practices--SK&P) compared with a control regimen of a nature walk and listening to relaxing music. We show that the SK&P program has a rapid and significantly greater effect on gene expression in PBMCs compared with the control regimen. These data suggest that yoga and related practices result in rapid gene expression alterations which may be the basis for their longer term cell biological and higher level health effects. PMID:23613970

  2. Influence of interleukin-1 gene polymorphism on periodontal regeneration in intrabony defects.

    PubMed

    Christgau, M; Aslanidis, C; Felden, A; Hiller, K A; Schmitz, G; Schmalz, G

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this controlled retrospective study was to evaluate the influence of an IL-1 gene polymorphism on the clinical and radiographic healing outcomes of GTR therapy. The study included 47 adult periodontitis patients with 94 deep intrabony defects treated by GTR using different membrane materials. The following clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and 12 months after surgery: papillary bleeding index (PBI), gingival recession (REC), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and the vertical relative attachment gain (V-rAG). Bone changes in the defect regions due to GTR therapy were quantitatively evaluated using digital subtraction radiography (DSR). Polymorphisms of the IL-1A gene at position - 889 and of the IL-1B gene at position + 3953 were analyzed by PCR. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney-U and the Wilcoxon-Signed-Rank tests (alpha = 0.05). The study comprised 19 IL-1 genotype positive (IL-1 +) patients and 28 IL-1 genotype negative (IL-1 -) patients. Twelve months after GTR therapy, both patient groups revealed statistically significant PPD reductions and CAL gain [median (25/75% percentiles)]: Delta PPD [IL-1 + : 4.0 (2.5/5.0) mm; IL-1-: 3.8 (3.0/4.9) mm], Delta CAL [IL-1 + : 3.5 (3.0/4.8) mm; IL-1 -: 3.0 (1, 2/4, 5) mm]. V-rAG amounted to 60.0 (47.7/78.6)% in IL-1 + patients and 53.1 (43.4/81.9)% in IL-1 - patients. Both patient groups showed significant bone density gain in 40% (IL-1 +) and 43.6% (IL-1 -) of the initial defect area due to GTR. Neither the clinical nor the radiographic healing parameters revealed any statistically significant differences in the GTR healing outcome between IL-1 + and IL-1 - patients. In conclusion, these 12-month findings indicate that the IL-1 gene polymorphism has no influence on the clinical and radiographic regeneration results following GTR therapy.

  3. A MED13-dependent skeletal muscle gene program controls systemic glucose homeostasis and hepatic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Amoasii, Leonela; Holland, William; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Baskin, Kedryn K.; Pearson, Mackenzie; Burgess, Shawn C.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    The Mediator complex governs gene expression by linking upstream signaling pathways with the basal transcriptional machinery. However, how individual Mediator subunits may function in different tissues remains to be investigated. Through skeletal muscle-specific deletion of the Mediator subunit MED13 in mice, we discovered a gene regulatory mechanism by which skeletal muscle modulates the response of the liver to a high-fat diet. Skeletal muscle-specific deletion of MED13 in mice conferred resistance to hepatic steatosis by activating a metabolic gene program that enhances muscle glucose uptake and storage as glycogen. The consequent insulin-sensitizing effect within skeletal muscle lowered systemic glucose and insulin levels independently of weight gain and adiposity and prevented hepatic lipid accumulation. MED13 suppressed the expression of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in skeletal muscle by inhibiting the nuclear receptor NURR1 and the MEF2 transcription factor. These findings reveal a fundamental molecular mechanism for the governance of glucose metabolism and the control of hepatic lipid accumulation by skeletal muscle. Intriguingly, MED13 exerts opposing metabolic actions in skeletal muscle and the heart, highlighting the customized, tissue-specific functions of the Mediator complex. PMID:26883362

  4. Automatic design of synthetic gene circuits through mixed integer non-linear programming.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Kececioglu, John; Köppe, Matthias; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    Automatic design of synthetic gene circuits poses a significant challenge to synthetic biology, primarily due to the complexity of biological systems, and the lack of rigorous optimization methods that can cope with the combinatorial explosion as the number of biological parts increases. Current optimization methods for synthetic gene design rely on heuristic algorithms that are usually not deterministic, deliver sub-optimal solutions, and provide no guaranties on convergence or error bounds. Here, we introduce an optimization framework for the problem of part selection in synthetic gene circuits that is based on mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP), which is a deterministic method that finds the globally optimal solution and guarantees convergence in finite time. Given a synthetic gene circuit, a library of characterized parts, and user-defined constraints, our method can find the optimal selection of parts that satisfy the constraints and best approximates the objective function given by the user. We evaluated the proposed method in the design of three synthetic circuits (a toggle switch, a transcriptional cascade, and a band detector), with both experimentally constructed and synthetic promoter libraries. Scalability and robustness analysis shows that the proposed framework scales well with the library size and the solution space. The work described here is a step towards a unifying, realistic framework for the automated design of biological circuits. PMID:22536398

  5. Automatic design of synthetic gene circuits through mixed integer non-linear programming.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Kececioglu, John; Köppe, Matthias; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    Automatic design of synthetic gene circuits poses a significant challenge to synthetic biology, primarily due to the complexity of biological systems, and the lack of rigorous optimization methods that can cope with the combinatorial explosion as the number of biological parts increases. Current optimization methods for synthetic gene design rely on heuristic algorithms that are usually not deterministic, deliver sub-optimal solutions, and provide no guaranties on convergence or error bounds. Here, we introduce an optimization framework for the problem of part selection in synthetic gene circuits that is based on mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP), which is a deterministic method that finds the globally optimal solution and guarantees convergence in finite time. Given a synthetic gene circuit, a library of characterized parts, and user-defined constraints, our method can find the optimal selection of parts that satisfy the constraints and best approximates the objective function given by the user. We evaluated the proposed method in the design of three synthetic circuits (a toggle switch, a transcriptional cascade, and a band detector), with both experimentally constructed and synthetic promoter libraries. Scalability and robustness analysis shows that the proposed framework scales well with the library size and the solution space. The work described here is a step towards a unifying, realistic framework for the automated design of biological circuits.

  6. Combining classifiers generated by multi-gene genetic programming for protein fold recognition using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bardsiri, Mahshid Khatibi; Eftekhari, Mahdi; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this study the problem of protein fold recognition, that is a classification task, is solved via a hybrid of evolutionary algorithms namely multi-gene Genetic Programming (GP) and Genetic Algorithm (GA). Our proposed method consists of two main stages and is performed on three datasets taken from the literature. Each dataset contains different feature groups and classes. In the first step, multi-gene GP is used for producing binary classifiers based on various feature groups for each class. Then, different classifiers obtained for each class are combined via weighted voting so that the weights are determined through GA. At the end of the first step, there is a separate binary classifier for each class. In the second stage, the obtained binary classifiers are combined via GA weighting in order to generate the overall classifier. The final obtained classifier is superior to the previous works found in the literature in terms of classification accuracy.

  7. Multi-gene genetic programming based predictive models for municipal solid waste gasification in a fluidized bed gasifier.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Daya Shankar; Pan, Indranil; Das, Saptarshi; Leahy, James J; Kwapinski, Witold

    2015-03-01

    A multi-gene genetic programming technique is proposed as a new method to predict syngas yield production and the lower heating value for municipal solid waste gasification in a fluidized bed gasifier. The study shows that the predicted outputs of the municipal solid waste gasification process are in good agreement with the experimental dataset and also generalise well to validation (untrained) data. Published experimental datasets are used for model training and validation purposes. The results show the effectiveness of the genetic programming technique for solving complex nonlinear regression problems. The multi-gene genetic programming are also compared with a single-gene genetic programming model to show the relative merits and demerits of the technique. This study demonstrates that the genetic programming based data-driven modelling strategy can be a good candidate for developing models for other types of fuels as well.

  8. The influence of maternal health literacy and child's age on participation in social welfare programs.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Siewert, Elizabeth; Wong, Angie T; Bhatt, Suraj K; Calixte, Rose E; Cnaan, Avital

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the influence of maternal health literacy and child's age on participation in social welfare programs benefiting children. In a longitudinal prospective cohort study of 560 Medicaid-eligible mother-infant dyads recruited in Philadelphia, maternal health literacy was assessed using the test of functional health literacy in adults (short version). Participation in social welfare programs [Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), child care subsidy, and public housing] was self-reported at child's birth, and at the 6, 12, 18, 24 month follow-up interviews. Generalized estimating equations quantified the strength of maternal health literacy as an estimator of program participation. The mothers were primarily African-Americans (83%), single (87%), with multiple children (62%). Nearly 24% of the mothers had inadequate or marginal health literacy. Children whose mothers had inadequate health literacy were less likely to receive child care subsidy (adjusted OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.34-0.85) than children whose mothers had adequate health literacy. Health literacy was not a significant predictor for TANF, SNAP, WIC or housing assistance. The predicted probability for participation in all programs decreased from birth to 24 months. Most notably, predicted WIC participation declined rapidly after age one. During the first 24 months, mothers with inadequate health literacy could benefit from simplified or facilitated child care subsidy application processes. Targeted outreach and enrollment efforts conducted by social welfare programs need to take into account the changing needs of families as children age.

  9. The influence of maternal health literacy and child's age on participation in social welfare programs.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Siewert, Elizabeth; Wong, Angie T; Bhatt, Suraj K; Calixte, Rose E; Cnaan, Avital

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the influence of maternal health literacy and child's age on participation in social welfare programs benefiting children. In a longitudinal prospective cohort study of 560 Medicaid-eligible mother-infant dyads recruited in Philadelphia, maternal health literacy was assessed using the test of functional health literacy in adults (short version). Participation in social welfare programs [Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), child care subsidy, and public housing] was self-reported at child's birth, and at the 6, 12, 18, 24 month follow-up interviews. Generalized estimating equations quantified the strength of maternal health literacy as an estimator of program participation. The mothers were primarily African-Americans (83%), single (87%), with multiple children (62%). Nearly 24% of the mothers had inadequate or marginal health literacy. Children whose mothers had inadequate health literacy were less likely to receive child care subsidy (adjusted OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.34-0.85) than children whose mothers had adequate health literacy. Health literacy was not a significant predictor for TANF, SNAP, WIC or housing assistance. The predicted probability for participation in all programs decreased from birth to 24 months. Most notably, predicted WIC participation declined rapidly after age one. During the first 24 months, mothers with inadequate health literacy could benefit from simplified or facilitated child care subsidy application processes. Targeted outreach and enrollment efforts conducted by social welfare programs need to take into account the changing needs of families as children age. PMID:23990157

  10. A genetic interaction between the APP and Dab1 genes influences brain development

    PubMed Central

    Pramatarova, Albéna; Chen, Kelian; Howell, Brian W.

    2008-01-01

    The Dab1 docking protein is required for the proper organization of brain laminae and for a signal transduction pathway initiated by Reelin binding to the ApoER2 and VLDLR receptors on the cell surface of neurons. Dab1 physically interacts with APP, however, it is not known whether the APP gene influences Dab1 function. Here we demonstrate a genetic interaction between Dab1 and APP. Dab1-hypomorphic animals have neuronal ectopias in the neocortex and reduced cerebellar volume, possibly a consequence of Purkinje cell misplacement. These phenotypes are exacerbated in transgenic animals overexpressing a mutant form of APP, APPswe, which is characterized by increased processing at the β-secretase site. The Dab1-hypomorphic phenotype is improved in the cerebellum of animals that are deficient for APP. Together this suggests that APP expression constrains the consequences of Dab1 activity during brain development. PMID:18029196

  11. Genetic Influences on Hand Osteoarthritis in Finnish Women – A Replication Study of Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hämäläinen, Satu; Solovieva, Svetlana; Vehmas, Tapio; Luoma, Katariina; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Hirvonen, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our aims were to replicate some previously reported associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five genes (A2BP1, COG5, GDF5, HFE, ESR1) with hand osteoarthritis (OA), and to examine whether genes (BCAP29, DIO2, DUS4L, DVWA, HLA, PTGS2, PARD3B, TGFB1 and TRIB1) associated with OA at other joint sites were associated with hand OA among Finnish women. Design We examined the bilateral hand radiographs of 542 occupationally active Finnish female dentists and teachers aged 45 to 63 and classified them according to the presence of OA by using reference images. Data regarding finger joint pain and other risk factors were collected using a questionnaire. We defined two hand OA phenotypes: radiographic OA in at least three joints (ROA) and symptomatic DIP OA. The genotypes were determined by PCR-based methods. In statistical analysis, we used SNPStats software, the chi-square test and logistic regression. Results Of the SNPs, rs716508 in A2BP1 was associated with ROA (OR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.5–0.9) and rs1800470 in TGFB1 with symptomatic DIP OA (1.8, 1.2–2.9). We found an interaction between ESR1 (rs9340799) and occupation: teachers with the minor allele were at an increased risk of symptomatic DIP OA (2.8, 1.3–6.5). We saw no association among the dentists. We also found that the carriage of the COG5 rs3757713 C allele increased the risk of ROA only among women with the BCAP29 rs10953541 CC genotype (2.6; 1.1–6.1). There was also a suggestive interaction between the HFE rs179945 and the ESR1 rs9340799, and the carriage of the minor allele of either of these SNPs was associated with an increased risk of symptomatic DIP OA (2.1, 1.3–2.5). Conclusions Our results support the earlier findings of A2BP1 and TBGF1 being OA susceptibility genes and provide evidence of a possible gene-gene interaction in the genetic influence on hand OA predisposition. PMID:24825461

  12. Gene silencing and sex determination by programmed DNA elimination in parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Streit, Adrian; Wang, Jianbin; Kang, Yuanyuan; Davis, Richard E

    2016-08-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is essential. However, programmed DNA elimination removes specific DNA sequences from the genome during development. DNA elimination occurs in unicellular ciliates and diverse metazoa ranging from nematodes to vertebrates. Two distinct groups of nematodes use DNA elimination to silence germline-expressed genes in the soma (ascarids) or for sex determination (Strongyloides spp.). Data suggest that DNA elimination likely evolved independently in these nematodes. Recent studies indicate that differential CENP-A deposition within chromosomes defines which sequences are retained and lost during Ascaris DNA elimination. Additional studies are needed to determine the distribution, functions, and mechanisms of DNA elimination in nematodes. PMID:27315434

  13. Evidence that variation in the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) gene influences susceptibility to panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Furukawa, Aizou; Takimoto, Takahiro; Terayama, Hayato; Iwahashi, Kazuhiko; Takei, Nori; Minabe, Yoshio; Sekine, Yoshimoto; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Iwata, Yasuhide; Pillai, Anitha; Nakamoto, Yurie; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Yoshii, Mitsunobu; Fukunishi, Isao; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Mori, Norio

    2006-04-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is the repeated sudden occurrence of panic attacks, episodes characterized by psychological symptoms. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is closely associated with personality traits for anxiety tolerance, and that it holds promise as a biological marker of stressful conditions. We have performed association analyses using the polymorphism to determine the PBR in PD. We screened the subjects for sequence variations within the 5' region, the coding region (exons 2-4), and the 3' noncoding region. One novel missense variant in exon 4, derived from the nucleotide transition in codon 162 (CGT --> CAT:485G > A) resulting in an arginine-to-histidine (Arg --> His) change, was detected in these subjects. The 485G > polymorphism of the PBR gene was analyzed in 91 PD patients and 178 controls. The genotypic and allelic analyses of the 485G > A revealed significant differences between the panic patients and the comparison subjects (P = 0.021 and 0.014, respectively). The present study provides new and important evidence that variation in the PBR gene influences susceptibility to PD.

  14. Influence of ERCC2 gene polymorphisms on the treatment outcome of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z F; Asila, A L J; Aikenmu, K; Zhao, J; Meng, Q C; Fang, R

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a prospective study to investigate the role of ERCC2 gene polymorphisms on the outcome of cisplatin-based treatment in patients with osteosarcoma. A total of 115 patients with osteosarcoma were included in our study. Genotyping of ERCC2 Asn312Asp (rs1799793) and Lys751Gln (rs13181) was performed using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry method. Of the 115 patients, 78 showed complete or partial response to chemotherapy, with a response rate of 67.85%. Our study suggested that the AA genotype of ERCC2 Asn312Asp was associated with a better response to chemotherapy, and the related adjusted OR (95%CI) was 4.85 (1.06-42.71). By Cox proportional hazards model analysis, we found that the AA genotype of ERCC2 Asn312Asp was associated with longer overall survival of patients with osteosarcoma when compared with the GG genotype, and the hazards ratio (95%CI) for the AA genotype was 0.65 (0.27-1.47). In conclusion, our study found that the ERCC2 Asn312Asp gene polymorphism likely plays an important role in influencing the chemotherapy response and overall survival of patients with osteosarcoma. PMID:26505449

  15. Influence of interactions between genes and childhood trauma on refractoriness in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders are excellent disease models in which gene-environmental interaction play a significant role in the pathogenesis. Childhood trauma has been known as a significant environmental factor in the progress of, and prognosis for psychiatric illness. Patients with refractory illness usually have more severe symptoms, greater disability, lower quality of life and are at greater risk of suicide than other psychiatric patients. Our literature review uncovered some important clinical factors which modulate response to treatment in psychiatric patients who have experienced childhood trauma. Childhood trauma seems to be a critical determinant of treatment refractoriness in psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. In patients with psychotic disorders, the relationship between childhood trauma and treatment-refractoriness appears to be mediated by cognitive impairment. In the case of bipolar disorder, the relationship appears to be mediated by greater affective disturbance and earlier onset, while in major depressive disorder the mediating factors are persistent, severe symptoms and frequent recurrence. In suicidal individuals, childhood maltreatment was associated with violent suicidal attempts. In the case of PTSD patients, it appears that childhood trauma makes the brain more vulnerable to subsequent trauma, thus resulting in more severe, refractory symptoms. Given that several studies have suggested that there are distinct subtypes of genetic vulnerability to childhood trauma, it is important to understand how gene-environment interactions influence the course of psychiatric illnesses in order to improve therapeutic strategies.

  16. Influence of interactions between genes and childhood trauma on refractoriness in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders are excellent disease models in which gene-environmental interaction play a significant role in the pathogenesis. Childhood trauma has been known as a significant environmental factor in the progress of, and prognosis for psychiatric illness. Patients with refractory illness usually have more severe symptoms, greater disability, lower quality of life and are at greater risk of suicide than other psychiatric patients. Our literature review uncovered some important clinical factors which modulate response to treatment in psychiatric patients who have experienced childhood trauma. Childhood trauma seems to be a critical determinant of treatment refractoriness in psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. In patients with psychotic disorders, the relationship between childhood trauma and treatment-refractoriness appears to be mediated by cognitive impairment. In the case of bipolar disorder, the relationship appears to be mediated by greater affective disturbance and earlier onset, while in major depressive disorder the mediating factors are persistent, severe symptoms and frequent recurrence. In suicidal individuals, childhood maltreatment was associated with violent suicidal attempts. In the case of PTSD patients, it appears that childhood trauma makes the brain more vulnerable to subsequent trauma, thus resulting in more severe, refractory symptoms. Given that several studies have suggested that there are distinct subtypes of genetic vulnerability to childhood trauma, it is important to understand how gene-environment interactions influence the course of psychiatric illnesses in order to improve therapeutic strategies. PMID:26827636

  17. Evidence for a gene influencing reading disability on chromosome 6p in two populations

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.D.; Brower, A.M.; Kimberling, W.J.

    1994-09-01

    A genetic contribution to specific reading disability has been demonstrated by twin studies, and segregation analysis has supported a dominant gene effect. In an effort to localize genes influencing reading disability, we have ascertained two independent populations of families: kindreds which were selected to have a three generation history of reading diability in an autosomal dominant pattern; and families with dizygotic twins, at least one of which has been diagnosed with reading disability. All available family members were given a battery of tests to measure reading and spelling ability and intelligence, and qualitative and quantitative phenotypes for reading disability were derived. Blood samples were obtained for genotyping on all consenting family members, in concordance with IRB requirements. Linkage analysis was performed by the sib pair method utilizing the S.A.G.E. (1992) package and by a differential regression technique developed by DeFries and Fulker (1985). In both populations and by both linkage techniques, several markers in the HLA region of chromosome 6p showed results suggestive of linkage, with the effect most pronounced in the twin families. Significance levels were enhanced when only the more severely affected subjects were analyzed with the differential regression technique.

  18. Temperature influences β-carotene production in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing carotenogenic genes from Phaffia rhodozyma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Zhan, Wubing; Li, Yongfu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Red yeast Phaffia rhodozyma is a prominent microorganism able to synthesize carotenoid. Here, three carotenogenic cDNAs of P. rhodozyma CGMCC 2.1557, crtE, crtYB and crtI, were cloned and introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVSc1. The recombinant Sc-EYBI cells could synthesize 258.8 ± 43.8 μg g(-1) dry cell weight (DCW) of β-carotene when growing at 20 °C, about 59-fold higher than in those growing at 30 °C. Additional expression of the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase from S. cerevisiae (Sc-EYBIH) increased the β-carotene level to 528.8 ± 13.3 μg g(-1) DCW as cells growing at 20 °C, 27-fold higher than cells growing at 30 °C, although cells grew faster at 30 °C than at 20 °C. Consistent with the much higher β-carotene level in cells growing at 20 °C, transcription level of three crt genes and cHMG1 gene in cells growing at 20 °C was a little higher than in those growing at 30 °C. Meanwhile, expression of three carotenogenic genes and accumulation of β-carotene promoted cell growth. These results reveal the influence of temperature on β-carotene biosynthesis and may be helpful for improving β-carotene production in recombinant S. cerevisiae. PMID:23861041

  19. Gene expression programs of mouse endothelial cells in kidney development and disease.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells are remarkably heterogeneous in both morphology and function, and they play critical roles in the formation of multiple organ systems. In addition endothelial cell dysfunction can contribute to disease processes, including diabetic nephropathy, which is a leading cause of end stage renal disease. In this report we define the comprehensive gene expression programs of multiple types of kidney endothelial cells, and analyze the differences that distinguish them. Endothelial cells were purified from Tie2-GFP mice by cell dissociation and fluorescent activated cell sorting. Microarrays were then used to provide a global, quantitative and sensitive measure of gene expression levels. We examined renal endothelial cells from the embryo and from the adult glomerulus, cortex and medulla compartments, as well as the glomerular endothelial cells of the db/db mutant mouse, which represents a model for human diabetic nephropathy. The results identified the growth factors, receptors and transcription factors expressed by these multiple endothelial cell types. Biological processes and molecular pathways were characterized in exquisite detail. Cell type specific gene expression patterns were defined, finding novel molecular markers and providing a better understanding of compartmental distinctions. Further, analysis of enriched, evolutionarily conserved transcription factor binding sites in the promoters of co-activated genes begins to define the genetic regulatory network of renal endothelial cell formation. Finally, the gene expression differences associated with diabetic nephropathy were defined, providing a global view of both the pathogenic and protective pathways activated. These studies provide a rich resource to facilitate further investigations of endothelial cell functions in kidney development, adult compartments, and disease. PMID:20706631

  20. Gene Expression Programs of Mouse Endothelial Cells in Kidney Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, Eric W.; Potter, S. Steven

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells are remarkably heterogeneous in both morphology and function, and they play critical roles in the formation of multiple organ systems. In addition endothelial cell dysfunction can contribute to disease processes, including diabetic nephropathy, which is a leading cause of end stage renal disease. In this report we define the comprehensive gene expression programs of multiple types of kidney endothelial cells, and analyze the differences that distinguish them. Endothelial cells were purified from Tie2-GFP mice by cell dissociation and fluorescent activated cell sorting. Microarrays were then used to provide a global, quantitative and sensitive measure of gene expression levels. We examined renal endothelial cells from the embryo and from the adult glomerulus, cortex and medulla compartments, as well as the glomerular endothelial cells of the db/db mutant mouse, which represents a model for human diabetic nephropathy. The results identified the growth factors, receptors and transcription factors expressed by these multiple endothelial cell types. Biological processes and molecular pathways were characterized in exquisite detail. Cell type specific gene expression patterns were defined, finding novel molecular markers and providing a better understanding of compartmental distinctions. Further, analysis of enriched, evolutionarily conserved transcription factor binding sites in the promoters of co-activated genes begins to define the genetic regulatory network of renal endothelial cell formation. Finally, the gene expression differences associated with diabetic nephropathy were defined, providing a global view of both the pathogenic and protective pathways activated. These studies provide a rich resource to facilitate further investigations of endothelial cell functions in kidney development, adult compartments, and disease. PMID:20706631

  1. Human clusterin gene expression is confined to surviving cells during in vitro programmed cell death.

    PubMed Central

    French, L E; Wohlwend, A; Sappino, A P; Tschopp, J; Schifferli, J A

    1994-01-01

    Clusterin is a serum glycoprotein endowed with cell aggregating, complement inhibitory, and lipid binding properties, and is also considered as a specific marker of dying cells, its expression being increased in various tissues undergoing programmed cell death (PCD). However, no study has so far directly shown that cells expressing clusterin in these tissues are actually apoptotic as defined by morphological and biochemical criteria. We have studied cellular clusterin gene expression in vitro using three different models of PCD: (a) ultraviolet B (UV-B) irradiation of human U937, HeLa, and A431 cell lines, (b) in vitro aging of human peripheral blood neutrophils (PMNs), and (c) dexamethasone-induced cell death of the human lymphoblastoid cell line CEM-C7. In all three models, the classical morphological and biochemical features of PCD observed did not correlate with an increase, but with either a marked decrease or an absence of clusterin gene expression as assessed by Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization of U937 and A431 cells after UV-B irradiation revealed, in addition, that only morphologically normal cells that are surviving continue to express the clusterin gene. Our results demonstrate that in the human myeloid, lymphoid, and epithelial cell types studied, clusterin gene expression is not a prerequisite to their death by apoptosis. In addition, and most interestingly, in situ hybridization of U937 and A431 cells revealed that only surviving cells express the clusterin gene after the induction of PCD, thus providing novel evidence suggesting that clusterin may be associated with cell survival within tissues regressing as a consequence of PCD. Images PMID:8113419

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention program to influence attitudes of students towards peers with disabilities.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Anke; Pijl, Sip Jan; Minnaert, Alexander; Post, Wendy

    2014-03-01

    In this study we examine the effectiveness of an intervention program to influence attitudes of elementary school students towards peers with intellectual, physical and severe physical and intellectual disabilities. A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was designed with an experimental group and a control group, both comprising two rural schools. An intervention program was developed for kindergarten (n(experimental) = 22, n(control) = 31) and elementary school students without disabilities (n(experimental) = 91, n(control) = 127) (age range 4-12 years old). This intervention consisted of a 3 weeks education project comprising six lessons about disabilities. The Acceptance Scale for Kindergarten-revised and the Attitude Survey to Inclusive Education were used to measure attitudes at three moments: prior to the start of the intervention, after the intervention and 1 year later. The outcomes of the multilevel analysis showed positive, immediate effects on attitudes of kindergarten students, but limited effects on elementary school students' attitudes. PMID:23982486

  3. Aerosol delivery of programmed cell death protein 4 using polysorbitol-based gene delivery system for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Kyoung; Xing, Lei; Chen, Bao-An; Xu, Fengguo; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Zhang, Can

    2014-11-01

    The development of a safe and effective gene delivery system is the most challenging obstacle to the broad application of gene therapy in the clinic. In this study, we report the development of a polysorbitol-based gene delivery system as an alternative gene carrier for lung cancer therapy. The copolymer was prepared by a Michael addition reaction between sorbitol diacrylate (SD) and spermine (SPE); the SD-SPE copolymer effectively condenses with DNA on the nanoscale and protects it from nucleases. SD-SPE/DNA complexes showed excellent transfection with low toxicity both in vitro and in vivo, and aerosol delivery of SD-SPE complexes with programmed cell death protein 4 DNA significantly suppressed lung tumorigenesis in K-ras(LA1) lung cancer model mice. These results demonstrate that SD-SPE has great potential as a gene delivery system based on its excellent biocompatibility and high gene delivery efficiency for lung cancer gene therapy. PMID:24983766

  4. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C; Gupta, C N; Chen, J; Patel, V; Calhoun, V D; Ehrlich, S; Wang, L; Bustillo, J R; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I; Turner, J A

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137-regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of these four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease. PMID:26836412

  5. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wright, C; Gupta, C N; Chen, J; Patel, V; Calhoun, V D; Ehrlich, S; Wang, L; Bustillo, J R; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I; Turner, J A

    2016-02-02

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137-regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of these four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease.

  6. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia

    DOE PAGES

    Wright, C.; Gupta, C. N.; Chen, J.; Patel, V.; Calhoun, V. D.; Ehrlich, S.; Wang, L.; Bustillo, J. R.; Perrone-Bizzozero, N. I.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-02-02

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137- regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of thesemore » four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Furthermore, given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease.« less

  7. Assessment of the influence of field size on maize gene flow using SSR analysis.

    PubMed

    Palaudelmàs, M; Melé, E; Monfort, A; Serra, J; Salvia, J; Messeguer, J

    2012-06-01

    One of the factors that may influence the rate of cross-fertilization is the relative size of the pollen donor and receptor fields. We designed a spatial distribution with four varieties of genetically-modified (GM) yellow maize to generate different sized fields while maintaining a constant distance to neighbouring fields of conventional white kernel maize. Samples of cross-fertilized, yellow kernels in white cobs were collected from all of the adjacent fields at different distances. A special series of samples was collected at distances of 0, 2, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 120 m following a transect traced in the dominant down-wind direction in order to identify the origin of the pollen through SSR analysis. The size of the receptor fields should be taken into account, especially when they extend in the same direction than the GM pollen flow is coming. From collected data, we then validated a function that takes into account the gene flow found in the field border and that is very useful for estimating the % of GM that can be found in any point of the field. It also serves to predict the total GM content of the field due to cross fertilization. Using SSR analysis to identify the origin of pollen showed that while changes in the size of the donor field clearly influence the percentage of GMO detected, this effect is moderate. This study demonstrates that doubling the donor field size resulted in an approximate increase of GM content in the receptor field of 7%. This indicates that variations in the size of the donor field have a smaller influence on GM content than variations in the size of the receptor field. PMID:21898271

  8. Assessment of the influence of field size on maize gene flow using SSR analysis.

    PubMed

    Palaudelmàs, M; Melé, E; Monfort, A; Serra, J; Salvia, J; Messeguer, J

    2012-06-01

    One of the factors that may influence the rate of cross-fertilization is the relative size of the pollen donor and receptor fields. We designed a spatial distribution with four varieties of genetically-modified (GM) yellow maize to generate different sized fields while maintaining a constant distance to neighbouring fields of conventional white kernel maize. Samples of cross-fertilized, yellow kernels in white cobs were collected from all of the adjacent fields at different distances. A special series of samples was collected at distances of 0, 2, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 120 m following a transect traced in the dominant down-wind direction in order to identify the origin of the pollen through SSR analysis. The size of the receptor fields should be taken into account, especially when they extend in the same direction than the GM pollen flow is coming. From collected data, we then validated a function that takes into account the gene flow found in the field border and that is very useful for estimating the % of GM that can be found in any point of the field. It also serves to predict the total GM content of the field due to cross fertilization. Using SSR analysis to identify the origin of pollen showed that while changes in the size of the donor field clearly influence the percentage of GMO detected, this effect is moderate. This study demonstrates that doubling the donor field size resulted in an approximate increase of GM content in the receptor field of 7%. This indicates that variations in the size of the donor field have a smaller influence on GM content than variations in the size of the receptor field.

  9. A Genome-Scale Investigation of How Sequence, Function, and Tree-Based Gene Properties Influence Phylogenetic Inference

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xing-Xing; Salichos, Leonidas; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic inference is inherently dependent on choices in both methodology and data. Many insightful studies have shown how choices in methodology, such as the model of sequence evolution or optimality criterion used, can strongly influence inference. In contrast, much less is known about the impact of choices in the properties of the data, typically genes, on phylogenetic inference. We investigated the relationships between 52 gene properties (24 sequence-based, 19 function-based, and 9 tree-based) with each other and with three measures of phylogenetic signal in two assembled data sets of 2,832 yeast and 2,002 mammalian genes. We found that most gene properties, such as evolutionary rate (measured through the percent average of pairwise identity across taxa) and total tree length, were highly correlated with each other. Similarly, several gene properties, such as gene alignment length, Guanine-Cytosine content, and the proportion of tree distance on internal branches divided by relative composition variability (treeness/RCV), were strongly correlated with phylogenetic signal. Analysis of partial correlations between gene properties and phylogenetic signal in which gene evolutionary rate and alignment length were simultaneously controlled, showed similar patterns of correlations, albeit weaker in strength. Examination of the relative importance of each gene property on phylogenetic signal identified gene alignment length, alongside with number of parsimony-informative sites and variable sites, as the most important predictors. Interestingly, the subsets of gene properties that optimally predicted phylogenetic signal differed considerably across our three phylogenetic measures and two data sets; however, gene alignment length and RCV were consistently included as predictors of all three phylogenetic measures in both yeasts and mammals. These results suggest that a handful of sequence-based gene properties are reliable predictors of phylogenetic signal

  10. A Genome-Scale Investigation of How Sequence, Function, and Tree-Based Gene Properties Influence Phylogenetic Inference.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xing-Xing; Salichos, Leonidas; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic inference is inherently dependent on choices in both methodology and data. Many insightful studies have shown how choices in methodology, such as the model of sequence evolution or optimality criterion used, can strongly influence inference. In contrast, much less is known about the impact of choices in the properties of the data, typically genes, on phylogenetic inference. We investigated the relationships between 52 gene properties (24 sequence-based, 19 function-based, and 9 tree-based) with each other and with three measures of phylogenetic signal in two assembled data sets of 2,832 yeast and 2,002 mammalian genes. We found that most gene properties, such as evolutionary rate (measured through the percent average of pairwise identity across taxa) and total tree length, were highly correlated with each other. Similarly, several gene properties, such as gene alignment length, Guanine-Cytosine content, and the proportion of tree distance on internal branches divided by relative composition variability (treeness/RCV), were strongly correlated with phylogenetic signal. Analysis of partial correlations between gene properties and phylogenetic signal in which gene evolutionary rate and alignment length were simultaneously controlled, showed similar patterns of correlations, albeit weaker in strength. Examination of the relative importance of each gene property on phylogenetic signal identified gene alignment length, alongside with number of parsimony-informative sites and variable sites, as the most important predictors. Interestingly, the subsets of gene properties that optimally predicted phylogenetic signal differed considerably across our three phylogenetic measures and two data sets; however, gene alignment length and RCV were consistently included as predictors of all three phylogenetic measures in both yeasts and mammals. These results suggest that a handful of sequence-based gene properties are reliable predictors of phylogenetic signal

  11. [Influence of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the expression of genes of biomarkers of inflammatory responses and apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Baranova, L A; Zhornik, E V; Volotovski, I D

    2015-01-01

    In order to evaluate the toxic effect of silver (AgNP) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles their influence on the expression of genes of biomarkers of inflammatory responses and apoptosis in human lymphocytes was studied. An increase in the IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and p53 genes expression in the concentration range of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles of 10-40 μk g/ml was found. Increased expression of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and p53 genes under the nanoparticles action indicates the stimulation of the immune system and of apoptosis, respectively.

  12. Human cerebral organoids recapitulate gene expression programs of fetal neocortex development

    PubMed Central

    Camp, J. Gray; Badsha, Farhath; Florio, Marta; Kanton, Sabina; Gerber, Tobias; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Lewitus, Eric; Sykes, Alex; Hevers, Wulf; Lancaster, Madeline; Knoblich, Juergen A.; Lachmann, Robert; Pääbo, Svante; Huttner, Wieland B.; Treutlein, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral organoids—3D cultures of human cerebral tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells—have emerged as models of human cortical development. However, the extent to which in vitro organoid systems recapitulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation programs observed in vivo remains unclear. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to dissect and compare cell composition and progenitor-to-neuron lineage relationships in human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex. Covariation network analysis using the fetal neocortex data reveals known and previously unidentified interactions among genes central to neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In the organoid, we detect diverse progenitors and differentiated cell types of neuronal and mesenchymal lineages and identify cells that derived from regions resembling the fetal neocortex. We find that these organoid cortical cells use gene expression programs remarkably similar to those of the fetal tissue to organize into cerebral cortex-like regions. Our comparison of in vivo and in vitro cortical single-cell transcriptomes illuminates the genetic features underlying human cortical development that can be studied in organoid cultures. PMID:26644564

  13. Human cerebral organoids recapitulate gene expression programs of fetal neocortex development.

    PubMed

    Camp, J Gray; Badsha, Farhath; Florio, Marta; Kanton, Sabina; Gerber, Tobias; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Lewitus, Eric; Sykes, Alex; Hevers, Wulf; Lancaster, Madeline; Knoblich, Juergen A; Lachmann, Robert; Pääbo, Svante; Huttner, Wieland B; Treutlein, Barbara

    2015-12-22

    Cerebral organoids-3D cultures of human cerebral tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells-have emerged as models of human cortical development. However, the extent to which in vitro organoid systems recapitulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation programs observed in vivo remains unclear. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to dissect and compare cell composition and progenitor-to-neuron lineage relationships in human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex. Covariation network analysis using the fetal neocortex data reveals known and previously unidentified interactions among genes central to neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In the organoid, we detect diverse progenitors and differentiated cell types of neuronal and mesenchymal lineages and identify cells that derived from regions resembling the fetal neocortex. We find that these organoid cortical cells use gene expression programs remarkably similar to those of the fetal tissue to organize into cerebral cortex-like regions. Our comparison of in vivo and in vitro cortical single-cell transcriptomes illuminates the genetic features underlying human cortical development that can be studied in organoid cultures. PMID:26644564

  14. Human cerebral organoids recapitulate gene expression programs of fetal neocortex development

    PubMed Central

    Camp, J. Gray; Badsha, Farhath; Florio, Marta; Kanton, Sabina; Gerber, Tobias; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Lewitus, Eric; Sykes, Alex; Hevers, Wulf; Lancaster, Madeline; Knoblich, Juergen A.; Lachmann, Robert; Pääbo, Svante; Huttner, Wieland B.; Treutlein, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral organoids—3D cultures of human cerebral tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells—have emerged as models of human cortical development. However, the extent to which in vitro organoid systems recapitulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation programs observed in vivo remains unclear. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to dissect and compare cell composition and progenitor-to-neuron lineage relationships in human cerebral organoids and fetal neocortex. Covariation network analysis using the fetal neocortex data reveals known and previously unidentified interactions among genes central to neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In the organoid, we detect diverse progenitors and differentiated cell types of neuronal and mesenchymal lineages and identify cells that derived from regions resembling the fetal neocortex. We find that these organoid cortical cells use gene expression programs remarkably similar to those of the fetal tissue to organize into cerebral cortex-like regions. Our comparison of in vivo and in vitro cortical single-cell transcriptomes illuminates the genetic features underlying human cortical development that can be studied in organoid cultures. PMID:26644564

  15. FrameD: a flexible program for quality check and gene prediction in prokaryotic genomes and noisy matured eukaryotic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schiex, Thomas; Gouzy, Jérôme; Moisan, Annick; de Oliveira, Yannick

    2003-01-01

    We describe FrameD, a program that predicts coding regions in prokaryotic and matured eukaryotic sequences. Initially targeted at gene prediction in bacterial GC rich genomes, the gene model used in FrameD also allows to predict genes in the presence of frameshifts and partially undetermined sequences which makes it also very suitable for gene prediction and frameshift correction in unfinished sequences such as EST and EST cluster sequences. Like recent eukaryotic gene prediction programs, FrameD also includes the ability to take into account protein similarity information both in its prediction and its graphical output. Its performances are evaluated on different bacterial genomes. The web site (http://genopole.toulouse.inra.fr/bioinfo/FrameD/FD) allows direct prediction, sequence correction and translation and the ability to learn new models for new organisms. PMID:12824407

  16. FrameD: A flexible program for quality check and gene prediction in prokaryotic genomes and noisy matured eukaryotic sequences.

    PubMed

    Schiex, Thomas; Gouzy, Jérôme; Moisan, Annick; de Oliveira, Yannick

    2003-07-01

    We describe FrameD, a program that predicts coding regions in prokaryotic and matured eukaryotic sequences. Initially targeted at gene prediction in bacterial GC rich genomes, the gene model used in FrameD also allows to predict genes in the presence of frameshifts and partially undetermined sequences which makes it also very suitable for gene prediction and frameshift correction in unfinished sequences such as EST and EST cluster sequences. Like recent eukaryotic gene prediction programs, FrameD also includes the ability to take into account protein similarity information both in its prediction and its graphical output. Its performances are evaluated on different bacterial genomes. The web site (http://genopole.toulouse.inra.fr/bioinfo/FrameD/FD) allows direct prediction, sequence correction and translation and the ability to learn new models for new organisms. PMID:12824407

  17. Induction of a program gene expression during osteoblast differentiation with strontium ranelate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lingling; Zaidi, Samir; Peng Yuanzhen; Zhou Hang; Moonga, Baljit S.; Blesius, Alexia; Dupin-Roger, Isabelle; Zaidi, Mone . E-mail: mone.zaidi@mssm.edu; Sun Li

    2007-04-06

    Strontium ranelate, a new agent for the treatment of osteoporosis, has been shown stimulate bone formation in various experimental models. This study examines the effect of strontium ranelate on gene expression in osteoblasts, as well as the formation of mineralized (von Kossa-positive) colony-forming unit-osteoblasts (CFU-obs). Bone marrow-derived stromal cells cultured for 21 days under differentiating conditions, when exposed to strontium ranelate, displayed a significant time- and concentration-dependent increase in the expression of the master gene, Runx2, as well as bone sialoprotein (BSP), but interestingly without effects on osteocalcin. This was associated with a significant increase in the formation of CFU-obs at day 21 of culture. In U-33 pre-osteoblastic cells, strontium ranelate significantly enhanced the expression of Runx2 and osteocalcin, but not BSP. Late, more mature osteoblastic OB-6 cells showed significant elevations in BSP and osteocalcin, but with only minimal effects on Runx2. In conclusion, strontium ranelate stimulates osteoblast differentiation, but the induction of the program of gene expression appears to be cell type-specific. The increased osteoblastic differentiation is the likely basis underlying the therapeutic bone-forming actions of strontium ranelate.

  18. A polymorphic (GA/CT)n- SSR influences promoter activity of Tryptophan decarboxylase gene in Catharanthus roseus L. Don.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2016-01-01

    Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) of polypurine-polypyrimidine type motifs occur very frequently in the 5' flanks of genes in plants and have recently been implicated to have a role in regulation of gene expression. In this study, 2 accessions of Catharanthus roseus having (CT)8 and (CT)21 varying motifs in the 5'UTR of Tryptophan decarboxylase (Tdc) gene, were investigated for its role in regulation of gene expression. Extensive Tdc gene expression analysis in the 2 accessions was carried out both at the level of transcription and translation. Transcript abundance was estimated using Northern analysis and qRT-PCR, whereas the rate of Tdc gene transcription was assessed using in-situ nuclear run-on transcription assay. Translation status of Tdc gene was monitored by quantification of polysome associated Tdc mRNA using qRT-PCR. These observations were validated through transient expression analysis using the fusion construct [CaM35S:(CT)8-21:GUS]. Our study demonstrated that not only does the length of (CT)n -SSRs influences the promoter activity, but the presence of SSRs per se in the 5'-UTR significantly enhances the level of gene expression. We termed this phenomenon as "microsatellite mediated enhancement" (MME) of gene expression. Results presented here will provide leads for engineering plants with enhanced amounts of medicinally important alkaloids. PMID:27623355

  19. A polymorphic (GA/CT)n- SSR influences promoter activity of Tryptophan decarboxylase gene in Catharanthus roseus L. Don

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2016-01-01

    Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) of polypurine-polypyrimidine type motifs occur very frequently in the 5′ flanks of genes in plants and have recently been implicated to have a role in regulation of gene expression. In this study, 2 accessions of Catharanthus roseus having (CT)8 and (CT)21 varying motifs in the 5′UTR of Tryptophan decarboxylase (Tdc) gene, were investigated for its role in regulation of gene expression. Extensive Tdc gene expression analysis in the 2 accessions was carried out both at the level of transcription and translation. Transcript abundance was estimated using Northern analysis and qRT-PCR, whereas the rate of Tdc gene transcription was assessed using in-situ nuclear run-on transcription assay. Translation status of Tdc gene was monitored by quantification of polysome associated Tdc mRNA using qRT-PCR. These observations were validated through transient expression analysis using the fusion construct [CaM35S:(CT)8–21:GUS]. Our study demonstrated that not only does the length of (CT)n -SSRs influences the promoter activity, but the presence of SSRs per se in the 5′-UTR significantly enhances the level of gene expression. We termed this phenomenon as “microsatellite mediated enhancement” (MME) of gene expression. Results presented here will provide leads for engineering plants with enhanced amounts of medicinally important alkaloids. PMID:27623355

  20. Confirming genes influencing risk to cleft lip with/without cleft palate in a case-parent trio study.

    PubMed

    Beaty, T H; Taub, M A; Scott, A F; Murray, J C; Marazita, M L; Schwender, H; Parker, M M; Hetmanski, J B; Balakrishnan, P; Mansilla, M A; Mangold, E; Ludwig, K U; Noethen, M M; Rubini, M; Elcioglu, N; Ruczinski, I

    2013-07-01

    A collection of 1,108 case-parent trios ascertained through an isolated, nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) was used to replicate the findings from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) conducted by Beaty et al. (Nat Genet 42:525-529, 2010), where four different genes/regions were identified as influencing risk to CL/P. Tagging SNPs for 33 different genes were genotyped (1,269 SNPs). All four of the genes originally identified as showing genome-wide significance (IRF6, ABCA4 and MAF, plus the 8q24 region) were confirmed in this independent sample of trios (who were primarily of European and Southeast Asian ancestry). In addition, eight genes classified as 'second tier' hits in the original study (PAX7, THADA, COL8A1/FILIP1L, DCAF4L2, GADD45G, NTN1, RBFOX3 and FOXE1) showed evidence of linkage and association in this replication sample. Meta-analysis between the original GWAS trios and these replication trios showed PAX7, COL8A1/FILIP1L and NTN1 achieved genome-wide significance. Tests for gene-environment interaction between these 33 genes and maternal smoking found evidence for interaction with two additional genes: GRID2 and ELAVL2 among European mothers (who had a higher rate of smoking than Asian mothers). Formal tests for gene-gene interaction (epistasis) failed to show evidence of statistical interaction in any simple fashion. This study confirms that many different genes influence risk to CL/P.

  1. Influence of Horse and Rider on Stress during Horse-riding Lesson Program

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ok-Deuk; Yun, Young-Min

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to confirm the influence of a horse-riding lesson program (HRLP) on the stress level of horses and riders by respectively analyzing their salivary cortisol concentration. Twenty-four healthy horses and 23 riders participated in this study. The horses were randomly classified into two groups for the horse riding lesson program: Class 1 (for the beginner lesson) and Class 2 (for the intermediate lesson). The Class 1 group consisted of 12 horses and 12 riders, while the Class 2 group consisted of 12 horses and 11 riders. Salivettes cotton wool swabs were used for saliva collection and the saliva analyses were conducted using a two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures with SAS version 8. As for the results, the average salivary cortisol concentration of all horses before HRLP significantly increased compared to the baseline (p<0.001) while it decreased after the HRLP. The results of the salivary cortisol concentration of the riders were similar to the horses’ results. However, there was no difference during the HRLP between Class 1 and Class 2 in the horse or rider groups. The results suggest that the HRLP did not influence the stress level of the horses or riders. Thus, this study provides the necessary information and guidelines for future studies on stress in horses during riding and gives insight into better horse welfare and management options. PMID:27004819

  2. Influence of Horse and Rider on Stress during Horse-riding Lesson Program.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ok-Deuk; Yun, Young-Min

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to confirm the influence of a horse-riding lesson program (HRLP) on the stress level of horses and riders by respectively analyzing their salivary cortisol concentration. Twenty-four healthy horses and 23 riders participated in this study. The horses were randomly classified into two groups for the horse riding lesson program: Class 1 (for the beginner lesson) and Class 2 (for the intermediate lesson). The Class 1 group consisted of 12 horses and 12 riders, while the Class 2 group consisted of 12 horses and 11 riders. Salivettes cotton wool swabs were used for saliva collection and the saliva analyses were conducted using a two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures with SAS version 8. As for the results, the average salivary cortisol concentration of all horses before HRLP significantly increased compared to the baseline (p<0.001) while it decreased after the HRLP. The results of the salivary cortisol concentration of the riders were similar to the horses' results. However, there was no difference during the HRLP between Class 1 and Class 2 in the horse or rider groups. The results suggest that the HRLP did not influence the stress level of the horses or riders. Thus, this study provides the necessary information and guidelines for future studies on stress in horses during riding and gives insight into better horse welfare and management options. PMID:27004819

  3. Influence of material removal programming on ion beam figuring of high-precision optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wenlin; Dai, Yifan; Xie, Xuhui

    2014-09-01

    Ion beam figuring (IBF) provides a nanometer/subnanometer precision fabrication technology for optical components, where the surface materials on highlands are gradually removed by the physical sputtering effect. In this deterministic method, the figuring process is usually divided into several iterations and the sum of the removed material in each iteration is expected to approach the ideally removed material as nearly as possible. However, we find that the material removal programming in each iteration would influence the surface error convergence of the figuring process. The influence of material removal programming on the surface error evolution is investigated through the comparative study of the contour removal method (CRM) and the geometric proportion removal method (PRM). The research results indicate that the PRM can maintenance the smoothness of the surface topography during the whole figuring process, which would benefit the stable operation of the machine tool and avoid the production of mid-to-high spatial frequency surface errors. Additionally, the CRM only has the corrective effect on the area above the contour line in each iteration, which would result in the nonuniform convergence of the surface errors in various areas. All these advantages distinguish PRM as an appropriate material removal method for ultraprecision optical surfaces.

  4. Stakeholder Effect: A Qualitative Study of the Influence of Farm Leaders' Ideas on a Sustainable Agriculture Education Program for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grudens-Schuck, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    In a Canadian adult education program on sustainable agriculture, stakeholder participation in planning reconfigured power relationships. Farmers successfully influenced program design, even when their assumptions differed from educators. The project showed the importance of social and political dimensions of learning and of educators' recognition…

  5. The Influence of Rare Book and Manuscript Repositories on Graduate Research in the Humanities: The Graduate Research Fellowship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the influence of the rare book and manuscript repository on graduate student researchers in the humanities, through an examination of the graduate research fellowship program. Based on a comparison of residential research fellowship programs at twenty-three rare book and manuscript repositories, this article argues that…

  6. RESIN, a FORTRAN IV program for determining the area of influence of samples or drill holes in resource target search

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV program that calculates the area of influence of drill holes or samples with respect to the size and shape of elliptical or circular resource targets is presented. Program options include determination of the degree to which areas within a region have been explored and estimation of probabilities that points are centers of undiscovered deposits. Errors of recognition can be utilized in the program input. ?? 1976.

  7. The Influence of Sleep Disordered Breathing on Weight Loss in a National Weight Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Janney, Carol A.; Kilbourne, Amy M.; Germain, Anne; Lai, Zongshan; Hoerster, Katherine D.; Goodrich, David E.; Klingaman, Elizabeth A.; Verchinina, Lilia; Richardson, Caroline R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: To investigate the influence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) on weight loss in overweight/obese veterans enrolled in MOVE!, a nationally implemented behavioral weight management program delivered by the National Veterans Health Administration health system. Methods: This observational study evaluated weight loss by SDB status in overweight/obese veterans enrolled in MOVE! from May 2008–February 2012 who had at least two MOVE! visits, baseline weight, and at least one follow-up weight (n = 84,770). SDB was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Primary outcome was weight change (lb) from MOVE! enrollment to 6- and 12-mo assessments. Weight change over time was modeled with repeated-measures analyses. Results: SDB was diagnosed in one-third of the cohort (n = 28,269). At baseline, veterans with SDB weighed 29 [48] lb more than those without SDB (P < 0.001). On average, veterans attended eight MOVE! visits. Weight loss patterns over time were statistically different between veterans with and without SDB (P < 0.001); veterans with SDB lost less weight (−2.5 [0.1] lb) compared to those without SDB (−3.3 [0.1] lb; P = 0.001) at 6 months. At 12 mo, veterans with SDB continued to lose weight whereas veterans without SDB started to re-gain weight. Conclusions: Veterans with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) had significantly less weight loss over time than veterans without SDB. SDB should be considered in the development and implementation of weight loss programs due to its high prevalence and negative effect on health. Citation: Janney CA, Kilbourne AM, Germain A, Lai Z, Hoerster KD, Goodrich DE, Klingaman EA, Verchinina L, Richardson CR. The influence of sleep disordered breathing on weight loss in a national weight management program. SLEEP 2016;39(1):59–65. PMID:26350475

  8. Prostaglandins A1 and E1 influence gene expression in an established insect cell line (BCIRL-HzAM1)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In work to determine the biochemical mechanisms of prostaglandin (PG) action in insect cells, we posed the hypothesis that prostaglandins (PGs) influence gene expression. In separate experiments, we exposed the BCIRL-HzAM1 cell line (derived from pupal ovarian tissue of the cotton bollworm, Helicov...

  9. Maternal pre-gravid body mass index and adiposity influence umbilical cord gene expression at term in AGA infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While maternal obesity is associated with unfavorable maternal and fetal outcomes, the influence of maternal obesity on fetal gene expression is less clear. Umbilical cords (UC) from 12 lean (pre-gravid BMI < 25) and 10 overweight/obese (OB, pre-gravid BMI =25) women without gestational diabetes wer...

  10. Major histocompatibility complex and host background genes in chickens influence resistance to high pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chicken’s major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype has a profound influence on the resistance or susceptibility to certain pathogens such as B21 MHC haplotype confers resistance to Marek’s disease (MD). However, non-MHC genes are also important in disease resistance. For example, both li...

  11. The Aeromonas caviae AHA0618 gene modulates cell length and influences swimming and swarming motility

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, Rebecca C; Parker, Jennifer L; Kumbhar, Ramhari; Mesnage, Stephane; Shaw, Jonathan G; Stafford, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas caviae is motile via a polar flagellum in liquid culture, with a lateral flagella system used for swarming on solid surfaces. The polar flagellum also has a role in cellular adherence and biofilm formation. The two subunits of the polar flagellum, FlaA and FlaB, are posttranslationally modified by O-linked glycosylation with pseudaminic acid on 6–8 serine and threonine residues within the central region of these proteins. This modification is essential for the formation of the flagellum. Aeromonas caviae possesses the simplest set of genes required for bacterial glycosylation currently known, with the putative glycosyltransferase, Maf1, being described recently. Here, we investigated the role of the AHA0618 gene, which shares homology (37% at the amino acid level) with the central region of a putative deglycosylation enzyme (HP0518) from the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori, which also glycosylates its flagellin and is proposed to be part of a flagellin deglycosylation pathway. Phenotypic analysis of an AHA0618 A. caviae mutant revealed increased swimming and swarming motility compared to the wild-type strain but without any detectable effects on the glycosylation status of the polar flagellins when analyzed by western blot analysis or mass spectroscopy. Bioinformatic analysis of the protein AHA0618, demonstrated homology to a family of l,d-transpeptidases involved in cell wall biology and peptidoglycan cross-linking (YkuD-like). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy analysis of the wild-type and AHA0618-mutant A. caviae strains revealed the mutant to be subtly but significantly shorter than wild-type cells; a phenomenon that could be recovered when either AHA0618 or H. pylori HP0518 were introduced. We can therefore conclude that AHA0618 does not affect A. caviae behavior by altering polar flagellin glycosylation levels but is likely to have a role in peptidoglycan processing at the bacterial cell wall, consequently altering

  12. Influence of earthworm activity on gene transfer from Pseudomonas fluorescens to indigenous soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Daane, L L; Molina, J A; Berry, E C; Sadowsky, M J

    1996-02-01

    We have developed a model system to assess the influence of earthworm activity on the transfer of plasmid pJP4 from an inoculated donor bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens C5t (pJP4), to indigenous soil microorganisms. Three different earthworm species (Lumbricus terrestris, Lumbricus rubellus, and Aporrectodea trapezoides), each with unique burrowing, casting, and feeding behaviors, were evaluated. Soil columns were inoculated on the surface with 10(8) cells per g of soil of the donor bacterium, and after a 2-week incubation period, donor, transconjugant, and total bacteria were enumerated at 5-cm-depth intervals. Transconjugants were confirmed by use of colony hybridization with a mer gene probe. In situ gene transfer of plasmid pJP4 from P. fluorescens C5t to indigenous soil bacteria was detected in all inoculated microcosms. In the absence of earthworms, the depth of recovery was limited to the top 5 cm of the column, with approximately 10(3) transconjugants per g of soil. However, the total number of transconjugants recovered from soil was significantly greater in microcosms containing either L. rubellus or A. trapezoides, with levels reaching about 10(5) CFU/g of soil. In addition, earthworms distributed donor and transconjugant bacteria throughout the microcosm columns, with the depth of recovery dependent on the burrowing behavior of each earthworm species. Donor and transconjugant bacteria were also recovered from earthworm casts and inside developing cocoons. Transconjugant bacteria from the indigenous soil microflora were classified as belonging to Acidovorax spp., Acinetobacter spp., Agrobacterium spp., Pasteurella spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Xanthomonas spp. PMID:8593052

  13. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Valero, Marjorie; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A) of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1%) were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9%) were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30) and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21) and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29). However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03) and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05) than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts.

  14. Dietary intake alters gene expression in colon tissue: possible underlying mechanism for the influence of diet on disease

    PubMed Central

    Pellatt, Andrew J.; Mullany, Lila E.; Wolff, Roger K.; Pellatt, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the association between diet and disease is well documented, the biologic mechanisms involved have not been entirely elucidated. In this study, we evaluate how dietary intake influences gene expression to better understand the underlying mechanisms through which diet operates. Methods We used data from 144 individuals who had comprehensive dietary intake and gene expression data from RNAseq using normal colonic mucosa. Using the DESeq2 statistical package, we identified genes that showed statistically significant differences in expression between individuals in high-intake and low-intake categories for several dietary variables of interest adjusting for age and sex. We examined total calories, total fats, vegetable protein, animal protein, carbohydrates, trans-fatty acids, mutagen index, red meat, processed meat, whole grains, vegetables, fruits, fiber, folate, dairy products, calcium, and prudent and western dietary patterns. Results Using a false discovery rate of less than 0.1, meat-related foods were statistically associated with 68 dysregulated genes, calcium with three dysregulated genes, folate with four dysregulated genes, and nonmeat-related foods with 65 dysregulated genes. With a more stringent false discovery rate of less than 0.05, there were nine meat-related dysregulated genes and 23 nonmeat-related genes. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified three major networks among genes identified as dysregulated with respect to meat-related dietary variables and three networks among genes identified as dysregulated with respect to nonmeat-related variables. The top networks (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis network score >30) associated with meat-related genes were (i) cancer, organismal injury, and abnormalities, tumor morphology, and (ii) cellular function and maintenance, cellular movement, cell death, and survival. Among genes related to nonmeat consumption variables, the top networks were (i) hematological system development and function

  15. The influences and factors of an undergraduate research program in preparing women for science careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ashley Mcdowell

    Progress has been made in diminishing barriers experienced by women in science in recent years, however obstacles still remain. One of the key elements of the Texas Tech University Howard Hughes Medical Institute (TTU/HHMI) Undergraduate Biological Sciences Education Program is to "support activities that broaden access to science for women." In light of the barriers women in science face, this dissertation examined how the experiences of females in the TTU/HHMI fellows program prepared them for a career in science. This study employed mixed methods, utilizing both a questionnaire involving all past female fellows, and in-depth interviews with seven fellows who chose a career as a professional scientist. According to the quantitative data, research experience, the relationship with mentors, and opportunities to present at state or national meetings were program factors that fellows identified as contributing to their career success. The TTU/HHMI program experiences positively influenced the fellows' level of interest in science, confidence in science, and motivation to pursue a science-related career. Encouragement from the mentor and increased confidence regarding the ability to be successful in science were significant predictors of career advantages. Motivation to pursue a science-related career was the most significant predictor of the fellows' preparation to overcome barriers. Qualitatively, six themes were identified for coding, which included (1) research experience, (2) the mentor, (3) support and interactions, (4) self-confidence, (5) career decisions, and (6) time demands related to a science career. The themes identified were important factors in preparing these past female fellows for a career in science by initiating a change in their attitudes, knowledge, and skills. With over 90% of past fellows currently pursuing a science career, the program, through research experience and encouraging mentors, made a large impact on the career paths of fellows

  16. System-Level Influences on the Sustainability of a Cognitive Therapy Program in a Community Behavioral Health Network

    PubMed Central

    Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Matza, Alexis; Gamarra, Jennifer; Toder, Katherine; Xhezo, Regina; Evans, Arthur C.; Hurford, Matthew; Beck, Aaron T.; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Creed, Torrey

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine influences on the sustainability of a program to implement an evidence-based psychotherapy in a mental health system. Methods Interviews with program administrators, training consultants, agency administrators, and supervisors (N=24), along with summaries of program evaluation data and program documentation, were analyzed with a directed content-analytic approach. Results Findings suggested a number of interconnected and interacting influences on sustainability, including alignment with emerging sociopolitical influences and system and organizational priorities; program-level adaptation and evolution; intervention flexibility; strong communication, collaboration, planning, and support; and perceived benefit. These individual factors appeared to mutually influence one another and contribute to the degree of program sustainability achieved at the system level. Although most influences were positive, financial planning and support emerged as potentially both facilitator and barrier, and evaluation of benefits at the patient level remained a challenge. Conclusions Several factors appeared to contribute to the sustainability of a psychosocial intervention in a large urban mental health system and warrant further investigation. Understanding interconnections between multiple individual facilitators and barriers appears critical to advancing understanding of sustainability in dynamic systems and adds to emerging recommendations for other implementation efforts. In particular, implications of the findings include the importance of implementation strategies, such as long-term planning, coalition building, clarifying roles and expectations, planned adaptation, evaluation, diversification of financing strategies, and incentivizing implementation. PMID:25828878

  17. HIV-1 gp140 epitope recognition is influenced by immunoglobulin DH gene segment sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuge; Kapoor, Pratibha; Parks, Robert; Silva-Sanchez, Aaron; Alam, S Munir; Verkoczy, Laurent; Liao, Hua-Xin; Zhuang, Yingxin; Burrows, Peter; Levinson, Michael; Elgavish, Ada; Cui, Xiangqin; Haynes, Barton F; Schroeder, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Complementarity Determining Region 3 of the immunoglobulin (Ig) H chain (CDR-H3) lies at the center of the antigen-binding site where it often plays a decisive role in antigen recognition and binding. Amino acids encoded by the diversity (DH) gene segment are the main component of CDR-H3. Each DH has the potential to rearrange into one of six DH reading frames (RFs), each of which exhibits a characteristic amino acid hydrophobicity signature that has been conserved among jawed vertebrates by natural selection. A preference for use of RF1 promotes the incorporation of tyrosine into CDR-H3 while suppressing the inclusion of hydrophobic or charged amino acids. To test the hypothesis that these evolutionary constraints on DH sequence influence epitope recognition, we used mice with a single DH that has been altered to preferentially use RF2 or inverted RF1. B cells in these mice produce a CDR-H3 repertoire that is enriched for valine or arginine in place of tyrosine. We serially immunized this panel of mice with gp140 from HIV-1 JR-FL isolate and then used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or peptide microarray to assess antibody binding to key or overlapping HIV-1 envelope epitopes. By ELISA, serum reactivity to key epitopes varied by DH sequence. By microarray, sera with Ig CDR-H3s enriched for arginine bound to linear peptides with a greater range of hydrophobicity but had a lower intensity of binding than sera containing Ig CDR-H3s enriched for tyrosine or valine. We conclude that patterns of epitope recognition and binding can be heavily influenced by DH germ line sequence. This may help explain why antibodies in HIV-infected patients must undergo extensive somatic mutation in order to bind to specific viral epitopes and achieve neutralization. PMID:26687685

  18. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more regions of active chromatin: Connection to a stochastic paradigm for sequential gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marlene; Mauro, James A; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis- and proliferation-effector genes are substantially regulated by the same transactivators, with E2F-1 and Oct-1 being notable examples. The larger proliferation-effector genes have more binding sites for the transactivators that regulate both sets of genes, and proliferation-effector genes have more regions of active chromatin, i.e, DNase I hypersensitive and histone 3, lysine-4 trimethylation sites. Thus, the size differences between the 2 classes of genes suggest a transcriptional regulation paradigm whereby the accumulation of transcription factors that regulate both sets of genes, merely as an aspect of stochastic behavior, accumulate first on the larger proliferation-effector gene "traps," and then accumulate on the apoptosis effector genes, thereby effecting sequential activation of the 2 different gene sets. As IRF-1 and p53 levels increase, tumor suppressor proteins are first activated, followed by the activation of apoptosis-effector genes, for example during S-phase pausing for DNA repair. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more IRF-1 and p53 binding sites, thereby likewise suggesting a paradigm for transcription sequencing based on stochastic interactions of transcription factors with different gene classes. In this report, using the ENCODE database, we determined that tumor suppressor genes have a greater number of open chromatin regions and histone 3 lysine-4 trimethylation sites, consistent with the idea that a larger gene size can facilitate earlier transcriptional activation via the inclusion of more transactivator binding sites.

  19. Transcriptome-Wide Mapping of Pea Seed Ageing Reveals a Pivotal Role for Genes Related to Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Colville, Louise; Lorenzo, Oscar; Graeber, Kai; Küster, Helge; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard; Kranner, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of seed ageing, which leads to viability loss during storage, is vital for ex situ plant conservation and agriculture alike. Yet the potential for regulation at the transcriptional level has not been fully investigated. Here, we studied the relationship between seed viability, gene expression and glutathione redox status during artificial ageing of pea (Pisum sativum) seeds. Transcriptome-wide analysis using microarrays was complemented with qRT-PCR analysis of selected genes and a multilevel analysis of the antioxidant glutathione. Partial degradation of DNA and RNA occurred from the onset of artificial ageing at 60% RH and 50°C, and transcriptome profiling showed that the expression of genes associated with programmed cell death, oxidative stress and protein ubiquitination were altered prior to any sign of viability loss. After 25 days of ageing viability started to decline in conjunction with progressively oxidising cellular conditions, as indicated by a shift of the glutathione redox state towards more positive values (>−190 mV). The unravelling of the molecular basis of seed ageing revealed that transcriptome reprogramming is a key component of the ageing process, which influences the progression of programmed cell death and decline in antioxidant capacity that ultimately lead to seed viability loss. PMID:24205239

  20. Influence of gene interaction on complex trait variation with multilocus models.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Tanila, Asko; Hill, William G

    2014-09-01

    Although research effort is being expended into determining the importance of epistasis and epistatic variance for complex traits, there is considerable controversy about their importance. Here we undertake an analysis for quantitative traits utilizing a range of multilocus quantitative genetic models and gene frequency distributions, focusing on the potential magnitude of the epistatic variance. All the epistatic terms involving a particular locus appear in its average effect, with the number of two-locus interaction terms increasing in proportion to the square of the number of loci and that of third order as the cube and so on. Hence multilocus epistasis makes substantial contributions to the additive variance and does not, per se, lead to large increases in the nonadditive part of the genotypic variance. Even though this proportion can be high where epistasis is antagonistic to direct effects, it reduces with multiple loci. As the magnitude of the epistatic variance depends critically on the heterozygosity, for models where frequencies are widely dispersed, such as for selectively neutral mutations, contributions of epistatic variance are always small. Epistasis may be important in understanding the genetic architecture, for example, of function or human disease, but that does not imply that loci exhibiting it will contribute much genetic variance. Overall we conclude that theoretical predictions and experimental observations of low amounts of epistatic variance in outbred populations are concordant. It is not a likely source of missing heritability, for example, or major influence on predictions of rates of evolution.

  1. A test of the influence of continental axes of orientation on patterns of human gene flow.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sohini; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2011-12-01

    The geographic distribution of genetic variation reflects trends in past population migrations and can be used to make inferences about these migrations. It has been proposed that the east-west orientation of the Eurasian landmass facilitated the rapid spread of ancient technological innovations across Eurasia, while the north-south orientation of the Americas led to a slower diffusion of technology there. If the diffusion of technology was accompanied by gene flow, then this hypothesis predicts that genetic differentiation in the Americas along lines of longitude will be greater than that in Eurasia along lines of latitude. We use 678 microsatellite loci from 68 indigenous populations in Eurasia and the Americas to investigate the spatial axes that underlie population-genetic variation. We find that genetic differentiation increases more rapidly along lines of longitude in the Americas than along lines of latitude in Eurasia. Distance along lines of latitude explains a sizeable portion of genetic distance in Eurasia, whereas distance along lines of longitude does not explain a large proportion of Eurasian genetic variation. Genetic differentiation in the Americas occurs along both latitudinal and longitudinal axes and has a greater magnitude than corresponding differentiation in Eurasia, even when adjusting for the lower level of genetic variation in the American populations. These results support the view that continental orientation has influenced migration patterns and has played an important role in determining both the structure of human genetic variation and the distribution and spread of cultural traits.

  2. Influence of Intron II microsatellite polymorphism in human toll-like receptor 2 gene in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, Naveen Chandra; Neela, Venkata Sanjeev Kumar; Devalraju, Kamakshi Prudhula; Jain, Suman; SivaSai, Krovvidi S R; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Jonnalagada, Subbanna; Anandaraj, M P J S

    2013-08-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by the obligate intracellular organism Mycobacterium leprae. TLR2 plays a key role when activated by M. leprae lipoproteins initiating protective responses which induce bacterial killing and therefore control of disease spread. Microsatellite polymorphisms in intron2 of TLR2 gene have been reported to be associated with development of clinical features of several infectious diseases. The study aims to evaluate the influence of GT microsatellite on the expression of TLR2 which could make humans prone to M. leprae infections. A total of 279 individuals were enrolled in the study, 88 were leprosy patients, 95 were house hold contacts (HHC) and 96 were healthy controls (HC). Genotyping was done using PCR-Sequencing method. TLR2 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. IL-10 and IFN-γ levels were measured using ELISA in MLSA stimulated cell culture supernatants. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-Square (χ(2)) test and t-tests. Allele/genotype of TLR2 microsatellite which includes longer GT repeats was associated with low TLR2 mRNA expression and high IL-10 production while that including shorter GT repeats was associated with high TLR2 mRNA expression and low IL-10 production. High IL10 producing allele of TLR2 microsatellite might predispose house hold contacts to leprosy. PMID:23619473

  3. Variation at Genes Influencing Facial Morphology Are Not Associated with Developmental Imprecision in Human Faces

    PubMed Central

    Windhager, Sonja; Schaschl, Helmut; Schaefer, Katrin; Mitteroecker, Philipp; Huber, Susanne; Wallner, Bernard; Fieder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Facial asymmetries are commonly used as a proxy for human developmental imprecision resulting from inbreeding, and thus reduced genetic heterozygosity. Several environmental factors influence human facial asymmetry (e.g., health care, parasites), but the generalizability of findings on genetic stressors has been limited in humans by sample characteristics (island populations, endogamy) and indirect genetic assessment (inference from pedigrees). In a sample of 3215 adult humans from the Rotterdam Study, we therefore studied the relationship of facial asymmetry, estimated from nine mid-facial landmarks, with genetic variation at 102 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci recently associated with facial shape variation. We further tested whether the degree of individual heterozygosity is negatively correlated with facial asymmetry. An ANOVA tree regression did not identify any SNP relating to either fluctuating asymmetry or total asymmetry. In a general linear model, only age and sex—but neither heterozygosity nor any SNP previously reported to covary with facial shape—was significantly related to total or fluctuating asymmetry of the midface. Our study does not corroborate the common assumption in evolutionary and behavioral biology that morphological asymmetries reflect heterozygosity. Our results, however, may be affected by a relatively small degree of inbreeding, a relatively stable environment, and an advanced age in the Rotterdam sample. Further large-scale genetic studies, including gene expression studies, are necessary to validate the genetic and developmental origin of morphological asymmetries. PMID:24914781

  4. Modelling formulations using gene expression programming--a comparative analysis with artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Colbourn, E A; Roskilly, S J; Rowe, R C; York, P

    2011-10-01

    This study has investigated the utility and potential advantages of gene expression programming (GEP)--a new development in evolutionary computing for modelling data and automatically generating equations that describe the cause-and-effect relationships in a system--to four types of pharmaceutical formulation and compared the models with those generated by neural networks, a technique now widely used in the formulation development. Both methods were capable of discovering subtle and non-linear relationships within the data, with no requirement from the user to specify the functional forms that should be used. Although the neural networks rapidly developed models with higher values for the ANOVA R(2) these were black box and provided little insight into the key relationships. However, GEP, although significantly slower at developing models, generated relatively simple equations describing the relationships that could be interpreted directly. The results indicate that GEP can be considered an effective and efficient modelling technique for formulation data.

  5. Use of Gene Expression Programming in regionalization of flow duration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, Muhammad Z.; Shamseldin, Asaad Y.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a recently introduced artificial intelligence technique known as Gene Expression Programming (GEP) has been employed to perform symbolic regression for developing a parametric scheme of flow duration curve (FDC) regionalization, to relate selected FDC characteristics to catchment characteristics. Stream flow records of selected catchments located in the Auckland Region of New Zealand were used. FDCs of the selected catchments were normalised by dividing the ordinates by their median value. Input for the symbolic regression analysis using GEP was (a) selected characteristics of normalised FDCs; and (b) 26 catchment characteristics related to climate, morphology, soil properties and land cover properties obtained using the observed data and GIS analysis. Our study showed that application of this artificial intelligence technique expedites the selection of a set of the most relevant independent variables out of a large set, because these are automatically selected through the GEP process. Values of the FDC characteristics obtained from the developed relationships have high correlations with the observed values.

  6. Pharmacodynamic genes do not influence risk of neutropenia in cancer patients treated with moderately high-dose irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Janelle M; Rosner, Gary L; Ratain, Mark J; McLeod, Howard L; Innocenti, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Aims A recent study found that variation in camptothecin pharmacodynamic genes (TOP1, PARP1, TDP1 and XRCC1) correlated with efficacy and risk of neutropenia in irinotecan-treated cancer patients (median dose: 180 mg/m2), which suggests that these genes might predict outcomes to irinotecan-based therapies. The present study was conducted to evaluate previous gene associations using an independent sample of patients receiving irinotecan. Materials & methods DNA was isolated from 85 advanced cancer patients treated with 300 or 350 mg/m2 irinotecan and genotyped for haplotype-tag polymorphisms across TOP1, PARP1, TDP1 and XRCC1. Associations between genotypes and haplotypes and log(absolute neutrophil count nadirs) were assessed by linear regression. Results No associations were observed. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the genes we tested do not influence toxicity of irinotecan when adminstered at 300-350 mg/m2. PMID:19604089

  7. Consequences of Early Life Programing by Genetic and Environmental Influences: A Synthesis Regarding Pubertal Timing.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christian L; DiVall, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Sexual maturation is closely tied to growth and body weight gain, suggesting that regulative metabolic pathways are shared between somatic and pubertal development. The pre- and postnatal environment affects both growth and pubertal development, indicating that common pathways are affected by the environment. Intrauterine and early infantile developmental phases are characterized by high plasticity and thereby susceptibility to factors that affect metabolic function as well as related reproductive function throughout life. In children born small for gestational age, poor nutritional conditions during gestation can modify metabolic systems to adapt to expectations of chronic undernutrition. These children are potentially poorly equipped to cope with energy-dense diets and are possibly programmed to store as much energy as possible, causing rapid weight gain with the risk for adult disease and premature onset of puberty. Environmental factors can cause modifications to the genome, so-called epigenetic changes, to affect gene expression and subsequently modify phenotypic expression of genomic information. Epigenetic modifications, which occur in children born small for gestational age, are thought to underlie part of the metabolic programming that subsequently effects both somatic and pubertal development. PMID:26680576

  8. Unique gene program of rat small resistance mesenteric arteries as revealed by deep RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Reho, John J; Shetty, Amol; Dippold, Rachael P; Mahurkar, Anup; Fisher, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Deep sequencing of RNA samples from rat small mesenteric arteries (MA) and aorta (AO) identified common and unique features of their gene programs. ∼5% of mRNAs were quantitatively differentially expressed in MA versus AO. Unique transcriptional control in MA smooth muscle is suggested by the selective or enriched expression of transcription factors Nkx2-3, HAND2, and Tcf21 (Capsulin). Enrichment in AO of PPAR transcription factors and their target genes of mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, and oxidative phosphorylation is consistent with slow (oxidative) tonic smooth muscle. In contrast MA was enriched in contractile and calcium channel mRNAs suggestive of components of fast (glycolytic) phasic smooth muscle. Myosin phosphatase regulatory subunit paralogs Mypt1 and p85 were expressed at similar levels, while smooth muscle MLCK was the only such kinase expressed, suggesting functional redundancy of the former but not the latter in accordance with mouse knockout studies. With regard to vaso-regulatory signals, purinergic receptors P2rx1 and P2rx5 were reciprocally expressed in MA versus AO, while the olfactory receptor Olr59 was enriched in MA. Alox15, which generates the EDHF HPETE, was enriched in MA while eNOS was equally expressed, consistent with the greater role of EDHF in the smaller arteries. mRNAs that were not expressed at a level consistent with impugned function include skeletal myogenic factors, IKK2, nonmuscle myosin, and Gnb3. This screening analysis of gene expression in the small mesenteric resistance arteries suggests testable hypotheses regarding unique aspects of small artery function in the regional control of blood flow. PMID:26156969

  9. Contamination with bacterial zoonotic pathogen genes in U.S. streams influenced by varying types of animal agriculture.

    PubMed

    Haack, Sheridan K; Duris, Joseph W; Kolpin, Dana W; Focazio, Michael J; Meyer, Michael T; Johnson, Heather E; Oster, Ryan J; Foreman, William T

    2016-09-01

    Animal waste, stream water, and streambed sediment from 19 small (<32km(2)) watersheds in 12U.S. states having either no major animal agriculture (control, n=4), or predominantly beef (n=4), dairy (n=3), swine (n=5), or poultry (n=3) were tested for: 1) cholesterol, coprostanol, estrone, and fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations, and 2) shiga-toxin producing and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and pathogenic and vancomycin-resistant enterococci by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on enrichments, and/or direct quantitative PCR. Pathogen genes were most frequently detected in dairy wastes, followed by beef, swine and poultry wastes in that order; there was only one detection of an animal-source-specific pathogen gene (stx1) in any water or sediment sample in any control watershed. Post-rainfall pathogen gene numbers in stream water were significantly correlated with FIB, cholesterol and coprostanol concentrations, and were most highly correlated in dairy watershed samples collected from 3 different states. Although collected across multiple states and ecoregions, animal-waste gene profiles were distinctive via discriminant analysis. Stream water gene profiles could also be discriminated by the watershed animal type. Although pathogen genes were not abundant in stream water or streambed samples, PCR on enrichments indicated that many genes were from viable organisms, including several (shiga-toxin producing or enterotoxigenic E. coli, Salmonella, vancomycin-resistant enterococci) that could potentially affect either human or animal health. Pathogen gene numbers and types in stream water samples were influenced most by animal type, by local factors such as whether animals had stream access, and by the amount of local rainfall, and not by studied watershed soil or physical characteristics. Our results indicated that stream water in small agricultural U.S. watersheds was susceptible to pathogen gene inputs under typical agricultural

  10. Contamination with bacterial zoonotic pathogen genes in U.S. streams influenced by varying types of animal agriculture.

    PubMed

    Haack, Sheridan K; Duris, Joseph W; Kolpin, Dana W; Focazio, Michael J; Meyer, Michael T; Johnson, Heather E; Oster, Ryan J; Foreman, William T

    2016-09-01

    Animal waste, stream water, and streambed sediment from 19 small (<32km(2)) watersheds in 12U.S. states having either no major animal agriculture (control, n=4), or predominantly beef (n=4), dairy (n=3), swine (n=5), or poultry (n=3) were tested for: 1) cholesterol, coprostanol, estrone, and fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations, and 2) shiga-toxin producing and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and pathogenic and vancomycin-resistant enterococci by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on enrichments, and/or direct quantitative PCR. Pathogen genes were most frequently detected in dairy wastes, followed by beef, swine and poultry wastes in that order; there was only one detection of an animal-source-specific pathogen gene (stx1) in any water or sediment sample in any control watershed. Post-rainfall pathogen gene numbers in stream water were significantly correlated with FIB, cholesterol and coprostanol concentrations, and were most highly correlated in dairy watershed samples collected from 3 different states. Although collected across multiple states and ecoregions, animal-waste gene profiles were distinctive via discriminant analysis. Stream water gene profiles could also be discriminated by the watershed animal type. Although pathogen genes were not abundant in stream water or streambed samples, PCR on enrichments indicated that many genes were from viable organisms, including several (shiga-toxin producing or enterotoxigenic E. coli, Salmonella, vancomycin-resistant enterococci) that could potentially affect either human or animal health. Pathogen gene numbers and types in stream water samples were influenced most by animal type, by local factors such as whether animals had stream access, and by the amount of local rainfall, and not by studied watershed soil or physical characteristics. Our results indicated that stream water in small agricultural U.S. watersheds was susceptible to pathogen gene inputs under typical agricultural

  11. Interaction between two cholesterol metabolism genes influences memory: findings from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Corinne D.; Koscik, Rebecca L.; Jonaitis, Erin M.; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Hermann, Bruce P.; La Rue, Asenath; Sager, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The strongest genetic factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is APOE; nine additional susceptibility genes have recently been identified. The effect of these genes is often assumed to be additive and polygenic scores are formed as a summary measure of risk. However, interactions between these genes are likely to be important. We sought to examine the role of interactions between the nine recently identified AD susceptibility genes and APOE in cognitive function and decline in 1,153 participants from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention, a longitudinal study of middle-aged adults enriched for a parental history of AD. Participants underwent extensive cognitive testing at baseline and up to two additional visits approximately 4 and 6 years later. The influence of the interaction between APOE and each of 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the nine recently identified genes on three cognitive factor scores (Verbal Learning and Memory, Working Memory, and Immediate Memory) was examined using linear mixed models adjusting for age, gender and ancestry. Interactions between the APOE ε4 allele and both of the genotyped ABCA7 SNPs, rs3764650 and rs3752246, were associated with all three cognitive factor scores (P-values ≤0.01). Both of these genes are in the cholesterol metabolism pathway leading to AD. This research supports the importance of considering non-additive effects of AD susceptibility genes. PMID:23669301

  12. The Influence of Major Life Events on Economic Attitudes in a World of Gene-Environment Interplay.

    PubMed

    Hatemi, Peter K

    2013-10-01

    The role of "genes" on political attitudes has gained attention across disciplines. However, person-specific experiences have yet to be incorporated into models that consider genetic influences. Relying on a gene-environment interplay approach, this study explicates how life-events, such as losing one's job or suffering a financial loss, influence economic policy attitudes. The results indicate genetic and environmental variance on support for unions, immigration, capitalism, socialism and property tax is moderated by financial risks. Changes in the magnitude of genetic influences, however, are temporary. After two years, the phenotypic effects of the life events remain on most attitudes, but changes in the sources of individual differences do not. Univariate twin models that estimate the independent contributions of genes and environment on the variation of attitudes appear to provide robust baseline indicators of sources of individual differences. These estimates, however, are not event or day specific. In this way, genetic influences add stability, while environment cues change, and this process is continually updated. PMID:24860199

  13. How contemporary human reproductive behaviors influence the role of fertility-related genes: the example of the p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Corbo, Rosa Maria; Gambina, Giuseppe; Scacchi, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Studies on human fertility genes have identified numerous risk/protective alleles involved in the occurrence of reproductive system diseases causing infertility or subfertility. Investigations we carried out in populations at natural fertility seem to suggest that the clinical relevance that some fertility genes are now acquiring depends on their interaction with contemporary reproductive behaviors (birth control, delayed childbearing, and spacing birth order, among others). In recent years, a new physiological role in human fertility regulation has emerged for the tumor- suppressor p53 gene (P53), and the P53 Arg72Pro polymorphism has been associated with recurrent implantation failure in humans. To lend support to our previous observations, we examined the impact of Arg72Pro polymorphism on fertility in two samples of Italian women not selected for impaired fertility but collected from populations with different (premodern and modern) reproductive behaviors. Among the women at near-natural fertility (n = 98), the P53 genotypes were not associated with different reproductive efficiency, whereas among those with modern reproductive behaviors (n = 68), the P53 genotypes were associated with different mean numbers of children [Pro/Pro = 0.75genes may have become "detrimental" following exposure to modern reproductive patterns and might therefore be associated with reduced reproductive success. Set within an evolutionary framework, this change could lead to the selection of a set of gene variants fitter to current reproductive behaviors as the shift to

  14. The influence of triploidy on gene expression in the silkworm, bombyx mori

    PubMed

    Suzuki; Shimada; Yokoyama; Kobayashi

    1999-06-01

    In Bombyx mori, it is well established that polyploids are easily induced when newly laid eggs are exposed to a variety of conditions, such as high or low temperature, centrifugal force, or chemicals like colchicine. To investigate gene dosage effects by varying the ploidy, the transcription levels of six genes expressed in various tissues were analysed in the diploid and two different genetically produced triploids (PPC and CCP). In the PPC triploid, the transcription level per cell of two genes was directly proportional to the structural gene dosage, whereas two other genes showed the mRNA level expected if compensation occurred. In the CCP triploid, three genes displayed dose-dependent levels of expression, whereas one gene showed the same expression level as the diploid strains. In both triploids, exceptional cases showed a negative correlation of expression with ploidy or a positive correlation greater than expected from the structural gene dosage. Interestingly, the transcription levels of most tested genes were significantly different from the strains which were used as parents of the triploids, and also widely divergent expression patterns were found for some genes in the diploid offspring. In this study, the cause of the unexpected expression patterns observed in the euploid series is discussed in relation to the difference between the two parental strains in expression level of genes and in trans-acting regulatory effects on their target genes. PMID:10383688

  15. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Marjorie; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A) of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1%) were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9%) were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30) and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21) and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29). However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03) and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05) than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts. PMID:27483374

  16. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Valero, Marjorie; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A) of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1%) were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9%) were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30) and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21) and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29). However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03) and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05) than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts. PMID:27483374

  17. Effect of Brahman genetic influence on collagen enzymatic crosslinking gene expression and meat tenderness.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J M; Johnson, D D; Elzo, M A; White, M C; Stelzleni, A M; Johnson, S E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effect of Brahman genetics on collagen enzymatic crosslinking gene expression and meat tenderness. Steers were randomly selected to represent a high percentage Brahman genetics (n = 13), Half-Blood genetics (n = 13), Brangus genetics (n = 13), and a high percentage Angus genetics (n = 13). Muscle samples from the Longissimus lumborum muscle were collected at weaning and harvest and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis was conducted to measure the mRNA expression of lysyl oxidase (LOX), bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1), and cystatin C (CYS). Steaks from subject animals were collected at harvest, aged for 14 d and subjected to collagen analysis, Warner-Bratzler Shear Force (WBS) and trained sensory panel analysis (tenderness, juiciness, and connective tissue). Data indicated that Half-Blood and Brahman steers had greater (P<0.05) WBS values and tended to receive decreased (P < 0.06) panel tenderness scores than Angus and Brangus steers. Panelists tended to detect more connective tissue in Brahman and Half-Blood steaks when compared to Angus and Brangus steaks (P < 0.07). Crosslinking gene expression data revealed that at weaning Half-Blood steers had more (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of CYS and LOX than Angus and Brangus steers. At weaning and harvest, all genetic groups had similar mRNA expression of BMP1 (P > 0.10). At harvest, Brangus and Angus steers had greater LOX mRNA expression than Brahman cattle (P < 0.05). Pearson's correlation coefficients indicated that only weaning CYS mRNA expression was correlated to WBS, panel tenderness and connective tissue scores (P < 0.05). Expression of LOX was only correlated to these measures at harvest, and BMP1 was correlated to these traits at both time periods (P < 0.05). These results indicate that collagen crosslinking enzyme activity, as indicated by mRNA levels, early in an animal's life may account for some of the variation seen in steak tenderness due

  18. Integration of Metabolic Modeling with Gene Co-expression Reveals Transcriptionally Programmed Reactions Explaining Robustness in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Kulshreshtha, Deepika; Mittal, Inna; Mobeen, Ahmed; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Robustness of metabolic networks is accomplished by gene regulation, modularity, re-routing of metabolites and plasticity. Here, we probed robustness against perturbations of biochemical reactions of M. tuberculosis in the form of predicting compensatory trends. In order to investigate the transcriptional programming of genes associated with correlated fluxes, we integrated with gene co-expression network. Knock down of the reactions NADH2r and ATPS responsible for producing the hub metabolites, and Central carbon metabolism had the highest proportion of their associated genes under transcriptional co-expression with genes of their flux correlated reactions. Reciprocal gene expression correlations were observed among compensatory routes, fresh activation of alternative routes and in the multi-copy genes of Cysteine synthase and of Phosphate transporter. Knock down of 46 reactions caused the activation of Isocitrate lyase or Malate synthase or both reactions, which are central to the persistent state of M. tuberculosis. A total of 30 new freshly activated routes including Cytochrome c oxidase, Lactate dehydrogenase, and Glycine cleavage system were predicted, which could be responsible for switching into dormant or persistent state. Thus, our integrated approach of exploring transcriptional programming of flux correlated reactions has the potential to unravel features of system architecture conferring robustness. PMID:27000948

  19. Integration of Metabolic Modeling with Gene Co-expression Reveals Transcriptionally Programmed Reactions Explaining Robustness in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Kulshreshtha, Deepika; Mittal, Inna; Mobeen, Ahmed; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Robustness of metabolic networks is accomplished by gene regulation, modularity, re-routing of metabolites and plasticity. Here, we probed robustness against perturbations of biochemical reactions of M. tuberculosis in the form of predicting compensatory trends. In order to investigate the transcriptional programming of genes associated with correlated fluxes, we integrated with gene co-expression network. Knock down of the reactions NADH2r and ATPS responsible for producing the hub metabolites, and Central carbon metabolism had the highest proportion of their associated genes under transcriptional co-expression with genes of their flux correlated reactions. Reciprocal gene expression correlations were observed among compensatory routes, fresh activation of alternative routes and in the multi-copy genes of Cysteine synthase and of Phosphate transporter. Knock down of 46 reactions caused the activation of Isocitrate lyase or Malate synthase or both reactions, which are central to the persistent state of M. tuberculosis. A total of 30 new freshly activated routes including Cytochrome c oxidase, Lactate dehydrogenase, and Glycine cleavage system were predicted, which could be responsible for switching into dormant or persistent state. Thus, our integrated approach of exploring transcriptional programming of flux correlated reactions has the potential to unravel features of system architecture conferring robustness. PMID:27000948

  20. The Earth Education Program Sunship™ Earth: A Mixed Methods Study of the Long-Term Influence on Environmental Attitudes and Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bires, Nancy K.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a limited number of studies on the short-term influence of environmental and earth education programs, however, not much information is available about the long-term influence of these programs on participants' environmental attitudes and actions. This mixed methods study explores the long-term influence of the earth education…

  1. Genetic variation in dopamine-related gene expression influences motor skill learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Qian, Y; Chen, M; Forssberg, H; Diaz Heijtz, R

    2013-08-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders with a strong genetic basis, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders and developmental coordination disorder, involve deficits in fine motor skills. This phenotype may depend on heritable variation in components of the dopamine (DA) system, which is known to play a critical role in motor skill learning. In this study, we took advantage of two inbred strains of mice (BALB/c and C57BL/6) that differ markedly in the number of midbrain DA neurons in order to investigate the influence of such naturally occurring genetic variation on the acquisition and performance of fine motor skills. Gene expression analysis of midbrain, frontal cortex and striatum showed significant differences in the expression of presynaptic and postsynaptic dopaminergic (DAergic) markers (e.g. tyrosine hydroxylase, DA transporter, DA D4 receptor, DA D5 receptor and DARPP-32) between these two strains. BALB/c mice had lower learning rate and performance scores in a complex skilled reaching task when compared with C57BL/6 mice. A negative correlation was found between the motor learning rate and level of DARPP-32 mRNA expression in the frontal cortex contralateral to the trained forelimb. The rate of motor learning was also negatively correlated with the levels of DARPP-32 and DA D1 receptor mRNAs in the striatum. Our results suggest that genetically driven variation in frontostriatal DAergic neurotransmission is a major contributor to individual differences in motor skill learning. Moreover, these findings implicate the D1R/cAMP/DARPP-32 signaling pathway in those neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with fine motor skill deficits.

  2. Analysis of the influence of PTPN22 gene polymorphisms in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Gallo, LM; Gourh, P; Broen, J; Simeon, C; Fonollosa, V; Ortego-Centeno, N; Agarwal, S; Vonk, MC; Coenen, M; Riemekasten, G; Hunzelmann, N; Hesselstrand, R; Tan, FK; Reveille, JD; Assassi, S; García-Hernandez, FJ; Carreira, P; Camps, MT; Fernandez-Nebro, A; de la Peña, P Garcia; Nearney, T; Hilda, D; González-Gay, MA; Airo, P; Beretta, L; Scorza, R; Herrick, A; Worthington, J; Pros, A; Gómez-Gracia, I; Trapiella, L; Espinosa, G; Castellvi, I; Witte, T; de Keyser, F; Vanthuyne, M; Mayes, MD; Radstake, TRDJ; Arnett, FC; Martin, J; Rueda, B

    2011-01-01

    Objective Two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the PTPN22 gene (rs24746601 and rs33996649) have been associated with autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the R263Q SNP for the first time and to re-evaluate the role of the R620W SNP in the genetic predisposition to systemic sclerosis (SSc) susceptibility and clinical phenotypes. Methods 3422 SSc patients (2020 with limited cutaneous SSc and 1208 with diffuse cutaneous SSc) and 3638 healthy controls of Caucasian ancestry from an initial case--control set of Spain and seven additional independent replication cohorts were included in our study. Both rs33996649 and rs2476601 PTPN22 polymorphisms were genotyped by TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. A meta-analysis was performed to test the overall effect of these PTPN22 polymorphisms in SSc. Results The meta-analysis revealed evidence of association of the rs2476601 T allele with SSc susceptibility (pFDRcorrected=0.03 pooled, OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.28). In addition, the rs2476601 T allele was significantly associated with anticentromere-positive status (pFDRcorrected=0.02 pooled, OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.42). Although the rs33996649 A allele was significantly associated with SSc in the Spanish population (pFDRcorrected=0.04, OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.92), this association was not confirmed in the meta-analysis (p=0.36 pooled, OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.1). Conclusion The study suggests that the PTPN22 R620W polymorphism influences SSc genetic susceptibility but the novel R263Q genetic variant does not. These data strengthen evidence that the R620W mutation is a common risk factor in autoimmune diseases. PMID:21131644

  3. Transcriptional Regulation of the Human P450 Oxidoreductase Gene: Hormonal Regulation and Influence of Promoter Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Meng Kian; Huang, Ningwu; Damm, Izabella

    2011-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the flavoprotein that acts as the obligatory electron donor to all microsomal P450 enzymes, including those involved in hepatic drug metabolism as well as three steroidogenic P450 enzymes. The untranslated first exon of human POR was located recently, permitting analysis of human POR transcription. Expression of deletional mutants containing up to 3193 bp of the human POR promoter in human adrenal NCI-H295A and liver Hep-G2 cells located the proximal promoter at −325/−1 bp from the untranslated exon. Common human POR polymorphisms at −208 and −173 had little influence on transcription, but the polymorphism at −152 reduced transcription significantly in both cell lines. EMSA and supershift assays identified binding of Smad3/Smad4 between −249 and −261 and binding of thyroid hormone receptor-β (TRβ) at −240/−245. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Smad3, Smad4, TRα, TRβ, and estrogen receptor-α were bound between −374 and −149. Cotransfection of vectors for these transcription factors and POR promoter-reporter constructs into both cell types followed by hormonal treatment showed that T3 exerts major tropic effects via TRβ, with TRα, estrogen receptor-α, Smad3, and Smad4 exerting lesser, modulatory effects. T3 also increased POR mRNA in both cell lines. Thyroid hormone also is essential for rat liver POR expression but acts via different transcription factor complexes. These are the first data on human POR gene transcription, establishing roles for TRβ and Smad3/4 in its expression and indicating that the common polymorphism at −152 may play a role in genetic variation in steroid biosynthesis and drug metabolism. PMID:21393444

  4. Factors Influencing the Improved Academic Success in Literacy at the Knowledge Is Power Program School in the Delta Region According to Administrator, Teacher, and Student Perceptions: Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kimberly Jonetta

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors that have influenced the literacy success of the Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) students in the low-income, poverty stricken Delta Region of a mid-south state. The study examined the progress made since the implementation of the KIPP Program and the influence the program has made upon student…

  5. Factors Influencing the Improved Academic Success in Literacy at the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) Schools in the Delta Region According to Adult Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kimberly J.; Holt, Carleton R.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored factors that have influenced literacy success of Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) students in the low-income, poverty stricken Delta Region of Arkansas. The study examined progress made since implementation of the KIPP Program and the influence the program had made upon student achievement in literacy at the…

  6. The influence of gene flow and drift on genetic and phenotypic divergence in two species of Zosterops in Vanuatu

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, Sonya M.; Phillimore, Albert B.

    2010-01-01

    Colonization of an archipelago sets the stage for adaptive radiation. However, some archipelagos are home to spectacular radiations, while others have much lower levels of diversification. The amount of gene flow among allopatric populations is one factor proposed to contribute to this variation. In island colonizing birds, selection for reduced dispersal ability is predicted to produce changing patterns of regional population genetic structure as gene flow-dominated systems give way to drift-mediated divergence. If this transition is important in facilitating phenotypic divergence, levels of genetic and phenotypic divergence should be associated. We consider population genetic structure and phenotypic divergence among two co-distributed, congeneric (Genus: Zosterops) bird species inhabiting the Vanuatu archipelago. The more recent colonist, Z. lateralis, exhibits genetic patterns consistent with a strong influence of distance-mediated gene flow. However, complex patterns of asymmetrical gene flow indicate variation in dispersal ability or inclination among populations. The endemic species, Z. flavifrons, shows only a partial transition towards a drift-mediated system, despite a long evolutionary history on the archipelago. We find no strong evidence that gene flow constrains phenotypic divergence in either species, suggesting that levels of inter-island gene flow do not explain the absence of a radiation across this archipelago. PMID:20194170

  7. The influence of gene flow and drift on genetic and phenotypic divergence in two species of Zosterops in Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Sonya M; Phillimore, Albert B

    2010-04-12

    Colonization of an archipelago sets the stage for adaptive radiation. However, some archipelagos are home to spectacular radiations, while others have much lower levels of diversification. The amount of gene flow among allopatric populations is one factor proposed to contribute to this variation. In island colonizing birds, selection for reduced dispersal ability is predicted to produce changing patterns of regional population genetic structure as gene flow-dominated systems give way to drift-mediated divergence. If this transition is important in facilitating phenotypic divergence, levels of genetic and phenotypic divergence should be associated. We consider population genetic structure and phenotypic divergence among two co-distributed, congeneric (Genus: Zosterops) bird species inhabiting the Vanuatu archipelago. The more recent colonist, Z. lateralis, exhibits genetic patterns consistent with a strong influence of distance-mediated gene flow. However, complex patterns of asymmetrical gene flow indicate variation in dispersal ability or inclination among populations. The endemic species, Z. flavifrons, shows only a partial transition towards a drift-mediated system, despite a long evolutionary history on the archipelago. We find no strong evidence that gene flow constrains phenotypic divergence in either species, suggesting that levels of inter-island gene flow do not explain the absence of a radiation across this archipelago.

  8. [Influence of polymorphism's of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and polymorphism of NADPH oxidase gene on development of complications of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, T Iu; Gavrilov, D V; Dudanov, I P; Makarevich, P I; Balatskiĭ, A V; Samokhodskaia, L M; Parfenova, E V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of polymorphism Glu298Asp of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and C242T p22 phox polymorphism of NADPH oxidase gene in patients with arterial hypertension (AH) and their influence on AH complications. The study included 272 AH patients, average age 50,7 years. The following analyses were performed: clinical analysis of the blood, general analysis of the urine, lipid spectrum, plasma electrolytes, creatinine, glucose, electrocardiography, echocardioscopy, examination of eye vessels, ultrasound examination of the carotid arteries, determination of microalbuminuria. The polymorphism Glu298Asp of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and C242T p22 phox polymorphism of NADPH oxidase gene were detected with two methods: polymerase chain reaction and restrictase reaction. The control group for Glu298Asp polymorphism detection included 102 healthy Russian donors aged 18 to 50 years. Genotypes prevalence in AH patients was as follows: GG 58,8%, GA 32,3%, AA 8,9%, and CC 48,2%, CT 44,9%, TT 6.9%. In the control group: GG 53%, GA 36%, AA 11% and CC 42%, CT 54%, TT 4%. These polymorphisms did not affect the incidence of complications, such as obliterating atherosclerosis of the lower extremity vessels, ischemic heart disease, and acute insufficiency of cerebral circulation, chronic heart failure, left ventricular hypertrophy, microalbuminuria, carotid arteries atherosclerosis. PMID:18429753

  9. Influence of sugars and hormones on the genes involved in sucrose metabolism in maize endosperms.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; Liu, H M; Liu, Y H; Hu, Y F; Zhang, J J; Huang, Y B

    2015-01-01

    Starch is the major storage product in the endosperm of cereals. Its synthesis is closely related to sucrose metabolism. In our previous study, we found that the expression of most of the genes involved in starch synthesis might be regulated by sugars and hormones in the maize endosperm. However, little is known regarding the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in sucrose metabolism. Thus, in this study, maize endosperms were treated with different sugars and hormones and the expression of genes involved in sucrose metabolism (including synthesis, degradation, and transport) were evaluated using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We found that genes affected by different sugars and hormones were primarily regulated by abscisic acid. Sucrose and abscisic acid showed an additive effect on the expression of some genes. Differences in the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in sucrose metabolism and starch biosynthesis were observed. PMID:25867309

  10. Genetic background matters: a plant-virus gene-for-gene interaction is strongly influenced by genetic contexts.

    PubMed

    Montarry, Josselin; Doumayrou, Juliette; Simon, Vincent; Moury, Benoìt

    2011-12-01

    Evolutionary processes responsible for parasite adaptation to their hosts determine our capacity to manage sustainably resistant plant crops. Most plant-parasite interactions studied so far correspond to gene-for-gene models in which the nature of the alleles present at a plant resistance locus and at a pathogen pathogenicity locus determine entirely the outcome of their confrontation. The interaction between the pepper pvr2 resistance locus and Potato virus Y (PVY) genome-linked protein VPg locus obeys this kind of model. Using synthetic chimeras between two parental PVY cDNA clones, we showed that the viral genetic background surrounding the VPg pathogenicity locus had a strong impact on the resistance breakdown capacity of the virus. Indeed, recombination of the cylindrical inclusion (CI) coding region between two PVY cDNA clones multiplied by six the virus capacity to break down the pvr2(3) -mediated resistance. High-throughput sequencing allowed the exploration of the diversity of PVY populations in response to the selection pressure of the pvr2(3) resistance. The CI chimera, which possessed an increased resistance breakdown capacity, did not show an increased mutation accumulation rate. Instead, selection of the most frequent resistance-breaking mutation seemed to be more efficient for the CI chimera than for the parental virus clone. These results echoed previous observations, which showed that the plant genetic background in which the pvr2(3) resistance gene was introduced modified strongly the efficiency of selection of resistance-breaking mutations by PVY. In a broader context, the PVY CI coding region is one of the first identified genetic factors to determine the evolvability of a plant virus. PMID:21726391

  11. Temperature and Food Influence Shell Growth and Mantle Gene Expression of Shell Matrix Proteins in the Pearl Oyster Pinctada margaritifera

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Caroline; Linard, Clémentine; Le Moullac, Gilles; Soyez, Claude; Saulnier, Denis; Teaniniuraitemoana, Vaihiti; Ky, Chin Long; Gueguen, Yannick

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the combined effect of microalgal concentration and temperature on the shell growth of the bivalve Pinctada margaritifera and the molecular mechanisms underlying this biomineralization process. Shell growth was measured after two months of rearing in experimental conditions, using calcein staining of the calcified structures. Molecular mechanisms were studied though the expression of 11 genes encoding proteins implicated in the biomineralization process, which was assessed in the mantle. We showed that shell growth is influenced by both microalgal concentration and temperature, and that these environmental factors also regulate the expression of most of the genes studied. Gene expression measurement of shell matrix protein thereby appears to be an appropriate indicator for the evaluation of the biomineralization activity in the pearl oyster P. margaritifera under varying environmental conditions. This study provides valuable information on the molecular mechanisms of mollusk shell growth and its environmental control. PMID:25121605

  12. Genome-Wide RNAi Screens in C. elegans to Identify Genes Influencing Lifespan and Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a rapid, inexpensive, and highly effective tool used to inhibit gene function. In C. elegans, whole genome screens have been used to identify genes involved with numerous traits including aging and innate immunity. RNAi in C. elegans can be carried out via feeding, soaking, or injection. Here we outline protocols used to maintain, grow, and carry out RNAi via feeding in C. elegans and determine whether the inhibited genes are essential for lifespan or innate immunity. PMID:27581293

  13. Il6 gene promoter polymorphism (-174G/C) influences the association between fat mass and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Moleres, A; Rendo-Urteaga, T; Azcona, C; Martínez, J A; Gómez-Martínez, S; Ruiz, J R; Moreno, L A; Marcos, A; Marti, A

    2009-12-01

    During the last decades, the prevalence of obesity has increased rapidly among young people. A polymorphism in the promoter region of the IL6 gene (-174G/C), has been previously reported to be involved in obesity and metabolic syndrome development. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine whether the IL6-174G/C polymorphism influence the association of body fat with low-grade inflammatory markers and blood lipids and lipoproteins in Spanish adolescents. 504 Spanish adolescents participating in the AVENA study were genotyped for the-174G/C polymorphism of the IL6 gene. Anthropometric and body composition measurements were taken and blood samples were collected for plasma molecules determinations. No differences between genotypes were observed in anthropometric values, body composition measurements and plasma markers concentration. Physical activity level differ between genotypes with subjects carrying the C allele of the polymorphism being significantly (p<0.05) more active than GG subjects. The association between body fat mass and plasma glucose was influenced by the -174G/C polymorphism of the IL6 gene. Subjects carrying the C allele of the mutation seem to have higher values of lipoprotein (a) and C-reactive protein as their percentage of body fat mass increase. Our results suggest that this promoter polymorphism influences the association between adiposity and some plasma markers.

  14. Influence of human T-cell leukemia virus type I tax and rex on interleukin-2 gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, K L; Curtiss, V E; Larson, E L; Haseltine, W A

    1993-01-01

    The X region of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) encodes two proteins that regulate viral gene expression. The tax protein is the product of the transactivator gene and has been shown to up-regulate the expression of some cellular genes controlling T-cell replication, including that of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) T-cell growth hormone and the alpha chain of its receptor (IL-2R). Several studies have shown that tax transactivation of the IL-2R alpha-chain promoter is mediated by binding sites for the transcriptional activator NF-kappa B, and this mechanism has also been implicated in the tax activation of IL-2 promoter activity. The rex gene product of HTLV-I regulates viral protein production by influencing mRNA expression and has been implicated in the stabilization of IL-2R alpha-chain mRNA. In the present studies, the ability of the tax and rex proteins to transactivate IL-2 gene expression has been reinvestigated. The ability of the tax protein to transactivate IL-2 promoter activity appears, at least in part, to be mediated by the recognition sequence for a DNA-binding complex known as CD28RC. Consistent with this hypothesis is the observation that tax-mediated activation of IL-2 gene expression is resistant to the immunosuppressive affects of cyclosporin A, a property postulated for the CD28RC binding complex. Unexpectedly, this tax-mediated up-regulation of IL-2 expression is synergized by the presence of the rex protein. These findings demonstrate that transactivation of IL-2 gene expression by tax is augmented by mechanisms distinct from NF-kappa B and raise the possibility that rex, as well as tax, contributes to the oncogenic capability of HTLV-I by altering the expression of the IL-2 gene in T cells infected with this retrovirus. Images PMID:8382312

  15. The weediness of wild plants: molecular analysis of genes influencing dispersal and persistence of johnsongrass, Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.

    PubMed

    Paterson, A H; Schertz, K F; Lin, Y R; Liu, S C; Chang, Y L

    1995-06-20

    Many major weeds rely upon vegetative dispersal by rhizomes and seed dispersal by "shattering" of the mature inflorescence. We report molecular analysis of these traits in a cross between cultivated and wild species of Sorghum that are the probable progenitors of the major weed "johnsongrass." By restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping, variation in the number of rhizomes producing above-ground shoots was associated with three quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Variation in regrowth (ratooning) after overwintering was associated with QTLs accounting for additional rhizomatous growth and with QTLs influencing tillering. Vegetative buds that become rhizomes are similar to those that become tillers--one QTL appears to influence the number of such vegetative buds available, and additional independent genes determine whether individual buds differentiate into tillers or rhizomes. DNA markers described herein facilitate cloning of genes associated with weediness, comparative study of rhizomatousness in other Poaceae, and assessment of gene flow between cultivated and weedy sorghums--a risk that constrains improvement of sorghum through biotechnology. Cloning of "weediness" genes may create opportunities for plant growth regulation, in suppressing propagation of weeds and enhancing productivity of major forage, turf, and "ratoon" crops.

  16. The weediness of wild plants: molecular analysis of genes influencing dispersal and persistence of johnsongrass, Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, A H; Schertz, K F; Lin, Y R; Liu, S C; Chang, Y L

    1995-01-01

    Many major weeds rely upon vegetative dispersal by rhizomes and seed dispersal by "shattering" of the mature inflorescence. We report molecular analysis of these traits in a cross between cultivated and wild species of Sorghum that are the probable progenitors of the major weed "johnsongrass." By restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping, variation in the number of rhizomes producing above-ground shoots was associated with three quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Variation in regrowth (ratooning) after overwintering was associated with QTLs accounting for additional rhizomatous growth and with QTLs influencing tillering. Vegetative buds that become rhizomes are similar to those that become tillers--one QTL appears to influence the number of such vegetative buds available, and additional independent genes determine whether individual buds differentiate into tillers or rhizomes. DNA markers described herein facilitate cloning of genes associated with weediness, comparative study of rhizomatousness in other Poaceae, and assessment of gene flow between cultivated and weedy sorghums--a risk that constrains improvement of sorghum through biotechnology. Cloning of "weediness" genes may create opportunities for plant growth regulation, in suppressing propagation of weeds and enhancing productivity of major forage, turf, and "ratoon" crops. PMID:11607551

  17. Influence of an injury reduction program on injury and fitness outcomes among soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, J; Bullock, S; Canada, S; Toney, E; Wells, J; Hoedebecke, E; Jones, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the influence of a multiple injury control intervention on injury and physical fitness outcomes among soldiers attending United States Army Ordnance School Advanced Individual Training. Methods: The study design was quasiexperimental involving a historical control group (n = 2559) that was compared to a multiple intervention group (n = 1283). Interventions in the multiple intervention group included modified physical training, injury education, and a unit based injury surveillance system (UBISS). The management responsible for training independently formed an Injury Control Advisory Committee that examined surveillance reports from the UBISS and recommended changes to training. On arrival at school, individual soldiers completed a demographics and lifestyle questionnaire and took an army physical fitness test (APFT: push-ups, sit-ups, and two mile run). Injuries among soldiers were tracked by a clinic based injury surveillance system that was separate from the UBISS. Soldiers completed a final APFT eight weeks after arrival at school. Results: Cox regression (survival analysis) was used to examine differences in time to the first injury while controlling for group differences in demographics, lifestyle characteristics, and physical fitness. The adjusted relative risk of a time loss injury was 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 1.8) times higher in the historical control men and 1.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.8) times higher in the historical control women compared with the multiple intervention men and women, respectively. After correcting for the lower initial fitness of the multiple intervention group, there were no significant differences between the multiple intervention and historical control groups in terms of improvements in push-ups, sit-ups, or two mile run performance. Conclusions: This multiple intervention program contributed to a reduction in injuries while improvements in physical fitness were similar to a

  18. Npas4 regulates excitatory-inhibitory balance within neural circuits through cell type-specific gene programs

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, I; Mardinly, AR; Gabel, HW; Bazinet, JE; Couch, CH; Tzeng, CP; Harmin, DA; Greenberg, ME

    2014-01-01

    Summary The nervous system adapts to experience by inducing a transcriptional program that controls important aspects of synaptic plasticity. Although the molecular mechanisms of experience-dependent plasticity are well characterized in excitatory neurons, the mechanisms that regulate this process in inhibitory neurons are only poorly understood. Here, we describe a transcriptional program that is induced by neuronal activity in inhibitory neurons. We find that while neuronal activity induces expression of early-response transcription factors such as Npas4 in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons, Npas4 activates distinct programs of late-response genes in inhibitory and excitatory neurons. These late-response genes differentially regulate synaptic input to these two types of neurons, promoting inhibition onto excitatory neurons while inducing excitation onto inhibitory neurons. These findings suggest that the functional outcomes of activity-induced transcriptional responses are adapted in a cell type-specific manner to achieve a circuit-wide homeostatic response. PMID:24855953

  19. The Influence of Major Life Events on Economic Attitudes in a World of Gene-Environment Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Hatemi, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    The role of “genes” on political attitudes has gained attention across disciplines. However, person-specific experiences have yet to be incorporated into models that consider genetic influences. Relying on a gene-environment interplay approach, this study explicates how life-events, such as losing one’s job or suffering a financial loss, influence economic policy attitudes. The results indicate genetic and environmental variance on support for unions, immigration, capitalism, socialism and property tax is moderated by financial risks. Changes in the magnitude of genetic influences, however, are temporary. After two years, the phenotypic effects of the life events remain on most attitudes, but changes in the sources of individual differences do not. Univariate twin models that estimate the independent contributions of genes and environment on the variation of attitudes appear to provide robust baseline indicators of sources of individual differences. These estimates, however, are not event or day specific. In this way, genetic influences add stability, while environment cues change, and this process is continually updated. PMID:24860199

  20. Global profiling of influence of intra-ischemic brain temperature on gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Megumi Sugahara; Asai, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Koichi; Nishida, Yayoi; Nagata, Toshihito; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2008-06-01

    Mild to moderate differences in brain temperature are known to greatly affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. The impact of brain temperature on ischemic disorders has been mainly evaluated through pathological analysis. However, no comprehensive analyses have been conducted at the gene expression level. Using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray, we screened 24000 genes in the hippocampus under hypothermic (32 degrees C), normothermic (37 degrees C), and hyperthermic (39 degrees C) conditions in a rat ischemia-reperfusion model. When the ischemic group at each intra-ischemic brain temperature was compared to a sham-operated control group, genes whose expression levels changed more than three-fold with statistical significance could be detected. In our screening condition, thirty-three genes (some of them novel) were obtained after screening, and extensive functional surveys and literature reviews were subsequently performed. In the hypothermic condition, many neuroprotective factor genes were obtained, whereas cell death- and cell damage-associated genes were detected as the brain temperature increased. At all intra-ischemic brain temperatures, multiple molecular chaperone genes were obtained. The finding that intra-ischemic brain temperature affects the expression level of many genes related to neuroprotection or neurotoxicity coincides with the different pathological outcomes at different brain temperatures, demonstrating the utility of the genetic approach.

  1. Developmental regulation of DNA replication: replication fork barriers and programmed gene amplification in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Macalpine, D M; Kapler, G M

    1997-10-01

    The palindromic Tetrahymena ribosomal DNA (rDNA) minichromosome is amplified 10,000-fold during development. Subsequent vegetative replication is cell cycle regulated. rDNA replication differs fundamentally in cycling vegetative and nondividing amplifying cells. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we show for the first time that replication origins that direct gene amplification also function in normal dividing cells. Two classes of amplification intermediates were identified. The first class is indistinguishable from vegetative rDNA, initiating in just one of the two 5' nontranscribed spacer (NTS) copies in the rDNA palindrome at either of two closely spaced origins. Thus, these origins are active throughout the life cycle and their regulation changes at different developmental stages. The second, novel class of amplification intermediates is generated by multiple initiation events. Intermediates with mass greater than fully replicated DNA were observed, suggesting that onionskin replication occurs at this stage. Unlike amplified rDNA in Xenopus laevis, the novel Tetrahymena species are not produced by random initiation; replication also initiates in the 5' NTS. Surprisingly, a replication fork barrier which is activated only in these amplifying molecules blocks the progression of forks near the center of the palindrome. Whereas barriers have been previously described, this is the first instance in which programmed regulation of replication fork progression has been demonstrated in a eukaryote.

  2. Maternal programming of defensive responses through sustained effects on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tie-Yuan; Bagot, Rose; Parent, Carine; Nesbitt, Cathy; Bredy, Timothy W; Caldji, Christian; Fish, Eric; Anisman, Hymie; Szyf, Moshe; Meaney, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    There are profound maternal effects on individual differences in defensive responses and reproductive strategies in species ranging literally from plants to insects to birds. Maternal effects commonly reflect the quality of the environment and are most likely mediated by the quality of the maternal provision (egg, propagule, etc.), which in turn determines growth rates and adult phenotype. In this paper we review data from the rat that suggest comparable forms of maternal effects on defensive responses stress, which are mediated by the effects of variations in maternal behavior on gene expression. Under conditions of environmental adversity maternal effects enhance the capacity for defensive responses in the offspring. In mammals, these effects appear to 'program' emotional, cognitive and endocrine systems towards increased sensitivity to adversity. In environments with an increased level of adversity, such effects can be considered adaptive, enhancing the probability of offspring survival to sexual maturity; the cost is that of an increased risk for multiple forms of pathology in later life. PMID:16513241

  3. Factors Influencing a Student's Perception of the Programs and Services Offered by a Career and Technical Education Student Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croom, Barry; Flowers, James L.

    A study investigated whether Future Farmers of America (FFA) members and non-members differed in their perception of FFA programs and services and whether their perceptions were influenced by gender and ethnicity, enrollment choice, prior enrollment in an agricultural class, block scheduling, grade level, and extracurricular activities. A…

  4. Differences between Faculty and Students' Perception of Recruitment Techniques that Influence Students To Attend Four-Year Automotive Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, Gregory; Frisbee, Robert; Sanford, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Responses were obtained from 382 of 607 students and 27 of 36 faculty in automotive technology. Both groups cited program reputation, university reputation, campus visits and high school/community college teachers/counselors as effective recruitment influences. Students thought parents and relatives were more influential than faculty did.…

  5. Factors Influencing Rural Women Cassava Processors' Intention to Participate in an Agricultural Extension Education Program. Summary of Research 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojomo, Christian O.; McCaslin, N. L.

    A study examined factors influencing female cassava processors' intentions regarding participation in an extension education program on cassava processing in rural Nigeria. Interviews were conducted with 224 women who were purposely selected from areas of zone 3 of Ondo State, Nigeria, which has large concentrations of cassava processors.…

  6. Significant Life Experience: Exploring the Lifelong Influence of Place-Based Environmental and Science Education on Program Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Corrie Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Current research provides a limited understanding of the life long influence of nonformal place-based environmental and science education programs on past participants. This study looks to address this gap, exploring the ways in which these learning environments have contributed to environmental identity and stewardship. Using Dorothy Holland's…

  7. The International Geophysical Year: Its influence on the beginning of the French space program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, Hervé

    2010-03-01

    In 1957-1958, the International Geophysical Year (IGY) was the most important scientific cooperation programme in the World, after the Second World War. Thousands of scientists from 67 countries were involved in this large operation, among them a lot of French scientists. IGY was previously called the IPY (International Polar Year) and France, as many other countries, has been involved in the Arctic and Antarctic regions researches. Everybody knows that the IGY is at the origin of Sputnik and the first launch of Russian and American satellites. But, we know less about the IGY rockets programme itself in which France had intended to participate. This paper will discuss this programme with a special highlight on some aspects of the French participation and their relationship with the IGY programme. This approach arises several questions, such as: Which French scientists have been involved? What was the attitude of the French Government about this program, etc. We focus our analysis on the interrogation: did the IGY have any real influence on the origin of the French space research activities?

  8. The influence of modifications of a fatigue loading history program on fatigue lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branger, J.

    1972-01-01

    Rectangular specimens of 7075 and 2014 aluminum alloys with two holes (stress concentration factor of 3.24) have been tested under axial fatigue loading on a six-rod test bed with modifications of the loading program, the surface particulars, and the frequency. The length of the precrack stage was investigated by use of a new crack detector. In most cases the two alloys behaved similarly, with similar life to crack start under the same loading. Some overloads lengthened the life. Truncation by omission of the lowest peak loads should be limited to about 20 percent of the ultimate load. Simplifying counting methods gave misleading results. Very thin surface layers of anodizing, protection by vinyl, dry nitrogen atmosphere, as well as stepwise reaming or grinding the surface of the holes, lengthened the life; thick anodized layers shortened the life. Compressing the hole surface by rolling had no influence. Frequencies at about 210 to 240 cpm produced shorter lives than those at 40 cpm. At 5.4 cpm the life was considerably longer. A model to better understand the precrack-stage fatigue mechanism is discussed.

  9. Influence of conservation programs on amphibians using seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balas, Caleb J.; Euliss, Ned H.; Mushnet, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive modification of upland habitats surrounding wetlands to facilitate agricultural production has negatively impacted amphibian communities in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America. In attempts to mitigate ecosystem damage associated with extensive landscape alteration, vast tracks of upland croplands have been returned to perennial vegetative cover (i.e., conservation grasslands) under a variety of U.S. Department of Agriculture programs. We evaluated the influence of these conservation grasslands on amphibian occupancy of seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region. Using automated call surveys, aquatic funnel traps, and visual encounter surveys, we detected eight amphibian species using wetlands within three land-use categories (farmed, conservation grasslands, and native prairie grasslands) during the summers of 2005 and 2006. Seasonal wetlands within farmlands were used less frequently by amphibians than those within conservation and native prairie grasslands, and wetlands within conservation grasslands were used less frequently than those within native prairie grasslands by all species and life-stages we successfully modeled. Our results suggest that, while not occupied as frequently as wetlands within native prairie, wetlands within conservation grasslands provide important habitat for maintaining amphibian biodiversity in the Prairie Pothole Region

  10. The influence of military service on auditory health and the efficacy of a Hearing Conservation Program.

    PubMed

    Muhr, Per; Rosenhall, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    The influence of military service on self-assessed hearing symptoms and measured auditory function was studied as well as the efficacy of the Hearing Conservation Program (HCP) of the Swedish Armed Forces. 839 conscripts were recruited for the study at reporting to military service. They were all exposed to noise over the risk-limits from weapons and vehicles and used earmuffs and/or earplugs. Questionnaires and pure tone screening audiometry were studied at the start and the end of the military service. Retrospective information regarding audiometry at conscription before military service was included as control. The prevalence values of tinnitus were 23% before and 32% after the service and of sensitivity to noise 16% and 19% respectively. The prevalence values of hearing impairment were 6.3% at conscription, 14.5% at reporting to military service, and 24% after the training period. The incidence values of hearing decline were 3.7% during the period with no military noise exposure and 6.6% during the military service. Acoustic accident increased the risk of worsened tinnitus and sensitivity to noise four times and for a high frequency hearing decline six times. We observed elevated prevalence values of tinnitus, sensitivity to noise and hearing impairment at discharge compared to before military service. We observed an elevated risk of hearing decline during military service. Acoustic accident increased the risk of tinnitus, noise sensitivity and hearing decline. We suggest improvements regarding inclusion criteria for military service, and for education regarding the HCP. PMID:21768736

  11. Common Variants in 40 Genes Assessed for Diabetes Incidence and Response to Metformin and Lifestyle Intervention in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kathleen A.; McAteer, Jarred B.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Franks, Paul W.; Pollin, Toni I.; Hanson, Robert L.; Saxena, Richa; Fowler, Sarah; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Knowler, William C.; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Genome-wide association studies have begun to elucidate the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes. We examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified through targeted complementary approaches affect diabetes incidence in the at-risk population of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and whether they influence a response to preventive interventions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We selected SNPs identified by prior genome-wide association studies for type 2 diabetes and related traits, or capturing common variation in 40 candidate genes previously associated with type 2 diabetes, implicated in monogenic diabetes, encoding type 2 diabetes drug targets or drug-metabolizing/transporting enzymes, or involved in relevant physiological processes. We analyzed 1,590 SNPs for association with incident diabetes and their interaction with response to metformin or lifestyle interventions in 2,994 DPP participants. We controlled for multiple hypothesis testing by assessing false discovery rates. RESULTS We replicated the association of variants in the metformin transporter gene SLC47A1 with metformin response and detected nominal interactions in the AMP kinase (AMPK) gene STK11, the AMPK subunit genes PRKAA1 and PRKAA2, and a missense SNP in SLC22A1, which encodes another metformin transporter. The most significant association with diabetes incidence occurred in the AMPK subunit gene PRKAG2 (hazard ratio 1.24, 95% CI 1.09–1.40, P = 7 × 10−4). Overall, there were nominal associations with diabetes incidence at 85 SNPs and nominal interactions with the metformin and lifestyle interventions at 91 and 69 mostly nonoverlapping SNPs, respectively. The lowest P values were consistent with experiment-wide 33% false discovery rates. CONCLUSIONS We have identified potential genetic determinants of metformin response. These results merit confirmation in independent samples. PMID:20682687

  12. Cluster of genes that encode positive and negative elements influencing filament length in a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

    2013-09-01

    The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria perform oxygenic photosynthesis in vegetative cells and nitrogen fixation in heterocysts, and their filaments can be hundreds of cells long. In the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the genes in the fraC-fraD-fraE operon are required for filament integrity mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. The fraC operon transcript partially overlaps gene all2395, which lies in the opposite DNA strand and ends 1 bp beyond fraE. Gene all2395 produces transcripts of 1.35 kb (major transcript) and 2.2 kb (minor transcript) that overlap fraE and whose expression is dependent on the N-control transcription factor NtcA. Insertion of a gene cassette containing transcriptional terminators between fraE and all2395 prevented production of the antisense RNAs and resulted in an increased length of the cyanobacterial filaments. Deletion of all2395 resulted in a larger increase of filament length and in impaired growth, mainly under N2-fixing conditions and specifically on solid medium. We denote all2395 the fraF gene, which encodes a protein restricting filament length. A FraF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein accumulated significantly in heterocysts. Similar to some heterocyst differentiation-related proteins such as HglK, HetL, and PatL, FraF is a pentapeptide repeat protein. We conclude that the fraC-fraD-fraE←fraF gene cluster (where the arrow indicates a change in orientation), in which cis antisense RNAs are produced, regulates morphology by encoding proteins that influence positively (FraC, FraD, FraE) or negatively (FraF) the length of the filament mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. This gene cluster is often conserved in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. PMID:23813733

  13. Cluster of Genes That Encode Positive and Negative Elements Influencing Filament Length in a Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Herrero, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria perform oxygenic photosynthesis in vegetative cells and nitrogen fixation in heterocysts, and their filaments can be hundreds of cells long. In the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the genes in the fraC-fraD-fraE operon are required for filament integrity mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. The fraC operon transcript partially overlaps gene all2395, which lies in the opposite DNA strand and ends 1 bp beyond fraE. Gene all2395 produces transcripts of 1.35 kb (major transcript) and 2.2 kb (minor transcript) that overlap fraE and whose expression is dependent on the N-control transcription factor NtcA. Insertion of a gene cassette containing transcriptional terminators between fraE and all2395 prevented production of the antisense RNAs and resulted in an increased length of the cyanobacterial filaments. Deletion of all2395 resulted in a larger increase of filament length and in impaired growth, mainly under N2-fixing conditions and specifically on solid medium. We denote all2395 the fraF gene, which encodes a protein restricting filament length. A FraF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein accumulated significantly in heterocysts. Similar to some heterocyst differentiation-related proteins such as HglK, HetL, and PatL, FraF is a pentapeptide repeat protein. We conclude that the fraC-fraD-fraE←fraF gene cluster (where the arrow indicates a change in orientation), in which cis antisense RNAs are produced, regulates morphology by encoding proteins that influence positively (FraC, FraD, FraE) or negatively (FraF) the length of the filament mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. This gene cluster is often conserved in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. PMID:23813733

  14. The Influence of Whole-Arm Trisomy on Gene Expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, R. H.; Holm, D. G.; Grigliatti, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    The biochemical consequences of extensive aneuploidy in Drosophila have been examined by measuring the levels of specific proteins in larvae trisomic for entire chromosome arms. By far the most common effect is a reduction in gene product levels (per gene template) by one-third from the diploid quantity, consistent with the model that concentration-dependent repressors of these loci reside on the duplicated chromosome arms. Most loci appear sensitive to such repression in one or more of the trisomies examined, suggesting that such regulatory loci might be quite common. Repression of gene-product levels in trisomies may significantly contribute to their inviability. Few loci are activated in trisomies implying that most factors necessary for gene expression are in excess. While autosomal trisomies can repress the expression of both X-linked and autosomal loci, X-chromosomal trisomies have little effect on most autosomal genes. A family of genes coding for larval serum proteins do not respond similarly in trisomies, suggesting that regulation operates on a process which is not common to their coordinate regulation. Finally, Adh genes transposed to new chromosomal positions maintain their ability to be repressed in 3L trisomies suggesting that this response to regulation involves a closely linked cis-acting regulatory element. PMID:8608935

  15. Influence of sex and disease severity on gene expression profiles in individuals with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Sean P; Zhang, Hongmei; Karmaus, Wilfried; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest sex-specific trends in the prevalence and mortality of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that are distinct for each disease. While the expression of numerous immune and extracellular matrix (ECM) genes in the lung have been well characterized in these diseases, associations elucidating their sex-specific expression patterns by disease type and severity, and the evaluation of hormone-related genes, have not been well studied. Here we performed targeted transcriptional profiling of 48 genes was performed on lung tissue samples from males and females with mild or medium severity IPF or COPD. The genes assessed included those involved in inflammation, ECM remodeling and hormonal processes. Data for 36 lung tissue samples were obtained that were stratified by disease and sex. Expression levels revealed a subset of genes which show differential expression among sexes, disease type, and disease severity. The most significant observations were the increased expression primarily of ECM genes in medium severity IPF (CATHK, COL1A1, COL3, MMP1, MMP7, IL-1RN) compared to mild IPF and COPD. Two genes, CH3L1 and MMP7 showed a tendency of interaction between sex and disease in IPF severity. Surprisingly, there were no significant differences in any of the sex genes measured between the IPF groups; however, ESR1 and AR expression levels were higher and lower, respectively, compared to COPD samples. Overall, this work highlights two genes, CH3L1 and MMP7, that may contribute to gender trends observed for IPF and COPD and are potential targets for future research. PMID:24959312

  16. KNOX genes influence a gradient of fruit chloroplast development through regulation of GOLDEN2-LIKE expression in tomato.

    PubMed

    Nadakuduti, Satya Swathi; Holdsworth, William L; Klein, Chelsey L; Barry, Cornelius S

    2014-06-01

    The chlorophyll content of unripe fleshy fruits is positively correlated with the nutrient content and flavor of ripe fruit. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the uniform ripening (u) locus, which encodes a GOLDEN 2-LIKE transcription factor (SlGLK2), influences a gradient of chloroplast development that extends from the stem end of the fruit surrounding the calyx to the base of the fruit. With the exception of the u locus, the factors that influence the formation of this developmental gradient are unknown. In this study, characterization and positional cloning of the uniform gray-green (ug) locus of tomato reveals a thus far unknown role for the Class I KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX) gene, TKN4, in specifying the formation of this chloroplast gradient. The involvement of KNOX in fruit chloroplast development was confirmed through characterization of the Curl (Cu) mutant, a dominant gain-of-function mutation of TKN2, which displays ectopic fruit chloroplast development that resembles SlGLK2 over-expression. TKN2 and TKN4 act upstream of SlGLK2 and the related gene ARABIDOPSIS PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 2-LIKE (SlAPRR2-LIKE) to establish their latitudinal gradient of expression across developing fruit that leads to a gradient of chloroplast development. Class I KNOX genes typically influence plant morphology through maintenance of meristem activity, but this study identifies a role for TKN2 and TKN4 in specifically influencing chloroplast development in fruit but not leaves, suggesting that this fundamental process is differentially regulated in these two organs.

  17. KNOX genes influence a gradient of fruit chloroplast development through regulation of GOLDEN2-LIKE expression in tomato.

    PubMed

    Nadakuduti, Satya Swathi; Holdsworth, William L; Klein, Chelsey L; Barry, Cornelius S

    2014-06-01

    The chlorophyll content of unripe fleshy fruits is positively correlated with the nutrient content and flavor of ripe fruit. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the uniform ripening (u) locus, which encodes a GOLDEN 2-LIKE transcription factor (SlGLK2), influences a gradient of chloroplast development that extends from the stem end of the fruit surrounding the calyx to the base of the fruit. With the exception of the u locus, the factors that influence the formation of this developmental gradient are unknown. In this study, characterization and positional cloning of the uniform gray-green (ug) locus of tomato reveals a thus far unknown role for the Class I KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX) gene, TKN4, in specifying the formation of this chloroplast gradient. The involvement of KNOX in fruit chloroplast development was confirmed through characterization of the Curl (Cu) mutant, a dominant gain-of-function mutation of TKN2, which displays ectopic fruit chloroplast development that resembles SlGLK2 over-expression. TKN2 and TKN4 act upstream of SlGLK2 and the related gene ARABIDOPSIS PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 2-LIKE (SlAPRR2-LIKE) to establish their latitudinal gradient of expression across developing fruit that leads to a gradient of chloroplast development. Class I KNOX genes typically influence plant morphology through maintenance of meristem activity, but this study identifies a role for TKN2 and TKN4 in specifically influencing chloroplast development in fruit but not leaves, suggesting that this fundamental process is differentially regulated in these two organs. PMID:24689783

  18. Microbial ecology, bacterial pathogens, and antibiotic resistant genes in swine manure wastewater as influenced by three swine management systems.

    PubMed

    Brooks, John P; Adeli, Ardeshir; McLaughlin, Michael R

    2014-06-15

    The environmental influence of farm management in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) can yield vast changes to the microbial biota and ecological structure of both the pig and waste manure lagoon wastewater. While some of these changes may not be negative, it is possible that CAFOs can enrich antibiotic resistant bacteria or pathogens based on farm type, thereby influencing the impact imparted by the land application of its respective wastewater. The purpose of this study was to measure the microbial constituents of swine-sow, -nursery, and -finisher farm manure lagoon wastewater and determine the changes induced by farm management. A total of 37 farms were visited in the Mid-South USA and analyzed for the genes 16S rRNA, spaQ (Salmonella spp.), Camp-16S (Campylobacter spp.), tetA, tetB, ermF, ermA, mecA, and intI using quantitative PCR. Additionally, 16S rRNA sequence libraries were created. Overall, it appeared that finisher farms were significantly different from nursery and sow farms in nearly all genes measured and in 16S rRNA clone libraries. Nearly all antibiotic resistance genes were detected in all farms. Interestingly, the mecA resistance gene (e.g. methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus) was below detection limits on most farms, and decreased as the pigs aged. Finisher farms generally had fewer antibiotic resistance genes, which corroborated previous phenotypic data; additionally, finisher farms produced a less diverse 16S rRNA sequence library. Comparisons of Camp-16S and spaQ GU (genomic unit) values to previous culture data demonstrated ratios from 10 to 10,000:1 depending on farm type, indicating viable but not cultivatable bacteria were dominant. The current study indicated that swine farm management schemes positively and negatively affect microbial and antibiotic resistant populations in CAFO wastewater which has future "downstream" implications from both an environmental and public health perspective.

  19. Microbial ecology, bacterial pathogens, and antibiotic resistant genes in swine manure wastewater as influenced by three swine management systems.

    PubMed

    Brooks, John P; Adeli, Ardeshir; McLaughlin, Michael R

    2014-06-15

    The environmental influence of farm management in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) can yield vast changes to the microbial biota and ecological structure of both the pig and waste manure lagoon wastewater. While some of these changes may not be negative, it is possible that CAFOs can enrich antibiotic resistant bacteria or pathogens based on farm type, thereby influencing the impact imparted by the land application of its respective wastewater. The purpose of this study was to measure the microbial constituents of swine-sow, -nursery, and -finisher farm manure lagoon wastewater and determine the changes induced by farm management. A total of 37 farms were visited in the Mid-South USA and analyzed for the genes 16S rRNA, spaQ (Salmonella spp.), Camp-16S (Campylobacter spp.), tetA, tetB, ermF, ermA, mecA, and intI using quantitative PCR. Additionally, 16S rRNA sequence libraries were created. Overall, it appeared that finisher farms were significantly different from nursery and sow farms in nearly all genes measured and in 16S rRNA clone libraries. Nearly all antibiotic resistance genes were detected in all farms. Interestingly, the mecA resistance gene (e.g. methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus) was below detection limits on most farms, and decreased as the pigs aged. Finisher farms generally had fewer antibiotic resistance genes, which corroborated previous phenotypic data; additionally, finisher farms produced a less diverse 16S rRNA sequence library. Comparisons of Camp-16S and spaQ GU (genomic unit) values to previous culture data demonstrated ratios from 10 to 10,000:1 depending on farm type, indicating viable but not cultivatable bacteria were dominant. The current study indicated that swine farm management schemes positively and negatively affect microbial and antibiotic resistant populations in CAFO wastewater which has future "downstream" implications from both an environmental and public health perspective. PMID:24704907

  20. The Immediate Early Gene Product EGR1 and Polycomb Group Proteins Interact in Epigenetic Programming during Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Marjolein M. J.; Prickaerts, Peggy; Rofel, Celine; Dahlmans, Vivian E. H.; Surtel, Don A. M.; Paulis, Yvette; Schweizer, Finja; Welting, Tim J. M.; Eijssen, Lars M.; Voncken, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    Initiation of and progression through chondrogenesis is driven by changes in the cellular microenvironment. At the onset of chondrogenesis, resting mesenchymal stem cells are mobilized in vivo and a complex, step-wise chondrogenic differentiation program is initiated. Differentiation requires coordinated transcriptomic reprogramming and increased progenitor proliferation; both processes require chromatin remodeling. The nature of early molecular responses that relay differentiation signals to chromatin is poorly understood. We here show that immediate early genes are rapidly and transiently induced in response to differentiation stimuli in vitro. Functional ablation of the immediate early factor EGR1 severely deregulates expression of key chondrogenic control genes at the onset of differentiation. In addition, differentiating cells accumulate DNA damage, activate a DNA damage response and undergo a cell cycle arrest and prevent differentiation associated hyper-proliferation. Failed differentiation in the absence of EGR1 affects global acetylation and terminates in overall histone hypermethylation. We report novel molecular connections between EGR1 and Polycomb Group function: Polycomb associated histone H3 lysine27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) blocks chromatin access of EGR1. In addition, EGR1 ablation results in abnormal Ezh2 and Bmi1 expression. Consistent with this functional interaction, we identify a number of co-regulated targets genes in a chondrogenic gene network. We here describe an important role for EGR1 in early chondrogenic epigenetic programming to accommodate early gene-environment interactions in chondrogenesis. PMID:23483971

  1. [Influence of mutant genes on crystallin synthesis in the forming mouse lens. II. Fidget and ocular retardation genes].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, M I; Platonov, E S; Koniukhov, B V

    1977-01-01

    The beginning of synthesis and the localization of alpha- and gamma-crystallins in the developing lenses of the 10-13 and 15 days old mouse embryos of the genotypes fi/fi +/+, +/+ or/or, fi/fi or/or and +/+ +/+ were studied by means of indirect immunofluorescence. The synthesis of crystallins in the mutant embryos with the exception of the embryo +/+ or/or was shown to begin somewhat later than in the normal ones but to proceed in all defective lenses, irrespective of the degree of defect. Hence, the activation of the genes controlling the synthesis of alpha-crystallins begins at the early stages of lens development and the synthesis of these proteins proceeds even during the abnormal with the slowing down of the formation of primary lens fibers. In the cases of strong defects of morphogenesis in the fi/fi +/+ and, especially, fi/fi or/or, embryos gamma-crystallins were not detected. The synthesis of gamma-crystallins appears to begin at the final stages of lens fiber differentiation.

  2. Significant life experience: Exploring the lifelong influence of place-based environmental and science education on program participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Corrie Ruth

    Current research provides a limited understanding of the life long influence of nonformal place-based environmental and science education programs on past participants. This study looks to address this gap, exploring the ways in which these learning environments have contributed to environmental identity and stewardship. Using Dorothy Holland's approach to social practice theory's understanding of identity formation, this study employed narrative interviews and a close-ended survey to understand past participants' experience over time. Participants from two place-based environmental education programs and one science-inquiry program were asked to share their reflections on their program experience and the influence they attribute to that experience. Among all participants, the element of hands-on learning, supportive instructors, and engaging learning environments remained salient over time. Participants of nature-based programs demonstrated that these programs in particular were formative in contributing to an environmental stewardship identity. Social practice theory can serve as a helpful theoretical framework for significant life experience research, which has largely been missing from this body of research. This study also holds implications for the fields of place-based environmental education, conservation psychology, and sustainability planning, all of which look to understand and increase environmentally sustainable practices.

  3. Influence of microarrays experiments missing values on the stability of gene groups by hierarchical clustering

    PubMed Central

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Hazout, Serge; Malpertuy, Alain

    2004-01-01

    Background Microarray technologies produced large amount of data. The hierarchical clustering is commonly used to identify clusters of co-expressed genes. However, microarray datasets often contain missing values (MVs) representing a major drawback for the use of the clustering methods. Usually the MVs are not treated, or replaced by zero or estimated by the k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) approach. The topic of the paper is to study the stability of gene clusters, defined by various hierarchical clustering algorithms, of microarrays experiments including or not MVs. Results In this study, we show that the MVs have important effects on the stability of the gene clusters. Moreover, the magnitude of the gene misallocations is depending on the aggregation algorithm. The most appropriate aggregation methods (e.g. complete-linkage and Ward) are highly sensitive to MVs, and surprisingly, for a very tiny proportion of MVs (e.g. 1%). In most of the case, the MVs must be replaced by expected values. The MVs replacement by the kNN approach clearly improves the identification of co-expressed gene clusters. Nevertheless, we observe that kNN approach is less suitable for the extreme values of gene expression. Conclusion The presence of MVs (even at a low rate) is a major factor of gene cluster instability. In addition, the impact depends on the hierarchical clustering algorithm used. Some methods should be used carefully. Nevertheless, the kNN approach constitutes one efficient method for restoring the missing expression gene values, with a low error level. Our study highlights the need of statistical treatments in microarray data to avoid misinterpretation. PMID:15324460

  4. A length polymorphism in the circadian clock gene Per3 influences age at onset of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Dallaspezia, Sara; Colombo, Cristina; Pirovano, Adele; Marino, Elena; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2008-11-14

    Age at onset of bipolar disorder might represent the penetrance of the system for specific genetic liability involved in the genesis of the illness. Genetic factors influencing age at onset have been shown to play a role in shaping core characteristics of the illness, such as severity and pattern of recurrence. Genetic variants of genes regulating the circadian clock could contribute to define endophenotypes of bipolar disorder, and have been associated with clinical features of the disease. The coding region of Per3 gene contains a variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphism which has been associated with diurnal preference, sleep structure and sleep homeostasis in healthy subjects. In a homogeneous sample of 99 patients affected by bipolar disorder type I we observed that Per3 VNTR influenced age at onset of illness: earlier age at onset in homozygote carriers of Per35 variant, later in homozygotes for Per34, and intermediate in heterozygotes. Allele frequencies were not significantly different from those reported in healthy subjects. Results need to be confirmed in larger samples, but warrant interest for the variants of molecular clock genes as possible endophenotypes of bipolar disorder.

  5. A Highly Efficient Gene Expression Programming (GEP) Model for Auxiliary Diagnosis of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hongzong; Liu, Shihai; Li, Xianchao; Gao, Caihong; Cui, Lianhua; Li, Chuan; Yang, Xue; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is an important and common cancer that constitutes a major public health problem, but early detection of small cell lung cancer can significantly improve the survival rate of cancer patients. A number of serum biomarkers have been used in the diagnosis of lung cancers; however, they exhibit low sensitivity and specificity. Methods We used biochemical methods to measure blood levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), Na+, Cl-, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in 145 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients and 155 non-small cell lung cancer and 155 normal controls. A gene expression programming (GEP) model and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves incorporating these biomarkers was developed for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. Results After appropriate modification of the parameters, the GEP model was initially set up based on a training set of 115 SCLC patients and 125 normal controls for GEP model generation. Then the GEP was applied to the remaining 60 subjects (the test set) for model validation. GEP successfully discriminated 281 out of 300 cases, showing a correct classification rate for lung cancer patients of 93.75% (225/240) and 93.33% (56/60) for the training and test sets, respectively. Another GEP model incorporating four biomarkers, including CEA, NSE, LDH, and CRP, exhibited slightly lower detection sensitivity than the GEP model, including six biomarkers. We repeat the models on artificial neural network (ANN), and our results showed that the accuracy of GEP models were higher than that in ANN. GEP model incorporating six serum biomarkers performed by NSCLC patients and normal controls showed low accuracy than SCLC patients and was enough to prove that the GEP model is suitable for the SCLC patients. Conclusion We have developed a GEP model with high sensitivity and specificity for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. This GEP model has the potential for the wide use

  6. A dynamic multiarmed bandit-gene expression programming hyper-heuristic for combinatorial optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Sabar, Nasser R; Ayob, Masri; Kendall, Graham; Qu, Rong

    2015-02-01

    Hyper-heuristics are search methodologies that aim to provide high-quality solutions across a wide variety of problem domains, rather than developing tailor-made methodologies for each problem instance/domain. A traditional hyper-heuristic framework has two levels, namely, the high level strategy (heuristic selection mechanism and the acceptance criterion) and low level heuristics (a set of problem specific heuristics). Due to the different landscape structures of different problem instances, the high level strategy plays an important role in the design of a hyper-heuristic framework. In this paper, we propose a new high level strategy for a hyper-heuristic framework. The proposed high-level strategy utilizes a dynamic multiarmed bandit-extreme value-based reward as an online heuristic selection mechanism to select the appropriate heuristic to be applied at each iteration. In addition, we propose a gene expression programming framework to automatically generate the acceptance criterion for each problem instance, instead of using human-designed criteria. Two well-known, and very different, combinatorial optimization problems, one static (exam timetabling) and one dynamic (dynamic vehicle routing) are used to demonstrate the generality of the proposed framework. Compared with state-of-the-art hyper-heuristics and other bespoke methods, empirical results demonstrate that the proposed framework is able to generalize well across both domains. We obtain competitive, if not better results, when compared to the best known results obtained from other methods that have been presented in the scientific literature. We also compare our approach against the recently released hyper-heuristic competition test suite. We again demonstrate the generality of our approach when we compare against other methods that have utilized the same six benchmark datasets from this test suite. PMID:24951713

  7. Surface EMG-based Sketching Recognition Using Two Analysis Windows and Gene Expression Programming

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhongliang; Chen, Yumiao

    2016-01-01

    Sketching is one of the most important processes in the conceptual stage of design. Previous studies have relied largely on the analyses of sketching process and outcomes; whereas surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals associated with sketching have received little attention. In this study, we propose a method in which 11 basic one-stroke sketching shapes are identified from the sEMG signals generated by the forearm and upper arm muscles from 4 subjects. Time domain features such as integrated electromyography, root mean square and mean absolute value were extracted with analysis windows of two length conditions for pattern recognition. After reducing data dimensionality using principal component analysis, the shapes were classified using Gene Expression Programming (GEP). The performance of the GEP classifier was compared to the Back Propagation neural network (BPNN) and the Elman neural network (ENN). Feature extraction with the short analysis window (250 ms with a 250 ms increment) improved the recognition rate by around 6.4% averagely compared with the long analysis window (2500 ms with a 2500 ms increment). The average recognition rate for the eleven basic one-stroke sketching patterns achieved by the GEP classifier was 96.26% in the training set and 95.62% in the test set, which was superior to the performance of the BPNN and ENN classifiers. The results show that the GEP classifier is able to perform well with either length of the analysis window. Thus, the proposed GEP model show promise for recognizing sketching based on sEMG signals. PMID:27790083

  8. A dynamic multiarmed bandit-gene expression programming hyper-heuristic for combinatorial optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Sabar, Nasser R; Ayob, Masri; Kendall, Graham; Qu, Rong

    2015-02-01

    Hyper-heuristics are search methodologies that aim to provide high-quality solutions across a wide variety of problem domains, rather than developing tailor-made methodologies for each problem instance/domain. A traditional hyper-heuristic framework has two levels, namely, the high level strategy (heuristic selection mechanism and the acceptance criterion) and low level heuristics (a set of problem specific heuristics). Due to the different landscape structures of different problem instances, the high level strategy plays an important role in the design of a hyper-heuristic framework. In this paper, we propose a new high level strategy for a hyper-heuristic framework. The proposed high-level strategy utilizes a dynamic multiarmed bandit-extreme value-based reward as an online heuristic selection mechanism to select the appropriate heuristic to be applied at each iteration. In addition, we propose a gene expression programming framework to automatically generate the acceptance criterion for each problem instance, instead of using human-designed criteria. Two well-known, and very different, combinatorial optimization problems, one static (exam timetabling) and one dynamic (dynamic vehicle routing) are used to demonstrate the generality of the proposed framework. Compared with state-of-the-art hyper-heuristics and other bespoke methods, empirical results demonstrate that the proposed framework is able to generalize well across both domains. We obtain competitive, if not better results, when compared to the best known results obtained from other methods that have been presented in the scientific literature. We also compare our approach against the recently released hyper-heuristic competition test suite. We again demonstrate the generality of our approach when we compare against other methods that have utilized the same six benchmark datasets from this test suite.

  9. Possible influence of B chromosomes on genes included in immune response and parasite burden in Apodemus flavicollis.

    PubMed

    Adnađević, Tanja; Jovanović, Vladimir M; Blagojević, Jelena; Budinski, Ivana; Cabrilo, Borislav; Bjelić-Čabrilo, Olivera; Bijelić-Čabrilo, Olivera; Vujošević, Mladen

    2014-01-01

    Genetic background underlying wild populations immune response to different parasites is still not well understood. We studied immune response to multiple infections and to competition between different parasite species at different developmental stages in population of yellow-necked mouse, Apodemus flavicollis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to investigate associations of MHC II-DRB, IL-10 and Tgf-β genes expressions with presence of intestinal parasites at different developmental stages. Furthermore, we were interested whether the host related characteristics (sex, age, body condition, presence of B chromosomes or expression of other genes) or characteristics of present parasites (number of adult parasites of each identified species, egg count of each parasite genus, total number of nematode individuals) affect differential expression of the studied genes. A significant invert association between the expression of MHC II-DRB and Tgf-β gene was found, which together with absence of IL-10 association confirmed modified Th2 as the main type of immune response to nematode infections. Effect of recorded parasites and parasite life-cycle stage on expression levels of MHC II-DRB gene was detected only through interactions with host-related characteristics such as sex, age, and the presence of B chromosomes. The presence of B chromosomes is associated with lower expression level of Tgf-β gene. Although the influence of host genetic background on parasite infection has already been well documented, this is the first study in mammals that gave presence of B chromosomes on immune response full consideration. PMID:25372668

  10. Does a Pre-Training Program Influence Colonoscopy Proficiency during Fellowship?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Hwan; Park, Soo Jung; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Hong, Sung Pil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine whether a pre-training program influences the entire learning process and overall proficiency of colonoscopy during fellowship. Methods From March 2011 to February 2013, a total of 28 first-year gastrointestinal fellows were trained in colonoscopy at a single tertiary center. Before entering their fellowship training, all fellows were board certified in internal medicine, but had no experience performing a full colonoscopy. Endoscopic quality indices were prospectively measured throughout the first training year and were compared between two groups, “pre-trained” fellows (n = 14), who had more than 100 cases of upper endoscopy experience and colonoscopy observation before starting their fellowship, and the “not pre-trained” group (n = 14), who had less experience. Results A total of 15,494 colonoscopies were evaluated and 5,411 were screening colonoscopies. There were no significant differences in the overall quality index between the pre-trained and not pre-trained groups. However, the improvement in the adenoma detection rate (ADR) from the first half of the year to the latter half was significantly higher for the pre-trained group compared to the not pre-trained group (28.6% to 34.5% vs. 36.7% to 28.3%, respectively, P = 0.007). Multivariate analysis showed that pre-training before learning colonoscopy was the only significant factor for high ADR in the second half of the year (11.666 ± 4.251 [B±SE], P = 0.012). Conclusion Sufficient observation of colonoscopy and experience of upper endoscopy before colonoscopy training might facilitate improvement of fellows’ manual and cognitive colonoscopic skills during the learning period. PMID:27764144

  11. Influence of Coding Variability in APP-Aβ Metabolism Genes in Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Celeste; Ridge, Perry G; Nalls, Michael A; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K; Troakes, Claire; Lunnon, Katie; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Brown, Kristelle S; Medway, Christopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F; Kauwe, John S; Cruchaga, Carlos; Bras, Jose; Goate, Alison M; Singleton, Andrew B; Guerreiro, Rita; Hardy, John

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral deposition of Aβ42, a neurotoxic proteolytic derivate of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a central event in Alzheimer's disease (AD)(Amyloid hypothesis). Given the key role of APP-Aβ metabolism in AD pathogenesis, we selected 29 genes involved in APP processing, Aβ degradation and clearance. We then used exome and genome sequencing to investigate the single independent (single-variant association test) and cumulative (gene-based association test) effect of coding variants in these genes as potential susceptibility factors for AD, in a cohort composed of 332 sporadic and mainly late-onset AD cases and 676 elderly controls from North America and the UK. Our study shows that common coding variability in these genes does not play a major role for the disease development. In the single-variant association analysis, the main hits, none of which statistically significant after multiple testing correction (1.9e-4genes mainly involved in Aβ extracellular degradation (TTR, ACE), clearance (LRP1) and APP trafficking and recycling (SORL1). These results were partially replicated in the gene-based analysis (c-alpha and SKAT tests), that reports ECE1, LYZ and TTR as nominally associated to AD (1.7e-3 genes is not a critical factor for AD development and 2) Aβ degradation and clearance, rather than Aβ production, may play a key role in the etiology of sporadic AD. PMID:27249223

  12. Influence of Coding Variability in APP-Aβ Metabolism Genes in Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, Celeste; Ridge, Perry G.; Nalls, Michael A.; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K.; Troakes, Claire; Lunnon, Katie; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Brown, Kristelle S.; Medway, Christopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F.; Kauwe, John S.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Bras, Jose; Goate, Alison M.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Guerreiro, Rita; Hardy, John

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral deposition of Aβ42, a neurotoxic proteolytic derivate of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a central event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD)(Amyloid hypothesis). Given the key role of APP-Aβ metabolism in AD pathogenesis, we selected 29 genes involved in APP processing, Aβ degradation and clearance. We then used exome and genome sequencing to investigate the single independent (single-variant association test) and cumulative (gene-based association test) effect of coding variants in these genes as potential susceptibility factors for AD, in a cohort composed of 332 sporadic and mainly late-onset AD cases and 676 elderly controls from North America and the UK. Our study shows that common coding variability in these genes does not play a major role for the disease development. In the single-variant association analysis, the main hits, none of which statistically significant after multiple testing correction (1.9e-4genes mainly involved in Aβ extracellular degradation (TTR, ACE), clearance (LRP1) and APP trafficking and recycling (SORL1). These results were partially replicated in the gene-based analysis (c-alpha and SKAT tests), that reports ECE1, LYZ and TTR as nominally associated to AD (1.7e-3 genes is not a critical factor for AD development and 2) Aβ degradation and clearance, rather than Aβ production, may play a key role in the etiology of sporadic AD. PMID:27249223

  13. Influence of intron length on interaction characters between post-spliced intron and its CDS in ribosomal protein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoqing; Li, Hong; Bao, Tonglaga; Ying, Zhiqiang

    2012-09-01

    Many experiment evidences showed that sequence structures of introns and intron loss/gain can influence gene expression, but current mechanisms did not refer to the functions of post-spliced introns directly. We propose that postspliced introns play their functions in gene expression by interacting with their mRNA sequences and the interaction is characterized by the matched segments between introns and their CDS. In this study, we investigated the interaction characters with length series by improved Smith-Waterman local alignment software for the ribosomal protein genes in C. elegans and D. melanogaster. Our results showed that RF values of five intron groups are significantly high in the central non-conserved region and very low in 5'-end and 3'-end splicing region. It is interesting that the number of the optimal matched regions gradually increases with intron length. Distributions of the optimal matched regions are different for five intron groups. Our study revealed that there are more interaction regions between longer introns and their CDS than shorter, and it provides a positive pattern for regulating the gene expression.

  14. Social interaction influences blood cortisol values and brain aromatase genes in the protandrous false clown anemonefish, Amphiprion ocellaris.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Eri; Mikami, Kyohei; Manbo, Jun; Moriya-Ito, Keiko; Sasaki, Hideaki

    2012-12-01

    Anemonefish, Amphiprion spp., are socially controlled, protandrous sex changers with a monogamous mating system. Under certain conditions, sexually immature anemonefish with ambisexual gonads differentiate directly into males or females. Formation and maintenance of social rank in a group are considered key requirements for the induction of sex change or differentiation. Generally, each animal living in a social group experiences a different level of social stress in accordance with its social rank, and we hypothesize that the stress situation of individual anemonefish influences its sex determination. Groups of three sexually immature anemonefish were placed into each of five experimental tanks and kept for 10 days to allow for social rank formation and behavioral observation. The fish were then euthanized, and blood and brain samples were collected from each fish. The social rank of each individual was distinguishable from day 1 of the experiment. Aggressive behaviors were most frequent and blood Cortisol values were higher in dominant individuals. The transcription of mRNA for stress-related genes, i.e., those encoding for glucocorticoid and arginine vasotocin receptors, was higher in the brains of dominant individuals than in other social ranks. Furthermore, we detected higher transcription levels of gonad and brain aromatase genes, which encode the enzyme that converts androgens into estrogens, in the brains of dominant individuals. These results suggest that social rank reflects the blood Cortisol value, which in turn leads to sex differentiation by manipulating transcription of genes, including aromatase genes, in the brain.

  15. Preaching about the converted: how meiotic gene conversion influences genomic diversity.

    PubMed

    Cole, Francesca; Keeney, Scott; Jasin, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Meiotic crossover (CO) recombination involves a reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosomes. COs are often associated with gene conversion at the exchange site where genetic information is unidirectionally transferred from one chromosome to the other. COs and independent assortment of homologous chromosomes contribute significantly to the promotion of genomic diversity. What has not been appreciated is the contribution of another product of meiotic recombination, noncrossovers (NCOs), which result in gene conversion without exchange of flanking markers. Here, we review our comprehensive analysis of recombination at a highly polymorphic mouse hotspot. We found that NCOs make up ∼90% of recombination events. Preferential recombination initiation on one chromosome allowed us to estimate the contribution of CO and NCO gene conversion to transmission distortion, a deviation from Mendelian inheritance in the population. While NCO gene conversion tracts are shorter, and thus have a more punctate effect, their higher frequency translates into an approximately two-fold greater contribution than COs to gene conversion-based allelic shuffling and transmission distortion. We discuss the potential impact of mammalian NCO characteristics on evolution and genomic diversity. PMID:22954222

  16. Study Abroad Programs as Tools of Internationalization: Which Factors Influence Hungarian Business Students to Participate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huják, Janka

    2015-01-01

    The internationalization of higher education has been on the agenda for decades now all over the world. Study abroad programs are undoubtedly tools of the internationalization endeavors. The ERASMUS Student Mobility Program is one of the flagships of the European Union's educational exchange programs implicitly aiming for the internationalization…

  17. What's Working: Program Factors Influencing California Community College Basic Skills Mathematics Students' Advancement to Transfer Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiero, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which basic skills program factors were exhibited by successful basic skills programs that helped students advance to transfer-level mathematics. This study specifically examined California community college basic skills programs that assist students who place in mathematics courses 2 levels…

  18. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  19. Evaluation of the All Stars Program: Student and Teacher Factors that Influence Mediators of Substance Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Steven M.; Harrington, Nancy Grant; Fearnow-Kenney, Melodie

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relationship between students' perceptions of a problem behavior prevention program, All Stars, and changes in program variables-bonding; normative beliefs; ideals; and commitment. Three factors-Program Enjoyment, Student Engagement, and Teacher Relationship-were used to predict changes in four variables. Results indicate Student…

  20. An Evaluation of the Influence of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program in Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Nelda M.; Gross, John G.

    The report evaluates the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) in Missouri by comparing the dietary adequacy and nutrition knowledge of 200 program families representative of urban, small town and rural areas with that of 200 similarly representative non-program families. Data were gathered by personal interviews taken in March,…

  1. The influence of tissue procurement procedures on RNA integrity, gene expression, and morphology in porcine and human liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Kap, Marcel; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Kubista, Mikael; Oomen, Monique; Arshad, Shazia; Riegman, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The advent of molecular characterization of tissues has brought an increasing emphasis on the quality of biospecimens, starting with the tissue procurement process. RNA levels are particularly affected by factors in the collection process, but the influence of different pre-analytical factors is not well understood. Here we present the influence of tissue specimen size, as well as the transport and freezing protocols, on RNA quality. Large, medium, and smaller porcine liver samples were stored either dry, on moist gauze, or in salt solution for various times, and then frozen in either liquid nitrogen or in pre-cooled isopentane. Large and small human liver samples were frozen in pre-cooled isopentane either immediately or after one hour at room temperature. The small samples were stored dry, on moist gauze, or in salt solution. RNA was isolated and RIN values were measured. The RNA for six standard reference genes from human liver was analyzed by RT-qPCR, and tissue morphology was assessed for artifacts of freezing. Experiments using porcine liver samples showed that RNA derived from smaller samples was more degraded after one hour of cold ischemia, and that cooled transport is preferable. Human liver samples showed significant RNA degradation after 1 h of cold ischemia, which was more pronounced in smaller samples. RNA integrity was not significantly influenced by the transport or freezing method, but changes in gene expression were observed in samples either transported on gauze or in salt solution. Based on observations in liver samples, smaller samples are more subject to gene expression variability introduced by post-excision sample handling than are larger samples. Small biopsies should be transported on ice and snap frozen as soon as possible after acquisition from the patient. PMID:26035010

  2. Disruption of the circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte influences mycardial contractile function, metabolism, and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtually every mammalian cell, including cardiomyocytes, possesses an intrinsic circadian clock. The role of this transcriptionally based molecular mechanism in cardiovascular biology is poorly understood. We hypothesized that the circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte influences diurnal variatio...

  3. Nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism (G894T) influences arterial stiffness in adults: The Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Bond, M Gene; Tang, Rong; Urbina, Elaine M; Li, Shengxu; Boerwinkle, Eric; Berenson, Gerald S

    2004-07-01

    The endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene is known to influence the regulation of blood pressure (BP) levels. However, whether the eNOS gene locus influences arterial stiffness independently of BP is unknown. This study examines the independent effect of the eNOS gene polymorphism (G894T) on arterial stiffness in 118 African American and 285 white young adults, aged 25 to 37 years. Arterial stiffness was measured from M-mode ultrasounds of common carotid artery using Peterson's (Ep) and Young's (YEM) elastic modulus. African Americans displayed a lower frequency of the T allele than did whites (0.131 v 0.321, P <.001). The T allele was associated with lower systolic BP in African Americans (P =.04) but not in whites. African Americans showed significantly higher values of Ep (that is, increased stiffness) than did whites (49.9 kPa vs 45.5 kPa, P =.003), whereas no such difference in ethnicity was found for YEM, a measure of elasticity adjusted for relative wall thickness. After controlling for sex, age, body mass index, insulin, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure, the T allele was associated with significantly lower values of Ep (P =.037) and YEM (P =.068) in African Americans. Although the genotype effect on Ep and YEM was not significant in whites, trends were similar to those in African Americans. In the total sample, including ethnicity as an additional covariate, the G894T genotype was significantly associated with Ep (P =.046) and YEM (P =.035). These results suggest that the allelic variation (G894T) of the eNOS gene or a locus closely linked to it is associated with lower arterial wall stiffness, adjusting for BP levels, in young adults.

  4. The genome sequence of allopolyploid Brassica juncea and analysis of differential homoeolog gene expression influencing selection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinghua; Liu, Dongyuan; Wang, Xiaowu; Ji, Changmian; Cheng, Feng; Liu, Baoning; Hu, Zhongyuan; Chen, Sheng; Pental, Deepak; Ju, Youhui; Yao, Pu; Li, Xuming; Xie, Kun; Zhang, Jianhui; Wang, Jianlin; Liu, Fan; Ma, Weiwei; Shopan, Jannat; Zheng, Hongkun; Mackenzie, Sally A; Zhang, Mingfang

    2016-10-01

    The Brassica genus encompasses three diploid and three allopolyploid genomes, but a clear understanding of the evolution of agriculturally important traits via polyploidy is lacking. We assembled an allopolyploid Brassica juncea genome by shotgun and single-molecule reads integrated to genomic and genetic maps. We discovered that the A subgenomes of B. juncea and Brassica napus each had independent origins. Results suggested that A subgenomes of B. juncea were of monophyletic origin and evolved into vegetable-use and oil-use subvarieties. Homoeolog expression dominance occurs between subgenomes of allopolyploid B. juncea, in which differentially expressed genes display more selection potential than neutral genes. Homoeolog expression dominance in B. juncea has facilitated selection of glucosinolate and lipid metabolism genes in subvarieties used as vegetables and for oil production. These homoeolog expression dominance relationships among Brassicaceae genomes have contributed to selection response, predicting the directional effects of selection in a polyploid crop genome. PMID:27595476

  5. Evidence of a major gene influencing hair length and heat tolerance in Bos taurus cattle.

    PubMed

    Olson, T A; Lucena, C; Chase, C C; Hammond, A C

    2003-01-01

    Evidence was found that supports the existence of a major gene (designated as the slick hair gene), dominant in mode of inheritance, that is responsible for producing a very short, sleek hair coat. Cattle with slick hair were observed to maintain lower rectal temperatures (RT). The gene is found in Senepol cattle and criollo (Spanish origin) breeds in Central and South America. This gene is also found in a Venezuelan composite breed, the Carora, formed from the Brown Swiss and a Venezuelan criollo breed. Two sets of backcross matings of normal-haired sire breeds to Senepol crossbred dams assumed to be heterozygous for the slick hair gene resulted in ratios of slick to normal-haired progeny that did not significantly differ from 1:1. Data from Carora x Holstein crossbred cows in Venezuela also support the concept of a major gene that is responsible for the slick hair coat of the Carora breed. Cows that were 75% Holstein: 25% Carora in breed composition segregated with a ratio that did not differ from 1:1, as would be expected from a backcross matinginvolving a dominant gene. The effect of the slick hair gene on RT depended on the degree of heat stress and appeared to be affected by age and/or lactation status. The decreased RT observed for slick-haired crossbred calves compared to normal-haired contemporaries ranged from 0.18 to 0.4 degrees C. An even larger decrease in RT (0.61 degrees C; P < 0.01) was observed in lactating Carora x Holstein F1 crossbred cows, even though it did not appear that these cows were under severe heat stress. The improved thermotolerance of crossbred calves due to their slick hair coats did not result in increased weaning weights, possibly because both the slick and normal-haired calves were being nursed by slick-haired dams. There were indications that the slick-haired calves grew faster immediately following weaning and that their growth during the cooler months of the year was not compromised significantly by their reduced quantity of

  6. Influence of β2-adrenoceptor gene polymorphisms on β2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in human lung mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Kay, L J; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Suvarna, S K; Peachell, P T

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Previous studies have shown that β 2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in human lung mast cells are highly variable. The aims of the present study were to establish whether polymorphisms of the β 2-adrenoceptor gene (ADRB2) influence this variability in (a) β 2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition and (b) desensitization of β 2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in human lung mast cells. Experimental approach: Mast cells were isolated from human lung tissue. The inhibitory effects of the β-adrenoceptor agonist, isoprenaline (10−10–10−5 M), on IgE-mediated histamine release from mast cells were determined (n=92). Moreover, the inhibitory effects of isoprenaline were evaluated following a desensitizing treatment involving long-term (24 h) incubation of mast cells with isoprenaline (10−6 M) (n=65). A potential influence of polymorphisms on these functional responses was determined by genotyping 11 positions, in the promoter and coding regions, of ADRB2 previously reported as polymorphic. Key results: There was no influence of any of the polymorphic positions of ADRB2 on the potency of isoprenaline to inhibit histamine release from mast cells with the exception of position 491C>T (Thr164Ile). There was no influence of any of the polymorphic positions of ADRB2 on the extent of desensitization of the isoprenaline-mediated response following a desensitizing treatment except for position 46G>A (Gly16Arg). Analyses at the haplotype level indicated that there was no influence of haplotype on β 2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in mast cells. Conclusions and implications: These data indicate that certain polymorphisms in ADRB2 influence β 2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in human lung mast cells. PMID:17643132

  7. The use of reference gene selection programs to study the silvering transformation in a freshwater eel Anguilla australis: a cautionary tale

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has been the method of choice for the quantification of mRNA. Due to the various artifactual factors that may affect the accuracy of qPCR, internal reference genes are most often used to normalize qPCR data. Recently, many studies have employed computer programs such as GeNorm, BestKeeper and NormFinder in selecting reference genes, but very few statistically validate the outcomes of these programs. Thus, in this study, we selected reference genes for qPCR of liver and ovary samples of yellow (juvenile), migratory (silver) and 11-KT treated juveniles of New Zealand shortfinned eels (Anguilla australis) using the three computer programs and validate the selected genes statistically using REST 2009 software and the Mann-Whitney test. We also tested for the repeatability of use for the best reference genes by applying them to a data set obtained in a similar experiment conducted the previous year. Results Out of six candidate genes, the combination of 18 s and eef1 was found to be the best statistically validated reference for liver, while in ovary it was l36. However, discrepancies in gene rankings were found between the different programs. Also, statistical validation procedures showed that several genes put forward as being the best by the programs were in fact, regulated, making them unsuitable as reference genes. Additionally, eef1 which was found to be a suitable - though not the top ranked - reference gene for liver tissues in one year, was regulated in another. Conclusions Our study highlights the need for external validations of reference gene selections made by computer programs. Researchers need to be vigilant in validating and reporting the rationale for the use of reference gene in published studies. PMID:20860839

  8. vir genes influence conjugal transfer of the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Gelvin, S B; Habeck, L L

    1990-01-01

    Mutation of the genes virA, virB, virC, and virG of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens octopine-type Ti plasmid pTiR10 was found to cause a 100- to 10,000-fold decrease in the frequency of conjugal transfer of this plasmid between Agrobacterium cells. This effect was not absolute, however, in that it occurred only during early times (18 to 24 h) of induction of the conjugal transfer apparatus by octopine. Induction of these mutant Agrobacterium strains by octopine for longer periods (48 to 72 h) resulted in a normal conjugal transfer frequency. The effect of these vir gene mutations upon conjugation could be restored by the introduction of cosmids harboring wild-type copies of the corresponding disrupted vir genes into the mutant Agrobacterium strains. In addition, transfer of the self-mobilizable plasmid pPH1JI was not impaired in any of the mutant Agrobacterium strains tested. The effect of vir gene function on the conjugal transfer of the Ti plasmid suggests that a relationship may exist between the processes that control the transfer of the T-DNA from Agrobacterium to plant cells and the conjugal transfer of the Ti plasmid between bacterial cells. PMID:2155206

  9. Maternal environment interacts with modifier genes to influence progression of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ratelade, Julien; Lavin, Tiphaine Aguirre; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Morisset, Ludivine; Mollet, Géraldine; Boyer, Olivia; Chen, Deborah S; Henger, Anna; Kretzler, Matthias; Hubner, Norbert; Théry, Clotilde; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Montagutelli, Xavier; Antignac, Corinne; Esquivel, Ernie L

    2008-08-01

    Mutations in the NPHS2 gene, which encodes podocin, are responsible for some cases of sporadic and familial autosomal recessive steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Inter- and intrafamilial variability in the progression of renal disease among patients bearing NPHS2 mutations suggests a potential role for modifier genes. Using a mouse model in which the podocin gene is constitutively inactivated, we sought to identify genetic determinants of the development and progression of renal disease as a result of the nephrotic syndrome. We report that the evolution of renal disease as a result of nephrotic syndrome in Nphs2-null mice depends on genetic background. Furthermore, the maternal environment significantly interacts with genetic determinants to modify survival and progression of renal disease. Quantitative trait locus mapping suggested that these genetic determinants may be encoded for by genes on the distal end of chromosome 3, which are linked to proteinuria, and on the distal end of chromosome 7, which are linked to a composite trait of urea, creatinine, and potassium. These loci demonstrate epistatic interactions with other chromosomal regions, highlighting the complex genetics of renal disease progression. In summary, constitutive inactivation of podocin models the complex interactions between maternal and genetically determined factors on the progression of renal disease as a result of nephrotic syndrome in mice.

  10. Parasitization by Scleroderma guani influences expression of superoxide dismutase genes in Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Ze, Sang-Zi; Stanley, David W; Yang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme involved in detoxifying reactive oxygen species. In this study, we identified genes encoding the extracellular and intracellular copper-zinc SODs (ecCuZnSOD and icCuZnSOD) and a manganese SOD (MnSOD) in the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor. The cDNAs for ecCuZnSOD, icCuZnSOD, and MnSOD, respectively, encode 24.55, 15.81, and 23.14 kDa polypeptides, which possess structural features typical of other insect SODs. They showed 20-94% identity to other known SOD sequences from Bombyx mori, Musca domestica, Nasonia vitripennis, Pediculus humanus corporis, and Tribolium castaneum. Expression of these genes was analyzed in selected tissues and developmental stages, and following exposure to Escherichia coli and parasitization by Scleroderma guani. We recorded expression of all three SODs in cuticle, fat body, and hemocytes and in the major developmental stages. Relatively higher expressions were detected in late-instar larvae and pupae, compared to other developmental stages. Transcriptional levels were upregulated following bacterial infection. Analysis of pupae parasitized by S. guani revealed that expression of T. molitor SOD genes was significantly induced following parasitization. We infer that these genes act in immune response and in host-parasitoid interactions. PMID:25042129

  11. Tumour sampling method can significantly influence gene expression profiles derived from neoadjuvant window studies

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Dominic A.; Arthur, Laura M.; Turnbull, Arran K.; Renshaw, Lorna; Sabine, Vicky S.; Thomas, Jeremy S.; Bartlett, John M. S.; Dixon, J. Michael; Sims, Andrew H.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-matched transcriptomic studies using tumour samples before and after treatment allow inter-patient heterogeneity to be controlled, but tend not to include an untreated comparison. Here, Illumina BeadArray technology was used to measure dynamic changes in gene expression from thirty-seven paired diagnostic core and surgically excised breast cancer biopsies obtained from women receiving no treatment prior to surgery, to determine the impact of sampling method and tumour heterogeneity. Despite a lack of treatment and perhaps surprisingly, consistent changes in gene expression were identified during the diagnosis-surgery interval (48 up, 2 down; Siggenes FDR 0.05) in a manner independent of both subtype and sampling-interval length. Instead, tumour sampling method was seen to directly impact gene expression, with similar effects additionally identified in six published breast cancer datasets. In contrast with previous findings, our data does not support the concept of a significant wounding or immune response following biopsy in the absence of treatment and instead implicates a hypoxic response following the surgical biopsy. Whilst sampling-related gene expression changes are evident in treated samples, they are secondary to those associated with response to treatment. Nonetheless, sampling method remains a potential confounding factor for neoadjuvant study design. PMID:27384960

  12. Polymorphisms in the hemagglutinin gene influenced the viral shedding of pandemic 2009 influenza virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contribution of influenza virus quasi-species for transmission efficiency and replication is poorly understood. In the present study we show that naturally occurring polymorphisms present in the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of two 2009 pandemic H1N1 isolates, A/California/04/2009 (Ca/09) and A/Mexico...

  13. Parasitization by Scleroderma guani influences expression of superoxide dismutase genes in Tenebrio molitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme involved in detoxifying reactive oxygen species. In this study, we identified genes encoding the extracellular and intracellular copper-zinc SODs (ecCuZnSOD and icCuZnSOD) and a manganese SOD (MnSOD) in the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor....

  14. Parasitization by Scleroderma guani influences expression of superoxide dismutase genes in Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Ze, Sang-Zi; Stanley, David W; Yang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme involved in detoxifying reactive oxygen species. In this study, we identified genes encoding the extracellular and intracellular copper-zinc SODs (ecCuZnSOD and icCuZnSOD) and a manganese SOD (MnSOD) in the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor. The cDNAs for ecCuZnSOD, icCuZnSOD, and MnSOD, respectively, encode 24.55, 15.81, and 23.14 kDa polypeptides, which possess structural features typical of other insect SODs. They showed 20-94% identity to other known SOD sequences from Bombyx mori, Musca domestica, Nasonia vitripennis, Pediculus humanus corporis, and Tribolium castaneum. Expression of these genes was analyzed in selected tissues and developmental stages, and following exposure to Escherichia coli and parasitization by Scleroderma guani. We recorded expression of all three SODs in cuticle, fat body, and hemocytes and in the major developmental stages. Relatively higher expressions were detected in late-instar larvae and pupae, compared to other developmental stages. Transcriptional levels were upregulated following bacterial infection. Analysis of pupae parasitized by S. guani revealed that expression of T. molitor SOD genes was significantly induced following parasitization. We infer that these genes act in immune response and in host-parasitoid interactions.

  15. Tumour sampling method can significantly influence gene expression profiles derived from neoadjuvant window studies.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Dominic A; Arthur, Laura M; Turnbull, Arran K; Renshaw, Lorna; Sabine, Vicky S; Thomas, Jeremy S; Bartlett, John M S; Dixon, J Michael; Sims, Andrew H

    2016-07-07

    Patient-matched transcriptomic studies using tumour samples before and after treatment allow inter-patient heterogeneity to be controlled, but tend not to include an untreated comparison. Here, Illumina BeadArray technology was used to measure dynamic changes in gene expression from thirty-seven paired diagnostic core and surgically excised breast cancer biopsies obtained from women receiving no treatment prior to surgery, to determine the impact of sampling method and tumour heterogeneity. Despite a lack of treatment and perhaps surprisingly, consistent changes in gene expression were identified during the diagnosis-surgery interval (48 up, 2 down; Siggenes FDR 0.05) in a manner independent of both subtype and sampling-interval length. Instead, tumour sampling method was seen to directly impact gene expression, with similar effects additionally identified in six published breast cancer datasets. In contrast with previous findings, our data does not support the concept of a significant wounding or immune response following biopsy in the absence of treatment and instead implicates a hypoxic response following the surgical biopsy. Whilst sampling-related gene expression changes are evident in treated samples, they are secondary to those associated with response to treatment. Nonetheless, sampling method remains a potential confounding factor for neoadjuvant study design.

  16. Influence of RNAi knockdown for E-complex genes on the silkworm proleg development.

    PubMed

    Xiang, H; Li, M W; Guo, J H; Jiang, J H; Huang, Y P

    2011-01-01

    Larvae of many holometabolous insects possess abdominal appendages called prolegs. Lepidoptera larvae have prolegs in the segments A3-A6. Functions of Lepidoptera hox genes on these abdominal appendages development is still a controversial issue. In this article, we report the use of double strand RNA (dsRNA)-mediated interference (RNAi) to dissect the function of some hox genes, specifically E-complex genes Ubx, abd-A, and Abd-B, in the ventral appendage development of the Lepidoptera silkworm, Bombyx mori. We found that Ubx RNAi caused leg identity in A1 segment, abd-A RNAi caused severe defect of abdominal prolegs and Abd-B RNAi allowed proleg identity in more posterior abdominal segments. These results confirm that Lepidoptera hox genes Ubx and Abd-B have evolved the repressing function to ventral appendage development, which is similar to those of Drosophila. However, Lepidoptera abd-A might have been modified distinctively during evolution, and has important roles in directing the development of prolegs.

  17. Influence of Smoking on Colonic Gene Expression Profile in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Csillag, Claudio; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Olsen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Background The development and course of Crohn's disease (CD) is related to both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been found to exacerbate the course of CD by increasing the risk of developing fistulas and strictures as well as the need for surgery, possibly because of an interaction between smoking or nicotine on macrophage function and the intestinal microvasculature. Several genes are involved in the pathogenesis of CD, and in this study the gene expression differences of the descending colonic mucosa were investigated in CD (smokers or never smokers) and controls (smokers or never smokers). Aim To identify any difference in gene expression of the descending colonic mucosa between smoking and never-smoking CD patients (and controls) by determining genetic expression profiles from microarray analysis. Methods Fifty-seven specimens were obtained by routine colonoscopy from the included material: CD smokers (n = 28) or never-smokers (n = 14) as compared to fifteen healthy controls (8 smokers and 7 never-smokers). RNA was isolated and gene expression assessed with Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0. Data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), Wilcoxon rank sum test and multiple linear regressions. Real-time (RT) PCR was subsequently applied to verify microarray results. Results The PCA analysis showed no intrinsic clustering of smokers versus never-smokers. However, when Wilcoxon rank sum test corrected with Q values were performed, six known genes were significantly expressed differently in the inflamed CD smokers as compared to the inflamed CD never-smokers: ring finger protein 138 (RNF138), metalothionein 2A (MT2A) and six transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate 3 (STEAP3), SA hypertension-associated homolog, PGM2L1 and KCNJ2. The subsequent RT-PCR-analyses verified, however, that only RNF138, MT2A and STEAP3 were significantly up-regulated in CD smokers in specimens with inflammatory activity of the

  18. Lead poisoning influences TCR-related gene expression patterns in peripheral blood T-lymphocytes of exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuzhe; Yu, Wei; Fang, Su; Liu, Sichu; Yang, Zhiqian; Liu, Weiwei; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Li, Bo; Li, Yangqiu

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that occupational lead (Pb) exposure might influence human T-lymphocyte function, including such as changes in T-cell receptor (TCR) Vβ and Vγ repertoire and in expression of the TCRζ gene. Thus, the study here further investigated expression of TCRζ-related factors and the FcεRIγ gene (whose product has a functional role complementary to the TCRζ chain) and the Elf-1 gene whose product is involved in regulation of TCR expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure expression of TCRζ, FcεRIγ, and Elf-1 genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from 17 Pb-exposed workers. Samples were collected before and after the workers had undergone chelation therapy regimens. Twenty-three healthy individuals served as controls. The results showed that TCRζ, FcεRIγ, and Elf-1 gene expression in Pb-exposed workers before chelation therapy was significantly lower than in PBMC from healthy individuals. After chelation therapy, expression of TCRζ appeared to trend toward normal levels; in comparison, lower expressions of FcεRIγ and Elf-1 persisted. In conclusion, the previously-documented impairment of T-lymphocyte functions and T- lymphocyte-mediated immune responses seen previously in response to occupational Pb exposure might be attributable, in part, to effects on TCR signaling pathways - including those related to TCRζ and FcεRIγ - and to any down-regulation of membrane TCRζ expression/activity that might be associated with Pb-induced effects on Elf-1 expression.

  19. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery.

    PubMed

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. PMID:27172221

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C.; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. PMID:27172221

  1. Influence of acetaminophen vehicle on regulation of transporter gene expression during hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Aleksunes, Lauren M; Augustine, Lisa M; Cherrington, Nathan J; Manautou, José E

    2007-11-01

    Researchers who study acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity use either a 50% propylene glycol solution or saline as a diluent. Previous studies demonstrated differential expression of hepatobiliary transporter mRNA in mice treated with a toxic dose of APAP dissolved in 50% propylene glycol. The purpose of this study was to determine whether using saline as a diluent for APAP alters regulation of transporter gene expression during hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice received acetaminophen (APAP 400 mg/kg, i.p. in saline) or saline (20 ml/kg). Plasma and liver samples were collected at 24 and 48 h for assessment of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity and gene expression. It was determined that plasma ALT activity was elevated at 24 and 48 h after APAP administration. Using the branched DNA signal amplification assay, reductions in organic anion-transporting polypeptides Oatp1a1, Oatp1b2, sodium/taurocholate-cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp), and bile salt export pump (Bsep) mRNA were observed in APAP-treated mice. In contrast, multidrug resistance-associated proteins Mrp1, Mrp2, Mrp3, and Mrp4, as well as multidrug resistance proteins Mdr1a and Mdr1b genes, were increased following APAP. No changes in Oatp1a4, Mdr2, or breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mRNA were observed. Alterations in transporter gene expression in this study were similar to those reported previously using propylene glycol as diluent. With the exceptions of Oatp1a1, Ntcp, and Mrp1, these data mirror previous results suggesting that the solution used to dissolve APAP may alter the susceptibility of mice to hepatotoxicity, but only minimally change the regulation of transporter gene expression.

  2. The influence of T cell receptor and cytokine genes on sarcoidosis susceptibility in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, B A; Maliarik, M J; Malvitz, E; Sheffer, R G; Major, M; Popovich, J; Iannuzzi, M C

    1999-09-01

    The pathogenesis of sarcoidosis, a multisystem granulomatous disorder, is mediated through immunoregulatory pathways. While sarcoidosis clusters in families, inherited risk factors remain undefined. In search of possible sarcoidosis susceptibility genes, we examined anonymous polymorphic genetic markers tightly linked to six different candidate gene regions on chromosomes 2q13, 5q31, 6p23-25, 7p14-15, 14q11 and 22q11. These candidate regions contain T cell receptor, interleukin (IL) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) genes. Our study population consisted of 105 African-American sarcoidosis cases and 95 unrelated healthy controls. The allelic frequency distribution of two out of the six markers, IL-1 alpha marker (p = 0.010) on 2q13 and the F13A marker (p = 0.0006) on 6p23-25, was statistically significantly different in cases compared with controls. The two alleles most strongly associated with sarcoidosis were IL-1 alpha*137 (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.60; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.36-4.98) and F13A*188 (OR = 2.42; 95% CI = 1.37-4.30). Individuals that had both of these alleles were at a six-fold increased risk for sarcoidosis (OR = 6.19; 95% CI = 2.54-15.10). Restricting the analysis to cases with at least one first or second-degree relative affected with sarcoidosis increased the OR to 15.38. IL-1 levels are elevated in sarcoidosis and the F13A marker is tightly linked to a gene that codes for a newly identified interferon regulatory factor protein (IRF-4), which is thought to play a role in T cell effector functions. Our results suggest genetic susceptibility to sarcoidosis may be conferred by more than one immune-related gene that act synergistically on disease risk.

  3. Influence of the corn resistance gene Mv on the fitness of Peregrinus maidis (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) and on the transmission of maize mosaic virus (Rhabdoviridae: Nucleorhabdovirus).

    PubMed

    Higashi, C H V; Brewbaker, J L; Bressan, A

    2013-08-01

    Crops that are resistant to pests and pathogens are cost-effective for the management of pests and diseases. A corn (Zea mays L.) breeding program conducted in Hawaii has identified a source of heritable resistance to maize mosaic virus (MMV) (Rhabdoviridae: Nucleorhabdovirus). This resistance is controlled by the gene Mv, which has been shown to have a codominant action. To date, no studies have examined whether the resistance associated with this gene affects only MMV or whether it also affects the insect vector, the corn planthopper Peregrinus maidis (Ashmead) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). Here, we examined the life history of the corn planthopper and its ability to transmit MMV on near isogenic lines that were homozygous dominant (Mv/Mv), homozygous recessive (mv/mv), or heterozygous (Mv/mv) for the gene. A field trial was also conducted to study the colonization of the corn plants with different genotypes by the planthopper. Although field observations revealed slightly lower densities ofplanthoppers on corn with the genotype Mv/Mv than on the inbreds with the genotype mv/mv and their hybrids with the genotype Mv/mv, laboratory assays showed no effects of the gene on planthopper development, longevity, or fecundity. In the field, the corn lines Mv/Mv had a lower incidence of MMV-infected plants. However, in the greenhouse, the transmission of MMV to corn seedlings did not differ across the near isogenic lines, although the corn lines Mv/Mv showed a delayed onset of symptoms compared with the corn lines mv/mv and Mv/mv. The acquisition of MMV by corn planthoppers on the corn genotypes Mv/Mv and Mv/mv averaged 0.2, whereas the acquisition on the corn genotypes mv/mv averaged > 0.3. Our results show that the Mv gene does not influence the fitness of the planthopper vector, suggesting that it may confer resistance by other means, possibly by limiting virus replication or movement within the host plant.

  4. Sensitive ChIP-DSL technology reveals an extensive estrogen receptor alpha-binding program on human gene promoters.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Soo; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Hutt, Kasey R; Cheng, Christine S; Jin, Mingjie; Liu, Dongyan; Benner, Chris; Wang, Dong; Ye, Zhen; Bibikova, Marina; Fan, Jian-Bing; Duan, Lingxun; Glass, Christopher K; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2007-03-20

    ChIP coupled with microarray provides a powerful tool to determine in vivo binding profiling of transcription factors to deduce regulatory circuitries in mammalian cells. Aiming at improving the specificity and sensitivity of such analysis, we developed a new technology called ChIP-DSL using the DNA selection and ligation (DSL) strategy, permitting robust analysis with much reduced materials compared with standard procedures. We profiled general and sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factors using a full human genome promoter array based on the ChIP-DSL technology, revealing an unprecedented number of the estrogen receptor (ERalpha) target genes in MCF-7 cells. Coupled with gene expression profiling, we found that only a fraction of these direct ERalpha target genes were highly responsive to estrogen and that the expression of those ERalpha-bound, estrogen-inducible genes was associated with breast cancer progression in humans. This study demonstrates the power of the ChIP-DSL technology in revealing regulatory gene expression programs that have been previously invisible in the human genome.

  5. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (Antarctic Peninsula): Sedimentology of glacially influenced continental margin topsets and foresets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eyles, N.; Daniels, J.; Osterman, L.E.; Januszczak, N.

    2001-01-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (February-April 1998) drilled two sites (Sites 1097 and 1103) on the outer Antarctic Peninsula Pacific continental shelf. Recovered strata are no older than late Miocene or early Pliocene (<4.6 Ma). Recovery at shallow depths in loosely consolidated and iceberg-turbated bouldery sediment was poor but improved with increasing depth and consolidation to allow description of lithofacies and biofacies and interpretation of depositional environment. Site 1097 lies on the outer shelf within Marguerite Trough which is a major outlet for ice expanding seaward from the Antarctic Peninsula and reached a maximum depth drilled of 436.6 m below the sea floor (mbsf). Seismic stratigraphic data show flat-lying upper strata resting on strata that dip gently seaward. Uppermost strata, to a depth of 150 mbsf, were poorly recovered, but data suggest they consist of diamictites containing reworked and abraded marine microfauna. This interval is interpreted as having been deposited largely as till produced by subglacial cannibalization of marine sediments (deformation till) recording ice sheet expansion across the shelf. Underlying gently dipping strata show massive, stratified and graded diamictite facies with common bioturbation and slump stuctures that are interbedded with laminated and massive mudstones with dropstones. The succession contains a well-preserved in situ marine microfauna typical of open marine and proglacial marine environments. The lower gently dipping succession at Site 1097 is interpreted as a complex of sediment gravity flows formed of poorly sorted glacial debris. Site 1103 was drilled in that part of the continental margin that shows uppermost flat-lying continental shelf topsets overlying steeper dipping slope foresets seaward of a structural mid-shelf high. Drilling reached a depth of 363 mbsf with good recovery in steeply dipping continental slope foreset strata. Foreset strata are dominated by massive and chaotically

  6. Perinatal malnutrition programs gene expression of leptin receptors isoforms in testis and prostate of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Gombar, Flavia Meireles; Ramos, Cristiane Fonte

    2013-06-10

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate if maternal malnutrition during lactation programs the expression of leptin receptor isoforms in the testes and prostate ventral lobe of adult rats. At delivery, Wistar rats were separated into 3 groups: control group (C) with free access to a standard laboratory diet containing 22% protein; protein-energy restricted group (PER) with free access to an isoenergy and protein-restricted diet containing 8% protein; and energy-restricted group (ER) receiving standard laboratory diet in restricted quantities, which were calculated according to the mean ingestion of the PER group. All animals were sacrificed at 90 days of age. Both PER and ER groups presented low body weight from the first days after birth, however, while the ER group reached the control weight around day 80, the body weight of PER group was significantly lower compared to controls until the day the animals were killed. In relation to tissue weight, only the relative testis weight of the ER group presented an alteration compared to the control group (p<0.03). There was also no alteration in the leptin serum levels among the groups. The main leptin receptors isoforms, OBRa and OBRb were significantly increased in the testis (OBRa: C=0.71±0.10; PER=1.14±0.17; ER=1.92±0.70, p<0.0007, OBRb: C=0.87±0.04; PER=1.20±0.05; ER=1.44±0.17, p<0.001) and prostate (OBRa: C=0.70±0.18; PER=1.30±0.14; ER=1.65±0.22, p<0.014, OBRb: C=0.77±0.14; PER=1.16±0.04; ER=1.30±0.13, p<0.027) of both malnourished groups. However, the testis OBRc (C=1.52±0.06; PER=1.35±0.23; ER=3.50±0.72, p<0.023) and OBRf (C=1.31±0.12; PER=1.66±0.27; ER=3.47±0.55, p<0.009) and prostate OBRc (C=0.48±0.13; ER=1.18±0.34, p<0.01) and OBRf (C=0.73±0.15; PER=0.99±0.11; ER=1.83±0.30, p<0.016) isoforms were significantly increased only in the ER group. The results presented here show for the first time that both testis and prostate leptin receptor isoforms gene expression are programmed by perinatal

  7. [The study of influence of stresses on virulence genes expression in foodborne pathogens Campylobacter jejuni].

    PubMed

    Efimochkina, N R; Bykova, I B; Markova, Yu M; Korotkevich, Yu V; Sheveleva, S A

    2016-01-01

    The study of the responses to cold exposure in Campylobacterjejuni (C. jejuni)--one of the most common foodborne pathogens is important for elucidating the mechanisms of acquisition of products contaminated with campylobacter, hazardous properties. These data are also necessary to create effective systems of microbiological controls at all stages of production and storage of food. 5 pairs of oligonucleotide primers were selected for detecting of genes cadF, cdtB, ciaB, flaA, iamA, encoding the main factors of pathogenicity of foodborne pathogens Campylobacter jejuni--adhesion and invasion of epithelial cells, production of CDT-toxin and mobility. To quantify the expression levels of target genes of C. jejuni a comparative method of determining the amount of amplification products of genes encoding pathogenicity factors of Campylobacter spp. has been developed using real-time PCR with intercalating dyes. To calculate and quantify gene expression the mathematical models have been obtained that allow extrapolation of threshold cycles of amplification to the initial number of copies of RNA/DNA in the tested samples. It has been established that exposure of C. jejuni at low temperatures +4 degrees C did not lead to increased levels of expression of genes cdtB and ciaB. However, in the populations of C. jejuni subjected to freezing, followed by incubation at optimum for the pathogen temperature of +42 degrees C, the increase in expression of mRNA encoding protein subunit B of CDT-toxin and antigenic marker of invasion took place. The number of copies of RNA in C. jejuni after stress exposure increased by 1.14-2.6 lg in comparison with intact cultures. CdtB and ciaB gene expression in C. jejuni can serve as an indicator of cell response to stress and helps to restore the functions of the bacterial cells after the termination of cold exposure and return of the pathogen in conditions favourable to the realization of its pathogenic potential. PMID:27228703

  8. [The study of influence of stresses on virulence genes expression in foodborne pathogens Campylobacter jejuni].

    PubMed

    Efimochkina, N R; Bykova, I B; Markova, Yu M; Korotkevich, Yu V; Sheveleva, S A

    2016-01-01

    The study of the responses to cold exposure in Campylobacterjejuni (C. jejuni)--one of the most common foodborne pathogens is important for elucidating the mechanisms of acquisition of products contaminated with campylobacter, hazardous properties. These data are also necessary to create effective systems of microbiological controls at all stages of production and storage of food. 5 pairs of oligonucleotide primers were selected for detecting of genes cadF, cdtB, ciaB, flaA, iamA, encoding the main factors of pathogenicity of foodborne pathogens Campylobacter jejuni--adhesion and invasion of epithelial cells, production of CDT-toxin and mobility. To quantify the expression levels of target genes of C. jejuni a comparative method of determining the amount of amplification products of genes encoding pathogenicity factors of Campylobacter spp. has been developed using real-time PCR with intercalating dyes. To calculate and quantify gene expression the mathematical models have been obtained that allow extrapolation of threshold cycles of amplification to the initial number of copies of RNA/DNA in the tested samples. It has been established that exposure of C. jejuni at low temperatures +4 degrees C did not lead to increased levels of expression of genes cdtB and ciaB. However, in the populations of C. jejuni subjected to freezing, followed by incubation at optimum for the pathogen temperature of +42 degrees C, the increase in expression of mRNA encoding protein subunit B of CDT-toxin and antigenic marker of invasion took place. The number of copies of RNA in C. jejuni after stress exposure increased by 1.14-2.6 lg in comparison with intact cultures. CdtB and ciaB gene expression in C. jejuni can serve as an indicator of cell response to stress and helps to restore the functions of the bacterial cells after the termination of cold exposure and return of the pathogen in conditions favourable to the realization of its pathogenic potential.

  9. Motor programming is not the only process which can influence RT: some thoughts on the Marteniuk and MacKenzie analysis.

    PubMed

    Klapp, S T

    1981-12-01

    The current status of research on the memory drum theory is evaluated with emphasis on the issues raised by Marteniuk and MacKenzie (1981). A general theme emerging from this review is that response programming is not the only process which can influence RT and that distinguishing programming from non-programming effects clarifies rather than "clouds" the issues.

  10. Individual and Institutional Influences on Faith-Based Health and Wellness Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bopp, Melissa; Fallon, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of the US population is affiliated with faith-based organizations (FBO). Health and wellness activities (HWAs) within FBOs have great potential for reach, though the factors influencing faith-based HWA are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine individual faith leader and institutional influences on HWAs offered…

  11. Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Includes a collection of eight short articles describing model community college programs. Discusses a literacy program, a mobile computer classroom, a support program for at-risk students, a timber-harvesting program, a multimedia presentation on successful women graduates, a career center, a collaboration with NASA, and an Israeli engineering…

  12. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and retinoblastoma gene-deficient MEFs (Rb-/- MEFs). Findings Comparative analysis of the expression profiles of 3T3-L1 cells and wild-type MEFs revealed genes involved specifically in early regulation of the adipocyte differentiation as well as secreted factors and signaling molecules regulating the later phase of differentiation. In an attempt to identify transcription factors regulating adipogenesis, bioinformatics analysis of the promoters of coordinately and highly expressed genes was performed. We were able to identify a number of high-confidence target genes for follow-up experimental studies. Additionally, combination of experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1. To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs) for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis of 64 deregulated genes showed that the Rb-/- MEF model exhibits a brown(-like) adipocyte phenotype. Additionally, the analysis results indicate a different or additional role for pRb family member involvement in the lineage commitment. Conclusion In this study a number of commonly modulated genes during adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells and MEFs, potential transcriptional regulation mechanisms, and differentially regulated targets during adipocyte differentiation of Rb

  13. The use and influence of employee incentives on participation and throughput in a telephonic disease management program.

    PubMed

    Wilhide, Calvin; Hayes, John R; Farah, J Ramsay

    2008-08-01

    Participation rates are often viewed by vendors and employer-based disease management (DM) services as an important benchmark of successful program implementation. Although participation is commonly understood to vary widely between and within employer groups, little is known about the role of incentives on rates of participation and graduation from DM programs. This study examined the use of incentives, employer characteristics, and perceptions of employee-employer communication on participation and program throughput. The relationship between incentive use and rates of participation and throughput among 87 employer groups from the 2004 company portfolio were assessed using existing account information. Detailed information on the highest and lowest third of the sample was obtained through interviews with account representatives. Wilcoxon, chi square, and regression analyses were used to examine the influence of employer characteristics and incentive factors on enrollee participation rates and program completion. Fifty-two percent of the accounts offered incentives for participation. From 1% to 23% of the eligible employees enrolled and completed the DM program. Incentives had a direct impact on participation, with amounts greater than $50 the most effective. Participation increased with communication tools including e-mail, high-blast (repeated) communications, and health fairs. Results suggest that cash incentives and communication play a significant role in rates of participation and program completion.

  14. Influence of age on clock gene expression in peripheral blood cells of healthy women.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hitoshi; Ushijima, Kentarou; Kumazaki, Masafumi; Takamura, Toshinari; Yokota, Noritsugu; Saito, Tetsuo; Irie, Shin; Kaneko, Shuichi; Fujimura, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a close relationship between circadian clock function and the development of obesity and various age-related diseases. In this study, we investigated whether messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of clock genes are associated with age, body mass index, blood pressures, fasting plasma glucose, or shift work. Peripheral blood cells were obtained from 70 healthy women, including 25 shift workers, at approximately 9:00 AM. Transcript levels of clock genes (CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, and PER3) were determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated that BMAL1 mRNA levels were correlated only with age (beta = -.50, p < .001). In contrast, PER3 levels were correlated with fasting plasma glucose (beta = -.29, p < .05) and shift work (beta = .31, p < .05). These results suggest that increased age, glucose intolerance, and irregular hours independently affect the intracellular clock in humans.

  15. Epigenetics: Behavioral Influences on Gene Function, Part I: Maternal Behavior Permanently Affects Adult Behavior in Offspring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogren, Marilee P.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    The article highlights the field of epigenetics and its relevance in determining the effects of maternal nurturing on behavioral patterns in offsprings. Results concluded that maternal behavior influences the offspring's behavior to stress in adulthood and the effects are transgenerational through epigenetic mechanisms.

  16. Social environment influences the relationship between genotype and gene expression in wild baboons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variation in the social environment can have profound effects on survival and reproduction in wild social mammals. However, we know little about the degree to which these effects are influenced by genetic differences among individuals, and, conversely, the degree to which social environmental variat...

  17. Diet-induced changes in maternal gut microbiota and metabolomic profiles influence programming of offspring obesity risk in rats.

    PubMed

    Paul, Heather A; Bomhof, Marc R; Vogel, Hans J; Reimer, Raylene A

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity and overnutrition during pregnancy and lactation can program an increased risk of obesity in offspring. In this context, improving maternal metabolism may help reduce the intergenerational transmission of obesity. Here we show that, in Sprague-Dawley rats, selectively altering obese maternal gut microbial composition with prebiotic treatment reduces maternal energy intake, decreases gestational weight gain, and prevents increased adiposity in dams and their offspring. Maternal serum metabolomics analysis, along with satiety hormone and gut microbiota analysis, identified maternal metabolic signatures that could be implicated in programming offspring obesity risk and highlighted the potential influence of maternal gut microbiota on maternal and offspring metabolism. In particular, the metabolomic signature of insulin resistance in obese rats normalized when dams consumed the prebiotic. In summary, prebiotic intake during pregnancy and lactation improves maternal metabolism in diet-induced obese rats in a manner that attenuates the detrimental nutritional programming of offspring associated with maternal obesity. Overall, these findings contribute to our understanding of the maternal mechanisms influencing the developmental programming of offspring obesity and provide compelling pre-clinical evidence for a potential strategy to improve maternal and offspring metabolic outcomes in human pregnancy.

  18. Diet-induced changes in maternal gut microbiota and metabolomic profiles influence programming of offspring obesity risk in rats

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Heather A.; Bomhof, Marc R.; Vogel, Hans J.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity and overnutrition during pregnancy and lactation can program an increased risk of obesity in offspring. In this context, improving maternal metabolism may help reduce the intergenerational transmission of obesity. Here we show that, in Sprague-Dawley rats, selectively altering obese maternal gut microbial composition with prebiotic treatment reduces maternal energy intake, decreases gestational weight gain, and prevents increased adiposity in dams and their offspring. Maternal serum metabolomics analysis, along with satiety hormone and gut microbiota analysis, identified maternal metabolic signatures that could be implicated in programming offspring obesity risk and highlighted the potential influence of maternal gut microbiota on maternal and offspring metabolism. In particular, the metabolomic signature of insulin resistance in obese rats normalized when dams consumed the prebiotic. In summary, prebiotic intake during pregnancy and lactation improves maternal metabolism in diet-induced obese rats in a manner that attenuates the detrimental nutritional programming of offspring associated with maternal obesity. Overall, these findings contribute to our understanding of the maternal mechanisms influencing the developmental programming of offspring obesity and provide compelling pre-clinical evidence for a potential strategy to improve maternal and offspring metabolic outcomes in human pregnancy. PMID:26868870

  19. Influence of Immune Responses in Gene/Stem Cell Therapies for Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Sitzia, Clementina; Erratico, Silvia; Torrente, Yvan

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases, caused by mutations in different components of sarcolemma, extracellular matrix, or enzymes. Inflammation and innate or adaptive immune response activation are prominent features of MDs. Various therapies under development are directed toward rescuing the dystrophic muscle damage using gene transfer or cell therapy. Here we discussed current knowledge about involvement of immune system responses to experimental therapies in MDs. PMID:24959590

  20. Influence of rimonabant treatment on peripheral blood mononuclear cells; flow cytometry analysis and gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Almestrand, Stefan; Wang, Xiao; Jeppsson-Ahlberg, Åsa; Nordgren, Marcus; Flygare, Jenny; Christensson, Birger; Rössner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonist rimonabant has been used as treatment for obesity. In addition, anti-proliferative effects on mitogen-activated leukocytes have been demonstrated in vitro. We have previously shown that rimonabant (SR141716A) induces cell death in ex vivo isolated malignant lymphomas with high expression of CB1 receptors. Since CB1 targeting may be part of a future lymphoma therapy, it was of interest to investigate possible effects on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients treated with rimonabant. We therefore evaluated leukocyte subsets by 6 color flow cytometry in eight patients before and at treatment with rimonabant for 4 weeks. Whole-transcript gene expression profiling in PBMC before and at 4 weeks of rimonabant treatment was done using Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Our data show no significant changes of monocytes, B cells, total T cells or T cell subsets in PBMC during treatment with rimonabant. There was a small but significant increase in CD3–, CD16+ and/or CD56+ cells after rimonabant therapy. Gene expression analysis detected significant changes in expression of genes associated with innate immunity, cell death and metabolism. The present study shows that normal monocytes and leukocyte subsets in blood remain rather constant during rimonabant treatment. This is in contrast to the induction of cell death previously observed in CB1 expressing lymphoma cells in response to treatment with rimonabant in vitro. These differential effects observed on normal and malignant lymphoid cells warrant investigation of CB1 targeting as a potential lymphoma treatment. PMID:26157624

  1. Influence of gene flow on divergence dating - implications for the speciation history of Takydromus grass lizards.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shu-Ping; Li, Shou-Hsien; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Wang, Hurng-Yi; Lin, Si-Min

    2014-10-01

    Dating the time of divergence and understanding speciation processes are central to the study of the evolutionary history of organisms but are notoriously difficult. The difficulty is largely rooted in variations in the ancestral population size or in the genealogy variation across loci. To depict the speciation processes and divergence histories of three monophyletic Takydromus species endemic to Taiwan, we sequenced 20 nuclear loci and combined with one mitochondrial locus published in GenBank. They were analysed by a multispecies coalescent approach within a Bayesian framework. Divergence dating based on the gene tree approach showed high variation among loci, and the divergence was estimated at an earlier date than when derived by the species-tree approach. To test whether variations in the ancestral population size accounted for the majority of this variation, we conducted computer inferences using isolation-with-migration (IM) and approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) frameworks. The results revealed that gene flow during the early stage of speciation was strongly favoured over the isolation model, and the initiation of the speciation process was far earlier than the dates estimated by gene- and species-based divergence dating. Due to their limited dispersal ability, it is suggested that geographical isolation may have played a major role in the divergence of these Takydromus species. Nevertheless, this study reveals a more complex situation and demonstrates that gene flow during the speciation process cannot be overlooked and may have a great impact on divergence dating. By using multilocus data and incorporating Bayesian coalescence approaches, we provide a more biologically realistic framework for delineating the divergence history of Takydromus. PMID:25142551

  2. The influence of a physical ability intervention program on improved running time and increased sport motivation among Jerusalem schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S T; Bronner, S

    1988-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated an inverse relationship between physical activity and coronary heart disease (CHD). Other studies have reported a negative correlation between aerobic capacity and obesity and CHD risk factors among adolescents. In this study, the possibility of modifying physical ability in adolescents aged 13 has been examined through a physical ability intervention program. During 1984-1985, all eligible eighth graders from five Jerusalem public schools participated in the program. Physical ability was defined in the biological dimension by the running time for 1000 meters, and in the psychological dimension by sport motivation. The intervention program involved a periodic and progressive increase of physical effort of children in 16 gym lessons during the regular curriculum. The major findings were that the test group improved their running time and had better sport motivation than did the control group, and there were differences between boys and girls and an influence of sexual maturation on running time in girls.

  3. Influence of an awareness program on Portuguese middle and high school students' perceptions of peers with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Campos, Maria J; Ferreira, José P; Block, Martin E

    2014-12-01

    The ongoing topic of attitudes toward inclusion of students with disabilities in Physical Education (PE) classes emphases the role of schools as a primary place where attitudes toward disabilities can be changed. The effect of an awareness program on students' attitudes toward the inclusion of peers with disabilities in PE was examined, as well as variables such as sex, age, previous contact with disability, and competitiveness. The participants were 509 students (235 girls, 274 boys; M age = 13.3 yr., SD = 1.1, range = 11-16), who attended middle and high Portuguese schools. The awareness intervention comprised a one-week program (2 PE classes, 90 min. and 45 min.). Attitudes were assessed before and after the intervention. The awareness program appeared to have a positive influence on changing students' attitudes toward inclusion in PE.

  4. KCNN Genes that Encode Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Influence Alcohol and Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Padula, Audrey E; Griffin, William C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Cannady, Reginald; McGuier, Natalie S; Chesler, Elissa J; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Randall, Patrick K; Woodward, John J; Becker, Howard C; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa2) channels control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in substance abuse. However, it is unknown if genes that encode KCa2 channels (KCNN1-3) influence alcohol and drug addiction. In the present study, an integrative functional genomics approach shows that genetic datasets for alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs contain the family of KCNN genes. Alcohol preference and dependence QTLs contain KCNN2 and KCNN3, and Kcnn3 transcript levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of genetically diverse BXD strains of mice predicted voluntary alcohol consumption. Transcript levels of Kcnn3 in the NAc negatively correlated with alcohol intake levels in BXD strains, and alcohol dependence enhanced the strength of this association. Microinjections of the KCa2 channel inhibitor apamin into the NAc increased alcohol intake in control C57BL/6J mice, while spontaneous seizures developed in alcohol-dependent mice following apamin injection. Consistent with this finding, alcohol dependence enhanced the intrinsic excitability of medium spiny neurons in the NAc core and reduced the function and protein expression of KCa2 channels in the NAc. Altogether, these data implicate the family of KCNN genes in alcohol, nicotine, and drug addiction, and identify KCNN3 as a mediator of voluntary and excessive alcohol consumption. KCa2.3 channels represent a promising novel target in the pharmacogenetic treatment of alcohol and drug addiction.

  5. Polymorphisms in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Influence Memory and Processing Speed One Month after Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Anna L.; Flashman, Laura A.; Rhodes, C. Harker; McDonald, Brenna C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Tsongalis, Gregory J.; Moore, Jason H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in cognition, as well as neural survival and plasticity. There are several common polymorphisms in the BDNF gene, one of which (rs6265) is an extensively studied non-synonymous coding polymorphism (Val66Met) which has been linked to cognitive performance in healthy controls and some clinical populations. We hypothesized that the Met allele of rs6265 would be associated with poorer cognitive performance in individuals with mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury, and that other polymorphisms in the BDNF gene would also affect cognition. Genotype at 9 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the BDNF gene, and measures of speed of information processing, learning, and memory were assessed in 75 patients with mTBI and 38 healthy subjects. Consistent with previous reports, the Met allele of rs6265 was associated with cognition (slower processing speed) in the entire group. Two other SNPs were associated with processing speed in the mTBI group, but both are in linkage disequilibrium with rs6265, and neither remained significant after adjustment for rs6265 status. Within the mTBI group, but not the controls, 4 SNPs, but not rs6265, were associated with memory measures. These associations were not affected by adjustment for rs6265 status. Polymorphisms in BDNF influence cognitive performance shortly after mTBI. The results raise the possibility that a functional polymorphism other than rs6265 may contribute to memory function after mTBI. PMID:22188054

  6. The putative zinc finger of a caulimovirus is essential for infectivity but does not influence gene expression.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Wu, F C; Kiernan, J M; Shepherd, R J

    1993-04-01

    Plant pararetroviruses, such as caulimoviruses, and animal retroviruses have in common the presence of a highly conserved arrangement of cysteines and a histidine in the precursor of the capsid protein. The composition of these amino acids resembles a zinc finger element, a structure that is common to a class of eukaryotic proteins that regulate gene expression. The role of the putative zinc finger in the life-cycle of caulimoviruses was investigated by introducing specific mutations in the coat protein coding region of a cloned and infectious form of figwort mosaic virus, a caulimovirus. This mutated viral genome, which no longer encoded the conserved cysteine and histidine residues, was not infectious in plants. Transient expression assays in protoplasts showed that expression of a reporter gene inserted at different places in the genome was not detectably influenced by the coat protein or its putative zinc finger. It appears that the zinc finger-like element of caulimoviruses is not involved in the regulation of gene expression. These observations support a model which predicts a function of the zinc finger in specific recognition and packaging of viral RNA into virions prior to reverse transcription.

  7. Interferon-gamma gene polymorphism influences the frequency of a Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection in young women.

    PubMed

    Eleutério, José; Teles, Rosiane A; Linhares, Iara M; Normand, Neil; Witkin, Steven S

    2015-11-01

    Cervicitis associated with Chlamydia trachomatis is frequent worldwide, but the factors determining susceptibility to infection remain incompletely determined. We evaluated whether a functional single nucleotide polymorphism at position +874 in the gene coding for interferon gamma (rs2430561) influenced the likelihood of having a cervical C. trachomatis infection. This was a cross-sectional study of 142 sexually-active women attending a general gynaecology service on the outskirts of the city of Fortaleza in northeastern Brazil between August 2011 and August 2012. Endocervical swabs were evaluated for C. trachomatis DNA using hybrid capture. DNA from buccal swabs was utilised for detection of the interferon gamma 874 T/A single nucleotide polymorphism by gene amplification, endonuclease digestion and gel electrophoresis. Nineteen women (13.4%) were positive for C. trachomatis in their cervix. Positivity was 21.7% in women with the A,A genotype versus 7.0% in women with one or two T alleles (p = 0.0227). The variant T allele frequency, associated with elevated interferon gamma production, was 36.2% in women who were negative for C. trachomatis as opposed to 18.4% in women who were positive for a cervical infection with this organism (p = 0.0415). Possession of the T allele at position +874 in the gene coding for interferon gamma is associated with a reduced likelihood of a C. trachomatis cervical infection.

  8. Nocturnal light environments influence color vision and signatures of selection on the OPN1SW opsin gene in nocturnal lemurs.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Carrie C; Louis, Edward E; Bolnick, Deborah A

    2013-06-01

    Although loss of short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) cones and dichromatic color vision in mammals has traditionally been linked to a nocturnal lifestyle, recent studies have identified variation in selective pressure for the maintenance of the OPN1SW opsin gene (and thus, potentially dichromacy) among nocturnal mammalian lineages. These studies hypothesize that purifying selection to retain SWS cones may be associated with a selective advantage for nocturnal color vision under certain ecological conditions. In this study, we explore the effect of nocturnal light environment on OPN1SW opsin gene evolution in a diverse sample of nocturnal lemurs (106 individuals, 19 species, and 5 genera). Using both phylogenetic and population genetic approaches, we test whether species from closed canopy rainforests, which are impoverished in short-wavelength light, have experienced relaxed selection compared with species from open canopy forests. We identify clear signatures of differential selection on OPN1SW by habitat type. Our results suggest that open canopy species generally experience strong purifying selection to maintain SWS cones. In contrast, closed canopy species experience weaker purifying selection or a relaxation of selection on OPN1SW. We also found evidence of nonfunctional OPN1SW genes in all Phaner species and in Cheirogaleus medius, implying at least three independent losses of SWS cones in cheirogaleids. Our results suggest that the evolution of color vision in nocturnal lemurs has been influenced by nocturnal light environment.

  9. KCNN Genes that Encode Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Influence Alcohol and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Padula, Audrey E; Griffin, William C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Cannady, Reginald; McGuier, Natalie S; Chesler, Elissa J; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Randall, Patrick K; Woodward, John J; Becker, Howard C; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa2) channels control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in substance abuse. However, it is unknown if genes that encode KCa2 channels (KCNN1-3) influence alcohol and drug addiction. In the present study, an integrative functional genomics approach shows that genetic datasets for alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs contain the family of KCNN genes. Alcohol preference and dependence QTLs contain KCNN2 and KCNN3, and Kcnn3 transcript levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of genetically diverse BXD strains of mice predicted voluntary alcohol consumption. Transcript levels of Kcnn3 in the NAc negatively correlated with alcohol intake levels in BXD strains, and alcohol dependence enhanced the strength of this association. Microinjections of the KCa2 channel inhibitor apamin into the NAc increased alcohol intake in control C57BL/6J mice, while spontaneous seizures developed in alcohol-dependent mice following apamin injection. Consistent with this finding, alcohol dependence enhanced the intrinsic excitability of medium spiny neurons in the NAc core and reduced the function and protein expression of KCa2 channels in the NAc. Altogether, these data implicate the family of KCNN genes in alcohol, nicotine, and drug addiction, and identify KCNN3 as a mediator of voluntary and excessive alcohol consumption. KCa2.3 channels represent a promising novel target in the pharmacogenetic treatment of alcohol and drug addiction. PMID:25662840

  10. Perinatal administration of a bitter tastant influences gene expression in chicken palate and duodenum.

    PubMed

    Cheled-Shoval, Shira L; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Niv, Masha Y; Uni, Zehava

    2014-12-31

    Bitter taste receptors (Tas2rs) and downstream effectors are responsible for mediating bitterness perception and regulation of food choice in mammals. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated the expression of three Tas2rs and taste signal transduction molecules, α-gustducin, PLCβ2, and TRPM5, in the palate, tongue, and gastrointestinal tract sections in chicken. The bitter tastant quinine activates all three chicken Tas2rs in vitro as shown using calcium-imaging assays of transfected cells. Administration of quinine postnatally or perinatally (both pre- and posthatch) to chickens increased the expression of Tas2r genes in the palate by 6.45-fold (ggTas2r1 postnatal treatment), 4.86-fold (ggTas2r1 perinatal treatment), and 4.48-fold (ggTas2r7 postnatal treatment) compared to the genes' expression in the naı̈ve group respectively, and affected taste related gene expression in the duodenum. Whereas no-choice intake of quinine solution was not significantly lower than that of water in naı̈ve chicks, the treatment groups postnatal, prenatal, and perinatal showed significantly lower intake of quinine by 56.1, 47.7, and 50.2%, respectively, suggesting a possible trend toward sensitization. These results open new venues toward unraveling the formative stages shaping food intake and nutrition in chicken.

  11. The influence of three genes on whether adolescents use contraception, United States 1994-2002

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Jonathan; Guo, Guang

    2013-01-01

    In a further contribution to recent investigations of the relevance of genetic processes for demographic outcomes, we investigate genetic associations with whether adolescents use contraception. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we find that variants in the dopamine transporter gene DAT1, the dopamine receptor gene DRD2, and the monoamine oxidase gene MAOA are associated with unprotected sexual intercourse. Consistent with previous analyses of these data, the genotypes DRD2*A1/A2, DRD2*A2/A2, DAT1*9R/10R, and MAOA*2R/ are associated with higher odds of unprotected sexual intercourse than other genotypes at these loci. The DRD2 associations apply to both men and women, whereas the other associations apply to women only. These results are robust to controls for population stratification by continental ancestry, do not vary by contraceptive type, and are consistent with previous research showing that these genetic variants are associated with higher rates of impulsivity. PMID:21916669

  12. Mosaicism for the FMR1 gene influences adaptive skills development in fragile X-affected males

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.L.; Sudhalter, V.; Nolin, S.L.

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X syndrome is one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, and the first of a new class of genetic disorders associated with expanded trinucleotide repeats. Previously, we found that about 41% of affected males are mosaic for this mutation in that some of their blood cells have an active fragile X gene and others do not. It has been hypothesized that these mosaic cases should show higher levels of functioning than those who have only the inactive full mutation gene, but previous studies have provided negative or equivocal results. In the present study, the cross-sectional development of communication, self-care, socialization, and motor skills was studied in 46 males with fragile X syndrome under age 20 years as a function of two variables: age and the presence or absence of mosaicism. The rate of adaptive skills development was 2-4 times as great in mosaic cases as in full mutation cases. There was also a trend for cases with autism to be more prevalent in the full-mutation group. These results have implications for prognosis, for the utility of gene or protein replacement therapies for this disorder, and for understanding the association between mental retardation, developmental disorders, and fragile X syndrome. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Using Magnetic Nanoparticles for Gene Transfer to Neural Stem Cells: Stem Cell Propagation Method Influences Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Mark R.; Adams, Christopher F.; Barraud, Perrine; Chari, Divya M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplants offer a key strategy to augment neural repair by releasing therapeutic biomolecules into injury sites. Genetic modification of NSCs is heavily reliant on viral vectors but cytotoxic effects have prompted development of non-viral alternatives, such as magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs). NSCs are propagated in laboratories as either 3-D suspension “neurospheres” or 2-D adherent “monolayers”. MNPs deployed with oscillating magnetic fields (“magnetofection technology”) mediate effective gene transfer to neurospheres but the efficacy of this approach for monolayers is unknown. It is important to address this issue as oscillating magnetic fields dramatically enhance MNP-based transfection in transplant cells (e.g., astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors) propagated as monolayers. We report for the first time that oscillating magnetic fields enhanced MNP-based transfection with reporter and functional (basic fibroblast growth factor; FGF2) genes in monolayer cultures yielding high transfection versus neurospheres. Transfected NSCs showed high viability and could re-form neurospheres, which is important as neurospheres yield higher post-transplantation viability versus monolayer cells. Our results demonstrate that the combination of oscillating magnetic fields and a monolayer format yields the highest efficacy for MNP-mediated gene transfer to NSCs, offering a viable non-viral alternative for genetic modification of this important neural cell transplant population. PMID:25918990

  14. Using magnetic nanoparticles for gene transfer to neural stem cells: stem cell propagation method influences outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Mark R; Adams, Christopher F; Barraud, Perrine; Chari, Divya M

    2015-04-24

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplants offer a key strategy to augment neural repair by releasing therapeutic biomolecules into injury sites. Genetic modification of NSCs is heavily reliant on viral vectors but cytotoxic effects have prompted development of non-viral alternatives, such as magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs). NSCs are propagated in laboratories as either 3-D suspension "neurospheres" or 2-D adherent "monolayers". MNPs deployed with oscillating magnetic fields ("magnetofection technology") mediate effective gene transfer to neurospheres but the efficacy of this approach for monolayers is unknown. It is important to address this issue as oscillating magnetic fields dramatically enhance MNP-based transfection in transplant cells (e.g., astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors) propagated as monolayers. We report for the first time that oscillating magnetic fields enhanced MNP-based transfection with reporter and functional (basic fibroblast growth factor; FGF2) genes in monolayer cultures yielding high transfection versus neurospheres. Transfected NSCs showed high viability and could re-form neurospheres, which is important as neurospheres yield higher post-transplantation viability versus monolayer cells. Our results demonstrate that the combination of oscillating magnetic fields and a monolayer format yields the highest efficacy for MNP-mediated gene transfer to NSCs, offering a viable non-viral alternative for genetic modification of this important neural cell transplant population.

  15. Two host microRNAs influence WSSV replication via STAT gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. During viral infection, viruses utilize hosts to enhance their replication by altering cellular miRNAs. The Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway plays crucial roles in the antiviral responses. In this study, two miRNAs (miR-9041 and miR-9850) from Macrobrachium rosenbergii were found to promote white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) replication. The up-regulation of miR-9041 or miR-9850 suppresses STAT expression in the gills of M. rosenbergii, which subsequently down-regulates the expression of its downstream dynamin (Dnm) genes: Dnm1, Dnm2, and Dnm3. Knockdown of miR-9041 and miR-9850 restricts WSSV replication by up-regulating STAT and Dnm gene expression. The silencing of STAT, Dnm1, Dnm2, or Dnm3 led to an increase of the number of WSSV copies in shrimp. The injection of recombinant Dnm1, Dnm2, or Dnm3 proteins could inhibit WSSV replication in vivo. Overall, our research indicates the roles of host miRNAs in the enhancement of WSSV replication by regulating the host JAK/STAT pathway. PMID:27029712

  16. c-Myb influences HIV type 1 gene expression and virus production.

    PubMed

    Churchill, M J; Ramsay, R G; Rhodes, D I; Deacon, N J

    2001-11-01

    c-Myb is expressed in proliferating T cells. Fifteen c-Myb-binding sites can be identified in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR), suggesting that c-Myb may regulate HIV-1 gene expression and virus replication. Increasing the cellular levels of c-Myb by transient transfection of CEM cells resulted in a 10- to 20-fold activation of HIV-1 LTR-driven gene expression and mutation of one high-affinity Myb-binding site within the LTR reduced this activation by 60 to 70%. Conversely, inhibition of c-Myb expression in MT-2 cells by treatment with c-myb antisense oligonucleotides decreased HIV-1 replication by 85%, as measured by reverse transcriptase activity and cytopathic effects. The effect of c-myb antisense oligonucleotides on HIV-1 gene expression and virus particle production appeared to be independent of cell proliferation, but dependent on the presence of c-Myb activity mediated through the HIV-1 LTR. These data show that c-myb expression affects HIV-1 replication in CD4(+) T cells.

  17. Influence of Different Levels of Lipoic Acid Synthase Gene Expression on Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Longquan; Hiller, Sylvia; Simington, Stephen; Nickeleit, Volker; Maeda, Nobuyo; James, Leighton R.; Yi, Xianwen

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) but outcomes of many clinical trials are controversial. To define the role of antioxidants in kidney protection during the development of diabetic nephropathy, we have generated a novel genetic antioxidant mouse model with over- or under-expression of lipoic acid synthase gene (Lias). These models have been mated with Ins2Akita/+ mice, a type I diabetic mouse model. We compare the major pathologic changes and oxidative stress status in two new strains of the mice with controls. Our results show that Ins2Akita/+ mice with under-expressed Lias gene, exhibit higher oxidative stress and more severe DN features (albuminuria, glomerular basement membrane thickening and mesangial matrix expansion). In contrast, Ins2Akita/+ mice with highly-expressed Lias gene display lower oxidative stress and less DN pathologic changes. Our study demonstrates that strengthening endogenous antioxidant capacity could be an effective strategy for prevention and treatment of DN. PMID:27706190

  18. Child μ-Opioid Receptor Gene Variant Influences Parent–Child Relations

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E; Sun, Hui; Costello, E Jane; Angold, Adrian; Heilig, Markus A; Barr, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Variation in the μ-opioid receptor gene has been associated with early social behavior in mice and rhesus macaques. The current study tested whether the functional OPRM1 A118G predicted various indices of social relations in children. The sample included 226 subjects of self-reported European ancestry (44% female; mean age 13.6, SD=2.2) who were part of a larger representative study of children aged 9–17 years in rural North Carolina. Multiple aspects of recent (past 3 months) parent–child relationship were assessed using the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment. Parent problems were coded based upon a lifetime history of mental health problems, substance abuse, or criminality. Child genotype interacted with parent behavior such that there were no genotype differences for those with low levels of parent problems; however, when a history of parent problems was reported, the G allele carriers had more enjoyment of parent–child interactions (mean ratio (MR)=3.5, 95% CI=1.6, 8.0) and fewer arguments (MR=3.1, 95% CI=1.1, 8.9). These findings suggest a role for the OPRM1 gene in the genetic architecture of social relations in humans. In summary, a variant in the μ-opioid receptor gene (118G) was associated with improved parent–child relations, but only in the context of a significant disruption in parental functioning. PMID:21326192

  19. Polymorphisms of genes related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis influence the cortisol awakening response as well as self-perceived stress.

    PubMed

    Li-Tempel, Ting; Larra, Mauro F; Winnikes, Ulrike; Tempel, Tobias; DeRijk, Roel H; Schulz, André; Schächinger, Hartmut; Meyer, Jobst; Schote, Andrea B

    2016-09-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a crucial endocrine system for coping with stress. A reliable and stable marker for the basal state of that system is the cortisol awakening response (CAR). We examined the influence of variants of four relevant candidate genes; the mineralocorticoid receptor gene (MR), the glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR), the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) and the gene encoding the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on CAR and self-perceived stress in 217 healthy subjects. We found that polymorphisms of GR influenced both, the basal state of the HPA axis as well as self-perceived stress. MR only associated with self-perceived stress and 5-HTT only with CAR. BDNF did not affected any of the investigated indices. In summary, we suggest that GR variants together with the CAR and supplemented with self reports on perceived stress might be useful indicators for the basal HPA axis activity. PMID:27427534

  20. Polymorphisms of genes related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis influence the cortisol awakening response as well as self-perceived stress.

    PubMed

    Li-Tempel, Ting; Larra, Mauro F; Winnikes, Ulrike; Tempel, Tobias; DeRijk, Roel H; Schulz, André; Schächinger, Hartmut; Meyer, Jobst; Schote, Andrea B

    2016-09-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a crucial endocrine system for coping with stress. A reliable and stable marker for the basal state of that system is the cortisol awakening response (CAR). We examined the influence of variants of four relevant candidate genes; the mineralocorticoid receptor gene (MR), the glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR), the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) and the gene encoding the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on CAR and self-perceived stress in 217 healthy subjects. We found that polymorphisms of GR influenced both, the basal state of the HPA axis as well as self-perceived stress. MR only associated with self-perceived stress and 5-HTT only with CAR. BDNF did not affected any of the investigated indices. In summary, we suggest that GR variants together with the CAR and supplemented with self reports on perceived stress might be useful indicators for the basal HPA axis activity.

  1. VH Replacement Footprint Analyzer-I, a Java-Based Computer Program for Analyses of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Genes and Potential VH Replacement Products in Human and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Lange, Miles D; Zhang, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement occurs through RAG-mediated secondary recombination between a rearranged VH gene and an upstream unrearranged VH gene. Due to the location of the cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS, TACTGTG) at the 3' end of VH gene coding region, a short stretch of nucleotides from the previous rearranged VH gene can be retained in the newly formed VH-DH junction as a "footprint" of VH replacement. Such footprints can be used as markers to identify Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes potentially generated through VH replacement. To explore the contribution of VH replacement products to the antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based computer program, VH replacement footprint analyzer-I (VHRFA-I), to analyze published or newly obtained IgH genes from human or mouse. The VHRFA-1 program has multiple functional modules: it first uses service provided by the IMGT/V-QUEST program to assign potential VH, DH, and JH germline genes; then, it searches for VH replacement footprint motifs within the VH-DH junction (N1) regions of IgH gene sequences to identify potential VH replacement products; it can also analyze the frequencies of VH replacement products in correlation with publications, keywords, or VH, DH, and JH gene usages, and mutation status; it can further analyze the amino acid usages encoded by the identified VH replacement footprints. In summary, this program provides a useful computation tool for exploring the biological significance of VH replacement products in human and mouse.

  2. Factors Influencing Success of Conditionally Admitted Students in Graduate TESOL Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micek, Timothy A.; Kim, Soonhyang; Weinstein, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Many graduate TESOL programs grapple with whether to admit applicants who fall short of meeting established admission criteria yet who show promise as future TESOL professionals. This study examined key characteristics affecting the success of candidates admitted conditionally to graduate TESOL programs. Participants were 21 students who had been…

  3. Influence of a Supervised Mentoring Program on the Achievement of Low-Income South Korean Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Sumi; Lemberger, Matthew E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a supervised mentoring program designed to improve the academic achievement of 834 low-income elementary and secondary school students in Seoul, South Korea. When compared to the control group, both elementary and middle school students exposed to the mentoring program improved in mathematic and reading…

  4. The McNair Program as a Socializing Influence on Doctoral Degree Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gittens, Cheryl Bailey

    2014-01-01

    The quality of doctoral students' academic and social experiences is a key element of their success in graduate school programs. These experiences support the completion of doctoral programs, especially for first-generation college students from low-income backgrounds. Framed by Weidman's (1989) undergraduate socialization model, the…

  5. The Influence of Hormonal Fluctuations on Womens' Selection and Enjoyment of Television Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadowcroft, Jeanne; Zillmann, Dolf

    Existing theory suggests that women in the premenstrual and menstrual phases of their hormonal cycle would select and enjoy nonarousing television programs, sucy as nonhostile comedy and game shows, and would avoid action drama and hostile and arousing programs. To test this theory, female undergraduates from telecommunications and journalism…

  6. The Influence of Program Structure and Learner Characteristics on Teacher Training Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Susan Mansfield; Dietrich, Amy P.

    This paper reports on research developed from a more comprehensive study of five teacher training programs at a large urban Southern university. During the initial study characteristics were observed in special education and Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) cohorts which differed from those of students in the three traditional programs. The…

  7. Influences of School Latino Composition and Linguistic Acculturation on a Prevention Program for Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Yabiku, Scott T.; Kulis, Stephen; Nieri, Tanya; Lewin, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how ethnic composition and linguistic acculturation within schools affected the efficacy of a youth substance use prevention model program. Data came from a randomized trial of the "keepin' it REAL" program, using a predominantly Mexican American sample of middle school students in Phoenix, Arizona. Schools were randomly…

  8. The Influence of Faculty Exchange Programs on Faculty Members' Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkarzon, Awni

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problems facing faculty members, who made short-term international exchange programs in foreign countries; in their attempts to internationalize the campus through teaching, research, and service. Some faculty members who participated in foreign exchange programs try to infuse their international experience through…

  9. Optimizing Teacher Preparation Loan Forgiveness Programs: Variables Related to Perceived Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Lawrenz, Frances

    2011-01-01

    This research used multilevel modeling to investigate the perceived effect of a teacher preparation loan forgiveness program on recruiting science and mathematics majors to become teachers and teach in high-need schools. The study investigated how and which personal perceptions, characteristics, and teacher preparation program variables influenced…

  10. Influence of an Academic Intervention Program on Minority Student Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Jennifer K.; Villarejo, Merna

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, retrospective study explored how educational experiences provided as part of an undergraduate intervention program helped to shape career decisions for minority biology students. A key goal for the program is to increase minority entry into science research and teaching careers, yet actual career choice has not been studied.…

  11. The Influence of Feedback from Supervising Teachers on a Student Teaching Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Fanchon F.; And Others

    An example of a comprehensive mechanism for obtaining specific evaluative data related to teacher education programs is presented. This Supervising Teacher's Program Evaluation Form was devised to gather data from cooperating teachers in three areas: (1) the adequacy of the student teacher's training; (2) the adequacy of the university…

  12. Variables Influencing Career Choices of Graduates of Informatics Programs Funded by the National Library of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braude, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A study of 171 graduates of medical informatics training programs found that the status of the institution (public or private), trainee's entry degree, and productivity of program faculty were enough to correctly classify most of the students who chose academic vs. nonacademic careers in the field. (Author/MSE)

  13. The Rapid Adjustment Farm Program's Influence on Other Farms in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simeral, Kenneth D.

    The study investigated the diffusion of innovative farming practices from Rapid Adjustment Farms (RAF) to other farms in southeast Ohio. The RAF program, begun in 1968, introduced new technology and management practices to its participant farmers. After reviewing literature of farming programs' information diffusion, a descriptive survey was made…

  14. A Tale of Two Educational Leadership Program Redesigns: How Policy Influences Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskey, Frederick; Polizzi, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the redesign of two educational leadership programs at different institutions: a medium-sized public university and a small private university. Both were committed to principals of ethical leadership. Each program faced a state mandate to redesign. In one case, state policy focused on detailed accountability measures based on…

  15. Beyond Cognitive Increase: Investigating the Influence of Computer Programming on Perception and Application of Mathematical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Peter J.; Bly, Neil; Leatham, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to provide first-hand accounts of the perceived long-term effects of learning computer programming on a learner's approach to mathematics. These phenomenological accounts, garnered from individual interviews of seven different programmers, illustrate four specific areas of interest: (1) programming provides context for many…

  16. The Influence of Using TI-84 Calculators with Programs on Algebra I High Stakes Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Misty

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a significant difference in scores on the Mississippi Algebra I SATP2 when one group was allowed to use programs and the other group was not allowed to use programs on TI-84 calculators. An additional purpose of the study was also to determine if there was a significant difference in the…

  17. National Implications in Juvenile Justice: The Influence of Juvenile Mentoring Programs on At Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belshaw, Scott H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    In 1972 the federal government created the Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act that procured funding for various governmental programs to combat the sudden increase in juvenile crime. A provision of this Act set out the creation of mentoring programs to help decrease the juvenile crime rate and dropout rates in secondary schools. This…

  18. Characteristics influencing weight reduction among veterans in the MOVE!® Program.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Jane T; Marion, Lucy N; Narsavage, Georgia L; Finnegan, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a common health problem for veterans. This study explored background and program characteristics associated with a 5% weight reduction for veterans enrolled in MOVE!(®), a weight management program. For data analysis, 404 veteran records were examined using logistic regression. Background characteristics included socio-demographic variables, comorbidity, body mass index, rurality, and Veterans Administration (VA) priority group. Program characteristics included the program type (group attendee or self-managed) as well as the number and type of provider contacts. Thirteen percent of participants achieved a 5% weight reduction. Age in years (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04) and the number of group visits (OR = 1.05) were significant predictors for achieving a 5% weight reduction. Given the importance of weight reduction, health professionals should consider these significant predictors when planning weight-reduction programs for veterans.

  19. A Conserved Core of Programmed Cell Death Indicator Genes Discriminates Developmentally and Environmentally Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Van Bel, Michiel; Van Hautegem, Tom; Fendrych, Matyáš; Simaskova, Maria; van Durme, Matthias; Buscaill, Pierre; Rivas, Susana; S. Coll, Nuria; Maere, Steven

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of diverse programmed cell death (PCD) processes has been described in living organisms. In animals and plants, different forms of PCD play crucial roles in development, immunity, and responses to the environment. While the molecular control of some animal PCD forms such as apoptosis is known in great detail, we still know comparatively little about the regulation of the diverse types of plant PCD. In part, this deficiency in molecular understanding is caused by the lack of reliable reporters to detect PCD processes. Here, we addressed this issue by using a combination of bioinformatics approaches to identify commonly regulated genes during diverse plant PCD processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Our results indicate that the transcriptional signatures of developmentally controlled cell death are largely distinct from the ones associated with environmentally induced cell death. Moreover, different cases of developmental PCD share a set of cell death-associated genes. Most of these genes are evolutionary conserved within the green plant lineage, arguing for an evolutionary conserved core machinery of developmental PCD. Based on this information, we established an array of specific promoter-reporter lines for developmental PCD in Arabidopsis. These PCD indicators represent a powerful resource that can be used in addition to established morphological and biochemical methods to detect and analyze PCD processes in vivo and in planta. PMID:26438786

  20. Influences of graphene on microbial community and antibiotic resistance genes in mouse gut as determined by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yongchao; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Yin, Jinbao; Mao, Liang; Hu, Maojie

    2016-02-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate as an antibacterial material owning to its bacterial toxicity. However, little information on influence of graphene on gut microbiota is available. In this study, mice were exposed to graphene for 4 weeks, and high-throughput sequencing was applied to characterize the changes in microbial community and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in mouse gut. The results showed that graphene exposure increased biodiversity of gut microbiota, and changed their community. The 1 μg/d graphene exposure had higher influences on the gut microbiota than 10 μg/d and 100 μg/d graphene exposures, which might be due to higher aggregation of high-level graphene. The influence of graphene on gut microbiota might attribute to that graphene could induce oxidative stress and damage of cell membrane integrity. The results were verified by the increase of ratio of Gram-negative bacteria. Outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria could reduce the membrane damage induced by graphene and make them more tolerance to graphene. Further, we found that graphene exposure significantly increased the abundance and types of ARGs, indicating a potential health risk of graphene. This study firstly provides new insight to the health effects of graphene on gut microbiota.

  1. SLC30A3 and SEP15 gene polymorphisms influence the serum concentrations of zinc and selenium in mature adults.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Tatiane Jacobsen; Korb, Camila; Schuch, Jaqueline Bohrer; Bamberg, Daiani Pires; de Andrade, Fabiana Michelsen; Fiegenbaum, Marilu

    2014-09-01

    Because of their numerous roles in several biological processes, zinc and selenium are the most commonly studied micronutrients in the elderly. Therefore, we hypothesized that the polymorphisms in the genes that are responsible for the transport of zinc and selenium may have a genotype-dependent effect on the serum concentration of these micronutrients. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3) and 15-kd selenoprotein (SEP15) polymorphisms on zinc and selenium concentrations, respectively, in the serum. This cross-sectional study included 110 individuals who were aged 50 years or older. Serum micronutrient concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (for zinc) and by atomic absorption spectrophotometry with a graphite furnace (for selenium). The single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs73924411 and rs11126936 of the SLC30A3 gene and rs5859, rs5854, and rs561104 of the SEP15 gene, were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Regarding rs11126936, the serum zinc concentration was lower in CC homozygotes (0.75 ± 0.31 mg/L) than in A carriers (0.89 ± 0.28 mg/L, P = .016). Concerning rs561104, the serum selenium concentration was higher in CC homozygotes (5.65 ± 1.11 μg/dL) compared with T carriers (4.88 ± 1.25 μg/dL, P = .044). Our results demonstrate the influence of SLC30A3 and SEP15 gene polymorphisms on the serum concentrations of zinc and selenium, respectively. The effects of these associations should be further investigated to help elucidate the modes of action of trace elements and to identify biomarkers, which could ultimately define the optimal intake of these micronutrients at the molecular level. More research must be performed before the roles of these polymorphisms in the serum concentrations of zinc and selenium can be fully understood. PMID:25249019

  2. Blood and Bones: The Influence of the Mass Media on Australian Primary School Children's Understandings of Genes and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Jenny; Venville, Grady

    2012-06-01

    Previous research showed that primary school children held several misconceptions about genetics of concern for their future lives. Included were beliefs that genes and DNA are separate substances, with genes causing family resemblance and DNA identifying suspects at crime scenes. Responses to this work `blamed' the mass media for these misunderstandings. This study aimed to determine whether that blame had any foundation by examining the media habits and conceptions about genes and DNA of Australian children. With little prior research considering the influence of entertainment mass media on children's academically relevant knowledge, this was an exploratory study with a mixed modes design. Data were collected by detailed media questionnaires and face-to-face interviews with 62 children aged 10-12 years, and subjected to content and thematic analysis. Specific mass media examples children reported using were examined for genetics content. Results indicate 5 h/day of media use, mostly television including crime shows, and that children perceived television to be their main source of information about genetics. Most children (89 %) knew DNA, 60 % knew genes, and more was known about uses of DNA outside the body such as crime solving or resolving family relationships than about its biological nature and function. Half believed DNA is only in blood and body parts used for forensics. These concepts paralleled the themes emerging from the media examples. The results indicate that the mass media is a pervasive teacher of children, and that fundamental concepts could be introduced earlier in schools to establish scientific concepts before misconceptions arise.

  3. Brn3a and Islet1 act epistatically to regulate the gene expression program of sensory differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Iain M; Tempest, Lynne; Lee, Su-In; Turner, Eric E

    2011-07-01

    The combinatorial expression of transcription factors frequently marks cellular identity in the nervous system, yet how these factors interact to determine specific neuronal phenotypes is not well understood. Sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) coexpress the homeodomain transcription factors Brn3a and Islet1, and past work has revealed partially overlapping programs of gene expression downstream of these factors. Here we examine sensory development in Brn3a/Islet1 double knock-out (DKO) mice. Sensory neurogenesis and the formation of the TG and DRG occur in DKO embryos, but the DRG are dorsally displaced, and the peripheral projections of the ganglia are markedly disturbed. Sensory neurons in DKO embryos show a profound loss of all early markers of sensory subtypes, including the Ntrk neurotrophin receptors, and the runt-family transcription factors Runx1 and Runx3. Examination of global gene expression in the E12.5 DRG of single and double mutant embryos shows that Brn3a and Islet1 are together required for nearly all aspects of sensory-specific gene expression, including several newly identified sensory markers. On a majority of targets, Brn3a and Islet1 exhibit negative epistasis, in which the effects of the individual knock-out alleles are less than additive in the DKO. Smaller subsets of targets exhibit positive epistasis, or are regulated exclusively by one factor. Brn3a/Islet1 double mutants also fail to developmentally repress neurogenic bHLH genes, and in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that Islet1 binds to a known Brn3a-regulated enhancer in the neurod4 gene, suggesting a mechanism of interaction between these genes. PMID:21734270

  4. Genetic variation in bitter taste receptor genes influences the foraging behavior of plateau zokor (Eospalax baileyi).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Zhang, Tongzuo; Xie, Jiuxiang; Zhang, Shoudong; Nevo, Eviatar; Su, Jianping; Lin, Gonghua

    2016-04-01

    The ability to detect bitter tastes is important for animals; it can help them to avoid ingesting harmful substances. Bitter taste perception is mainly mediated by bitter taste receptor proteins, which are encoded by members of the Tas2r gene family and vary with the dietary preference of a specific species. Although individuals with different genotypes differ in bitterness recognition capability, little is known about the relationship between genetic variation and food selection tendencies at the intraspecific level. In this study, we examined the relationship between genotypes and diet in plateau zokor (Eospalax baileyi), a subterranean rodent endemic to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau that caches food for the winter. We assayed the composition and taste profile of each plant contained in temporary caches and vicinity quadrats, which were representative of selected and available food, respectively. Bitter plant selection indices (E bitter) were estimated. We also sequenced 26 candidate Tas2r genes from zokors and determined their relationships with the E bitter of their caches. We identified four key results: (1) zokors varied considerably in both bitter food preference and Tas2r sequences; (2) five genes (zTas2r115,zTas2r119,zTas2r126,zTas2r134, and zTas2r136) exhibited allelic variation that was significantly associated with E bitter; (3) synonymous SNPs, nonsynonymous SNPs, and pseudogenization are involved in the genotype-phenotype relationship; (4) the minor genotypes of zTas2r115,zTas2r134, and zTas2r136 and the major genotypes of zTas2r119 and zTas2r126 cached more bitter plants. Our results link Tas2r variation with food selection behavior at the population level for the first time. PMID:27110349

  5. Micro-RNA-31 controls hair cycle-associated changes in gene expression programs of the skin and hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Mardaryev, Andrei N; Ahmed, Mohammed I; Vlahov, Nikola V; Fessing, Michael Y; Gill, Jason H; Sharov, Andrey A; Botchkareva, Natalia V

    2010-10-01

    The hair follicle is a cyclic biological system that progresses through stages of growth, regression, and quiescence, which involves dynamic changes in a program of gene regulation. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are critically important for the control of gene expression and silencing. Here, we show that global miRNA expression in the skin markedly changes during distinct stages of the hair cycle in mice. Furthermore, we show that expression of miR-31 markedly increases during anagen and decreases during catagen and telogen. Administration of antisense miR-31 inhibitor into mouse skin during the early- and midanagen phases of the hair cycle results in accelerated anagen development, and altered differentiation of hair matrix keratinocytes and hair shaft formation. Microarray, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that miR-31 negatively regulates expression of Fgf10, the components of Wnt and BMP signaling pathways Sclerostin and BAMBI, and Dlx3 transcription factor, as well as selected keratin genes, both in vitro and in vivo. Using luciferase reporter assay, we show that Krt16, Krt17, Dlx3, and Fgf10 serve as direct miR-31 targets. Thus, by targeting a number of growth regulatory molecules and cytoskeletal proteins, miR-31 is involved in establishing an optimal balance of gene expression in the hair follicle required for its proper growth and hair fiber formation. PMID:20522784

  6. Dendritic cell subtypes from lymph nodes and blood show contrasted gene expression programs upon Bluetongue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ruscanu, Suzana; Jouneau, Luc; Urien, Céline; Bourge, Mickael; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Moroldo, Marco; Loup, Benoit; Dalod, Marc; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Hope, Jayne; Vitour, Damien; Zientara, Stéphan; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2013-08-01

    Human and animal hemorrhagic viruses initially target dendritic cells (DCs). It has been proposed, but not documented, that both plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and conventional DCs (cDCs) may participate in the cytokine storm encountered in these infections. In order to evaluate the contribution of DCs in hemorrhagic virus pathogenesis, we performed a genome-wide expression analysis during infection by Bluetongue virus (BTV), a double-stranded RNA virus that induces hemorrhagic fever in sheep and initially infects cDCs. Both pDCs and cDCs accumulated in regional lymph nodes and spleen during BTV infection. The gene response profiles were performed at the onset of the disease and markedly differed with the DC subtypes and their lymphoid organ location. An integrative knowledge-based analysis revealed that blood pDCs displayed a gene signature related to activation of systemic inflammation and permeability of vasculature. In contrast, the gene profile of pDCs and cDCs in lymph nodes was oriented to inhibition of inflammation, whereas spleen cDCs did not show a clear functional orientation. These analyses indicate that tissue location and DC subtype affect the functional gene expression program induced by BTV and suggest the involvement of blood pDCs in the inflammation and plasma leakage/hemorrhage during BTV infection in the real natural host of the virus. These findings open the avenue to target DCs for therapeutic interventions in viral hemorrhagic diseases. PMID:23785206

  7. BloodSpot: a database of gene expression profiles and transcriptional programs for healthy and malignant haematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Sasivarevic, Damir; Sohi, Sina Hadi; Laursen, Linea Gøricke; Pundhir, Sachin; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Winther, Ole; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T.

    2016-01-01

    Research on human and murine haematopoiesis has resulted in a vast number of gene-expression data sets that can potentially answer questions regarding normal and aberrant blood formation. To researchers and clinicians with limited bioinformatics experience, these data have remained available, yet largely inaccessible. Current databases provide information about gene-expression but fail to answer key questions regarding co-regulation, genetic programs or effect on patient survival. To address these shortcomings, we present BloodSpot (www.bloodspot.eu), which includes and greatly extends our previously released database HemaExplorer, a database of gene expression profiles from FACS sorted healthy and malignant haematopoietic cells. A revised interactive interface simultaneously provides a plot of gene expression along with a Kaplan–Meier analysis and a hierarchical tree depicting the relationship between different cell types in the database. The database now includes 23 high-quality curated data sets relevant to normal and malignant blood formation and, in addition, we have assembled and built a unique integrated data set, BloodPool. Bloodpool contains more than 2000 samples assembled from six independent studies on acute myeloid leukemia. Furthermore, we have devised a robust sample integration procedure that allows for sensitive comparison of user-supplied patient samples in a well-defined haematopoietic cellular space. PMID:26507857

  8. Micro-RNA-31 controls hair cycle-associated changes in gene expression programs of the skin and hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Mardaryev, Andrei N; Ahmed, Mohammed I; Vlahov, Nikola V; Fessing, Michael Y; Gill, Jason H; Sharov, Andrey A; Botchkareva, Natalia V

    2010-10-01

    The hair follicle is a cyclic biological system that progresses through stages of growth, regression, and quiescence, which involves dynamic changes in a program of gene regulation. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are critically important for the control of gene expression and silencing. Here, we show that global miRNA expression in the skin markedly changes during distinct stages of the hair cycle in mice. Furthermore, we show that expression of miR-31 markedly increases during anagen and decreases during catagen and telogen. Administration of antisense miR-31 inhibitor into mouse skin during the early- and midanagen phases of the hair cycle results in accelerated anagen development, and altered differentiation of hair matrix keratinocytes and hair shaft formation. Microarray, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that miR-31 negatively regulates expression of Fgf10, the components of Wnt and BMP signaling pathways Sclerostin and BAMBI, and Dlx3 transcription factor, as well as selected keratin genes, both in vitro and in vivo. Using luciferase reporter assay, we show that Krt16, Krt17, Dlx3, and Fgf10 serve as direct miR-31 targets. Thus, by targeting a number of growth regulatory molecules and cytoskeletal proteins, miR-31 is involved in establishing an optimal balance of gene expression in the hair follicle required for its proper growth and hair fiber formation.

  9. Enhanced thermogenic program by non-viral delivery of combinatory browning genes to treat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hongsuk; Cho, Sungpil; Janat-Amsbury, Margit M; Bae, You Han

    2015-12-01

    Thermogenic program (also known as browning) is a promising and attractive anti-obesity approach. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) and irisin have emerged as potential browning hormones that hold high potential to treat obesity. Here, we have constructed a dual browning gene system containing both IAPP and irisin (derived from fibronectin type III domain containing 5; FNDC5) combined with 2A and furin self-cleavage sites. Intraperitoneal administration of the construct complexed with a linear polyethylenimine into diet-induced obese mice demonstrated the elevation of anti-obesogenic effects characterized as the decreased body weight, adiposity, and levels of glucose and insulin. In addition, the construct delivery increased energy expenditure and the expression of core molecular determinants associated with browning. The additional advantages of the dual browning gene construct delivery compared to both single gene construct delivery and dual peptide delivery can be emphasized on efficacy and practicability. Hence, we have concluded that dual browning gene delivery makes it therapeutically attractive for diet-induced obesity treatment.

  10. The influence of BMX gene polymorphisms on clinical symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jia; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Chang, Che-Mai; Wu, Chung-Che; Ou, Ju-Chi; Tsai, Yan-Rou; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Chen, Kai-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is one of the most common neurological disorders. Most patients diagnosed with mTBI could fully recover, but 15% of patients suffer from persistent symptoms. In recent studies, genetic factors were found to be associated with recovery and clinical outcomes after TBI. In addition, results from our previous research have demonstrated that the bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene in chromosome X (BMX), a member of the Tec family of kinases, is highly expressed in rats with TBI. Therefore, our aim in this study was to identify the association between genetic polymorphisms of BMX and clinical symptoms following mTBI. Four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) of BMX with minimum allele frequency (MAF) >1% were selected from the HapMap Han Chinese database. Among these polymorphisms, rs16979956 was found to be associated with the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI) and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) scores within the first week after head injury. Additionally, another SNP, rs35697037, showed a significant correlation with dizziness symptoms. These findings suggested that polymorphisms of the BMX gene could be a potential predictor of clinical symptoms following mTBI. PMID:24860816

  11. Genomewide introgressive hybridization patterns in wild Atlantic salmon influenced by inadvertent gene flow from hatchery releases.

    PubMed

    Ozerov, M Y; Gross, R; Bruneaux, M; Vähä, J-P; Burimski, O; Pukk, L; Vasemägi, A

    2016-03-01

    Many salmonid fish populations are threatened by genetic homogenization, primarily due to introgressive hybridization with hatchery-reared conspecifics. By applying genomewide analysis using two molecular marker types (1986 SNPs and 17 microsatellites), we assessed the genetic impacts of inadvertent gene flow via straying from hatchery releases on wild populations of Atlantic salmon in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea, over 16 years (1996-2012). Both microsatellites and SNPs revealed congruent population genetic structuring, indicating that introgression changed the genetic make-up of wild populations by increasing genetic diversity and reducing genetic divergence. However, the degree of genetic introgression varied among studied populations, being higher in the eastern part and lower in the western part of Estonia, which most likely reflects the history of past stocking activities. Using kernel smoothing and permutation testing, we detected considerable heterogeneity in introgression patterns across the genome, with a large number of regions exhibiting nonrandom introgression widely dispersed across the genome. We also observed substantial variation in nonrandom introgression patterns within populations, as the majority of genomic regions showing elevated or reduced introgression were not consistently detected among temporal samples. This suggests that recombination, selection and stochastic processes may contribute to complex nonrandom introgression patterns. Our results suggest that (i) some genomic regions in Atlantic salmon are more vulnerable to introgressive hybridization, while others show greater resistance to unidirectional gene flow; and (ii) the hybridization of previously separated populations leads to complex and dynamic nonrandom introgression patterns that most likely have functional consequences for indigenous populations. PMID:26840557

  12. Influence of functional polymorphisms in DNA repair genes of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Howard Lopes; Soares Maia, Allan Rodrigo; Costa, Marília Braga; Farias, Izabelle Rocha; de Paula Borges, Daniela; de Oliveira, Roberta Taiane Germano; de Sousa, Juliana Cordeiro; Magalhães, Silvia Maria Meira; Pinheiro, Ronald Feitosa

    2016-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) malignances characterized by peripheral cytopenias and predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Several studies show that the MDS pathogenesis is a complex and heterogeneous process that involves multiple steps through a sequence of genetic lesions in the DNA which lead to functional changes in the cell and the emergence and subsequent evolution of pre-malignant clone. Double strand breaks (DSB) lesions are the most severe type of DNA damage in HSCs, which, if not properly repaired, might contribute to the development of chromosomal abnormalities, which in turn may lead to leukemia development. We assessed the mRNA expression levels of ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51, XRCC5, XRCC6 and LIG4 genes in bone marrow samples of 47 MDS patients in order to evaluate the association with functional polymorphisms rs228593, rs4793191, rs9567623, rs1801320, rs3835, rs2267437 and rs1805388, respectively, and try to detect clinical associations. We found that the rs228593, rs2267437 and rs1805388 functional polymorphisms probably alter the level of expression of the ATM, XRCC6 and LIG4 genes, respectively, being important in the maintenance of genomic instability in MDS. PMID:27497341

  13. Reciprocal influence of ethylene and gibberellins on response-gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    De Grauwe, Liesbeth; Vriezen, Wim H; Bertrand, Sophie; Phillips, Andy; Vidal, Ana M; Hedden, Peter; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2007-07-01

    The complexity of hormonal responses and their functional overlap support the presence of an intensive cross-talk between hormone signalling pathways. A detailed analysis of responses induced by ethylene and gibberellin (GA) in a GA-insensitive mutant (gai), an ethylene-resistant mutant (etr1-3), the gai etr1-3 double-mutant, and in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana plants, revealed multiple interactions between ethylene and GA signal transduction pathways. Ethylene insensitive mutants and wild-type plants treated with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), an ethylene perception inhibitor, displayed a stronger responsiveness of genes differentially regulated by GA. In addition, microarray-analysis showed that the GA-response in an ethylene-insensitive background is different from that in the wild-type, confirming the importance of ethylene in a plant's response towards GA. In this paper, we present a number of genes with an altered response-pattern as a direct consequence of cross-talk between ethylene and GA.

  14. Genomewide introgressive hybridization patterns in wild Atlantic salmon influenced by inadvertent gene flow from hatchery releases.

    PubMed

    Ozerov, M Y; Gross, R; Bruneaux, M; Vähä, J-P; Burimski, O; Pukk, L; Vasemägi, A

    2016-03-01

    Many salmonid fish populations are threatened by genetic homogenization, primarily due to introgressive hybridization with hatchery-reared conspecifics. By applying genomewide analysis using two molecular marker types (1986 SNPs and 17 microsatellites), we assessed the genetic impacts of inadvertent gene flow via straying from hatchery releases on wild populations of Atlantic salmon in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea, over 16 years (1996-2012). Both microsatellites and SNPs revealed congruent population genetic structuring, indicating that introgression changed the genetic make-up of wild populations by increasing genetic diversity and reducing genetic divergence. However, the degree of genetic introgression varied among studied populations, being higher in the eastern part and lower in the western part of Estonia, which most likely reflects the history of past stocking activities. Using kernel smoothing and permutation testing, we detected considerable heterogeneity in introgression patterns across the genome, with a large number of regions exhibiting nonrandom introgression widely dispersed across the genome. We also observed substantial variation in nonrandom introgression patterns within populations, as the majority of genomic regions showing elevated or reduced introgression were not consistently detected among temporal samples. This suggests that recombination, selection and stochastic processes may contribute to complex nonrandom introgression patterns. Our results suggest that (i) some genomic regions in Atlantic salmon are more vulnerable to introgressive hybridization, while others show greater resistance to unidirectional gene flow; and (ii) the hybridization of previously separated populations leads to complex and dynamic nonrandom introgression patterns that most likely have functional consequences for indigenous populations.

  15. Characterization of the bovine gene LIPE and possible influence on fatty acid composition of meat

    PubMed Central

    Goszczynski, Daniel Estanislao; Mazzucco, Juliana Papaleo; Ripoli, María Verónica; Villarreal, Edgardo Leopoldo; Rogberg-Muñoz, Andrés; Mezzadra, Carlos Alberto; Melucci, Lilia Magdalena; Giovambattista, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    LIPE is an intracellular neutral lipase, which is capable of hydrolyzing a variety of esters and plays a key role in the mobilization of fatty acids from diacylglycerols. The objectives of this study were to characterize the genetic polymorphism of bovine LIPE gene and to evaluate the possible association between three SNPs in the coding regions of this gene with the fatty acid composition of meat in a cattle population. Forty-three unrelated animals from different cattle breeds were re-sequenced and 21 SNPs were detected over approximately 2600 bp, five of these SNPs were novel. Three SNPs were selected, on the basis of evolutionary conservation, to perform validation and association studies in a crossbred cattle population. Our results may suggest a possible association of SNP1 with contents of oleic acid and total monounsaturated fatty acids (p < 0.01), and SNP2 and SNP3 with Heneicosylic acid content (p < 0.01), may be helpful to improve the quality of meat and improve health. PMID:25606458

  16. Factors influencing the number of applications submitted per applicant to orthopedic residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Finkler, Elissa S.; Fogel, Harold A.; Kroin, Ellen; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Wu, Karen; Nystrom, Lukas M.; Schiff, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2002 to 2014, the orthopedic surgery residency applicant pool increased by 25% while the number of applications submitted per applicant rose by 69%, resulting in an increase of 109% in the number of applications received per program. Objective This study aimed to identify applicant factors associated with an increased number of applications to orthopedic surgery residency programs. Design An anonymous survey was sent to all applicants applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Questions were designed to define the number of applications submitted per respondent as well as the strength of their application. Of 733 surveys sent, 140 (19.1%) responses were received. Setting An academic institution in Maywood, IL. Participants Fourth-year medical students applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Results An applicant's perception of how competitive he or she was (applicants who rated themselves as ‘average’ submitted more applications than those who rated themselves as either ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’, p=0.001) and the number of away rotations (those who completed >2 away rotations submitted more applications, p=0.03) were significantly associated with an increased number of applications submitted. No other responses were found to be associated with an increased number of applications submitted. Conclusion Less qualified candidates are not applying to significantly more programs than their more qualified counterparts. The increasing number of applications represents a financial strain on the applicant, given the costs required to apply to more programs, and a time burden on individual programs to screen increasing numbers of applicants. In order to stabilize or reverse this alarming trend, orthopedic surgery residency programs should openly disclose admission criteria to prospective candidates, and medical schools should provide additional guidance for candidates in this process

  17. The influence of a family program on adolescent tobacco and alcohol use.

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, K E; Foshee, V A; Ennett, S T; Pemberton, M; Hicks, K A; King, T S; Koch, G G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined a family-directed program's effectiveness in preventing adolescent tobacco and alcohol use in a general population. METHODS: Adolescents aged 12 to 14 years and their families were identified by random-digit dialing throughout the contiguous United States. After providing baseline data by telephone interviews, they were randomly allocated to receive or not receive a family-directed program featuring mailed booklets and telephone contacts by health educators. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted 3 and 12 months after program completion. RESULTS: The findings suggested that smoking onset was reduced by 16.4% at 1 year, with a 25.0% reduction for non-Hispanic Whites but no statistically significant program effect for other races/ethnicities. There were no statistically significant program effects for smokeless tobacco or alcohol use onset. CONCLUSIONS: The family-directed program was associated with reduced smoking onset for non-Hispanic Whites, suggesting that it is worthy of further application, development, and evaluation. PMID:11291373

  18. Associations between CD36 gene polymorphisms and metabolic response to a short-term endurance-training program in a young-adult population.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Gwinn, Tom; Hancock, Dale P; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that CD36 gene variants are associated with an increased prevalence of chronic disease. Although a genetic component to trainability has been proven, no data are available specifically on the influence of CD36 on training response. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs1527479 and rs1984112) were assessed for associations with whole-body substrate oxidation, response to a 75-g dextrose oral glucose tolerance test, fasting plasma lipids, and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a young healthy cohort, both using cross-sectional analysis and following a 4-week endurance-exercise training program. Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cross-sectional data were collected in 34 individuals (age, 22.7 ± 3.5 years), with 17 completing the training program. At baseline, TT SNP carriers at rs1527479 and wild-type GG carriers at rs1984112 were associated with significantly greater whole-body rate of fat oxidation (Fatox) during submaximal exercise (P < 0.05), whilst AA carriers at the same position were associated with elevated triglyceride (TG) levels. A significant genotype × time interaction in Fatox at SNP rs1984112 was identified at rest. Significant genotype × time interactions were present at rs1527479, with TT carriers exhibiting a favourable response to training when compared with C-allele carriers for fasting TG, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In conclusion, cross-sectional assessment identified associations with Fatox and TG. Training response at both SNPs identified "at-risk" genotypes responding favourably to the training stimulus in Fatox, TG, DBP, and MAP. Although these data show potential pleiotropic influence of CD36 SNPs, assessment in a larger cohort is warranted.

  19. Influence of environmental chemicals on epigenetic programming and its applicability in human health risk assessment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The field of epigenetics is rapidly evolving in response to the growing concern that heritable changes in gene expression may be involved in chemically-mediated adverse health outcomes, such as cancer. Although human and animal studies have shown a strong involvement of epigeneti...

  20. Diet and gene interactions influence the skeletal response to polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Somm, Emmanuel; Rosen, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    Diets rich in omega-3s have been thought to prevent both obesity and osteoporosis. However, conflicting findings are reported, probably as a result of gene by nutritional interactions. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ), is a nuclear receptor that improves insulin sensitivity but causes weight gain and bone loss. Fish oil is a natural agonist for PPARγ and thus may exert its actions through PPARγ pathway. We examined the role of PPARγ in body composition changes induced by a fish or safflower oil diet using two strains of C57BL6J (B6); i.e. B6.C3H-6T (6T) congenic mice created by backcrossing a small locus on Chr 6 from C3H carrying ‘gain of function’ polymorphisms in the Pparγ gene onto a B6 background, and C57BL6J mice. After 9 months of feeding both diets to female mice, body weight, percent fat and leptin levels were less in mice fed the fish oil vs those fed safflower oil, independent of genotype. At the skeletal level, fish oil preserved vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) and microstructure in B6 but not in 6T mice. Moreover, fish oil consumption was associated with an increase in bone marrow adiposity and a decrease in BMD, cortical thickness, ultimate force and plastic energy in femur of the 6T but not B6 mice. These effects paralleled an increase in adipogenic inflammatory and resorption markers in 6T but not B6. Thus, compared to safflower oil, fish oil (high ratio omega-3/-6) prevents weight gain, bone loss, and changes in trabecular microarchitecture in the spine with age. These beneficial effects are absent in mice with polymorphisms in the Pparγ gene (6T), supporting the tenet that the actions of n-3 fatty acids on bone microstructure are likely to be genotype dependent. Thus caution must be used in interpreting dietary intervention trials with skeletal endpoints in mice and in humans. PMID:25088402

  1. Diet and gene interactions influence the skeletal response to polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Somm, Emmanuel; Rosen, Clifford J

    2014-11-01

    Diets rich in omega-3s have been thought to prevent both obesity and osteoporosis. However, conflicting findings are reported, probably as a result of gene by nutritional interactions. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor that improves insulin sensitivity but causes weight gain and bone loss. Fish oil is a natural agonist for PPARγ and thus may exert its actions through the PPARγ pathway. We examined the role of PPARγ in body composition changes induced by a fish or safflower oil diet using two strains of C57BL/6J (B6); i.e. B6.C3H-6T (6T) congenic mice created by backcrossing a small locus on Chr 6 from C3H carrying 'gain of function' polymorphisms in the Pparγ gene onto a B6 background, and C57BL/6J mice. After 9months of feeding both diets to female mice, body weight, percent fat and leptin levels were less in mice fed the fish oil vs those fed safflower oil, independent of genotype. At the skeletal level, fish oil preserved vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) and microstructure in B6 but not in 6T mice. Moreover, fish oil consumption was associated with an increase in bone marrow adiposity and a decrease in BMD, cortical thickness, ultimate force and plastic energy in femur of the 6T but not the B6 mice. These effects paralleled an increase in adipogenic inflammatory and resorption markers in 6T but not B6. Thus, compared to safflower oil, fish oil (high ratio omega-3/-6) prevents weight gain, bone loss, and changes in trabecular microarchitecture in the spine with age. These beneficial effects are absent in mice with polymorphisms in the Pparγ gene (6T), supporting the tenet that the actions of n-3 fatty acids on bone microstructure are likely to be genotype dependent. Thus caution must be used in interpreting dietary intervention trials with skeletal endpoints in mice and in humans.

  2. Diet and gene interactions influence the skeletal response to polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Somm, Emmanuel; Rosen, Clifford J

    2014-11-01

    Diets rich in omega-3s have been thought to prevent both obesity and osteoporosis. However, conflicting findings are reported, probably as a result of gene by nutritional interactions. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor that improves insulin sensitivity but causes weight gain and bone loss. Fish oil is a natural agonist for PPARγ and thus may exert its actions through the PPARγ pathway. We examined the role of PPARγ in body composition changes induced by a fish or safflower oil diet using two strains of C57BL/6J (B6); i.e. B6.C3H-6T (6T) congenic mice created by backcrossing a small locus on Chr 6 from C3H carrying 'gain of function' polymorphisms in the Pparγ gene onto a B6 background, and C57BL/6J mice. After 9months of feeding both diets to female mice, body weight, percent fat and leptin levels were less in mice fed the fish oil vs those fed safflower oil, independent of genotype. At the skeletal level, fish oil preserved vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) and microstructure in B6 but not in 6T mice. Moreover, fish oil consumption was associated with an increase in bone marrow adiposity and a decrease in BMD, cortical thickness, ultimate force and plastic energy in femur of the 6T but not the B6 mice. These effects paralleled an increase in adipogenic inflammatory and resorption markers in 6T but not B6. Thus, compared to safflower oil, fish oil (high ratio omega-3/-6) prevents weight gain, bone loss, and changes in trabecular microarchitecture in the spine with age. These beneficial effects are absent in mice with polymorphisms in the Pparγ gene (6T), supporting the tenet that the actions of n-3 fatty acids on bone microstructure are likely to be genotype dependent. Thus caution must be used in interpreting dietary intervention trials with skeletal endpoints in mice and in humans. PMID:25088402

  3. Genetic background influences adaptation to cardiac hypertrophy and Ca(2+) handling gene expression.

    PubMed

    Waters, Steve B; Diak, Douglass M; Zuckermann, Matthew; Goldspink, Paul H; Leoni, Lara; Roman, Brian B

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variability has a profound effect on the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to stress. Consequently, using a variety of inbred mouse strains with known genetic profiles may be powerful models for studying the response to cardiovascular stress. To explore this approach we looked at male C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ mice. Hemodynamic analyses of left ventricular pressures (LVPs) indicated significant differences in 129/SvJ and C57BL/6J mice that implied altered Ca(2+) handling. Specifically, 129/SvJ mice demonstrated reduced rates of relaxation and insensitivity to dobutamine (Db). We hypothesized that altered expression of genes controlling the influx and efflux of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was responsible and investigated the expression of several genes involved in maintaining the intracellular and sarcoluminal Ca(2+) concentration using quantitative real-time PCR analyses (qRT-PCR). We observed significant differences in baseline gene expression as well as different responses in expression to isoproterenol (ISO) challenge. In untreated control animals, 129/SvJ mice expressed 1.68× more ryanodine receptor 2(Ryr2) mRNA than C57BL/6J mice but only 0.37× as much calsequestrin 2 (Casq2). After treatment with ISO, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase(Serca2) expression was reduced nearly two-fold in 129/SvJ while expression in C57BL/6J was stable. Interestingly, β (1) adrenergic receptor(Adrb1) expression was lower in 129/SvJ compared to C57BL/6J at baseline and lower in both strains after treatment. Metabolically, the brain isoform of creatine kinase (Ckb) was up-regulated in response to ISO in C57BL/6J but not in 129/SvJ. These data suggest that the two strains of mice regulate Ca(2+) homeostasis via different mechanisms and may be useful in developing personalized therapies in human patients.

  4. Changes in the gene expression programs of renal mesangial cells during diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end stage renal disease. All three cell types of the glomerulus, podocytes, endothelial cells and mesangial cells, play important roles in diabetic nephropathy. In this report we used Meis1-GFP transgenic mice to purify mesangial cells from normal mice and from db/db mice, which suffer diabetic nephropathy. The purpose of the study is to better define the unique character of normal mesangial cells, and to characterize their pathogenic and protective responses during diabetic nephropathy. Methods Comprehensive gene expression states of the normal and diseased mesangial cells were defined with microarrays. By comparing the gene expression profiles of mesangial cells with those of multiple other renal cell types, including podocytes, endothelial cells and renal vesicles, it was possible to better define their exceptional nature, which includes smooth muscle, phagocytic and neuronal traits. Results The complete set of mesangial cell expressed transcription factors, growth factors and receptors were identified. In addition, the analysis of the mesangial cells from diabetic nephropathy mice characterized their changes in gene expression. Molecular functions and biological processes specific to diseased mesangial cells were characterized, identifying genes involved in extracellular matrix, cell division, vasculogenesis, and growth factor modulation. Selected gene changes considered of particular importance to the disease process were validated and localized within the glomuerulus by immunostaining. For example, thrombospondin, a key mediator of TGFβ signaling, was upregulated in the diabetic nephropathy mesangial cells, likely contributing to fibrosis. On the other hand the decorin gene was also upregulated, and expression of this gene has been strongly implicated in the reduction of TGFβ induced fibrosis. Conclusions The results provide an important complement to previous studies examining mesangial cells grown in

  5. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and pomegranate influence circadian gene expression and period length.

    PubMed

    Loizides-Mangold, Ursula; Koren-Gluzer, Marie; Skarupelova, Svetlana; Makhlouf, Anne-Marie; Hayek, Tony; Aviram, Michael; Dibner, Charna

    2016-01-01

    The circadian timing system regulates key aspects of mammalian physiology. Here, we analyzed the effect of the endogenous antioxidant paraoxonase 1 (PON1), a high-density lipoprotein-associated lipolactonase that hydrolyses lipid peroxides and attenuates atherogenesis, on circadian gene expression in C57BL/6J and PON1KO mice fed a normal chow diet or a high-fat diet (HFD). Expression levels of core-clock transcripts Nr1d1, Per2, Cry2 and Bmal1 were altered in skeletal muscle in PON1-deficient mice in response to HFD. These findings were supported by circadian bioluminescence reporter assessments in mouse C2C12 and human primary myotubes, synchronized in vitro, where administration of PON1 or pomegranate juice modulated circadian period length. PMID:27010443

  6. Gibberellin 3-oxidase gene expression patterns influence gibberellin biosynthesis, growth, and development in pea.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, Dennis M; Wickramarathna, Aruna D; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Kurepin, Leonid V; Jin, Alena L; Good, Allen G; Pharis, Richard P

    2013-10-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are key modulators of plant growth and development. PsGA3ox1 (LE) encodes a GA 3β-hydroxylase that catalyzes the conversion of GA20 to biologically active GA1. To further clarify the role of GA3ox expression during pea (Pisum sativum) plant growth and development, we generated transgenic pea lines (in a lele background) with cauliflower mosaic virus-35S-driven expression of PsGA3ox1 (LE). PsGA3ox1 transgene expression led to higher GA1 concentrations in a tissue-specific and development-specific manner, altering GA biosynthesis and catabolism gene expression and plant phenotype. PsGA3ox1 transgenic plants had longer internodes, tendrils, and fruits, larger stipules, and displayed delayed flowering, increased apical meristem life, and altered vascular development relative to the null controls. Transgenic PsGA3ox1 overexpression lines were then compared with lines where endogenous PsGA3ox1 (LE) was introduced, by a series of backcrosses, into the same genetic background (BC LEle). Most notably, the BC LEle plants had substantially longer internodes containing much greater GA1 levels than the transgenic PsGA3ox1 plants. Induction of expression of the GA deactivation gene PsGA2ox1 appears to make an important contribution to limiting the increase of internode GA1 to modest levels for the transgenic lines. In contrast, PsGA3ox1 (LE) expression driven by its endogenous promoter was coordinated within the internode tissue to avoid feed-forward regulation of PsGA2ox1, resulting in much greater GA1 accumulation. These studies further our fundamental understanding of the regulation of GA biosynthesis and catabolism at the tissue and organ level and demonstrate that the timing/localization of GA3ox expression within an organ affects both GA homeostasis and GA1 levels, and thereby growth.

  7. Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Santhi K.; Tragante, Vinicius; Guo, Wei; Guo, Yiran; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Smith, Erin N.; Johnson, Toby; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C.; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E.; Franceschini, Nora; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gho, Johannes M.I.H.; Gieger, Christian; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E.; Leach, Irene Mateo; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Mellander, Olle; Molony, Cliona M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Price, Tom S.; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Van Setten, Jessic A.; Vonk, Judith M.; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Burkley, Ben; Burt, Amber; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Wei; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Curtis, Sean P.; Dreisbach, Albert; Duggan, David; Ehret, Georg B.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Ervin; Furlong, Clement E.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Hofker, Marten H.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kirkland, Susan A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kutlar, Abdullah; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Li, Yun R.; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Kiang; Maiwald, Steffi; Malik, Rainer; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pepine, Carl J.; Pettinger, Mary; Polak, Joseph F.; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Ranchalis, Jane; Redline, Susan; Ridker, Paul M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Scharnag, Hubert; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shimbo, Daichi; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Taylor, Herman A.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J. Hunter; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Davidson, Karina W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Gums, John G.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hillege, Hans L.; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Sarah S.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Reiner, Alex P.; Schadt, Eric E.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Snieder, Harold; Stanton, Alice V.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel; Keating, Brendan J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.

    2013-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable determinant of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ∼50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ∼2100 candidate genes for cardiovascular phenotypes in 61 619 individuals of European ancestry from cohort studies in the USA and Europe. We identified novel associations between rs347591 and SBP (chromosome 3p25.3, in an intron of HRH1) and between rs2169137 and DBP (chromosome1q32.1 in an intron of MDM4) and between rs2014408 and SBP (chromosome 11p15 in an intron of SOX6), previously reported to be associated with MAP. We also confirmed 10 previously known loci associated with SBP, DBP, MAP or PP (ADRB1, ATP2B1, SH2B3/ATXN2, CSK, CYP17A1, FURIN, HFE, LSP1, MTHFR, SOX6) at array-wide significance (P < 2.4 × 10−6). We then replicated these associations in an independent set of 65 886 individuals of European ancestry. The findings from expression QTL (eQTL) analysis showed associations of SNPs in the MDM4 region with MDM4 expression. We did not find any evidence of association of the two novel SNPs in MDM4 and HRH1 with sequelae of high BP including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or stroke. In summary, we identified two novel loci associated with BP and confirmed multiple previously reported associations. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, some of which may eventually provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23303523

  8. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  9. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01–0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20–20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  10. Decreased expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 alpha during the acute-phase response influences transthyretin gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, X; Samadani, U; Porcella, A; Costa, R H

    1995-01-01

    Three distinct hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 (HNF-3) proteins (alpha, beta, and gamma) are known to regulate the transcription of numerous liver-specific genes. The HNF-3 proteins bind to DNA as monomers through a winged-helix motif, which is also utilized by a number of developmental regulators, including the Drosophila homeotic fork head (fkh) protein. We have previously characterized a strong-affinity HNF-3S site in the transthyretin (TTR) promoter region which is essential for expression in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. In the current study, we identify an activating protein 1 (AP-1) site which partially overlaps the HNF-3S sequence in the TTR promoter. We show that in HepG2 cells the AP-1 sequence confers 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate inducibility to the TTR promoter and contributes to normal TTR transcriptional activity. We also demonstrate that the HNF-3 proteins and AP-1 bind independently to the TTR AP-1-HNF-3 site, and cotransfection experiments suggest that they do not cooperate to activate an AP-1-HNF-3 reporter construct. In addition, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate exposure of HepG2 cells results in a reciprocal decrease in HNF-3 alpha and -3 gamma expression which may facilitate interaction of AP-1 with the TTR AP-1-HNF-3 site. In order to explore the role of HNF-3 in the liver, we have examined expression patterns of TTR and HNF-3 during the acute-phase response and liver regeneration. Partial hepatectomy produced minimal fluctuation in HNF-3 and TTR expression, suggesting that HNF-3 expression is not influenced by proliferative signals induced during liver regeneration. In acute-phase livers, we observed a dramatic reduction in HNF-3 alpha expression which correlates with a decrease in the expression of its target gene, the TTR gene. Furthermore, consistent with previous studies, the acute-phase livers are induced for c-jun but not c-fos expression. We propose that the reduction in TTR gene expression during the acute phase is likely due

  11. Polymorphisms of the TAP 1 and 2 gene may influence clinical outcome of primary dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Soundravally, R; Hoti, S L

    2008-06-01

    Antigen peptides are actively transported across the endoplasmic reticulum by the transporters associated with antigen presentation (TAP). TAP genes polymorphism could influence the selection process that determines which antigen peptides play a role in the pathogenesis of dengue infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of TAP genes polymorphism in diverse pathogenesis of dengue infection. This study included 197 dengue-infected patients who were further categorized into 64, 23 and 11 primary dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), dengue shock syndrome (DSS) cases, respectively and 26, 52, and 21 secondary DF, DHF and DSS cases, respectively as per WHO grading system. TAP1 and 2 gene polymorphisms were performed by the amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR). Analysis of TAP1 gene polymorphism demonstrated decreased frequency of Ile/Ile genotype at TAP1(333) in primary DHF cases (39.1%) when compared with primary DF (64.1%, P < 0.034, OR = 0.611). The genotype frequency of Val/Val at TAP2(379) locus was significantly decreased among primary DHF (43.5%) in comparison to primary DF (71.9%, P = 0.015, OR = 0.605). Significant low proportion of primary DSS were found to have TAP1(637) Asp/Asp genotypes (54.5%) when compared with primary DF (70.3%, P = 0.043). Asp/Asp genotype at TAP1(637) was found to reduce the risk by 0.643 times for primary DSS. There was no significant difference in the genotypes studied between primary and secondary infection and also within secondary dengue infection in all three clinical groups. This report on TAP gene polymorphisms in dengue suggested that among the primary-infected individuals, homozygous patterns for Ile at TAP1(333) Val at TAP2(379) loci and Asp at TAP1(637) were found to be a protective factor against development of DHF and DSS, respectively.

  12. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  13. The influence of newborn early literacy intervention programs in three canadian provinces.

    PubMed

    Letourneau, Nicole; Whitty, Pam; Watson, Barry; Phillips, Jennifer; Joschko, Justin; Gillis, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Low levels of literacy in early childhood can have lasting effects on children's educational and intellectual development. Many countries have implemented newborn literacy programs designed to teach parents pre-literacy promoting activities to share with their children. We conducted 2 quasi-experimental studies using 1) a pre-test/post-test design and 2) a non-equivalent control group design to examine the effect of newborn literacy programs on parents' self-reported literacy intentions/behaviors, values toward literacy, and parent-child interactions. Parents were recruited from 3 provinces, 2 with newborn literacy programs (intervention) and 1 without (control). Parents in the intervention group completed prenatal and postnatal (after participation in program) questionnaires. Parents in the control group completed 1 questionnaire. Questionnaires were designed to capture parents' literacy intentions (prenatal), behaviors (postnatal), values, and parent-child interactions (postnatal). A total of 98 parents were included in study one and 174 were included in study two. Parents' self-reported prenatal intentions and values were higher than their postnatal behaviors and values. Parents in the intervention group exhibited higher literacy behaviors and values and greater enjoyment reading to their children than parents in the control group, though they also reported reading to their children less frequently. Parents in the intervention group had significantly higher Positive Interactive scores than controls. Overall, we found participation in newborn literacy programs positively impacted parenting behaviors and attitudes. Lower postnatal within-group scores (intentions and values versus behaviors and values) may have been the result of participants' high expectations. Given our findings, we recommend that these programs continue.

  14. Epigenetic modification of the oxytocin receptor gene influences the perception of anger and fear in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Puglia, Meghan H.; Lillard, Travis S.; Morris, James P.; Connelly, Jessica J.

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the neuropeptide oxytocin plays a critical role in social and emotional behavior. The actions of this molecule are dependent on a protein that acts as its receptor, which is encoded by the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR). DNA methylation of OXTR, an epigenetic modification, directly influences gene transcription and is variable in humans. However, the impact of this variability on specific social behaviors is unknown. We hypothesized that variability in OXTR methylation impacts social perceptual processes often linked with oxytocin, such as perception of facial emotions. Using an imaging epigenetic approach, we established a relationship between OXTR methylation and neural activity in response to emotional face processing. Specifically, high levels of OXTR methylation were associated with greater amounts of activity in regions associated with face and emotion processing including amygdala, fusiform, and insula. Importantly, we found that these higher levels of OXTR methylation were also associated with decreased functional coupling of amygdala with regions involved in affect appraisal and emotion regulation. These data indicate that the human endogenous oxytocin system is involved in attenuation of the fear response, corroborating research implicating intranasal oxytocin in the same processes. Our findings highlight the importance of including epigenetic mechanisms in the description of the endogenous oxytocin system and further support a central role for oxytocin in social cognition. This approach linking epigenetic variability with neural endophenotypes may broadly explain individual differences in phenotype including susceptibility or resilience to disease. PMID:25675509

  15. Influence of lipid components on gene delivery by polycation liposomes: Transfection efficiency, intracellular kinetics and in vivo tumor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinliang; Sun, Xiaoyi; Yu, Zhenwei; Gao, Jianqing; Liang, Wenquan

    2012-01-17

    Transfection efficiency of non-viral gene vectors is influenced by many factors, including chemical makeup, cellular uptake pathway and intracellular delivery. To investigate the effect of lipid saturation on transfection efficiency of polycation liposomes (PCLs), a soybean phospholipids (SPL), egg phospholipids (EPL) and hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine (HSPC) series was used to prepare PCLs. Testing these PCLs in a luciferase assay indicated that with increasing saturation (SPLgene expression decreased. The effect of protamine combined with these PCLs was also studied in different cell lines. Improved transfection because of protamine incorporation was dependent on lipid saturation and on the cell line tested. The kinetics of cellular uptake and intracellular distribution was studied using flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscope, which showed that naked oligonucleotide (ODN) and PCLs/ODN complexes became equilibrium after 4h incubation. PCLs containing SPL (PCLs-S) and 1,2-dieleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (PCLs-D) increased uptake rates by 2.20- and 5.45-fold, respectively. Furthermore, pCMV-IL-12 transfection mediated by PCLs-D showed excellent tumor inhibition efficiency compared with control and naked pCMV-IL-12 treatments in vivo. PMID:22119962

  16. Mechanisms of geomagnetic field influence on gene expression using influenza as a model system: basics of physical epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Zaporozhan, Valeriy; Ponomarenko, Andriy

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies demonstrate distinct changes in gene expression in cells exposed to a weak magnetic field (MF). Mechanisms of this phenomenon are not understood yet. We propose that proteins of the Cryptochrome family (CRY) are "epigenetic sensors" of the MF fluctuations, i.e., magnetic field-sensitive part of the epigenetic controlling mechanism. It was shown that CRY represses activity of the major circadian transcriptional complex CLOCK/BMAL1. At the same time, function of CRY, is apparently highly responsive to weak MF because of radical pairs that periodically arise in the functionally active site of CRY and mediate the radical pair mechanism of magnetoreception. It is known that the circadian complex influences function of every organ and tissue, including modulation of both NF-kappaB- and glucocorticoids- dependent signaling pathways. Thus, MFs and solar cycles-dependent geomagnetic field fluctuations are capable of altering expression of genes related to function of NF-kappaB, hormones and other biological regulators. Notably, NF-kappaB, along with its significant role in immune response, also participates in differential regulation of influenza virus RNA synthesis. Presented data suggests that in the case of global application (example-geomagnetic field), MF-mediated regulation may have epidemiological and other consequences. PMID:20617011

  17. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene variants influence antidepressant response to repeated total sleep deprivation in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Barbini, Barbara; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Fulgosi, Mara Cigala; Colombo, Cristina; Dallaspezia, Sara; Gavinelli, Chiara; Marino, Elena; Pirovano, Adele; Radaelli, Daniele; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2008-12-12

    5-HT2A receptor density in prefrontal cortex was associated with depression and suicide. 5-HT2A receptor gene polymorphism rs6313 was associated with 5-HT2A receptor binding potential, with the ability of individuals to use environmental support in order to prevent depression, and with sleep improvement after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. Studies on response to antidepressant drugs gave inconsistent results. Here we studied the effect of rs6313 on response to repeated total sleep deprivation (TSD) in 80 bipolar depressed inpatients treated with three consecutive TSD cycles (each one made of 36 h awake followed by a night of undisturbed sleep). All genotype groups showed comparable acute effects of the first TSD, but patients homozygotes for the T variant had better perceived and observed benefits from treatment than carriers of the C allele. These effects became significant after the first recovery night and during the following days, leading to a 36% higher final response rate (Hamilton depression rating<8). The higher density of postsynaptic excitatory 5-HT2A receptors in T/T homozygotes could have led to higher behavioural effects of increased 5-HT neurotransmission due to repeated TSD. Other possible mechanisms involve allostatic/homeostatic adaptation to sleep loss, and a different effect of the allele variants on epigenetic influences. Results confirm the interest for individual gene variants of the serotonin pathway in shaping clinical characteristics of depression and antidepressant response.

  18. Factors Influencing Career Decisions: Perspectives of Nursing Students in Three Types of Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Pamala D.; McGill, Joan S.; Palmer, Stephanie J.

    2003-01-01

    North Carolina nursing students (99 baccalaureate, 309 associate degree, and 87 diploma) were surveyed. They were motivated to pursue nursing by past experiences with illness, past health-care work experiences, or family member/friend who was a nurse. Career decisions were also influenced by characteristics of nursing. There were no differences by…

  19. Influence of a Parent Leadership Program on Participants' Leadership Capacity and Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Shayna D.; Kreider, Holly; Ocon, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the influence of Parent Services Project's Vision and Voice Family Leadership Institute (VVFLI; formerly known as Parent Leadership Institute) on parent leadership capacity and action. Pre- and post-test data were collected from new VVFLI attendees during their first (N = 83) and last (N = 85) session, respectively.…

  20. Individual and institutional influences on faith-based health and wellness programming.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Melissa; Fallon, Elizabeth A

    2011-12-01

    The majority of the US population is affiliated with faith-based organizations (FBO). Health and wellness activities (HWAs) within FBOs have great potential for reach, though the factors influencing faith-based HWA are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine individual faith leader and institutional influences on HWAs offered within FBOs. A national convenience sample of faith leaders (N = 844) completed an online survey assessing individual (demographics, health, health behaviors and attitudes) and institutional influences (size, location and external support) on health and HWA within FBO. Respondents were primarily White (93%), male (72%), middle-aged and affiliated with Methodist (42.5%) or Lutheran (20.2%) religions. Respondents reported 4.8 ± 3.2 HWA within their FBO per year. Faith leader education, length of service to the FBO, physical activity and fruit/vegetable intake were positively related to HWA and body mass index was negatively related. Denomination, congregation diversity, location and size were also related to HWA. Results show a strong relationship between faith leaders' health and HWA, indicating the influence of the social environment on health promotion in FBOs. Institutional variables, though not modifiable, were significant predictors of HWA and should be considered when delivering interventions to achieve a significant impact.

  1. Using Sanctioned Athletics Programs to Understand Stakeholders' Perceived Influence in Decisions at Major Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirko, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This study set out to learn more about the perceived influence of stakeholders on academic decisions affecting intercollegiate athletics, with the intent that such knowledge would help provide useful implications for future leaders making decisions that impact unique student populations. As an area of research, the semi-autonomous unit of…

  2. Measuring the Accountability of CTE Programs: Factors that Influence Postcollege Earnings among Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Kenneth J.; Starobin, Soko S.; Laanan, Frankie Santos; Friedel, Janice N.

    2012-01-01

    In this study specific factors were examined to determine their ability to influence fifth-year earnings of community college students in the Manufacturing/Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) career cluster and the Arts/Audiovisual/Technology/ Communication career cluster. State and national data sets from Iowa's Management…

  3. Improving Classroom Quality: Teacher Influences and Experimental Impacts of the 4Rs Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Joshua L.; Jones, Stephanie M.; LaRusso, Maria D.; Aber, J. Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    This study capitalizes on recent advances in the reliable and valid measurement of classroom-level social processes known to influence children's social-emotional and academic development and addresses a number of limitations in our current understanding of teacher- and intervention-related impacts on elementary school classroom processes. A…

  4. Seasonal influence on gene expression of monoterpene synthases in Salvia officinalis (Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Grausgruber-Gröger, Sabine; Schmiderer, Corinna; Steinborn, Ralf; Novak, Johannes

    2012-03-01

    Garden sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) is one of the most important medicinal and aromatic plants and possesses antioxidant, antimicrobial, spasmolytic, astringent, antihidrotic and specific sensorial properties. The essential oil of the plant, formed mainly in very young leaves, is in part responsible for these activities. It is mainly composed of the monoterpenes 1,8-cineole, α- and β-thujone and camphor synthesized by the 1,8-cineole synthase, the (+)-sabinene synthase and the (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, respectively, and is produced and stored in epidermal glands. In this study, the seasonal influence on the formation of the main monoterpenes in young, still expanding leaves of field-grown sage plants was studied in two cultivars at the level of mRNA expression, analyzed by qRT-PCR, and at the level of end-products, analyzed by gas chromatography. All monoterpene synthases and monoterpenes were significantly influenced by cultivar and season. 1,8-Cineole synthase and its end product 1,8-cineole remained constant until August and then decreased slightly. The thujones increased steadily during the vegetative period. The transcript level of their corresponding terpene synthase, however, showed its maximum in the middle of the vegetative period and declined afterwards. Camphor remained constant until August and then declined, exactly correlated with the mRNA level of the corresponding terpene synthase. In summary, terpene synthase mRNA expression and respective end product levels were concordant in the case of 1,8-cineole (r=0.51 and 0.67 for the two cultivars, respectively; p<0.05) and camphor (r=0.75 and 0.82; p<0.05) indicating basically transcriptional control, but discordant for α-/β-thujone (r=-0.05 and 0.42; p=0.87 and 0.13, respectively).

  5. Pathway Based Analysis of Genes and Interactions Influencing Porcine Testis Samples from Boars with Divergent Androstenone Content in Back Fat

    PubMed Central

    Sahadevan, Sudeep; Gunawan, Asep; Tholen, Ernst; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Tesfaye, Dawit; Schellander, Karl; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary factors contributing to boar taint is the level of androstenone in porcine adipose tissues. A majority of the studies performed to identify candidate biomarkers for the synthesis of androstenone in testis tissues follow a reductionist approach, identifying and studying the effect of biomarkers individually. Although these studies provide detailed information on individual biomarkers, a global picture of changes in metabolic pathways that lead to the difference in androstenone synthesis is still missing. The aim of this work was to identify major pathways and interactions influencing steroid hormone synthesis and androstenone biosynthesis using an integrative approach to provide a bird’s eye view of the factors causing difference in steroidogenesis and androstenone biosynthesis. For this purpose, we followed an analysis procedure merging together gene expression data from boars with divergent levels of androstenone and pathway mapping and interaction network retrieved from KEGG database. The interaction networks were weighted with Pearson correlation coefficients calculated from gene expression data and significant interactions and enriched pathways were identified based on these networks. The results show that 1,023 interactions were significant for high and low androstenone animals and that a total of 92 pathways were enriched for significant interactions. Although published articles show that a number of these enriched pathways were activated as a result of downstream signaling of steroid hormones, we speculate that the significant interactions in pathways such as glutathione metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and significant interactions in cAMP-PKA/PKC signaling might be the key factors determining the difference in steroidogenesis and androstenone biosynthesis between boars with divergent androstenone levels in our study. The results and assumptions presented in this study are from an in-silico analysis done at the

  6. High-resolution linkage analyses to identify genes that influence Varroa sensitive hygiene behavior in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Jennifer M; Harris, Jeffrey W; Bourgeois, Lanie; Danka, Robert G; Hunt, Greg J

    2012-01-01

    Varroa mites (V. destructor) are a major threat to honey bees (Apis melilfera) and beekeeping worldwide and likely lead to colony decline if colonies are not treated. Most treatments involve chemical control of the mites; however, Varroa has evolved resistance to many of these miticides, leaving beekeepers with a limited number of alternatives. A non-chemical control method is highly desirable for numerous reasons including lack of chemical residues and decreased likelihood of resistance. Varroa sensitive hygiene behavior is one of two behaviors identified that are most important for controlling the growth of Varroa populations in bee hives. To identify genes influencing this trait, a study was conducted to map quantitative trait loci (QTL). Individual workers of a backcross family were observed and evaluated for their VSH behavior in a mite-infested observation hive. Bees that uncapped or removed pupae were identified. The genotypes for 1,340 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms were used to construct a high-resolution genetic map and interval mapping was used to analyze the association of the genotypes with the performance of Varroa sensitive hygiene. We identified one major QTL on chromosome 9 (LOD score = 3.21) and a suggestive QTL on chromosome 1 (LOD = 1.95). The QTL confidence interval on chromosome 9 contains the gene 'no receptor potential A' and a dopamine receptor. 'No receptor potential A' is involved in vision and olfaction in Drosophila, and dopamine signaling has been previously shown to be required for aversive olfactory learning in honey bees, which is probably necessary for identifying mites within brood cells. Further studies on these candidate genes may allow for breeding bees with this trait using marker-assisted selection.

  7. High-Resolution Linkage Analyses to Identify Genes That Influence Varroa Sensitive Hygiene Behavior in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruda, Jennifer M.; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Bourgeois, Lanie; Danka, Robert G.; Hunt, Greg J.

    2012-01-01

    Varroa mites (V. destructor) are a major threat to honey bees (Apis melilfera) and beekeeping worldwide and likely lead to colony decline if colonies are not treated. Most treatments involve chemical control of the mites; however, Varroa has evolved resistance to many of these miticides, leaving beekeepers with a limited number of alternatives. A non-chemical control method is highly desirable for numerous reasons including lack of chemical residues and decreased likelihood of resistance. Varroa sensitive hygiene behavior is one of two behaviors identified that are most important for controlling the growth of Varroa populations in bee hives. To identify genes influencing this trait, a study was conducted to map quantitative trait loci (QTL). Individual workers of a backcross family were observed and evaluated for their VSH behavior in a mite-infested observation hive. Bees that uncapped or removed pupae were identified. The genotypes for 1,340 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms were used to construct a high-resolution genetic map and interval mapping was used to analyze the association of the genotypes with the performance of Varroa sensitive hygiene. We identified one major QTL on chromosome 9 (LOD score = 3.21) and a suggestive QTL on chromosome 1 (LOD = 1.95). The QTL confidence interval on chromosome 9 contains the gene ‘no receptor potential A’ and a dopamine receptor. ‘No receptor potential A’ is involved in vision and olfaction in Drosophila, and dopamine signaling has been previously shown to be required for aversive olfactory learning in honey bees, which is probably necessary for identifying mites within brood cells. Further studies on these candidate genes may allow for breeding bees with this trait using marker-assisted selection. PMID:23133626

  8. Pathway based analysis of genes and interactions influencing porcine testis samples from boars with divergent androstenone content in back fat.

    PubMed

    Sahadevan, Sudeep; Gunawan, Asep; Tholen, Ernst; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Tesfaye, Dawit; Schellander, Karl; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary factors contributing to boar taint is the level of androstenone in porcine adipose tissues. A majority of the studies performed to identify candidate biomarkers for the synthesis of androstenone in testis tissues follow a reductionist approach, identifying and studying the effect of biomarkers individually. Although these studies provide detailed information on individual biomarkers, a global picture of changes in metabolic pathways that lead to the difference in androstenone synthesis is still missing. The aim of this work was to identify major pathways and interactions influencing steroid hormone synthesis and androstenone biosynthesis using an integrative approach to provide a bird's eye view of the factors causing difference in steroidogenesis and androstenone biosynthesis. For this purpose, we followed an analysis procedure merging together gene expression data from boars with divergent levels of androstenone and pathway mapping and interaction network retrieved from KEGG database. The interaction networks were weighted with Pearson correlation coefficients calculated from gene expression data and significant interactions and enriched pathways were identified based on these networks. The results show that 1,023 interactions were significant for high and low androstenone animals and that a total of 92 pathways were enriched for significant interactions. Although published articles show that a number of these enriched pathways were activated as a result of downstream signaling of steroid hormones, we speculate that the significant interactions in pathways such as glutathione metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and significant interactions in cAMP-PKA/PKC signaling might be the key factors determining the difference in steroidogenesis and androstenone biosynthesis between boars with divergent androstenone levels in our study. The results and assumptions presented in this study are from an in-silico analysis done at the

  9. Individual Attitudes and Social Influences on College Students' Intent to Participate in Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Liz C.; Gault, John; Christ, Paul; Diggin, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Participation in study abroad programs (SAPs) is widely viewed as offering important professional and personal benefits for college students. This study applies the "Theory of Reasoned Action" [Ajzen, I., & Fishbein, M. (1980) and "Understanding attitudes and predicting social behavior," Englewood Cliffs, NJ:…

  10. How People Choose Vocational Education and Training Programs: Social, Education and Personal Influences on Aspiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Graham; Cooper, Maureen; Biggs, Neville

    The reasons why Australians choose to enroll in vocational education and training (VET) programs were examined through a questionnaire survey and site visits. The questionnaire yielded responses from 1,501 VET students of a target sample of 3,000 students who were equally representative of the following fields of study: business, engineering,…

  11. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  12. The Influence of Leadership Development Programs on the Community College Leadership Shortage: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornheimer, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges are experiencing a leadership shortage due to the majority of college presidents retiring by 2011. This leadership shortage has created financial and operational challenges for the nation's community college system. To remedy the shortage, community colleges and other organizations have developed leadership development programs.…

  13. Writing under the Influence: Science versus Fiction in the Analysis of Corporate Alcoholism Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the development and reporting of knowledge about employee alcoholism programs. Argues that specialists in this field frequently have overstated both the severity of the problem and the effectiveness of rehabilitative measures. Compares their claims with evidence from the limited body of systematic research on this topic. (Author/KS)

  14. Factors Influencing College Attendance of Appalachian Kentucky Students Participating in a Federal Educational Talent Search Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Post-secondary education is quickly becoming a requirement for many growing careers. Because of this, an increased focused on post-secondary enrollment and attainment has been seen in the education community, particularly in the K-12 systems. To that end a large number of programs and organizations have begun to provide assistance to these…

  15. Caregiver Involvement in the Intensive Mental Health Program: Influence on Changes in Child Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Margaret M.; Bowers, Mark J.; Lazicki, Tammy; Krall, Dan; Jacobs, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    We examined behavioral markers of caregiver involvement and the ways in which family participation was related to treatment outcomes in 47 elementary school children with SED enrolled in a school-based intensive mental health program. Measures of caregiver involvement included therapeutic home visits, attendance at therapeutic meetings, completion…

  16. Factors Influencing the Implementation of an International Baccalaureate Diploma Program in a Diverse Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Anysia P.

    2010-01-01

    This article identifies factors that promoted the successful implementation of an International Baccalaureate Diploma Program in an urban high school. The study draws on data from an in-depth case study at a large high school serving an urban community in a Western state. The study investigates seven implementation mechanisms that research…

  17. Influences of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Home Economics Program. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Opal

    In planning a reorganization of the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service by re-grouping counties, a statewide study of home economics education was made to determine the audience for the programs, methods by which audiences were reached, and differences between members of homemakers clubs and nonmembers. Interviews were held with a 5% random…

  18. The Influence of Current Television Programing on the Maintenance of Female Gender Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arquette, Cecile M.; Horton, Julie

    Over the years, it has been shown that television has the tendency to use stereotypical gender imagery, and despite the continuing trend toward political correctness, the same types of gender bias are still very common today. Because of this tendency for bias, television programming continues to be an area of concern, especially in light of the…

  19. Do Rape Education Programs Influence Rape Patterns among New York State College Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrot, Andrea

    This study examined the differences in patterns of college student reports of rape and the availability of educational programs among college students. College students (N=994) from 26 colleges and universities in New York State were studied to determine the extent of forced sex and rape experiences. Additionally, they were studied to determine if…

  20. Influence of School Organizational Characteristics on the Outcomes of a School Health Promotion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Baranowski, Tom; Baranowski, Janice; Hebert, David; deMoor, Carl; Hearn, Marsha Davis; Resnicow, Ken

    1999-01-01

    Assessed the impact of school organizational characteristics on outcomes of a teacher health behavior change program. Organizational, dietary, and psychologic data from intervention and control schools indicated that teachers at intervention schools with high organizational climate, organizational health, and job satisfaction reported better…

  1. How Robotics Programs Influence Young Women's Career Choices: A Grounded Theory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cecilia Dosh-Bluhm

    2014-01-01

    The fields of engineering, computer science, and physics have a paucity of women despite decades of intervention by universities and organizations. Women's graduation rates in these fields continue to stagnate, posing a critical problem for society. This qualitative grounded theory (GT) study sought to understand how robotics programs influenced…

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF A STRUCTURED PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM ON ADOLESCENT PERSONALITY. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRIMBLE, W.E.; UNTERSEHER, RICHARD

    A STRUCTURED PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM CONSISTING MOSTLY OF BODY BUILDING EXERCISES AND WEIGHT LIFTING WAS USED TO GIVE PHYSICALLY UNDERDEVELOPED BOYS A SENSE OF PERSONAL ACCOMPLISHMENT. JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL BOYS FROM GRADES SEVEN, EIGHT, AND NINE, CLASSIFIED ON THE BASIS OF LACK OF ATHLETIC ABILITY, WERE GIVEN THE CALIFORNIA PSYCHOLOGICAL…

  3. The Power of Plain Talk: Exploring One Program' Influence on the Adolescent Reproductive Health Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerville, Geri; Canova, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Launched by the Annie E. Casey Foundation in the early 1990s, Plain Talk is a community-based initiative that seeks to reduce the incidence of teen pregnancy and STDs by improving adult/teen communication about sex. A key component of the program is parental involvement--which was once seen by many in the adolescent reproductive health (ARH) field…

  4. Factors That Influence Students To Attend Four-Year Automotive Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, Gregory G.; Frisbee, Robert L.

    A study was conducted to identify effective recruitment techniques as reported by students within baccalaureate automotive technology programs. Participants in the study were 382 students (freshmen through seniors) of 8 universities in the United States that offer automotive technology baccalaureate degrees. The following sixteen recruitment…