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Sample records for programmed death type-1

  1. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  2. Competing-risk analysis of ESRD and death among patients with type 1 diabetes and macroalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Thorn, Lena M; Wadén, Johan; Tolonen, Nina; Saraheimo, Markku; Gordin, Daniel; Moran, John L; Thomas, Merlin C; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2011-03-01

    Patients with both type 1 diabetes and CKD have an increased risk of adverse outcomes. The competing risks of death and ESRD may confound the estimates of risk for each outcome. Here, we sought to determine the major predictors of the cumulative incidence of ESRD and pre-ESRD mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes and macroalbuminuria while incorporating the competing risk for the alternate outcome into a Fine-Gray competing-risks analysis. We followed 592 patients with macroalbuminuria for a median of 9.9 years. During this time, 56 (9.5%) patients died and 210 (35.5%) patients developed ESRD. Predictors of incident ESRD, taking baseline renal function and the competing risk for death into account, included an elevated HbA(1c), elevated LDL cholesterol, male sex, weight-adjusted insulin dose, and a shorter duration of diabetes. By contrast, predictors of pre-ESRD death, taking baseline renal function and the competing risk for ESRD into account, included only age, the presence of established macrovascular disease, and elevated cholesterol levels. This competing-risks approach has potential to highlight the appropriate targets and strategies for preventing premature mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  3. Sudden death in type 1 diabetes: the mystery of the 'dead in bed' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tu, Emily; Twigg, Stephen M; Semsarian, Christopher

    2010-01-07

    Sudden cardiac death is an unpredictable and devastating event, particularly in the young. A significant proportion of sudden deaths in the young are unexplained-no cause is identified either during life or at post-mortem. This is seen in a subgroup of young patients with type 1 diabetes who have dead in bed syndrome, where these victims are in good health, retire to bed, only to be found dead the following morning in a bed which is undisturbed, suggesting no terminal struggle or seizure. The underlying cause of dead in bed syndrome remains unknown, but is likely to be due to a terminal malignant arrhythmia. A plausible hypothesis is that it may be secondary to QT interval prolongation (followed by a degenerate ventricular tachycardia), caused by a number of factors including acute hypoglycaemia, on a background of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, and possible genetic influences. It is envisaged that understanding the causes and triggers of dead in bed syndrome will allow appropriate therapeutic interventions to be initiated in high-risk patients with type 1 diabetes, with the ultimate goal to prevent sudden death.

  4. Mortality associated with neurofibromatosis type 1: A study based on Italian death certificates (1995-2006)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Persons affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have a decreased survival, yet information on NF1-associated mortality is limited. Methods/Aim The National Mortality Database and individual Multiple-Causes-of-Death records were used to estimate NF1-associated mortality in Italy in the period 1995-2006, to compare the distribution of age at death (as a proxy of survival) to that of the general population and to evaluate the relation between NF1 and other medical conditions by determining whether the distribution of underlying causes of NF1-associated deaths differs from that of general population. Results Of the nearly 6.75 million deaths in the study period, 632 had a diagnosis of NF1, yet for nearly three-fourths of them the underlying cause was not coded as neurofibromatosis. The age distribution showed that NF1-associated deaths also occurred among the elderly, though mortality in early ages was high. The mean age for NF1-associated death was approximately 20 years lower than that for the general population. The gender differential may suggest that women are affected by more severe NF1-related complications, or they may simply reflect a greater tendency for NF1 to be reported on the death certificates of young women. Regarding the relation with other medical conditions, we found an excess, as the underlying cause of death, for malignant neoplasm of connective and other soft tissue and brain, but not for other sites. We also found an excess for obstructive chronic bronchitis and musculoskeletal system diseases among elderly persons. Conclusion This is the first nationally representative population-based study on NF1-associated mortality in Italy. It stresses the importance of the Multiple-Causes-of-Death Database in providing a more complete picture of mortality for conditions that are frequently not recorded as the underlying cause of death, or to study complex chronic diseases or diseases that have no specific International Classification of

  5. Causes of Death and Prognostic Factors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Uehara, Hirotsugu; Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is classically characterized by the development of functional or nonfunctional hyperplasia or tumors in endocrine tissues (parathyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal). Because effective treatments have been developed for the hormone excess state, which was a major cause of death in these patients in the past, coupled with the recognition that nonendocrine tumors increasingly develop late in the disease course, the natural history of the disease has changed. An understanding of the current causes of death is important to tailor treatment for these patients and to help identify prognostic factors; however, it is generally lacking. To add to our understanding, we conducted a detailed analysis of the causes of death and prognostic factors from a prospective long-term National Institutes of Health (NIH) study of 106 MEN1 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1/ZES patients) and compared our results to those from the pooled literature data of 227 patients with MEN1 with pancreatic endocrine tumors (MEN1/PET patients) reported in case reports or small series, and to 1386 patients reported in large MEN1 literature series. In the NIH series over a mean follow-up of 24.5 years, 24 (23%) patients died (14 MEN1-related and 10 non-MEN1-related deaths). Comparing the causes of death with the results from the 227 patients in the pooled literature series, we found that no patients died of acute complications due to acid hypersecretion, and 8%–14% died of other hormone excess causes, which is similar to the results in 10 large MEN1 literature series published since 1995. In the 2 series (the NIH and pooled literature series), two-thirds of patients died from an MEN1-related cause and one-third from a non-MEN1-related cause, which agrees with the mean values reported in 10 large MEN1 series in the literature, although in the literature the causes of death varied widely. In the NIH and pooled

  6. Sudden unexpected nocturnal death in Chiari type 1 malformation and potential role of opioid analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Roohi, Fereydoon; Gropen, Toby; Kula, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1) is a common congenital anomaly of the craniocervical junction. CM1 is reported to run a usually benign course and patients typically experience no symptoms or chronic, slowly progressive symptoms. However, recent reports indicate that a subset of patients with CM1 may present with acute deterioration and sudden unexpected death (SUD). We report a case of SUD during sleep in a young man with CM1, which we believe was related to the administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. We will clarify the pathophysiology of acute deterioration and SUD in CM1 and the possibility that the adverse effects of opiate analgesics likely were the leading cause of death in our patient. Case Description: In this review, we present a 29-year-old male with worsening headache secondary to previously diagnosed CM1. The patient died suddenly and unexpectedly after administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. Conclusion: The mechanism(s) of acute neurological deterioration and sudden death in patients with CM1 remains poorly understood. We believe the rapid fatal deterioration in our patient following administration of opioids suggests that this category of medication may cause sudden unexpected “neurogenic” cardiac death in CM1 patients by inducing sleep-related breathing difficulties and associated hypercapnia. Hypercapnia by further increasing intracranial pressure can result in a sudden pressure-induced decompensation of the cardiopulmonary control centers in the brain stem and cause instantaneous cardiorespiratory arrest. PMID:24778905

  7. The vicious cycle of apoptotic beta-cell death in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune insulitis, the cause of type 1 diabetes, evolves through several discrete stages that culminate in beta-cell death. In the first stage, antigenic epitopes of B-cell-specific peptides are processed by antigen presenting cells in local lymph nodes, and auto-reactive lymphocyte clones are propagated. Subsequently, cell-mediated and direct cytokine-mediated reactions are generated against the beta-cells, and the beta-cells are sensitized to apoptosis. Ironically, the beta-cells themselves contribute some of the cytokines and chemokines that provoke the immune reaction within the islets. Once this vicious cycle of autoimmunity is fully developed, the fate of the beta-cells in the islets is sealed, and clinical diabetes inevitably ensues. Differences in various aspects of these concurrent events appear to underlie the significant discrepancies in experimental data observed in experimental models that simulate autoimmune insulitis.

  8. [Pathophysiologic programming of cell death].

    PubMed

    Dobryszycka, W

    1998-01-01

    In multicellular organisms homeostasis depends on a balance between cell proliferation and cell death. In this review principles of the physiology of programmed cell death (apoptosis), i.e. biochemical features, involved genes and proteolytic enzymes, are described. Alterations in apoptosis contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, including cancer, viral infections, inflammation, hematopoietic and immunological system defects (e.g. AIDS), neurodegenerative disorders. Specific effect on regulation of apoptosis might lead to new possibilities for treatment. Methods of quantitative determinations of apoptosis are discussed.

  9. Programmed cell death in Giardia.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Susmita; Oniku, Abraham E; Topping, Kate; Mamhoud, Zahra N; Paget, Timothy A

    2012-06-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has been observed in many unicellular eukaryotes; however, in very few cases have the pathways been described. Recently the early divergent amitochondrial eukaryote Giardia has been included in this group. In this paper we investigate the processes of PCD in Giardia. We performed a bioinformatics survey of Giardia genomes to identify genes associated with PCD alongside traditional methods for studying apoptosis and autophagy. Analysis of Giardia genomes failed to highlight any genes involved in apoptotic-like PCD; however, we were able to induce apoptotic-like morphological changes in response to oxidative stress (H2O2) and drugs (metronidazole). In addition we did not detect caspase activity in induced cells. Interestingly, we did observe changes resembling autophagy when cells were starved (staining with MDC) and genome analysis revealed some key genes associated with autophagy such as TOR, ATG1 and ATG 16. In organisms such as Trichomonas vaginalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Blastocystis similar observations have been made but no genes have been identified. We propose that Giardia possess a pathway of autophagy and a form of apoptosis very different from the classical known mechanism; this may represent an early form of programmed cell death.

  10. Effects of Antiretroviral Drugs on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Induced CD4+ T-Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Estaquier, Jérôme; Lelièvre, Jean-Daniel; Petit, Frédéric; Brunner, Thomas; Moutouh-de Parseval, Laure; Richman, Douglas D.; Ameisen, Jean Claude; Corbeil, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Apoptosis of peripheral blood T cells plays an important role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In this study, we found that HIV type 1 (HIV-1) primes CD4+ T cells from healthy donors for apoptosis, which occurs after CD95 ligation or CD3-T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. CD95-mediated death did not depend on CD4 T-cell infection, since it occurred in the presence of the reverse transcriptase inhibitor didanosine (ddI). In contrast, apoptosis induced by productive infection (CD3-TCR stimulation) is prevented by both CD95 decoy receptor and ddI. Our data suggest that HIV-1 triggers at least two distinct death pathways: a CD95-dependent pathway that does not require viral replication and a viral replication-mediated cell death independent of the CD95 pathway. Further experiments indicated that saquinavir, a protease inhibitor, at a 0.2 μM concentration, decreased HIV-mediated CD95 expression and thus cell death, which is independent of its role in inhibiting viral replication. However, treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors with a higher concentration (10 μM) of an HIV protease inhibitor, saquinavir or indinavir, induced both a loss in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cell death. Thus, protease inhibitors have the potential for both beneficial and detrimental effects on CD4+ T cells independent of their antiretroviral effects. PMID:12021329

  11. Bovine herpesvirus type 1 induces cell death by a cell-type-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Geiser, Vicki; Rose, Suzanne; Jones, Clinton

    2008-06-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), a member of the alpha-herpesvirinae sub-family, causes significant losses to the cattle industry. BHV-1 establishes latency in trigeminal ganglionic sensory neurons, but periodically reactivates from latency. Previous studies suggested that infection with BHV-1-induced novel morphological changes in rabbit skin (RS) cells versus bovine kidney cells (MDBK). Consequently, we hypothesized that viral infection led to a novel form of cell death in RS cells compared to MDBK cells. To test this hypothesis, we examined the levels of apoptosis in these cell types following infection with BHV-1. Infection of RS, but not MDBK, cells leads to high levels of apoptosis compared to mock-infected cells. Previous studies indicated that a BHV-1 recombinant virus that does not express the bICP0 protein grows poorly in permissive cells and induces a persistent-like infection. This suggested that bICP0 played an important role in regulating cell death following infection. To test this hypothesis, we compared the levels of apoptosis in cells infected with the bICP0 null mutant versus viral strains that expressed bICP0. The bICP0 null mutant induces low levels of apoptosis in RS or MDBK cells. When MDBK cells are treated with UV light prior to infection, bICP0 expressing viral strains, but not the bICP0 null mutant, inhibited UV-induced apoptosis. Infection of MDBK cells with the bICP0 null mutant, leads to an accumulation of autophagosomes that are not detected following infection with bICP0 expressing viruses. These studies suggest that the bICP0 null mutant induces autophagy in MDBK cells, and bICP0 protein expression mediates cell-type specific cytotoxicity.

  12. Programmed cell death in aging.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2015-09-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) pathways, including apoptosis and regulated necrosis, are required for normal cell turnover and tissue homeostasis. Mis-regulation of PCD is increasingly implicated in aging and aging-related disease. During aging the cell turnover rate declines for several highly-mitotic tissues. Aging-associated disruptions in systemic and inter-cell signaling combined with cell-autonomous damage and mitochondrial malfunction result in increased PCD in some cell types, and decreased PCD in other cell types. Increased PCD during aging is implicated in immune system decline, skeletal muscle wasting (sarcopenia), loss of cells in the heart, and neurodegenerative disease. In contrast, cancer cells and senescent cells are resistant to PCD, enabling them to increase in abundance during aging. PCD pathways limit life span in fungi, but whether PCD pathways normally limit adult metazoan life span is not yet clear. PCD is regulated by a balance of negative and positive factors, including the mitochondria, which are particularly subject to aging-associated malfunction.

  13. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Programmed cell death , or apoptosis, is a genetically regulated process through which a cell is active in bringing about its own death for the sake...delays and inhibits the cell death response, so that the breast cancer cell lines are much less susceptible to thapsigargin-induced apoptosis than...lymphoid cell lines, an observation that parallels the differential susceptibility of breast cancer and lymphomas to chemotherapy-induced cell death in

  14. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    TITLE: Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Case Western Reserve...Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J-4451 6. AUTHOR(S) Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...cell death , apoptosis, in breast cancer cells has been developed. This model is based on induction of apoptosis by the selective endoplasmic reticulum

  15. A comparison of two internet programs for adolescents with type 1 diabetes: design and methods.

    PubMed

    Grey, Margaret; Whittemore, Robin; Liberti, Lauren; Delamater, Alan; Murphy, Kathryn; Faulkner, Melissa S

    2012-07-01

    Implementing psycho-educational programs for youth with type 1 diabetes in clinical care and reaching diverse youth with type 1 diabetes is challenging due to youth, provider, and organizational barriers. This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of an internet coping skills training program with a control condition of internet diabetes education. Each program consists of 5 weekly interactive lessons; the coping skills training program also provides the ability for youth to interact with each other as well as a health coach. Approximately 300 youths with type 1 diabetes will be recruited to participate in this multi-site clinical trial. The primary outcomes are metabolic control, quality of life, and family conflict. Secondary outcomes include stress, coping, self-efficacy, and social competence. Usage, satisfaction, and cost will also be evaluated. In addition, mediators and moderators to intervention effects will be explored. An internet based psycho-educational program for youth with type 1 diabetes may be a promising approach that can be easily be integrated into clinical care.

  16. Development of an Internet coping skills training program for teenagers with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Whittemore, Robin; Grey, Margaret; Lindemann, Evie; Ambrosino, Jodie; Jaser, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an Internet coping skills training program and to evaluate its feasibility and acceptability compared with an Internet education intervention for teenagers with type 1 diabetes. A multiphase mixed-methods design with focus groups, a randomized pilot study, and a program evaluation was used. Teenagers with type 1 diabetes, parents, and health professionals were included in the development and evaluative phases along with the research and information technology team. The pilot study included 12 teenagers with type 1 diabetes (mean [SD] age, 14.4 [.90] years; 58% female; mean [SD] duration of diabetes, 5.9 [3.0] years). Psychosocial data and HbA1c levels were collected at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Results indicate that the development of a psychosocial Internet intervention was complex and required multiple iterations of development and evaluation. Results of this study also indicate the feasibility and acceptability of translating a group-based intervention for teenagers with type 1 diabetes to the Internet. Thus, this study demonstrates a systematic approach to Internet intervention development. Including teenagers with type 1 diabetes and a multidisciplinary professional team into the intervention design was critical to the success of this project.

  17. Development of an Internet Coping Skills Training Program for Teenagers With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    WHITTEMORE, ROBIN; GREY, MARGARET; LINDEMANN, EVIE; AMBROSINO, JODIE; JASER, SARAH

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an Internet coping skills training program and to evaluate its feasibility and acceptability compared with an Internet education intervention for teenagers with type 1 diabetes. A multiphase mixed-methods design with focus groups, a randomized pilot study, and a program evaluation was used. Teenagers with type 1 diabetes, parents, and health professionals were included in the development and evaluative phases along with the research and information technology team. The pilot study included 12 teenagers with type 1 diabetes (mean [SD] age, 14.4 [.90] years; 58% female; mean [SD] duration of diabetes, 5.9 [3.0] years). Psychosocial data and HbA1c levels were collected at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Results indicate that the development of a psychosocial Internet intervention was complex and required multiple iterations of development and evaluation. Results of this study also indicate the feasibility and acceptability of translating a group-based intervention for teenagers with type 1 diabetes to the Internet. Thus, this study demonstrates a systematic approach to Internet intervention development. Including teenagers with type 1 diabetes and a multidisciplinary professional team into the intervention design was critical to the success of this project. PMID:20182161

  18. Role of programmed cell death in development.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, R M; Nagashree, N R

    2001-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of both animal and plant development. In animals, model systems such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and mice have shown a general cell death profile of induction, caspase mediation, cell death, and phagocytosis. Tremendous strides have been made in cell death research in animals in the past decade. The ordering of the C. elegans genes Ced-3, 4 and 9, identification of caspase-activated DNase that degrades nuclear DNA during PCD, identification of signal transduction modules involving caspases as well as the caspase-independent pathway, and the involvement of mitochondria are some of the findings of immense value in understanding animal PCDs. Similarly, the caspase inactivation mechanisms of infecting viruses to stall host cell death give a new dimension to the viral infection process. However, plant cell death profiles provide an entirely different scenario. The presence of a cell wall that cannot be phagocytosed, absence of the hallmarks of animal PCDs such as DNA laddering, formation of apoptotic bodies, a cell-death-specific nuclease, a biochemical machinery of killer enzymes such as caspases all point to novel ways of cell elimination. Large gaps in our understanding of plant cell death have prompted speculative inferences and comparisons with animal cell death mechanisms. This paper deals with both animals and plants for a holistic view on cell death in eukaryotes.

  19. Feasibility of the SMART Project: A Text Message Program for Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Linda Jones; Mehta, Priya; Monaghan, Maureen; Cogen, Fran; Streisand, Randi

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated response rates to the Self-Management and Research Technology Project, a 6-week text message program for adolescents with type 1 diabetes designed to provide diabetes self-management reminders and education. The rate of response to texts was high, with 78% of texts responded to during the 6-week period. Girls and participants who self-reported sending a large number of personal daily texts had higher response rates; other demographic and medical variables were unrelated to text response rates. Inclusion of mobile health technologies such as text messages in clinical care may be a unique, relevant method of intervention for youths with type 1 diabetes, regardless of age, socioeconomic status, or glycemic control.

  20. Programmed cell death in plant reproduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, H M; Cheun, A Y

    2000-10-01

    Reproductive development is a rich arena to showcase programmed cell death in plants. After floral induction, the first act of reproductive development in some plants is the selective killing of cells destined to differentiate into an unwanted sexual organ. Production of functional pollen grains relies significantly on deterioration and death of the anther tapetum, a tissue whose main function appears to nurture and decorate the pollen grains with critical surface molecules. Degeneration and death in a number of anther tissues result ultimately in anther rupture and dispersal of pollen grains. Female sporogenesis frequently begins with the death of all but one of the meiotic derivatives, with surrounding nucellar cells degenerating in concert with embryo sac expansion. Female tissues that interact with pollen undergo dramatic degeneration, including death, to ensure the encounter of compatible male and female gametes. Pollen and pistil interact to kill invading pollen from an incompatible source. Most observations on cell death in reproductive tissues have been on the histological and cytological levels. We discuss various cell death phenomena in reproductive development with a view towards understanding the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes.

  1. Programmed cell death in seeds of angiosperms.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2015-12-01

    During the diversification of angiosperms, seeds have evolved structural, chemical, molecular and physiologically developing changes that specially affect the nucellus and endosperm. All through seed evolution, programmed cell death (PCD) has played a fundamental role. However, examples of PCD during seed development are limited. The present review examines PCD in integuments, nucellus, suspensor and endosperm in those representative examples of seeds studied to date.

  2. Costs of Development and Maintenance of an Internet Program for Teens with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Margaret; Liberti, Lauren; Whittemore, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Many adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have difficulty completing self-management tasks within the context of their social environments. Group-based approaches to psycho-educational support have been shown to prevent declines in glucose control, but are challenging to implement due to youths’ many activities and costs. A novel solution is providing psycho-educational support via the internet. The purpose of this study is to describe the cost of developing and maintaining two internet psycho-educational programs, both of which have been shown to improve health outcomes in adolescents with T1D. We calculated actual costs of personnel and programming in the development of TEENCOPE™ and Managing Diabetes, two highly interactive programs that were evaluated in a multi-site clinical trial (n=320). Cost calculations were set at U.S. dollars and converted to value for 2013 as expenses were incurred over 6 years. Development costs over 1.5 years totaled $324,609, with the majority of costs being for personnel to develop and write content in a creative and engaging format, to get feedback from teens on content and a prototype, and IT programming. Maintenance of the program, including IT support, a part-time moderator to assure safety of the discussion board (0.5–1 hour/week), and yearly update of content was $43,845/year, or $137.00 per youth over 4.5 years. Overall, program and site development were relatively expensive, but the program reach was high, including non-white youth from 4 geographically distinct regions. Once developed, maintenance was minimal. With greater dissemination, cost-per-youth would decrease markedly, beginning to offset the high development expense. PMID:26213677

  3. Programmed cell death 50 (and beyond)

    PubMed Central

    Lockshin, R A

    2016-01-01

    In the 50 years since we described cell death as ‘programmed,' we have come far, thanks to the efforts of many brilliant researchers, and we now understand the mechanics, the biochemistry, and the genetics of many of the ways in which cells can die. This knowledge gives us the resources to alter the fates of many cells. However, not all cells respond similarly to the same stimulus, in either sensitivity to the stimulus or timing of the response. Cells prevented from dying through one pathway may survive, survive in a crippled state, or die following a different pathway. To fully capitalize on our knowledge of cell death, we need to understand much more about how cells are targeted to die and what aspects of the history, metabolism, or resources available to individual cells determine how each cell reaches and crosses the threshold at which it commits to death. PMID:26564398

  4. Research Program on Type 1 Diabetes and Youth Depression in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Cumba-Avilés, Eduardo; Sáez-Santiago, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This work reviews the progress and current state of a research program on Diabetes and youth depression in Puerto Rico. Given the high depression rate, its impact in youth with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D), and the lack of interventions to target this link in an integrative way, the manual titled Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Depression in Adolescents with T1D was developed. After its first use in an Open Trial, we currently assess the initial efficacy of its revised version to reduce depression and improve glycemic control, self-care, and quality of life. We present its approach, and initial data on its feasibility, acceptability and potential to reduce emotional problems in T1D youth. We discuss implications of this line of research for health psychology, and its utility to model the development of interventions alike focused on other chronic illnesses.

  5. Research Program on Type 1 Diabetes and Youth Depression in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Cumba-Avilés, Eduardo; Sáez-Santiago, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This work reviews the progress and current state of a research program on Diabetes and youth depression in Puerto Rico. Given the high depression rate, its impact in youth with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D), and the lack of interventions to target this link in an integrative way, the manual titled Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Depression in Adolescents with T1D was developed. After its first use in an Open Trial, we currently assess the initial efficacy of its revised version to reduce depression and improve glycemic control, self-care, and quality of life. We present its approach, and initial data on its feasibility, acceptability and potential to reduce emotional problems in T1D youth. We discuss implications of this line of research for health psychology, and its utility to model the development of interventions alike focused on other chronic illnesses. PMID:27818725

  6. Programmed death phenomena: from organelle to organism.

    PubMed

    Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2002-04-01

    Programmed death phenomena appear to be inherent not only in living cells (apoptosis), but also in subcellular organelles (e.g., self-elimination of mitochondria, called mitoptosis), organs (organoptosis), and even whole organisms (phenoptosis). In all these cases, the "Samurai law of biology"--it is better to die than to be wrong--seems to be operative. The operation of this law helps complicated living systems avoid the risk of ruin when a system of lower hierarchic position makes a significant mistake. Thus, mitoptosis purifies a cell from damaged and hence unwanted mitochondria; apoptosis purifies a tissue from unwanted cells; and phenoptosis purifies a community from unwanted individuals. Defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) is probably one of the primary evolutionary functions of programmed death mechanisms. So far, it seems that ROS play a key role in the mito-, apo-, organo-, and phenoptoses, which is consistent with Harman's theory of aging. Here a concept is described that tries to unite Weismann's hypothesis of aging as an adaptive programmed death mechanism and the generally accepted alternative point of view that considers aging as an inevitable result of accumulation in an organism of occasional injuries. It is suggested that injury accumulation is monitored by a system(s) actuating a phenoptotic death program when the number of injuries reaches some critical level. The system(s) in question are organized in such a way that the lethal case appears to be a result of phenoptosis long before the occasional injuries make impossible the functioning of the organism. It is stressed that for humans these cruel regulations look like an atavism that, if overcome, might dramatically prolong the human life span.

  7. Impact of disease-management programs on metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kun; Yang, Xiaoping; Wu, Yixi; Chen, Shuru; Yin, Guoshu; Zhan, Jianjun; Lin, Chujia; Xu, Wencan; Chen, Yongsong; Lin, Dan; Xie, Peiwen; Fang, Yishan; Lin, Qiuqiang; Lin, Shaoda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of diabetes disease management program (DMP) on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients in Shantou China. A sample of 240 participants recruited from 3C study Shantou subgroup was followed up in DMP for 3 years. The DMP provided self-management education, individualized therapy plan, diabetes complications screening, and laboratory examination periodical according to clinical practice guidelines. Primary outcomes were changes in hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c). Two hundred one of the participants completed the follow-up. There was a significant decrease in the HbA1c levels after DMP implemented. The mean (± SD) pre- and post-intervention HbA1c levels were 10.26% ± 3.30% and 8.57% ± 1.57% respectively with a P value <0.001. General linear mixed model analyse demonstrated that changes in glycemic control were associated with insulin treatment regimen, frequency of Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG), diabetes diet adherence, physical activity, and duration of diabetes. DMP helped to improve glycemic control and should be general implemented in China's T1DM. Individuals with basal-bolus regimen (multiple daily injections or pump therapy), more frequency of SMBG, following a diabetes diet, more physical activity, shorter diabetes duration may derive greater benefits from DMP. PMID:28033258

  8. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Sara

    2013-01-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm—a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue—were highlighted and discussed. PMID:23833197

  9. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-08-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm--a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue--were highlighted and discussed.

  10. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival.

  11. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles.

  12. The type 1 Interleukin 1 receptor is not required for the death of murine hippocampal dentate granule cells and microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Harry, G. Jean; Funk, Jason; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Aoyama, Mineyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in the inflammatory process, neuronal death, and glia response have been observed under manipulation of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine and subsequent signaling through the type 1 IL-1 receptor (IL-1R1). To investigate the influence of IL-1R1 activation in the pathophysiology of a chemical-induced injury to the murine hippocampus, we examined the level and pattern of neuronal death and neuroinflammation in 25-day-old male mice exposed to trimethyltin hydroxide (2.0 mg/kg, i.p.). In IL-1R1 null (IL-1R1−/−) mice, the pattern and severity of dentate granule cell death was similar as compared to wild type mice. In both groups of mice, mRNA levels for TNFα and MIP-1α were elevated and the early activation of microglia, including their ability to progress to a phagocytic phenotype, was maintained. Compared to WT mice, IL-1R1−/− mice displayed a limited glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) astrocytic response, as well as a preferential induction in mRNA levels of Fas signaling components. Cumulatively, these results indicate that IL-1R1 activation is not necessary for TMT-induced death of dentate granule neurons or local activation of microglia; however, IL-1R1 signaling is involved in mediating the structural response of astrocytes to injury and may also regulate apoptotic mechanisms by influencing Fas signaling components. PMID:18191113

  13. Predictive Efficacy Biomarkers of Programmed Cell Death 1/Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand Blockade Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-Na; Fu, Li-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of immune check-point molecule, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) have attracted much attention in cancer immunotherapy recently due to their durable antitumor effects in various malignances, especially the advanced ones. Unfortunately, only a fraction of patients with advanced tumors could benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy, while others still worsened. The key to this point is that there are no efficient biomarkers for screening anti-PD-1/PD-L1-sensitive patients. In this review, we aim at summarizing the latest advances of anti-PD-1/PDL1 immunotherapy and the potential predictive efficacy biomarkers to provide evidences for identifying anti-PD-1/PDL1- sensitive patients. The present article also includes the patent review coverage on this topic.

  14. Normal development, oncogenesis and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, D A

    1998-09-10

    Meeting's Report -- June 2, 1998, Sugarload Estate Conference Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. A symposium on Normal Development, Oncogenesis and Programmed Cell Death, was held at the Sugarload Estate Conference Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA sponsored by the Fels Cancer Institute, Temple University School of Medicine, with the support of the Alliance Pharmaceutical Corporation. The symposium was organized by Drs Dan A Liebermann and Barbara Hoffman at the Fels. Invited speakers included: Dr Andrei V Gudkov (University of Illinois) who started the symposium talking about 'New cellular factors modulating the tumor suppressor function of p53'; Dr Yuri Lazebnik (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories) spoke about 'Caspases considered as enemies within'; Dr E Premkumar Reddy (Fels Institute, Temple University) talked about recent exciting findings in his laboratory regarding 'JAK-STATs dedicated signaling pathways'; Dr Michael Greenberg (Harvard University) spoke about 'Signal transduction pathways that regulate differentiation and survival in the developing nervous system'; Dr Richard Kolesnick's (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center) talk has been focused at 'Stress signals for apoptosis, including Ceramide and c-Jun Kinase/Stress-activated Protein Kinase'; Dr Barbara Hoffman (Fels Institute, Temple University) described research, conducted in collaboration with Dr Dan A Liebermann, aimed at deciphering the roles of 'myc, myb, and E2F as negative regulators of terminal differentiation', using hematopoietic cells as model system. Dr Daniel G Tenen (Harvard Medical School), described studies aimed at understanding the 'Regulation of hematopoietic cell development by lineage specific transcription regulators'. Dr George C Prendergast (The Wistar Institute) talked about the 'Myc-Bin1 signaling pathway in cell death and differentiation. Dr Ruth J Muschel (University of Pennsylvania) spoke about work, conducted in collaboration with Dr WG McKenna, aimed at

  15. The Fas death pathway controls coordinated expansions of type 1 CD8 and type 2 CD4 T cells in Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Guillermo, Landi V Costilla; Silva, Elisabeth M; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L; De Meis, Juliana; Pereira, Wânia F; Yagita, Hideo; DosReis, George A; Lopes, Marcela F

    2007-04-01

    We investigated the role of the Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas death pathway on apoptosis and cytokine production by T cells in Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Anti-FasL, but not anti-TNF-alpha or anti-TRAIL, blocked activation-induced cell death of CD8 T cells and increased secretion of IL-10 and IL-4 by CD4 T cells from T. cruzi-infected mice. CD4 and CD8 T cells up-regulated Fas/FasL expression during T. cruzi infection. However, Fas expression increased earlier in CD8 T cells, and a higher proportion of CD8 T cells was activated and expressed IFN-gamma compared with CD4 T cells. Injection of anti-FasL in infected mice reduced parasitemia and CD8 T cell apoptosis and increased the ratio of CD8:CD4 T cells recovered from spleen and peritoneum. FasL blockade increased the number of activated T cells, enhanced NO production, and reduced parasite loads in peritoneal macrophages. Injection of anti-FasL increased IFN-gamma secretion by splenocytes responding to T. cruzi antigens but also exacerbated production of type 2 cytokines IL-10 and IL-4 at a late stage of acute infection. These results indicate that the FasL/Fas death pathway regulates apoptosis and coordinated cytokine responses by type 1 CD8 and type 2 CD4 T cells in T. cruzi infection.

  16. Programmed death 1 immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Meghna S; Hoffner, Brianna; Winkelmann, Jennifer L; Abbott, Maura E; Hamid, Omid; Carvajal, Richard D

    2015-12-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is an immune checkpoint that provides inhibitory signals to the immune system in order to modulate the activity of T cells in peripheral tissues and maintain self-tolerance in the setting of infection and inflammation. In cancer, the immune checkpoints are exploited so that the tumor cells are able to evade the immune system. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are a type of cancer immunotherapy that targets pathways such as PD-1 in order to reinvigorate and enhance the immune response against tumor cells. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved 2 PD-1 inhibitors, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, and several others are under investigation. Although PD-1 inhibitors have demonstrated activity in many different types of malignancies, FDA approval has been granted only in melanoma and in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Identifying biomarkers that can predict response to PD-1 inhibitors is critical to maximizing the benefit of these agents. Future directions for PD-1 inhibitors include investigation of combination therapies, use in malignancies other than melanoma and NSCLC, and refinement of biomarkers.

  17. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system.

    PubMed

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-08-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms.

  18. New Areas for Preventive Programing: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Joseph

    Crisis intervention programs for persons experiencing the sudden death of family members or surviving natural disasters have been advocated as methods of primary prevention, although few have actually been implemented. A program utilizing nurses to deliver grief intervention to parents losing a baby to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) was…

  19. Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Sohei; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Nomura, Taisei

    1995-12-31

    Cell death after exposure to low-level radiation is often considered evidence that radiation is poisonous, however small the dose. Evidence has been accumulating to support the notion that cell death after low-level exposure to radiation results from activation of suicidal genes {open_quote}programmed cell death{close_quote} or {open_quote}apoptosis{close_quote} - for the health of the whole body. This paper gives experimental evidence that embryos of fruit flies and mouse fetuses have potent defense mechanisms against teratogenic or tumorigenic injury caused by radiation and carcinogens, which function through programmed cell death.

  20. Regulation of Neuroinflammation through Programed Death-1/Programed Death Ligand Signaling in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shangfeng; Li, Fengwu; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Hu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS), which involve both resident glial cells and infiltrating peripheral immune cells, play critical roles in the progress of brain injuries and neurodegeneration. To avoid inflammatory damage to the compromised brain, the immune cell activities in the CNS are controlled by a plethora of chemical mediators and signal transduction cascades, such as inhibitory signaling through programed death-1 (PD-1) and programed death ligand (PD-L) interactions. An increasing number of recent studies have highlighted the importance of PD-1/PD-L pathway in immune regulation in CNS disorders such as ischemic stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we review the current knowledge of the impact of PD-1/PD-L signaling on brain injury and neurodegeneration. An improved understanding of the function of PD-1/PD-L in the cross-talk between peripheral immune cells, CNS glial cells, and non-immune CNS cells is expected to shed further light on immunomodulation and help develop effective and safe immunotherapies for CNS disorders. PMID:25232304

  1. Pneumonitis in Patients Treated With Anti-Programmed Death-1/Programmed Death Ligand 1 Therapy.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Jarushka; Wang, Xuan; Woo, Kaitlin M; Iyriboz, Tunc; Halpenny, Darragh; Cunningham, Jane; Chaft, Jamie E; Segal, Neil H; Callahan, Margaret K; Lesokhin, Alexander M; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Voss, Martin H; Rudin, Charles M; Rizvi, Hira; Hou, Xue; Rodriguez, Katherine; Albano, Melanie; Gordon, Ruth-Ann; Leduc, Charles; Rekhtman, Natasha; Harris, Bianca; Menzies, Alexander M; Guminski, Alexander D; Carlino, Matteo S; Kong, Benjamin Y; Wolchok, Jedd D; Postow, Michael A; Long, Georgina V; Hellmann, Matthew D

    2017-03-01

    Purpose Pneumonitis is an uncommon but potentially fatal toxicity of anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1)/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features are poorly described. Methods Patients who received anti-PD-1/PD-L1 monotherapy or in combination with anti-cytotoxic T-cell lymphocyte-4 mAb were identified at two institutions (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: advanced solid cancers, 2009 to 2014, and Melanoma Institute of Australia: melanomas only, 2013 to 2015). Pneumonitis was diagnosed by the treating investigator; cases with confirmed malignant lung infiltration or infection were excluded. Clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of pneumonitis were collected. Associations among pneumonitis incidence, therapy received, and underlying malignancy were examined with Fisher's exact test as were associations between pneumonitis features and outcomes. Results Of 915 patients who received anti-PD-1/PD-L1 mAbs, pneumonitis developed in 43 (5%; 95% CI, 3% to 6%; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 27 of 578 [5%]; Melanoma Institute of Australia, 16 of 337 [5%]). Time to onset of pneumonitis ranged from 9 days to 19.2 months. The incidence of pneumonitis was higher with combination immunotherapy versus monotherapy (19 of 199 [10%] v 24 of 716 [3%]; P < .01). Incidence was similar in patients with melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer (overall, 26 of 532 [5%] v nine of 209 [4%]; monotherapy, 15 of 417 v five of 152 [ P = 1.0]; combination, 11 of 115 v four of 57 [ P = .78]). Seventy-two percent (31 of 43) of cases were grade 1 to 2, and 86% (37 of 43) improved/resolved with drug holding/immunosuppression. Five patients worsened clinically and died during the course of pneumonitis treatment; proximal cause of death was pneumonitis (n = 1), infection related to immunosuppression (n = 3), or progressive cancer (n = 1). Radiologic and pathologic features of pneumonitis were diverse. Conclusion

  2. Centenarian Rates and Life Expectancy Related to the Death Rates of Multiple Sclerosis, Asthma, and Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes in Children.

    PubMed

    Lens-Pechakova, Lilia S

    2016-02-01

    The autoimmune diseases are among the 10 leading causes of death for women and the number two cause of chronic illness in America as well as a predisposing factor for cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Patients of some autoimmune diseases have shown a shorter life span and are a model of accelerated immunosenescence. Conversely, centenarians are used as a model of successful aging and have shown several immune parameters that are better preserved and lower levels of autoantibodies. The study reported here focused on clarifying the connection between longevity and some autoimmune and allergic diseases in 29 developed Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, because multidisciplinary analyses of the accelerated or delayed aging data could show a distinct relationship pattern, help to identify common factors, and determine new important factors that contribute to longevity and healthy aging. The relationships between the mortality rates data of multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), asthma, the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) from one side and centenarian rates (two sets) as well as life expectancy data from the other side were assessed using regression models and Pearson correlation coefficients. The data obtained correspond to an inverse linear correlation with different degrees of linearity. This is the first observation of a clear tendency of diminishing centenarian rates or life expectancy in countries having higher death rates of asthma, MS, and RA and a higher incidence of T1D in children. The conclusion is that most probably there are common mechanistic pathways and factors affecting the above diseases and at the same time but in the opposite direction the processes of longevity. Further study, comparing genetic data, mechanistic pathways, and other factors connected to autoimmune diseases with those of longevity could clarify the processes involved, so as to promote longevity and limit the expansion of those

  3. Anti program death-1/anti program death-ligand 1 in digestive cancers

    PubMed Central

    de Guillebon, Eléonore; Roussille, Pauline; Frouin, Eric; Tougeron, David

    2015-01-01

    Human tumors tend to activate the immune system regulatory checkpoints as a means of escaping immunosurveillance. For instance, interaction between program death-1 (PD-1) and program death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) will lead the activated T cell to a state of anergy. PD-L1 is upregulated on a wide range of cancer cells. Anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), called immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), have consequently been designed to restore T cell activity. Accumulating data are in favor of an association between PD-L1 expression in tumors and response to treatment. A PD-L1 expression is present in 30% to 50% of digestive cancers. Multiple anti-PD-1 (nivolumab, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 mAbs (MPDL3280A, Medi4736) are under evaluation in digestive cancers. Preliminary results in metastatic gastric cancer with pembrolizumab are highly promising and phase II will start soon. In metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), a phase III trial of MPDL3280A as maintenance therapy will shortly be initiated. Trials are also ongoing in metastatic CRC with high immune T cell infiltration (i.e., microsatellite instability). Major challenges are ahead in order to determine how, when and for which patients we should use these ICIs. New radiologic criteria to evaluate tumor response to ICIs are awaiting prospective validation. The optimal therapeutic sequence and association with cytotoxic chemotherapy needs to be established. Finally, biomarker identification will be crucial to selection of patients likely to benefit from ICIs. PMID:26306141

  4. Anti program death-1/anti program death-ligand 1 in digestive cancers.

    PubMed

    de Guillebon, Eléonore; Roussille, Pauline; Frouin, Eric; Tougeron, David

    2015-08-15

    Human tumors tend to activate the immune system regulatory checkpoints as a means of escaping immunosurveillance. For instance, interaction between program death-1 (PD-1) and program death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) will lead the activated T cell to a state of anergy. PD-L1 is upregulated on a wide range of cancer cells. Anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), called immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), have consequently been designed to restore T cell activity. Accumulating data are in favor of an association between PD-L1 expression in tumors and response to treatment. A PD-L1 expression is present in 30% to 50% of digestive cancers. Multiple anti-PD-1 (nivolumab, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 mAbs (MPDL3280A, Medi4736) are under evaluation in digestive cancers. Preliminary results in metastatic gastric cancer with pembrolizumab are highly promising and phase II will start soon. In metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), a phase III trial of MPDL3280A as maintenance therapy will shortly be initiated. Trials are also ongoing in metastatic CRC with high immune T cell infiltration (i.e., microsatellite instability). Major challenges are ahead in order to determine how, when and for which patients we should use these ICIs. New radiologic criteria to evaluate tumor response to ICIs are awaiting prospective validation. The optimal therapeutic sequence and association with cytotoxic chemotherapy needs to be established. Finally, biomarker identification will be crucial to selection of patients likely to benefit from ICIs.

  5. Nitric Oxide-induced Activation of the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Is Critical for Epileptic Seizure-induced Neuronal Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Yoshinori; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Okubo, Yohei; Nakaune, Takuya; Suzuki, Junji; Shibata, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Koyama, Ryuta; Murayama, Takashi; Ito, Akihiro; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Ikegaya, Yuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Saito, Nobuhito; Kakizawa, Sho; Iino, Masamitsu

    2016-09-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening emergency that can cause neurodegeneration with debilitating neurological disorders. However, the mechanism by which convulsive SE results in neurodegeneration is not fully understood. It has been shown that epileptic seizures produce markedly increased levels of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain, and that NO induces Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), which occurs through S-nitrosylation of the intracellular Ca(2+) release channel. Here, we show that through genetic silencing of NO-induced activation of the RyR1 intracellular Ca(2+) release channel, neurons were rescued from seizure-dependent cell death. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of RyR1, was protective against neurodegeneration caused by SE. These results demonstrate that NO-induced Ca(2+) release via RyR is involved in SE-induced neurodegeneration, and provide a rationale for the use of RyR1 inhibitors for the prevention of brain damage following SE.

  6. Programmed cell death as a defence against infection.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Ine; Rayamajhi, Manira; Miao, Edward A

    2017-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells can die from physical trauma, which results in necrosis. Alternatively, they can die through programmed cell death upon the stimulation of specific signalling pathways. In this Review, we discuss the role of different cell death pathways in innate immune defence against bacterial and viral infection: apoptosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis and NETosis. We describe the interactions that interweave different programmed cell death pathways, which create complex signalling networks that cross-guard each other in the evolutionary 'arms race' with pathogens. Finally, we describe how the resulting cell corpses - apoptotic bodies, pore-induced intracellular traps (PITs) and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) - promote the clearance of infection.

  7. Programmed Cell Death of Dendritic Cells in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Wang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Programmed cell death is essential for the maintenance of lymphocyte homeostasis and immune tolerance. Dendritic cells (DCs), the most efficient antigen presenting cells, represent a small cell population in the immune system. However, DCs play major roles in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Programmed cell death in DCs is essential for regulating DC homeostasis and consequently, the scope of immune responses. Interestingly, different DC subsets show varied turnover rates in vivo. The conventional DCs are relatively short-lived in most lymphoid organs, while plasmacytoid DCs are long-lived cells. Mitochondrion-dependent programmed cell death plays an important role in regulating spontaneous DC turnover. Antigen-specific T cells are also capable of killing DCs, thereby providing a mechanism for negative feedback regulation of immune responses. It has been shown that a surplus of DCs due to defects in programmed cell death leads to overactivation of lymphocytes and the onset of autoimmunity. Studying programmed cell death in DCs will shed light on the roles for DC turnover in the regulation of the duration and magnitude of immune responses in vivo, and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. PMID:20636805

  8. Biochemical evidence for programmed cell death in rabbit uterine epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Rotello, R. J.; Hocker, M. B.; Gerschenson, L. E.

    1989-01-01

    Uterine epithelial cell proliferation, differentiation, and death are known to be regulated by estrogen and progesterone. The authors investigated a specific pattern of cell death called apoptosis, or programmed cell death, which is biochemically characterized by a specific pattern of DNA degradation. DNA isolated from endometrium of ovariectomized pseudopregnant rabbits showed a pattern of DNA cleavage at internucleosomal locations. In comparison, DNA from the endometrium of non-ovariectomized animals, as well as several other organs, did not exhibit that pattern. This biochemical evidence supports previous and present morphologic data and correlates with it. Under the experimental conditions used, only the uterine epithelial compartment of the endometrium shows apoptotic cell death, which is absent in the stromal compartment. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2923180

  9. Programed Death is Favored by Natural Selection in Spatial Systems.

    PubMed

    Werfel, Justin; Ingber, Donald E; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2015-06-12

    Standard evolutionary theories of aging and mortality, implicitly based on mean-field assumptions, hold that programed mortality is untenable, as it opposes direct individual benefit. We show that in spatial models with local reproduction, programed deaths instead robustly result in long-term benefit to a lineage, by reducing local environmental resource depletion via spatiotemporal patterns causing feedback over many generations. Results are robust to model variations, implying that direct selection for shorter life span may be quite widespread in nature.

  10. Programed Death is Favored by Natural Selection in Spatial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, Justin; Ingber, Donald E.; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2015-06-01

    Standard evolutionary theories of aging and mortality, implicitly based on mean-field assumptions, hold that programed mortality is untenable, as it opposes direct individual benefit. We show that in spatial models with local reproduction, programed deaths instead robustly result in long-term benefit to a lineage, by reducing local environmental resource depletion via spatiotemporal patterns causing feedback over many generations. Results are robust to model variations, implying that direct selection for shorter life span may be quite widespread in nature.

  11. Ceramide mediates caspase-independent programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Thon, Lutz; Möhlig, Heike; Mathieu, Sabine; Lange, Arne; Bulanova, Elena; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Schütze, Stefan; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Adam, Dieter

    2005-12-01

    Although numerous studies have implicated the sphingolipid ceramide in the induction of cell death, a causative function of ceramide in caspase-dependent apoptosis remains a highly debated issue. Here, we show that ceramide is a key mediator of a distinct route to programmed cell death (PCD), i.e., caspase-independent PCD. Under conditions where apoptosis is either not initiated or actively inhibited, TNF induces caspase-independent PCD in L929 fibrosarcoma cells, NIH3T3 fibroblasts, human leukemic Jurkat T cells, and lung fibroblasts by increasing intracellular ceramide levels prior to the onset of cell death. Survival is significantly enhanced when ceramide accumulation is prevented, as demonstrated in fibroblasts genetically deficient for acid sphingomyelinase, in L929 cells overexpressing acid ceramidase, by pharmacological intervention, or by RNA interference. Jurkat cells deficient for receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) do not accumulate ceramide and therefore are fully resistant to caspase-independent PCD whereas Jurkat cells overexpressing the mitochondrial protein Bcl-2 are partially protected, implicating RIP1 and mitochondria as components of the ceramide death pathway. Our data point to a role of caspases (but not cathepsins) in suppressing the ceramide death pathway under physiological conditions. Moreover, clonogenic survival of tumor cells is clearly reduced by induction of the ceramide death pathway, promising additional options for the development of novel tumor therapies.

  12. Multiple cell death programs: Charon's lifts to Hades.

    PubMed

    Bursch, Wilfried

    2004-11-01

    Cells use different pathways for active self-destruction as reflected by different morphology: while in apoptosis (or "type I") nuclear fragmentation associated with cytoplasmic condensation but preservation of organelles is predominant, autophagic degradation of cytoplasmic structures preceding nuclear collapse is a characteristic of a second type of programmed cell death (PCD). The diverse morphologies can be attributed--at least to some extent--to distinct biochemical and molecular events (e.g. caspase-dependent and -independent death programs; DAP-kinase activity, Ras-expression). However, apoptosis and autophagic PCD are not mutually exclusive phenomena. Rather, diverse PCD programs emerged during evolution, the conservation of which apparently allows cells a flexible response to environmental changes, either physiological or pathological.

  13. Ceramide Synthase-dependent Ceramide Generation and Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Thomas D.; Jenkins, Russell W.; Clarke, Christopher J.; Bielawski, Jacek; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2011-01-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide has been widely implicated in the regulation of programmed cell death or apoptosis. The accumulation of ceramide has been demonstrated in a wide variety of experimental models of apoptosis and in response to a myriad of stimuli and cellular stresses. However, the detailed mechanisms of its generation and regulatory role during apoptosis are poorly understood. We sought to determine the regulation and roles of ceramide production in a model of ultraviolet light-C (UV-C)-induced programmed cell death. We found that UV-C irradiation induces the accumulation of multiple sphingolipid species including ceramide, dihydroceramide, sphingomyelin, and hexosylceramide. Late ceramide generation was also found to be regulated by Bcl-xL, Bak, and caspases. Surprisingly, inhibition of de novo synthesis using myriocin or fumonisin B1 resulted in decreased overall cellular ceramide levels basally and in response to UV-C, but only fumonisin B1 inhibited cell death, suggesting the presence of a ceramide synthase (CerS)-dependent, sphingosine-derived pool of ceramide in regulating programmed cell death. We found that this pool did not regulate the mitochondrial pathway, but it did partially regulate activation of caspase-7 and, more importantly, was necessary for late plasma membrane permeabilization. Attempting to identify the CerS responsible for this effect, we found that combined knockdown of CerS5 and CerS6 was able to decrease long-chain ceramide accumulation and plasma membrane permeabilization. These data identify a novel role for CerS and the sphingosine salvage pathway in regulating membrane permeability in the execution phase of programmed cell death. PMID:21388949

  14. Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have long served as useful models for the study of oxidative stress, an event associated with cell death and severe human pathologies. This review will discuss oxidative stress in yeast, in terms of sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their molecular targets, and the metabolic responses elicited by cellular ROS accumulation. Responses of yeast to accumulated ROS include upregulation of antioxidants mediated by complex transcriptional changes, activation of pro-survival pathways such as mitophagy, and programmed cell death (PCD) which, apart from apoptosis, includes pathways such as autophagy and necrosis, a form of cell death long considered accidental and uncoordinated. The role of ROS in yeast aging will also be discussed. PMID:22737670

  15. Interdigital cell death function and regulation: new insights on an old programmed cell death model.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Rocío; Covarrubias, Luis

    2011-02-01

    Interdigital cell death (ICD) is the oldest and best-studied model of programmed cell death (PCD) in vertebrates. The classical view of ICD function is the separation of digits by promotion of tissue regression. However, in addition, ICD can contribute to digit individualization by restricting interdigital tissue growth. Depending on the species, the relative contribution of either regression or growth-restricting functions of ICD to limb morphogenesis may differ. Under normal conditions, most cells appear to die by apoptosis during ICD. Accordingly, components of the apoptotic machinery are found in the interdigits, though their role in the initiation and execution of cell death is yet to be defined. Fgf8 has been identified as a survival factor for the distal mesenchymal cells of the limb such that ICD can initiate following specific downregulation of Fgf8 expression in the ectoderm overlying the interdigital tissue. On the other hand, Bmps may promote cell death directly by acting on the interdigital tissue, or indirectly by downregulating Fgf8 expression in the ectoderm. In addition, retinoic acid can activate ICD directly or through a Bmp-mediated mechanism. Interactions at different levels between these factors establish the spatiotemporal patterning of ICD activation. Defining the regulatory network behind ICD activation will greatly advance our understanding of the mechanisms controlling PCD in general.

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome prevention: a model program for NICUs.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Sherri L; Lipke, Bethann; LeMura, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Health care providers' opinions can influence how parents place their infant to sleep. Neonatal nurses can improve how they teach and model safe infant sleep practices to parents. To increase neonatal nurses' knowledge, a sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention program was implemented. Program components included a computerized teaching tool, a crib card, sleep sacks, and discharge instructions. Initial program evaluation showed that 98 percent of infants slept supine and 93 percent slept in sleep sacks in open cribs. However, nurses continued to swaddle some infants with blankets to improve thermoregulation. To increase nursing compliance in modeling safe infant sleep practices, Halo SleepSack Swaddles were provided for nurses to use in place of a blanket to regulate infant temperature. Recent data show that 100 percent of infants in open cribs are now sleeping supine wearing a Halo Swaddle or a traditional Halo SleepSack. This model program can easily be replicated to enhance neonatal nurses' knowledge about SIDS prevention.

  17. Mechanisms of programmed cell death during oogenesis in Drosophila virilis.

    PubMed

    Velentzas, Athanassios D; Nezis, Ioannis P; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Papassideri, Issidora S; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2007-02-01

    We describe the features of programmed cell death occurring in the egg chambers of Drosophila virilis during mid-oogenesis and late oogenesis. During mid-oogenesis, the spontaneously degenerating egg chambers exhibit typical characteristics of apoptotic cell death. As revealed by propidium iodide, rhodamine-conjugated phalloidin staining, and the TUNEL assay, respectively, the nurse cells contain condensed chromatin, altered actin cytoskeleton, and fragmented DNA. In vitro caspase activity assays and immunostaining procedures demonstrate that the atretic egg chambers possess high levels of caspase activity. Features of autophagic cell death are also observed during D. virilis mid-oogenesis, as shown by monodansylcadaverine staining, together with an ultrastructural examination by transmission electron microscopy. During the late stages of oogenesis in D. virilis, once again, the two mechanisms, viz., nurse cell cluster apoptosis and autophagy, operate together, manifesting features of cell death similar to those detailed above. Moreover, an altered form of cytochrome c seems to be released from the mitochondria in the nurse cells proximal to the oocyte. We propose that apoptosis and autophagy function synergistically during oogenesis in D. virilis in order to achieve a more efficient elimination of the degenerated nurse cells and abnormal egg chambers.

  18. Sulfur dioxide induced programmed cell death in Vicia guard cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Huilan; Yin, Jingjing; Liu, Xin; Jing, Xiuqing; Fan, Sanhong; Zhang, Hufang

    2012-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) induced nuclear condensation and nuclear fragmentation and rapid loss of guard cell viability in detached epidermis of Vicia leaves at concentrations of 1 mM and higher (3 h exposure). Caspase inhibitors Z-Asp-CH(2)-DCB (0.1 mM) and TLCK (0.1 mM) markedly suppressed SO(2)-induced cell death. The typical nuclear morphological changes and the inhibition effects of caspase inhibitors suggest the activation of a programmed cell death (PCD) pathway. SO(2)-induced cell death can be blocked by either antioxidants (0.1 mM AsA or 200 U/mL CAT) or Ca(2+) antagonists (0.1mM EGTA or LaCl(3)). AsA and CAT also blocked SO(2)-induced ROS production and [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase. However, EGTA and LaCl(3) can inhibit SO(2)-induced [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase, but cannot suppress SO(2)-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that high concentrations of SO(2) induce guard cell death via a PCD pathway through ROS mediating [Ca(2+)](cyt) elevation, which causes harmful effects to plants.

  19. Death's toolbox: examining the molecular components of bacterial programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Rice, Kelly C; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2003-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically determined process of cellular suicide that is activated in response to cellular stress or damage, as well as in response to the developmental signals in multicellular organisms. Although historically studied in eukaryotes, it has been proposed that PCD also functions in prokaryotes, either during the developmental life cycle of certain bacteria or to remove damaged cells from a population in response to a wide variety of stresses. This review will examine several putative examples of bacterial PCD and summarize what is known about the molecular components of these systems.

  20. Megasporogenesis and programmed cell death in Tillandsia (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Papini, Alessio; Mosti, Stefano; Milocani, Eva; Tani, Gabriele; Di Falco, Pietro; Brighigna, Luigi

    2011-10-01

    The degeneration of three of four meiotic products is a very common process in the female gender of oogamous eukaryotes. In Tillandsia (and many other angiosperms), the surviving megaspore has a callose-free wall in chalazal position while the other three megaspores are completely embedded in callose. Therefore, nutrients and signals can reach more easily the functional megaspore from the nucellus through the chalazal pole with respect to the other megaspores. The abortion of three of four megaspores was already recognized as the result of a programmed cell death (PCD) process. We investigated the process to understand the modality of this specific type of PCD and its relationship to the asymmetric callose deposition around the tetrad. The decision on which of the four megaspores will be the supernumerary megaspores in angiosperms, and hence destined to undergo programmed cell death, appears to be linked to the callose layer deposition around the tetrad. During supernumerary megaspores degeneration, events leading to the deletion of the cells do not appear to belong to a single type of cell death. The first morphological signs are typical of autophagy, including the formation of autophagosomes. The TUNEL positivity and a change in morphology of mitochondria and chloroplasts indicate the passage to an apoptotic-like PCD phase, while the cellular remnants undergo a final process resembling at least partially (ER swelling) necrotic morphological syndromes, eventually leading to a mainly lipidic cell corpse still separated from the functional megaspore by a callose layer.

  1. Programmed Cell Death of Embryonic Motoneurons Triggered through the FAS Death Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raoul, Cédric; Henderson, Christopher E.; Pettmann, Brigitte

    1999-01-01

    About 50% of spinal motoneurons undergo programmed cell death (PCD) after target contact, but little is known about how this process is initiated. Embryonic motoneurons coexpress the death receptor Fas and its ligand FasL at the stage at which PCD is about to begin. In the absence of trophic factors, many motoneurons die in culture within 2 d. Most (75%) of these were saved by Fas-Fc receptor body, which blocks interactions between Fas and FasL, or by the caspase-8 inhibitor tetrapeptide IETD. Therefore, activation of Fas by endogenous FasL underlies cell death induced by trophic deprivation. In the presence of neurotrophic factors, exogenous Fas activators such as soluble FasL or anti-Fas antibodies triggered PCD of 40–50% of purified motoneurons over the following 3–5 d; this treatment led to activation of caspase-3, and was blocked by IETD. Sensitivity to Fas activation is regulated: motoneurons cultured for 3 d with neurotrophic factors became completely resistant. Levels of Fas expressed by motoneurons varied little, but FasL was upregulated in the absence of neurotrophic factors. Motoneurons resistant to Fas activation expressed high levels of FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), an endogenous inhibitor of caspase-8 activation. Our results suggest that Fas can act as a driving force for motoneuron PCD, and raise the possibility that active triggering of PCD may contribute to motoneuron loss during normal development and/or in pathological situations. PMID:10579724

  2. Vacuolar processing enzyme in plant programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Yamada, Kenji; Goto-Yamada, Shino; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2015-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) is a cysteine proteinase originally identified as the proteinase responsible for the maturation and activation of vacuolar proteins in plants, and it is known to be an ortholog of animal asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP/VPE/legumain). VPE has been shown to exhibit enzymatic properties similar to that of caspase 1, which is a cysteine protease that mediates the programmed cell death (PCD) pathway in animals. Although there is limited sequence identity between VPE and caspase 1, their predicted three-dimensional structures revealed that the essential amino-acid residues for these enzymes form similar pockets for the substrate peptide YVAD. In contrast to the cytosolic localization of caspases, VPE is localized in vacuoles. VPE provokes vacuolar rupture, initiating the proteolytic cascade leading to PCD in the plant immune response. It has become apparent that the VPE-dependent PCD pathway is involved not only in the immune response, but also in the responses to a variety of stress inducers and in the development of various tissues. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the contribution of VPE to plant PCD and its role in vacuole-mediated cell death, and it also compares VPE with the animal cell death executor caspase 1. PMID:25914711

  3. Perturbations in the Lipid Profile of Individuals with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Lipidomics Analysis of a Diabetes Antibody Standardization Program Sample Subset

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Christina M.; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Qibin; Alquier, Thierry; Zhao, Rui; Mueller, Patricia W.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2010-08-01

    Objectives: To characterize the lipid profile of individuals with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus using LC-MS-based lipidomics and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach. Design and methods: Lipids were extracted from plasma and sera of 10 subjects from the Diabetes Antibody Standardization Program (years 2000-2005) and 10 non-diabetic subjects and analyzed by capillary liquid chromatography coupled with a hybrid ion-trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Lipids were identified and quantified using the AMT tag approach. Results: Five hundred sixty lipid features differentiated (q < 0.05) diabetic from healthy individuals in a partial least-squares analysis, characterizing of individuals with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conclusions: A lipid profile associated with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes may aid in further characterization of biochemical pathways involved in lipid regulation or mobilization and lipotoxicity of pancreatic beta-cells.

  4. Statins and Voriconazole Induce Programmed Cell Death in Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; Reyes-Batlle, María; Valladares, Basilio; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E.; Maciver, Sutherland K.; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a life-threatening encephalitis. In order to treat those infections properly, it is necessary to target the treatment not only to the trophozoite but also to the cyst. Furthermore, it may be advantageous to avoid parasite killing by necrosis, which may induce local inflammation. We must also avoid toxicity of host tissue. Many drugs which target eukaryotes are known to induce programmed cell death (PCD), but this process is poorly characterized in Acanthamoeba. Here, we study the processes of programmed cell death in Acanthamoeba, induced by several drugs, such as statins and voriconazole. We tested atorvastatin, fluvastatin, simvastatin, and voriconazole at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) and IC90s that we have previously established. In order to evaluate this phenomenon, we investigated the DNA fragmentation, one of the main characteristics of PCD, with quantitative and qualitative techniques. Also, the changes related to phosphatidylserine exposure on the external cell membrane and cell permeability were studied. Finally, because caspases are key to PCD pathways, caspase activity was evaluated in Acanthamoeba. All the drugs assayed in this study induced PCD in Acanthamoeba. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where PCD induced by drugs is described quantitatively and qualitatively in Acanthamoeba. PMID:25733513

  5. Elevated Expression of Programmed Death-1 and Programmed Death Ligand-1 Negatively Regulates Immune Response against Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhifang; Pang, Nannan; Du, Rong; Zhu, Yuejie; Fan, Lingling; Cai, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    The present study is to measure the expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1), as well as its clinical significance in cervical cancer patients. Our results showed that different T cell subsets in patients with cervical cancer had high expression of PD-1, and DCs had high expression of PD-L1. High expression of PD-1 on Treg cells in cervical cancer patients facilitated the production of TGF-β and IL-10 but inhibited the production of IFN-γ. Cervical cancer elevated the expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 in mRNA level. PD-1 expression in peripheral blood of cervical cancer patients was related with tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and invasiveness. PD-1/PD-L1 pathway inhibited lymphocyte proliferation but enhanced the secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β in vitro. In summary, our findings demonstrate that elevated levels of PD-1/PD-L1, TGF-β, and IL-10 in peripheral blood of cervical cancer patients may negatively regulate immune response against cervical cancer cells and contribute to the progression of cervical cancer. Therefore, PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may become an immunotherapy target in the future. PMID:27721577

  6. Programmed cell death in C. elegans, mammals and plants.

    PubMed

    Lord, Christina E N; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2012-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is the regulated removal of cells within an organism and plays a fundamental role in growth and development in nearly all eukaryotes. In animals, the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has aided in elucidating many of the pathways involved in the cell death process. Various analogous PCD processes can also be found within mammalian PCD systems, including vertebrate limb development. Plants and animals also appear to share hallmarks of PCD, both on the cellular and molecular level. Cellular events visualized during plant PCD resemble those seen in animals including: nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, cytoplasmic condensation, and plasma membrane shrinkage. Recently the molecular mechanisms involved in plant PCD have begun to be elucidated. Although few regulatory proteins have been identified as conserved across all eukaryotes, molecular features such as the participation of caspase-like proteases, Bcl-2-like family members and mitochondrial proteins appear to be conserved between plant and animal systems. Transgenic expression of mammalian and C. elegans pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in plants has been observed to dramatically influence the regulatory pathways of plant PCD. Although these genes often show little to no sequence similarity they can frequently act as functional substitutes for one another, thus suggesting that action may be more important than sequence resemblance. Here we present a summary of these findings, focusing on the similarities, between mammals, C. elegans, and plants. An emphasis will be placed on the mitochondria and its role in the cell death pathway within each organism. Through the comparison of these systems on both a cellular and molecular level we can begin to better understand PCD in plant systems, and perhaps shed light on the pathways, which are controlling the process. This manuscript adds to the field of PCD in plant systems by profiling apoptotic factors, to scale on a protein

  7. The Molecular Ecophysiology of Programmed Cell Death in Marine Phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidle, Kay D.

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) share a diverse and ancient evolutionary history, during which time they have played key roles in regulating marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Because phytoplankton represent the basis of marine ecosystems, the manner in which they die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining upper-ocean biogeochemistry. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of nutrient stressors and are employed by parasitic viruses, play an integral role in determining the cell fate of diverse photoautotrophs in the modern ocean. Indeed, these multifaceted death pathways continue to shape the success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages at sea. Research over the past two decades has employed physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques to provide a novel, comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling this key process. Here, I discuss the current understanding of the genetics, activation, and regulation of PCD pathways in marine model systems; how PCD evolved in unicellular photoautotrophs; how it mechanistically interfaces with viral infection pathways; how stress signals are sensed and transduced into cellular responses; and how novel molecular and biochemical tools are revealing the impact of PCD genes on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages.

  8. The molecular ecophysiology of programmed cell death in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bidle, Kay D

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) share a diverse and ancient evolutionary history, during which time they have played key roles in regulating marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Because phytoplankton represent the basis of marine ecosystems, the manner in which they die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining upper-ocean biogeochemistry. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of nutrient stressors and are employed by parasitic viruses, play an integral role in determining the cell fate of diverse photoautotrophs in the modern ocean. Indeed, these multifaceted death pathways continue to shape the success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages at sea. Research over the past two decades has employed physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques to provide a novel, comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling this key process. Here, I discuss the current understanding of the genetics, activation, and regulation of PCD pathways in marine model systems; how PCD evolved in unicellular photoautotrophs; how it mechanistically interfaces with viral infection pathways; how stress signals are sensed and transduced into cellular responses; and how novel molecular and biochemical tools are revealing the impact of PCD genes on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages.

  9. Programmed Cell Death Initiation and Execution in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Strich, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death (PCD) was initially described in metazoans as a genetically controlled process leading to intracellular breakdown and engulfment by a neighboring cell . This process was distinguished from other forms of cell death like necrosis by maintenance of plasma membrane integrity prior to engulfment and the well-defined genetic system controlling this process. Apoptosis was originally described as a mechanism to reshape tissues during development. Given this context, the assumption was made that this process would not be found in simpler eukaryotes such as budding yeast. Although basic components of the apoptotic pathway were identified in yeast, initial observations suggested that it was devoid of prosurvival and prodeath regulatory proteins identified in mammalian cells. However, as apoptosis became extensively linked to the elimination of damaged cells, key PCD regulatory proteins were identified in yeast that play similar roles in mammals. This review highlights recent discoveries that have permitted information regarding PCD regulation in yeast to now inform experiments in animals. PMID:26272996

  10. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit.

  11. Programmed Cell Death in Animal Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Yaron; Steller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Programmed Cell Death (PCD) plays a fundamental role in animal development and tissue homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this process is associated with a wide variety of human diseases, including immunological and developmental disorders, neuro-degeneration, and cancer. Here, we provide a brief historical overview of the field and reflect on myriad functions carried out by PCD during development and explore how PCD is regulated. We also focus on the function and regulation of apoptotic proteins, including caspases, the key executioners of apoptosis, highlighting the non-lethal functions of these proteins in diverse developmental processes including cell differentiation and tissue remodeling. Finally, we explore a growing body of work about the connections between apoptosis, stem cells and cancer, focusing on how apoptotic cells release a variety of signals to communicate with their cellular environment, including factors that promote cell division, tissue regeneration, and wound healing. PMID:22078876

  12. A Role for Programmed Cell Death in the Microbial Loop

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Pierre M.; Whitehead, Kenia; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2013-01-01

    The microbial loop is the conventional model by which nutrients and minerals are recycled in aquatic eco-systems. Biochemical pathways in different organisms become metabolically inter-connected such that nutrients are utilized, processed, released and re-utilized by others. The result is that unrelated individuals end up impacting each others' fitness directly through their metabolic activities. This study focused on the impact of programmed cell death (PCD) on a population's growth as well as its role in the exchange of carbon between two naturally co-occurring halophilic organisms. Flow cytometric, biochemical, 14C radioisotope tracing assays, and global transcriptomic analyses show that organic algal photosynthate released by Dunalliela salina cells undergoing PCD complements the nutritional needs of other non-PCD D. salina cells. This occurs in vitro in a carbon limited environment and enhances the growth of the population. In addition, a co-occurring heterotroph Halobacterium salinarum re-mineralizes the carbon providing elemental nutrients for the mixoheterotrophic chlorophyte. The significance of this is uncertain and the archaeon can also subsist entirely on the lysate of apoptotic algae. PCD is now well established in unicellular organisms; however its ecological relevance has been difficult to decipher. In this study we found that PCD in D. salina causes the release of organic nutrients such as glycerol, which can be used by others in the population as well as a co-occurring halophilic archaeon. H. salinarum also re-mineralizes the dissolved material promoting algal growth. PCD in D. salina was the mechanism for the flow of dissolved photosynthate between unrelated organisms. Ironically, programmed death plays a central role in an organism's own population growth and in the exchange of nutrients in the microbial loop. PMID:23667496

  13. Caspase-like activity in programmed nuclear death during conjugation of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Endoh, H

    2003-06-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is common in a variety of eucaryotes, from unicellular protozoa to vertebrates. The ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila has a unique apoptosis-like nuclear death during conjugation, called programmed nuclear death. This death program involves nuclear condensation (pyknosis) and oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the parental macronucleus. Subsequently, the condensed nucleus is entirely resorbed in the autophagosome. Here we demonstrate that caspase-8- and -9-like activity was detected, but no caspase-3-like activity, by in vitro assay during the nuclear resorption process, suggesting that caspase-like activity is associated with both programmed cell death and apoptosis-like nuclear death in Tetrahymena. The use of indicator dye to detect the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggested the uptake of mitochondria and the degenerating macronucleus by the autophagosome. An involvement of mitochondria in the programmed nuclear death is discussed.

  14. Using Small Molecules to Dissect Non-apoptotic Programmed Cell Death: Necroptosis, Ferroptosis, and Pyroptosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ting; Liao, Daohong; Liu, Xiaohui; Lei, Xiaoguang

    2015-12-01

    Genetically programmed cell death is a universal and fundamental cellular process in multicellular organisms. Apoptosis and necroptosis, two common forms of programmed cell death, play vital roles in maintenance of homeostasis in metazoans. Dysfunction of the regulatory machinery of these processes can lead to carcinogenesis or autoimmune diseases. Inappropriate death of essential cells can lead to organ dysfunction or even death; ischemia-reperfusion injury and neurodegenerative disorders are examples of this. Recently, novel forms of non-apoptotic programmed cell death have been identified. Although these forms of cell death play significant roles in both physiological and pathological conditions, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying them are still poorly understood. Here, we discuss progress in using small molecules to dissect three forms of non-apoptotic programmed cell death: necroptosis, ferroptosis, and pyroptosis.

  15. Analysis of the Death Gratuity Program: History, Current Issues and Future Implications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    11 III. THE EFFECTS OF PUBLIC LAW 109-13 ON THE DEATH GRATUITY...government life insurance policy remained in effect , the death gratuity was no longer necessary. Additional controversy also developed over the debate...III. THE EFFECTS OF PUBLIC LAW 109-13 ON THE DEATH GRATUITY PROGRAM A. INTRODUCTION The purpose

  16. The Evaluation of Two Death Education Programs for EMTs Using the Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Cumberland, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two death education programs by comparing pretest and posttest scores of behavioral intentions and (reported) behavior of EMTs when at the scene of a death. After the interventions, the majority of EMTs intended to change their behavior at the scene of a death when compared to the control…

  17. Gigantic macroautophagy in programmed nuclear death of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Akematsu, Takahiko; Pearlman, Ronald E; Endoh, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    Programmed nuclear death (PND) in Tetrahymena is a unique process during conjugation, in which only the parental macronucleus is degraded and then eliminated from the progeny cytoplasm, but other co-existing nuclei such as new micro- and macronuclei are unaffected. PND through autophagic elimination is expected to be strictly controlled, considering the significant roles in ciliates such as turnover of disused organelles and production of the next generation. Here we demonstrate that PND in Tetrahymena involves peculiar aspects of autophagy, which differ from mammalian or yeast macroautophagy. Drastic change of the parental macronucleus occurs when differentiation of new macronuclei is initiated. Combined use of monodansylcadaverine and a lysosome indicator LysoTracker Red showed that prior to nuclear condensation, the envelope of the parental macronucleus changed its nature as if it is an autophagic membrane, without the accumulation of a pre-autophagosomal structure from the cytoplasm. Subsequently, lysosomes approached only to the parental macronucleus and localized at the envelope until a final resorption stage. In addition, we found that the parental macronucleus exhibits certain sugars and phosphatidylserine on the envelope, which are possible "attack me" signals, that are not found on other types of nuclei. These findings suggest that PND is a highly elaborated process, different from the typical macroautophagy seen in other systems, and is executed through interaction between specific molecular signals on the parental macronuclear envelope and autophagic/lysosomal machineries.

  18. Apoptosis: understanding programmed cell death for the CRNA.

    PubMed

    Bennetts, Paul S; Pierce, Janet D

    2010-06-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is a physiologic mechanism employed by most multicellular organisms to maintain homeostasis of body tissues. In balance with the production of new cells by mitosis, apoptosis provides for the orderly destruction and removal of cells that are no longer needed by the organism. Apoptosis occurs by complex pathways involving multiple biochemical signals and processes. Dysfunctional apoptotic mechanisms are the pathologic basis for many human diseases, including common disorders of the heart, lungs, brain, and endocrine systems. Researchers have demonstrated in animal models that neurodegenerative changes after the administration of anesthetic drugs are related to apoptosis. Anesthesia drugs have been found to induce apoptosis, perhaps through the production of reactive oxygen species. Propofol is a drug used in anesthesia that has unique antioxidant qualities that may be beneficial. The purpose of this article is to review, for nurse anesthesia providers, current information about the process of apoptosis, the role of apoptosis in comorbid diseases, and the implications of the effects of anesthesia drugs on normal apoptotic mechanisms that need to be evaluated as potential sources of risk or benefit to surgical patients.

  19. Programmed death-1 pathway in cancer and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pedoeem, Ariel; Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Strazza, Marianne; Silverman, Gregg J; Mor, Adam

    2014-07-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a co-receptor that is expressed predominantly by T cells. The binding of PD-1 to its ligands, PD-L1 or PD-L2, is vital for the physiologic regulation of the immune system. A major functional role of the PD-1 signaling pathway is the inhibition of self-reactive T cells, which serve to protect against autoimmune diseases. Elimination of the PD-1 pathway can therefore result in the breakdown of immune tolerance that can ultimately lead to the development of pathogenic autoimmunity. Conversely, tumor cells can at times co-opt the PD-1 pathway to escape from immunosurveillance mechanisms. Therefore, blockade of the PD-1 pathway has become an attractive target in cancer therapy. Recent clinical trials have shown that anti-PD-1 agents have profound effects on solid tumor regression. Current approaches include six agents that are either PD-1 and PD-L1 targeted neutralizing antibodies or fusion proteins. More than forty clinical trials are underway to better define the role of PD-1 blockade in variety of tumor types. In this review we will highlight the basic biology of the PD-1 system and discuss its potential roles in both autoimmunity and cancer. We propose that future research on PD-1 may lead to the translation of fundamental regulatory pathways into the development of practical new approaches for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer.

  20. Bacterial Programmed Cell Death as a Population Phenomenon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-11

    Moving in for the kil:Activation of an endoribonuclease toxin by quorum sensing peptide, Molecular Cell, (03 2011): . doi: 06/11/2013 11.00...shown that E. coli mazEF-mediated cell death is a population phenomenon requiring the E. coli quorum sensing factor EDF (Extracellular Death Factor... quorum - sensing factor required for mazEF-mediated cell death in Escherichia coli. Science 318: 652-655. 7) Kolodkin-Gal I, Engelberg-Kulka, H (2008

  1. Programmed Death-Ligand 1 Expression and Response to the Anti-Programmed Death 1 Antibody Pembrolizumab in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Daud, Adil I; Wolchok, Jedd D; Robert, Caroline; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Weber, Jeffrey S; Ribas, Antoni; Hodi, F Stephen; Joshua, Anthony M; Kefford, Richard; Hersey, Peter; Joseph, Richard; Gangadhar, Tara C; Dronca, Roxana; Patnaik, Amita; Zarour, Hassane; Roach, Charlotte; Toland, Grant; Lunceford, Jared K; Li, Xiaoyun Nicole; Emancipator, Kenneth; Dolled-Filhart, Marisa; Kang, S Peter; Ebbinghaus, Scot; Hamid, Omid

    2016-12-01

    Purpose Expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) is a potential predictive marker for response and outcome after treatment with anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1). This study explored the relationship between anti-PD-1 activity and PD-L1 expression in patients with advanced melanoma who were treated with pembrolizumab in the phase Ib KEYNOTE-001 study (clinical trial information: NCT01295827). Patients and Methods Six hundred fifty-five patients received pembrolizumab10 mg/kg once every 2 weeks or once every 3 weeks, or 2 mg/kg once every 3 weeks. Tumor response was assessed every 12 weeks per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) v1.1 by independent central review. Primary outcome was objective response rate. Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Membranous PD-L1 expression in tumor and tumor-associated immune cells was assessed by a clinical trial immunohistochemistry assay (22C3 antibody) and scored on a unique melanoma (MEL) scale of 0 to 5 by one of three pathologists who were blinded to clinical outcome; a score ≥ 2 (membranous staining in ≥ 1% of cells) was considered positive. Results Of 451 patients with evaluable PD-L1 expression, 344 (76%) had PD-L1-positive tumors. Demographic and staging variables were equally distributed among PD-L1-positive and -negative patients. An association between higher MEL score and higher response rate and longer PFS (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.82) and OS (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.83) was observed ( P < .001 for each). Objective response rate was 8%, 12%, 22%, 43%, 57%, and 53% for MEL 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Conclusion PD-L1 expression in pretreatment tumor biopsy samples was correlated with response rate, PFS, and OS; however, patients with PD-L1-negative tumors may also achieve durable responses.

  2. A Traumatic Death Support Group Program: Applying an Integrated Conceptual Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walijarvi, Corrine M.; Weiss, Ann H.; Weinman, Maxine L.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an 8-week, curriculum-based traumatic death support group program that is offered at Bo's Place, a grief and bereavement center in Houston, Texas. The program was implemented in 2006 in an effort to help family members who had experienced a death in the family by suicide, murder, accident, or sudden medical problem. The…

  3. Blockade of programmed death-1/programmed death ligand pathway enhances the antitumor immunity of human invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Toshiko; Suzuki, Akane; Mise, Naoko; Ihara, Fumie; Takami, Mariko; Makita, Yuji; Horinaka, Atsushi; Harada, Kazuaki; Kunii, Naoki; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Yoshino, Ichiro; Nakayama, Toshinori; Motohashi, Shinichiro

    2016-12-01

    The role of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in antitumor immunity has been studied extensively, and clinical trials in patients with advanced cancer have revealed a prolonged survival in some cases. In recent years, humanized blocking antibodies against co-stimulatory molecules such as PD-1 have been developed. The enhancement of T cell function is reported to improve antitumor immunity, leading to positive clinical effects. However, there are limited data on the role of PD-1/programmed death ligand (PDL) molecules in human iNKT cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction between PD-1 on iNKT cells and PDL on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the context of iNKT cell stimulation. The blockade of PDL1 at the time of stimulation resulted in increased release of helper T cell (Th) 1 cytokines from iNKT cells, leading to the activation of NK cells. The direct antitumor function of iNKT cells was also enhanced after stimulation with anti-PDL1 antibody-treated APCs. According to these results, we conclude that the co-administration of anti-PDL1 antibody and alpha-galactosylceramide (αGalCer)-pulsed APCs enhances iNKT cell-mediated antitumor immunity.

  4. Programmed cell death ligand 1 expression in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jacson K; Cote, Gregory M; Choy, Edwin; Yang, Pei; Harmon, David; Schwab, Joseph; Nielsen, G Petur; Chebib, Ivan; Ferrone, Soldano; Wang, Xinhui; Wang, Yangyang; Mankin, Henry; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2014-07-01

    Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1, also known as B7H1) is a cell-surface protein that suppresses the cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune response. PDL1 expression and its clinical relevance in sarcomas are not well understood. Therefore, we sought to measure RNA expression levels for PDL1 in 38 clinically annotated osteosarcoma tumor samples and aimed to determine if PDL1 expression correlates with clinical features and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR for PDL1 was optimized in 18 cell lines, of which 5 were osteosarcoma derived. qRT-PCR results were validated via flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in select cell lines. Total RNA was isolated from 38 human osteosarcoma samples for qRT-PCR analysis. Clinical data were sorted, and significance was determined by the Student t test. TILs were examined in patient samples by tissue microarray hematoxylin-eosin staining. We confirmed the constitutive PDL1 mRNA expression in cell lines by qRT-PCR, flow cytometry, and IHC. Across human osteosarcoma samples, PDL1 mRNA gene expression ranged over 4 log (>5,000-fold difference). Relative expression levels were evaluated against clinical factors such as age/gender, metastasis, recurrence, chemotherapy, percentage of necrosis, and survival; no significant associations were identified. The presence of TILs was associated with high PDL1 expression (R(2) = 0.37; P = 0.01). In summary, we developed an RNA-based assay to determine PDL1 expression levels, and we show, for the first time, that high levels of PDL1 are expressed in a subset of osteosarcoma, and PDL1 expression is positively correlated with TILs. Multiple agents targeting PD1/PDL1 are in clinical development, and this may be a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for osteosarcoma clinical trials.

  5. Programmed death-1/programmed death-L1 signaling pathway and its blockade in hepatitis C virus immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed L; El-Badawy, Ahmed

    2015-10-18

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a public health issue that often progresses to life-threatening complications, including liver cirrhosis, fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Impaired immune responses to HCV are key features of chronic HCV infection. Therefore, intervention strategies usually involve enhancing the immune responses against HCV. Cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a critical role in the control of HCV infection. However, their cytolytic function can be impaired by the expression of co-inhibitory molecules. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligand PD-L1 function in a T cell co-inhibitory pathway, which either blocks the function of CTLs or the differentiation of CD8(+) T cells. During chronic HCV infection, the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1 is upregulated on dysfunctional HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells. As such, blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in these CD8(+) T cells might restore their functional capabilities. Indeed, clinical trials using therapies to block this pathway have shown promise in the fostering of anti-HCV immunity. Understanding how chronic HCV infection induces upregulation of PD-1 on HCV specific T cells and how the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction develops HCV specific T cell dysfunction will accelerate the development of an efficacious prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against chronic HCV infections, which will significantly improve HCV treatments and patient survival. In this review, we discuss the relationship between PD-1 expression and clinical responses and the potential use of PD-1 blockade for anti-HCV therapy.

  6. A critical role for the programmed death ligand 1 in fetomaternal tolerance.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Indira; Khosroshahi, Arezou; Ansari, Mohammed Javeed; Habicht, Antje; Azuma, Miyuki; Yagita, Hideo; Noelle, Randolph J; Coyle, Anthony; Mellor, Andrew L; Khoury, Samia J; Sayegh, Mohamed H

    2005-07-18

    Fetal survival during gestation implies that tolerance mechanisms suppress the maternal immune response to paternally inherited alloantigens. Here we show that the inhibitory T cell costimulatory molecule, programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1), has an important role in conferring fetomaternal tolerance in an allogeneic pregnancy model. Blockade of PDL1 signaling during murine pregnancy resulted in increased rejection rates of allogeneic concepti but not syngeneic concepti. Fetal rejection was T cell- but not B cell-dependent because PDL1-specific antibody treatment caused fetal rejection in B cell-deficient but not in RAG-1-deficient females. Blockade of PDL1 also resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of IFN-gamma-producing lymphocytes in response to alloantigen in an ELISPOT assay and higher IFN-gamma levels in placental homogenates by ELISA. Finally, PDL1-deficient females exhibited decreased allogeneic fetal survival rates as compared with littermate and heterozygote controls and showed evidence of expansion of T helper type 1 immune responses in vivo. These results provide the first evidence that PDL1 is involved in fetomaternal tolerance.

  7. Diabetes Type 1

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  8. Zinc treatment prevents type 1 diabetes-induced hepatic oxidative damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and cell death, and even prevents possible steatohepatitis in the OVE26 mouse model: Important role of metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tingting; Zhang, Quan; Sun, Weixia; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiguo; Tan, Yi; Zhou, Shanshan; Zhang, Chi; Cai, Lu; Lu, Xuemian; Cheng, Mingliang

    2015-03-04

    Whether zinc is able to improve diabetes-induced liver injury remains unknown. Transgenic type 1 diabetic (OVE26) mice develop hyperglycemia at 3 weeks old; therefore therapeutic effect of zinc on diabetes-induced liver injury was investigated in OVE26 mice. Three-month old OVE26 and age-matched wild-type mice were treated by gavage with saline or zinc at 5mg/kg body-weight every other day for 3 months. Hepatic injury was examined by serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level with liver histopathological and biochemical changes. OVE26 mice at 6 months old showed significant increases in serum ALT level and hepatic oxidative damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress and associated cell death, mild inflammation, and fibrosis. However, all these hepatic morphological and functional changes were significantly prevented in 3-month zinc-treated OVE26 mice. Mechanistically, zinc treatment significantly increased hepatic metallothionein, a protein with known antioxidant activity, in both wild-type and OVE26 mice. These results suggest that there were significantly functional, structural and biochemical abnormalities in the liver of OVE26 diabetic mice at 6 months old; however, all these changes could be prevented with zinc treatment, which was associated with the upregulation of hepatic metallothionein expression.

  9. PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH IN EXTRAOCULAR MUSCLE TENDON/SCLERA PRECURSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Purpose: This study was designed to examine the occurrence of natural cell death in the periocular mesenchyme of mouse embryos.

    Methods: Vital staining with LysoTracker Red and Nile blue sulphate as well as terminal nick end labeling (TUNEL) were utiliz...

  10. Rational Design of Regulators of Programmed Cell Death in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a better understanding of the intricate pathways of cell death and their contributions to breast cancers...basis for a set of molecular interactions that regulate programmed cell death , and allow the design of novel interventional agents that have investigative and therapeutic potential.

  11. Development of a Microfluidic Platform to Analyze Evolution of Programmed Bacterial Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-20

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Evolution of programmed cell death in bacteria is a poorly understood phenomenon in biology . A critical limitation...Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Microfluidics, systems biology REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM...Report Title Evolution of programmed cell death in bacteria is a poorly understood phenomenon in biology . A critical limitation is the lack of high

  12. Programmed death in a unicellular organism has species-specific fitness effects.

    PubMed

    Durand, Pierre M; Choudhury, Rajdeep; Rashidi, Armin; Michod, Richard E

    2014-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an ancient phenomenon and its origin and maintenance in unicellular life is unclear. We report that programmed death provides differential fitness effects that are species specific in the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Remarkably, PCD in this organism not only benefits others of the same species, but also has an inhibitory effect on the growth of other species. These data reveal that the fitness effects of PCD can depend upon genetic relatedness.

  13. Catching up with solid tumor oncology: what is the evidence for a prognostic role of programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 expression in B-cell lymphomas?

    PubMed Central

    McClanahan, Fabienne; Sharp, Thomas G.; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies targeting the programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 pathway have shown significant responses and good tolerability in solid malignancies. Although preclinical studies suggest that inhibiting programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 interactions might also be highly effective in hematological malignancies, remarkably few clinical trials have been published. Determining patients who will benefit most from programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1-directed immunotherapy and whether programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 are adequate prognostic markers becomes an increasingly important clinical question, especially as aberrant programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 expression are key mediators of impaired anti-tumor immune responses in a range of B-cell lymphomas. Herein, we systematically review the published literature on the expression and prognostic value of programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 in these patients and identify considerable differences in expression patterns, distribution and numbers of programmed cell death-ligand 1+/programmed cell death-1+cells, both between and within lymphoma subtypes, which is reflected in conflicting findings regarding the prognostic value of programmed cell death-ligand 1+/programmed cell death-1+ cells. This can be partly explained by differences in methodologies (techniques, protocols, cutoff values) and definitions of positivity. Moreover, lymphomagenesis, disease progression, and prognosis appear to be determined not only by the presence, numbers and distribution of specific subtypes of T cells, but also by other cells and additional immune checkpoints. Collectively, our findings indicate that programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 interactions play an essential role in B-cell lymphoma biology and are of clinical importance, but that the overall outcome is determined by additional components

  14. Reducing stress and supporting positive relations in families of young children with type 1 diabetes: A randomized controlled study for evaluating the effects of the DELFIN parenting program

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess initial efficacy and feasibility of a structured behavioural group training (DELFIN) for parents of children with diabetes type 1, in order to reduce parenting stress and to improve parenting skills. Methods A randomized controlled study was conducted between July 2008 and September 2010, at a children’s hospital in Hannover with parents of children with type 1 diabetes (2–10 yrs) (intervention group n = 37; control group n = 28). Parenting skills, parents’ psychological burden, children’s behavioural difficulties and quality of metabolic control were assessed before, 3 months after and 12 months after participating in the training program. Results In the intervention group parenting behaviour in conflict situations improved significantly after 3 months (Z = −3.28; p ≤ 0.001). It remained stable over 12 months (Z = −2.94; p ≤ 0.01). Depression and anxiety scores of parents decreased (Z = −1.93; p ≤ .05; Z = −2.02; p ≤ .05). Even though the outcome in the intervention group was more positive, the differences between both study arms failed to reach statistical significance. Unexpectedly parenting behaviour in the control group improved also (Z = −2.45; p ≤ .05). Anxiety as well as stress scores decreased in this group (Z = −2.02; p ≤ .05 and Z = −2.11; p ≤ .05). In both groups the initial metabolic control was good and without significant differences (A1c 7.2±0.8% vs. 7.1±0.4%; p > 0.5). It remained stable in the DELFIN group (A1c 7.1±0.8%; p > 0.5), but it increased slightly in controls (A1c 7.3±0.5%; Z = −2.79; p = .005). Conclusions This study has brought first evidence for the efficacy and feasibility of the program. A multicentre study with a larger sample is necessary to confirm these first results. PMID:22994843

  15. Programming cell death in the 1960s: developmental biology beyond dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Wook

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has been one of the most significant topics in modern biomedical research. Its broad importance in many biological and pathological phenomena, including morphogenesis, autoimmune disease, and cancer, demonstrates that its origin deserves a historical examination. By analyzing the role of developmental biology of the 1960s in shaping the notion of a program, this paper explains the emergence of a close correlation between not only life and death, but also the normal and the pathological in the postwar study of cell death.

  16. How France launched its donation after cardiac death program.

    PubMed

    Antoine, C; Mourey, F; Prada-Bordenave, E

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of the literature and results presented at the 6th International Conference, donation after cardio-circulatory death provides a significant, practical, additional high quality source of transplantable organs. The vast majority of DCD are 'controlled' Maastricht category III donors. In 2010, the parliamentary information mission on the revision of the bioethics laws invited the Intensive Care Societies to debate and to make recommendations to implement controlled donation after circulatory death. They came to the conclusion that such retrieval is possible in France and insisted on the medical criteria that frame it: the writing of the medical procedures, the ethical aspects and the delay. The major recommendations of the ethics committees were firstly, The WLST decision is independent of the possibility of organ donation; secondly, the strict respect of "The dead donor and organ transplantation rule" and the updated national guidance for the WLST; thirdly, the drafting of a nationally agreed protocol defining the mandatory conditions to determine death and to perform procurement and transplantation. Organ donation after WLST will be authorised only in pilot centres with a locally agreed WLST policy including external second opinion and written transcript of the WLST decision, experienced intensive care staff, a local organ procurement coordination team familiar with DBD and DCD protocols and only in hospitals authorised for organ procurement. It is important to have an optimal and standardized national guidance to limit the known risk factors of graft failure (donor and recipient choice, warm and cold ischemia time), to increase acceptance by medical community and civil society and to improve results and allow more powerful analysis.

  17. Impact of disease-management programs on metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: A cohort study in Shantou, China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun; Yang, Xiaoping; Wu, Yixi; Chen, Shuru; Yin, Guoshu; Zhan, Jianjun; Lin, Chujia; Xu, Wencan; Chen, Yongsong; Lin, Dan; Xie, Peiwen; Fang, Yishan; Lin, Qiuqiang; Lin, Shaoda

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of diabetes disease management program (DMP) on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients in Shantou China.A sample of 240 participants recruited from 3C study Shantou subgroup was followed up in DMP for 3 years. The DMP provided self-management education, individualized therapy plan, diabetes complications screening, and laboratory examination periodical according to clinical practice guidelines. Primary outcomes were changes in hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c).Two hundred one of the participants completed the follow-up. There was a significant decrease in the HbA1c levels after DMP implemented. The mean (± SD) pre- and post-intervention HbA1c levels were 10.26% ± 3.30% and 8.57% ± 1.57% respectively with a P value <0.001. General linear mixed model analyse demonstrated that changes in glycemic control were associated with insulin treatment regimen, frequency of Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG), diabetes diet adherence, physical activity, and duration of diabetes.DMP helped to improve glycemic control and should be general implemented in China's T1DM. Individuals with basal-bolus regimen (multiple daily injections or pump therapy), more frequency of SMBG, following a diabetes diet, more physical activity, shorter diabetes duration may derive greater benefits from DMP.

  18. Evaluation of a quality assurance program for quantitation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in plasma by the AIDS Clinical Trials Group virology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Yen-Lieberman, B; Brambilla, D; Jackson, B; Bremer, J; Coombs, R; Cronin, M; Herman, S; Katzenstein, D; Leung, S; Lin, H J; Palumbo, P; Rasheed, S; Todd, J; Vahey, M; Reichelderfer, P

    1996-11-01

    A number of quantitative assays have been developed by using amplification techniques to measure human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in the plasma of infected individuals. The Virology Committee of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group in the Division of AIDS, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has established a quality assurance program (QAP) for quantitative assays of HIV-1 RNA levels in plasma. The primary objective of the QAP was to ascertain that a laboratory could maintain the precision required to have a 90% power to detect a fivefold difference in RNA copy number between two samples in the same batch. To achieve this goal, the QAP required an intra-assay standard deviation of no greater than 0.15 log10 RNA copies per ml. Panels for proficiency testing consisted of coded replicate samples and a common set of standards. To date, 41 laboratories have participated in the program and have used both commercial and in-house assays. We demonstrated that 65% of the laboratories were capable of attaining the necessary level of intra-assay precision. The fitted regressions indicated that the differences among laboratories that used the same kit were generally greater than the differences among population-average regressions for the kits themselves. The use of an external QAP and a common set of standards reduced differences both among laboratories that used the same kit and among laboratories that used different kits. Thus, use of a common set of standards across clinical trial protocols would allow for cross-protocol comparisons.

  19. The effect of chemotherapy on programmed cell death 1/programmed cell death 1 ligand axis: some chemotherapeutical drugs may finally work through immune response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Fu, Liwu

    2016-01-01

    Most tumors are immunogenic which would trigger some immune response. Chemotherapy also has immune potentiating mechanisms of action. But it is unknown whether the immune response is associated with the efficacy of chemotherapy and the development of chemoresistance. Recently, there is a growing interest in immunotherapy, among which the co-inhibitory molecules, programmed cell death 1/programmed cell death 1 ligand (PD-1/PD-L1) leads to immune evasion. Since some reports showed that conventional chemotherapeutics can induce the expression of PD-L1, we try to summarize the effect of chemotherapy on PD-1/PD-L1 axis and some potential molecules relevant to PD-1/PD-L1 in chemoresistance in this review. PMID:26919108

  20. Apoptosis goes on a chip: advances in the microfluidic analysis of programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sharpe, John C; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Cooper, Jonathan Mark

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent years have brought enormous progress in cell-based lab-on-a-chip technologies, allowing dynamic studies of cell death with an unprecedented accuracy. As interest in the microfabricated technologies for cell-based bioassays is rapidly gaining momentum, we highlight the most promising technologies that provide a new outlook for the rapid assessment of programmed and accidental cell death and are applicable in drug discovery, high-content drug screening, and personalized clinical diagnostics. PMID:21630641

  1. Die for the community: an overview of programmed cell death in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Allocati, N; Masulli, M; Di Ilio, C; De Laurenzi, V

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a process known to have a crucial role in many aspects of eukaryotes physiology and is clearly essential to their life. As a consequence, the underlying molecular mechanisms have been extensively studied in eukaryotes and we now know that different signalling pathways leading to functionally and morphologically different forms of death exist in these organisms. Similarly, mono-cellular organism can activate signalling pathways leading to death of a number of cells within a colony. The reason why a single-cell organism would activate a program leading to its death is apparently counterintuitive and probably for this reason cell death in prokaryotes has received a lot less attention in the past years. However, as summarized in this review there are many reasons leading to prokaryotic cell death, for the benefit of the colony. Indeed, single-celled organism can greatly benefit from multicellular organization. Within this forms of organization, regulation of death becomes an important issue, contributing to important processes such as: stress response, development, genetic transformation, and biofilm formation. PMID:25611384

  2. Lozenge directly activates argos and klumpfuss to regulate programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Wildonger, Jill; Sosinsky, Alona; Honig, Barry; Mann, Richard S

    2005-05-01

    We show that reducing the activity of the Drosophila Runx protein Lozenge (Lz) during pupal development causes a decrease in cell death in the eye. We identified Lz-binding sites in introns of argos (aos) and klumpfuss (klu) and demonstrate that these genes are directly activated targets of Lz. Loss of either aos or klu reduces cell death, suggesting that Lz promotes apoptosis at least in part by regulating aos and klu. These results provide novel insights into the control of programmed cell death (PCD) by Lz during Drosophila eye development.

  3. IL-1β, But Not Programed Death-1 and Programed Death Ligand Pathway, Is Critical for the Human Th17 Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Sharma, Varun Kumar; Das, Mrinmoy; Karnam, Anupama; Saha, Chaitrali; Lecerf, Maxime; Galeotti, Caroline; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2016-01-01

    The programed death-1 (PD-1)–programed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) and PD-L2 co-inhibitory pathway has been implicated in the evasion strategies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Specifically, M. tuberculosis-induced PD-L1 orchestrates expansion of regulatory T cells and suppression of Th1 response. However, the role of PD pathway in regulating Th17 response to M. tuberculosis has not been investigated. In the present report, we demonstrate that M. tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis-derived antigen fractions have differential abilities to mediate human monocyte- and dendritic cell (DC)-mediated Th17 response and were independent of expression of PD-L1 or PD-L2 on aforementioned antigen-presenting cells. Importantly, we observed that blockade of PD-L1 or PD-1 did not significantly modify either the frequencies of Th17 cells or the production of IL-17 from CD4+ T cells though IFN-γ response was significantly enhanced. On the contrary, IL-1β from monocytes and DCs were critical for the Th17 response to M. tuberculosis. Together, our results indicate that IL-1β, but not members of the programed death pathway, is critical for human Th17 response to M. tuberculosis. PMID:27867382

  4. Inhibition of programmed cell death by cyclosporin A; preferential blocking of cell death induced by signals via TCR/CD3 complex and its mode of action.

    PubMed Central

    Yasutomi, D; Odaka, C; Saito, S; Niizeki, H; Kizaki, H; Tadakuma, T

    1992-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is reported to inhibit programmed cell death. We confirmed this by using T-cell hybridomas which are inducible to programmed cell death by activation with immobilized anti-CD3 antibody or with anti-Thy 1.2 antibody. Cell death and DNA fragmentation, characteristic features of programmed cell death, were almost completely blocked by CsA or FK506. To investigate whether CsA inhibits only the cell death through the signals via the TCR/CD3 complex or all of the programmed cell death induced by various reagents, we further established CD4+8+ thymic lymphomas which result in programmed cell death after activation with calcium ionophore, dexamethasone, cyclic AMP or anti-CD3 antibody. It was revealed that CsA could block only the cell death mediated by the TCR/CD3 complex. For the clarification of the site of action of CsA, Ca2+ influx and endocytosis of receptors after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody were monitored in the presence of CsA, and no significant effects of CsA were observed. Furthermore, prevention of cell death was examined by adding CsA at various periods of time after initiation of culture. CsA was found to exert its effect even when added after 4 h of cultivation, and the kinetic pattern of suppression was similar to that of the suppressive effect on IL-2 production. These observations indicate that in the events of programmed cell death, the major site of action of CsA will not be the inhibition of the immediate membrane events after activation of the TCR/CD3 complex but rather the interference in the function of molecules that transmit signals between membrane events and the activation of genes in the nucleus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1383138

  5. Programmed cell death during metamorphosis in the blow-fly Calliphora vomitoria.

    PubMed

    Bowen, I D; Mullarkey, K; Morgan, S M

    1996-06-15

    During metamorphosis, the salivary glands of the blow-fly undergo programmed cell death. Data is presented indicating that this programmed cell death does not in many respects emulate classical apoptosis. The cells are seen to vacuolate and swell rather than condense and shrink. There appears to be a transient enhancement in autophagy and an increase in acid phosphatase activity. This is followed by the characteristic appearance of ribosomal and extracisternal sources of the enzyme leading to autolysis. There appears to be no lysosomal leakage of acid phosphatase. As in apoptosis, the mitochondria persist until the cell fragments. The nucleus, however, does not show the distinct chromatin margination and blebbing that is typical of apoptosis. These changes are compared with necrotic changes induced by experimental anoxia. Overall the results show that a programmed cell death distinct from classical apoptosis is taking place.

  6. A Conserved Core of Programmed Cell Death Indicator Genes Discriminates Developmentally and Environmentally Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Van Bel, Michiel; Van Hautegem, Tom; Fendrych, Matyáš; Simaskova, Maria; van Durme, Matthias; Buscaill, Pierre; Rivas, Susana; S. Coll, Nuria; Maere, Steven

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of diverse programmed cell death (PCD) processes has been described in living organisms. In animals and plants, different forms of PCD play crucial roles in development, immunity, and responses to the environment. While the molecular control of some animal PCD forms such as apoptosis is known in great detail, we still know comparatively little about the regulation of the diverse types of plant PCD. In part, this deficiency in molecular understanding is caused by the lack of reliable reporters to detect PCD processes. Here, we addressed this issue by using a combination of bioinformatics approaches to identify commonly regulated genes during diverse plant PCD processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Our results indicate that the transcriptional signatures of developmentally controlled cell death are largely distinct from the ones associated with environmentally induced cell death. Moreover, different cases of developmental PCD share a set of cell death-associated genes. Most of these genes are evolutionary conserved within the green plant lineage, arguing for an evolutionary conserved core machinery of developmental PCD. Based on this information, we established an array of specific promoter-reporter lines for developmental PCD in Arabidopsis. These PCD indicators represent a powerful resource that can be used in addition to established morphological and biochemical methods to detect and analyze PCD processes in vivo and in planta. PMID:26438786

  7. Mastoparan-induced programmed cell death in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Yordanova, Zhenya P.; Woltering, Ernst J.; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta M.; Iakimova, Elena T.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Under stress-promoting conditions unicellular algae can undergo programmed cell death (PCD) but the mechanisms of algal cellular suicide are still poorly understood. In this work, the involvement of caspase-like proteases, DNA cleavage and the morphological occurrence of cell death in wasp venom mastoparan (MP)-treated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were studied. Methods Algal cells were exposed to MP and cell death was analysed over time. Specific caspase inhibitors were employed to elucidate the possible role of caspase-like proteases. YVADase activity (presumably a vacuolar processing enzyme) was assayed by using a fluorogenic caspase-1 substrate. DNA breakdown was evaluated by DNA laddering and Comet analysis. Cellular morphology was examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Key Results MP-treated C. reinhardtii cells expressed several features of necrosis (protoplast shrinkage) and vacuolar cell death (lytic vesicles, vacuolization, empty cell-walled corpse-containing remains of digested protoplast) sometimes within one single cell and in different individual cells. Nucleus compaction and DNA fragmentation were detected. YVADase activity was rapidly stimulated in response to MP but the early cell death was not inhibited by caspase inhibitors. At later time points, however, the caspase inhibitors were effective in cell-death suppression. Conditioned medium from MP-treated cells offered protection against MP-induced cell death. Conclusions In C. reinhardtii MP triggered PCD of atypical phenotype comprising features of vacuolar and necrotic cell deaths, reminiscent of the modality of hypersensitive response. It was assumed that depending on the physiological state and sensitivity of the cells to MP, the early cell-death phase might be not mediated by caspase-like enzymes, whereas later cell death may involve caspase-like-dependent proteolysis. The findings substantiate the hypothesis that, depending on the mode of induction and sensitivity of

  8. Nuclear alterations associated to programmed cell death in larval salivary glands of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Silva-Zacarin, E C M; Taboga, S R; Silva de Moraes, R L M

    2008-01-01

    The silk glands of bees are a good model for the study of cell death in insects. With the objective to detect the nuclear features during glandular regression stage, larvae at the last instar and pre-pupae were collected and their silk glands were dissected and processed for ultrastructural analysis and histologically for cytochemical and imunocytochemical analysis. The results showed that the cellular nuclei exhibited characteristics of death by atypical apoptosis as well as autophagic cell death. Among the apoptosis characteristic were: nuclear strangulation with bleb formation in some nuclei, DNA fragmentation in most of the nuclei and nucleolar fragmentation. Centripetal chromatin compaction was observed in many nuclei, forming a perichromatin halo differing from typical apoptotic nuclei. With regards to the characteristics of autophagic-programmed cell death, most relevant was the delay in the collapse of many nuclei.

  9. Programmed necrosis in the Cross Talk of Cell Death and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Francis Ka-Ming; Luz, Nivea Farias; Moriwaki, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    Cell proliferation and cell death are integral elements in maintaining homeostatic balance in metazoans. Disease pathologies ensue when these processes are disturbed. A plethora of evidence indicates that malfunction of cell death can lead to inflammation, autoimmunity or immuno-deficiency. Programmed necrosis or necroptosis is a form of non-apoptotic cell death driven by the receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) and its substrate mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL). RIPK3 partners with its upstream adaptors RIPK1, TRIF or DAI to signal for necroptosis in response to death receptor or toll-like receptor stimulation, pathogen infection, or sterile cell injury. Necroptosis promotes inflammation through leakage of cellular contents from damaged plasma membrane. Intriguingly, many of the signal adaptors of necroptosis have dual functions in innate immune signaling. This unique signature illustrates the cooperative nature of necroptosis and innate inflammatory signaling pathways in managing cell and organismal stresses from pathogen infection and sterile tissue injury. PMID:25493335

  10. Fas-induced programmed cell death is mediated by a Ras-regulated O2- synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Gulbins, E; Brenner, B; Schlottmann, K; Welsch, J; Heinle, H; Koppenhoefer, U; Linderkamp, O; Coggeshall, K M; Lang, F

    1996-01-01

    Fas induces apoptosis in lymphocytes via a poorly defined intracellular signalling cascade. Previously, we have demonstrated the involvement and significance of a signalling cascade from the Fas receptor via sphingomyelinases and ceramide to Ras in Fas-induced apoptosis. Here we demonstrate rapid and transient synthesis of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) via activation of Ras after Fas. Genetic inhibition of Ras by transfection of transdominant inhibitory N17Ras blocked Fas-mediated ROI synthesis and programmed cell death. Likewise, the antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine and N-t-butyl-phenylnitrone abolished Fas-induced cell death, pointing to an important role for Ras-triggered ROI synthesis in Fas-mediated programmed cell death. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8943716

  11. Researching "good death" in a Hong Kong palliative care program: a clinical data-mining study.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wallace C H; Epstein, I

    This study operationalizes and assesses the percentage of "good deaths" achieved among Chinese cancer patients in a palliative care program, the profile of these patients, the relationship between patients with a good death and psychosocial factors, and the differences in background factors, and physical and psychosocial conditions between patients who experienced a good death and those who did not. Clinical data mining was the research method used. Records of deceased cancer patients between 2003 and 2005 in a palliative care unit were the sole data source. Good death was operationally defined as the patient's record indicating no pain (physical) or anxiety (psychological), and having open and honest communication with family (social) in the final assessment by the Support Team Assessment Schedule (STAS) just before death. Using these criteria, about one-fifth of patients (21.5%; 137 out of 638) experienced a good death. Those with a good death were significantly older and were in palliative care longer. Their records also indicated lower levels of constipation, insomnia, oral discomfort, and family anxiety at their first and at their final STAS assessments. Good death was positively associated with recorded indicators of fullness in life, caregivers' acceptance and support, and negatively with reported feelings of upset about changes in the course of their illness. The results heighten awareness among social workers and other healthcare professionals about the value of good death in patients in palliative care. This empirically-based awareness can foster professionals' ability to set intervention objectives to help patients in palliative care achieve this universally accepted goal.

  12. Neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Kevin P.; Korf, Bruce R.; Theos, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder affecting approximately 1 in 3500 people. Significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of NF1 have been made in the last decade. While no medical therapies are currently available, trials are ongoing to discover and test medical treatments for the various manifestations of NF1, primarily plexiform neurofibromas, learning disabilities, and optic pathway gliomas. Additionally, mutational analysis has become available on a clinical basis and is useful for diagnostic confirmation in individuals who do not fulfill diagnostic criteria or when prenatal diagnosis is desired. There are several disorders which may share overlapping features with NF1; in 2007, a disorder with cutaneous findings similar to NF1 was described. This paper addresses the dermatologist's role in diagnosis and management of NF1 and describes the variety of cutaneous and extracutaneous findings in NF1 to which the dermatologist may be exposed. PMID:19539839

  13. New Method for Monitoring Programmed Cell Death and Differentiation in Submerged Streptomyces Cultures▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yagüe, Paula; Manteca, Angel; Simon, Alejandro; Diaz-Garcia, Marta Elena; Sanchez, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Vital stains were used in combination with fluorimetry for the elaboration of a new method to quantify Streptomyces programmed cell death, one of the key events in Streptomyces differentiation. The experimental approach described opens the possibility of designing online protocols for automatic monitoring of industrial fermentations. PMID:20348294

  14. An Evidence-Based Infant Safe Sleep Program to Reduce Sudden Unexplained Infant Deaths.

    PubMed

    Zachritz, Whitney; Fulmer, Megan; Chaney, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    : Objective: The purpose of this project was to design, implement, and evaluate a safe sleep program for expectant mothers and the families of infants discharged from our hospital's neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It was prompted by the sleep-related deaths of two infants in the community, both of whom had been discharged from our NICU.

  15. Programmed death-1(+) T cells inhibit effector T cells at the pathological site of miliary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Mohan, A; Dey, A B; Mitra, D K

    2017-02-01

    Optimal T cell activation is vital for the successful resolution of microbial infections. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a key immune check-point receptor expressed by activated T cells. Aberrant/excessive inhibition mediated by PD-1 may impair host immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, leading to disseminated disease such as miliary tuberculosis (MTB). PD-1 mediated inhibition of T cells in pulmonary tuberculosis and TB pleurisy is reported. However, their role in MTB, particularly at the pathological site, remains to be addressed. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of PD-1-PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in T cell responses at the pathological site from patients of TB pleurisy and MTB as clinical models of contained and disseminated forms of tuberculosis, respectively. We examined the expression and function of PD-1 and its ligands (PD-L1-PD-L2) on host immune cells among tuberculosis patients. Bronchoalveolar lavage-derived CD3 T cells in MTB expressed PD-1 (54·2 ± 27·4%, P ≥ 0·0009) with significantly higher PD-1 ligand-positive T cells (PD-L1: 19·8 ± 11·8%; P ≥ 0·019, PD-L2: 12·6 ± 6·2%; P ≥ 0·023), CD19(+) B cells (PD-L1: 14·4 ± 10·4%; P ≥ 0·042, PD-L2: 2·6 ± 1·43%; not significant) and CD14(+) monocytes (PD-L1: 40·2 ± 20·1%; P ≥ 0·047, PD-L2: 22·4 ± 15·6%; P ≥ 0·032) compared with peripheral blood (PB) of MTB and healthy controls. The expression of PD-1 was associated with a diminished number of cells producing effector cytokines interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-2 and elevated apoptosis. Locally accumulated T cells were predominantly PD-1(+) -PD-L1(+) , and blocking this pathway restores the protective T cell response. We conclude that M. tuberculosis exploits the PD-1 pathway to evade the host immune response by altering the T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 balance at the pathological site of MTB, thereby

  16. When supply does not meet demand-ER stress and plant programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brett; Verchot, Jeanmarie; Dickman, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the central organelle in the eukaryotic secretory pathway. The ER functions in protein synthesis and maturation and is crucial for proper maintenance of cellular homeostasis and adaptation to adverse environments. Acting as a cellular sentinel, the ER is exquisitely sensitive to changing environments principally via the ER quality control machinery. When perturbed, ER-stress triggers a tightly regulated and highly conserved, signal transduction pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that prevents the dangerous accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins. In situations where excessive UPR activity surpasses threshold levels, cells deteriorate and eventually trigger programmed cell death (PCD) as a way for the organism to cope with dysfunctional or toxic signals. The programmed cell death that results from excessive ER stress in mammalian systems contributes to several important diseases including hypoxia, neurodegeneration, and diabetes. Importantly, hallmark features and markers of cell death that are associated with ER stress in mammals are also found in plants. In particular, there is a common, conserved set of chaperones that modulate ER cell death signaling. Here we review the elements of plant cell death responses to ER stress and note that an increasing number of plant-pathogen interactions are being identified in which the host ER is targeted by plant pathogens to establish compatibility. PMID:24926295

  17. A Kunitz-type protease inhibitor regulates programmed cell death during flower development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-10-01

    Flower development and fertilization are tightly controlled in Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to permit the fertilization of a maximum amount of ovules as well as proper embryo and seed development, a subtle balance between pollen tube growth inside the transmitting tract and pollen tube exit from the septum is needed. Both processes depend on a type of programmed cell death that is still poorly understood. Here, it is shown that a Kunitz protease inhibitor related to water-soluble chlorophyll proteins of Brassicaceae (AtWSCP, encoded by At1g72290) is involved in controlling cell death during flower development in A. thaliana. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biology approaches revealed that WSCP physically interacts with RD21 (RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION) and that this interaction in turn inhibits the activity of RD21 as a pro-death protein. The regulatory circuit identified depends on the restricted expression of WSCP in the transmitting tract and the septum epidermis. In a respective Atwscp knock-out mutant, flowers exhibited precocious cell death in the transmitting tract and unnatural death of septum epidermis cells. As a consequence, apical-basal pollen tube growth, fertilization of ovules, as well as embryo development and seed formation were perturbed. Together, the data identify a unique mechanism of cell death regulation that fine-tunes pollen tube growth.

  18. Induction of DNA damage and caspase-independent programmed cell death by vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, C; Neophytou, C M; Vraka, P; Hyatt, J A; Papas, K A; Constantinou, A I

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin E comprises 8 functionally unique isoforms and may be a suitable candidate for the adjuvant treatment of prostate cancer. In this study, we examined the ability of 2 vitamin E isoforms [α-tocotrienol (γ-TT) and δ-tocotrienol (δ-TT)] and 4 synthetic derivatives [γ- and δ-tocotrienol succinate (γ-TS, δ-TS), α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS), and α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol ether (TPGS-e)] of vitamin E to induce cell death in AR- (DU145 and PC-3) and AR+ (LNCaP) prostate cancer cell lines. Our results show that δ-TT and TPGS-e are the most effective isoform and synthetic derivative, respectively, of all compounds examined. Overall, the results of our study suggest that isoforms and synthetic derivatives of vitamin E have the potency to trigger both caspase-dependent and -independent DNA damage and dominant caspase-independent programmed cell death. The capacity of vitamin E to trigger caspase-independent programmed cell death suggests that it may be useful in the chemotherapy of prostate cancer since it may prevent the tumor resistance commonly associated with the use of classical chemotherapeutic agents that trigger caspase-dependent programmed cell death.

  19. The programmed death phenomena, aging, and the Samurai law of biology.

    PubMed

    Skulachev, V P

    2001-07-01

    Analysis of the programmed death phenomena from mitochondria (mitoptosis) to whole organisms (phenoptosis) clearly shows that suicide programs are inherent at various levels of organization of living systems. Such programs perform very important functions, purifying (i) cells from damaged (or unwanted for other reasons) organelles, (ii) tissues from unwanted cells, (iii) organisms from organs transiently appearing during ontogenesis, and (iv) communities of organisms from unwanted individuals. Defence against reactive oxygen species (ROS) is probably one of primary evolutionary functions of programmed death mechanisms. So far, it seems that ROS play a key role in the mito-, apo-, organo- and phenoptoses. Here a concept is described which tries to unite Weismann's concept of aging as an adaptive programmed death mechanism and the alternative point of view considering aging as an inevitable result of accumulation in an organism of occasional injuries. It is suggested that injury accumulation is monitored by special system sending a death signal to actuate a phenoptotic program when the number of injuries reaches some critical level. The system in question is organized in such a way that the lethal case appears to be a result of phenoptosis long before occasional injuries make the functioning of the organism impossible. This strategy is supposed to prevent the appearance of asocial monsters capable to ruining kin, community and entire population. These relationships are regarded as an example of the Samurai law of biology: 'It is better to die than to be wrong'. It is stressed that for humans these cruel regulations look like an atavism that should be overcome to prolong the human life span.

  20. Programmed cell death protein-1/programmed cell death ligand-1 pathway inhibition and predictive biomarkers: understanding transforming growth factor-beta role

    PubMed Central

    González-Cao, María; Viteri, Santiago; Karachaliou, Niki; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    A deeper understanding of the key role of the immune system in regulating tumor growth and progression has led to the development of a number of immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Immune checkpoint inhibitors target molecular pathways involved in immunosuppression, such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1)/programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) pathway, with the goal to enhance the host’s own immune anticancer response. In phase I–III trials, anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies have demonstrated to be effective treatment strategies by inducing significant durable tumor responses, with manageable toxicities, in patients with various malignancies, including those traditionally considered non-immunogenic, such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Identification of predictive biomarkers to select patients for immune therapies is currently being investigated to improve their therapeutic efficacy. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a pleiotropic cytokine with immunosuppressive effects on multiple cell types of the innate and adaptive immune system, has emerged as one of the potential key factors modulating response to immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, due to the complexity of the anti-cancer immune response, the predictive value of many other factors related to cancer cells or tumor microenvironment needs to be further explored. PMID:26798582

  1. High fat programming of beta cell compensation, exhaustion, death and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2015-03-01

    Programming refers to events during critical developmental windows that shape progeny health outcomes. Fetal programming refers to the effects of intrauterine (in utero) events. Lactational programming refers to the effects of events during suckling (weaning). Developmental programming refers to the effects of events during both fetal and lactational life. Postnatal programming refers to the effects of events either from birth (lactational life) to adolescence or from weaning (end of lactation) to adolescence. Islets are most plastic during the early life course; hence programming during fetal and lactational life is most potent. High fat (HF) programming is the maintenance on a HF diet (HFD) during critical developmental life stages that alters progeny metabolism and physiology. HF programming induces variable diabetogenic phenotypes dependent on the timing and duration of the dietary insult. Maternal obesity reinforces HF programming effects in progeny. HF programming, through acute hyperglycemia, initiates beta cell compensation. However, HF programming eventually leads to chronic hyperglycemia that triggers beta cell exhaustion, death and dysfunction. In HF programming, beta cell dysfunction often co-presents with insulin resistance. Balanced, healthy nutrition during developmental windows is critical for preserving beta cell structure and function. Thus early positive nutritional interventions that coincide with the development of beta cells may reduce the overwhelming burden of diabetes and metabolic disease.

  2. Programmed cell death in Leishmania: biochemical evidence and role in parasite infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Debrabant, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Demonstration of features of a programmed cell death (PCD) pathway in protozoan parasites initiated a great deal of interest and debate in the field of molecular parasitology. Several of the markers typical of mammalian apoptosis have been shown in Leishmania which suggested the existence of an apoptosis like death in these organisms. However, studies to elucidate the downstream events associated with phosphotidyl serine exposure, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, and caspase-like activities in cells undergoing such cell death remain an ongoing challenge. Recent advances in genome sequencing, chemical biology should help to solve some of these challenges. Leishmania genetic mutants that lack putative regulators/effectors of PCD pathway should not only help to demonstrate the mechanisms of PCD but also provide tools to better understand the putative role for this pathway in population control and in the establishment of a successful infection of the host. PMID:22919685

  3. Ethylene signaling pathway and MAPK cascades are required for AAL toxin-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Mase, Keisuke; Mizuno, Takahito; Ishihama, Nobuaki; Fujii, Takayuki; Mori, Hitoshi; Kodama, Motoichiro; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2012-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD), known as hypersensitive response cell death, has an important role in plant defense response. The signaling pathway of PCD remains unknown. We employed AAL toxin and Nicotiana umbratica to analysis plant PCD. AAL toxin is a pathogenicity factor of the necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici. N. umbratica is sensitive to AAL toxin, susceptible to pathogens, and effective in Tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). VIGS analyses indicated that AAL toxin-triggered cell death (ACD) is dependent upon the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase MEK2, which is upstream of both salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) responsible for ethylene (ET) synthesis. ET treatment of MEK2-silenced N. umbratica re-established ACD. In SIPK- and WIPK-silenced N. umbratica, ACD was compromised and ET accumulation was not observed. However, in contrast to the case of MEK2-silenced plants, ET treatment did not induce cell death in SIPK- and WIPK-silenced plants. This work showed that ET-dependent pathway and MAP kinase cascades are required in ACD. Our results suggested that MEK2-SIPK/WIPK cascades have roles in ET biosynthesis; however, SIPK and WIPK have other roles in ET signaling or another pathway leading to cell death by AAL toxin.

  4. BGP-15 inhibits caspase-independent programmed cell death in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Gabor; Szarka, Andras; Lotz, Gabor; Doczi, Judit; Wunderlich, Livius; Kiss, Andras; Jemnitz, Katalin; Veres, Zsuzsa; Banhegyi, Gabor; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Suemegi, Balazs; Mandl, Jozsef

    2010-02-15

    It has been recently shown that acute acetaminophen toxicity results in endoplasmic reticulum redox stress and an increase in cells with apoptotic phenotype in liver. Since activation of effector caspases was absent, the relevance of caspase-independent mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death was investigated. BGP-15, a drug with known protective actions in conditions involving redox imbalance, has been co-administered with a single sublethal dose of acetaminophen. Proapoptotic events and outcome of the injury were investigated. ER redox alterations and early ER-stress-related signaling events induced by acetaminophen, such as ER glutathione depletion, phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and JNK and induction of the transcription factor GADD153, were not counteracted by co-treatment with BGP-15. However, BGP-15 prevented AIF mitochondria-to-nucleus translocation and mitochondrial depolarization. BGP-15 co-treatment attenuated the rate of acetaminophen-induced cell death as assessed by apoptotic index and enzyme serum release. These results reaffirm that acute acetaminophen toxicity involves oxidative stress-induced caspase-independent cell death. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of AIF translocation may effectively protect against or at least delay acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death.

  5. Targeting programmed cell death ligand 1 in osteosarcoma: an auto-commentary on therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jacson K; Cote, Gregory M; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1) expression was recently shown to correlate with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a subset of osteosarcoma patients. Among clinical factors evaluated across human osteosarcoma samples, a pulmonary origin of metastases correlated with high PDL1 expression and prominent TILs. Considering that multiple agents targeting PD-1/PDL1 are under development, targeting this immune checkpoint may be a novel immunotherapeutic route for osteosarcoma in future clinical trials.

  6. Holocrine Secretion of Sebum Is a Unique DNase2-Dependent Mode of Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Heinz; Fumicz, Judith; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Napirei, Markus; Buchberger, Maria; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2017-03-01

    Sebaceous glands produce sebum via holocrine secretion, a largely uncharacterized mode of programmed cell death that contributes to the homeostasis and barrier function of the skin. To determine the mechanism of DNA degradation during sebocyte cell death, we have inactivated candidate DNA-degrading enzymes by targeted gene deletions in mice. DNase1 and DNase1-like 2 were dispensable for nuclear DNA degradation in sebocytes. By contrast, epithelial cell-specific deletion of lysosomal DNase2 blocked DNA degradation in these cells. DNA breakdown during sebocyte differentiation coincided with the loss of LAMP1 and was accelerated by the abrogation of autophagy, the central cellular program of lysosome-dependent catabolism. Suppression of DNA degradation by the deletion of DNase2 resulted in aberrantly increased concentrations of residual DNA and decreased amounts of the DNA metabolite uric acid in secreted sebum. These results define holocrine secretion as a DNase2-mediated form of programmed cell death and suggest that autophagy-dependent metabolism, DNA degradation, and the molecular composition of sebum are mechanistically linked.

  7. Epidemiology of type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill; Dabelea, Dana

    2004-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes can be diagnosed at any age, but dinical course, genetic, and environmental determinants appear to be heterogenous by age. The common pathway begins with preclinical beta-cell autoimmunity with progressive defect of insulin secretion, followed by onset of hyperglycemia, transient usually partial remission, and finally complete insulinopenia associated with acute and chronic complications and premature death. Current research effort is focused on identification of the genetic and environmental determinants of this process and the ways they interact.

  8. Expression of programmed cell death 1 and programmed cell death ligand 1 in extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jae-Cheol; Kim, Misung; Choi, Yunsuk; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Ji Eun; Chae, Seoung Wan; Kim, Hawk; Cha, Hee Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) are new therapeutic targets in cancer immunotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of PD-1 and PD-L1 expression in extranodal natural killer/T‑cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL). We performed PD-1 and PD-L1 immunostaining in 79 ENKTL biopsy samples and retrospectively analyzed medical records of all 79 patients from four tertiary referral hospitals. The expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 by tumor cells and/or infiltrating immune cells was evaluated. The expression rates of PD-L1 in tumor cells and infiltrating immune cells were 79.7 and 78.5 %, respectively, whereas PD-1 in tumor cells and infiltrating immune cells were 1.3 and 11.4 %. The PD-L1 positivity in tumor cells and infiltrating immune cells was significantly associated with low international prognostic index (IPI) (P = 0.044 and 0.037, respectively). Patients with normal range of serum lactate dehydrogenase demonstrated a significantly higher PD-L1 positivity in tumor cells (P = 0.020). PD-L1-positive patients had a trend toward better overall survival compared with that in patients with PD-L1-negative in tumor cells and infiltrating immune cells (P = 0.498 and 0.435, respectively). The expression rate of PD-L1 was up to 79.7 % in ENKTL, while PD-1 expression rate was very low. This is the first report describing the clinicopathological features and survival outcome according to expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 in ENKTL.

  9. Increased level of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, programmed death receptor ligand 1/programmed death receptor 1, and soluble CD25 in Sokal high risk chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Christiansson, Lisa; Söderlund, Stina; Svensson, Emma; Mustjoki, Satu; Bengtsson, Mats; Simonsson, Bengt; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Loskog, Angelica S I

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy (eg interferon α) in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is currently in clinical trials for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Cancer patients commonly have problems with so called immune escape mechanisms that may hamper immunotherapy. Hence, to study the function of the immune system in CML is of interest. In the present paper we have identified immune escape mechanisms in CML with focus on those that directly hamper T cells since these cells are important to control tumor progression. CML patient samples were investigated for the presence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), expression of programmed death receptor ligand 1/programmed death receptor 1 (PD-L1/PD-1), arginase 1 and soluble CD25. MDSC levels were increased in samples from Sokal high risk patients (p<0.05) and the cells were present on both CD34 negative and CD34 positive cell populations. Furthermore, expression of the MDSC-associated molecule arginase 1, known to inhibit T cells, was increased in the patients (p = 0.0079). Myeloid cells upregulated PD-L1 (p<0.05) and the receptor PD-1 was present on T cells. However, PD-L1 blockade did not increase T cell proliferation but upregulated IL-2 secretion. Finally, soluble CD25 was increased in high risk patients (p<0.0001). In conclusion T cells in CML patients may be under the control of different immune escape mechanisms that could hamper the use of immunotherapy in these patients. These escape mechanisms should be monitored in trials to understand their importance and how to overcome the immune suppression.

  10. Injury Deaths Among U.S. Females: CDC Resources and Programs.

    PubMed

    Mack, Karin A; Peterson, Cora; Zhou, Chao; MacConvery, Elliane; Wilkins, Natalie

    2017-03-15

    Injury death rates are lower for women than for men at all ages, but we have a long way to go in understanding the circumstances of injury fatalities among females. This article presents resources that can be used to examine the most recent data on injury fatalities among females and highlights activities of CDC's Injury Center. The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control's (NCIPC's) Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System, an online surveillance database, can be used to examine injury deaths. We present examples that show the 2015 number of female fatal injuries by age group and injury cause and method, as well as a 2008-2014 county-level map of female fatal injury rates. In 2015, there were 68,572 injury fatalities of females of age ≥1 year, equivalent to 1 death every 7 minutes. Injuries were the leading cause of death for females of ages 1-41 years and the sixth-ranked cause of female death overall. Falls were the leading cause of injury death overall (and for women ≥70 years), unintentional poisonings were second, and motor vehicle traffic injuries were third. NCIPC funds national organizations, state health agencies, and other groups to develop, implement, and promote effective injury and violence prevention and control practices. Five key programs are discussed. Presenting data on injury fatalities is an essential element in identifying meaningful prevention efforts. Further investigation of the causes and impact of female injury fatalities can refine the public health approach to reduce this injury burden.

  11. Alaska's model program for surveillance and prevention of occupational injury deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, G A; Lincoln, J M; Husberg, B J; Manwaring, J C; Klatt, M L; Thomas, T K

    1999-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) established its Alaska Field Station in Anchorage in 1991 after identifying Alaska as the highest-risk state for traumatic worker fatalities. Since then, the Field Station, working in collaboration with other agencies, organizations, and individuals, has established a program for occupational injury surveillance in Alaska and formed interagency working groups to address the risk factors leading to occupational death and injury in the state. Collaborative efforts have contributed to reducing crash rates and mortality in Alaska's rapidly expanding helicopter logging industry and have played an important supportive role in the substantial progress made in reducing the mortality rate in Alaska's commercial fishing industry (historically Alaska's and America's most dangerous industry). Alaska experienced a 46% overall decline in work-related acute traumatic injury deaths from 1991 to 1998, a 64% decline in commercial fishing deaths, and a very sharp decline in helicopter logging-related deaths. Extending this regional approach to other parts of the country and applying these strategies to the entire spectrum of occupational injury and disease hazards could have a broad effect on reducing occupational injuries. PMID:10670623

  12. Increased Resistance of Complex I Mutants to Phytosphingosine-induced Programmed Cell Death*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ana; Lemos, Catarina; Falcão, Artur; Glass, N. Louise; Videira, Arnaldo

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the effects of phytosphingosine (PHS) on cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Highly reduced viability, impairment of asexual spore germination, DNA condensation and fragmentation, and production of reactive oxygen species were observed in conidia treated with the drug, suggesting that PHS induces an apoptosis-like death in this fungus. Interestingly, we found that complex I mutants are more resistant to PHS treatment than the wild type strain. This effect appears to be specific because it was not observed in mutants defective in other components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, pointing to a particular involvement of complex I in cell death. The response of the mutant strains to PHS correlated with their response to hydrogen peroxide. The fact that complex I mutants generate fewer reactive oxygen species than the wild type strain when exposed to PHS likely explains the PHS-resistant phenotype. As compared with the wild type strain, we also found that a strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding an AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor)-like protein is more resistant to PHS and H2O2. In contrast, a strain containing a deletion in a gene encoding an AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death)-like polypeptide is more sensitive to both drugs. These results indicate that N. crassa has the potential to be a model organism to investigate the molecular basis of programmed cell death in eukaryotic species. PMID:18474589

  13. Increased resistance of complex I mutants to phytosphingosine-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ana; Lemos, Catarina; Falcão, Artur; Glass, N Louise; Videira, Arnaldo

    2008-07-11

    We have studied the effects of phytosphingosine (PHS) on cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Highly reduced viability, impairment of asexual spore germination, DNA condensation and fragmentation, and production of reactive oxygen species were observed in conidia treated with the drug, suggesting that PHS induces an apoptosis-like death in this fungus. Interestingly, we found that complex I mutants are more resistant to PHS treatment than the wild type strain. This effect appears to be specific because it was not observed in mutants defective in other components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, pointing to a particular involvement of complex I in cell death. The response of the mutant strains to PHS correlated with their response to hydrogen peroxide. The fact that complex I mutants generate fewer reactive oxygen species than the wild type strain when exposed to PHS likely explains the PHS-resistant phenotype. As compared with the wild type strain, we also found that a strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding an AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor)-like protein is more resistant to PHS and H2O2. In contrast, a strain containing a deletion in a gene encoding an AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death)-like polypeptide is more sensitive to both drugs. These results indicate that N. crassa has the potential to be a model organism to investigate the molecular basis of programmed cell death in eukaryotic species.

  14. Photodynamic therapy-induced programmed cell death in carcinoma cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Yan; Sikes, Robert A.; Thomsen, Sharon L.; Chung, L.; Jacques, Steven L.

    1993-06-01

    The mode of cell death following photodynamic therapy (PDT) was investigated from the perspective of programmed cell death (apoptosis). Human prostate carcinoma cells (PC3), human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H322a), and rat mammary carcinoma (MTF7) were treated by PDT following sensitization with dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE). The response of these carcinoma cell lines to PDT was variable. An examination of extracted cellular DNA by gel electrophoresis showed the characteristic DNA ladder pattern indicative of internucleosomal cleavage of DNA during apoptosis. MTF7 and PC3 responded to PDT by inducing apoptosis while H322a had no apoptotic response. The magnitude of the response and the PDT dosage required to induce the effect were different in PC3 and MTF7. MTF7 cells responded with rapid apoptosis at the dose of light and drug that yielded 50% cell death (LD50). In contrast, PC3 showed only marginal apoptosis at the LD50 but had a marked response at the LD85. Furthermore, the onset of apoptosis followed slower kinetics in PC3 (2 hr - 4 hr) than in MTF7 (< 1 hr). H322a cells were killed by PDT but failed to exhibit any apoptotic response. This study indicates that apoptosis may occur during PDT induced cell death, but this pathway is not universal for all cancer cell lines.

  15. Infertility in the hyperplasic ovary of freshwater planarians: the role of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Harrath, Abdel Halim; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Mansour, Lamjed; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Sirotkin, Alexander V; Al Omar, Suliman Y; Arfah, Maha; Al Anazi, Mohamed S; Alhazza, Ibrahim M; Nyengaard, Jens R; Alwasel, Saleh

    2014-11-01

    Ex-fissiparous planarians produce infertile cocoons or, in very rare cases, cocoons with very low fertility. Here, we describe the features of programmed cell death (PCD) occurring in the hyperplasic ovary of the ex-fissiparous freshwater planarian Dugesia arabica that may explain this infertility. Based on TEM results, we demonstrate a novel extensive co-clustering of cytoplasmic organelles, such as lysosomes and microtubules, and their fusion with autophagosomes during the early stage of oocyte cell death occurring through an autophagic pattern. During a later stage of cell death, the generation of apoptotic vesicles in the cytoplasm can be observed. The immunohistochemical labeling supports the ultrastructural results because it has been shown that the proapoptotic protein bax was more highly expressed in the hyperplasic ovary than in the normal one, whereas the anti-apoptotic protein bcl2 was slightly more highly expressed in the normal ovary compared to the hyperplasic one. TUNEL analysis of the hyperplasic ovary confirmed that the nuclei of the majority of differentiating oocytes were TUNEL-positive, whereas the nuclei of oogonia and young oocytes were TUNEL-negative; in the normal ovary, oocytes are TUNEL-negative. Considering all of these data, we suggest that the cell death mechanism of differentiating oocytes in the hyperplasic ovary of freshwater planarians is one of the most important factors that cause ex-fissiparous planarian infertility. We propose that autophagy precedes apoptosis during oogenesis, whereas apoptotic features can be observed later.

  16. Control of adult neurogenesis by programmed cell death in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Hong, Caroline Jeeyeon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Sun, Woong; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-04-21

    The presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) and the production of new neurons in the adult brain have received great attention from scientists and the public because of implications to brain plasticity and their potential use for treating currently incurable brain diseases. Adult neurogenesis is controlled at multiple levels, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and programmed cell death (PCD). Among these, PCD is the last and most prominent process for regulating the final number of mature neurons integrated into neural circuits. PCD can be classified into apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death and emerging evidence suggests that all three may be important modes of cell death in neural stem/progenitor cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate PCD and thereby impact the intricate balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during adult neurogenesis are not well understood. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the extent, mechanism, and biological significance of PCD for the control of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the regulation of PCD at the molecular and systems levels is also discussed. Adult neurogenesis is a dynamic process, and the signals for differentiation, proliferation, and death of neural progenitor/stem cells are closely interrelated. A better understanding of how adult neurogenesis is influenced by PCD will help lead to important insights relevant to brain health and diseases.

  17. mazEF-mediated programmed cell death in bacteria: "what is this?".

    PubMed

    Ramisetty, Bhaskar Chandra Mohan; Natarajan, Bhargavi; Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini

    2015-02-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems consist of a bicistronic operon, encoding a toxin and an antitoxin. They are widely distributed in the prokaryotic kingdom, often in multiple numbers. TAs are implicated in contradicting phenomena of persistence and programmed cell death (PCD) in bacteria. mazEF TA system, one of the widely distributed type II toxin-antitoxin systems, is particularly implicated in PCD of Escherichia coli. Nutrient starvation, antibiotic stress, heat shock, DNA damage and other kinds of stresses are shown to elicit mazEF-mediated-PCD. ppGpp and extracellular death factor play a central role in regulating mazEF-mediated PCD. The activation of mazEF system is achieved through inhibition of transcription or translation of mazEF loci. Upon activation, MazF cleaves RNA in a ribosome-independent fashion and subsequent processes result in cell death. It is hypothesized that PCD aids in perseverance of the population during stress; the surviving minority of the cells can scavenge the nutrients released by the dead cells, a kind of "nutritional-altruism." Issues regarding the strains, reproducibility of experimental results and ecological plausibility necessitate speculation. We review the molecular mechanisms of the activation of mazEF TA system, the consequences leading to cell death and the pros and cons of the altruism hypothesis from an ecological perspective.

  18. Stress Management in Cyst-Forming Free-Living Protists: Programmed Cell Death and/or Encystment

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Iqbal, Junaid

    2015-01-01

    In the face of harsh conditions and given a choice, a cell may (i) undergo programmed cell death, (ii) transform into a cancer cell, or (iii) enclose itself into a cyst form. In metazoans, the available evidence suggests that cellular machinery exists only to execute or avoid programmed cell death, while the ability to form a cyst was either lost or never developed. For cyst-forming free-living protists, here we pose the question whether the ability to encyst was gained at the expense of the programmed cell death or both functions coexist to counter unfavorable environmental conditions with mutually exclusive phenotypes. PMID:25648302

  19. Effect of Ca2+ on programmed death of guard and epidermal cells of pea leaves.

    PubMed

    Kiselevsky, D B; Kuznetsova, Yu E; Vasil'ev, L A; Lobysheva, N V; Zinovkin, R A; Nesov, A V; Shestak, A A; Samuilov, V D

    2010-05-01

    The effect of Ca2+ on programmed death of guard cells (GC) and epidermal cells (EC) determined from destruction of the cell nucleus was investigated in epidermis of pea leaves. Ca2+ at concentrations of 1-100 microM increased and at a concentration of 1 mM prevented the CN(-)-induced destruction of the nucleus in GC, disrupting the permeability barrier of GC plasma membrane for propidium iodide (PI). Ca2+ at concentrations of 0.1-1 mM enhanced drastically the number of EC nuclei stained by PI in epidermis treated with chitosan, an inducer of programmed cell death. The internucleosomal DNA fragmentation caused by CN(-) was suppressed by 2 mM Ca2+ on 6 h incubation, but fragmentation was stimulated on more prolonged treatment (16 h). Presumably, the disruption of the permeability barrier of plasma membrane for PI is not a sign of necrosis in plant cells. Quinacrine and diphenylene iodonium at 50 microM concentration prevented GC death induced by CN(-) or CN(-) + 0.1 mM Ca2+ but had no influence on respiration and photosynthetic O2 evolution in pea leaf slices. The generation of reactive oxygen species determined from 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence was promoted by Ca2+ in epidermal peels from pea leaves.

  20. Developmental programmed cell death during asymmetric microsporogenesis in holocentric species of Rhynchospora (Cyperaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Danilo M.; Marques, André; Andrade, Celia G.T.J.; Guyot, Romain; Chaluvadi, Srinivasa R.; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea; Houben, Andreas; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Vanzela, André L.L.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Cyperaceae family exhibit an asymmetric microsporogenesis that results in the degeneration of three out of four meiotic products. Efforts have been made previously to describe the resulting structure, named the pseudomonad, but mechanisms concerning the establishment of cell domains, nuclear development, and programmed cell death are largely unknown. Using the Rhynchospora genus as a model, evidence for cell asymmetry, cytoplasmic isolation, and programmed cell death was obtained by a combination of electron microscopic, cytochemical, immunocytochemical, in situ hybridization, and flow cytometric methods. Degenerative cells were identified at the abaxial region, with the cytoskeleton marking their delimitation from the functional domain after meiosis. After attempting to initiate cell division with an unreplicated genome and abnormal spindle assembly, these cells exhibited a gradual process of cytoplasmic contraction associated with hypermethylation of cytosines and differential loss of DNA. These results indicate that the asymmetric tetrad establishes a functional cell, where one nucleus is preferentially selected to survive. Degenerative haploid cells are then eliminated in a multistep process associated with mitotic disorder, non-random elimination of repetitive DNA, vacuolar cell death, and DNA fragmentation. PMID:27492982

  1. Cyclic programmed cell death stimulates hormone signaling and root development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Wei; Band, Leah R; Kumpf, Robert P; Van Damme, Daniël; Parizot, Boris; De Rop, Gieljan; Opdenacker, Davy; Möller, Barbara K; Skorzinski, Noemi; Njo, Maria F; De Rybel, Bert; Audenaert, Dominique; Nowack, Moritz K; Vanneste, Steffen; Beeckman, Tom

    2016-01-22

    The plant root cap, surrounding the very tip of the growing root, perceives and transmits environmental signals to the inner root tissues. In Arabidopsis thaliana, auxin released by the root cap contributes to the regular spacing of lateral organs along the primary root axis. Here, we show that the periodicity of lateral organ induction is driven by recurrent programmed cell death at the most distal edge of the root cap. We suggest that synchronous bursts of cell death in lateral root cap cells release pulses of auxin to surrounding root tissues, establishing the pattern for lateral root formation. The dynamics of root cap turnover may therefore coordinate primary root growth with root branching in order to optimize the uptake of water and nutrients from the soil.

  2. A comparison between nuclear dismantling during plant and animal programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Fernando; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2012-12-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a process of organized destruction of cells, essential for the development and maintenance of cellular homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Cells undergoing PCD begin a degenerative process in response to internal or external signals, whereby the nucleus becomes one of the targets. The process of nuclear dismantling includes events affecting the nuclear envelope, such as formation of lobes at the nuclear surface, selective proteolysis of nucleoporins and nuclear pore complex clustering. In addition, chromatin condensation increases in coordination with DNA fragmentation. These processes have been largely studied in animals, but remain poorly understood in plants. The overall process of cell death has different morphological and biochemical features in plants and animals. However, recent advances suggest that nuclear dismantling in plant cells progresses with morphological and biochemical characteristics similar to those in apoptotic animal cells. In this review, we summarize nuclear dismantling in plant PCD, focusing on the similarities and differences with their animal counterparts.

  3. Cross-talk of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in plant programed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiqin; Loake, Gary J.; Chu, Chengcai

    2013-01-01

    In plants, programed cell death (PCD) is an important mechanism to regulate multiple aspects of growth and development, as well as to remove damaged or infected cells during responses to environmental stresses and pathogen attacks. Under biotic and abiotic stresses, plant cells exhibit a rapid synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and a parallel accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Frequently, these responses trigger a PCD process leading to an intrinsic execution of plant cells. The accumulating evidence suggests that both NO and ROS play key roles in PCD. These redox active small molecules can trigger cell death either independently or synergistically. Here we summarize the recent progress on the cross-talk of NO and ROS signals in the hypersensitive response, leaf senescence, and other kinds of plant PCD caused by diverse cues. PMID:23967004

  4. Detection of programmed cell death in cells exposed to genotoxic agents using a caspase activation assay.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhu; Santra, Madhumita; Koty, Patrick P

    2014-01-01

    Many toxins that individuals are exposed to cause DNA damage. Cells that have sustained DNA damage may attempt to repair the damage prior to replication. However, if a cell has sustained serious damage it cannot repair, it will commit suicide through a genetically regulated programmed cell death (PCD) pathway. Crucial to the ultimate execution of PCD is a family of cysteine proteases called caspases. Activation of these enzymes occurs late enough in the PCD pathway that a cell can no longer avoid cell death, but still earlier than PCD-associated morphological changes or DNA fragmentation. This protocol details a method for using fluorochrome-conjugated caspase inhibitors for the detection of activated caspases in intact cells. The analysis and documentation is performed using fluorescence microscopy.

  5. Detection of programmed cell death in cells exposed to genotoxic agents using a caspase activation assay.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Michael E; Koty, Patrick P

    2005-01-01

    Many environmental toxins cause DNA damage. Cells that have sustained significant DNA damage must attempt to repair the damage prior to replication, in which aberrant base incorporation can result in an irreversible mutation. If a cell cannot repair the damage, however, it may commit suicide through a genetically regulated programmed cell death (PCD) pathway. Crucial to the ultimate execution of PCD is a family of cysteine proteases called caspases. Activation of these enzymes occurs late in the PCD pathway, when a cell can no longer avoid cell death, but earlier than other PCD markers, such as morphological changes or DNA fragmentation. This protocol details a method for using fluorochrome-conjugated caspase inhibitors for the detection of activated caspases in intact cells using fluorescent microscopy.

  6. Acetic acid induces a programmed cell death process in the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Ludovico, Paula; Sansonetty, Filipe; Silva, Manuel T; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2003-03-01

    Here we show that 320-800 mM acetic acid induces in Zygosaccharomyces bailii a programmed cell death (PCD) process that is inhibited by cycloheximide, is accompanied by structural and biochemical alterations typical of apoptosis, and occurs in cells with preserved mitochondrial and plasma membrane integrity (as revealed by rhodamine 123 (Rh123) and propidium iodide (PI) staining, respectively). Mitochondrial ultrastructural changes, namely decrease of the cristae number, formation of myelinic bodies and swelling were also seen. Exposure to acetic acid above 800 mM resulted in killing by necrosis. The occurrence of an acetic acid-induced active cell death process in Z. bailii reinforces the concept of a physiological role of the PCD in the normal yeast life cycle.

  7. Programmed cell death during development of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) seed coat.

    PubMed

    Lima, Nathália Bastos; Trindade, Fernanda Gomes; da Cunha, Maura; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir Amâncio; Topping, Jennifer; Lindsey, Keith; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales

    2015-04-01

    The seed coat develops primarily from maternal tissues and comprises multiple cell layers at maturity, providing a metabolically dynamic interface between the developing embryo and the environment during embryogenesis, dormancy and germination of seeds. Seed coat development involves dramatic cellular changes, and the aim of this research was to investigate the role of programmed cell death (PCD) events during the development of seed coats of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.]. We demonstrate that cells of the developing cowpea seed coats undergo a programme of autolytic cell death, detected as cellular morphological changes in nuclei, mitochondria, chloroplasts and vacuoles, DNA fragmentation and oligonucleosome accumulation in the cytoplasm, and loss of membrane viability. We show for the first time that classes 6 and 8 caspase-like enzymes are active during seed coat development, and that these activities may be compartmentalized by translocation between vacuoles and cytoplasm during PCD events.

  8. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis: an example of programmed cell death in the immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Target cells are programmed to die following interaction with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Within minutes of exposure to CTL the target cell's nuclear DNA is fragmented. Target cell lysis, as measured by /sup 51/Cr release, occurs about 60 minutes after induction of DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation results from the action of an endonuclease which cleaves DNA in the linker region between nucleosomes. The origin of this nuclease, whether transferred to the target by the CTL or endogenous to the target cell, has not been resolved. DNA fragmentation occurs only when appropriately sensitized CTL are used and is not merely the result of cell death because killing of target cells by extreme deviation from homeostasis, by interruption of energy production, or by lysis with antibody and complement does not induce DNA cleavage. When Triton X-100 is added to target cells which have interacted with CTL, the DNA fragments do not remain in association with the nucleus. This observation suggests that breakdown of overall nuclear structure is induced concomitantly with DNA fragmentation. Morphologically, disruption of nuclear structure and DNA fragmentation are observed as widespread chromatin condensation (apoptosis). Apoptosis is observed in metabolically active target cells and is not a consequence of cell death. A cell whose DNA is extensively fragmented is condemmed to die. Induction of oligonucleosome-sized DNA is also an early event in glucocorticoid-induced thymocyte death and death of T cells upon removal of growth factor. Several similarities exist between these systems and CTL-mediated cytolysis suggesting a final common biochemical pathway for all three types of cell death.

  9. Knockout of Arabidopsis ACCELERATED-CELL-DEATH11 encoding a sphingosine transfer protein causes activation of programmed cell death and defense

    PubMed Central

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Pike, Helen M.; Olszak, Brian; Skov, Søren; Ødum, Niels; Jørgensen, Lise Bolt; Brown, Rhoderick E.; Mundy, John

    2002-01-01

    We describe the lethal, recessive accelerated-cell-death11 Arabidopsis mutant (acd11). Cell death in acd11 exhibits characteristics of animal apoptosis monitored by flow cytometry, and acd11 constitutively expresses defense-related genes that accompany the hypersensitive response normally triggered by avirulent pathogens. Global transcriptional changes during programmed cell death (PCD) and defense activation in acd11 were monitored by cDNA microarray hybridization. The PCD and defense pathways activated in acd11 are salicylic acid (SA) dependent, but do not require intact jasmonic acid or ethylene signaling pathways. Light is required for PCD execution in acd11, as application of an SA-analog to SA-deficient acd11 induced death in the light, but not in the dark. Epistatic analysis showed that the SA-dependent pathways require two regulators of SA-mediated resistance responses, PAD4 and EDS1. Furthermore, acd11 PR1 gene expression, but not cell death, depends on the SA signal tranducer NPR1, suggesting that the npr1-1 mutation uncouples resistance responses and cell death in acd11. The acd11 phenotype is caused by deletion of the ACD11 gene encoding a protein homologous to a mammalian glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP). In contrast to GLTP, ACD11 accelerates the transfer of sphingosine, but not of glycosphingolipids, between membranes in vitro. PMID:11850411

  10. Cellular and Molecular Changes Associated with Onion Skin Formation Suggest Involvement of Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Galsurker, Ortal; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Daus, Avinoam; Fridman, Yael; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2017-01-01

    Skin formation of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulb involves scale desiccation accompanied by scale senescence, resulting in cell death and tissue browning. Understanding the mechanism of skin formation is essential to improving onion skin and bulb qualities. Although onion skin plays a crucial role in postharvest onion storage and shelf life, its formation is poorly understood. We investigated the mode of cell death in the outermost scales that are destined to form the onion skin. Surprisingly, fluorescein diacetate staining and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the outer scale desiccates from the inside out. This striking observation suggests that cell death in the outer scales, during skin formation, is an internal and organized process that does not derive only from air desiccation. DNA fragmentation, a known hallmark of programmed cell death (PCD), was revealed in the outer scales and gradually decreased toward the inner scales of the bulb. Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the outer scales which were absent from the inner scales. De novo transcriptome assembly for three different scales: 1st (outer), 5th (intermediate) and 8th (inner) fleshy scales identified 2,542 differentially expressed genes among them. GO enrichment for cluster analysis revealed increasing metabolic processes in the outer senescent scale related to defense response, PCD processes, carbohydrate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis, whereas increased metabolism and developmental growth processes were identified in the inner scales. High expression levels of PCD-related genes were identified in the outer scale compared to the inner ones, highlighting the involvement of PCD in outer-skin development. These findings suggest that a program to form the dry protective skin exists and functions only in the outer scales of onion. PMID:28119713

  11. Cellular and Molecular Changes Associated with Onion Skin Formation Suggest Involvement of Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Galsurker, Ortal; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Daus, Avinoam; Fridman, Yael; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Skin formation of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulb involves scale desiccation accompanied by scale senescence, resulting in cell death and tissue browning. Understanding the mechanism of skin formation is essential to improving onion skin and bulb qualities. Although onion skin plays a crucial role in postharvest onion storage and shelf life, its formation is poorly understood. We investigated the mode of cell death in the outermost scales that are destined to form the onion skin. Surprisingly, fluorescein diacetate staining and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the outer scale desiccates from the inside out. This striking observation suggests that cell death in the outer scales, during skin formation, is an internal and organized process that does not derive only from air desiccation. DNA fragmentation, a known hallmark of programmed cell death (PCD), was revealed in the outer scales and gradually decreased toward the inner scales of the bulb. Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the outer scales which were absent from the inner scales. De novo transcriptome assembly for three different scales: 1st (outer), 5th (intermediate) and 8th (inner) fleshy scales identified 2,542 differentially expressed genes among them. GO enrichment for cluster analysis revealed increasing metabolic processes in the outer senescent scale related to defense response, PCD processes, carbohydrate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis, whereas increased metabolism and developmental growth processes were identified in the inner scales. High expression levels of PCD-related genes were identified in the outer scale compared to the inner ones, highlighting the involvement of PCD in outer-skin development. These findings suggest that a program to form the dry protective skin exists and functions only in the outer scales of onion.

  12. FK506 augments activation-induced programmed cell death of T lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Migita, K; Eguchi, K; Kawabe, Y; Tsukada, T; Mizokami, A; Nagataki, S

    1995-01-01

    FK506 is an immunosuppressive drug that inhibits T cell receptor-mediated signal transduction. This drug can induce immunological tolerance in allograft recipients. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of FK506 on T cell receptor-mediated apoptosis induction. Injection of anti-CD3 antibody (Ab) in mice resulted in the elimination of CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes by DNA fragmentation. FK506 treatment significantly augmented thymic apoptosis induced by in vivo anti-CD3 Ab administration. Increased thymic apoptosis resulted in the disappearance of CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes after anti-CD3 Ab/FK506 treatment. DNA fragmentation triggered by FK506 was induced exclusively in antigen-stimulated T cells, since enhanced DNA fragmentation induced by in vivo staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) injection was confirmed in SEB-reactive V beta 8+ thymocytes but not in SEB-nonreactive V beta 6+ thymocytes. In addition to thymocytes, mature peripheral T cells also die by activation-induced programmed cell death. A similar effect of FK506 on activation-induced programmed cell death was observed in SEB-activated peripheral spleen T cells. In contrast, cyclosporin A treatment did not enhance activation-induced programmed cell death of thymocytes and peripheral T cells. Apoptosis is required for the generation and maintenance of self-tolerance in the immune system. Our findings suggest that FK506-triggered apoptosis after elimination of antigen-activated T cells may represent a potential mechanism of the immunological tolerance achieved by FK506 treatment. Images PMID:7543492

  13. Nivolumab as Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) Inhibitor for Targeted Immunotherapy in Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liting; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Baoan

    2017-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapy has become the most promising approach for tumor patients. Programmed death-1 (PD-1), an inhibitory receptor expressed on activated T cells, can reverse immune suppression and release T cell activation. Nivolumab, a fully human immunoglobulin G4 PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody, blocks PD-1 and promotes antitumor immunity, and it is effective for treating non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), melanoma, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other cancers. The present review summarizes the efficacy and current status of clinical trials of nivolumab and that enabled nivolumab to be investigated in patients. PMID:28261342

  14. Sulfated lentinan induced mitochondrial dysfunction leads to programmed cell death of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Yaofeng; Shen, Lili; Qian, Yumei; Yang, Jinguang; Wang, Fenglong

    2017-04-01

    Sulphated lentinan (sLTN) is known to act as a resistance inducer by causing programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is largely unknown. Using tobacco BY-2 cell model, morphological and biochemical studies revealed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to sLNT induced PCD. Cell viability, and HO/PI fluorescence imaging and TUNEL assays confirmed a typical cell death process caused by sLNT. Acetylsalicylic acid (an ROS scavenger), diphenylene iodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases) and protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (a protonophore and an uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation) inhibited sLNT-induced H2O2 generation and cell death, suggesting that ROS generation linked, at least partly, to a mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-like activation. This conclusion was further confirmed by double-stained cells with the mitochondria-specific marker MitoTracker RedCMXRos and the ROS probe H2DCFDA. Moreover, the sLNT-induced PCD of BY-2 cells required cellular metabolism as up-regulation of the AOX family gene transcripts and induction of the SA biosynthesis, the TCA cycle, and miETC related genes were observed. It is concluded that mitochondria play an essential role in the signaling pathway of sLNT-induced ROS generation, which possibly provided new insight into the sLNT-mediated antiviral response, including PCD.

  15. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep.

    PubMed

    Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  16. Identification of a novel cell death-inducing domain reveals that fungal amyloid-controlled programmed cell death is related to necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Daskalov, Asen; Habenstein, Birgit; Sabaté, Raimon; Berbon, Mélanie; Martinez, Denis; Chaignepain, Stéphane; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Hofmann, Kay; Loquet, Antoine; Saupe, Sven J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings have revealed the role of prion-like mechanisms in the control of host defense and programmed cell death cascades. In fungi, HET-S, a cell death-inducing protein containing a HeLo pore-forming domain, is activated through amyloid templating by a Nod-like receptor (NLR). Here we characterize the HELLP protein behaving analogously to HET-S and bearing a new type of N-terminal cell death-inducing domain termed HeLo-like (HELL) and a C-terminal regulatory amyloid motif known as PP. The gene encoding HELLP is part of a three-gene cluster also encoding a lipase (SBP) and a Nod-like receptor, both of which display the PP motif. The PP motif is similar to the RHIM amyloid motif directing formation of the RIP1/RIP3 necrosome in humans. The C-terminal region of HELLP, HELLP(215-278), encompassing the motif, allows prion propagation and assembles into amyloid fibrils, as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction and FTIR analyses. Solid-state NMR studies reveal a well-ordered local structure of the amyloid core residues and a primary sequence that is almost entirely arranged in a rigid conformation, and confirm a β-sheet structure in an assigned stretch of three amino acids. HELLP is activated by amyloid templating and displays membrane-targeting and cell death-inducing activity. HELLP targets the SBP lipase to the membrane, suggesting a synergy between HELLP and SBP in membrane dismantling. Remarkably, the HeLo-like domain of HELLP is homologous to the pore-forming domain of MLKL, the cell death-execution protein in necroptosis, revealing a transkingdom evolutionary relationship between amyloid-controlled fungal programmed cell death and mammalian necroptosis. PMID:26903619

  17. Identification of a novel cell death-inducing domain reveals that fungal amyloid-controlled programmed cell death is related to necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Daskalov, Asen; Habenstein, Birgit; Sabaté, Raimon; Berbon, Mélanie; Martinez, Denis; Chaignepain, Stéphane; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Hofmann, Kay; Loquet, Antoine; Saupe, Sven J

    2016-03-08

    Recent findings have revealed the role of prion-like mechanisms in the control of host defense and programmed cell death cascades. In fungi, HET-S, a cell death-inducing protein containing a HeLo pore-forming domain, is activated through amyloid templating by a Nod-like receptor (NLR). Here we characterize the HELLP protein behaving analogously to HET-S and bearing a new type of N-terminal cell death-inducing domain termed HeLo-like (HELL) and a C-terminal regulatory amyloid motif known as PP. The gene encoding HELLP is part of a three-gene cluster also encoding a lipase (SBP) and a Nod-like receptor, both of which display the PP motif. The PP motif is similar to the RHIM amyloid motif directing formation of the RIP1/RIP3 necrosome in humans. The C-terminal region of HELLP, HELLP(215-278), encompassing the motif, allows prion propagation and assembles into amyloid fibrils, as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction and FTIR analyses. Solid-state NMR studies reveal a well-ordered local structure of the amyloid core residues and a primary sequence that is almost entirely arranged in a rigid conformation, and confirm a β-sheet structure in an assigned stretch of three amino acids. HELLP is activated by amyloid templating and displays membrane-targeting and cell death-inducing activity. HELLP targets the SBP lipase to the membrane, suggesting a synergy between HELLP and SBP in membrane dismantling. Remarkably, the HeLo-like domain of HELLP is homologous to the pore-forming domain of MLKL, the cell death-execution protein in necroptosis, revealing a transkingdom evolutionary relationship between amyloid-controlled fungal programmed cell death and mammalian necroptosis.

  18. Possible involvement of programmed cell death pathways in the neuroprotective action of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Bastianetto, S; Krantic, S; Chabot, J-G; Quirion, R

    2011-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of senile plaques composed of extra-cellular aggregates of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. It is well established that at least in vitro, Aβ triggers apoptotic cell death via the activation of caspase-dependent and -independent cell death effectors, namely caspase-3 and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), respectively. Epidemiological studies have reported that elderly people have a lower risk (up to 50%) of developing dementia if they regularly eat fruits and vegetables and drink tea and red wine (in moderation). Numerous studies indicate that polyphenols derived from these foods and beverages account for the observed neuroprotective effects. In particular, we have reported that polyphenols extracted from green tea (i.e. epigallocatechin gallate or EGCG) and red wine (i.e. resveratrol) block Aβ-induced hippocampal cell death, by at least partially inhibiting Aβ fibrillisation. It has been shown that polyphenols may also modulate caspase-dependent and -independent programmed cell death (PCD) pathways. Indeed, polyphenols including resveratrol, EGCG and luteolin significantly inhibit the activation of the key apoptotic executioner, caspase-3 and are able to modulate mitogen-activated protein kinases known to play an important role in neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, it has been reported that polyphenols may exert their anti-apoptotic action by inhibiting AIF release from mitochondria, thus providing new mechanism of action for polyphenols. This review aims to update the current knowledge regarding the differential effects of polyphenols on PCD pathways and discuss their putative neuroprotective action resulting from their capacity to modulate these pathways.

  19. Regulation of programmed cell death during neural induction in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Anna; Robinson, Neil; Streit, Andrea; Sheng, Guojun; Stern, Claudio D

    2011-01-01

    To study early responses to neural inducing signals from the organizer (Hensen's node), a differential screen was performed in primitive streak stage chick embryos, comparing cells that had or had not been exposed to a node graft for 5 hours. Three of the genes isolated have been implicated in Programmed Cell Death (PCD): Defender Against Cell Death (Dad1), Polyubiquitin II (UbII) and Ferritin Heavy chain (fth1). We therefore explored the potential involvement of PCD in neural induction. Dad1, UbII and fth1 are expressed in partly overlapping domains during early neural plate development, along with the pro-apoptotic gene Cas9 and the death effector Cas3. Dad1 and UbII are induced by a node graft within 3 hours. TUNEL staining revealed that PCD is initially random, but both during normal development and following neural induction by a grafted node, it becomes concentrated at the border of the forming neural plate and anterior non-neural ectoderm and downregulated from the neural plate itself. PCD was observed in regions of Caspase expression that are free from Dad1, consistent with the known anti-apoptotic role of Dad1. However, gain- and loss-of-function of any of these genes had no detectable effect on cell identity or on neural plate development. This study reveals that early development of the neural plate is accompanied by induction of putative pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in distinct domains. We suggest that the neural plate is protected against apoptosis, confining cell death to its border and adjacent non-neural ectoderm.

  20. Intrauterine infection induces programmed cell death in rabbit periventricular white matter.

    PubMed

    Debillon, T; Gras-Leguen, C; Vérielle, V; Winer, N; Caillon, J; Rozé, J C; Gressens, P

    2000-06-01

    An association between chorioamnionitis and periventricular leukomalacia has been reported in human preterm infants. However, whether this link is causal has not been convincingly established, and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The objective of this study was to establish a reproducible model of cerebral white matter disease in preterm rabbits after intrauterine infection. Escherichia coli was inoculated into both uterine horns of laparotomized pregnant rabbits when gestation was 80% complete. The fetuses were delivered by cesarean section and killed 12, 24, or 48 h after the inoculation. Programmed cell death in the white matter was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin-saffron staining and in situ fragmented DNA labeling (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling). In a first group of 14 pregnant rabbits not treated with antibiotics, all fetuses delivered 48 h after inoculation were stillborn, whereas fetuses extracted 12 or 24 h after inoculation were alive. No significant cell death was detected in the live fetuses compared with the control noninfected rabbits. In a second group of five pregnant rabbits treated with ceftriaxone initiated 24 h after the inoculation and continued until cesarean section was performed 48 h after inoculation, 13 fetuses were alive, but all showed evidence of extensive programmed cell death in the white matter by hematoxylin-eosin-saffron staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling. White matter damage became histologically detectable only 48 h after inoculation. Three of the 13 brains displayed periventricular white matter cysts mimicking human cystic periventricular leukomalacia. The high reproducibility of white matter damage in our model should permit further studies aimed at unraveling the molecular mechanisms of periventricular leukomalacia.

  1. Regulation of oogenesis in honey bee workers via programed cell death.

    PubMed

    Ronai, Isobel; Barton, Deborah A; Oldroyd, Benjamin P; Vergoz, Vanina

    2015-10-01

    Reproductive division of labour characterises eusociality. Currently little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the 'sterility' of the worker caste, but queen pheromone plays a major role in regulating the reproductive state. Here we investigate oogenesis in the young adult honey bee worker ovary in the presence of queen pheromone and in its absence. When queen pheromone is absent, workers can activate their ovaries and have well-developed follicles. When queen pheromone is present, even though workers have non-activated ovaries, they continually produce oocytes which are aborted at an early stage. Therefore, irrespective of the presence of the queen, the young adult worker ovary contains oocytes. By this means young workers retain reproductive plasticity. The degeneration of the germ cells in the ovarioles of workers in the presence of queen pheromone has the morphological hallmarks of programmed cell death. Therefore the mechanistic basis of 'worker sterility' relies in part on the regulation of oogenesis via programmed cell death. Our results suggest that honey bees have co-opted a highly conserved checkpoint at mid-oogenesis to regulate the fertility of the worker caste.

  2. Tuberculosis-Related Deaths within a Well-Functioning DOTS Control Program

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Maria de Lourdes; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; García-Sancho, Maria Cecilia; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Palacios-Martínez, Manuel; Fuentes, Javier; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Bobadilla, Miriam; Small, Peter; Sifuentes-Osornio, José

    2002-01-01

    To describe the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB)-related deaths in a well-managed program in a low-HIV area, we analyzed data from a cohort of 454 pulmonary TB patients recruited between March 1995 and October 2000 in southern Mexico. Patients who were sputum acid-fast bacillus smear positive underwent clinical and mycobacteriologic evaluation (isolation, identification, drug-susceptibility testing, and IS6110-based genotyping and spoligotyping) and received treatment from the local directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS) program. After an average of 2.3 years of follow-up, death was higher for clustered cases (28.6 vs. 7%, p=0.01). Cox analysis revealed that TB-related mortality hazard ratios included treatment default (8.9), multidrug resistance (5.7), recently transmitted TB (4.1), weight loss (3.9), and having less than 6 years of formal education (2). In this community, TB is associated with high mortality rates. PMID:12453365

  3. The programmed death-1 immune-suppressive pathway: barrier to antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Horn, Lucas A; Haile, Samuel T

    2014-10-15

    Programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1, also known as B7 homolog 1 or CD274) is a major obstacle to antitumor immunity because it tolerizes/anergizes tumor-reactive T cells by binding to its receptor programmed death-1 (CD279), renders tumor cells resistant to CD8(+) T cell- and FasL-mediated lysis, and tolerizes T cells by reverse signaling through T cell-expressed CD80. PD-L1 is abundant in the tumor microenvironment, where it is expressed by many malignant cells, as well as by immune cells and vascular endothelial cells. The critical role of PD-L1 in obstructing antitumor immunity has been demonstrated in multiple animal models and in recent clinical trials. This article reviews the mechanisms by which PD-L1 impairs antitumor immunity and discusses established and experimental strategies for maintaining T cell activation in the presence of PD-L1-expressing cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  4. Dealing with death: an audit of family bereavement programs in Australian intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Valks, Katrina; Mitchell, Marion Lucy; Inglis-Simons, Chris; Limpus, Anthony

    2005-11-01

    Patient death in Intensive Care Units (ICU) can be sudden and unexpected, leading to emotionally charged situations and life changing circumstances for family members. Supporting families during and after this critical period is particularly challenging for ICU nurses who often feel dissatisfied with the way they deal with the situation. Bereavement programs in various areas of nursing have been reported to be beneficial in promoting normal grief patterns. There is, however, a lack of research in the area of evaluation of bereavement programs in adult ICUs. This paper presents the results of an Australia-wide audit on current practices in the area of bereavement programs within adult ICUs. Surveys were sent to 117 adult Australian ICUs; 99 surveys were returned completed (84.6% response rate). It was identified that most surveyed units offer minimal components of bereavement programs, such as viewing of the deceased and communicating with family members. Less than one third (n=26) provide additional follow-up services in the form of telephone calls and sympathy cards or referral to additional services. Ten units employ some form of program evaluation. Verbal feedback from staff and families is the primary assessment method. Over half of responding ICUs indicated they are considering or interested in providing a bereavement program in their unit. This study highlights the need for research-based data to support the introduction or deletion of strategies for bereavement programs using family-centred outcome measures. ICU nurses are interested in this area of clinical practice and require considerable support. It is recommended that this support can come via postgraduate and on-going education, hospital policies and procedures.

  5. In situ and in silico kinetic analyses of the Programmed Cell Death 1, Programmed Cell Death-Ligands, and B7-1 interaction network.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaitao; Cheng, Xiaoxiao; Tilevik, Andreas; Davis, Simon J; Zhu, Cheng

    2017-03-06

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is an inhibitory receptor with an essential role in maintaining peripheral tolerance, and among the most promising immunotherapeutic targets for treating cancer, autoimmunity, and infectious diseases. A complete understanding of the consequences of PD-1 engagement by its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, and of PD-L1 binding to B7-1, requires quantitative analysis of their interactions at the cell surface. We present here the first complete in situ kinetic analysis of the PD-1/PD-1 ligands/B7-1 system. Consistent with previous solution measurements, we observed higher in situ affinities for human (h) than murine (m) PD-1 interactions, stronger binding of hPD-1 to hPD-L2 than hPD-L1, and comparable binding of mPD-1 to both ligands. However, in contrast to the relatively weak solution affinities, the in situ affinities of PD-1 are as high as those of the TCR for agonist pMHC and of LFA-1 for ICAM-1, but significantly lower than that of the B7-1-CTLA-4 interaction, suggesting a distinct basis for PD-1 versus CTLA-4 mediated inhibition. Notably, the in situ interactions of PD-1 are much stronger than that of B7-1 with PD-L1. Overall, the in situ affinity ranking greatly depends on the on-rate instead of the off-rate. In silico simulations predict that PD-1-PD-L1 interactions dominate at interfaces between activated T cells and mature dendritic cells, and that these interactions will be highly sensitive to the dynamics of PD-L1 and PD-L2 expression. Our results provide a kinetic framework for better understanding inhibitory PD-1 activity in health and disease.

  6. Apocynin attenuates cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death by suppressing NF-κB-mediated cell death process in differentiated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da Hee; Nam, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Chung Soo

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol oxidation products are suggested to be involved in neuronal degeneration. Apocynin has demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. We assessed the effect of apocynin on the cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death in neuronal cells using differentiated PC12 cells in relation to NF-κB-mediated cell death process. 7-Ketocholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the levels of Bid and Bcl-2, increased the levels of Bax and p53, and induced loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, release of cytochrome c and activation of caspases (-8, -9 and -3). 7-Ketocholesterol caused an increase in the levels of cytosolic and nuclear NF-κB p65, cytosolic NF-κB p50 and cytosolic phospho-IκB-α, which was inhibited by the addition of 0.5 μM Bay11-7085 (an inhibitor of NF-κB activation). Apocynin attenuated the cholesterol oxidation product-induced changes in the programmed cell death-related protein levels, NF-κB activation, production of reactive oxygen species, and depletion of GSH. The results show that apocynin appears to attenuate the cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death in PC12 cells by suppressing the activation of the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways that are mediated by NF-κB activation. The preventive effect appears to be associated with the inhibitory effect on the production of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH.

  7. Involvement of Programmed Cell Death in Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bin; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Jia; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-11-01

    The widespread application of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) or NP-based products has increased the risk of exposure to NPs in humans. The brain is an important organ that is more susceptible to exogenous stimuli. Moreover, any impairment to the brain is irreversible. Recently, several in vivo studies have found that metallic NPs can be absorbed into the animal body and then translocated into the brain, mainly through the blood-brain barrier and olfactory pathway after systemic administration. Furthermore, metallic NPs can cross the placental barrier to accumulate in the fetal brain, causing developmental neurotoxicity on exposure during pregnancy. Therefore, metallic NPs become a big threat to the brain. However, the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs remain unclear. Programmed cell death (PCD), which is different from necrosis, is defined as active cell death and is regulated by certain genes. PCD can be mainly classified into apoptosis, autophagy, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. It is involved in brain development, neurodegenerative disorders, psychiatric disorders, and brain injury. Given the pivotal role of PCD in neurological functions, we reviewed relevant articles and tried to summarize the recent advances and future perspectives of PCD involvement in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, with the purpose of comprehensively understanding the neurotoxic mechanisms of NPs.

  8. The bacterial cell cycle checkpoint protein Obg and its role in programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Dewachter, Liselot; Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of programmed cell death (PCD), in which cells initiate their own demise, is not restricted to multicellular organisms. Unicellular organisms, both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, also possess pathways that mediate PCD. We recently identified a PCD mechanism in Escherichia coli that is triggered by a mutant isoform of the essential GTPase ObgE (Obg of E. coli). Importantly, the PCD pathway mediated by mutant Obg (Obg*) differs fundamentally from other previously described bacterial PCD pathways and thus constitutes a new mode of PCD. ObgE was previously proposed to act as a cell cycle checkpoint protein able to halt cell division. The implication of ObgE in the regulation of PCD further increases the similarity between this protein and eukaryotic cell cycle regulators that are capable of doing both. Moreover, since Obg is conserved in eukaryotes, the elucidation of this cell death mechanism might contribute to the understanding of PCD in higher organisms. Additionally, if Obg*-mediated PCD is conserved among different bacterial species, it will be a prime target for the development of innovative antibacterials that artificially induce this pathway.

  9. Role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) in programmed nuclear death during conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Programmed nuclear death (PND), which is also referred to as nuclear apoptosis, is a remarkable process that occurs in ciliates during sexual reproduction (conjugation). In Tetrahymena thermophila, when the new macronucleus differentiates, the parental macronucleus is selectively eliminated from the cytoplasm of the progeny, concomitant with apoptotic nuclear events. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not well understood. The parental macronucleus is engulfed by a large autophagosome, which contains numerous mitochondria that have lost their membrane potential. In animals, mitochondrial depolarization precedes apoptotic cell death, which involves DNA fragmentation and subsequent nuclear degradation. Results We focused on the role of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) during PND in Tetrahymena. The disruption of AIF delays the normal progression of PND, specifically, nuclear condensation and kilobase-size DNA fragmentation. AIF is localized in Tetrahymena mitochondria and is released into the macronucleus prior to nuclear condensation. In addition, AIF associates and co-operates with the mitochondrial DNase to facilitate the degradation of kilobase-size DNA, which is followed by oligonucleosome-size DNA laddering. Conclusions Our results suggest that Tetrahymena AIF plays an important role in the degradation of DNA at an early stage of PND, which supports the notion that the mitochondrion-initiated apoptotic DNA degradation pathway is widely conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:20146827

  10. Reactive oxygen species do not contribute to ObgE*-mediated programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Dewachter, Liselot; Herpels, Pauline; Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in bacteria is considered an important target for developing novel antimicrobials. Development of PCD-specific therapies requires a deeper understanding of what drives this process. We recently discovered a new mode of PCD in Escherichia coli that is triggered by expression of a mutant isoform of the essential ObgE protein, ObgE*. Our previous findings demonstrate that ObgE*-mediated cell death shares key characteristics with apoptosis in eukaryotic cells. It is well-known that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed during PCD in eukaryotes and play a pivotal role as signaling molecules in the progression of apoptosis. Therefore, we explored a possible role for ROS in bacterial killing by ObgE*. Using fluorescent probes and genetic reporters, we found that expression of ObgE* induces formation of ROS. Neutralizing ROS by chemical scavenging or by overproduction of ROS-neutralizing enzymes did not influence toxicity of ObgE*. Moreover, expression of ObgE* under anaerobic conditions proved to be as detrimental to bacterial viability as expression under aerobic conditions. In conclusion, ROS are byproducts of ObgE* expression that do not play a role in the execution or progression of ObgE*-mediated PCD. Targeted therapies should therefore look to exploit other aspects of ObgE*-mediated PCD. PMID:27641546

  11. A tomato metacaspase gene is upregulated during programmed cell death in Botrytis cinerea-infected leaves.

    PubMed

    Hoeberichts, Frank A; ten Have, Arjen; Woltering, Ernst J

    2003-07-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in plant cells is often accompanied by biochemical and morphological hallmarks similar to those of animal apoptosis. However, orthologs of animal caspases, cysteinyl aspartate-specific proteases that constitute the core component of animal apoptosis, have not yet been identified in plants. Recent studies have revealed the presence of a family of genes encoding proteins with distant homology to mammalian caspases, designated metacaspases, in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Here, we describe the isolation of LeMCA1, a type-II metacaspase cDNA clone from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). BLAST analysis demonstrated that the LeMCA1 gene is located in close vicinity of several genes that have been linked with PCD. Southern analysis indicated the existence of at least one more metacaspase in the tomato genome. LeMCA1 mRNA levels rapidly increased upon infection of tomato leaves with Botrytis cinerea, a fungal pathogen that induces cell death in several plant species. LeMCA1 was not upregulated during chemical-induced PCD in suspension-cultured tomato cells.

  12. Acetic acid-induced programmed cell death and release of volatile organic compounds in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhaojiang; Zhu, Yerong; Bai, Yanling; Wang, Yong

    2012-02-01

    Acetic acid widely spreads in atmosphere, aquatic ecosystems containing residues and anoxic soil. It can inhibit aquatic plant germination and growth, and even cause programmed cell death (PCD) of yeast. In the present study, biochemical and physiological responses of the model unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were examined after acetic acid stress. H(2)O(2) burst was found in C. reinhardtii after acetic acid stress at pH 5.0 for 10 min. The photosynthetic pigments were degraded, gross photosynthesis and respiration were disappeared gradually, and DNA fragmentation was also detected. Those results indicated that C. reinhardtii cells underwent a PCD but not a necrotic, accidental cell death event. It was noticed that C. reinhardtii cells in PCD released abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) upon acetic acid stress. Therefore, we analyzed the VOCs and tested their effects on other normal cells. The treatment of C. reinhardtii cultures with VOCs reduced the cell density and increased antioxidant enzyme activity. Therefore, a function of VOCs as infochemicals involved in cell-to-cell communication at the conditions of applied stress is suggested.

  13. Nuclear transfer with apoptotic bovine fibroblasts: can programmed cell death be reprogrammed?

    PubMed

    Miranda, Moyses dos Santos; Bressan, Fabiana Fernandes; De Bem, Tiago Henrique Camara; Merighe, Giovana Krempel Fonseca; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio; King, William Alan; Meirelles, Flavio Viera

    2012-06-01

    Cell death by apoptosis is considered to be irreversible. However, reports have indicated that its reversibility is possible if the cells have not yet reached the "point of no return." In order to add new information about this topic, we used cells at different moments of apoptotic process as nuclear donors in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in order to test if programmed cell death can be reversed. Adult bovine fibroblasts were treated with 10 μM of staurosporine (STP) for 3 h and analyzed for phosphatidylserine externalization (Annexin assay) and presence of active caspase-9. Annexin-positive (Anx+) and Caspase-9-positive (Casp-9+) cells were isolated by FACS and immediately transferred into enucleated in vitro matured bovine oocytes. After STP treatment, 89.9% of cells were Anx+ (4.6% in control cells; p<0.01) and 24.9% were Casp-9+ (2.4% in control cells; p<0.01). Fusion and cleavage were not affected by the use apoptotic cells (p>0.05). Also, the use of Anx+ cells did not affect blastocyst production compared to control (26.4% vs. 22.9%, respectively; p>0.05). However, blastocyst formation was affected by the use of Casp-9+ cells (12.3%; p<0.05). These findings contribute to the idea of that apoptosis is reversible only at early stages. Additionally, we hypothesize that the "point of no return" for apoptosis may be located around activation of Caspase-9.

  14. Nivolumab, anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) monoclonal antibody immunotherapy: Role in advanced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Arun; Kim, Chul; Heery, Christopher R; Guha, Udayan; Gulley, James L

    2016-09-01

    The development of immune checkpoint inhibitors has altered the landscape of treatment of advanced cancers. These drugs are well tolerated and have shown clinical activity against a wide variety of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. The durability of response is particularly impressive when compared to other forms of systemic therapy. Nivolumab (Opdivo) is an IgG4 antibody that causes immune checkpoint blockade by diminishing inhibitory signaling through the programmed death receptor-1 pathway. It is approved for treatment of recurrent non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma. Efforts to identify biomarkers of response to nivolumab are ongoing. Clinical trials are also being conducted to determine the benefits of combining nivolumab with other forms of treatment including chemotherapy, molecular-targeted therapy, radiation therapy, and other forms of immune therapy. This review outlines the clinical trials that have led to the emergence of nivolumab as a treatment option for patients with advanced cancers.

  15. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death induced in Zea mays L. by allelochemical stress.

    PubMed

    Ciniglia, Claudia; Mastrobuoni, Francesco; Scortichini, Marco; Petriccione, Milena

    2015-05-01

    The allelochemical stress on Zea mays was analyzed by using walnut husk washing waters (WHWW), a by-product of Juglans regia post-harvest process, which possesses strong allelopathic potential and phytotoxic effects. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death were induced by WHWW in roots of maize seedlings. Treatment induced ROS burst, with excess of H2O2 content. Enzymatic activities of catalase were strongly increased during the first hours of exposure. The excess in malonildialdehyde following exposure to WHWW confirmed that oxidative stress severely damaged maize roots. Membrane alteration caused a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity along with DNA damage as confirmed by DNA laddering. The DNA instability was also assessed through sequence-related amplified polymorphism assay, thus suggesting the danger of walnut processing by-product and focusing the attention on the necessity of an efficient treatment of WHWW.

  16. Role of peroxynitrite in programmed cell death induced in self-incompatible pollen.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Irene; Romero-Puertas, María C; Rodríguez Serrano, María; Sandalio, Luisa M; Olmedilla, Adela

    2012-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species and NO are involved in the signaling pathway of programmed cell death (PCD). Information concerning the role of these molecules in self-incompatible pollination is scarce especially in non-model species studied in vivo. We recently reported that in the olive tree, compatible and self-incompatible pollen have different levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and that PCD is induced in self-incompatible pollen. Levels of O 2 (.-) and NO are higher in pollen after self-incompatible pollination than after compatible pollination. The presence of these reactive species was concomitant with the presence of peroxynitrite. Similar results were obtained on pollen-germination experiments both in vivo and in vitro. These data, together with observations made after treating pollinated flowers with scavengers, suggest that peroxynitrite plays a role in PCD induced after self-incompatible pollination and we propose here a model to describe the way in which it might work.

  17. Discovery of peptide inhibitors targeting human programmed death 1 (PD-1) receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Jiankun; He, Zenghui; Wang, Xia; Meng, Jiajia; Zhao, Zhenjiang; Zhu, Lili; Liu, Xiaofeng; Li, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    Blocking the interaction of human programmed death 1 (hPD-1) and its ligand hPD-L1 has been a promising immunotherapy in cancer treatment. In this paper, using a computational de novo peptide design method, we designed several hPD-1 binding peptides. The most potent peptide Ar5Y_4 showed a KD value of 1.38 ± 0.39 μM, comparable to the binding affinity of the cognate hPD-L1. A Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) competitive binding assay result indicated that Ar5Y_4 could inhibit the interaction of hPD-1/hPD-L1. Moreover, Ar5Y_4 could restore the function of Jurkat T cells which had been suppressed by stimulated HCT116 cells. Peptides described in this paper provide promising biologic candidates for cancer immunotherapy or diagnostics. PMID:27533458

  18. Early events induced by the toxin deoxynivalenol lead to programmed cell death in Nicotiana tabacum cells.

    PubMed

    Yekkour, Amine; Tran, Daniel; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Briand, Joël; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Errakhi, Rafik; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Bouteau, François

    2015-09-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin affecting animals and plants. This toxin synthesized by Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum is currently believed to play a decisive role in the fungal phytopathogenesis as a virulence factor. Using cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum BY2, we showed that DON-induced programmed cell death (PCD) could require transcription and translation processes, in contrast to what was observed in animal cells. DON could induce different cross-linked pathways involving (i) reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation linked, at least partly, to a mitochondrial dysfunction and a transcriptional down-regulation of the alternative oxidase (Aox1) gene and (ii) regulation of ion channel activities participating in cell shrinkage, to achieve PCD.

  19. Virus-host arms race at the joint origin of multicellularity and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Iranzo, Jaime; Lobkovsky, Alexander E; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-01-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes and most prokaryotes possess distinct mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD). How an "altruistic" trait, such as PCD, could evolve in unicellular organisms? To address this question, we developed a mathematical model of the virus-host co-evolution that involves interaction between immunity, PCD and cellular aggregation. Analysis of the parameter space of this model shows that under high virus load and imperfect immunity, joint evolution of cell aggregation and PCD is the optimal evolutionary strategy. Given the abundance of viruses in diverse habitats and the wide spread of PCD in most organisms, these findings imply that multiple instances of the emergence of multicellularity and its essential attribute, PCD, could have been driven, at least in part, by the virus-host arms race.

  20. Over-expression of mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 suppresses programmed cell death in rice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yaocheng; Wang, Hongjuan; Zou, Yu; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Yanqi; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-03

    In this study, we identified and functionally characterized the mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mtHsp70). Over-expression of mtHsp70 suppressed heat- and H(2)O(2)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in rice protoplasts, as reflected by higher cell viability, decreased DNA laddering and chromatin condensation. Mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) after heat shock was destroyed gradually in protoplasts, but mtHsp70 over-expression showed higher Δψ(m) relative to the vector control cells, and partially inhibited cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol. Heat treatment also significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a phenomenon not observed in protoplasts over-expressing mtHsp70. Together, these results suggest that mtHsp70 may suppress PCD in rice protoplasts by maintaining mitochondrial Δψ(m) and inhibiting the amplification of ROS.

  1. Programmed death-1 immune checkpoint blockade in the treatment of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tsirigotis, Panagiotis; Savani, Bipin N; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-09-01

    The use of tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) has revolutionize the field of cancer immunotherapy. Although treatment of malignant diseases with MAbs is promising, many patients fail to respond or relapse after an initial response. Both solid tumors and hematological malignancies develop mechanisms that enable them to evade the host immune system by usurping immune checkpoint pathways such as PD-1, PD-2, PDL-1, or PDL-2 (programmed cell death protein-1 or 2 and PD-Ligand 1 or 2), which are expressed on activated T cells and on T-regulatory, B cells, natural killers, monocytes, and dendritic cells. One of the most exciting anticancer development in recent years has been the immune checkpoint blockade therapy by using MAbs against immune checkpoint receptor and/or ligands. Anti-PD1 antibodies have been tested in clinical studies that included patients with hematological malignancies and showed remarkable efficacy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). In our review, we will focus on the effect of PD-1 activation on hematological malignancies and its role as a therapeutic target. Key messages The programmed death 1 (PD1) immune checkpoint is an important homeostatic mechanism of the immune system that helps in preventing autoimmunity and uncontrolled inflammation in cases of chronic infections. However, PD1 pathway is also operated by a wide variety of malignancies and represents one of the most important mechanisms by which tumor cells escape from the surveillance of the immune system. Blocking of immune checkpoints by the use of monoclonal antibodies opened a new era in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Results from clinical trials are promising, and currently, this approach has been proven effective and safe in patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies.

  2. Role of class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase during programmed nuclear death of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Akematsu, Takahiko; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Attiq, Rizwan; Pearlman, Ronald E

    2014-02-01

    Programmed nuclear death (PND) in the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila is a novel type of autophagy that occurs during conjugation, in which only the parental somatic macronucleus is destined to die and is then eliminated from the progeny cytoplasm. Other coexisting nuclei, however, such as new micro- and macronuclei are unaffected. PND starts with condensation in the nucleus followed by apoptotic DNA fragmentation, lysosomal acidification, and final resorption. Because of the peculiarity in the process and the absence of some ATG genes in this organism, the mechanism of PND has remained unclear. In this study, we focus on the role of class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K, corresponding to yeast Vps34) in order to identify central regulators of PND. We identified the sole Tetrahymena thermophila ortholog (TtVPS34) to yeast Vps34 and human PIK3C3 (the catalytic subunit of PtdIns3K), through phylogenetic analysis, and generated the gene knockdown mutant for functional analysis. Loss of TtVPS34 activity prevents autophagosome formation on the parental macronucleus, and this nucleus escapes from the lysosomal pathway. In turn, DNA fragmentation and final resorption of the nucleus are drastically impaired. These phenotypes are similar to the situation in the ATG8Δ mutants of Tetrahymena, implying an inextricable link between TtVPS34 and TtATG8s in controlling PND as well as general macroautophagy. On the other hand, TtVPS34 does not appear responsible for the nuclear condensation and does not affect the progeny nuclear development. These results demonstrate that TtVPS34 is critically involved in the nuclear degradation events of PND in autophagosome formation rather than with an involvement in commitment to the death program.

  3. Programmed necrosis - a new mechanism of steroidogenic luteal cell death and elimination during luteolysis in cows

    PubMed Central

    Hojo, Takuo; Siemieniuch, Marta J.; Lukasik, Karolina; Piotrowska-Tomala, Katarzyna K.; Jonczyk, Agnieszka W.; Okuda, Kiyoshi; Skarzynski, Dariusz J.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed necrosis (necroptosis) is an alternative form of programmed cell death that is regulated by receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIPK) 1 and 3-dependent, but is a caspase (CASP)-independent pathway. In the present study, to determine if necroptosis participates in bovine structural luteolysis, we investigated RIPK1 and RIPK3 expression throughout the estrous cycle, during prostaglandin F2α (PGF)-induced luteolysis in the bovine corpus luteum (CL), and in cultured luteal steroidogenic cells (LSCs) after treatment with selected luteolytic factors. In addition, effects of a RIPK1 inhibitor (necrostatin-1, Nec-1; 50 μM) on cell viability, progesterone secretion, apoptosis related factors and RIPKs expression, were evaluated. Expression of RIPK1 and RIPK3 increased in the CL tissue during both spontaneous and PGF-induced luteolysis (P < 0.05). In cultured LSCs, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF; 2.3 nM) in combination with interferon γ (IFNG; 2.5 nM) up-regulated RIPK1 mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.05). TNF + IFNG also up-regulated RIPK3 mRNA expression (P < 0.05), but not RIPK3 protein. Although Nec-1 prevented TNF + IFNG-induced cell death (P < 0.05), it did not affect CASP3 and CASP8 expression. Nec-1 decreased both RIPK1 and RIPK3 protein expression (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that RIPKs-dependent necroptosis is a potent mechanism responsible for bovine structural luteolysis induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27901113

  4. Programmed death ligand 1 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma: Relationship With clinical and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Julien; Rousseau, Benoît; Amaddeo, Giuliana; Mercey, Marion; Charpy, Cécile; Costentin, Charlotte; Luciani, Alain; Zafrani, Elie-Serge; Laurent, Alexis; Azoulay, Daniel; Lafdil, Fouad; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2016-12-01

    The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains poor, with only one third of patients eligible for curative treatments and very limited survival benefits with the use of sorafenib, the current standard of care for advanced disease. Recently, agents targeting the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1)/programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint were shown to display impressive antitumor activity in various solid or hematological malignancies, including HCC. PD-L1 immunohistochemical expression is thought to represent a biomarker predictive of drug sensitivity. Here, we investigated PD-L1 expression in a series of 217 HCCs and correlated our results with clinical and histological features and immunohistochemical markers (PD-1, cytokeratin 19, glutamine synthetase, and β-catenin expression). PD-L1 expression by neoplastic cells was significantly associated with common markers of tumor aggressiveness (high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels, P = 0.038; satellite nodules, P < 0.001; macrovascular invasion, P < 0.001; microvascular invasion, P < 0.001; poor differentiation, P < 0.001) and with the progenitor subtype of HCC (cytokeratin 19 expression, P = 0.031). High PD-L1 expression by inflammatory cells from the tumor microenvironment also correlated with high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels (P < 0.001), macrovascular invasion (P = 0.001), poor differentiation (P = 0.001), high PD-1 expression (P < 0.001), and the so-called lymphoepithelioma-like histological subtype of HCC (P = 0.003).

  5. Comprehensive profiling of metaplastic breast carcinomas reveals frequent overexpression of programmed death-ligand 1

    PubMed Central

    Joneja, Upasana; Vranic, Semir; Swensen, Jeffrey; Feldman, Rebecca; Chen, Wangjuh; Kimbrough, Jeffrey; Xiao, Nianqing; Reddy, Sandeep; Palazzo, Juan; Gatalica, Zoran

    2017-01-01

    Aims Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare subtype of breast carcinoma less responsive to conventional chemotherapy than ductal carcinoma. In molecular terms, MBCs usually cluster with triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs), but have a worse prognosis than TNBCs. Studies investigating MBCs for specific biomarkers of therapy response are rare and limited by the methodological approaches. The aim of the present study was to characterise MBCs on a molecular level and test programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) biomarker expression in MBCs for future therapeutic interventions. Methods We profiled 297 samples (MBC (n=75), TNBC (n=106), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancers (n=32) and hormone-positive breast cancers (n=84)) by next-generation sequencing. Immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) expression was performed using automated procedures. Results The most commonly mutated genes in MBCs included TP53 (56%) and PIK3CA (23%). Pathogenic mutations in other genes, including HRAS, FBXW7, PTEN, AKT1 and SMAD4, were rare. PD-L1 expression was detected in a significantly higher proportion of MBCs (46%) than in other subtypes (6% each in hormone-positive and HER2-positive breast cancers, and 9% in TNBC, not otherwise specified, p<0.001). PD-1-positive tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) varied greatly in MBCs. Conclusions Comprehensive profiling of a large cohort of this rare subtype of breast carcinoma highlighted the predominance of TP53 mutation and increased PD-L1 expression in carcinoma cells. These results can be exploited in clinical trials using immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27531819

  6. Untangling the Roles of Anti-Apoptosis in Regulating Programmed Cell Death using Humanized Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Caitlin; Portt, Liam; Khoury, Chamel; Sheibani, Sara; Eid, Rawan; Greenwood, Matthew; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Genetically programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms, including apoptosis, are important for the survival of metazoans since it allows, among things, the removal of damaged cells that interfere with normal function. Cell death due to PCD is observed in normal processes such as aging and in a number of pathophysiologies including hypoxia (common causes of heart attacks and strokes) and subsequent tissue reperfusion. Conversely, the loss of normal apoptotic responses is associated with the development of tumors. So far, limited success in preventing unwanted PCD has been reported with current therapeutic approaches despite the fact that inhibitors of key apoptotic inducers such as caspases have been developed. Alternative approaches have focused on mimicking anti-apoptotic processes observed in cells displaying increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Hormesis and pre-conditioning are commonly observed cellular strategies where sub-lethal levels of pro-apoptotic stimuli lead to increased resistance to higher or lethal levels of stress. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic sequences is a common mechanism mediating these protective effects. The relevance of the latter observation is exemplified by the observation that transgenic mice overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes show significant reductions in tissue damage following ischemia. Thus strategies aimed at increasing the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, using gene therapy or cell penetrating recombinant proteins are being evaluated as novel therapeutics to decrease cell death following acute periods of cell death inducing stress. In spite of its functional and therapeutic importance, more is known regarding the processes involved in apoptosis than anti-apoptosis. The genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has emerged as an exceptional model to study multiple aspects of PCD including the mitochondrial mediated apoptosis observed in metazoans. To increase our knowledge of the process of anti

  7. Untangling the Roles of Anti-Apoptosis in Regulating Programmed Cell Death using Humanized Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Caitlin; Portt, Liam; Khoury, Chamel; Sheibani, Sara; Eid, Rawan; Greenwood, Matthew; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A.; Greenwood, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms, including apoptosis, are important for the survival of metazoans since it allows, among things, the removal of damaged cells that interfere with normal function. Cell death due to PCD is observed in normal processes such as aging and in a number of pathophysiologies including hypoxia (common causes of heart attacks and strokes) and subsequent tissue reperfusion. Conversely, the loss of normal apoptotic responses is associated with the development of tumors. So far, limited success in preventing unwanted PCD has been reported with current therapeutic approaches despite the fact that inhibitors of key apoptotic inducers such as caspases have been developed. Alternative approaches have focused on mimicking anti-apoptotic processes observed in cells displaying increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Hormesis and pre-conditioning are commonly observed cellular strategies where sub-lethal levels of pro-apoptotic stimuli lead to increased resistance to higher or lethal levels of stress. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic sequences is a common mechanism mediating these protective effects. The relevance of the latter observation is exemplified by the observation that transgenic mice overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes show significant reductions in tissue damage following ischemia. Thus strategies aimed at increasing the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, using gene therapy or cell penetrating recombinant proteins are being evaluated as novel therapeutics to decrease cell death following acute periods of cell death inducing stress. In spite of its functional and therapeutic importance, more is known regarding the processes involved in apoptosis than anti-apoptosis. The genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has emerged as an exceptional model to study multiple aspects of PCD including the mitochondrial mediated apoptosis observed in metazoans. To increase our knowledge of the process of anti

  8. Exploring diabetes type 1-related stigma

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, Samereh; Abazari, Parvaneh; Mardanian, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Background: Empowerment of people with diabetes means integrating diabetes with identity. However, others’ stigmatization can influence it. Although diabetes is so prevalent among Iranians, there is little knowledge about diabetes-related stigma in Iran. The present study explored diabetes-related stigma in people living with type 1 diabetes in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: A conventional content analysis was used with in-depth interview with 26 people with and without diabetes from November 2011 to July 2012. Results: A person with type 1 diabetes was stigmatized as a miserable human (always sick and unable, death reminder, and intolerable burden), rejected marriage candidate (busy spouse, high-risk pregnant), and deprived of a normal life [prisoner of (to must), deprived of pleasure]. Although, young adults with diabetes undergo all aspects of the social diabetes-related stigma; in their opinion they were just deprived of a normal life Conclusion: It seems that in Isfahan, diabetes-related stigma is of great importance. In this way, conducting an appropriate intervention is necessary to improve the empowerment process in people with type 1 diabetes in order to reduce the stigma in the context. PMID:23983731

  9. Type-1.5 superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Moshchalkov, Victor; Menghini, Mariela; Nishio, T; Chen, Q H; Silhanek, A V; Dao, V H; Chibotaru, L F; Zhigadlo, N D; Karpinski, J

    2009-03-20

    We demonstrate the existence of a novel superconducting state in high quality two-component MgB2 single crystalline superconductors where a unique combination of both type-1 (lambda{1}/xi{1}<1/sqrt[2]) and type-2 (lambda{2}/xi{2}>1/sqrt[2]) superconductor conditions is realized for the two components of the order parameter. This condition leads to a vortex-vortex interaction attractive at long distances and repulsive at short distances, which stabilizes unconventional stripe- and gossamerlike vortex patterns that we have visualized in this type-1.5 superconductor using Bitter decoration and also reproduced in numerical simulations.

  10. From AIDS to parasite infection: pathogen-mediated subversion of programmed cell death as a mechanism for immune dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Ameisen, J C; Estaquier, J; Idziorek, T

    1994-12-01

    Premature cell death can result either from cell injury or degeneration, leading to necrosis, or from the activation of a physiological cell-suicide process, termed programmed cell death or apoptosis, that is regulated by intercellular signalling. This process plays an essential role in the selection of developing lymphocytes, and is also involved in the function of the mature adaptative immune system. A growing number of experimental findings during the last 4 years has provided support to our hypothesis that inappropriate HIV-mediated dysregulation of programmed T-cell death is relevant to AIDS pathogenesis. A series of recent experimental results also supports the general concept that the persistence and pathogenesis of several infectious pathogens, ranging from retroviruses to parasites, may be related to their capacity to dysregulate programmed cell death in various cell populations including lymphocytes. Subversion by pathogens of the physiological control of programmed cell death provides a paradigm for the pathogenesis of a wide range of infectious diseases that involve immune dysregulation and suggests therapeutic potential for the in vivo modulation of cell signalling.

  11. Direct regulation of egl-1 and of programmed cell death by the Hox protein MAB-5 and by CEH-20, a C. elegans homolog of Pbx1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huarui; Strauss, Tamara J; Potts, Malia B; Cameron, Scott

    2006-02-01

    Hox genes are crucial determinants of cell fates and of body morphology of animals; mutations affecting these genes result in abnormal patterns of programmed cell death. How Hox genes regulate programmed cell death is an important and poorly understood aspect of normal development. In the nematode C. elegans, the Hox gene mab-5 is required for the programmed cell deaths of two lineally related cells generated in the P11 and P12 lineages. We show here that in the P11 lineage, a complex between MAB-5 and the Pbx homolog CEH-20 directly regulates transcription of the BH3 domain gene egl-1 to initiate programmed cell death; in the P12 lineage, mab-5 and ceh-20 apparently act indirectly to initiate programmed cell death. Direct regulation of programmed cell death may be an evolutionarily ancient and conserved function of Hox genes.

  12. ROS-mediated abiotic stress-induced programmed cell death in plants

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Veselin; Hille, Jacques; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Gechev, Tsanko S.

    2015-01-01

    During the course of their ontogenesis plants are continuously exposed to a large variety of abiotic stress factors which can damage tissues and jeopardize the survival of the organism unless properly countered. While animals can simply escape and thus evade stressors, plants as sessile organisms have developed complex strategies to withstand them. When the intensity of a detrimental factor is high, one of the defense programs employed by plants is the induction of programmed cell death (PCD). This is an active, genetically controlled process which is initiated to isolate and remove damaged tissues thereby ensuring the survival of the organism. The mechanism of PCD induction usually includes an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are utilized as mediators of the stress signal. Abiotic stress-induced PCD is not only a process of fundamental biological importance, but also of considerable interest to agricultural practice as it has the potential to significantly influence crop yield. Therefore, numerous scientific enterprises have focused on elucidating the mechanisms leading to and controlling PCD in response to adverse conditions in plants. This knowledge may help develop novel strategies to obtain more resilient crop varieties with improved tolerance and enhanced productivity. The aim of the present review is to summarize the recent advances in research on ROS-induced PCD related to abiotic stress and the role of the organelles in the process. PMID:25741354

  13. Live to die another way: modes of programmed cell death and the signals emanating from dying cells.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Yaron; Steller, Hermann

    2015-06-01

    All life ends in death, but perhaps one of life's grander ironies is that it also depends on death. Cell-intrinsic suicide pathways, termed programmed cell death (PCD), are crucial for animal development, tissue homeostasis and pathogenesis. Originally, PCD was almost synonymous with apoptosis; recently, however, alternative mechanisms of PCD have been reported. Here, we provide an overview of several distinct PCD mechanisms, namely apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis. In addition, we discuss the complex signals that emanate from dying cells, which can either trigger regeneration or instruct additional killing. Further advances in understanding the physiological roles of the various mechanisms of cell death and their associated signals will be important to selectively manipulate PCD for therapeutic purposes.

  14. Live to die another way: modes of programmed cell death and the signals emanating from dying cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Yaron; Steller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Preface All life ends in death, but perhaps one of life’s grander ironies is that it also depends on death. Cell-intrinsic suicide pathways, termed programmed cell death (PCD), are crucial for animal development, tissue homeostasis and pathogenesis. Originally, PCD was virtually synonymous with apoptosis, but recently, alternative PCD mechanisms have been reported. Here, we provide an overview of several distinct PCD mechanisms, namely apoptosis, autophagy and necroptosis. In addition, we discuss the complex signals emanating from dying cells, which can either fuel regeneration or instruct additional killing. Further advances in understanding the physiological role of multiple cell death mechanisms and associated signals will be important to selectively manipulate PCD for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25991373

  15. Ethylene signaling in salt stress- and salicylic acid-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Poór, Péter; Kovács, Judit; Szopkó, Dóra; Tari, Irma

    2013-02-01

    Salt stress- and salicylic acid (SA)-induced cell death can be activated by various signaling pathways including ethylene (ET) signaling in intact tomato plants. In tomato suspension cultures, a treatment with 250 mM NaCl increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and ET. The 10(-3) M SA-induced cell death was also accompanied by ROS and NO production, but ET emanation, the most characteristic difference between the two cell death programs, did not change. ET synthesis was enhanced by addition of ET precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, which, after 2 h, increased the ROS production in the case of both stressors and accelerated cell death under salt stress. However, it did not change the viability and NO levels in SA-treated samples. The effect of ET induced by salt stress could be blocked with silver thiosulfate (STS), an inhibitor of ET action. STS reduced the death of cells which is in accordance with the decrease in ROS production of cells exposed to high salinity. Unexpectedly, application of STS together with SA resulted in increasing ROS and reduced NO accumulation which led to a faster cell death. NaCl- and SA-induced cell death was blocked by Ca(2+) chelator EGTA and calmodulin inhibitor W-7, or with the inhibitors of ROS. The inhibitor of MAPKs, PD98059, and the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 reduced cell death in both cases. These results show that NaCl induces cell death mainly by ET-induced ROS production, but ROS generated by SA was not controlled by ET in tomato cell suspension.

  16. AtPDCD5 Plays a Role in Programmed Cell Death after UV-B Exposure in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Falcone Ferreyra, María Lorena; D’Andrea, Lucio; AbdElgawad, Hamada

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage responses have evolved to sense and react to DNA damage; the induction of DNA repair mechanisms can lead to genomic restoration or, if the damaged DNA cannot be adequately repaired, to the execution of a cell death program. In this work, we investigated the role of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein, AtPDCD5, which is highly similar to the human PDCD5 protein; it is induced by ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation and participates in programmed cell death in the UV-B DNA damage response. Transgenic plants expressing AtPDCD5 fused to GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN indicate that AtPDCD5 is localized both in the nucleus and the cytosol. By use of pdcd5 mutants, we here demonstrate that these plants have an altered antioxidant metabolism and accumulate higher levels of DNA damage after UV-B exposure, similar to levels in ham1ham2 RNA interference transgenic lines with decreased expression of acetyltransferases from the MYST family. By coimmunoprecipitation and pull-down assays, we provide evidence that AtPDCD5 interacts with HAM proteins, suggesting that both proteins participate in the same pathway of DNA damage responses. Plants overexpressing AtPDCD5 show less DNA damage but more cell death in root tips upon UV-B exposure. Finally, we here show that AtPDCD5 also participates in age-induced programmed cell death. Together, the data presented here demonstrate that AtPDCD5 plays an important role during DNA damage responses induced by UV-B radiation in Arabidopsis and also participates in programmed cell death programs. PMID:26884483

  17. Involvement of TatD nuclease during programmed cell death in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Debrabant, Alain

    2012-03-01

    In this report, we describe the involvement of TatD nuclease during programmed cell death (PCD) in the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. T. brucei TatD nuclease showed intrinsic DNase activity, was localized in the cytoplasm and translocated to the nucleus when cells were treated with inducers previously demonstrated to cause PCD in T. brucei. Overexpression of TatD nuclease resulted in elevated PCD and conversely, loss of TatD expression by RNAi conferred significant resistance to the induction of PCD in T. brucei. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that TatD nuclease interacts with endonucleaseG suggesting that these two nucleases could form a DNA degradation complex in the nucleus. Together, biochemical activity, RNAi and subcellular localization results demonstrate the role of TatD nuclease activity in DNA degradation during PCD in these evolutionarily ancient eukaryotic organisms. Further, in conjunction with endonucleaseG, TatD may represent a critical nuclease in a caspase-independent PCD pathway in trypanosomatid parasites since caspases have not been identified in these organisms.

  18. Intracellular energy depletion triggers programmed cell death during petal senescence in tulip

    PubMed Central

    Azad, A. K.; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, H.

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in petals provides a model system to study the molecular aspects of organ senescence. In this study, the very early triggering signal for PCD during the senescence process from young green buds to 14-d-old petals of Tulipa gesneriana was determined. The opening and closing movement of petals of intact plants increased for the first 3 d and then gradually decreased. DNA degradation and cytochrome c (Cyt c) release were clearly observed in 6-d-old flowers. Oxidative stress or ethylene production can be excluded as the early signal for petal PCD. In contrast, ATP was dramatically depleted after the first day of flower opening. Sucrose supplementation to cut flowers maintained their ATP levels and the movement ability for a longer time than in those kept in water. The onset of DNA degradation, Cyt c release, and petal senescence was also delayed by sucrose supplementation to cut flowers. These results suggest that intracellular energy depletion, rather than oxidative stress or ethylene production, may be the very early signal to trigger PCD in tulip petals. PMID:18515833

  19. Programmed cell death in the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium mediates carbon and nitrogen export

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Zeev, Edo; Avishay, Itamar; Bidle, Kay D; Berman-Frank, Ilana

    2013-01-01

    The extent of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) export to the deep ocean depends upon the efficacy of the biological pump that transports primary production to depth, thereby preventing its recycling in the upper photic zone. The dinitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) Trichodesmium spp. contributes significantly to oceanic C and N cycling by forming extensive blooms in nutrient-poor tropical and subtropical regions. These massive blooms generally collapse several days after forming, but the cellular mechanism responsible, along with the magnitude of associated C and N export processes, are as yet unknown. Here, we used a custom-made, 2-m high water column to simulate a natural bloom and to specifically test and quantify whether the programmed cell death (PCD) of Trichodesmium mechanistically regulates increased vertical flux of C and N. Our findings demonstrate that extremely rapid development and abrupt, PCD-induced demise (within 2–3 days) of Trichodesmium blooms lead to greatly elevated excretions of transparent exopolymers and a massive downward pulse of particulate organic matter. Our results mechanistically link autocatalytic PCD and bloom collapse to quantitative C and N export fluxes, suggesting that PCD may have an impact on the biological pump efficiency in the oceans. PMID:23887173

  20. In Vitro Brucella suis Infection Prevents the Programmed Cell Death of Human Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Antoine; Terraza, Annie; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Liautard, Jean-Pierre; Dornand, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    During the complex interaction between an infectious agent and a host organism, the pathogen can interfere with the host cell's programmed death to its own benefit. Induction or prevention of host cell apoptosis appears to be a critical step for determining the infection outcome. Members of the gram-negative bacterial genus Brucella are intracellular pathogens which preferentially invade monocytic cells and develop within these cells. We investigated the effect of Brucella suis infection on apoptosis of human monocytic phagocytes. The present study provides evidence that Brucella infection inhibited spontaneously occurring apoptosis in human monocytes. Prevention of monocyte apoptosis was not mediated by Brucella lipopolysaccharide and required bacterial survival within infected cells. Both invaded and noninvaded cells were protected, indicating that soluble mediators released during infection were involved in the phenomenon. Analysis of Brucella-infected monocytes revealed specific overexpression of the A1 gene, a member of the bcl-2 family implicated in the survival of hematopoietic cells. Brucella infection also rendered macrophage-like cells resistant to Fas ligand- or gamma interferon-induced apoptosis, suggesting that Brucella infection protected host cells from several cytotoxic processes occurring at different steps of the immune response. The present data clearly show that Brucella suis modulated the monocyte/macrophage's apoptotic response to the advantage of the pathogen, thus preventing host cell elimination. This might represent a strategy for Brucella development in infected hosts. PMID:10603407

  1. Amoebicidal activity of caffeine and maslinic acid by the induction of Programmed Cell Death in Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Martín-Navarro, Carmen M; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; Reyes-Battle, María; Fouque, Emilie; Osuna, Antonio; Valladares, Basilio; Piñero, José E; Héchard, Yann; Maciver, Sutherland K; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2017-03-20

    Free living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba are the causal agents of a sight threatening ulceration of the cornea called Acanthamoeba keratitis, and the rare but usually fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. Although there are many therapeutic options for the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections, they are generally lengthy and/or have limited efficacy. For the best clinical outcome, the treatments should target both the trophozoite and the cyst stages as the later are known to confer resistance to treatment. In this study we document the activity of caffeine and maslinic acid against both the trophozoite and the cyst stages of three clinical strains of Acanthamoeba These drugs were chosen because they are reported to inhibit glycogen phosphorylase which is required for encystation. Maslinic acid is also reported to be an inhibitor of extracellular proteases which may be relevant since the protease activity of Acanthamoeba is correlated with their pathogenicity. We also provide evidence or the first time that both drugs exert their anti-amoebal effects through programmed cell death.

  2. A novel ligand of calcitonin receptor reveals a potential new sensor that modulates programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Furness, SGB; Hare, DL; Kourakis, A; Turnley, AM; Wookey, PJ

    2016-01-01

    We have discovered that the accumulation of an anti-calcitonin receptor (anti-CTR) antibody conjugated to a fluorophore (mAb2C4:AF568) provides a robust signal for cells undergoing apoptotic programmed cell death (PCD). PCD is an absolute requirement for normal development of metazoan organisms. PCD is a hallmark of common diseases such as cardiovascular disease and tissue rejection in graft versus host pathologies, and chemotherapeutics work by increasing PCD. This robust signal or high fluorescent events were verified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry in several cell lines and a primary culture in which PCD had been induced. In Jurkat cells, GBM-L2 and MG63 cells, the percentage undergoing PCD that were positive for both mAb2C4:AF568 and annexin V ranged between 70 and >90%. In MG63 cells induced for the preapoptotic cell stress response (PACSR), the normal expression of α-tubulin, a key structural component of the cytoskeleton, and accumulation of mAb2C4:AF568 were mutually exclusive. Our data support a model in which CTR is upregulated during PACSR and recycles to the plasma membrane with apoptosis. In cells committed to apoptosis (α-tubulin negative), there is accumulation of the CTR-ligand mAb2C4:AF568 generating a high fluorescent event. The reagent mAb2C4:AF568 effectively identifies a novel event linked to apoptosis. PMID:27777788

  3. Relationship between programmed cell death-1 polymorphisms and clearance of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Ülger, Y; Bayram, S; Sandıkçı, M Ü; Akgöllü, E; Bekar, A

    2015-06-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) plays a critical role in regulating T-cell function during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study investigated the relationship between the polymorphisms of PD-1 gene and the susceptibility to HBV infection. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in PD-1 gene at positions +7146 G>A (guanine to adenine substitution) and +7209 C>T (cytosine to thymine substitution) were analysed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method in 220 subjects with chronic hepatitis B infection and 165 spontaneous clearance of HBV subjects. However, no statistically significant differences were found in the genotype distributions of the PD-1 +7146 G>A and PD-1 +7209 C>T polymorphisms among chronic hepatitis B and spontaneous clearance subjects. According to stratified analyses, borderline significance was observed between PD-1 +7146 GA genotype and risk of HBV chronicity in the subgroup of male gender (OR = 1.88, 95% 0.95-3.71; P = 0.07). Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the PD-1 +7146 G>A and PD-1 +7209 C>T polymorphisms have not been any major role in genetic susceptibility to chronicity of HBV infection, at least in the population studied here. Independent studies are needed to validate our findings in a larger series, as well as in patients of different ethnic origins.

  4. Fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus with anti-programmed cell death-1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masahide; Okamoto, Mitsuhiro; Gotoh, Koro; Masaki, Takayuki; Ozeki, Yoshinori; Ando, Hisae; Anai, Manabu; Sato, Asami; Yoshida, Yuichi; Ueda, So; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2016-11-01

    Anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) antibodies are regarded as a risk factor for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus as a side-effect. While a small number of cases have been reported, evidence remains limited. This is the first report of an Asian patient developing insulin-dependent diabetes during anti-PD-1 therapy. A 55-year-old euglycemic woman receiving nivolumab for malignant melanoma showed abrupt onset of ketonuria, and elevated levels of plasma glucose (580 mg/dL) and hemoglobin A1c (7.0%). Over the next 2 weeks, serum C-peptide levels fell below the limit of detection. Islet autoantibodies were negative, and the patient showed a human leukocyte antigen haplotype associated with type 1 diabetes. Anti-PD-1 therapy can cause rapid onset of insulin-dependent diabetes, possibly because of inappropriate activation of T cells. Human leukocyte antigen haplotypes might be related to the onset of this disease. Physicians should be aware of this serious adverse event and carry out routine blood glucose testing during anti-PD-1 therapy.

  5. Mod(mdg4) participates in hormonally regulated midgut programmed cell death during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wen; He, Hong-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2012-12-01

    The insect midgut undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) during metamorphosis, but the molecular basis for this phenomenon has not been demonstrated. We report a mod(mdg4) protein [designated as mod(mdg4)1A] that is involved in hormonally regulated insect midgut PCD, from the lepidopteran Helicoverpa armigera. Mod(mdg4)1A is localized in the larval midgut and is highly expressed during metamorphosis. Knockdown of mod(mdg4)1a by feeding dsRNA to the larvae suppressed midgut PCD and delayed metamorphosis. The mechanism is that mod(mdg4)1a knockdown decreased the transcript levels of genes involved in PCD and metamorphosis, but increased the transcript level of inhibitor of apoptosis survivin. The transcript level of mod(mdg4)1a is independently upregulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) or juvenile hormone (JH) analog methoprene. Overlapped 20E and methoprene counteractively regulate the transcript level of mod(mdg4)1a. 20E upregulates the mod(mdg4)1a transcript level not through its nuclear receptor EcRB1. Methoprene upregulates the mod(mdg4)1a transcript level through the juvenile hormone candidate receptor Met. These findings indicate that mod(mdg4)1a participates in midgut PCD and metamorphosis by regulating the transcript levels of a network of genes via different pathways under 20E and JH regulation.

  6. Inhibition of cathepsin B by caspase-3 inhibitors blocks programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Y; Cai, Y-M; Bonneau, L; Rotari, V; Danon, A; McKenzie, E A; McLellan, H; Mach, L; Gallois, P

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is used by plants for development and survival to biotic and abiotic stresses. The role of caspases in PCD is well established in animal cells. Over the past 15 years, the importance of caspase-3-like enzymatic activity for plant PCD completion has been widely documented despite the absence of caspase orthologues. In particular, caspase-3 inhibitors blocked nearly all plant PCD tested. Here, we affinity-purified a plant caspase-3-like activity using a biotin-labelled caspase-3 inhibitor and identified Arabidopsis thaliana cathepsin B3 (AtCathB3) by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Consistent with this, recombinant AtCathB3 was found to have caspase-3-like activity and to be inhibited by caspase-3 inhibitors. AtCathepsin B triple-mutant lines showed reduced caspase-3-like enzymatic activity and reduced labelling with activity-based caspase-3 probes. Importantly, AtCathepsin B triple mutants showed a strong reduction in the PCD induced by ultraviolet (UV), oxidative stress (H2O2, methyl viologen) or endoplasmic reticulum stress. Our observations contribute to explain why caspase-3 inhibitors inhibit plant PCD and provide new tools to further plant PCD research. The fact that cathepsin B does regulate PCD in both animal and plant cells suggests that this protease may be part of an ancestral PCD pathway pre-existing the plant/animal divergence that needs further characterisation. PMID:27058316

  7. Laticiferous canal formation in fruits of Decaisnea fargesii: a programmed cell death process?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ya-Fu; Liu, Wen-Zhe

    2011-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD), a topic of abiding interest, remodels plants at the cell, tissue, and organ levels involving various developmental processes of plants. The aim of this study is to provide a morphological characterization of evidence of PCD involvement in the laticiferous canal formation in fruit of Decaisnea fargesii. Several ultrastructural features of PCD have been observed including disintegration of vacuole and plasma membranes, cell wall degeneration, degenerated cytoplasm, abundant membrane structures and flocculent material, mitochondria and misshapen nuclei coupled with degraded plastids in vacuoles, and nuclei enveloped by rubber granule. In D. fargesii, the nuclei of the secretory epidermal cells become TUNEL-positive from the sunken stage to the late expanding stage, then DAPI-negative during the mature stage, indicating an early event of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) cleavage and a late event of complete DNA degeneration. Gel electrophoresis indicates that DNA cleavage is random and does not result in the laddering pattern indicating multiples of internucleosomal units. During the PCD of secretory epidermal cells, the rubber granules continue to be synthesized and accumulated in the secretory epidermal cells despite nuclear degradation. The PCD's role in laticiferous canal formation suggests that PCD may play important roles in gland development of plants.

  8. Induction of metamorphosis in the marine gastropod Ilyanassa obsoleta: 5HT, NO and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Leise, Esther M; Kempf, S C; Durham, N R; Gifondorwa, D J

    2004-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) of a metamorphically competent larva of the caenogastropod Ilyanassa obsoleta contains a medial, unpaired apical ganglion (AG) of approximately 25 neurons that lies above the commissure connecting the paired cerebral ganglia. The AG, also known as the cephalic or apical sensory organ (ASO), contains numerous sensory neurons and innervates the ciliated velar lobes, the larval swimming and feeding structures. Before metamorphosis, the AG contains 5 serotonergic neurons and exogenous serotonin can induce metamorphosis in competent larvae. The AG appears to be a purely larval structure as it disappears within 3 days of metamorphic induction. In competent larvae, most neurons of the AG display nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like immunoreactivity and inhibition of NOS activity can induce larval metamorphose. Because nitric oxide (NO) can prevent cells from undergoing apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death (PCD), we hypothesize that inhibition of NOS activity triggers the loss of the AG at the beginning of the metamorphic process. Within 24 hours of metamorphic induction, cellular changes that are typical of the early stages of PCD are visible in histological sections and results of a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay in metamorphosing larvae show AG nuclei containing fragmented DNA, supporting our hypothesis.

  9. Intracellular energy depletion triggers programmed cell death during petal senescence in tulip.

    PubMed

    Azad, A K; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Sawa, Y; Shibata, H

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in petals provides a model system to study the molecular aspects of organ senescence. In this study, the very early triggering signal for PCD during the senescence process from young green buds to 14-d-old petals of Tulipa gesneriana was determined. The opening and closing movement of petals of intact plants increased for the first 3 d and then gradually decreased. DNA degradation and cytochrome c (Cyt c) release were clearly observed in 6-d-old flowers. Oxidative stress or ethylene production can be excluded as the early signal for petal PCD. In contrast, ATP was dramatically depleted after the first day of flower opening. Sucrose supplementation to cut flowers maintained their ATP levels and the movement ability for a longer time than in those kept in water. The onset of DNA degradation, Cyt c release, and petal senescence was also delayed by sucrose supplementation to cut flowers. These results suggest that intracellular energy depletion, rather than oxidative stress or ethylene production, may be the very early signal to trigger PCD in tulip petals.

  10. Localization of Barley yellow dwarf virus Movement Protein Modulating Programmed Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jiwon; Kim, Kangmin; Lee, Kui-Jae; Lee, Wang Hu; Ju, Ho-Jong

    2017-02-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) belongs to Luteovirus and is limited only at phloem related tissues. An open reading frame (ORF) 4 of BYDV codes for the movement protein (MP) of BYDV gating plasmodesmata (PD) to facilitate virus movement. Like other Luteoviruses, ORF 4 of BYDV is embedded in the ORF3 but expressed from the different reading frame in leaky scanning manner. Although MP is a very important protein for systemic infection of BYDV, there was a little information. In this study, MP was characterized in terms of subcellular localization and programmed cell death (PCD). Gene of MP or its mutant (ΔMP) was expressed by Agroinfiltration method. MP was clearly localized at the nucleus and the PD, but ΔMP which was deleted distal N-terminus of MP showed no localization to PD exhibited the different target with original MP. In addition to PD localization, MP appeared associated with small granules in cytoplasm whereas ΔMP did not. MP associated with PD and small granules induced PCD, but ΔMP showed no association with PD and small granules did not exhibit PCD. Based on this study, the distal N-terminal region within MP is seemingly responsible for the localization of PD and the induction small granules and PCD induction. These results suggest that subcellular localization of BYDV MP may modulate the PCD in Nicotiana benthamiana.

  11. YihE kinase is a central regulator of programmed cell death in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey-Oresto, Angella; Lu, Tao; Mosel, Michael; Wang, Xiuhong; Salz, Tal; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2013-01-01

    Stress-mediated programmed cell death (PCD) in bacteria has recently attracted attention, largely because it raises novel possibilities for controlling pathogens. How PCD in bacteria is regulated to avoid population extinction from transient, moderate stress remains a central question. We report that the YihE protein kinase is a key regulator that protects Escherichia coli from antimicrobial and environmental stressors by antagonizing the MazEF toxin-antitoxin module. YihE was linked to a reactive oxygen species (ROS) cascade, and a deficiency of yihE stimulated stress-induced PCD even after stress dissipated. YihE was partially regulated by the Cpx envelope stress-response system, which, along with MazF toxin and superoxide, has both protective and destructive roles that help bacteria make a live-or-die decision in response to stress. YihE probably acts early in the stress response to limit self-sustaining ROS production and PCD. Inhibition of YihE may provide a new way to enhance antimicrobial lethality and attenuate virulence. PMID:23416055

  12. Cdc42 is required for chondrogenesis and interdigital programmed cell death during limb development.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Ryo; Yamada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Dai; Iimura, Tadahiro; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Harada, Takeshi; Tsukasaki, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Gou; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Nakao, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Aiba, Atsu; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2012-01-01

    Cdc42, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is known to be a regulator of multiple cellular functions, including cytoskeletal organization, cell migration, proliferation, and apoptosis. However, its tissue-specific roles, especially in mammalian limb development, remain unclear. To investigate the physiological function of Cdc42 during limb development, we generated limb bud mesenchyme-specific inactivated Cdc42 (Cdc42(fl/fl); Prx1-Cre) mice. Cdc42(fl/fl); Prx1-Cre mice demonstrated short limbs and body, abnormal calcification of the cranium, cleft palate, disruption of the xiphoid process, and syndactyly. Severe defects were also found in long bone growth plate cartilage, characterized by loss of columnar organization of chondrocytes, and thickening and massive accumulation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with reduced bone growth. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that expressions of Col10 and Mmp13 were reduced in non-resorbed hypertrophic cartilage, indicating that deletion of Cdc42 inhibited their terminal differentiation. Syndactyly in Cdc42(fl/fl); Prx1-Cre mice was caused by fusion of metacarpals and a failure of interdigital programmed cell death (ID-PCD). Whole mount in situ hybridization analysis of limb buds showed that the expression patterns of Sox9 were ectopic, while those of Bmp2, Msx1, and Msx2, known to promote apoptosis in the interdigital mesenchyme, were down-regulated. These results demonstrate that Cdc42 is essential for chondrogenesis and ID-PCD during limb development.

  13. Localization of Barley yellow dwarf virus Movement Protein Modulating Programmed Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jiwon; Kim, Kangmin; Lee, Kui-Jae; Lee, Wang Hu; Ju, Ho-Jong

    2017-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) belongs to Luteovirus and is limited only at phloem related tissues. An open reading frame (ORF) 4 of BYDV codes for the movement protein (MP) of BYDV gating plasmodesmata (PD) to facilitate virus movement. Like other Luteoviruses, ORF 4 of BYDV is embedded in the ORF3 but expressed from the different reading frame in leaky scanning manner. Although MP is a very important protein for systemic infection of BYDV, there was a little information. In this study, MP was characterized in terms of subcellular localization and programmed cell death (PCD). Gene of MP or its mutant (ΔMP) was expressed by Agroinfiltration method. MP was clearly localized at the nucleus and the PD, but ΔMP which was deleted distal N-terminus of MP showed no localization to PD exhibited the different target with original MP. In addition to PD localization, MP appeared associated with small granules in cytoplasm whereas ΔMP did not. MP associated with PD and small granules induced PCD, but ΔMP showed no association with PD and small granules did not exhibit PCD. Based on this study, the distal N-terminal region within MP is seemingly responsible for the localization of PD and the induction small granules and PCD induction. These results suggest that subcellular localization of BYDV MP may modulate the PCD in Nicotiana benthamiana. PMID:28167888

  14. Identification of programmed cell death in situ via specific labeling of nuclear DNA fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) plays a key role in developmental biology and in maintenance of the steady state in continuously renewing tissues. Currently, its existence is inferred mainly from gel electrophoresis of a pooled DNA extract as PCD was shown to be associated with DNA fragmentation. Based on this observation, we describe here the development of a method for the in situ visualization of PCD at the single-cell level, while preserving tissue architecture. Conventional histological sections, pretreated with protease, were nick end labeled with biotinylated poly dU, introduced by terminal deoxy- transferase, and then stained using avidin-conjugated peroxidase. The reaction is specific, only nuclei located at positions where PCD is expected are stained. The initial screening includes: small and large intestine, epidermis, lymphoid tissues, ovary, and other organs. A detailed analysis revealed that the process is initiated at the nuclear periphery, it is relatively short (1-3 h from initiation to cell elimination) and that PCD appears in tissues in clusters. The extent of tissue-PCD revealed by this method is considerably greater than apoptosis detected by nuclear morphology, and thus opens the way for a variety of studies. PMID:1400587

  15. Program Death-1 Suppresses Autoimmune Arthritis by Inhibiting Th17 Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lifen; Qiao, Guilin; Hassan, Yassir; Li, Zhenping; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Kong, Huimin; Zeng, Weimin; Yin, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Program death-1 (PD-1) is a co-inhibitory receptor inducibly expressed on activated T cells. PD-1 has been reported to be associated with the development of several autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, but the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. To study the role of PD-1 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and the possible underlying mechanisms, we performed collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57BL/6 mice. Here, we show that PD-1 deficiency leads to the development of severe CIA in mice. When analyzing T cells from CIA mice ex vivo, we noticed aberrant antigen-specific Th17 responses in mice lacking PD-1. This is possibly due to deregulated activation of PKC-θ and Akt. In support of this notion, treating Pdcd1 (-/-) mice with an inhibitor of PI3-kinase that is upstream of PKC-θ and Akt significantly suppressed the disease severity. Therefore, our data indicate that PD-1 dampens antigen-specific Th17 response, thus inhibiting the disease.

  16. Pollen tube reuses intracellular components of nucellar cells undergoing programmed cell death in Pinus densiflora.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Rie; Terasaka, Osamu

    2011-04-01

    Through the process known as programmed cell death (PCD), nucelli of Pinus densiflora serve as the transmitting tissue for growth of the pollen tube. We sought to clarify the processes of degradation of nucellar cell components and their transport to the pollen tube during PCD in response to pollen tube penetration of such nucelli. Stimulated by pollination, synthesis of large amounts of starch grains occurred in cells in a wide region of the nucellus, but as the pollen tube penetrated the nucellus, starch grains were degraded in amyloplasts of nucellar cells. In cells undergoing PCD, electron-dense vacuoles with high membrane contrast appeared, assumed a variety of autophagic structures, expanded, and ultimately collapsed and disappeared. Vesicles and electron-dense amorphous materials were released inside the thickened walls of cells undergoing PCD, and those vesicles and materials reaching the pollen tube after passing through the extracellular matrix were taken into the tube by endocytosis. These results show that in PCD of nucellar cells, intracellular materials are degraded in amyloplasts and vacuoles, and some of the degraded material is supplied to the pollen tube by vesicular transport to support tube growth.

  17. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) suppresses metastastic potential of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuhong; Li, Jianfeng; Jiang, Ying; Xu, Yijun; Qin, Chengyong

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal malignancy with high rate of metastasis and poor prognosis. There are no effective managements to block metastasis of HCC. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is found to be a tumor transformation suppressor. Among investigations on effects of PDCD4, little is about the metastatic potentials of HCC cells. This study was to investigate the role of PDCD4 on metastatic potential of human HCC cells. Methods We examined the expression of PDCD4 in three HCC cell lines with different metastatic potentials, MHCC-97H (high metastatic potential), MHCC-97L (low metastatic potential) and Hep3B (no metastatic potential). A plasmid encoding PDCD4 gene was constructed and then transfected into HCC cells with the lowest PDCD4 expression level. Effects of PDCD4 on cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, gene expression of metastasis tumor antigen 1 (MTA1) and in vitro migration and invasion capacity were assessed after transfection. Results Our results showed that the expression level of PDCD4 was inversely correlated to the metastatic potential of HCC cells. After transfection with the PDCD4 gene, HCC cell proliferation rate was significantly decreased, cell apoptosis rate was significantly increased, the expression of MTA1 gene, HCC cell migration and Matrigel invasion were also remarkably inhibited. Conclusion PDCD4 expression is inversely correlated to the metastatic potential of HCC cells. PDCD4 can effectively suppress the metastatic potential of HCC cells. PMID:19480673

  18. Expression of programmed death 1 is correlated with progression of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjie; Xiao, Hong; Liu, Huan; Zhou, Yue

    2015-02-01

    Accumulating bodies of evidence indicate that immune dysregulation plays a key role in the development of osteosarcoma (OS). Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is a surface receptor expressed on activated and exhausted T cells, which mediate T-cell inhibition upon binding with its ligand. Researches on PD-1 and OS remain extremely limited. Here, we investigated whether PD-1 could be involved in the development of OS. Expression of PD-1 was measured by flow cytometry on peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from 56 OS cases and 42 healthy controls. Data revealed that percentages of PD-1 were significantly upregulated on both peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from OS patients (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Patients with different tumor locations did not present obvious variations in PD-1 level. However, patients with metastasis showed significantly higher level of PD-1 on CD4+ T cells than those without metastasis (p < 0.001). Furthermore, PD-1 expression on CD4+ T cells started to increase in stage III, whereas PD-1 expression on CD8+ T cells started to increase in stage II. In addition, patients with pathological fracture were observed to have elevated PD-1 on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These data suggest that PD-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of OS, especially in the progression of disease.

  19. Enhanced expression of Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) protein in benign vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Clarissa N; Wians, Frank H; Bryan, Brad A; Torabi, Alireza

    2017-04-01

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligands have been shown to play a significant role in evasion of malignant tumour cells from the immune system. Last year, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved anti-PD-1 inhibitors for treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma and recently has approved anti-PD-L1 blocker for treatment of metastatic urothelial cell carcinoma. However, the role that the immune system might have on benign tumours including vascular anomalies has received less attention. In this study, we evaluated PD-1 and PD-L1 expression on two benign vascular anomalies: infantile haemangiomas and venous malformations. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from these two entities were stained for PD-1 and PD-L1 antibodies. Blood vessels from normal tissue were used as control. The endothelial cells in both infantile haemangioma and venous malformation showed high expression of PD-1 but were negative for PD-L1. Endothelial cells within the blood vessels in normal tissues were negative for both PD-1 and PD-L1. Our results showed over-expression of PD-1 in subsets of vascular anomalies, while PD-L1 was negative. This would raise the possibility of immunotherapy in benign vascular tumour when other options are exhausted.

  20. Expression and biological function of programmed death ligands in human placenta mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoyan; Zhang, Siying; Wang, Feifei; Li, Guangyun; Zhang, Lixia; Luan, Xiying

    2013-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play important roles in tissue regeneration due to their self-renewal, multilineage differentiation and immunosuppression abilities. MSCs can be isolated from various kinds of tissue, such as umbilical cord, cord blood and placenta. Human placenta mesenchymal stem cells (hPMSCs) possess stronger immunosuppressive properties, such as the ability to inhibit T-cell activation and proliferation, than human bone marrow MSCs. We have investigated that the roles of the programmed death ligands 1 and 2 (PDL1 and PDL2) in hPMSC adhesion, migration and immunosuppression were investigated. PDL1 and PDL2 were highly expressed by hPMSCs. Knockdown of PDL1 and/or PDL2 by siRNA increased hPMSC adhesion, but greatly decreasing migration. PDL1 and PDL2 expressed on hPMSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle. Knockdown of PDL1 and/or PDL2 in hPMSCs, however, had no effect on the expression of CD69, a T-cell early activation marker found on both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell subsets. In summary, the roles of the negative co-stimulators PDL1 and PDL2 is on the adhesion, migration and immunosuppression of hPMSCs. These findings may be useful regarding the potential use of hPMSCs in clinical cell.

  1. Extracellular calcium triggers unique transcriptional programs and modulates staurosporine-induced cell death in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, A. P.; Monteiro, João; Lucchi, Chiara; Kowbel, David J.; Cordeiro, J. M.; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Rigden, Daniel J.; Glass, N. L.; Videira, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the intracellular levels of calcium are a common response to cell death stimuli in animals and fungi and, particularly, in the Neurospora crassa response to staurosporine. We highlight the importance of the extracellular availability of Ca2+ for this response. Limitation of the ion in the culture medium further sensitizes cells to the drug and results in increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Conversely, an approximately 30-fold excess of external Ca2+ leads to increased drug tolerance and lower ROS generation. In line with this, distinct staurosporine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ signaling profiles were observed in the absence or presence of excessive external Ca2+. High-throughput RNA sequencing revealed that different concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ define distinct transcriptional programs. Our transcriptional profiling also pointed to two putative novel Ca2+-binding proteins, encoded by the NCU08524 and NCU06607 genes, and provides a reference dataset for future investigations on the role of Ca2+ in fungal biology. PMID:28357255

  2. Structure-function correlation of human programmed cell death 5 protein.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Xu, Lanjun; Feng, Yingang; Liu, Dongsheng; Chen, Yingyu; Wang, Jinfeng

    2009-06-15

    Human programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) is a translocatory protein playing an important role in the apoptotic process of cells. Although there are accumulated data about PDCD5 function, the correlation of the structure with the function of PDCD5 has not been investigated. Here, we report the studies of structure-function relationship of PDCD5 by multidimensional NMR methods and by FACScan flow cytometer and fluorescence microscope. The 3D structure of intact PDCD5 and the internal motions of PDCD5 have been determined. PDCD5 has a compact core structure of low flexibility with two mobile alpha-helices at N-terminal region and a flexible unstructured C-terminal region. The flow cytometry and internalization measurements of different PDCD5 fragments indicate that the charged residues are crucial for the ability of apoptosis-promoting and cell translocation of the protein. Combined analyses reveal a fact that the regions that seem to be most involved in the function also are more flexible in PDCD5.

  3. Streptomyces natalensis programmed cell death and morphological differentiation are dependent on oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Beites, Tiago; Oliveira, Paulo; Rioseras, Beatriz; Pires, Sílvia D. S.; Oliveira, Rute; Tamagnini, Paula; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Manteca, Ángel; Mendes, Marta V.

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces are aerobic Gram-positive bacteria characterized by a complex life cycle that includes hyphae differentiation and spore formation. Morphological differentiation is triggered by stressful conditions and takes place in a pro-oxidant environment, which sets the basis for an involvement of the oxidative stress response in this cellular process. Characterization of the phenotypic traits of Streptomyces natalensis ΔkatA1 (mono-functional catalase) and ΔcatR (Fur-like repressor of katA1 expression) strains in solid medium revealed that both mutants had an impaired morphological development process. The sub-lethal oxidative stress caused by the absence of KatA1 resulted in the formation of a highly proliferative and undifferentiated vegetative mycelium, whereas de-repression of CatR regulon, from which KatA1 is the only known representative, resulted in the formation of scarce aerial mycelium. Both mutant strains had the transcription of genes associated with aerial mycelium formation and biosynthesis of the hyphae hydrophobic layer down-regulated. The first round of the programmed cell death (PCD) was inhibited in both strains which caused the prevalence of the transient primary mycelium (MI) over secondary mycelium (MII). Our data shows that the first round of PCD and morphological differentiation in S. natalensis is dependent on oxidative stress in the right amount at the right time. PMID:26256439

  4. Programmed cell death 5 mediates HDAC3 decay to promote genotoxic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo-Kyoung; Choi, Youngsok; Park, Eun Sung; Park, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Jaesung; Jeong, Mi-Hyeon; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Jeong, Jae-Ho; Lee, Peter C. W.; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of p53 activity by histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) has been reported, but the precise molecular mechanism is unknown. Here we show that programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) selectively mediates HDAC3 dissociation from p53, which induces HDAC3 cleavage and ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. Casein kinase 2 alpha phosphorylates PDCD5 at Ser-119 to enhance its stability and importin 13-mediated nuclear translocation of PDCD5. Genetic deletion of PDCD5 abrogates etoposide (ET)-induced p53 stabilization and HDAC3 cleavage, indicating an essential role of PDCD5 in p53 activation. Restoration of PDCD5WT in PDCD5−/− MEFs restores ET-induced HDAC3 cleavage. Reduction of both PDCD5 and p53, but not reduction of either protein alone, significantly enhances in vivo tumorigenicity of AGS gastric cancer cells and correlates with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. Our results define a mechanism for p53 activation via PDCD5-dependent HDAC3 decay under genotoxic stress conditions. PMID:26077467

  5. Programmed death-1 controls T cell survival by regulating oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tkachev, Victor; Goodell, Stefanie; Opipari, Anthony W; Hao, Ling-Yang; Franchi, Luigi; Glick, Gary D; Ferrara, James L M; Byersdorfer, Craig A

    2015-06-15

    The coinhibitory receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1) maintains immune homeostasis by negatively regulating T cell function and survival. Blockade of PD-1 increases the severity of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), but the interplay between PD-1 inhibition and T cell metabolism is not well studied. We found that both murine and human alloreactive T cells concomitantly upregulated PD-1 expression and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. This PD-1(Hi)ROS(Hi) phenotype was specific to alloreactive T cells and was not observed in syngeneic T cells during homeostatic proliferation. Blockade of PD-1 signaling decreased both mitochondrial H2O2 and total cellular ROS levels, and PD-1-driven increases in ROS were dependent upon the oxidation of fatty acids, because treatment with etomoxir nullified changes in ROS levels following PD-1 blockade. Downstream of PD-1, elevated ROS levels impaired T cell survival in a process reversed by antioxidants. Furthermore, PD-1-driven changes in ROS were fundamental to establishing a cell's susceptibility to subsequent metabolic inhibition, because blockade of PD-1 decreased the efficacy of later F1F0-ATP synthase modulation. These data indicate that PD-1 facilitates apoptosis in alloreactive T cells by increasing ROS in a process dependent upon the oxidation of fat. In addition, blockade of PD-1 undermines the potential for subsequent metabolic inhibition, an important consideration given the increasing use of anti-PD-1 therapies in the clinic.

  6. Programmed cell death-10 enhances proliferation and protects malignant T cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lauenborg, Britt; Kopp, Katharina; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Eriksen, Karsten W; Geisler, Carsten; Dabelsteen, Sally; Gniadecki, Robert; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A; Woetmann, Anders; Odum, Niels

    2010-10-01

    The programmed cell death-10 (PDCD10; also known as cerebral cavernous malformation-3 or CCM3) gene encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein associated with cell apoptosis. Mutations in PDCD10 result in cerebral cavernous malformations, an important cause of cerebral hemorrhage. PDCD10 is associated with serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases and modulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway suggesting a role in the regulation of cellular growth. Here we provide evidence of a constitutive expression of PDCD10 in malignant T cells and cell lines from peripheral blood of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (Sezary syndrome) patients. PDCD10 is associated with protein phosphatase-2A, a regulator of mitogenesis and apoptosis in malignant T cells. Inhibition of oncogenic signal pathways [Jak3, Notch1, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)] partly inhibits the constitutive PDCD10 expression, whereas an activator of Jak3 and NF-κB, interleukin-2 (IL-2), enhances PDCD10 expression. Functional data show that PDCD10 depletion by small interfering RNA induces apoptosis and decreases proliferation of the sensitive cells. To our knowledge, these data provide the first functional link between PDCD10 and cancer.

  7. Ethylene-Mediated Programmed Cell Death during Maize Endosperm Development of Wild-Type and shrunken2 Genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Young, T. E.; Gallie, D. R.; DeMason, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    We characterized the progression of programmed cell death during maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm development of starchy (Su; wild-type) and shrunken2 (sh2) genotypes and tested the involve ment of ethylene in mediating this process. Histological and viability staining demonstrated that endosperm cell death was initiated earlier and progressed more rapidly in sh2 endosperm compared with Su endosperm. Internucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied endosperm cell death and occurred more extensively in sh2 endosperm. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid levels peaked approximately 16 d after pollination (dap) in Su endosperm and gradually decreased during subsequent development, whereas two large 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid peaks were observed in sh2 endosperm, the first between 16 and 20 dap and the second at 36 dap. Ethylene levels were elevated in sh2 kernels compared with Su kernels, with an initial peak 20 dap approximately 3-fold higher than in Su kernels and a second peak 36 dap approximately 5-fold higher than that in Su kernels. Ethylene treatment of Su kernels resulted in earlier and more extensive endosperm cell death and DNA fragmentation. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine treatment of sh2 kernels reduced the extent of DNA fragmentation. We conclude that ethylene is involved in triggering programmed cell death in developing maize endosperm and is responsible for the aberrant phenotype of sh2 kernels. PMID:12223841

  8. Myopia in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Garty, B Z; Laor, A; Danon, Y L

    1996-05-01

    We studied the prevalence of myopia in 17-year-old Israeli military recruits with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Twenty-four percent of the youngsters with neurofibromatosis had myopia, compared to 19% of the controls; this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.03). The recruits with NF1 had a slightly lower IQ, fewer years of education, and lower height and weight than the controls. Thus, these factors, which have been reported to be associated with myopia, did not significantly influence the high prevalence of myopia in the neurofibromatosis subjects. A high prevalence of myopia seems to be an additional feature of NF1.

  9. Ceramide synthase-dependent ceramide generation and programmed cell death: involvement of salvage pathway in regulating postmitochondrial events.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Thomas D; Jenkins, Russell W; Clarke, Christopher J; Bielawski, Jacek; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2011-05-06

    The sphingolipid ceramide has been widely implicated in the regulation of programmed cell death or apoptosis. The accumulation of ceramide has been demonstrated in a wide variety of experimental models of apoptosis and in response to a myriad of stimuli and cellular stresses. However, the detailed mechanisms of its generation and regulatory role during apoptosis are poorly understood. We sought to determine the regulation and roles of ceramide production in a model of ultraviolet light-C (UV-C)-induced programmed cell death. We found that UV-C irradiation induces the accumulation of multiple sphingolipid species including ceramide, dihydroceramide, sphingomyelin, and hexosylceramide. Late ceramide generation was also found to be regulated by Bcl-xL, Bak, and caspases. Surprisingly, inhibition of de novo synthesis using myriocin or fumonisin B1 resulted in decreased overall cellular ceramide levels basally and in response to UV-C, but only fumonisin B1 inhibited cell death, suggesting the presence of a ceramide synthase (CerS)-dependent, sphingosine-derived pool of ceramide in regulating programmed cell death. We found that this pool did not regulate the mitochondrial pathway, but it did partially regulate activation of caspase-7 and, more importantly, was necessary for late plasma membrane permeabilization. Attempting to identify the CerS responsible for this effect, we found that combined knockdown of CerS5 and CerS6 was able to decrease long-chain ceramide accumulation and plasma membrane permeabilization. These data identify a novel role for CerS and the sphingosine salvage pathway in regulating membrane permeability in the execution phase of programmed cell death.

  10. Role of a Transcriptional Regulator in Programmed Cell Death and Plant Development

    SciTech Connect

    Julie M. Stone

    2008-09-13

    The long-term goal of this research is to understand the role(s) and molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in the controlling plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. We developed a genetic selection scheme to identify A. thaliana FB1-resistant (fbr) mutants as a way to find genes involved in PCD (Stone et al., 2000; Stone et al., 2005; Khan and Stone, 2008). The disrupted gene in fbr6 (AtSPL14) responsible for the FB1-insensitivity and plant architecture phenotypes encodes a plant-specific SBP DNA-binding domain transcriptional regulator (Stone et al., 2005; Liang et al., 2008). This research plan is designed to fill gaps in the knowledge about the role of SPL14 in plant growth and development. The work is being guided by three objectives aimed at determining the pathways in which SPL14 functions to modulate PCD and/or plant development: (1) determine how SPL14 functions in plant development, (2) identify target genes that are directly regulated by SPL14, and (3) identify SPL14 modifications and interacting proteins. We made significant progress during the funding period. Briefly, some major accomplishments are highlighted below: (1) To identify potential AtSPL14 target genes, we identified a consensus DNA binding site for the AtSPL14 SBP DNA-binding domain using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential selection (SELEX) and site-directed mutagenesis (Liang et al., 2008). This consensus binding site was used to analyze Affymetrix microarray gene expression data obtained from wild-type and fbr6 mutant plants to find possible AtSPL14-regulated genes. These candidate AtSPL14-regulated genes are providing new information on the molecular mechanisms linking plant PCD and plant development through modulation of the 26S proteasome. (2) Transgenic plants expressing epitope-tagged versions of AtSPL14 are being used to confirm the AtSPL14 targets (by ChIP-PCR) and further dissect the molecular interactions (Nazarenus, Liang

  11. Study of programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1) gene polymorphims in Iranian patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Soleimanifar, Narjes; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Azizi, Esfandiar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Rezaei, Nima; Tahoori, Mohammad Taher; Bidad, Katayoon; Nikbin, Behrouz; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by axial arthritis in which the genetic-environmental factors seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. This study was performed to investigate the role of polymorphisms of the programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1) gene on susceptibility to AS. In this study, 161 Iranian patients with AS and 208 normal controls were enrolled; two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the PDCD1 gene PD-1.3 (G, A) in nucleotide position +7146 of intron 4 and PD-1.9 (C, T) in nucleotide +7625 of exon 5 were studied. Analysis of PD-1.3 revealed that 82% of patients and 79% of controls had GG genotype, while GA and AA genotypes were detected in 17% and 0.6% of patients, respectively, and 20% and 1.4% of controls, respectively. Moreover, the genotype CC (PD-1.9) was present in 92% of patients and 97% of controls. Although these differences were not statistically significant between patients and controls, comparisons of genotypes frequencies in the AS patients, based on human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27, revealed that all patients who had CT genotype (PD-1.9) were HLA-B27 positive, whereas 30% of patients with CC genotype were HLA-B27 negative. There was no evidence of association for PDCD1 SNPs with AS in our study, but CT genotype (PD-1.9) seems to be associated with HLA-B27 positivity in the patients with AS.

  12. Photoacoustic spectral analysis to sense programmed erythrocyte cell death (eryptosis) for monitoring cancer response to treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kibria, Fayruz; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Many types of cancer therapies target the tumor microenvironment, causing biochemical and morphological changes in tissues. In therapies using ultrasound activated microbubbles, vascular collapse is typically reported. Red blood cells (RBCs) that leak out of the vasculature become exposed to the ceramide that is released from damaged endothelial cells. Ceramide can induce programmed cell death in RBCs (eryptosis), and is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and scrambling. Since the effect of eryptotic cells on generated photoacoustics (PA) signals has not been reported, we investigated the potential PA may have for cancer treatment monitoring by using PA spectral analysis to sense eryptosis. To induce eryptosis, C2-ceramide was added to RBC suspensions and that were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. A control and ceramide-induced sample was imaged in a vessel phantom using a high frequency PA system (VevoLAZR, 10 - 45 MHz bandwidth) irradiated with multiple wavelengths ranging from 680 to 900 nm. PA spectral parameters were measured and linked to changes in RBCs as it underwent eryptosis. These samples were examined using optical microscopy, a blood gas analyzer and an integrating sphere setup to measure optical properties (wavelengths 600 - 900 nm). The results of the experiment demonstrate how PA spectral analysis can be used to identify eryptosis at a depth of more than 1 cm into the phantom using ultrasound derived the y-intercept and mid bandfit (MBF) parameters at optical wavelengths of 800 - 900 nm. These parameters were correlated to the morphological and biochemical changes that eryptotic RBCs display. The results establish the potential of PA in cancer treatment monitoring through sensing treatment induced eryptosis.

  13. Ricinosomes: an organelle for developmentally regulated programmed cell death in senescing plant tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gietl, C.; Schmid, M.

    2001-02-01

    This review describes aspects of programmed cell death (PCD). Present research maps the enzymes involved and explores the signal transduction pathways involved in their synthesis. A special organelle (the ricinosome) has been discovered in the senescing endosperm of germinating castor beans (Ricinus communis) that develops at the beginning of PCD and delivers large amounts of a papain-type cysteine endopeptidase (CysEP) in the final stages of cellular disintegration. Castor beans store oil and proteins in a living endosperm surrounding the cotyledons. These stores are mobilized during germination and transferred into the cotyledons. PCD is initiated after this transfer is complete. The CysEP is synthesized in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it is retained by its C-terminal KDEL peptide as a rather inactive pro-enzyme. Large number of ricinosomes bud from the ER at the same time as the nuclear DNA is characteristically fragmented during PCD. The mitochondria, glyoxysomes and ribosomes are degraded in autophagic vacuoles, while the endopeptidase is activated by removal of the propeptide and the KDEL tail and enters the cytosol. The endosperm dries and detaches from the cotyledons. A homologous KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase has been found in several senescing tissues; it has been localized in ricinosomes of withering day-lily petals and dying seed coats. Three genes for a KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase have been identified in Arabidopsis. One is expressed in senescing ovules, the second in the vascular vessels and the third in maturing siliques. These genes open the way to exploring PCD in plants.

  14. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Niki, Tomoko; Shibuya, Kenichi; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD) begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP) and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC) genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12) drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals. PMID:26605547

  15. Comprehensive characterization of programmed death ligand structural rearrangements in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Chong, Lauren C; Twa, David D W; Mottok, Anja; Ben-Neriah, Susana; Woolcock, Bruce W; Zhao, Yongjun; Savage, Kerry J; Marra, Marco A; Scott, David W; Gascoyne, Randy D; Morin, Ryan D; Mungall, Andrew J; Steidl, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Programmed death ligands (PDLs) are immune-regulatory molecules that are frequently affected by chromosomal alterations in B-cell lymphomas. Although PDL copy-number variations are well characterized, a detailed and comprehensive analysis of structural rearrangements (SRs) and associated phenotypic consequences is largely lacking. Here, we used oligonucleotide capture sequencing of 67 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues derived from primary B-cell lymphomas and 1 cell line to detect and characterize, at base-pair resolution, SRs of the PDL locus (9p24.1; harboring PDL1/CD274 and PDL2/PDCD1LG2). We describe 36 novel PDL SRs, including 17 intrachromosomal events (inversions, duplications, deletions) and 19 translocations involving BZRAP-AS1, CD44, GET4, IL4R, KIAA0226L, MID1, RCC1, PTPN1 and segments of the immunoglobulin loci. Moreover, analysis of the precise chromosomal breakpoints reveals 2 distinct cluster breakpoint regions (CBRs) within either CD274 (CBR1) or PDCD1LG2 (CBR2). To determine the phenotypic consequences of these SRs, we performed immunohistochemistry for CD274 and PDCD1LG2 on primary pretreatment biopsies and found that PDL SRs are significantly associated with PDL protein expression. Finally, stable ectopic expression of wild-type PDCD1LG2 and the PDCD1LG2-IGHV7-81 fusion showed, in coculture, significantly reduced T-cell activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate the complementary utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization and capture sequencing approaches and provide a classification scheme for PDL SRs with implications for future studies using PDL immune-checkpoint inhibitors in B-cell lymphomas.

  16. Relationship between petal abscission and programmed cell death in Prunus yedoensis and Delphinium belladonna

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Depending on the species, the end of flower life span is characterized by petal wilting or by abscission of petals that are still fully turgid. Wilting at the end of petal life is due to programmed cell death (PCD). It is not known whether the abscission of turgid petals is preceded by PCD. We studied some parameters that indicate PCD: chromatin condensation, a decrease in nuclear diameter, DNA fragmentation, and DNA content per nucleus, using Prunus yedoensis and Delphiniumbelladonna which both show abscission of turgid petals at the end of floral life. No DNA degradation, no chromatin condensation, and no change in nuclear volume was observed in P. yedoensis petals, prior to abscission. In abscising D.belladonna petals, in contrast, considerable DNA degradation was found, chromatin was condensed and the nuclear volume considerably reduced. Following abscission, the nuclear area in both species drastically increased, and the chromatin became unevenly distributed. Similar chromatin changes were observed after dehydration (24 h at 60°C) of petals severed at the time of flower opening, and in dehydrated petals of Ipomoea nil and Petunia hybrida, severed at the time of flower opening. In these flowers the petal life span is terminated by wilting rather than abscission. It is concluded that the abscission of turgid petals in D. belladonna was preceded by a number of PCD indicators, whereas no such evidence for PCD was found at the time of P. yedoensis petal abscission. Dehydration of the petal cells, after abscission, was associated with a remarkable nuclear morphology which was also found in younger petals subjected to dehydration. This nuclear morphology has apparently not been described previously, for any organism. PMID:17618454

  17. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors.

  18. Programmed cell death in Ricinus and Arabidopsis: the function of KDEL cysteine peptidases in development.

    PubMed

    Hierl, Georg; Vothknecht, Ute; Gietl, Christine

    2012-05-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in plants is a prerequisite for development as well as seed and fruit production. It also plays a significant role in pathogen defense. A unique group of papain-type cysteine endopeptidases, characterized by a C-terminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (KDEL CysEP), is involved in plant PCD. Genes for these endopeptidases have been sequenced and analyzed from 25 angiosperms and gymnosperms. They have no structural relationship to caspases involved in mammalian PCD and homologs to this group of plant cysteine endopeptidases have not been found in mammals or yeast. In castor beans (Ricinus communis), the CysEP is synthesized as pre-pro-enzyme. The pro-enzyme is transported to the cytosol of cells undergoing PCD in ER-derived vesicles called ricinosomes. These vesicles release the mature CysEP in the final stages of organelle disintegration triggered by acidification of the cytoplasm resulting from the disruption of the vacuole. Mature CysEP digests the hydroxyproline (Hyp)-rich proteins (extensins) that form the basic scaffold of the plant cell wall. The KDEL CysEPs accept a wide variety of amino acids at the active site, including the glycosylated Hyp residues of the extensins. In Arabidopsis, three KDEL CysEPs (AtCEP1, AtCEP2 and AtCEP3) are expressed in tissues undergoing PCD. In transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing β-glucuronidase under the control of the promoters for these three genes, cell- and tissue-specific activities were mapped during seedling, flower and seed development. KDEL CysEPs participate in the collapse of tissues in the final stage of PCD and in tissue re-modeling such as lateral root formation.

  19. Ricinosomes: an organelle for developmentally regulated programmed cell death in senescing plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Gietl, C; Schmid, M

    2001-02-01

    This review describes aspects of programmed cell death (PCD). Present research maps the enzymes involved and explores the signal transduction pathways involved in their synthesis. A special organelle (the ricinosome) has been discovered in the senescing endosperm of germinating castor beans (Ricinus communis) that develops at the beginning of PCD and delivers large amounts of a papain-type cysteine endopeptidase (CysEP) in the final stages of cellular disintegration. Castor beans store oil and proteins in a living endosperm surrounding the cotyledons. These stores are mobilized during germination and transferred into the cotyledons. PCD is initiated after this transfer is complete. The CysEP is synthesized in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it is retained by its C-terminal KDEL peptide as a rather inactive pro-enzyme. Large number of ricinosomes bud from the ER at the same time as the nuclear DNA is characteristically fragmented during PCD. The mitochondria, glyoxysomes and ribosomes are degraded in autophagic vacuoles, while the endopeptidase is activated by removal of the propeptide and the KDEL tail and enters the cytosol. The endosperm dries and detaches from the cotyledons. A homologous KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase has been found in several senescing tissues; it has been localized in ricinosomes of withering day-lily petals and dying seed coats. Three genes for a KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase have been identified in Arabidopsis. One is expressed in senescing ovules, the second in the vascular vessels and the third in maturing siliques. These genes open the way to exploring PCD in plants.

  20. Programmed cell death genes are linked to elevated creatine kinase levels in unhealthy male nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangkyu; Simon, Eric; Myers, Leann; Hamm, L. Lee; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2016-01-01

    Declining health in the oldest-old takes an energy toll for simple maintenance of body functions. The underlying mechanisms, however, differ in males and females. In females, the declines are explained by loss of muscle mass, but this is not the case in males in whom they are associated with increased levels of circulating creatine kinase. This relationship raises the possibility that muscle damage rather than muscle loss is the cause of the increased energy demands of unhealthy aging in males. We have now examined factors that contribute to the increase in creatine kinase. Much of it (60%) can be explained by a history of cardiac problems and lower kidney function, while being mitigated by moderate physical activity, reinforcing the notion that tissue damage is a likely source. In a search for genetic risk factors associated with elevated creatine kinase, the Ku70 gene XRCC6 and the ceramide synthase gene LASS1 were investigated because of their roles in telomere length and longevity and healthy aging, respectively. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these two genes were independently associated with creatine kinase levels. The XRCC6 variant was epistatic to one of the LASS1 variants but not to the other. These gene variants have potential regulatory activity. Ku70 is an inhibitor of the pro-apoptotic Bax, while the product of Lass1, ceramide, operates in both caspase-dependent and independent pathways of programmed cell death, providing a potential cellular mechanism for the effects of these genes on tissue damage and circulating creatine kinase. PMID:26913518

  1. Increased expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) in human pituitary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Noah F.; Du, Ziming; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Woodmansee, Whitney W.; Reardon, David A.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Fecci, Peter E.; Laws, Edward R.; Santagata, Sandro; Dunn, Gavin P.; Dunn, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Subsets of pituitary tumors exhibit an aggressive clinical courses and recur despite surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Because modulation of the immune response through inhibition of T-cell checkpoints has led to durable clinical responses in multiple malignancies, we explored whether pituitary adenomas express immune-related biomarkers that could suggest suitability for immunotherapy. Specifically, programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) has emerged as a potential biomarker whose expression may portend more favorable responses to immune checkpoint blockade therapies. We thus investigated the expression of PD-L1 in pituitary adenomas. Methods PD-L1 RNA and protein expression were evaluated in 48 pituitary tumors, including functioning and non-functioning adenomas as well as atypical and recurrent tumors. Tumor infiltrating lymphocyte populations were also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Pituitary tumors express variable levels of PD-L1 transcript and protein. PD-L1 RNA and protein expression were significantly increased in functioning (growth hormone and prolactin-expressing) pituitary adenomas compared to non-functioning (null cell and silent gonadotroph) adenomas. Moreover, primary pituitary adenomas harbored higher levels of PD-L1 mRNA compared to recurrent tumors. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were observed in all pituitary tumors and were positively correlated with increased PD-L1 expression, particularly in the functional subtypes. Conclusions Human pituitary adenomas harbor PD-L1 across subtypes, with significantly higher expression in functioning adenomas compared to non-functioning adenomas. This expression is accompanied by the presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. These findings suggest the existence of an immune response to pituitary tumors and raise the possibility of considering checkpoint blockade immunotherapy in cases refractory to conventional management. PMID:27655724

  2. Programmed cell death promotes male sterility in the functional dioecious Opuntia stenopetala (Cactaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Orozco-Arroyo, Gregorio; Cruz-García, Felipe; García-Campusano, Florencia; Alfaro, Isabel; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The sexual separation in dioecious species has interested biologists for decades; however, the cellular mechanism leading to unisexuality has been poorly understood. In this study, the cellular changes that lead to male sterility in the functionally dioecious cactus, Opuntia stenopetala, are described. Methods The spatial and temporal patterns of programmed cell death (PCD) were determined in the anthers of male and female flowers using scanning electron microscopy analysis and histological observations, focusing attention on the transition from bisexual to unisexual development. In addition, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling assays were used as an indicator of DNA fragmentation to corroborate PCD. Key results PCD was detected in anthers of both female and male flowers, but their patterns differed in time and space. Functionally male individuals developed viable pollen, and normal development involved PCD on each layer of the anther wall, which occurred progressively from the inner (tapetum) to the outer layer (epidermis). Conversely, functional female individuals aborted anthers by premature and displaced PCD. In anthers of female flowers, the first signs of PCD, such as a nucleus with irregular shape, fragmented and condensed chromatin, high vacuolization and condensed cytoplasm, occurred at the microspore mother cell stage. Later these features were observed simultaneously in all anther wall layers, connective tissue and filament. Neither pollen formation nor anther dehiscence was detected in female flowers of O. stenopetala due to total anther disruption. Conclusions Temporal and spatial changes in the patterns of PCD are responsible for male sterility of female flowers in O. stenopetala. Male fertility requires the co-ordination of different events, which, when altered, can lead to male sterility and to functionally unisexual individuals. PCD could be a widespread mechanism in the determination of

  3. Reactive Carbonyl Species Activate Caspase-3-Like Protease to Initiate Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Md Sanaullah; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered programmed cell death (PCD) is a typical plant response to biotic and abiotic stressors. We have recently shown that lipid peroxide-derived reactive carbonyl species (RCS), downstream products of ROS, mediate oxidative signal to initiate PCD. Here we investigated the mechanism by which RCS initiate PCD. Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cultured cells were treated with acrolein, one of the most potent RCS. Acrolein at 0.2 mM caused PCD in 5 h (i.e. lethal), but at 0.1 mM it did not (sublethal). Specifically, these two doses caused critically different effects on the cells. Both lethal and sublethal doses of acrolein exhausted the cellular glutathione pool in 30 min, while the lethal dose only caused a significant ascorbate decrease and ROS increase in 1-2 h. Prior to such redox changes, we found that acrolein caused significant increases in the activities of caspase-1-like protease (C1LP) and caspase-3-like protease (C3LP), the proteases which trigger PCD. The lethal dose of acrolein increased the C3LP activity 2-fold more than did the sublethal dose. In contrast, C1LP activity increments caused by the two doses were not different. Acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal, another RCS, activated both proteases in a cell-free extract from untreated cells. H2O2 at 1 mM added to the cells increased C1LP and C3LP activities and caused PCD, and the RCS scavenger carnosine suppressed their activation and PCD. However, H2O2 did not activate the proteases in a cell-free extract. Thus the activation of caspase-like proteases, particularly C3LP, by RCS is an initial biochemical event in oxidative signal-stimulated PCD in plants.

  4. Programmed cell death activated by Rose Bengal in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures requires functional chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Jorge; González-Pérez, Sergio; García-García, Francisco; Daly, Cara T.; Lorenzo, Óscar; Revuelta, José L.; McCabe, Paul F.; Arellano, Juan B.

    2014-01-01

    Light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture (ACSC) were subjected to mild photooxidative damage with Rose Bengal (RB) with the aim of gaining a better understanding of singlet oxygen-mediated defence responses in plants. Additionally, ACSC were treated with H2O2 at concentrations that induced comparable levels of protein oxidation damage. Under low to medium light conditions, both RB and H2O2 treatments activated transcriptional defence responses and inhibited photosynthetic activity, but they differed in that programmed cell death (PCD) was only observed in cells treated with RB. When dark-grown ACSC were subjected to RB in the light, PCD was suppressed, indicating that the singlet oxygen-mediated signalling pathway in ACSC requires functional chloroplasts. Analysis of up-regulated transcripts in light-grown ACSC, treated with RB in the light, showed that both singlet oxygen-responsive transcripts and transcripts with a key role in hormone-activated PCD (i.e. ethylene and jasmonic acid) were present. A co-regulation analysis proved that ACSC treated with RB exhibited higher correlation with the conditional fluorescence (flu) mutant than with other singlet oxygen-producing mutants or wild-type plants subjected to high light. However, there was no evidence for the up-regulation of EDS1, suggesting that activation of PCD was not associated with the EXECUTER- and EDS1-dependent signalling pathway described in the flu mutant. Indigo Carmine and Methylene Violet, two photosensitizers unable to enter chloroplasts, did not activate transcriptional defence responses in ACSC; however, whether this was due to their location or to their inherently low singlet oxygen quantum efficiencies was not determined. PMID:24723397

  5. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Niki, Tomoko; Shibuya, Kenichi; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD) begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP) and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC) genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12) drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals.

  6. Relationship between petal abscission and programmed cell death in Prunus yedoensis and Delphinium belladonna.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Ichimura, Kazuo; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2007-10-01

    Depending on the species, the end of flower life span is characterized by petal wilting or by abscission of petals that are still fully turgid. Wilting at the end of petal life is due to programmed cell death (PCD). It is not known whether the abscission of turgid petals is preceded by PCD. We studied some parameters that indicate PCD: chromatin condensation, a decrease in nuclear diameter, DNA fragmentation, and DNA content per nucleus, using Prunus yedoensis and Delphinium belladonna which both show abscission of turgid petals at the end of floral life. No DNA degradation, no chromatin condensation, and no change in nuclear volume was observed in P. yedoensis petals, prior to abscission. In abscising D. belladonna petals, in contrast, considerable DNA degradation was found, chromatin was condensed and the nuclear volume considerably reduced. Following abscission, the nuclear area in both species drastically increased, and the chromatin became unevenly distributed. Similar chromatin changes were observed after dehydration (24 h at 60 degrees C) of petals severed at the time of flower opening, and in dehydrated petals of Ipomoea nil and Petunia hybrida, severed at the time of flower opening. In these flowers the petal life span is terminated by wilting rather than abscission. It is concluded that the abscission of turgid petals in D. belladonna was preceded by a number of PCD indicators, whereas no such evidence for PCD was found at the time of P. yedoensis petal abscission. Dehydration of the petal cells, after abscission, was associated with a remarkable nuclear morphology which was also found in younger petals subjected to dehydration. This nuclear morphology has apparently not been described previously, for any organism.

  7. Programmed death ligand-1 expression on donor T cells drives graft-versus-host disease lethality

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Roddy S.; Thangavelu, Govindarajan; Lovitch, Scott B.; Dandamudi, Durga Bhavani; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Tkachev, Victor; Pawlicki, Jan M.; Furlan, Scott N.; Kean, Leslie S.; Aoyama, Kazutoshi; Taylor, Patricia A.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Foncea, Rocio; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Devine, Steven M.; Burrill, Joel S.; Guo, Lili; Sacristan, Catarina; Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Blair, Ian A.; Milone, Michael C.; Dustin, Michael L.; Riley, James L.; Bernlohr, David A.; Murphy, William J.; Fife, Brian T.; Munn, David H.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Turka, Laurence A.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) interaction with PD-1 induces T cell exhaustion and is a therapeutic target to enhance immune responses against cancer and chronic infections. In murine bone marrow transplant models, PD-L1 expression on host target tissues reduces the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). PD-L1 is also expressed on T cells; however, it is unclear whether PD-L1 on this population influences immune function. Here, we examined the effects of PD-L1 modulation of T cell function in GVHD. In patients with severe GVHD, PD-L1 expression was increased on donor T cells. Compared with mice that received WT T cells, GVHD was reduced in animals that received T cells from Pdl1–/– donors. PD-L1–deficient T cells had reduced expression of gut homing receptors, diminished production of inflammatory cytokines, and enhanced rates of apoptosis. Moreover, multiple bioenergetic pathways, including aerobic glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid metabolism, were also reduced in T cells lacking PD-L1. Finally, the reduction of acute GVHD lethality in mice that received Pdl1–/– donor cells did not affect graft-versus-leukemia responses. These data demonstrate that PD-L1 selectively enhances T cell–mediated immune responses, suggesting a context-dependent function of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis, and suggest selective inhibition of PD-L1 on donor T cells as a potential strategy to prevent or ameliorate GVHD. PMID:27294527

  8. Cancer-secreted AGR2 induces programmed cell death in normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Vitello, Elizabeth A.; Quek, Sue-Ing; Kincaid, Heather; Fuchs, Thomas; Crichton, Daniel J.; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) is a protein expressed in many solid tumor types including prostate, pancreatic, breast and lung. AGR2 functions as a protein disulfide isomerase in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, AGR2 is secreted by cancer cells that overexpress this molecule. Secretion of AGR2 was also found in salamander limb regeneration. Due to its ubiquity, tumor secretion of AGR2 must serve an important role in cancer, yet its molecular function is largely unknown. This study examined the effect of cancer-secreted AGR2 on normal cells. Prostate stromal cells were cultured, and tissue digestion media containing AGR2 prepared from prostate primary cancer 10-076 CP and adenocarcinoma LuCaP 70CR xenograft were added. The control were tissue digestion media containing no AGR2 prepared from benign prostate 10-076 NP and small cell carcinoma LuCaP 145.1 xenograft. In the presence of tumor-secreted AGR2, the stromal cells were found to undergo programmed cell death (PCD) characterized by formation of cellular blebs, cell shrinkage, and DNA fragmentation as seen when the stromal cells were UV irradiated or treated by a pro-apoptotic drug. PCD could be prevented with the addition of the monoclonal AGR2-neutralizing antibody P3A5. DNA microarray analysis of LuCaP 70CR media-treated vs. LuCaP 145.1 media-treated cells showed downregulation of the gene SAT1 as a major change in cells exposed to AGR2. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the array result. SAT1 encodes spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, which maintains intracellular polyamine levels. Abnormal polyamine metabolism as a result of altered SAT1 activity has an adverse effect on cells through the induction of PCD. PMID:27283903

  9. Programmed death ligand-1 expression on donor T cells drives graft-versus-host disease lethality.

    PubMed

    Saha, Asim; O'Connor, Roddy S; Thangavelu, Govindarajan; Lovitch, Scott B; Dandamudi, Durga Bhavani; Wilson, Caleph B; Vincent, Benjamin G; Tkachev, Victor; Pawlicki, Jan M; Furlan, Scott N; Kean, Leslie S; Aoyama, Kazutoshi; Taylor, Patricia A; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Foncea, Rocio; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Devine, Steven M; Burrill, Joel S; Guo, Lili; Sacristan, Catarina; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Blair, Ian A; Milone, Michael C; Dustin, Michael L; Riley, James L; Bernlohr, David A; Murphy, William J; Fife, Brian T; Munn, David H; Miller, Jeffrey S; Serody, Jonathan S; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H; Turka, Laurence A; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-07-01

    Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) interaction with PD-1 induces T cell exhaustion and is a therapeutic target to enhance immune responses against cancer and chronic infections. In murine bone marrow transplant models, PD-L1 expression on host target tissues reduces the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). PD-L1 is also expressed on T cells; however, it is unclear whether PD-L1 on this population influences immune function. Here, we examined the effects of PD-L1 modulation of T cell function in GVHD. In patients with severe GVHD, PD-L1 expression was increased on donor T cells. Compared with mice that received WT T cells, GVHD was reduced in animals that received T cells from Pdl1-/- donors. PD-L1-deficient T cells had reduced expression of gut homing receptors, diminished production of inflammatory cytokines, and enhanced rates of apoptosis. Moreover, multiple bioenergetic pathways, including aerobic glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid metabolism, were also reduced in T cells lacking PD-L1. Finally, the reduction of acute GVHD lethality in mice that received Pdl1-/- donor cells did not affect graft-versus-leukemia responses. These data demonstrate that PD-L1 selectively enhances T cell-mediated immune responses, suggesting a context-dependent function of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis, and suggest selective inhibition of PD-L1 on donor T cells as a potential strategy to prevent or ameliorate GVHD.

  10. Programmed death ligand-1 expression and its prognostic role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ryul; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kwon, Dohee; Ock, Chan-Young; Kim, Miso; Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Hak Jae; Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Park, In Kyu; Kang, Chang Hyun; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Young Tae; Heo, Dae Seog

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression and prognostic role of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) in locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS A total of 200 patients with ESCC who underwent radical esophagectomy with standard lymphadenectomy as the initial definitive treatment in Seoul National University Hospital from December 2000 to April 2013 were eligible for this analysis. Tissue microarrays were constructed by collecting tissue cores from surgical specimens, and immunostained with antibodies directed against PD-L1, p16, and c-Met. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively to assess clinical outcomes. Patients were divided into two groups by PD-L1 status, and significant differences in clinicopathologic characteristics between the two groups were assessed. RESULTS Tumor tissues from 67 ESCC patients (33.5%) were PD-L1-positive. Positive p16 expression was observed in 21 specimens (10.5%). The H-score for c-Met expression was ≥ 50 in 42 specimens (21.0%). Although PD-L1-positivity was not significantly correlated with any clinical characteristics including age, sex, smoking/alcoholic history, stage, or differentiation, H-scores for c-Met expression were significantly associated with PD-L1-positivity (OR = 2.34, 95%CI: 1.16-4.72, P = 0.017). PD-L1 expression was not significantly associated with a change in overall survival (P = 0.656). In contrast, the locoregional relapse rate tended to increase (P = 0.134), and the distant metastasis rate was significantly increased (HR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.01-2.79, P = 0.028) in patients with PD-L1-positive ESCC compared to those with PD-L1-negative ESCC. CONCLUSION PD-L1 expression is positively correlated with c-Met expression in ESCC. PD-L1 may play a critical role in distant failure and progression of ESCC. PMID:27729745

  11. Program death 1 (PD1) haplotyping in patients with breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Naeimi, Sirous; Talei, Abdolrasoul; Ghaderi, Abbas; Erfani, Nasrollah

    2011-08-01

    Located on chromosome 2q37.3, the programmed death 1 (PD1) gene encodes for PD-1 (also known as CD279), a negative co-stimulator in the immune system. PD-1 renders potent inhibitory effects on T and B lymphocytes as well as monocyte responses. Expression of PD-1 ligands by tumor cells has been reported to contribute in immune system evasion. We aimed, in current study, to investigate the association of two single nucleotide polymorphisms in PD1 gene, +7146 G to A (PD-1.3) and +7785 C to T (PD-1.5 or +872), with susceptibility and/or progression of breast carcinoma. Four hundred forty-three women with breast cancer and 328 age-sex match healthy donors were recruited in present study. Genotyping was performed using Nested polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Arlequin software package was used to check for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibration and to determine the haplotypes. Results revealed no significant differences in the frequencies of genotypes and alleles at PD-1.3 (P=0.252 and 0.279 for genotypes and alleles, respectively) and PD-1.5 positions (P=0.522 and 0.278 for genotypes and alleles, respectively). Four haplotypes were observed among populations with no differences in the frequency between patients and controls. Our results also revealed no association between PD1 genotypes and tumor stage, tumor size, tumor grade, lymph node involvement, vascular invasion, distant metastasis, and Nottingham prognostic index. Present data do not confirm association of PD-1.3 (+7146) G/A and PD-1.5 (+7785 or +872) C/T genetic markers with susceptibility of Iranians to breast cancer.

  12. A Novel Role for Programmed Cell Death Receptor Ligand-1 in Sepsis-Induced Intestinal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Youping; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Chen, Yaping; Monaghan, Sean Farrell; Patel, Sima; Huang, Xin; Heffernan, Daithi Seamus; Ayala, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Studies imply that intestinal barrier dysfunction is a key contributor to morbid events associated with sepsis. Recently, the co-inhibitory molecule programmed death-ligand1 (PD-L1) has been shown to be involved in the regulation of intestinal immune tolerance and/or inflammation. Our previous studies showed that PD-L1 gene deficiency reduced sepsis-induced intestinal injury morphologically. However, it is not known how PD-L1 expression impacts intestinal barrier dysfunction during sepsis. Here we tested the hypothesis that PD-L1 expressed on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) has a role in sepsis-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. To address this, C57BL/6 or PD-L1 gene knockout mice were subjected to experimental sepsis and PD-L1 expression, intestinal permeability and tissue cytokine levels were assessed. Subsequently, septic or nonseptic colonic samples (assigned by pathology report) were immunohistochemically stained for PD-L1 in a blinded fashion. Finally, human Caco2 cells were used for in vitro studies. The results demonstrated that PD-L1 was constitutively expressed and sepsis significantly upregulates PD-L1 in IECs from C57BL/6 mice. Concurrently, we observed increased PD-L1 expression in colon tissue samples from septic patients. PD-L1 gene deficiency reduced ileal permeability and tissue levels of IL-6, TNF-α and MCP-1, and prevented ileal tight junction protein loss compared with WT after sepsis. Comparatively, while Caco2 cell monolayers also responded to inflammatory cytokine stimulation with elevated PD-L1 expression, increased monolayer permeability and altered/decreased monolayer tight junction protein morphology/expression, these changes were reversed by PD-L1 blocking antibody. Together these data indicate that ligation of PD-L1 plays a novel role in mediating the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. PMID:27782294

  13. Programmed cell death 1 correlates with the occurrence and development of MG63 osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fuyou; Wu, Qiong; Dai, Xiusong; Li, Yumei; Gan, Huaiyong; Wang, Ri; Lv, Jie; Chen, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) on osteosarcoma (OD) stem cells and T cells, and to determine their correlation. OS stem cells were sorted and identified from OS MG63 cells. Flow cytometry was used to detect the PD-1 expression of the OS tumor stem cell membrane surface. The expression of PD-1 mRNA was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). MTT was used to detect the effect of PD-1 signals on T-cell proliferation. The results indicated that the cancer cells (cultured in DMEM medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum) exhibited clear proliferation within 1 week of cell culture, which showed their strong proliferation and aggressive ability. The formation of tumor cell spheres was dependent on the support of serum nutrition. The proliferation of MG63 cells in the serum culture medium was significantly higher than the number of OS cell spheres in serum-free suspension culture (P<0.05). Pluripotent stem cells in cancer cell spheres exhibited significantly higher cluster of differentiation 133 expression compared with the MG63 cells. The PD-1 expression levels of the cancer cell spheres was significantly increased compared with the MG63 cells, which is consistent with the results of the RT-PCR. In conclusion, the MG63 cell line possesses the features of OS stem cells. The MG63 cell line can express the certain cancer-associated cell markers. The expression of PD-1 in spheres was also increased significantly compared to the MG63 cells, which can reduce the immune function of patients and may be closely associated with the occurrence and development of tumors. PMID:28105229

  14. Loss of endothelial programmed cell death 10 activates glioblastoma cells and promotes tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuan; Zhao, Kai; Prinz, Anja; Keyvani, Kathy; Lambertz, Nicole; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Lei, Ting; Sure, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Background Neo-angiogenesis is a hallmark of glioblastoma (GBM) and is sustained by autocrine and paracrine interactions between neoplastic and nonneoplastic cells. Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) is ubiquitously expressed in nearly all tissues and plays crucial roles in regulating angiogenesis and apoptosis. We recently discovered the absence of PDCD10 expression in the tumor vessels of GBM patients. This raised the hypothesis that loss of endothelial PDCD10 affected GBM cell phenotyping and tumor progression. Methods Endothelial PDCD10 was silenced by siRNA and lentiviral shRNA. The tumor cell phenotype was studied in direct and indirect co-culture of endothelial cells (ECs) with U87 or LN229. Angiogenic protein array was performed in the media of PDCD10-silenced ECs. Tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth were investigated in a human GBM xenograft mouse model. Results Endothelial silence of PDCD10 significantly stimulated tumor cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, and invasion and inhibited apoptosis in co-cultures. Stable knockdown of endothelial PDCD10 increased microvessel density and the formation of a functional vascular network, leading to a 4-fold larger tumor mass in mice. Intriguingly, endothelial deletion of PDCD10 increased (≥2-fold) the release of 20 of 55 tested proangiogenic factors including VEGF, which in turn activated Erk1/2 and Akt in GBM cells. Conclusions For the first time, we provide evidence that loss of endothelial PDCD10 activates GBM cells and promotes tumor growth, most likely via a paracrine mechanism. PDCD10 shows a tumor-suppressor-like function in the cross talk between ECs and tumor cells and is potentially implicated in GBM progression. PMID:26254477

  15. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of programmed cell death 10 from sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Jie; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Lu, Shi-Ying; Li, Chuang; Hu, Pan; Li, Yan-Song; Liu, Nan-Nan; Tang, Feng; Xu, Yun-Ming; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Li, Zhao-Hui; Feng, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Hong-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) is a highly conserved adaptor protein. Its mutations result in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). In this study, PDCD10 cDNA from the buffy coat of Small Tail Han sheep (Ovis aries) was cloned from a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library, named OaPDCD10. The full-length cDNA of OaPDCD10 was 1343bp with a 639bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 212 amino acid residues. Tissue distribution of OaPDCD10 mRNA determined that it was ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissue samples, and the highest expression was observed in the heart. The differential expression of OaPDCD10 between infected sheep (challenged with Brucella melitensis) and vaccinated sheep (vaccinated with Brucella suis S2) was also investigated. The results revealed that, compared to the control group, the expression of OaPDCD10 from infected and vaccinated sheep was both significantly up-regulated (p<0.05). Moreover, the expression levels of OaPDCD10 from the vaccinated sheep were significantly higher than the infected sheep (p<0.05) after 30days post-inoculation. The recombinant OaPDCD10 (rOaPDCD10) protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then purified by affinity chromatography. The rOaPDCD10 protein was demonstrated to induce apoptosis and promote cell proliferation. Our studies are intended to discover potential diagnostic biomarkers of brucellosis to discern infected sheep from vaccinated sheep, and OaPDCD10 could be considered as a potential diagnostic biomarker of brucellosis.

  16. Prevention of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wherrett, Diane K.; Daneman, Denis

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Prevention of loss of β cells in type 1 diabetes is a major goal of current research. Knowledge of the genetic susceptibility, the increasing ability to predict who may be at risk, the recognition of the potential clinical impact of residual insulin secretion after diagnosis and the development of new immunomodulatory agents have supported an increasing number of clinical trials to prevent β cell loss. Interventions can be targeted at three stages: prior to the development of autoimmunity – primary prevention, after autoimmunity is recognized – secondary prevention or after diagnosis when significant numbers of β cells remain- tertiary prevention. Thus far a number of agents show promise when given shortly after diagnosis but no interventions prior to diagnosis have shown benefit. Knowledge in this area has grown quickly in recent years and will continue to grow rapidly with a number of international collaborative efforts underway. PMID:19944292

  17. Influence of antiretroviral therapy on programmed death-1 (CD279) expression on T cells in lymph nodes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Ehrhard, Simone; Wernli, Marion; Dürmüller, Ursula; Battegay, Manuel; Gudat, Fred; Erb, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection leads to T-cell exhaustion and involution of lymphoid tissue. Recently, the programmed death-1 pathway was found to be crucial for virus-specific T-cell exhaustion during human immunodeficiency virus infection. Programmed death-1 expression was elevated on human immunodeficiency virus-specific peripheral blood CD8+ and CD4+ T cells and correlated with disease severity. During human immunodeficiency infection, lymphoid tissue acts as a major viral reservoir and is an important site for viral replication, but it is also essential for regulatory processes important for immune recovery. We compared programmed death-1 expression in 2 consecutive inguinal lymph nodes of 14 patients, excised before antiretroviral therapy (antiretroviral therapy as of 1997-1999) and 16 to 20 months under antiretroviral therapy. In analogy to lymph nodes of human immunodeficiency virus-negative individuals, in all treated patients, the germinal center area decreased, whereas the number of germinal centers did not significantly change. Programmed death-1 expression was mostly found in germinal centers. The absolute extent of programmed death 1 expression per section was not significantly altered after antiretroviral therapy resulting in a significant-relative increase of programmed death 1 per shrunken germinal center. In colocalization studies, CD45R0+ cells that include helper/inducer T cells strongly expressed programmed death-1 before and during therapy, whereas CD8+ T cells, fewer in numbers, showed a weak expression for programmed death-1. Thus, although antiretroviral therapy seems to reduce the number of programmed death-1-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes within germinal centers, it does not down-regulate programmed death-1 expression on the helper/inducer T-cell subset that may remain exhausted and therefore unable to trigger immune recovery.

  18. Argos induces programmed cell death in the developing Drosophila eye by inhibition of the Ras pathway.

    PubMed

    Sawamoto, K; Taguchi, A; Hirota, Y; Yamada, C; Jin, M H; Okano, H

    1998-04-01

    We studied the role of Ras signaling in the regulation of cell death during Drosophila eye development. Overexpression of Argos, a diffusible inhibitor of the EGF receptor and Ras signaling, caused excessive cell death in developing eyes at pupal stages. The Argos-induced cell death was suppressed by coexpression of the anti-apoptotic genes p35, diap1, or diap2 in the eye as well as by the Df(3L)H99 chromosomal deletion that lacks three apoptosis-inducing genes, reaper, head involution defective (hid) and grim. Transient misexpression of the activated Ras1 protein (Ras1V12) later in pupal development suppressed the Argos-induced cell death. Thus, Argos-induced cell death seemed to have resulted from the suppression of the anti-apoptotic function of Ras. Conversely, cell death induced by overexpression of Hid was suppressed by gain-of-function mutations of the genes coding for MEK and ERK. These results support the idea that Ras signaling functions in two distinct processes during eye development, first triggering the recruitment of cells and later negatively regulating cell death.

  19. A major human immunodeficiency virus type 1-initiated killing pathway distinct from apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnitchenko, V; King, L; Riva, A; Tani, Y; Korsmeyer, S J; Cohen, D I

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the relative contribution of apoptosis or programmed cell death (PCD) to cell killing during acute infection with T-cell-tropic, cytopathic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), by employing diverse strategies to inhibit PCD or to detect its common end-stage sequelae. When Bcl-2-transfected cell lines were infected with HIV-1, their viability was only slightly higher than that of control infections. Although the adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein has been reported to be a stronger competitor of apoptosis than Bcl-2, it did not inhibit HIV-mediated cell death better than Bcl-2 protein. Competition for Fas ligand or inactivation of the Fas pathway secondary to intracellular mutation (MOLT-4 T cells) also had modest effects on overall cell death during acute HIV infection. In contrast to these observations with HIV infection or with HIV envelope-initiated cell death, Tat-expressing cell lines were much more susceptible (200% enhancement) to Fas-induced apoptosis than controls and Bcl-2 overexpression strongly (75%) inhibited this apoptotic T-cell death. PCD associated with FasR ligation resulted in the cleavage of common interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme (ICE)-protease targets, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and pro-ICE, whereas cleaved products were not readily detected during HIV infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells or T-cell lines even during periods of extensive cell death. These results indicate that one important form of HIV-mediated cell killing proceeds by a pathway that lacks the characteristics of T-cell apoptosis. Our observations support the conclusion that at least two HIV genes (env and tat) can kill T cells by distinct pathways and that an envelope-initiated process of T-cell death can be discriminated from apoptosis by many of the properties most closely associated with apoptotic cell death. PMID:9371641

  20. Living with Type 1 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... considered, plays a key role in diabetes care. Connecting with other people living with diabetes that understand ... affected by diabetes to find that support. Our Family Link program connects parents of children with type ...

  1. beta-cell apoptosis and defense mechanisms: lessons from type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Eizirik, D L; Darville, M I

    2001-02-01

    Increased evidence suggests that apoptosis is the main mode of beta-cell death in early type 1 diabetes. Cytokines mediate beta-cell apoptosis, and in this article, we discuss some of the cytokine-modified genes that may contribute to beta-cell survival or death. The gene encoding for the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase is induced by interleukin (IL)-1beta or IL-1beta plus gamma-interferon in rodent and human islets, respectively. This leads to nitric oxide (NO) formation, which contributes to a major extent to beta-cell necrosis and to a minor extent to the process of beta-cell apoptosis. The main mode of cell death induced by cytokines in human beta-cells is apoptosis, whereas cytokines lead to both necrosis and apoptosis in rat and mouse beta-cells. It is suggested that the necrotic component in rodent islets is due to NO-induced mitochondrial impairment and consequent decreased ATP production. Human islets, possessing better antioxidant defenses, are able to preserve glucose oxidation and ATP production, and can thus complete the apoptotic program after the death signal delivered by cytokines. We propose that this death signal results from cytokine-induced parallel and/or sequential changes in the expression of multiple proapoptotic and prosurvival genes. The identity of these "gene modules" and of the transcription factors regulating them remains to be established.

  2. Regulation of cell division cycle progression by bcl-2 expression: a potential mechanism for inhibition of programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the bcl-2 gene has been shown to effectively confer resistance to programmed cell death under a variety of circumstances. However, despite a wealth of literature describing this phenomenon, very little is known about the mechanism of resistance. In the experiments described here, we show that bcl-2 gene expression can result in an inhibition of cell division cycle progression. These findings are based upon the analysis of cell cycle distribution, cell cycle kinetics, and relative phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein, using primary tissues in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro, as well as continuous cell lines. The effects of bcl-2 expression on cell cycle progression appear to be focused at the G1 to S phase transition, which is a critical control point in the decision between continued cell cycle progression or the induction programmed cell death. In all systems tested, bcl-2 expression resulted in a substantial 30-60% increase in the length of G1 phase; such an increase is very substantial in the context of other regulators of cell cycle progression. Based upon our findings, and the related findings of others, we propose a mechanism by which bcl-2 expression might exert its well known inhibition of programmed cell death by regulating the kinetics of cell cycle progression at a critical control point. PMID:8642331

  3. Programmed Cell Death in Floral Organs: How and Why do Flowers Die?

    PubMed Central

    ROGERS, HILARY J.

    2006-01-01

    • Background Flowers have a species-specific, limited life span with an irreversible programme of senescence, which is largely independent of environmental factors, unlike leaf senescence, which is much more closely linked with external stimuli. • Timing Life span of the whole flower is regulated for ecological and energetic reasons, but the death of individual tissues and cells within the flower is co-ordinated at many levels to ensure correct timing. Some floral cells die selectively during organ development, whereas others are retained until the whole organ dies. • Triggers Pollination is an important floral cell death trigger in many species, and its effects are mediated by the plant growth regulator (PGR) ethylene. In some species ethylene is a major regulator of floral senescence, but in others it plays a very minor role and the co-ordinating signals involved remain elusive. Other PGRs such as cytokinin and brassinosteroids are also important but their role is understood only in some specific systems. • Mechanisms In two floral cell types (the tapetum and the pollen-tube) there is strong evidence for apoptotic-type cell death, similar to that in animal cells. However, in petals there is stronger evidence for an autophagous type of cell death involving endoplasmic reticulum-derived vesicles and the vacuole. Proteases are important, and homologues to animal caspases, key regulators of animal cell death, exist in plants. However, their role is not yet clear. • Comparison with Other Organs There are similarities to cell death in other plant organs, and many of the same genes are up-regulated in both leaf and petal senescence; however, there are also important differences for example in the role of PGRs. • Conclusions Understanding gene regulation may help to understand cell death in floral organs better, but alone it cannot provide all the answers. PMID:16394024

  4. HIV-1 Vpr potently induces programmed cell death in the CNS in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaodong; Cheng, Xiandong; Mukhtar, Muhammad; Acheampong, Edward A; Srinivasan, Algarsamy; Rafi, Mohammad; Pomerantz, Roger J; Parveen, Zahida

    2007-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) accessory protein Vpr has been associated with the induction of programmed cell death (apoptosis) and cell-cycle arrest. Studies have shown the apoptotic effect of Vpr on primary and established cell lines and on diverse tissues including the central nervous system (CNS) in vitro. However, the relevance of the effect of Vpr observed in vitro to HIV-1 neuropathogenesis in vivo, remains unknown. Due to the narrow host range of HIV-1 infection, no animal model is currently available. This has prompted us to consider a small animal model to evaluate the effects of Vpr on CNS in vivo through surrogate viruses expressing HIV-1Vpr. A single round of replication competent viral vectors, expressing Vpr, were used to investigate the apoptosis-inducing capabilities of HIV-1Vpr in vivo. Viral particles pseudotyped with VSV-G or N2c envelopes were generated from spleen necrosis virus (SNV) and HIV-1-based vectors to transduce CNS cells. The in vitro studies have demonstrated that Vpr generated by SNV vectors had less apoptotic effects on CNS cells compared with Vpr expressed by HIV-1 vectors. The in vivo study has suggested that viral particles, expressing Vpr generated by HIV-1-based vectors, when delivered through the ventricle, caused loss of neurons and dendritic processes in the cortical region. The apoptotic effect was extended beyond the cortical region and affected the hippocampus neurons, the lining of the choroids plexus, and the cerebellum. However, the effect of Vpr, when delivered through the cortex, showed neuronal damage only around the site of injection. Interestingly, the number of apoptotic neurons were significantly higher with HIV-1 vectors expressing Vpr than by the SNV vectors. This may be due to the differences in the proteins expressed by these viral vectors. These results suggest that Vpr induces apoptosis in CNS cells in vitro and in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the

  5. High programmed death 1 expression on T cells in aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wanhong; Zhang, Yilin; Zhang, Pengyu; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Longjin; He, Aili; Zhang, Wanggang; Hideto, Tamura

    2017-03-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) has been reported to be associated with aberrant regulation of T cells activation in aplastic anemia (AA). However, the connection between PD-1 expression status and AA needs to be further explored. The aim of this study is to investigate PD-1 expression status on T cells in AA patients and to explore the effect of PD-1 on apoptosis of T cells and BMHSCs. The concentration of platelet, lymphocyte and hemoglobin in peripheral blood of AA patients and healthy volunteers was detected by automatic blood-counter system. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) of peripheral blood and marrow were isolated from AA patients and healthy volunteers. PD-1 expression level on CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (BMHSCs) and B7-H1 expression level on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and BMHSCs were detected by flow cytometry (FCM). Cell apoptosis on T cells and BMHSCs was also detected by FCM. PD-1, B7-H1, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA expression levels on T cells of peripheral blood were detected by real-time PCR. MNCs from healthy volunteers were treated with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) to block the nuclear factor (NF)-кB pathway. Our results showed that in AA patients, T cells had high levels of PD-1 expression and apoptosis rate. In BMHSCs, apoptosis rate was also higher than healthy volunteers. The expression of PD-1 on T cells was correlated with lymphocyte count and hemoglobin level. PD-1 was highly expressed on CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells of AA patients and PD-1 expression was negatively correlated with the percentage of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells in AA patients. B7-H1, the ligand of PD-1, was also highly expressed on T cells, B cells, PBMCs and BMHSCs. When the NF-κB pathway was blocked by PDTC, the apoptosis of T cells and BMHSCs was reduced in a dose-dependent manner and PD-1 expression was also decreased in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, PD-1 was up-regulated in T cells in AA patients

  6. Mutations within the programmed cell death 10 gene cause cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Bergametti, F; Denier, C; Labauge, P; Arnoult, M; Boetto, S; Clanet, M; Coubes, P; Echenne, B; Ibrahim, R; Irthum, B; Jacquet, G; Lonjon, M; Moreau, J J; Neau, J P; Parker, F; Tremoulet, M; Tournier-Lasserve, E

    2005-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are hamartomatous vascular malformations characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities without intervening brain parenchyma. They cause seizures and cerebral hemorrhages, which can result in focal neurological deficits. Three CCM loci have been mapped, and loss-of-function mutations were identified in the KRIT1 (CCM1) and MGC4607 (CCM2) genes. We report herein the identification of PDCD10 (programmed cell death 10) as the CCM3 gene. The CCM3 locus has been previously mapped to 3q26-27 within a 22-cM interval that is bracketed by D3S1763 and D3S1262. We hypothesized that genomic deletions might occur at the CCM3 locus, as reported previously to occur at the CCM2 locus. Through high-density microsatellite genotyping of 20 families, we identified, in one family, null alleles that resulted from a deletion within a 4-Mb interval flanked by markers D3S3668 and D3S1614. This de novo deletion encompassed D3S1763, which strongly suggests that the CCM3 gene lies within a 970-kb region bracketed by D3S1763 and D3S1614. Six additional distinct deleterious mutations within PDCD10, one of the five known genes mapped within this interval, were identified in seven families. Three of these mutations were nonsense mutations, and two led to an aberrant splicing of exon 9, with a frameshift and a longer open reading frame within exon 10. The last of the six mutations led to an aberrant splicing of exon 5, without frameshift. Three of these mutations occurred de novo. All of them cosegregated with the disease in the families and were not observed in 200 control chromosomes. PDCD10, also called "TFAR15," had been initially identified through a screening for genes differentially expressed during the induction of apoptosis in the TF-1 premyeloid cell line. It is highly conserved in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Its implication in cerebral cavernous malformations strongly suggests that it is a new player in vascular morphogenesis and

  7. Vibrio cholerae Porin OmpU Induces Caspase-independent Programmed Cell Death upon Translocation to the Host Cell Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shelly; Prasad, G V R Krishna; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-12-25

    Porins, a major class of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, primarily act as transport channels. OmpU is one of the major porins of human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. In the present study, we show that V. cholerae OmpU has the ability to induce target cell death. Although OmpU-mediated cell death shows some characteristics of apoptosis, such as flipping of phosphatidylserine in the membrane as well as cell size shrinkage and increased cell granularity, it does not show the caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering pattern typical of apoptotic cells. Increased release of lactate dehydrogenase in OmpU-treated cells indicates that the OmpU-mediated cell death also has characteristics of necrosis. Further, we show that the mechanism of OmpU-mediated cell death involves major mitochondrial changes in the target cells. We observe that OmpU treatment leads to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF translocates to the host cell nucleus, implying that it has a crucial role in OmpU-mediated cell death. Finally, we observe that OmpU translocates to the target cell mitochondria, where it directly initiates mitochondrial changes leading to mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and AIF release. Partial blocking of AIF release by cyclosporine A in OmpU-treated cells further suggests that OmpU may be inducing the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. All of these results lead us to the conclusion that OmpU induces cell death in target cells in a programmed manner in which mitochondria play a central role.

  8. Vibrio cholerae Porin OmpU Induces Caspase-independent Programmed Cell Death upon Translocation to the Host Cell Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shelly; Prasad, G. V. R. Krishna; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-01-01

    Porins, a major class of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, primarily act as transport channels. OmpU is one of the major porins of human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. In the present study, we show that V. cholerae OmpU has the ability to induce target cell death. Although OmpU-mediated cell death shows some characteristics of apoptosis, such as flipping of phosphatidylserine in the membrane as well as cell size shrinkage and increased cell granularity, it does not show the caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering pattern typical of apoptotic cells. Increased release of lactate dehydrogenase in OmpU-treated cells indicates that the OmpU-mediated cell death also has characteristics of necrosis. Further, we show that the mechanism of OmpU-mediated cell death involves major mitochondrial changes in the target cells. We observe that OmpU treatment leads to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF translocates to the host cell nucleus, implying that it has a crucial role in OmpU-mediated cell death. Finally, we observe that OmpU translocates to the target cell mitochondria, where it directly initiates mitochondrial changes leading to mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and AIF release. Partial blocking of AIF release by cyclosporine A in OmpU-treated cells further suggests that OmpU may be inducing the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. All of these results lead us to the conclusion that OmpU induces cell death in target cells in a programmed manner in which mitochondria play a central role. PMID:26559970

  9. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Falchetti, Alberto; Monte, Francesca Del; Sala, Silvia Carbonell; Gozzini, Alessia; Luzi, Ettore; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome presented mostly by tumours of the parathyroids, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary, and characterised by a very high penetrance and an equal sex distribution. It occurs in approximately one in 30,000 individuals. Two different forms, sporadic and familial, have been described. The sporadic form presents with two of the three principal MEN1-related endocrine tumours (parathyroid adenomas, entero-pancreatic tumours and pituitary tumours) within a single patient, while the familial form consists of a MEN1 case with at least one first degree relative showing one of the endocrine characterising tumours. Other endocrine and non-endocrine lesions, such as adrenal cortical tumours, carcinoids of the bronchi, gastrointestinal tract and thymus, lipomas, angiofibromas, collagenomas have been described. The responsible gene, MEN1, maps on chromosome 11q13 and encodes a 610 aminoacid nuclear protein, menin, with no sequence homology to other known human proteins. MEN1 syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations of the MEN1 tumour suppressor gene. This gene is probably involved in the regulation of several cell functions such as DNA replication and repair and transcriptional machinery. The combination of clinical and genetic investigations, together with the improving of molecular genetics knowledge of the syndrome, helps in the clinical management of patients. Treatment consists of surgery and/or drug therapy, often in association with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Currently, DNA testing allows the early identification of germline mutations in asymptomatic gene carriers, to whom routine surveillance (regular biochemical and/or radiological screenings to detect the development of MEN1-associated tumours and lesions) is recommended. PMID:17014705

  10. Lack of the programmed death-1 receptor renders host susceptible to enteric microbial infection through impairing the production of the mucosal natural killer cell effector molecules.

    PubMed

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Frey, Blake F; Billeskov, Rolf; Singer, Steven M; Berzofsky, Jay A; Eckmann, Lars; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2016-03-01

    The programmed death-1 receptor is expressed on a wide range of immune effector cells, including T cells, natural killer T cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, and natural killer cells. In malignancies and chronic viral infections, increased expression of programmed death-1 by T cells is generally associated with a poor prognosis. However, its role in early host microbial defense at the intestinal mucosa is not well understood. We report that programmed death-1 expression is increased on conventional natural killer cells but not on CD4(+), CD8(+) or natural killer T cells, or CD11b(+) or CD11c(+) macrophages or dendritic cells after infection with the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Mice genetically deficient in programmed death-1 or treated with anti-programmed death-1 antibody were more susceptible to acute enteric and systemic infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Wild-type but not programmed death-1-deficient mice infected with Citrobacter rodentium showed significantly increased expression of the conventional mucosal NK cell effector molecules granzyme B and perforin. In contrast, natural killer cells from programmed death-1-deficient mice had impaired expression of those mediators. Consistent with programmed death-1 being important for intracellular expression of natural killer cell effector molecules, mice depleted of natural killer cells and perforin-deficient mice manifested increased susceptibility to acute enteric infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Our findings suggest that increased programmed death-1 signaling pathway expression by conventional natural killer cells promotes host protection at the intestinal mucosa during acute infection with a bacterial gut pathogen by enhancing the expression and production of important effectors of natural killer cell function.

  11. Nitric Oxide Is Involved in Cadmium-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis Suspension Cultures1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    De Michele, Roberto; Vurro, Emanuela; Rigo, Chiara; Costa, Alex; Elviri, Lisa; Di Valentin, Marilena; Careri, Maria; Zottini, Michela; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to cadmium (Cd2+) can result in cell death, but the molecular mechanisms of Cd2+ cytotoxicity in plants are not fully understood. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspension cultures underwent a process of programmed cell death when exposed to 100 and 150 μm CdCl2 and that this process resembled an accelerated senescence, as suggested by the expression of the marker senescence-associated gene12 (SAG12). CdCl2 treatment was accompanied by a rapid increase in nitric oxide (NO) and phytochelatin synthesis, which continued to be high as long as cells remained viable. Hydrogen peroxide production was a later event and preceded the rise of cell death by about 24 h. Inhibition of NO synthesis by NG-monomethyl-arginine monoacetate resulted in partial prevention of hydrogen peroxide increase, SAG12 expression, and mortality, indicating that NO is actually required for Cd2+-induced cell death. NO also modulated the extent of phytochelatin content, and possibly their function, by S-nitrosylation. These results shed light on the signaling events controlling Cd2+ cytotoxicity in plants. PMID:19261736

  12. Chloroplast Activity and 3′phosphadenosine 5′phosphate Signaling Regulate Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Mazubert, Christelle; Prunier, Florence; Chan, Kai Xun; Pogson, Barry James; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Delarue, Marianne; Benhamed, Moussa; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5′-3′ exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. PMID:26747283

  13. Position in cell cycle controls the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to nitric oxide-dependent programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Jarry, Anne; Charrier, Laetitia; Bou-Hanna, Chantal; Devilder, Marie-Claire; Crussaire, Véronique; Denis, Marc G; Vallette, Geneviève; Laboisse, Christian L

    2004-06-15

    Mounting evidence suggests that the position in the cell cycle of cells exposed to an oxidative stress could determine their survival or apoptotic cell death. This study aimed at determining whether nitric oxide (NO)-induced cell death in colon cancer cells might depend on their position in the cell cycle, based on a clone of the cancer cell line HT29 exposed to an NO donor, in combination with the manipulation of the cell entry into the cell cycle. We show that PAPA NONOate (pNO), from 10(-4) m to 10(-3) m, exerted early and reversible cytostatic effects through ribonucleotide reductase inhibition, followed by late resumption of cell growth at 5 x 10(-4) m pNO. In contrast, 10(-3) m pNO led to late programmed cell death that was accounted for by the progression of cells into the cell cycle as shown by (a) the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the G(2)-M phase at 10(-3) m pNO treatment; and (b) the prevention of cell death by inhibiting the entry of cells into the cell cycle. The entry of pNO-treated cells into the G(2)-M phase was associated with actin depolymerization and its S-glutathionylation in the same way as in control cells. However, the pNO treatment interfered with the build-up of a high reducing power, associated in control cells with a dramatic increase in reduced glutathione biosynthesis in the G(2)-M phase. This oxidative stress prevented the exit from the G(2)-M phase, which requires a high reducing power for actin deglutathionylation and its repolymerization. Finally, our demonstration that programmed cell death occurred through a caspase-independent pathway is in line with the context of a nitrosative/oxidative stress. In conclusion, this work, which deciphers the connection between the position of colonic cancer cells in the cell cycle and their sensitivity to NO-induced stress and their programmed cell death, could help optimize anticancer protocols based on NO-donating compounds.

  14. A Single-Amino-Acid Substitution in Obg Activates a New Programmed Cell Death Pathway in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dewachter, Liselot; Verstraeten, Natalie; Monteyne, Daniel; Kint, Cyrielle Ines; Versées, Wim; Pérez-Morga, David; Fauvart, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Programmed cell death (PCD) is an important hallmark of multicellular organisms. Cells self-destruct through a regulated series of events for the benefit of the organism as a whole. The existence of PCD in bacteria has long been controversial due to the widely held belief that only multicellular organisms would profit from this kind of altruistic behavior at the cellular level. However, over the past decade, compelling experimental evidence has established the existence of such pathways in bacteria. Here, we report that expression of a mutant isoform of the essential GTPase ObgE causes rapid loss of viability in Escherichia coli. The physiological changes that occur upon expression of this mutant protein—including loss of membrane potential, chromosome condensation and fragmentation, exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface, and membrane blebbing—point to a PCD mechanism. Importantly, key regulators and executioners of known bacterial PCD pathways were shown not to influence this cell death program. Collectively, our results suggest that the cell death pathway described in this work constitutes a new mode of bacterial PCD. PMID:26695632

  15. Yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death can occur without cytochrome c release which requires metacaspase YCA1.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Bobba, Antonella; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2010-01-04

    To investigate the role of cytochrome c (cyt c) release in yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death (AA-PCD), wild type (wt) and cells lacking metacaspase (Deltayca1), cytochrome c (Deltacyc1,7) and both (Deltacyc1,7Deltayca1) were compared for AA-PCD occurrence, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production and caspase activity. AA-PCD occurs in Deltacyc1,7 and Deltacyc1,7Deltayca1 cells slower than in wt, but similar to that in Deltayca1 cells, in which no cytochrome c release occurs. Both H(2)O(2) production and caspase activation occur in these cells with early and extra-activation in Deltacyc1,7 cells. We conclude that alternative death pathways can be activated in yeast AA-PCD, one dependent on cyt c release, which requires YCA1, and the other(s) independent on it.

  16. Can a single "powerless" mitochondrion in the malaria parasite contribute to parasite programmed cell death in the asexual stages?

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, Jun-Hong; Yeo, Su-Ping; Shyong-Wei Tan, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    The protozoan pathogens responsible for malaria are from the Plasmodium genus, with Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax accounting for almost all clinical infections. With recent estimates of mortality exceeding 800,000 annually, malaria continues to take a terrible toll on lives and the early promises of medicine to eradicate the disease have yet to approach realization, in part due to the spread of drug resistant parasites. Recent reports of artemisinin-resistance have prompted renewed efforts to identify novel therapeutic options, and one such pathway being considered for antimalarial exploit is the parasite's programmed cell death (PCD) pathway. In this mini-review, we will discuss the roles of the plasmodium mitochondria in cell death and as a target of antimalarial compounds, taking into account recent data suggesting that PCD pathways involving the mitochondria may be attractive antimalarial targets.

  17. Blood-based signatures in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Susanne M; Chen, Yi-Guang; Hagopian, William A; Hessner, Martin J

    2016-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood. It develops through autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells and results in lifelong dependence on exogenous insulin. The pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes involves a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors and has historically been attributed to aberrant adaptive immunity; however, there is increasing evidence for a role of innate inflammation. Over the past decade new methodologies for the analysis of nucleic acid and protein signals have been applied to type 1 diabetes. These studies are providing a new understanding of type 1 diabetes pathogenesis and have the potential to inform the development of new biomarkers for predicting diabetes onset and monitoring therapeutic interventions. In this review we will focus on blood-based signatures in type 1 diabetes, with special attention to both direct transcriptomic analyses of whole blood and immunocyte subsets, as well as plasma/serum-induced transcriptional signatures. Attention will also be given to proteomics, microRNA assays and markers of beta cell death. We will also discuss the results of blood-based profiling in type 1 diabetes within the context of the genetic and environmental factors implicated in the natural history of autoimmune diabetes.

  18. Blood-based signatures in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Susanne M.; Chen, Yi-Guang; Hagopian, William A.; Hessner, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood. It develops through autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells and results in lifelong dependence on exogenous insulin. The pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes involves a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors and has historically been attributed to aberrant adaptive immunity; however, there is increasing evidence for a role of innate inflammation. Over the past decade new methodologies for the analysis of nucleic acid and protein signals have been applied to type 1 diabetes. These studies are providing a new understanding of type 1 diabetes pathogenesis and have the potential to inform the development of new biomarkers for predicting diabetes onset and monitoring therapeutic interventions. In this review we will focus on blood-based signatures in type 1 diabetes, with special attention to both direct transcriptomic analyses of whole blood and immunocyte subsets, as well as plasma/serum-induced transcriptional signatures. Attention will also be given to proteomics, microRNA assays and markers of beta cell death. We will also discuss the results of blood-based profiling in type 1 diabetes within the context of the genetic and environmental factors implicated in the natural history of autoimmune diabetes. PMID:26699650

  19. Leishmania major metacaspase can replace yeast metacaspase in programmed cell death and has arginine-specific cysteine peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    González, Iveth J; Desponds, Chantal; Schaff, Cédric; Mottram, Jeremy C; Fasel, Nicolas

    2007-02-01

    The human protozoan parasite Leishmania major has been shown to exhibit several morphological and biochemical features characteristic of a cell death program when differentiating into infectious stages and under a variety of stress conditions. Although some caspase-like peptidase activity has been reported in dying parasites, no caspase gene is present in the genome. However, a single metacaspase gene is present in L. major whose encoded protein harbors the predicted secondary structure and the catalytic dyad histidine/cysteine described for caspases and other metacaspases identified in plants and yeast. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae metacaspase YCA1 has been implicated in the death of aging cells, cells defective in some biological functions, and cells exposed to different environmental stresses. In this study, we describe the functional heterologous complementation of a S. cerevisiae yca1 null mutant with the L. major metacaspase (LmjMCA) in cell death induced by oxidative stress. We show that LmjMCA is involved in yeast cell death, similar to YCA1, and that this function depends on its catalytic activity. LmjMCA was found to be auto-processed as occurs for caspases, however LmjMCA did not exhibit any activity with caspase substrates. In contrast and similarly to Arabidopsis thaliana metacaspases, LmjMCA was active towards substrates with arginine in the P1 position, with the activity being abolished following H147A and C202A catalytic site mutations. These results suggest that metacaspases are members of a family of peptidases with a role in cell death conserved in evolution notwithstanding possible differences in their catalytic activity.

  20. The Influence of Programmed Cell Death in Myeloid Cells on Host Resilience to Infection with Legionella pneumophila or Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gamradt, Pia; Xu, Yun; Gratz, Nina; Duncan, Kellyanne; Kobzik, Lester; Högler, Sandra; Decker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen clearance and host resilience/tolerance to infection are both important factors in surviving an infection. Cells of the myeloid lineage play important roles in both of these processes. Neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells all have important roles in initiation of the immune response and clearance of bacterial pathogens. If these cells are not properly regulated they can result in excessive inflammation and immunopathology leading to decreased host resilience. Programmed cell death (PCD) is one possible mechanism that myeloid cells may use to prevent excessive inflammation. Myeloid cell subsets play roles in tissue repair, immune response resolution, and maintenance of homeostasis, so excessive PCD may also influence host resilience in this way. In addition, myeloid cell death is one mechanism used to control pathogen replication and dissemination. Many of these functions for PCD have been well defined in vitro, but the role in vivo is less well understood. We created a mouse that constitutively expresses the pro-survival B-cell lymphoma (bcl)-2 protein in myeloid cells (CD68(bcl2tg), thus decreasing PCD specifically in myeloid cells. Using this mouse model we explored the impact that decreased cell death of these cells has on infection with two different bacterial pathogens, Legionella pneumophila and Streptococcus pyogenes. Both of these pathogens target multiple cell death pathways in myeloid cells, and the expression of bcl2 resulted in decreased PCD after infection. We examined both pathogen clearance and host resilience and found that myeloid cell death was crucial for host resilience. Surprisingly, the decreased myeloid PCD had minimal impact on pathogen clearance. These data indicate that the most important role of PCD during infection with these bacteria is to minimize inflammation and increase host resilience, not to aid in the clearance or prevent the spread of the pathogen. PMID:27973535

  1. The demise of residential new construction programs: Is there life after death?

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.L.

    1995-05-01

    Based on an evaluation of 10 residential new construction programs sponsored by investor-owned utilities in the US, the authors find that many of these programs are in dire straits and are in danger of being discontinued because they are not cost-effective. They believe that the cost-effectiveness of residential new construction programs can be improved by: (1) reducing program marketing costs and developing more effective marketing strategies; (2) promoting technologies and advanced building design practices significantly exceeding state and federal standards; (3) recognizing these programs` role in increasing compliance by participants with existing state building codes; and (4) obtaining an energy-savings credit for program spillover (market transformation) impacts. The issues involved in evaluating residential new construction programs will be challenging as evaluators attempt to quantify the savings from program spillover.

  2. Autoimmune diseases associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arti

    2008-01-01

    Associations of autoimmune diseases with neurofibromatosis type 1 have been rarely described. In the present report, we describe two patients of neurofibromatosis type 1 having an association with vitiligo in one, and alopecia areata and autoimmune thyroiditis in another. The associations of neurofibromatosis type 1 with vitiligo, alopecia areata, and autoimmune thyroiditis have not been reported earlier. Whether these associations reflect a causal relationship with neurofibromatosis type 1 or are coincidental needs to be settled.

  3. Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitors Engage the Cell Death Program Through the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    any capacity. The goal of this proposal was two- fold. One was to determine the mechanism by which the ER might initiate death following FAS inhibition...acid synthase and human cancer: new perspectives on its role in tumor biology. Nutrition 2000;16:202–8. 8. Kuhajda FP, Jenner K, Wood FD, et al. Fatty...flexibility of the acyl carrier protein-thioesterase interdomain linker on functionality of the animal fatty acid synthase . Biochemistry 44, 4100–4107

  4. Developmental Block and Programmed Cell Death in Bos indicus Embryos: Effects of Protein Supplementation Source and Developmental Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sheila Merlo; Marinho, Luciana Simões Rafagnin; Lunardelli, Paula Alvares; Seneda, Marcelo Marcondes; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if the protein source of the medium influences zebu embryo development and if developmental kinetics, developmental block and programmed cell death are related. The culture medium was supplemented with either fetal calf serum or bovine serum albumin. The embryos were classified as Fast (n = 1,235) or Slow (n = 485) based on the time required to reach the fourth cell cycle (48 h and 90 h post insemination - hpi -, respectively). The Slow group was further separated into two groups: those presenting exactly 4 cells at 48 hpi (Slow/4 cells) and those that reached the fourth cell cycle at 90 hpi (Slow). Blastocyst quality, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial membrane potential and signs of apoptosis or necrosis were evaluated. The Slow group had higher incidence of developmental block than the Fast group. The embryos supplemented with fetal calf serum had lower quality. DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential were absent in embryos at 48 hpi but present at 90 hpi. Early signs of apoptosis were more frequent in the Slow and Slow/4 cell groups than in the Fast group. We concluded that fetal calf serum reduces blastocyst development and quality, but the mechanism appears to be independent of DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic cells detected at 48 hpi reveal a possible mechanism of programmed cell death activation prior to genome activation. The apoptotic cells observed in the slow-developing embryos suggested a relationship between programmed cell death and embryonic developmental kinetics in zebu in vitro-produced embryos. PMID:25760989

  5. Antisense bcl-2 treatment increases programmed cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koty, P P; Zhang, H; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically regulated pathway that is altered in many cancers. This process is, in part, regulated by the ratio of PCD inducers (Bax) or inhibitors (Bcl-2). An abnormally high ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax prevents PCD, thus contributing to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, many of which are capable of inducing PCD. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells demonstrate resistance to these PCD-inducing agents. If Bcl-2 prevents NSCLC cells from entering the PCD pathway, then reducing the amount of endogenous Bcl-2 product may allow these cells to spontaneously enter the PCD pathway. Our purpose was to determine the effects of bcl-2 antisense treatment on the levels of programmed cell death in NSCLC cells. First, we determined whether bcl-2 and bax mRNA were expressed in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines: NCI-H226 (squamous), NCI-H358 (adenocarcinoma), and NCI-H596 (adenosquamous). Cells were then exposed to synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment, after which programmed cell death was determined, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation. Bcl-2 protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. All three NSCLC cell lines expressed both bcl-2 and bax mRNA and had functional PCD pathways. Synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment resulted in decreased Bcl-2 levels, reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell viability, and increased levels of spontaneous PCD. This represents the first evidence that decreasing Bcl-2 in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines allows the cells to spontaneously enter a PCD pathway. It also indicates the potential therapeutic use of antisense bcl-2 in the treatment of NSCLC.

  6. A New Nucleolar Body Appears in Drosophila saltans Salivary Gland Cells Before Histolysis, in Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, C. C.; de Campos Bicudo, H. E. M.

    2006-01-01

    The salivary glands of Drosophila saltans (saltans group, saltans subgroup) analyzed in an advanced stage of programmed cell death showed the appearance of a single, round, nucleolar corpuscle inside the highly altered nucleus of every gland cell, at a time during which the integrity of the original nucleolus was already lost and the original nucleolar material apparently disappeared. In the same nuclei, which already had also lost the characteristic chromosome structure, some delicate chromosome threads were maintained. In many cells, the new nucleolar corpuscle and these chromosome threads are associated. These findings are novel. However, the hypothesis put forward concerning their meaning remains dependent on other studies. PMID:20307232

  7. An in vivo root hair assay for determining rates of apoptotic-like programmed cell death in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana we demonstrate that dying root hairs provide an easy and rapid in vivo model for the morphological identification of apoptotic-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD) in plants. The model described here is transferable between species, can be used to investigate rates of AL-PCD in response to various treatments and to identify modulation of AL-PCD rates in mutant/transgenic plant lines facilitating rapid screening of mutant populations in order to identify genes involved in AL-PCD regulation. PMID:22165954

  8. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Inyo County

    2006-07-26

    Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA.

  9. Dihydrosphingosine-induced programmed cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells is independent of H₂O₂ production.

    PubMed

    Lachaud, Christophe; Da Silva, Daniel; Amelot, Nicolas; Béziat, Chloé; Brière, Christian; Cotelle, Valérie; Graziana, Annick; Grat, Sabine; Mazars, Christian; Thuleau, Patrice

    2011-03-01

    Sphinganine or dihydrosphingosine (d18:0, DHS), one of the most abundant free sphingoid Long Chain Base (LCB) in plants, has been recently shown to induce both cytosolic and nuclear calcium transient increases and a correlated Programmed Cell Death (PCD) in tobacco BY-2 cells. In this study, in order to get deeper insight into the LCB signaling pathway leading to cell death, the putative role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) has been investigated. We show that DHS triggers a rapid dose-dependent production of H₂O₂ that is blocked by diphenyleniodonium (DPI), indicating the involvement of NADPH oxidase(s) in the process. In addition, while DPI does not block DHS-induced calcium increases, the ROS production is inhibited by the broad spectrum calcium channel blocker lanthanum (La³+). Therefore, ROS production occurs downstream of DHS-induced Ca²+ transients. Interestingly, DHS activates expression of defense-related genes that is inhibited by both La³+ and DPI. Since DPI does not prevent DHS-induced cell death, these results strongly indicate that DHS-induced H₂O₂ production is not implicated in PCD mechanisms but rather would be associated to basal cell defense mechanisms.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide production and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the fusaric acid-induced programmed cell death in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Sun, Ling; Zhou, Benguo; Gao, Zhengliang; Hao, Yu; Zhu, Xiaoping; Liang, Yuancun

    2014-08-15

    Fusaric acid (FA), a non-specific toxin produced mainly by Fusarium spp., can cause programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells. The mechanism underlying the FA-induced PCD was not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the roles of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and mitochondrial function in the FA-induced PCD. Tobacco suspension cells were treated with 100 μM FA and then analyzed for H2O2 accumulation and mitochondrial functions. Here we demonstrate that cells undergoing FA-induced PCD exhibited H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, and a decrease of the catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities. Pre-treatment of tobacco suspension cells with antioxidant ascorbic acid and NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyl iodonium significantly reduced the rate of FA-induced cell death as well as the caspase-3-like protease activity. Moreover, FA treatment of tobacco cells decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content. Oligomycin and cyclosporine A, inhibitors of the mitochondrial ATP synthase and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, respectively, could also reduce the rate of FA-induced cell death significantly. Taken together, the results presented in this paper demonstrate that H2O2 accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction are the crucial events during the FA-induced PCD in tobacco suspension cells.

  11. Sequential reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species in early programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a physiological process commonly defined by alterations in nuclear morphology (apoptosis) and/or characteristic stepwise degradation of chromosomal DNA occurring before cytolysis. However, determined characteristics of PCD such as loss in mitochondrial reductase activity or cytolysis can be induced in enucleated cells, indicating cytoplasmic PCD control. Here we report a sequential disregulation of mitochondrial function that precedes cell shrinkage and nuclear fragmentation. A first cyclosporin A-inhibitable step of ongoing PCD is characterized by a reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, as determined by specific fluorochromes (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine++ + iodide; 3,3'dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide). Cytofluorometrically purified cells with reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential are initially incapable of oxidizing hydroethidine (HE) into ethidium. Upon short-term in vitro culture, such cells acquire the capacity of HE oxidation, thus revealing a second step of PCD marked by mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This step can be selectively inhibited by rotenone and ruthenium red yet is not affected by cyclosporin A. Finally, cells reduce their volume, a step that is delayed by radical scavengers, indicating the implication of ROS in the apoptotic process. This sequence of alterations accompanying early PCD is found in very different models of apoptosis induction: glucocorticoid-induced death of lymphocytes, activation-induced PCD of T cell hybridomas, and tumor necrosis factor-induced death of U937 cells. Transfection with the antiapoptotic protooncogene Bcl-2 simultaneously inhibits mitochondrial alterations and apoptotic cell death triggered by steroids or ceramide. In vivo injection of fluorochromes such as 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide; 3,3'dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide; or HE allows for the detection of

  12. Morphophysiological responses and programmed cell death induced by cadmium in Genipa americana L. (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Souza, Vânia L; de Almeida, Alex-Alan F; Lima, Stella G C; de M Cascardo, Júlio C; da C Silva, Delmira; Mangabeira, Pedro A O; Gomes, Fábio P

    2011-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) originating from atmospheric deposits, from industrial residues and from the application of phosphate fertilizers may accumulate in high concentrations in soil, water and food, thus becoming highly toxic to plants, animals and human beings. Once accumulated in an organism, Cd discharges and sets off a sequence of biochemical reactions and morphophysiological changes which may cause cell death in several tissues and organs. In order to test the hypothesis that Cd interferes in the metabolism of G. americana, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to measure eventual morphophysiological responses and cell death induced by Cd in this species. The plants were exposed to Cd concentrations ranging from 0 to 16 mg l(-1), in a nutritive solution. In TUNEL reaction, it was shown that Cd caused morphological changes in the cell nucleus of root tip and leaf tissues, which are typical for apoptosis. Cadmium induced anatomical changes in roots and leaves, such as the lignification of cell walls in root tissues and leaf main vein. In addition, the leaf mesophyll showed increase of the intercellular spaces. On the other hand, Cd caused reductions in the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration, while the maximum potential quantum efficiency of PS2 (Fv/Fm) was unchanged. Cadmium accumulated in the root system in high concentrations, with low translocation for the shoot, and promoted an increase of Ca and Zn levels in the roots and a decrease of K level in the leaves. High concentrations of Cd promoted morphophysiological changes and caused cell death in roots and leaves tissues of G. americana.

  13. Metacaspase-8 modulates programmed cell death induced by ultraviolet light and H2O2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    He, Rui; Drury, Georgina E; Rotari, Vitalie I; Gordon, Anna; Willer, Martin; Farzaneh, Tabasum; Woltering, Ernst J; Gallois, Patrick

    2008-01-11

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically controlled cell death that is regulated during development and activated in response to environmental stresses or pathogen infection. The degree of conservation of PCD across kingdoms and phylum is not yet clear; however, whereas caspases are proteases that act as key components of animal apoptosis, plants have no orthologous caspase sequences in their genomes. The discovery of plant and fungi metacaspases as proteases most closely related to animal caspases led to the hypothesis that metacaspases are the functional homologues of animal caspases in these organisms. Arabidopsis thaliana has nine metacaspase genes, and so far it is unknown which members of the family if any are involved in the regulation of PCD. We show here that metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is a member of the gene family strongly up-regulated by oxidative stresses caused by UVC, H(2)O(2), or methyl viologen. This up-regulation was dependent of RCD1, a mediator of the oxidative stress response. Recombinant metacaspase-8 cleaved after arginine, had a pH optimum of 8, and complemented the H(2)O(2) no-death phenotype of a yeast metacaspase knock-out. Overexpressing AtMC8 up-regulated PCD induced by UVC or H(2)O(2), and knocking out AtMC8 reduced cell death triggered by UVC and H(2)O(2) in protoplasts. Knock-out seeds and seedlings had an increased tolerance to the herbicide methyl viologen. We suggest that metacaspase-8 is part of an evolutionary conserved PCD pathway activated by oxidative stress.

  14. Double-stranded RNA cooperates with interferon-gamma and IL-1 beta to induce both chemokine expression and nuclear factor-kappa B-dependent apoptosis in pancreatic beta-cells: potential mechanisms for viral-induced insulitis and beta-cell death in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongbo; Cardozo, Alessandra K; Darville, Martine I; Eizirik, Décio L

    2002-04-01

    Viral infections may trigger the autoimmune assault leading to type 1 diabetes mellitus. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is produced by many viruses during their replicative cycle. The dsRNA, tested as synthetic poly(IC) (PIC), in synergism with the proinflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and/or IL-1 beta, results in nitric oxide production, Fas expression, beta-cell dysfunction, and death. Activation of the transcription nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) is required for PIC-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in beta-cells, and we hypothesized that this transcription factor may also participate in PIC-induced Fas expression and beta-cell apoptosis. This hypothesis, and the possibility that PIC induces expression of additional chemokines and cytokines (previously reported as NF-kappa B dependent) in pancreatic beta-cells, was investigated in the present study. We observed that the PIC-responsive region in the Fas promoter is located between nucleotides -223 and -54. Site-directed mutations at the NF-kappa B and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-binding sites prevented PIC-induced Fas promoter activity. Increased Fas promoter activity was paralleled by enhanced susceptibility of PIC + cytokine-treated beta-cells to apoptosis induced by Fas ligand. beta-Cell infection with the NF-kappa B inhibitor AdI kappa B((SA)2) prevented both necrosis and apoptosis induced by PIC + IL-1 beta or PIC + IFN-gamma. Messenger RNAs for several chemokines and one cytokine were induced by PIC, alone or in combination with IFN-gamma, in pancreatic beta-cells. These included IP-10, interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10, IL-15, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, fractalkine, and macrophage inflammatory protein-3 alpha. There was not, however, induction of IL-1 beta expression. We propose that dsRNA, generated during a viral infection, may contribute for beta-cell demise by both inducing expression of chemokines and IL-15, putative contributors for the build

  15. Programmed death 1 expression in variant immunoarchitectural patterns of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: comparison with CD57 and lymphomas in the differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Hywyn R O; Roncador, Giovanna; Warnke, Roger A; Natkunam, Yasodha

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have exploited an antibody directed against programmed death 1 expressed by follicular helper T-cells in the diagnosis of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. We had previously described clinically relevant, variant immunoarchitectural patterns of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma and, in this study, sought to address the diagnostic utility of programmed death 1 in comparison with CD57 in variant nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Immunohistologic staining for programmed death 1 was carried out on biopsies of 67 patients with variant nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Thirty-four additional cases of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma with associated diffuse areas, de novo T-cell and histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma, and lymphocyte-rich classic Hodgkin lymphoma were also studied. Our results show that programmed death 1 positivity was found in the majority of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma cases with a classic nodular architecture (87%) as compared with 50% for CD57 and was particularly helpful in identifying extranodular large atypical cells. Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma with diffuse areas showed a gradual decrease in programmed death 1 reactivity from nodular to diffuse areas, although a significant proportion (40%-50%) of cases retained programmed death 1 positivity also in diffuse areas. In addition, T-cell and histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma and lymphocyte-rich classic Hodgkin lymphoma displayed programmed death 1 positivity in a significant subset of cases (33%-40%). In conclusion, our study supports the utility of programmed death 1 in the diagnosis of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma and shows greater sensitivity of staining of programmed death 1 as compared with CD57 across all variants of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Loss of programmed death 1 reactivity did not correlate with diffuse areas

  16. Med13p prevents mitochondrial fission and programmed cell death in yeast through nuclear retention of cyclin C.

    PubMed

    Khakhina, Svetlana; Cooper, Katrina F; Strich, Randy

    2014-09-15

    The yeast cyclin C-Cdk8 kinase forms a complex with Med13p to repress the transcription of genes involved in the stress response and meiosis. In response to oxidative stress, cyclin C displays nuclear to cytoplasmic relocalization that triggers mitochondrial fission and promotes programmed cell death. In this report, we demonstrate that Med13p mediates cyclin C nuclear retention in unstressed cells. Deleting MED13 allows aberrant cytoplasmic cyclin C localization and extensive mitochondrial fragmentation. Loss of Med13p function resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and hypersensitivity to oxidative stress-induced programmed cell death that were dependent on cyclin C. The regulatory system controlling cyclin C-Med13p interaction is complex. First, a previous study found that cyclin C phosphorylation by the stress-activated MAP kinase Slt2p is required for nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation. This study found that cyclin C-Med13p association is impaired when the Slt2p target residue is substituted with a phosphomimetic amino acid. The second step involves Med13p destruction mediated by the 26S proteasome and cyclin C-Cdk8p kinase activity. In conclusion, Med13p maintains mitochondrial structure, function, and normal oxidative stress sensitivity through cyclin C nuclear retention. Releasing cyclin C from the nucleus involves both its phosphorylation by Slt2p coupled with Med13p destruction.

  17. Spinosad induces programmed cell death involves mitochondrial dysfunction and cytochrome C release in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingjun; Wang, Bo; Gao, Jufang; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Wenping; Tao, Liming

    2017-02-01

    Spinosad, a reduced-risk insecticide, acts on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor in the nervous system of target insects. However, its mechanism of action in non-neural insect cells is unclear. This study aimed to evaluate mitochondrial functional changes associated with spinosad in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells. Our results indicate that in Sf9 cells, spinosad induces programmed cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction through enhanced reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, and mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, eventually leading to cytochrome C release and apoptosis. The cytochrome C release induced by spinosad treatment was partly inhibited by the mPTP inhibitors cyclosporin A and bongkrekic acid. Subsequently, we found that spinosad downregulated Bcl-2 expression and upregulated p53 and Bax expressions, activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, and triggered PARP cleavage in Sf9 cells. These findings suggested that spinosad-induced programmed cell death was modulated by mitochondrial dysfunction and cytochrome C release.

  18. Chromosome instabilities and programmed cell death in tapetal cells of maize with B chromosomes and effects on pollen viability.

    PubMed Central

    González-Sánchez, Mónica; Rosato, Marcela; Chiavarino, Mauricio; Puertas, María J

    2004-01-01

    B chromosomes (B's), knobbed chromosomes, and chromosome 6 (NOR) of maize undergo nondisjunction and micronucleus formation in binucleate tapetal cells. These chromosome instabilities are regular events in the program of tapetal cell death, but the B's strongly increase A chromosome instability. We studied 1B and 0B plants belonging to selected lines for high or low B transmission rate and their F1 hybrids. These lines are characterized by meiotic conservation or loss of B chromosomes, respectively. The female B transmission (fBtl) allele(s) for low B transmission is dominant, inducing micronucleus formation and B nondisjunction. We hypothesize that the fBtl allele(s) induces knob instability. This instability would be sufficient to produce B loss in both meiocytes and binucleate tapetal cells. B instability could, in turn, produce instabilities in all chromosomes of maize complement. To establish whether the chromosomal instabilities are related to the tapetal programmed cell death (PCD) process, we applied the TUNEL technique. PCD, estimated as the frequency of binucleate tapetal cells with TUNEL label, was significantly correlated with the formation of micronuclei and the frequency of pollen abortion. It can be concluded that the observed chromosome instabilities are important to the PCD process and to the development of microspores to form viable pollen grains. PMID:15020483

  19. LIN-3/EGF promotes the programmed cell death of specific cells in Caenorhabditis elegans by transcriptional activation of the pro-apoptotic gene egl-1.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hang-Shiang; Wu, Yi-Chun

    2014-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is the physiological death of a cell mediated by an intracellular suicide program. Although key components of the PCD execution pathway have been identified, how PCD is regulated during development is poorly understood. Here, we report that the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like ligand LIN-3 acts as an extrinsic signal to promote the death of specific cells in Caenorhabditis elegans. The loss of LIN-3 or its receptor, LET-23, reduced the death of these cells, while excess LIN-3 or LET-23 signaling resulted in an increase in cell deaths. Our molecular and genetic data support the model that the LIN-3 signal is transduced through LET-23 to activate the LET-60/RAS-MPK-1/ERK MAPK pathway and the downstream ETS domain-containing transcription factor LIN-1. LIN-1 binds to, and activates transcription of, the key pro-apoptotic gene egl-1, which leads to the death of specific cells. Our results provide the first evidence that EGF induces PCD at the whole organism level and reveal the molecular basis for the death-promoting function of LIN-3/EGF. In addition, the level of LIN-3/EGF signaling is important for the precise fine-tuning of the life-versus-death fate. Our data and the previous cell culture studies that say EGF triggers apoptosis in some cell lines suggest that the EGF-mediated modulation of PCD is likely conserved in C. elegans and humans.

  20. Involvement of the yeast metacaspase Yca1 in ubp10Delta-programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Bettiga, Maurizio; Calzari, Luciano; Orlandi, Ivan; Alberghina, Lilia; Vai, Marina

    2004-11-01

    UBP10 encodes a deubiquitinating enzyme of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Its inactivation results in a complex phenotype characterized by a subpopulation of cells that exhibits the typical cellular markers of apoptosis. Here, we show that additional deletion of YCA1, coding for the yeast metacaspase, suppressed the ubp10 disruptant phenotype. Moreover, YCA1 overexpression, without any external stimulus, had a detrimental effect on growth and viability of ubp10 cells accompanied by an increase of apoptotic cells. This response was completely abrogated by ascorbic acid addition. We also observed that cells lacking UBP10 had an endogenous caspase activity, revealed by incubation in vivo with FITC-labeled VAD-fmk. All these results argue in favour of an involvement of the yeast metacaspase in the active cell death triggered by loss of UBP10 function.

  1. Programmed death-1 receptor suppresses γ-IFN producing NKT cells in human tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar; Dey, Aparajit Ballav; Mohan, Anant; Mitra, Dipendra Kumar

    2014-05-01

    IFN-γ biased Th1 effector immune response is crucial for containment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Various T cell subsets with regulatory function dictate the generation of Th1 like cells. NKT cells are a specialized T cell subset known to be activated early in immune response and control T cell response via release of immunoregulatory cytokines like IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10. M. tuberculosis, with abundance of its cell wall lipids may potently activate NKT cells resulting in cytokine production and PD-1 expression. In this study, among 49 treatment naive active pulmonary tuberculosis patients, we found a higher percentage of PD1(+) NKT cells correlating with sputum bacillary load. Furthermore, blocking PD-1 increased the number of IFN-γ producing NKT cells by inhibiting their apoptosis. Moreover, peripheral frequency of NKT cells declined with therapy suggesting their role in host T cell response. In this study, we concluded that PD-1 preferentially induces apoptosis of IFN-γ producing NKT cells while sparing NKT cells that produce IL-4. Such a polarized NKT cell function may impose a Th2 bias on the ensuing effector T cell response leading to inefficient clearance of M. tuberculosis. Inhibiting PD-1 may therefore alter the T cell response in favor of the host by rescuing type 1 NKT cells from apoptosis and boosting Th1 effector T cell functions against M. tuberculosis.

  2. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Loss & grief > Neonatal death Neonatal death E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... cope with your baby’s death. What is neonatal death? Neonatal death is when a baby dies in ...

  3. Novel Treatment of Melanoma: Combined Parasite-Derived Peptide GK-1 and Anti-Programmed Death Ligand 1 Therapy.

    PubMed

    Vera-Aguilera, Jesus; Perez-Torres, Armando; Beltran, Diego; Villanueva-Ramos, Cynthia; Wachtel, Mitchell; Moreno-Aguilera, Eduardo; Vera-Aguilera, Carlos; Ventolini, Gary; Martínez-Zaguilán, Raul; Sennoune, Souad R

    2017-03-01

    Recent successes in the development of new therapies for metastatic melanoma, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitors, anticytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4, and programmed cell death protein 1/programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway-blocking antibodies, as well as combination strategies, all yielded promising results, changing the continually evolving landscape of therapeutic options for patients with melanoma. One promising new treatment modality is based on the use of immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies that enhance the function of components of the antitumor immune response such as T cells or block immunologic checkpoints that restrain effective antitumor immunity. Program death-1 receptor and its ligand, PD-L1, is a major mechanism by which a tumor suppresses T cell-mediated antitumor immune responses. Studies in mice have shown that GK-1, an 18 amino acid peptide from Taenia crassiceps cisticerci, has the potential to be used as a primary or adjuvant component for the treatment of cancers by stimulating proinflammatory cytokines. The authors hypothesized that treatment with GK-1 in combination with anti-PD-L1 will increase survival in mice bearing melanoma tumors. C57BL/6 mice were injected with B16-F10-luc2 cells and separated into four groups: control, GK-1, anti-PD-L1, and GK-1/anti-PD-L1. The tumor sizes were measured and monitored using calipers and bioluminescence. The GK-1 peptide in combination with anti-PD-L1 showed significantly longer survival (34 days) compared with the other groups (23-27 days). This means an increase; survival increased 47.82% in the mice treated with GK-1+anti-PD-L1, 21.7% in mice treated with GK-1 alone, and 6.08% in those mice treated with anti-PD-L1 only. Blood samples were collected at days 0, 14, and at euthanization or end of the experiment and monitored for cytokines using mouse-specific V-PLEX Proinflammatory Panel. A decrease in TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10 serum levels

  4. Epidemiology of type 1 diabetes in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Rita Angélica; Garibay-Nieto, Nayely; Wacher-Rodarte, Niels; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Latin America is among the regions with the highest diabetes-related burden. Research and treatment programs have increased in number and complexity in recent years, but they are focused in type 2 diabetes, because this condition explains a large proportion of the cases. In contrast, the information regarding the epidemiology of type 1 diabetes is scant in this area. Here, we analyze the available information on this topic and identify potential areas of opportunity to generate new knowledge through the study of type 1 diabetes in Latin Americans. Both, the prevalence and the incidence of type 1 diabetes, are lower in Latin American countries compared to that reported in Europe, North America, southern Asia and northern Africa. Biologic and methodological factors may explain the smaller contribution of type 1. The presence of some putative 'protective' environmental exposures or the absence of those prevalent in a region may explain the lower type 1 diabetes prevalence observed in most Latin American countries. However, the number and quality of the diabetes registries are not enough in this region. During the past decade, the incidence of type 1 diabetes has grown worldwide. The same trend has been reported in Latin America. This epidemiologic transition is a unique opportunity to identify interactions between rapidly changing environmental factors in subjects with different genetic backgrounds (such as the admixed Latin American populations). Finally, on-going therapeutic initiatives in this region are highlighted.

  5. Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? Print A A A What's in this article? ... pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, ...

  6. Transgenic plant cells lacking mitochondrial alternative oxidase have increased susceptibility to mitochondria-dependent and -independent pathways of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Robson, Christine A; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2002-08-01

    The plant mitochondrial electron transport chain is branched such that electrons at ubiquinol can be diverted to oxygen via the alternative oxidase (AOX). This pathway does not contribute to ATP synthesis but can dampen the mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species. Here, we establish that transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Petit Havana SR1) cells lacking AOX (AS8 cells) show increased susceptibility to three different death-inducing compounds (H(2)O(2), salicylic acid [SA], and the protein phosphatase inhibitor cantharidin) in comparison with wild-type cells. The timing and extent of AS8 cell death are very similar among the three treatments and, in each case, are accompanied by the accumulation of oligonucleosomal fragments of DNA, indicative of programmed cell death. Death induced by H(2)O(2) or SA occurs by a mitochondria-dependent pathway characterized by cytochrome c release from the mitochondrion. Conversely, death induced by cantharidin occurs by a pathway without any obvious mitochondrial involvement. The ability of AOX to attenuate these death pathways may relate to its ability to maintain mitochondrial function after insult with a death-inducing compound or may relate to its ability to prevent chronic oxidative stress within the mitochondrion. In support of the latter, long-term treatment of AS8 cells with an antioxidant compound increased the resistance of AS8 cells to SA- or cantharidin-induced death. The results indicate that plants maintain both mitochondria-dependent and -independent pathways of programmed cell death and that AOX may act as an important mitochondrial "survival protein" against such death.

  7. The plant metacaspase AtMC1 in pathogen-triggered programmed cell death and aging: functional linkage with autophagy.

    PubMed

    Coll, N S; Smidler, A; Puigvert, M; Popa, C; Valls, M; Dangl, J L

    2014-09-01

    Autophagy is a major nutrient recycling mechanism in plants. However, its functional connection with programmed cell death (PCD) is a topic of active debate and remains not well understood. Our previous studies established the plant metacaspase AtMC1 as a positive regulator of pathogen-triggered PCD. Here, we explored the linkage between plant autophagy and AtMC1 function in the context of pathogen-triggered PCD and aging. We observed that autophagy acts as a positive regulator of pathogen-triggered PCD in a parallel pathway to AtMC1. In addition, we unveiled an additional, pro-survival homeostatic function of AtMC1 in aging plants that acts in parallel to a similar pro-survival function of autophagy. This novel pro-survival role of AtMC1 may be functionally related to its prodomain-mediated aggregate localization and potential clearance, in agreement with recent findings using the single budding yeast metacaspase YCA1. We propose a unifying model whereby autophagy and AtMC1 are part of parallel pathways, both positively regulating HR cell death in young plants, when these functions are not masked by the cumulative stresses of aging, and negatively regulating senescence in older plants.

  8. Dehydroascorbate: a possible surveillance molecule of oxidative stress and programmed cell death in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Murik, Omer; Elboher, Ahinoam; Kaplan, Aaron

    2014-04-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii tolerates relatively high H2 O2 levels that induce an array of antioxidant activities. However, rather than rendering the cells more resistant to oxidative stress, the cells become far more sensitive to an additional H2 O2 dose. If H2 O2 is provided 1.5-9 h after an initial dose, it induces programmed cell death (PCD) in the wild-type, but not in the dum1 mutant impaired in the mitochondrial respiratory complex III. This mutant does not exhibit a secondary oxidative burst 4-5 h after the inducing H2 O2 , nor does it activate metacaspase-1 after the second H2 O2 treatment. The intracellular dehydroascorbate level, a product of ascorbate peroxidase, increases under conditions leading to PCD. The addition of dehydroascorbate induces PCD in the wild-type and dum1 cultures, but higher levels are required in dum1 cells, where it is metabolized faster. The application of dehydroascorbate induces the expression of metacaspase-2, which is much stronger than the expression of metacaspase-1. The presence or absence of oxidative stress, in addition to the rise in internal dehydroascorbate, may determine which metacaspase is activated during Chlamydomonas PCD. Cell death is strongly affected by the timing of H2 O2 or dehydroascorbate admission to synchronously grown cultures, suggesting that the cell cycle phase may distinguish cells that perish from those that do not.

  9. Characterization of the programmed cell death induced by metabolic products of Alternaria alternata in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dan-Dan; Jia, Yu-Jiao; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Zhang, Li-Tao; Zhang, Zi-Shan; Xue, Zhong-Cai; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2011-02-01

    Alternaria alternata has received considerable attention in current literature and most of the studies are focused on its pathogenic effects on plant chloroplasts, but little is known about the characteristics of programmed cell death (PCD) induced by metabolic products (MP) of A. alternata, the effects of the MP on mitochondrial respiration and its relation to PCD. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism of MP-induced PCD in non-green tobacco BY-2 cells and to explore the role of mitochondrial inhibitory processes in the PCD of tobacco BY-2 cells. MP treatment led to significant cell death that was proven to be PCD by the concurrent cytoplasm shrinkage, chromatin condensation and DNA laddering observed in the cells. Moreover, MP treatment resulted in the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), rapid ATP depletion and a respiratory decline in the tobacco BY-2 cells. It was concluded that the direct inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), alternative pathway (AOX) capacity and catalase (CAT) activity by the MP might be the main contributors to the MP-induced ROS burst observed in tobacco BY-2 cells. The addition of adenosine together with the MP significantly inhibited ATP depletion without preventing PCD; however, when the cells were treated with the MP plus CAT, ROS overproduction was blocked and PCD did not occur. The data presented here demonstrate that the ROS burst played an important role in MP-induced PCD in the tobacco BY-2 cells.

  10. Entamoeba histolytica P-glycoprotein (EhPgp) inhibition, induce trophozoite acidification and enhance programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Medel Flores, Olivia; Gómez García, Consuelo; Sánchez Monroy, Virgina; Villalba Magadaleno, José D'Artagnan; Nader García, Elvira; Pérez Ishiwara, D Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is induced in Entamoeba histolytica by a variety of stimuli in vitro and in vivo. In mammals, intracellular acidification serves as a global switch for inactivating cellular processes and initiates molecular mechanisms implicated in the destruction of the genome. In contrast, intracellular alkalinization produced by P-glycoprotein overexpression in multidrug-resistant cells has been related to apoptosis resistance. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of E. histolytica P-glycoprotein (PGP) altered chloride-dependent currents and triggered trophozoite swelling, the reverse process of cell shrinkage produced during PCD. Here we showed that antisense inhibition of PGP expression produced a synchronous death of trophozoites and the enhancement of biochemical and morphological characteristics of PCD induced by G418. The nucleus was contracted, and the nuclear membrane was disrupted. Moreover, chromatin was extensively fragmented. Ca(2+) concentration was increased, while the intracellular pH (ipH) was acidified. In contrast, PGP overexpression prevented intracellular acidification and circumvented the apoptotic effect of G418.

  11. The plant metacaspase AtMC1 in pathogen-triggered programmed cell death and aging: functional linkage with autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Coll, N S; Smidler, A; Puigvert, M; Popa, C; Valls, M; Dangl, J L

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a major nutrient recycling mechanism in plants. However, its functional connection with programmed cell death (PCD) is a topic of active debate and remains not well understood. Our previous studies established the plant metacaspase AtMC1 as a positive regulator of pathogen-triggered PCD. Here, we explored the linkage between plant autophagy and AtMC1 function in the context of pathogen-triggered PCD and aging. We observed that autophagy acts as a positive regulator of pathogen-triggered PCD in a parallel pathway to AtMC1. In addition, we unveiled an additional, pro-survival homeostatic function of AtMC1 in aging plants that acts in parallel to a similar pro-survival function of autophagy. This novel pro-survival role of AtMC1 may be functionally related to its prodomain-mediated aggregate localization and potential clearance, in agreement with recent findings using the single budding yeast metacaspase YCA1. We propose a unifying model whereby autophagy and AtMC1 are part of parallel pathways, both positively regulating HR cell death in young plants, when these functions are not masked by the cumulative stresses of aging, and negatively regulating senescence in older plants. PMID:24786830

  12. Pseudomonas type III effector AvrPtoB induces plant disease susceptibility by inhibition of host programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Abramovitch, Robert B.; Kim, Young-Jin; Chen, Shaorong; Dickman, Martin B.; Martin, Gregory B.

    2003-01-01

    The AvrPtoB type III effector protein is conserved among diverse genera of plant pathogens suggesting it plays an important role in pathogenesis. Here we report that Pseudomonas AvrPtoB acts inside the plant cell to inhibit programmed cell death (PCD) initiated by the Pto and Cf9 disease resistance proteins and, remarkably, the pro-apoptotic mouse protein Bax. AvrPtoB also suppressed PCD in yeast, demonstrating that AvrPtoB functions as a cell death inhibitor across kingdoms. Using truncated AvrPtoB proteins, we identified distinct N- and C-terminal domains of AvrPtoB that are sufficient for host recognition and PCD inhibition, respectively. We also identified a novel resistance phenotype, Rsb, that is triggered by an AvrPtoB truncation disrupted in the anti-PCD domain. A Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 strain with a chromosomal mutation in the AvrPtoB C-terminus elicited Rsb-mediated immunity in previously susceptible tomato plants and disease was restored when full-length AvrPtoB was expressed in trans. Thus, our results indicate that a type III effector can induce plant susceptibility to bacterial infection by inhibiting host PCD. PMID:12505984

  13. In vivo study of developmental programmed cell death using the lace plant (Aponogeton madagascariensis; Aponogetonaceae) leaf model system.

    PubMed

    Wright, Harrison; van Doorn, Wouter G; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2009-05-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is required for many morphological changes, but in plants it has been studied in much less detail than in animals. The unique structure and physiology of the lace plant (Aponogeton madagascariensis) is well suited for the in vivo study of developmental PCD. Live streaming video and quantitative analysis, coupled with transmission electron microscopy, were used to better understand the PCD sequence, with an emphasis on the chloroplasts. Dividing, dumbbell-shaped chloroplasts persisted until the late stages of PCD. However, the average size and number of chloroplasts, and the starch granules associated with them, declined steadily in a manner reminiscent of leaf senescence, but distinct from PCD described in the Zinnia tracheary element system. Remaining chloroplasts often formed a ring around the nucleus. Transvacuolar strands, which appeared to be associated with chloroplast transport, first increased and then decreased. Mitochondrial streaming ceased abruptly during the late stages of PCD, apparently due to tonoplast rupture. This rupture occurred shortly before the rapid degradation of the nucleus and plasma membrane collapse, in a manner also reminiscent of the Zinnia model. The presence of numerous objects in the vacuoles suggests increased macro-autophagy before cell death. These objects were rarely observed in cells not undergoing PCD.

  14. Downregulation of programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) in tumorigenesis and progression of human digestive tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Gang; Zhang, Hao; Dong, Ming; Zheng, Xinyu; Ozaki, Iwata; Matsuhashi, Sachiko; Guo, Kejian

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, digestive tract cancers become the commonest neoplasia and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. The development of diagnosis and therapy is urgently required. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), a new tumor suppressor, has been documented to be a potential diagnostic tool and treatment target for neoplasia due to the inhabitation of tumor promotion/progression and metastasis. However, its role in human digestive tract cancers is few available up to now. In this study, we examined the expression of PDCD4 in human digestive tract cancers (61 gastric cancer, 65 colorectal cancer, and 69 pancreatic cancer patients) by Western blot analysis, reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Western blot, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry examination showed that expressions of PDCD4 were significantly lower in cancers specimens than in noncancerous tissues. Among the different differentiated cancer tissues, PDCD4 expression was significantly lower in moderately or poorly differentiated cancers than in well-differentiated cancers (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested that PDCD4 might be a potentially valuable molecular target in diagnosis and therapy for human digestive tract cancers.

  15. Adiposity and Mortality in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Baqiyyah; Miller, Rachel G; Costacou, Tina; Fried, Linda; Kelsey, Sheryl; Evans, Rhobert W

    2009-01-01

    Background In the general population, adiposity exhibits a J- or U-shaped relationship with mortality; however, in catabolic states this relationship is often inversely linear. We have recently documented an age-independent increase in overweight/obesity in the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications study (EDC) of type 1 diabetes (T1D). As intensified insulin therapy (IIT) may promote weight gain, the impact of weight gain in T1D is of importance. We therefore assessed the association of adiposity with mortality in 655 EDC participants during twenty years of follow-up. Methods Individuals were categorized as underweight (BMI <20), normal (20≤BMI<25), overweight (25≤BMI<30), or obese (BMI≥30). Cox models were constructed using BMI and covariates at baseline, updated means during follow-up, time-varying (reflecting most recent status), and change during adulthood as predictors of mortality. Results The prevalence of IIT (3+ insulin shots daily and/or pump) increased from 7% to 82%. Overweight increased 47%; obesity increased 7-fold. There were 146 deaths. In unadjusted models BMI (modeled continuously) demonstrated a quadratic relationship with mortality (p=0.002, <0.0001, <0.0001 for baseline, updated mean, and time-varying models, respectively). However, only in the time-varying model were the obese significantly different from the normal weight. while the baseline model revealed no differences by BMI category, in both the updated mean and time varying models, the underweight were at greater risk than the normal weight (p<0.0001 both models). The nonlinear relationship of adiposity with mortality remained after adjustment for diabetes complications, biological, or socioeconomic/lifestyle risk factors, with the exception of baseline socioeconomic/lifestyle risk factors where a linear association emerged. Adjustment for waist circumference eliminated the risk in the obese. Finally, weight gain during follow-up was protective. Conclusion The

  16. Tumor cell programmed death ligand 1-mediated T cell suppression is overcome by coexpression of CD80.

    PubMed

    Haile, Samuel T; Bosch, Jacobus J; Agu, Nnenna I; Zeender, Annette M; Somasundaram, Preethi; Srivastava, Minu K; Britting, Sabine; Wolf, Julie B; Ksander, Bruce R; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2011-06-15

    Programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1, or B7-H1) is expressed constitutively or is induced by IFN-γ on the cell surface of most human cancer cells and acts as a "molecular shield" by protecting tumor cells from T cell-mediated destruction. Using seven cell lines representing four histologically distinct solid tumors (lung adenocarcinoma, mammary carcinoma, cutaneous melanoma, and uveal melanoma), we demonstrate that transfection of human tumor cells with the gene encoding the costimulatory molecule CD80 prevents PDL1-mediated immune suppression by tumor cells and restores T cell activation. Mechanistically, CD80 mediates its effects through its extracellular domain, which blocks the cell surface expression of PDL1 but does not prevent intracellular expression of PDL1 protein. These studies demonstrate a new role for CD80 in facilitating antitumor immunity and suggest new therapeutic avenues for preventing tumor cell PDL1-induced immune suppression.

  17. Ricinosomes and endosperm transfer cell structure in programmed cell death of the nucellus during Ricinus seed development.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John S; Helm, Michael; Gietl, Christine

    2005-02-08

    The ricinosome (precursor protease vesicle) is an organelle found exclusively in plant cells. Ricinosomes contain a 45-kDa pro-cysteine endopeptidase (CysEP) with a C-terminal KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal. CysEP is a member of a unique group of papain-type cysteine peptidases found specifically in senescing and ricinosome-containing tissues. During seed development in the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis L.), the cells of the nucellus are killed as the major seed storage organ, the cellular endosperm, expands and begins to accumulate reserves. The destruction of the maternal seed tissues is a developmentally programmed cell death. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling revealed that nuclear DNA fragmentation occurs in the nucellar cells adjacent to the expanding endosperm. These cells exhibit ultrastructural features consistent with programmed cell death, including vesiculation of the cytosol, development of irregularly shaped nuclei, vacuolar collapse, and shrinkage of the cytoplasm. Ricinosomes containing the CysEP were identified in the nucellar cells by light and electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Both proCysEP and mature CysEP are present in protein extracts of the nucellar tissues during seed development. Upon collapse of the nucellar cells, the content of the ricinosomes is released into the cytoplasm, where the activated CysEP digests the remaining proteinaceous cellular debris. Digestion products of the nucellar cells are presumed taken up by the outermost cells of the endosperm, which have labyrinthine ingrowths of the outer walls typical of transfer cells.

  18. A High Soy Diet Reduces Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Bcl-xL Expression In Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lovekamp-Swan, Tara; Glendenning, Michele; Schreihofer, Derek A.

    2009-01-01

    Soy phytoestrogens have been proposed as an alternative to estrogen replacement therapy and have demonstrated potential neuroprotective effects in the brain. We have shown that a high soy diet significantly reduces infarct size following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Here, we tested the hypothesis that a high soy diet would attenuate programmed cell death after stroke. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and fed either an isoflavone-reduced diet (IFP) or a high soy diet (SP) for 2 weeks before undergoing 90 minutes of transient MCAO (tMCAO) followed by 22.5 hr reperfusion. Infarct size, as assessed by TTC staining, was significantly reduced by a high soy diet (p< 0.05). Apoptosis in the ischemic cortex, measured by TUNEL staining, was significantly reduced by the high soy diet. The number of active caspase-3 positive cells and caspase-mediated α-spectrin cleavage was also significantly decreased in the ischemic cortex of SP rats. Furthermore, nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was significantly reduced in the ischemic cortex of SP rats. Soy significantly increased bcl-xL mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic cortex compared to IFP rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased neuronal expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL in the ischemic cortex of both IFP and SP rats following tMCAO. These results suggest that a high soy diet decreases both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent programmed cell death following tMCAO. Further, a high soy diet enhances expression of the cell survival factor bcl-xL following tMCAO, contributing to the neuroprotective effects of soy in the ischemic cortex. PMID:17706879

  19. Streptolysin S Promotes Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Inflammatory Signaling in Epithelial Keratinocytes during Group A Streptococcus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Rebecca A.; Puricelli, Jessica M.; Higashi, Dustin L.; Park, Claudia J.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogen that causes a multitude of human diseases from pharyngitis to severe infections such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. One of the primary virulence factors produced by GAS is the peptide toxin streptolysin S (SLS). In addition to its well-recognized role as a cytolysin, recent evidence has indicated that SLS may influence host cell signaling pathways at sublytic concentrations during infection. We employed an antibody array-based approach to comprehensively identify global host cell changes in human epithelial keratinocytes in response to the SLS toxin. We identified key SLS-dependent host responses, including the initiation of specific programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades with concomitant downregulation of Akt-mediated cytoprotection. Significant signaling responses identified by our array analysis were confirmed using biochemical and protein identification methods. To further demonstrate that the observed SLS-dependent host signaling changes were mediated primarily by the secreted toxin, we designed a Transwell infection system in which direct bacterial attachment to host cells was prevented, while secreted factors were allowed access to host cells. The results using this approach were consistent with our direct infection studies and reveal that SLS is a bacterial toxin that does not require bacterial attachment to host cells for activity. In light of these findings, we propose that the production of SLS by GAS during skin infection promotes invasive outcomes by triggering programmed cell death and inflammatory cascades in host cells to breach the keratinocyte barrier for dissemination into deeper tissues. PMID:26238711

  20. The novel costimulatory programmed death ligand 1/B7.1 pathway is functional in inhibiting alloimmune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Riella, Leonardo V; Chock, Susanne; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Yuan, Xueli; Paterson, Alison M; Watanabe, Toshihiko; Vanguri, Vijay; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Blazar, Bruce R; Freeman, Gordon J; Rodig, Scott J; Sharpe, Arlene H; Chandraker, Anil; Sayegh, Mohamed H

    2011-08-01

    The programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1)/programmed death 1 (PD1) costimulatory pathway plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses as well as in the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. It has been demonstrated recently that PDL1 also can bind B7.1 to inhibit T cell responses in vitro. Using the bm12 into B6 heart transplant model, we investigated the functional significance of this interaction in alloimmune responses in vivo. PD1 blockade unlike PDL1 blockade failed to accelerate bm12 allograft rejection, suggesting a role for an additional binding partner for PDL1 other than PD1 in transplant rejection. PDL1 blockade was able to accelerate allograft rejection in B7.2-deficient recipients but not B7.1-deficient recipients, indicating that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 was important in inhibiting rejection. Administration of the novel 2H11 anti-PDL1 mAb, which only blocks the PDL1-B7.1 interaction, aggravated chronic injury of bm12 allografts in B6 recipients. Aggravated chronic injury was associated with an increased frequency of alloreactive IFN-γ-, IL-4-, and IL-6-producing splenocytes and a decreased percentage of regulatory T cells in the recipients. Using an in vitro cell culture assay, blockade of the interaction of PDL1 on dendritic cells with B7.1 on T cells increased IFN-γ production from alloreactive CD4(+) T cells, whereas blockade of dendritic cell B7.1 interaction with T cell PDL1 did not. These data indicate that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses in vivo and suggests a dominant direction for PDL1 and B7.1 interaction.

  1. Filamentation protects Candida albicans from amphotericin B-induced programmed cell death via a mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1.

    PubMed

    Laprade, David J; Brown, Melissa S; McCarthy, Morgan L; Ritch, James J; Austriaco, Nicanor

    2016-07-01

    The budding yeast Candida albicans is one of the most significant fungal pathogens worldwide. It proliferates in two distinct cell types: blastopores and filaments. Only cells that are able to transform from one cell type into the other are virulent in mouse disease models. Programmed cell death is a controlled form of cell suicide that occurs when C. albicans cells are exposed to fungicidal drugs like amphotericin B and caspofungin, and to other stressful conditions. We now provide evidence that suggests that programmed cell death is cell-type specific in yeast: Filamentous C. albicans cells are more resistant to amphotericin B- and caspofungin-induced programmed cell death than their blastospore counterparts. Finally, our genetic data suggests that this phenomenon is mediated by a protective mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1.

  2. Filamentation protects Candida albicans from amphotericin B-induced programmed cell death via a mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1

    PubMed Central

    Laprade, David J.; Brown, Melissa S.; McCarthy, Morgan L.; Ritch, James J.; Austriaco, Nicanor

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Candida albicans is one of the most significant fungal pathogens worldwide. It proliferates in two distinct cell types: blastopores and filaments. Only cells that are able to transform from one cell type into the other are virulent in mouse disease models. Programmed cell death is a controlled form of cell suicide that occurs when C. albicans cells are exposed to fungicidal drugs like amphotericin B and caspofungin, and to other stressful conditions. We now provide evidence that suggests that programmed cell death is cell-type specific in yeast: Filamentous C. albicans cells are more resistant to amphotericin B- and caspofungin-induced programmed cell death than their blastospore counterparts. Finally, our genetic data suggests that this phenomenon is mediated by a protective mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1. PMID:27683660

  3. Risky Business: Risk Behaviors in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jaser, Sarah S.; Yates, Heather; Dumser, Susan; Whittemore, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to review risk behaviors and their health consequences in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. The existing literature on common risk behaviors in adolescents is examined, with a focus on illicit drug use, alcohol use, smoking, unprotected sexual activity, and disordered eating behaviors. Conclusions A review of the literature highlights the lack of studies of risk behaviors in this population. Much of what is known comes from studies with adolescents in the general population or from studies of adults with type 1 diabetes. Known risk and protective factors for risk behaviors and health outcomes are noted. Based on these findings, suggestions are provided for diabetes educators and health care providers to assess for and prevent risk behaviors in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Directions for future research in this population are indicated, including the need to develop and test standardized prevention programs. PMID:22002971

  4. Test of an Electronic Program to Query Clinicians About Nonspecific Causes Reported for Pneumonia Deaths, New York City, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Korin, Laura; Das, Tara; Soto, Antonio; Begier, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    We tested an electronic cause-of-death query system at a hospital in New York City to evaluate clinicians’ reporting of cause of death. We used the system to query clinicians about all deaths assigned International Classification of Disease code J189 (pneumonia, unspecified) as the underlying cause of death. Of 29 death certificates that generated queries, 28 were updated with additional information, which led to revisions in the underlying cause of 27 deaths. The electronic system for querying reported cause of death was feasible and enabled quicker than usual responses; however, follow-up with clinicians to ensure timely, accurate, and complete responses was labor-intensive. Educating clinicians and enforcing reporting standards would reduce the time and effort required to ensure accurate and timely cause-of-death reporting. PMID:25427318

  5. The soluble proteome of tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells undergoing H₂O₂-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Candida; Marsoni, Milena; Cantara, Carlo; De Pinto, Maria Concetta; Locato, Vittoria; De Gara, Laura; Bracale, Marcella

    2012-05-01

    Plant programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically controlled process that plays an important role in development and stress responses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key inducers of PCD. The addition of 50 mM H₂O₂ to tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (TBY-2) cell cultures induces PCD. A comparative proteomic analysis of TBY-2 cells treated with 50 mM H₂O₂ for 30 min and 3 h was performed. The results showed early down-regulation of several elements in the cellular redox hub and inhibition of the protein repair-degradation system. The expression patterns of proteins involved in the homeostatic response, in particular those associated with metabolism, were consistently altered. The changes in abundance of several cytoskeleton proteins confirmed the active role of the cytoskeleton in PCD signalling. Cells undergoing H₂O₂-induced PCD fail to cope with oxidative stress. The antioxidant defence system and the anti-PCD signalling cascades are inhibited. This promotes a genetically programmed cell suicide pathway. Fifteen differentially expressed proteins showed an expression pattern similar to that previously observed in TBY-2 cells undergoing heat shock-induced PCD. The possibility that these proteins are part of a core complex required for PCD induction is discussed.

  6. A Jekyll and Hyde Profile: Type 1 Interferon Signaling Plays a Prominent Role in the Initiation and Maintenance of a Persistent Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2015-01-01

    The hallmarks of persistent viral infections are exhaustion of virus-specific T cells, elevated production of interleukin 10 (IL-10) and programmed death-1 (PD-1) the dominant negative regulators of the immune system and disruption of secondary lymphoid tissues. Within the first 12–24 hours after mice are infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) clone 13, which is used as a model of persistent virus infection, we note generation of high titers of type 1 interferon. Blockade of type 1 interferon significantly lessens IL-10 and PD-1/PD-L1, allows normal secondary lymphoid architecture and re-establishes antiviral T-cell function, thus eradicating the virus and clearing the infection. Hence, type 1 interferon is a master reostat for establishing persistent viral infection. PMID:26116728

  7. New Arabidopsis thaliana Cytochrome c Partners: A Look Into the Elusive Role of Cytochrome c in Programmed Cell Death in Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fábregas, Jonathan; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Janocha, Simon; Navarro, José A.; Hervás, Manuel; Bernhardt, Rita; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; De la Rosa, Miguel Á.

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death is an event displayed by many different organisms along the evolutionary scale. In plants, programmed cell death is necessary for development and the hypersensitive response to stress or pathogenic infection. A common feature in programmed cell death across organisms is the translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol. To better understand the role of cytochrome c in the onset of programmed cell death in plants, a proteomic approach was developed based on affinity chromatography and using Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c as bait. Using this approach, ten putative new cytochrome c partners were identified. Of these putative partners and as indicated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, nine of them bind the heme protein in plant protoplasts and human cells as a heterologous system. The in vitro interaction between cytochrome c and such soluble cytochrome c-targets was further corroborated using surface plasmon resonance. Taken together, the results obtained in the study indicate that Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c interacts with several distinct proteins involved in protein folding, translational regulation, cell death, oxidative stress, DNA damage, energetic metabolism, and mRNA metabolism. Interestingly, some of these novel Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c-targets are closely related to those for Homo sapiens cytochrome c (Martínez-Fábregas et al., unpublished). These results indicate that the evolutionarily well-conserved cytosolic cytochrome c, appearing in organisms from plants to mammals, interacts with a wide range of targets on programmed cell death. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000280. PMID:24019145

  8. Explaining the increased mortality in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mameli, Chiara; Mazzantini, Sara; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Fiorina, Paolo; Scaramuzza, Andrea E; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Despite large improvements in the management of glucose levels and in the treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, the mortality rate in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is still high. Recently, Lind et al found that T1D individuals with glycated hemoglobin levels of 6.9% or lower had a risk of death from any cause or from cardiovascular causes that is twice as high as the risk for matched controls. T1D is a chronic disease with an early onset (e.g., pediatric age) and thus in order to establish a clear correlation between death rate and the glycometabolic control, the whole history of glycemic control should be considered; particularly in the early years of diabetes. The switch from a normo- to hyperglycemic milieu in an individual with T1D in the pediatric age, represents a stressful event that may impact outcomes and death rate many years later. In this paper we will discuss the aforementioned issues, and offer our view on these findings, paying a particular attention to the several alterations occurring in the earliest phases of T1D and to the many factors that may be associated with the chronic history of T1D. This may help us to better understand the recently published death rate data and to develop future innovative and effective preventive strategies. PMID:26185597

  9. A lysigenic programmed cell death-dependent process shapes schizogenously formed aerenchyma in the stems of the waterweed Egeria densa

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, G.; Forino, L. M. C.; Durante, M.; Tagliasacchi, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant adaptation to submergence can include the formation of prominent aerenchyma to facilitate gas exchange. The aim of this study was to characterize the differentiation of the constitutive aerenchyma in the stem of the aquatic macrophyte Egeria densa (Hydrocharitaceae) and to verify if any form of cell death might be involved. Methods Plants were collected from a pool in a botanical garden. Aerenchyma differentiation and apoptotic hallmarks were investigated by light microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay coupled with genomic DNA extraction and gel electrophoresis (DNA laddering assay). Cell viability and the occurrence of peroxides and nitric oxide (NO) were determined histochemically using specific fluorogenic probes. Key Results Aerenchyma differentiation started from a hexagonally packed pre-aerenchymatic tissue and, following a basipetal and centripetal developmental pattern, produced a honeycomb arrangement. After an early schizogenous differentiation process, a late lysigenous programmed cell death- (PCD) dependent mechanism occurred. This was characterized by a number of typical apoptotic hallmarks, including DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation, apoptotic-like bodies, partial cell wall lysis and plasmolysis. In addition, local increases in H2O2 and NO were observed and quantified. Conclusions The differentiation of cortical aerenchyma in the stem of E. densa is a complex process, consisting of a combination of an early schizogenous differentiation mechanism and a late lysigenous PCD-dependent process. The PCD remodels the architecture of the gas spaces previously formed schizogenously, and also results in a reduction of O2-consuming cells and in recycling of material derived from the lysigenic dismantling of the cells. PMID:26002256

  10. Caspase Dependent Programmed Cell Death in Developing Embryos: A Potential Target for Therapeutic Intervention against Pathogenic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Alok Das; Kumar, Sunil; Satapathy, Ashok Kumar; Ravindran, Balachandran

    2011-01-01

    Background Successful embryogenesis is a critical rate limiting step for the survival and transmission of parasitic worms as well as pathology mediated by them. Hence, blockage of this important process through therapeutic induction of apoptosis in their embryonic stages offers promise for developing effective anti-parasitic measures against these extra cellular parasites. However, unlike in the case of protozoan parasites, induction of apoptosis as a therapeutic approach is yet to be explored against metazoan helminth parasites. Methodology/Principal Findings For the first time, here we developed and evaluated flow cytometry based assays to assess several conserved features of apoptosis in developing embryos of a pathogenic filarial nematode Setaria digitata, in-vitro as well as ex-vivo. We validated programmed cell death in developing embryos by using immuno-fluorescence microscopy and scoring expression profile of nematode specific proteins related to apoptosis [e.g. CED-3, CED-4 and CED-9]. Mechanistically, apoptotic death of embryonic stages was found to be a caspase dependent phenomenon mediated primarily through induction of intracellular ROS. The apoptogenicity of some pharmacological compounds viz. DEC, Chloroquine, Primaquine and Curcumin were also evaluated. Curcumin was found to be the most effective pharmacological agent followed by Primaquine while Chloroquine displayed minimal effect and DEC had no demonstrable effect. Further, demonstration of induction of apoptosis in embryonic stages by lipid peroxidation products [molecules commonly associated with inflammatory responses in filarial disease] and demonstration of in-situ apoptosis of developing embryos in adult parasites in a natural bovine model of filariasis have offered a framework to understand anti-fecundity host immunity operational against parasitic helminths. Conclusions/Significance Our observations have revealed for the first time, that induction of apoptosis in developing embryos can

  11. Turning up the heat: heat stress induces markers of programmed cell death in Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, D; Coetzer, T L

    2013-12-19

    Malaria is characterised by cyclical febrile episodes that result from the rupture of mature schizont-infected erythrocytes releasing merozoites. In patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum, fever may reach peak temperatures as high as 41 °C. Febrile episodes typically have a deleterious effect on parasites and probably benefit the host by aiding parasite clearance; however, the parasite may also gain advantage from limiting its burden on the host and prolonging infection to ensure development and transmission of slow-maturing gametocytes. Programmed cell death (PCD) may provide the parasite with a mechanism of self-limitation, although the occurrence and phenotype of PCD in the erythrocytic stages remain controversial due to conflicting data. This study aimed to characterise the cell death phenotype of P. falciparum in response to in vitro heat stress. A variety of biochemical markers of PCD, including DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial dysregulation and phosphatidylserine externalisation, as well as morphological studies of Giemsa-stained thin smears and real-time microscopy were utilised to characterise the phenotype. Heat stress decreased P. falciparum growth and development in vitro. Late-stage parasites were more susceptible, although early stages were more affected than expected. Early-stage parasites exposed to 41 °C exhibited markers of an apoptosis-like PCD phenotype, including DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarisation. Heat-stressed late-stage parasites showed no significant DNA fragmentation or mitochondrial dysregulation; however, cytoplasmic vacuolisation was suggestive of an autophagy-like form of PCD. Our results therefore showed that biochemical and morphological markers of PCD varied with intra-erythrocytic parasite development and that P. falciparum exhibited facets of both apoptosis- and autophagy-like phenotypes after exposure to febrile temperatures, which may reflect a unique PCD phenotype.

  12. Iron starvation and culture age activate metacaspases and programmed cell death in the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Bidle, Kay D; Bender, Sara J

    2008-02-01

    In the modern ocean, phytoplankton maintain extremely high primary production/biomass ratios, indicating that they bloom, die, and are replaced weekly. The molecular mechanisms regulating cellular mortality and turnover are largely unknown, even though they effectively short-circuit carbon export to the deep ocean and channel primary productivity to microbial food webs. Here, we present morphological, biochemical, and molecular evidence of caspase-mediated, autocatalytic programmed cell death (PCD) in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana in response to iron starvation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed internal degradation of nuclear, chloroplastic, and mitochondrial organelles, all while the plasma membranes remained intact. Cellular degradation was concomitant with dramatic decreases in photosynthetic efficiency, externalization of phosphatidylserine, and significantly elevated caspase-specific activity, with the addition of a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor rescuing cells from death. A search of the T. pseudonana genome identified six distinct putative metacaspases containing a conserved caspase domain structure. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed differential gene and protein expression of T. pseudonana metacaspases, some of which correlated with physiological stress and caspase activity. Taken together with the recent discovery of the metacaspase-mediated viral infection of phytoplankton (K. D. Bidle, L. Haramaty, J. Barcelos-Ramos, and P. G. Falkowski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 104:6049-6054, 2007), our findings reveal a key role for metacaspases in the turnover of phytoplankton biomass in the oceans. Furthermore, given that Fe is required for photosynthetic electron transfer and is chronically limiting in a variety of oceanic systems, including high-nutrient low-chlorophyll regions, our findings provide a potential ecological context for PCD in these unicellular photoautotrophs.

  13. Expression of Inflammatory and Cell Death Program Genes and Comet DNA Damage Assay Induced by Escherichia coli in Layer Hens

    PubMed Central

    Mehaisen, Gamal M. K.; Eshak, Mariam G.; El Sabry, M. I.; Abass, Ahmed O.

    2016-01-01

    Modern methods of industrial poultry and egg production systems involve stressful practices that stimulate Escherichia coli (E. coli) activity causing endotoxic shock. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death program genes and DNA damage induced by E. coli in the brain and liver tissues of laying hens. A total of two hundred and ten H&N brown layer hens with 20 week age, were used in this research. First, preliminary experiments were designed (60 hens in total) to establish the optimal exposure dose of E. coli and to determine the nearest time of notable response to be used in the remainder studies of this research. At 35-wk of age, 150 hens were randomly assigned into 2 groups with 3 replicates of 25 birds each; the first group was injected in the brachial wing vein with 107 E. coli colony/hen, while the second group was injected with saline and served as a control. The body temperature and plasma corticosterone concentration were measured 3 hr after injection. Specimens of liver and brain were obtained from each group and the gene expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, interlukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bax, and caspase-3 genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. DNA damage in the brain and liver tissues were also measured by comet assay. Hens treated with E. coli showed significant (P<0.05) increase of body temperature and plasma corticosterone (42.6°C and 14.5 ng/ml, respectively) compared to the control group (41.1°C and 5.5 ng/ml, respectively). Additional remarkable over-inflammation gene expression of p38, IL-1β and TNF-α.genes were also detected in the brain (2.2-fold, 2.0-fold and 3.3-fold, respectively) and the liver (2.1-fold, 1.9-fold and 3.0-fold, respectively) tissues of the infected chickens. It is also important to note that hens injected with E. coli showed an increase in DNA damage in the brain and liver cells (P<0.05). These

  14. Programmed hepatocytes cell death associated with FLIP downregulation in response to extracellular preS1/2.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Masyelly D; Peterson, Darrell L; Barboza, Luisa; Terán-Ángel, Guillermo; Labastida-Moreno, Cesar A; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Salmen, Siham

    2014-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection involves liver damage resulting in continuous cell injury and death. During HBV infection, hepatocytes exhibit changes in death receptor expression and in their susceptibility to death. These changes are observed not only in infected cells but also in bystander cells. Because excess viral surface protein (HBsAg) is secreted in large amounts as soluble particles containing preS proteins, the role of soluble preS1/2 in hepatocyte (HepG2) death modulation is an important issue to be explored. An increase of cell death induced by preS1/2 was observed. Also, cell death was associated with the down-regulation of FLIP and activation of caspase 8, caspase 9, and BID. Additionally, hepatocytes exhibited a sensitization to death mediated by the Fas receptor. These results, may contribute to understanding the role of envelope proteins (preS1/2) in the pathogenesis of HBV infection.

  15. Tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (T-MSCs) prevent Th17-mediated autoimmune response via regulation of the programmed death-1/programmed death ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yon; Park, Minhwa; Kim, Yu-Hee; Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Lee, Kyung Ho; Cho, Kyung-Ah; Woo, So-Youn

    2017-01-20

    Our knowledge of the immunomodulatory role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in both the innate and adaptive immune systems has dramatically expanded, providing great promise for treating various autoimmune diseases. However, the contribution of MSCs to Th17 dominant immune disease, such as psoriasis and its underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that human palatine tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs) constitutively express both the membrane-bound and soluble forms of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), which enables T-MSCs to be distinguished from MSCs originating from other organs (i.e., bone marrow or adipose tissue). We also found that T-MSC-derived PD-L1 effectively represses Th17 differentiation via both cell-to-cell contact and a paracrine effect. Further, T-MSCs increase PD-1 expression on T cells by secreting IFN-β, which may enhance engagement with PD-L1. Finally, transplantation of T-MSCs into imiquimod induced psoriatic skin inflammation in mice significantly abrogated disease symptoms, mainly by blunting the Th17 response in a PD-L1 dependent manner. This study suggests that T-MSCs might be a promising cell source to treat autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, via its unique immunoregulatory features.

  16. Clinical Significance of Programmed Death Ligand‑1 and Intra-Tumoral CD8+ T Lymphocytes in Ovarian Carcinosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Wen, Hao; Ju, Xingzhu; Bi, Rui; Zuo, Wenjia; Wu, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian carcinosarcoma (OCS) accounts for high mortality and lacks effective therapeutic methods. So far, we lack reliable biomarkers capable of predicting the risk of aggressive course of the disease. Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) is expressed in various tumors, and antibodies targeting its receptor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) are emerging cancer therapeutics. This study was designed to evaluate the expression of PD-L1 and intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocytes by immunohistochemistry from 19 OCS patients who underwent primary surgery at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. The correlations between PD-L1 expression and CD8+ T lymphocytes as well as the patients’ clinicopathologic characteristics were integrated and statistically analyzed. PD-L1-positive expression was observed in 52.6% of intraepithelial tissues and 47.4% of mesenchymal tissues (p = 0.370). Meanwhile, intraepithelial and mesenchymal CD8+ T lymphocytes were positive in 36.8% and 84.2% of OCS, respectively (p = 0.628). A significantly negative correlation was found between mesenchymal CD8+ T lymphocytes and PD-L1 expression (r = -0.630, p = 0.011). Intraepithelial PD-L1-positive expression was associated only with positive ascitic fluid (p = 0.008). Mesenchymal PD-L1-positive patients had a poorer survival than those with negative expression (p = 0.036). Meanwhile, intraepithelial PD-L1-positive patients had a better survival trend than PD-L1-negative patients, though no statistical significance was found (p = 0.061). There was a better postoperative survival noted in mesenchymal CD8-positive patients (p = 0.024), and allthough a better trend of OS was observed in intraepithelial CD8-positive patients, no statistical significance was found (p = 0.382). Positive tumoral CD8+ T lymphocytes and mesenchymal PD-L1-negative expression seem to be associated with better survival in OCS. It is possible that immunotherapy targeting PD-L1 pathway could be used in OCS. PMID:28125702

  17. Multidendritic sensory neurons in the adult Drosophila abdomen: origins, dendritic morphology, and segment- and age-dependent programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Kohei; Fujimoto, Azusa; Tsuyama, Taiichi; Yamamoto-Kochi, Misato; Sato, Motohiko; Hattori, Yukako; Sugimura, Kaoru; Usui, Tadao; Kimura, Ken-ichi; Uemura, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    prominent radial-to-lattice transformation in 1-day-old adults, and the resultant lattice-shaped arbor persisted throughout adult life. Conclusion Our study provides the basis on which we can investigate the genetic programs controlling dendritic remodeling and programmed cell death of adult neurons, and the life-long maintenance of dendritic arbors. PMID:19799768

  18. Programmed Death Ligand-1 Immunohistochemistry--A New Challenge for Pathologists: A Perspective From Members of the Pulmonary Pathology Society.

    PubMed

    Sholl, Lynette M; Aisner, Dara L; Allen, Timothy Craig; Beasley, Mary Beth; Borczuk, Alain C; Cagle, Philip T; Capelozzi, Vera; Dacic, Sanja; Hariri, Lida; Kerr, Keith M; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Raparia, Kirtee; Rekhtman, Natasha; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Thunnissen, Eric; Tsao, Ming Sound; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-04-01

    The binding of programmed death ligand-1 and ligand-2 (PD-L1 and PD-L2) to PD-1 blocks T-cell-mediated immune response to tumor. Antibodies that target programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) will block the ligand-receptor interface, thereby allowing T cells to attack the tumor and increase antitumor immune response. In clinical trials, PD-1 inhibitors have been associated with an approximately 20% overall response rate in unselected patients with non-small cell lung cancer, with sustained tumor response in a subset of patients treated by these immune checkpoint inhibitors. Facing a proliferation of PD-L1 immunohistochemistry clones, staining platforms, and scoring criteria, the pathologist must decide on the feasibility of introducing a newly approved companion diagnostic assay that may require purchase not only of a specific antibody kit but of a particular staining platform. Given the likely reality that clinical practice may, in the near future, demand access to 4 different PD-L1 antibodies coupled with different immunohistochemistry platforms, laboratories will be challenged with deciding among this variety of testing methods, each with its own potential benefits. Another immediate challenge to PD-L1 testing in lung cancer patients is that of access to adequate tumor tissue, given that non-small cell lung cancer samples are often extremely limited in size. With PD-L1 testing it has become clear that the historically used US regulatory approach of one assay-one drug will not be sustainable. One evolving concept is that of complementary diagnostics, a novel regulatory pathway initiated by the US Food and Drug Administration, which is distinct from companion diagnostics in that it may present additional flexibility. Although pathologists need to face the practical reality that oncologists will be asking regularly for the PD-L1 immunohistochemistry status of their patients' tumors, we should also keep in mind that there may be room for improvement of biomarkers for

  19. Type 1 Diabetes in Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Maureen; Helgeson, Vicki; Wiebe, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been studied as a chronic illness of childhood. However, young adulthood is a critical time for the development and integration of lifelong diabetes management skills, and research is starting to identify unique challenges faced by youth with diabetes as they age into adulthood. Most young adults experience multiple transitions during this unstable developmental period, including changes in lifestyle (e.g., education, occupation, living situation), changes in health care, and shifting relationships with family members, friends, and intimate others. Young adults with type 1 diabetes must navigate these transitions while also assuming increasing responsibility for their diabetes care and overall health. Despite these critical health and psychosocial concerns, there is a notable lack of evidence-based clinical services and supports for young adults with type 1 diabetes. We review relevant evolving concerns for young adults with type 1 diabetes, including lifestyle considerations, health care transitions, psychosocial needs, and changes in supportive networks, and how type 1 diabetes impacts and is impacted by these key developmental considerations. Specific avenues for intervention and future research are offered. PMID:25901502

  20. Disruption of the vacuolar calcium-ATPases in arabidopsis results in the activation of a salicylic acid-dependent programmed cell death pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium (Ca2+) signals regulate many aspects of plant development, including the Hypersensitive Response (HR) that triggers a programmed cell death response to protect a plant from a pathogen. A transient increase in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt ) results from Ca2+ entry from the apoplast or release fr...

  1. Tomato 14-3-3 protein 7 (TFT7) positively regulates immunity-associated programmed cell death by enhancing accumulation and signaling ability of MAPKKKalpha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is triggered when Pto, a serine-threonine protein kinase recognizes either the AvrPto or AvrPtoB effector from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. This PCD requires MAPKKKalpha as a positive regulator in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. To examine how PCD-eliciting activi...

  2. Fluconazole-Induced Type 1 Kounis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh Mahal, Hardeep

    2016-01-01

    The administration of fluconazole is commonly used in both inpatient and outpatient settings for the management of candidiasis infection. Although it is associated with a relatively safe side effect profile, some patients experience adverse effects associated with increased morbidity. We describe 1 such patient, a 42-year-old woman with a history of severe eczema who developed fluconazole-induced type 1 Kounis syndrome. Review of literature indicates that this as the first case reported of fluconazole-induced type 1 Kounis syndrome.

  3. Fragile X mental retardation protein is required for programmed cell death and clearance of developmentally-transient peptidergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Cheryl L; Broadie, Kendal

    2011-08-15

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene function, is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. The FMR1 product (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein best established to function in activity-dependent modulation of synaptic connections. In the Drosophila FXS disease model, loss of functionally-conserved dFMRP causes synaptic overgrowth and overelaboration in pigment dispersing factor (PDF) peptidergic neurons in the adult brain. Here, we identify a very different component of PDF neuron misregulation in dfmr1 mutants: the aberrant retention of normally developmentally-transient PDF tritocerebral (PDF-TRI) neurons. In wild-type animals, PDF-TRI neurons in the central brain undergo programmed cell death and complete, processive clearance within days of eclosion. In the absence of dFMRP, a defective apoptotic program leads to constitutive maintenance of these peptidergic neurons. We tested whether this apoptotic defect is circuit-specific by examining crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and bursicon circuits, which are similarly developmentally-transient and normally eliminated immediately post-eclosion. In dfmr1 null mutants, CCAP/bursicon neurons also exhibit significantly delayed clearance dynamics, but are subsequently eliminated from the nervous system, in contrast to the fully persistent PDF-TRI neurons. Thus, the requirement of dFMRP for the retention of transitory peptidergic neurons shows evident circuit specificity. The novel defect of impaired apoptosis and aberrant neuron persistence in the Drosophila FXS model suggests an entirely new level of "pruning" dysfunction may contribute to the FXS disease state.

  4. Expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Nicolas; Goeke, Friederike; Splittstoesser, Vera; Lankat-Buttgereit, Brigitte; Mueller, Stefan C.; Ellinger, Joerg

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tumor suppressor gene PDCD4 is down-regulated in many tumorous entities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the impact of PDCD4 and its regulating factor miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We confirm PDCD4 as a tumor suppressor gene and it could be a diagnostic marker for this tumor. -- Abstract: Background: We investigated the role of the programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) tumor suppressor gene in specimens of transitional cell carcinoma and of healthy individuals. Methods: PDCD4 immunohistochemical expression was investigated in 294 cases in histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma in different tumorous stages (28 controls, 122 non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma, stages Tis-T1, 119 invasive transitional cell carcinoma stages T2-T4 and 25 metastases). MiR-21 expression, an important PDCD4 regulator, was assessed with real-time PCR analysis and showed inverse correlation to tissue PDCD4 expression. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmatic PDCD4 immunostaining decreased significantly with histopathological progression of the tumor (p < 0001). Controls showed strong nuclear and cytoplasmatic immunohistochemical staining. MiR-21 up regulation in tissue corresponded to PDCD4 suppression. Conclusions: These data support a decisive role for PDCD4 down regulation in transitional cell carcinoma and confirm miR-21 as a negative regulator for PDCD4. Additionally, PDCD4 immunohistochemical staining turns out to be a possible diagnostic marker for transitional cell carcinoma.

  5. Attenuation of the programmed cell death-1 pathway increases the M1 polarization of macrophages induced by zymosan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Wang, J; Jia, L; Liu, J; Tian, Y

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is a member of the CD28 superfamily that delivers negative signals on interaction with its 2 ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. We assessed the contribution of the PD-1 pathway to regulating the polarization of macrophages that promote inflammation induced by zymosan. We found that PD-1−/− mice developed robust peritonitis with more abundant infiltration of M1 macrophages, accompanied by higher levels of pro-inflammation factors, especially monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) compared with wild-type controls ex vivo and in vitro. Our results indicated that PD-1 deficiency promotes M1 rather than M2 polarization of macrophages by enhancing the expression of p-STAT1/p-NF-κB p65 and downregulating p-STAT6. We found that PD-1 engagement followed by zymosan stimulation might primarily attenuate the phosphorylation of tyrosine residue in PD-1 receptor/ligand and the recruitment of SHP-2 to PD-1 receptor/ligand, leading to the reduction of M1 type cytokine production. PMID:26913605

  6. Inflammation and programmed cell death in Alzheimer's disease: comparison of the central nervous system and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Beatrice; Marino-Merlo, Francesca; Frezza, Caterina; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Mastino, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Although the central nervous system (CNS) has been defined as a privileged site in Alzheimer's disease (AD), periphery can be more than simply witness of events leading to neurodegeneration. The CNS and peripheral blood can mutually communicate through cells and factors trafficking from the circulation into the brain and vice versa. A number of articles have reviewed inflammatory profiles and programmed cell death (PCD) in AD, separately in the CNS and at the peripheral level. This review does not provide an exhaustive account of what has been published on inflammation and PCD in AD. Rather, the aim of this review is to focus on possible linkages between the central and the peripheral compartments during AD progression, by critically analyzing, in a comparative manner, phenomena occurring in the CNS as well as the peripheral blood. In fact, growing evidence suggests that CNS and peripheral inflammation might present common features in the disease. Microarrays and metabolomics revealed that dysfunction of the glycolytic and oxidative pathways is similar in the brain and in the periphery. Moreover, dysregulated autophagosome/lysosomal molecular machinery, both at the CNS and the peripheral level, in AD-related cell damage, has been observed. Possible implications of these observations have been discussed.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Complex Between Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) and its Ligand PD-L2

    SciTech Connect

    Lazar-Molnar,E.; Yan, Q.; Cao, E.; Ramagopal, U.; Nathenson, S.; Almo, S.

    2008-01-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a member of the CD28/B7 superfamily that delivers negative signals upon interaction with its two ligands, PD-L1 or PD-L2. The high-resolution crystal structure of the complex formed by the complete ectodomains of murine PD-1 and PD-L2 revealed a 1:1 receptor:ligand stoichiometry and displayed a binding interface and overall molecular organization distinct from that observed in the CTLA-4/B7 inhibitory complexes. Furthermore, our structure also provides insights into the association between PD-1 and PD-L1 and highlights differences in the interfaces formed by the two PD-1 ligands (PD-Ls) Mutagenesis studies confirmed the details of the proposed PD-1/PD-L binding interfaces and allowed for the design of a mutant PD-1 receptor with enhanced affinity. These studies define spatial and organizational constraints that control the localization and signaling of PD-1/PD-L complexes within the immunological synapse and provide a basis for manipulating the PD-1 pathways for immunotherapy.

  8. The TUNEL assay suggests mandibular regression by programmed cell death during presoldier differentiation in the nasute termite Nasutitermes takasagoensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toga, Kouhei; Yoda, Shinichi; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2011-09-01

    Termite soldiers are the most specialized caste of social insects in terms of their morphology and function. Soldier development requires increased juvenile hormone (JH) titer and the two molts via a presoldier stage. These molts are accompanied by dramatic morphological changes, including the exaggeration and regression of certain organs. Soldiers of the most apical termitid subfamily Nasutitermitinae possess not only a horn-like frontal tube, called the nasus, for the projection of defensive chemicals from the frontal gland reservoir but also regressed mandibles. Although candidate genes regulating soldier mandibular growth were reported in a relatively basal termite species, the regulatory mechanisms of mandibular regression remain unknown. To clarify these mechanisms, we performed morphological and histological examinations of the mandibles during soldier differentiation in Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Mandibular size reduced dramatically during soldier differentiation, and mandibular regression occurred just prior to the presoldier molt. Spotted TUNEL signals were observed in regressing mandibles of presoldiers, suggesting that the regression involved programmed cell death. Because soldiers of N. takasagoensis possess exaggerated organs (nasus and frontal gland), the present results suggest that JH-dependent regressive mechanisms exist in the mandibles without interfering with the formation of the exaggerated organs.

  9. Endosperm degradation during seed development of Echinocystis lobata (Cucurbitaceae) as a manifestation of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowska, Marzena; Olszewska, Maria J

    2003-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an active, genetically controlled process that ultimately leads to elimination of unnecessary or damaged cells from multicellular organism. It occurs during normal growth and development or in response to a variety of environmental triggers and is indispensable for survival of the organism. In Echinocystis lobata the endosperm, an ephemeral tissue in angiosperm plants, undergoes distinct cytological, physiological and molecular changes during seed development and maturation. As a result, mature seeds are deprived of this tissue. The endosperm was analyzed at the consecutive stages of seed development. The morphological changes of cells were studied at light and electron microscope levels. In this paper we report that endosperm cells undergo morphological and biochemical changes characteristic of apoptosis, a particular type of PCD, i.e. cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, and cytoplasm degradation, while the ultrastructure of mitochondria seems to be less changed. Furthermore, the progression of DNA degradation has been shown by agarose gel electrophoresis (ladder pattern of DNA fragmentseparation), TUNEL and comet assay. It isconcluded that during seed maturation, endosperm degradation process is accompanied by typical PCD-related changes of cell morphology and internucleosomal DNA cleavage.

  10. Structure-guided development of a high-affinity human Programmed Cell Death-1: Implications for tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lázár-Molnár, Eszter; Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Basu, Indranil; Quinn, Thomas; Sylvestre, Eliezer; Palmieri, Edith; Ramagopal, Udupi A; Nathenson, Stanley G; Guha, Chandan; Almo, Steven C

    2017-02-06

    Programmed Cell Death-1 (PD-1) is an inhibitory immune receptor, which plays critical roles in T cell co-inhibition and exhaustion upon binding to its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2. We report the crystal structure of the human PD-1 ectodomain and the mapping of the PD-1 binding interface. Mutagenesis studies confirmed the crystallographic interface, and resulted in mutant PD-1 receptors with altered affinity and ligand-specificity. In particular, a high-affinity mutant PD-1 (HA PD-1) exhibited 45 and 30-fold increase in binding to PD-L1 and PD-L2, respectively, due to slower dissociation rates. This mutant (A132L) was used to engineer a soluble chimeric Ig fusion protein for cell-based and in vivo studies. HA PD-1 Ig showed enhanced binding to human dendritic cells, and increased T cell proliferation and cytokine production in a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay. Moreover, in an experimental model of murine Lewis lung carcinoma, HA PD-1 Ig treatment synergized with radiation therapy to decrease local and metastatic tumor burden, as well as in the establishment of immunological memory responses. Our studies highlight the value of structural considerations in guiding the design of a high-affinity chimeric PD-1 Ig fusion protein with robust immune modulatory properties, and underscore the power of combination therapies to selectively manipulate the PD-1 pathway for tumor immunotherapy.

  11. Soluble CD80 restores T cell activation and overcomes tumor cell programmed death ligand 1-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Haile, Samuel T; Dalal, Sonia P; Clements, Virginia; Tamada, Koji; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2013-09-01

    Many tumor cells escape anti-tumor immunity through their expression of programmed death ligand-1 (PDL1 or B7-H1), which interacts with T cell-expressed PD1 and results in T cell apoptosis. We previously reported that transfection of human tumor cells with a membrane-bound form of the human costimulatory molecule CD80 prevented PD1 binding and restored T cell activation. We now report that a membrane-bound form of murine CD80 similarly reduces PDL1-PD1-mediated suppression by mouse tumor cells and that a soluble protein consisting of the extracellular domains of human or mouse CD80 fused to the Fc domain of IgG1 (CD80-Fc) overcomes PDL1-mediated suppression by human and mouse tumor cells, respectively. T cell activation experiments with human and mouse tumor cells indicate that CD80-Fc facilitates T cell activation by binding to PDL1 to inhibit PDL1-PD1 interactions and by costimulating through CD28. CD80-Fc is more effective in preventing PD1-PDL1-mediated suppression and restoring T cell activation compared with treatment with mAb to either PD1 or PDL1. These studies identify CD80-Fc as an alternative and potentially more efficacious therapeutic agent for overcoming PDL1-induced immune suppression and facilitating tumor-specific immunity.

  12. Role of the Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) pathway in regulation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Sho; Kaneyama, Tomoki; Tsugane, Sayaka; Takeichi, Naoya; Yanagisawa, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Motoki; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2014-09-15

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) belongs to the CD28 family of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules and regulates adaptive immunity. This molecule induces the development of regulatory T cells, T cell tolerance, or apoptosis. We examined the role of PD-1 pathway in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) mice. Up-regulation of PD-1 and PD-1 ligand-1 (PD-L1) mRNA expression in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were induced by TMEV infection in vitro. Furthermore, PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA expression was increased in the spinal cords of the TMEV-infected mice in vivo. Treatment with a blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) against PD-1, especially during the effector phase, resulted in significant deterioration of the TMEV-IDD both clinically and histologically. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a dramatically increase of CD4(+) T cells producing Th1 cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α in the spinal cord of anti-PD-1 mAb-treated mice. These results indicate that the PD-1 pathway plays a pivotal regulatory role in the development of TMEV-IDD.

  13. miR-613 suppresses ischemia-reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by targeting the programmed cell death 10 gene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenhua; Qi, Yujuan; Guo, Zhigang; Li, Peijun; Zhou, Ding

    2016-09-05

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important gene regulators in both biological and pathological processes, including myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study investigated the effect of miR-613 on I/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and its molecular mechanism of action. Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) significantly increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, but these effects were attenuated by an miR-613 mimic. Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) was identified as a target gene of miR-613. miR-613 significantly increased the phosphorylation of Akt (p-Akt). An miR-613 mimic lowered the level of expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), and it up-regulated the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2). All of these effects were reversed by restoration of PDCD10. Taken together, the current findings indicate that miR-613 inhibits I/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by targeting PDCD10 by regulating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  14. Deletion of AIF1 but not of YCA1/MCA1 protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans cells from caspofungin-induced programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Christopher; Donaghey, Faith; Helming, Katherine; McCarthy, Morgan; Rogers, Stephen; Austriaco, Nicanor

    2014-01-01

    Caspofungin was the first member of a new class of antifungals called echinocandins to be approved by a drug regulatory authority. Like the other echinocandins, caspofungin blocks the synthesis of β(1,3)-D-glucan of the fungal cell wall by inhibiting the enzyme, β(1,3)-D-glucan synthase. Loss of β(1,3)-D-glucan leads to osmotic instability and cell death. However, the precise mechanism of cell death associated with the cytotoxicity of caspofungin was unclear. We now provide evidence that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells cultured in media containing caspofungin manifest the classical hallmarks of programmed cell death (PCD) in yeast, including the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the fragmentation of mitochondria, and the production of DNA strand breaks. Our data also suggests that deleting AIF1 but not YCA1/MCA1 protects S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans from caspofungin-induced cell death. This is not only the first time that AIF1 has been specifically tied to cell death in Candida but also the first time that caspofungin resistance has been linked to the cell death machinery in yeast.

  15. Both the Caspase CSP-1 and a Caspase-Independent Pathway Promote Programmed Cell Death in Parallel to the Canonical Pathway for Apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Denning, Daniel P.; Hatch, Victoria; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Caspases are cysteine proteases that can drive apoptosis in metazoans and have critical functions in the elimination of cells during development, the maintenance of tissue homeostasis, and responses to cellular damage. Although a growing body of research suggests that programmed cell death can occur in the absence of caspases, mammalian studies of caspase-independent apoptosis are confounded by the existence of at least seven caspase homologs that can function redundantly to promote cell death. Caspase-independent programmed cell death is also thought to occur in the invertebrate nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The C. elegans genome contains four caspase genes (ced-3, csp-1, csp-2, and csp-3), of which only ced-3 has been demonstrated to promote apoptosis. Here, we show that CSP-1 is a pro-apoptotic caspase that promotes programmed cell death in a subset of cells fated to die during C. elegans embryogenesis. csp-1 is expressed robustly in late pachytene nuclei of the germline and is required maternally for its role in embryonic programmed cell deaths. Unlike CED-3, CSP-1 is not regulated by the APAF-1 homolog CED-4 or the BCL-2 homolog CED-9, revealing that csp-1 functions independently of the canonical genetic pathway for apoptosis. Previously we demonstrated that embryos lacking all four caspases can eliminate cells through an extrusion mechanism and that these cells are apoptotic. Extruded cells differ from cells that normally undergo programmed cell death not only by being extruded but also by not being engulfed by neighboring cells. In this study, we identify in csp-3; csp-1; csp-2 ced-3 quadruple mutants apoptotic cell corpses that fully resemble wild-type cell corpses: these caspase-deficient cell corpses are morphologically apoptotic, are not extruded, and are internalized by engulfing cells. We conclude that both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways promote apoptotic programmed cell death and the phagocytosis of cell corpses in parallel to

  16. Genetics Home Reference: neurofibromatosis type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... of neurofibromatosis type 1. Semin Pediatr Neurol. 2006 Mar;13(1):8-20. Review. Citation on PubMed ... PubMed Rose VM. Neurocutaneous syndromes. Mo Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;101(2):112-6. Review. Citation on ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyperkalaemic acidosis, pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1. Nat Genet. 1996 Mar;12(3):248-53. Citation on PubMed Chen ... sgk. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1999 Mar 2;96(5):2514-9. Citation on PubMed ...

  18. Environmental triggers of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Couper, J J

    2001-06-01

    High risk HLA class II alleles account for 40% of the genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in Caucasians, but the majority of the genetically predisposed do not develop the disease. This supports some environmental modification of the autoimmune destruction of beta cells that precedes type 1 diabetes. Identical twin studies and geographical variation in incidence also argue for a critical role of environmental factors. Attention has been directed to the possible harmful effect of cow's milk protein (or protective effect of breast-feeding) and enteric infections in early life. Natural history studies that follow children at increased risk of type 1 diabetes provide the best opportunity to study environmental triggers. The Australian Baby Diab Study has followed approximately 500 babies from birth who have a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes. No prospective association between duration of breast-feeding or introduction of cow's milk and the development of islet autoimmunity was found. The same Australian cohort demonstrated a relationship between rotavirus infection and the first appearance or increase in islet antibodies. Enteroviral infection is seen more frequently in prediabetic children and prior to the onset of islet autoimmunity in Finnish cohorts. Environmental factors may interact. Breast milk protects against enteric infections; enteric infections in turn could increase immunity to dietary antigens by increasing intestinal permeability. It is also possible that an alteration in gut mucosal immune function in genetically susceptible individuals underlies any effect of dietary or viral proteins on the development of islet autoimmunity in early life.

  19. Experimental Reproduction of Type 1B Chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, G. E.; Le, L.

    2002-01-01

    We have replicated type 1B chondrule textures and compositions with crystallization experiments in which UOC material was melted at 1400 deg.C and cooled at 5-1000 deg.C/hr using graphite crucibles in evacuated silica tubes to provide a reducing environment. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Increased expression of programmed death (PD)-1 and its ligand PD-L1 correlates with impaired cell-mediated immunity in high-risk human papillomavirus-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Song, Yan; Lu, Yun-Long; Sun, Jun-Zhong; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2013-08-01

    Impaired local cellular immunity contributes to the pathogenesis of persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, the programmed death 1/programmed death 1 ligand (PD-1/PD-L1; CD279/CD274) pathway was demonstrated to play a critical role in attenuating T-cell responses and promoting T-cell tolerance during chronic viral infections. In this study, we examined the expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 on cervical T cells and dendritic cells (DCs), respectively, from 40 women who were HR-HPV-negative (-) or HR-HPV-positive (+) with CIN grades 0, I and II-III. We also measured interferon-γ, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-10 in cervical exudates. The most common HPV type was HPV 16, followed by HPV 18, 33, 51 and 58. PD-1 and PD-L1 expression on cervical T cells and DCs, respectively, was associated with HR-HPV positivity and increased in parallel with increasing CIN grade. The opposite pattern was observed for CD80 and CD86 expression on DCs, which decreased in HR-HPV+ patients in parallel with increasing CIN grade. Similarly, reduced levels of the T helper type 1 cytokines interferon-γ and IL-12 and increased levels of the T helper type 2 cytokine IL-10 in cervical exudates correlated with HR-HPV positivity and CIN grade. Our results suggest that up-regulation of the inhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may negatively regulate cervical cell-mediated immunity to HPV and contribute to the progression of HR-HPV-related CIN. These results may aid in the development of PD-1/PD-L1 pathway-based strategies for immunotherapy of HR-HPV-related CIN.

  1. Induction of multiple programmed cell death pathways by IFN-beta in human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Koty, P P; Mayotte, J; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-25

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and keratinocyte transglutaminase (kTG), as well as the cross-linked envelopes (CLE) that they form, have been associated with squamous differentiation and programmed cell death in epithelial cells. When interferon-beta (IFN-beta) was used to stimulate differentiation and programmed cell death in the human lung cancer cell lines NCI-H596 and NCI-H226, the cells underwent a decrease in cellular density. In NCI-H596 IFN-beta caused an increase in kTG activity and DNA fragmentation in the lower density cells, which were significantly slower growing than control cells. However, in the higher density cells, which were only slightly slower growing than control cells, IFN-beta caused an increase in tTG activity and CLE competence. Dual-parameter flow cytometry demonstrated that IFN-beta-induced squamous differentiation preceded programmed cell death. Treatment of NCI-H596 cells with monodansylcadaverine, a transglutaminase inhibitor, prevented the increase in CLE competence, but did not inhibit DNA fragmentation. These results suggest that IFN-beta can induce NCI-H596 cells to enter multiple cell death pathways and that these pathways are not only differentiation related, but may also be growth driven.

  2. The presence of the TAR RNA structure alters the programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift efficiency of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by modifying the rate of translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, Karine; Charbonneau, Johanie; Dulude, Dominic; Heveker, Nikolaus; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 uses a programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift to synthesize the precursor of its enzymes, Gag-Pol. The frameshift efficiency that is critical for the virus replication, is controlled by an interaction between the ribosome and a specific structure on the viral mRNA, the frameshift stimulatory signal. The rate of cap-dependent translation initiation is known to be altered by the TAR RNA structure, present at the 5′ and 3′ end of all HIV-1 mRNAs. Depending upon its concentration, TAR activates or inhibits the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). We investigated here whether changes in translation initiation caused by TAR affect HIV-1 frameshift efficiency. CD4+ T cells and 293T cells were transfected with a dual-luciferase construct where the firefly luciferase expression depends upon the HIV-1 frameshift. Translation initiation was altered by adding TAR in cis or trans of the reporter mRNA. We show that HIV-1 frameshift efficiency correlates negatively with changes in the rate of translation initiation caused by TAR and mediated by PKR. A model is presented where changes in the rate of initiation affect the probability of frameshifting by altering the distance between elongating ribosomes on the mRNA, which influences the frequency of encounter between these ribosomes and the frameshift stimulatory signal. PMID:17984074

  3. Immune checkpoints programmed death 1 ligand 1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated molecule 4 in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlößer, Hans A.; Drebber, Uta; Kloth, Michael; Thelen, Martin; Rothschild, Sacha I.; Haase, Simon; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Wennhold, Kerstin; Berlth, Felix; Urbanski, Alexander; Alakus, Hakan; Schauss, Astrid; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; Warnecke-Ebertz, Ute; Stippel, Dirk L.; Zippelius, Alfred; Büttner, Reinhard; Hallek, Michael; Hölscher, Arnulf H.; Zander, Thomas; Mönig, Stefan P.; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition has been reported for several types of solid tumors and early studies in gastric adenocarcinoma are promising. A detailed knowledge about the natural biology of immune checkpoints in gastric adenocarcinoma is essential for clinical and translational evaluation of these drugs. This study is a comprehensive analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated molecule 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in gastric adenocarcinoma. PD-L1 and CTLA-4 were stained on tumor sections of 127 Caucasian patients with gastric adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and somatic mutation profiling was performed using targeted next-generation sequencing. Expression of PD-L1 and CTLA-4 on lymphocytes in tumor sections, tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN) and peripheral blood were studied by flow-cytometry and immune-fluorescence microscopy in an additional cohort. PD-L1 and CTLA-4 were expressed in 44.9% (57/127) and 86.6% (110/127) of the analyzed gastric adenocarcinoma samples, respectively. Positive tumor cell staining for PD-L1 or CTLA-4 was associated with inferior overall survival. Somatic mutational analysis did not reveal a correlation to expression of PD-L1 or CTLA-4 on tumor cells. Expression of PD-1 (52.2%), PD-L1 (42.2%) and CTLA-4 (1.6%) on tumor infiltrating T cells was significantly elevated compared to peripheral blood. Of note, PD-1 and PD-L1 were expressed far higher by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes than CTLA-4. In conclusion, specific immune checkpoint-inhibitors should be evaluated in this disease and the combination with molecular targeted therapies might be of benefit. An extensive immune monitoring should accompany these studies to better understand their mode of action in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27467911

  4. Reactive oxygen species regulate programmed cell death progress of endosperm in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under waterlogging.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiang-Xu; Yu, Min; Zhang, Nan; Zhou, Zhu-Qing; Xu, Qiu-Tao; Mei, Fang-Zhu; Qu, Liang-Huan

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have proved that waterlogging stress accelerates the programmed cell death (PCD) progress of wheat endosperm cells. A highly waterlogging-tolerant wheat cultivar Hua 8 and a waterlogging susceptible wheat cultivar Hua 9 were treated with different waterlogging durations, and then, dynamic changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS), gene expressions, and activities of antioxidant enzymes in endosperm cells were detected. The accumulation of ROS increased considerably after 7 days of waterlogging treatment (7 DWT) and 12 DWT in both cultivars compared with control group (under non-waterlogged conditions), culminated at 12 DAF (days after flowering) and reduced hereafter. Waterlogging resulted in a great increase of H2O2 and O2 (-) in plasma membranes, cell walls, mitochondrias, and intercellular spaces with ultracytochemical localization. Moreover, the deformation and rupture of cytomembranes as well as the swelling and distortion of mitochondria were obvious. Under waterlogging treatment conditions, catalase (CAT) gene expression increased in endosperm of Hua 8 but activity decreased. In addition, Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene expression and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased. Compared with Hua 8, both CAT, MnSOD gene expressions and CAT, SOD activities decreased in Hua 9. Moreover, ascorbic acid and mannitol relieve the intensifying of PCD processes in Hua 8 endosperm cells induced by waterlogging. These results indicate that ROS have important roles in the PCD of endosperm cells, the changes both CAT, MnSOD gene expressions and CAT, SOD activities directly affected the accumulation of ROS in two different wheat cultivars under waterlogging, ultimately led to the PCD acceleration of endosperm.

  5. Smad1/Smad5 signaling in limb ectoderm functions redundantly and is required for interdigital programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yuk Lau; Behringer, Richard R; Kwan, Kin Ming

    2012-03-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are secreted signals that regulate apical ectodermal ridge (AER) functions and interdigital programmed cell death (PCD) of developing limb. However the identities of the intracellular mediators of these signals are unknown. To investigate the role of Smad proteins in BMP-regulated AER functions in limb development, we inactivated Smad1 and Smad5 selectively in AER and ventral ectoderm of developing limb, using Smad1 or/and Smad5 floxed alleles and an En1(Cre/+) knock-in allele. Single inactivation of either Smad1 or Smad5 did not result in limb abnormalities. However, the Smad1/Smad5 double mutants exhibited syndactyly due to a reduction in interdigital PCD and an increase in interdigital cell proliferation. Cell tracing experiments in the Smad1/Smad5 double mutants showed that ventral ectoderm became thicker and the descendents of ventral En1(Cre/+) expressing ectodermal cells were located at dorsal interdigital regions. At the molecular level, Fgf8 expression was prolonged in the interdigital ectoderm of embryonic day (E) 13 Smad1/Smad5 double mutants, suggesting that the ectopic Fgf8 expression may serve as a survival signal for interdigital epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Our result suggests that Smad1 and Smad5 are required and function redundantly as intracellular mediators for BMP signaling in the AER and ventral ectoderm. Smad1/Smad5 signaling in the AER and ventral ectoderm regulates interdigital tissue regression of developing limb. Our mutants with defects in interdigital PCD could also serve as a valuable model for investigation of PCD regulation machinery.

  6. Mitochondrial proteomics of the acetic acid - induced programmed cell death response in a highly tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii - derived hybrid strain

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Joana F.; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Soares, Renata; Coelho, Ana V.; Leão, Cecília; Ludovico, Paula; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Very high concentrations of acetic acid at low pH induce programmed cell death (PCD) in both the experimental model Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Zygosaccharomyces bailii, the latter being considered the most problematic acidic food spoilage yeast due to its remarkable intrinsic resistance to this food preservative. However, while the mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae PCD induced by acetic acid have been previously examined, the corresponding molecular players remain largely unknown in Z. bailii. Also, the reason why acetic acid concentrations known to be necrotic for S. cerevisiae induce PCD with an apoptotic phenotype in Z. bailii remains to be elucidated. In this study, a 2-DE-based expression mitochondrial proteomic analysis was explored to obtain new insights into the mechanisms involved in PCD in the Z. bailii derived hybrid strain ISA1307. This allowed the quantitative assessment of expression of protein species derived from each of the parental strains, with special emphasis on the processes taking place in the mitochondria known to play a key role in acetic acid - induced PCD. A marked decrease in the content of proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolism, in particular, in respiratory metabolism (Cor1, Rip1, Lpd1, Lat1 and Pdb1), with a concomitant increase in the abundance of proteins involved in fermentation (Pdc1, Ald4, Dld3) was registered. Other differentially expressed identified proteins also suggest the involvement of the oxidative stress response, protein translation, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, among other processes, in the PCD response. Overall, the results strengthen the emerging concept of the importance of metabolic regulation of yeast PCD. PMID:28357336

  7. Programmed death ligand 1 as an indicator of pre-existing adaptive immune responses in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qian-Kun; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Pan, Tao; Lyu, Ning; Mu, Lu-Wen; Li, Shao-Long; Shi, Mu-De; Zhang, Zhen-Feng; Zhou, Peng-Hui; Zhao, Ming

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the aberrant expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) on tumor cells impairs antitumor immunity. To date, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the relationship between PD-L1 expression and host-tumor immunity is not well defined. Here, the expression levels of PD-L1 and CD8(+) T cell infiltration were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens from 167 HCC patients undergoing resection. A significant positive association was found between PD-L1 expression and the presence of CD8(+) T cell (p < 0.0001). Moreover, constitutive PD-L1 protein expression was not detected by western blot in HepG2, Hep3B, and 7402 HCC cancer cell lines; but co-cultured these cell lines with INFγ, a cytokine produced by activated CD8(+) T cells, remarkably upregulated PD-L1 expression. In fresh frozen HCC specimens, INFγ was found to be significantly correlated with PD-L1 and CD8(+) gene expression, as evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These findings indicate that increased PD-L1 level may represent an adaptive immune resistance mechanism exerted by tumor cells in response to endogenous antitumor activity. Both increased intratumoral PD-L1 and CD8(+) were significantly associated with superior DFS (CD8(+): p = 0.03; PD-L1: p = 0.023) and OS (CD8(+): p = 0.001 and PD-L1: p = 0.059), but PD-L1 expression was not independently prognostic. In conclusions, PD-L1 upregulation is mainly induced by activated CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells pre-existing in HCC milieu rather than be constitutively expressed by the tumor cells, and it is a favorable prognostic factor for HCC.

  8. Endothelial apoptosis in pulmonary hypertension is controlled by a microRNA/programmed cell death 4/caspase-3 axis.

    PubMed

    White, Kevin; Dempsie, Yvonne; Caruso, Paola; Wallace, Emma; McDonald, Robert A; Stevens, Hannah; Hatley, Mark E; Van Rooij, Eva; Morrell, Nicholas W; MacLean, Margaret R; Baker, Andrew H

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis is a transient, yet defining pathogenic event integral to the onset of many pulmonary vascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, there is a paucity of information concerning the molecular pathway(s) that control pulmonary arterial endothelial cell apoptosis. Here, we introduce a molecular axis that when functionally active seems to induce pulmonary arterial endothelial cell apoptosis in vitro and PH in vivo. In response to apoptotic stimuli, human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells exhibited robust induction of a programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4)/caspase-3/apoptotic pathway that was reversible by direct PDCD4 silencing. Indirectly, this pathway was also repressed by delivery of a microRNA-21 mimic. In vivo, genetic deletion of microRNA-21 in mice (miR-21(-/-) mice) resulted in functional activation of the PDCD4/caspase-3 axis in the pulmonary tissues, leading to the onset of progressive PH. Conversely, microRNA-21-overexpressing mice (CAG-microRNA-21 mice) exhibited reduced PDCD4 expression in pulmonary tissues and were partially resistant to PH in response to chronic hypoxia plus SU 5416 injury. Furthermore, direct PDCD4 knockout in mice (PDCD4(-/-) mice) potently blocked pulmonary caspase-3 activation and the development of chronic hypoxia plus SU 5416 PH, confirming its importance in disease onset. Broadly, these findings support the existence of a microRNA-21-responsive PDCD4/caspase-3 pathway in the pulmonary tissues that when active serves to promote endothelial apoptosis in vitro and PH in vivo.

  9. Epigenetic Changes are Associated with Programmed Cell Death Induced by Heat Stress in Seedling Leaves of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Zhao, Lin; Hou, Haoli; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Yan; Wang, Yapei; Li, Hui; Gao, Fei; Yan, Shihan; Li, Lijia

    2015-05-01

    Histone modification plays a crucial role in regulation of chromatin architecture and function, responding to adverse external stimuli. However, little is known about a possible relationship between epigenetic modification and programmed cell death (PCD) in response to environmental stress. Here, we found that heat stress induced PCD in maize seedling leaves which was characterized by chromatin DNA laddering and DNA strand breaks detected by a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) test. The activities of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) were progressively increased over time in the heat-treated seedlings. However, the concentration of H2O2 remained at relatively lower levels, while the concentration of superoxide anion ([Formula: see text]) was increased, accompanied by the occurrence of higher ion leakage rates after heat treatment. The total acetylation levels of histones H3K9, H4K5 and H3 were significantly increased, whereas the di-methylation level of histone H3K4 was unchanged and the di-methylation level of histone H3K9 was decreased in the seedling leaves exposed to heat stress compared with the control seedlings, accompanied by increased nucleolus size indicative of chromatin decondensation. Furthermore, treatment of seedlings with trichostatin A (TSA), which always results in genomic histone hyperacetylation, caused an increase in the [Formula: see text] level within the cells. The results suggested that heat stress persistently induced [Formula: see text], leading to PCD in association with histone modification changes in the maize leaves.

  10. Overexpression of ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE1a alleviates mitochondria-dependent programmed cell death induced by aluminium phytotoxicity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Li, Zhe; Wang, Yongqiang; Xing, Da

    2014-08-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) is a terminal oxidase found in all plants, and functions to maintain the electron flux and reduce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our previous study demonstrated that aluminium (Al) treatment could induce increased expression of the AOX1a gene, but the mechanism of how AOX1a participates in the regulation of Al-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is still not clear. To investigate the possible mechanism, mitochondrial ROS production and the behaviour of mitochondria, as well as caspase-3-like activation were monitored under Al treatment in wild-type (WT), AOX1a-lacking (aox1a), and AOX1a-overexpressing (AOX1a-OE) Arabidopsis. Our results showed that Al treatment increased the expression of AOX1a at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Overexpression of AOX1a reduced mitochondrial ROS production by maintaining the mitochondrial electron flux, and alleviated subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-3-like activation in Al-induced PCD. Moreover, it was found that a change in AOX1a level could influence the expression levels of downstream functional genes that play protective roles in Al-induced PCD. Experiments using mutants and inhibitors demonstrated that superoxide anion (O2 (-)) derived from mitochondria was involved in Al-induced upregulation of AOX1a gene expression. Taken together, these results indicated that overexpression of AOX1a alleviated Al-induced PCD by maintaining mitochondrial function and promoting the expression of protective functional genes, providing new insights into the signalling cascades that modulate the Al phytotoxicity mechanism.

  11. Self-incompatibility-induced programmed cell death in field poppy pollen involves dramatic acidification of the incompatible pollen tube cytosol.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katie A; Bosch, Maurice; Haque, Tamanna; Teng, Nianjun; Poulter, Natalie S; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2015-03-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is an important genetically controlled mechanism to prevent inbreeding in higher plants. SI involves highly specific interactions during pollination, resulting in the rejection of incompatible (self) pollen. Programmed cell death (PCD) is an important mechanism for destroying cells in a precisely regulated manner. SI in field poppy (Papaver rhoeas) triggers PCD in incompatible pollen. During SI-induced PCD, we previously observed a major acidification of the pollen cytosol. Here, we present measurements of temporal alterations in cytosolic pH ([pH]cyt); they were surprisingly rapid, reaching pH 6.4 within 10 min of SI induction and stabilizing by 60 min at pH 5.5. By manipulating the [pH]cyt of the pollen tubes in vivo, we show that [pH]cyt acidification is an integral and essential event for SI-induced PCD. Here, we provide evidence showing the physiological relevance of the cytosolic acidification and identify key targets of this major physiological alteration. A small drop in [pH]cyt inhibits the activity of a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase required for pollen tube growth. We also show that [pH]cyt acidification is necessary and sufficient for triggering several key hallmark features of the SI PCD signaling pathway, notably activation of a DEVDase/caspase-3-like activity and formation of SI-induced punctate actin foci. Importantly, the actin binding proteins Cyclase-Associated Protein and Actin-Depolymerizing Factor are identified as key downstream targets. Thus, we have shown the biological relevance of an extreme but physiologically relevant alteration in [pH]cyt and its effect on several components in the context of SI-induced events and PCD.

  12. Hypoxic stress triggers a programmed cell death pathway to induce vascular cavity formation in Pisum sativum roots.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Gladish, Daniel K

    2012-12-01

    Flooding at warm temperatures induces hypoxic stress in Pisum sativum seedling roots. In response, some undifferentiated cells in the primary root vascular cylinder start degenerating and form a longitudinal vascular cavity. Changes in cellular morphology and cell wall ultrastructure detected previously in the late stages of cavity formation suggest possible involvement of programmed cell death (PCD). In this study, cytological events occurring in the early stages of cavity formation were investigated. Systematic DNA fragmentation, a feature of many PCD pathways, was detected in the cavity-forming roots after 3 h of flooding in situ by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay and in isolated total DNA by gel electrophoresis. High molecular weight DNA fragments of about 20-30 kb were detected by pulse-field gel electrophoresis, but no low-molecular weight internucleosomal DNA fragments were detected by conventional gel electrophoresis. Release of mitochondrial cytochrome c protein into the cytosol, an integral part of mitochondria-dependent PCD pathways, was detected in the cavity-forming roots within 2 h of flooding by fluorescence microscopy of immunolabeled cytochrome c in situ and in isolated mitochondrial and cytosolic protein fractions by western blotting. DNA fragmentation and cytochrome c release remained confined to the undifferentiated cells in center of the root vascular cylinders, even after 24 h of flooding, while outer vascular cylinder cells and cortical cells maintained cellular integrity and normal activity. These findings confirm that hypoxia-induced vascular cavity formation in P. sativum roots involves PCD, and provides a chronological model of cytological events involved in this rare and understudied PCD system.

  13. Programmed cell death in kiwifruit stigmatic arms and its relationship to the effective pollination period and the progamic phase

    PubMed Central

    Ferradás, Yolanda; López, Marián; Rey, Manuel; González, Ma Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Kiwifruit is a crop with a highly successful reproductive performance, which is impaired by the short effective pollination period of female flowers. This study investigates whether the degenerative processes observed in both pollinated and non-pollinated flowers after anthesis may be considered to be programmed cell death (PCD). Methods Features of PCD in kiwifruit, Actinidia chinensis var. deliciosa, were studied in both non-pollinated and pollinated stigmatic arms using transmission electron microscopy, DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling) assays, DNA gel electrophoresis and caspase-like activity assays. Key Results In the secretory tissues of the stigmatic arms, cell organelles disintegrated sequentially while progressive vacuolization was detected. At the same time, chromatin condensation, nuclear deformation, and DNA fragmentation and degradation were observed. These features were detected in both non-pollinated and pollinated stigmatic arms; they were evident in the stigmas of pollinated flowers by the second day after anthesis but only by 4 d after anthesis in non-pollinated flowers. In addition, in pollinated stigmatic arms, these features were first initiated in the stigma and gradually progressed through the style, consistent with pollen tube growth. This timing of events was also observed in both non-pollinated and pollinated stigmatic arms for caspase-3-like activity. Conclusions The data provide evidence to support the hypothesis that PCD processes occurring in the secretory tissue of non-pollinated kiwifruit stigmatic arms could be the origin for the observed short effective pollination period. The results obtained in the secretory tissue of pollinated kiwifruit stigmatic arms upon pollination support the idea that PCD might be accelerated by pollination, pointing to the involvement of PCD during the progamic phase. PMID:24782437

  14. Nitric oxide modulates cadmium influx during cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenwen; Xu, Wenzhong; Xu, Hua; Chen, Yanshan; He, Zhenyan; Ma, Mi

    2010-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a bioactive gas and functions as a signaling molecule in plants exposed to diverse biotic and abiotic stresses including cadmium (Cd(2+)). Cd(2+) is a non-essential and toxic heavy metal, which has been reported to induce programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. Here, we investigated the role of NO in Cd(2+)-induced PCD in tobacco BY-2 cells (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2). In this work, BY-2 cells exposed to 150 microM CdCl(2) underwent PCD with TUNEL-positive nuclei, significant chromatin condensation and the increasing expression of a PCD-related gene Hsr203J. Accompanied with the occurring of PCD, the production of NO increased significantly. The supplement of NO by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) had accelerated the PCD, whereas the NO synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) and NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) alleviated this toxicity. To investigate the mechanism by which NO exerted its function, Cd(2+) concentration was measured subsequently. SNP led more Cd(2+) content than Cd(2+) treatment alone. By contrast, the prevention of NO by L-NAME decreased Cd(2+) accumulation. Using the scanning ion-selective electrode technique, we analyzed the pattern and rate of Cd(2+) fluxes. This analysis revealed the promotion of Cd(2+) influxes into cells by application of SNP, while L-NAME and cPTIO reduced the rate of Cd(2+) uptake or even resulted in net Cd(2+) efflux. Based on these founding, we concluded that NO played a positive role in CdCl(2)-induced PCD by modulating Cd(2+) uptake and thus promoting Cd(2+) accumulation in BY-2 cells.

  15. Near infrared photoimmunotherapy with avelumab, an anti-programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibody

    PubMed Central

    Nagaya, Tadanobu; Nakamura, Yuko; Sato, Kazuhide; Harada, Toshiko; Choyke, Peter L.; Hodge, James W.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2017-01-01

    Near Infrared-Photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a highly selective tumor treatment that employs an antibody-photo-absorber conjugate (APC). Programmed cell death protein-1 ligand (PD-L1) is emerging as a molecular target. Here, we describe the efficacy of NIR-PIT, using fully human IgG1 anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), avelumab, conjugated to the photo-absorber, IR700DX, in a PD-L1 expressing H441 cell line, papillary adenocarcinoma of lung. Avelumab-IR700 showed specific binding and cell-specific killing was observed after exposure of the cells to NIR in vitro. In the in vivo study, avelumab-IR700 showed high tumor accumulation and high tumor-background ratio. Tumor-bearing mice were separated into 4 groups: (1) no treatment; (2) 100 μg of avelumab-IR700 i.v.; (3) NIR light exposure only, NIR light was administered; (4) 100 μg of avelumab-IR700 i.v., NIR light was administered. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by NIR-PIT treatment compared with the other groups (p < 0.001), and significantly prolonged survival was achieved (p < 0.01 vs other groups). In conclusion, the anti-PD-L1 antibody, avelumab, is suitable as an APC for NIR-PIT. Furthermore, NIR-PIT with avelumab-IR700 is a promising candidate of the treatment of PD-L1-expressing tumors that could be readily translated to humans. PMID:27716622

  16. Anti-programmed cell death protein 1 tolerance and efficacy after ipilimumab immunotherapy: observational study of 39 patients.

    PubMed

    Amode, Reyhan; Baroudjian, Barouyr; Kowal, Anita; Jebali, Majdi; Allayous, Clara; Bagot, Martine; Madjlessi, Nika; Roux, Jennifer; Viguier, Manuelle; Basset Seguin, Nicole; Porcher, Raphaël; Pagès, Cécile; Lebbé, Céleste

    2017-04-01

    In patients with ipilimumab (IPI)-refractory melanoma, the anti-programmed cell death proteins 1 (PD1s) nivolumab (NIV) and pembrolizumab (PEM) are considered to be a new standard of treatment. Few data are available on anti-PD1 safety in patients who develop IPI-related severe adverse events (AEs) (grade≥3). The aim of this study was to compare the anti-PD1 safety and efficacy in patients with previous severe toxicity to IPI versus in those showing moderate and no previous IPI-related AEs. This single institution-based observational study included all patients treated with anti-PD1 (PEM or NIV) and previously treated with IPI for unresectable stage III or IV melanoma. The patients enrolled were classified according to the occurrence of IPI-related AEs: group A: no previous IPI-related AEs; group B: mild to moderate IPI-related AEs; and group C: severe to life-threatening IPI-related AEs. The main outcome measure was safety of the anti-PD1 among the three groups. The secondary endpoints included response parameters. Groups A, B, and C included, respectively, 16, 13, and 10 patients. The incidence of severe anti-PD1-related AEs (grades 3-4) was 12, 23, and 10% in groups A, B, and C, respectively. One-year estimates of survival were 52.2, 73.4, and 66.7% among the patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The number of patients was too small to enable a meaningful statistical comparison. We did not observe any difference in anti-PD1 toxicity onset incidence according to the occurrence of previous IPI AEs. These reassuring real-life data should be confirmed in a wider analysis.

  17. MicroRNA-425-5p regulates chemoresistance in colorectal cancer cells via regulation of Programmed Cell Death 10.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Hu, Xingqian; Miao, Xiaofei; Zhu, Kuiyu; Cui, Songkui; Meng, Qingyang; Sun, Jialin; Wang, Tong

    2016-02-01

    Acquired chemoresistance represents a major obstacle in cancer treatment, the underlying mechanism of which is complex and not well understood. MiR-425-5p has been reported to be implicated tumorigenesis in a few cancer types. However, its role in regulating chemoresistance has not been investigated in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Microarray analysis was performed in isogenic chemosensitive and chemoresistant HCT116 cell lines to identify differentially expressed miRNAs. miRNA quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect miR-425-5p expression levels between drug resistant and parental cancer cells. MiR-425-5p mimic and inhibitor were transfected, followed by CellTiter-Glo(®) assay to examine drug sensitivity in these two cell lines. Western Blot and luciferase assay were performed to investigate the direct target of miR-425-5p. Xenograft mouse models were used to examine in vivo function of miR-425-5p. Our data showed that expression of miR-425-5p was significantly up-regulated in HCT116-R compared with parental HCT116 cells. Inhibition of miR-425-5p reversed chemoresistance in HCT116-R cells. Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) is the direct target of miR-425-5p which is required for the regulatory role of miR-425-5p in chemoresistance. MiR-425-5p inhibitor sensitized HCT116-R xenografts to chemo drugs in vivo. Our study demonstrated that miR-425-5p regulates chemoresistance of CRC cells by modulating PDCD10 expression level both in vitro and in vivo. MiR-425-5p may represent a new therapeutic target for the intervention of CRC.

  18. A type-1 metacaspase from Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Trzyna, Wendy C; Legras, Xavier D; Cordingley, John S

    2008-01-01

    The complete sequence of a type-1 metacaspase from Acanthamoeba castellanii is reported comprising 478 amino acids. The metacaspase was recovered from an expression library using sera specific for membrane components implicated in stimulating encystation. A central domain of 155 amino acid residues contains the Cys/His catalytic dyad and is the most conserved region containing at least 30 amino acid identities in all metacaspases. The Acanthamoeba castellanii metacaspase has the most proline-rich N-terminus so far reported in type-1 metacaspases with over 40 prolines in the first 150 residues. Ala-Pro-Pro is present 11 times. Phylogenies constructed using only the conserved proteolytic domains or the complete sequences show identical branching patterns, differing only in the rates of change.

  19. Writer's cramp in spinocerebellar ataxia Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, Geeta Anjum; Srivastava, Abhilekh; Ghuge, Vijay Vishwanath; Chaudhry, Neera

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia can be encountered in a small subset of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), but task specific dystonia is extremely rare. We report a case of a 48-year-old male with confirmed SCA Type 1 (SCA1) with mild progressive cerebellar ataxia and a prominent and disabling Writer's cramp. This case highlights the ever-expanding phenotypic heterogeneity of the SCA's in general and SCA1 in particular. PMID:27695243

  20. Diabetes in young: Beyond type 1

    PubMed Central

    Virmani, Anju; Kulkarni, Abhishek

    2012-01-01

    Although majority of diabetes in children is type1 diabetes, childhood type2 diabetes prevalence is rapidly increasing due to changing lifestyle. Most patients can be definitely grouped into either of the two but some present diagnostic difficulty due to overlapping and non specific clinical features and laboratory findings. MODY and several other diseases affecting the pancreas also result in childhood diabetes. Treatment of diabetes in children presents unique challenges and primary prevention is of prime importance. PMID:23565393

  1. Type 1 diabetes and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The presence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Type 1 diabetes largely impairs life expectancy. Hyperglycemia leading to an increase in oxidative stress is considered to be the key pathophysiological factor of both micro- and macrovascular complications. In Type 1 diabetes, the presence of coronary calcifications is also related to coronary artery disease. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy, which significantly impairs myocardial function and blood flow, also enhances cardiac abnormalities. Also hypoglycemic episodes are considered to adversely influence cardiac performance. Intensive insulin therapy has been demonstrated to reduce the occurrence and progression of both micro- and macrovascular complications. This has been evidenced by the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) / Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. The concept of a metabolic memory emerged based on the results of the study, which established that intensified insulin therapy is the standard of treatment of Type 1 diabetes. Future therapies may also include glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-based treatment therapies. Pilot studies with GLP-1-analogues have been shown to reduce insulin requirements. PMID:24165454

  2. Hypothesis: increase of the ratio singlet oxygen plus superoxide radical to hydrogen peroxide changes stress defense response to programmed leaf death

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, Bartolomé; Martín, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increases under different stresses and, by destroying cellular components, may cause cell death. In addition, ROS are part of the complex network of transduction signals that induce defense reactions against stress or, alternatively, trigger programmed cell death, and key questions are the levels of each ROS that, respectively determine defense and death responses of the cell. The answer to those questions is difficult because there are several patterns of cell death that frequently appear mixed and are hardly distinguishable. Moreover, although considerable progresses have been achieved in the determination of the levels of specific ROS, critical questions remain on the ROS level in specific cell compartments. By considering chloroplasts as the main source of ROS in photosynthetic tissues at light, a comparison of the levels in stress and senescence of the chloroplastic activities involved in the generation and scavenging of ROS suggests plausible differences in the levels of specific ROS between stress defense and death. In effect, the three activities of the chlororespiratory chain increase similarly in stress defense response. However, in senescence, superoxide dismutase (SOD), that converts superoxide anion radical (O2∙−) to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2,) decreases, while the thylakoid Ndh complex, that favors the generation of singlet oxygen (1O2) and O2∙−, and peroxidase (PX), that consumes H2O2, increase. The obvious inference is that, in respect to defense response, the ratio (1O2 plus O2∙−)/H2O2 is increased in the senescence previous to cell death. We hypothesize that the different ROS ratios, probably through changes in the jasmonic acid/H2O2 ratio, could determine the activation of the defense network or the death network response of the cell. PMID:24324479

  3. The Risk and Clinical/Molecular Characteristics of Breast Cancer in Women with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Characteristics of Breast Cancer in Women with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Xia Wang, M.D., Ph.D...Women with Neurofibromatosis Type 1” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0671 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Xia Wang...Several reports from England and the United States have described increased breast cancer occurrence in women affected with Neurofibromatosis type 1

  4. Death Education for the Health Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains seven articles reviewing various death education programs for health professionals. Discusses death education in undergraduate and advanced nursing practice programs; a graduate course focusing on social, psychological, and cultural conditions influencing death; two death education programs in medical schools; and humanistic health care…

  5. RNA-Seq-based transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis reveal stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yachen; Hu, Jingjin; Fan, Linlin; Chen, Qihe

    2017-02-17

    As a typical harmful inhibitor in cellulosic hydrolyzates, acetic acid not only hinders bioethanol production, but also induces cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Herein, we conducted both transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to investigate the global responses under acetic acid stress at different stages. There were 295 up-regulated and 427 down-regulated genes identified at more than two time points during acetic acid treatment (150 mM, pH 3.0). These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mainly involved in intracellular homeostasis, central metabolic pathway, transcription regulation, protein folding and stabilization, ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process, vesicle-mediated transport, protein synthesis, MAPK signaling pathways, cell cycle, programmed cell death, etc. The interaction network of all identified DEGs was constructed to speculate the potential regulatory genes and dominant pathways in response to acetic acid. The transcriptional changes were confirmed by metabolic profiles and phenotypic analysis. Acetic acid resulted in severe acidification in both cytosol and mitochondria, which was different from the effect of extracellular pH. Additionally, the imbalance of intracellular acetylation was shown to aggravate cell death under this stress. Overall, this work provides a novel and comprehensive understanding of stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in yeast.

  6. RNA-Seq-based transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis reveal stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yachen; Hu, Jingjin; Fan, Linlin; Chen, Qihe

    2017-01-01

    As a typical harmful inhibitor in cellulosic hydrolyzates, acetic acid not only hinders bioethanol production, but also induces cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Herein, we conducted both transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to investigate the global responses under acetic acid stress at different stages. There were 295 up-regulated and 427 down-regulated genes identified at more than two time points during acetic acid treatment (150 mM, pH 3.0). These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mainly involved in intracellular homeostasis, central metabolic pathway, transcription regulation, protein folding and stabilization, ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process, vesicle-mediated transport, protein synthesis, MAPK signaling pathways, cell cycle, programmed cell death, etc. The interaction network of all identified DEGs was constructed to speculate the potential regulatory genes and dominant pathways in response to acetic acid. The transcriptional changes were confirmed by metabolic profiles and phenotypic analysis. Acetic acid resulted in severe acidification in both cytosol and mitochondria, which was different from the effect of extracellular pH. Additionally, the imbalance of intracellular acetylation was shown to aggravate cell death under this stress. Overall, this work provides a novel and comprehensive understanding of stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in yeast. PMID:28209995

  7. [Severe pulmonary involvement in the course of type 1 neurofibromatosis].

    PubMed

    Martignac, B; Gagnadoux, F; Trzepizur, W; Beneton, N; Vinchon, F; Paris, A; Montani, D; Goupil, F

    2014-09-01

    Type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1) is a hereditary disease inherited as an autosomal dominant. Respiratory involvement is rare. We report the case of a woman suffering from NF1 with mutation of the corresponding gene and with respiratory involvement combining diffuse parenchymatous lesions, severe precapillary pulmonary hypertension and an enlarging, spiculated pulmonary nodule, very suspicious of malignancy, though histological examination was not possible on account of the patient's poor respiratory function. There was progressive deterioration of the patient's respiratory condition, leading to death, despite the introduction of oral therapy combining a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor and an endothelin receptor antagonist. Our case illustrates the development of multiple severe respiratory pathologies in the setting of NF1. The specific contribution of the NF1 gene mutation in the pathophysiology of these different pulmonary manifestations needs to be examined in detail.

  8. Two cases of anti-programmed cell death 1-associated bullous pemphigoid-like disease and eruptive keratoacanthomas featuring combined histopathology.

    PubMed

    Bandino, Justin P; Perry, David M; Clarke, Christina E; Marchell, Richard M; Elston, Dirk M

    2017-02-21

    Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) inhibitors (pembrolizumab, nivolumab) are novel immunotherapies revolutionizing the management of advanced malignancy with an improved adverse effect profile, yet the immune-related side effects are still being characterized.(1,2) We report the unique concurrence of bullous pemphigoid-like disease (BP) with keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas in two patients receiving anti-PD-1 immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. 17beta-estradiol attenuates programmed cell death in cortical pericontusional zone following traumatic brain injury via upregulation of ERalpha and inhibition of caspase-3 activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Zhuo; Bao, Yi-Jun; Zhao, Min

    2011-01-01

    Pericontusional zone (PCZ) of traumatic cerebral contusion is a target of pharmacological intervention. It is well studied that 17beta-estradiol has a protective role in ischemic brain injury, but its role in brain protection of traumatic brain damage deserves further investigation, especially in pericontusional zone. Here we show that 17beta-estradiol enhances the protein expression and mRNA induction of estrogen alpha receptor (ERalpha) and prevents from programmed cell death in cortical pericontusional zone. ERalpha specific antagonist blocks this protective effect of 17beta-estradiol. Caspase-3 activation occurs in cortical pericontusional zone of the oil-treated injured rat brain and its activation is inhibited by 17beta-estradiol treatment. Additionally, ERalpha specific antagonist reverses this inhibition. Pan-caspase inhibitor also protect cortical pericontusional zone from programmed cell death. Our present study indicates 17beta-estradiol protects from programmed cell death in cortical pericontusional zone via enhancement of ERalpha and decrease of caspase-3 activation.

  10. Voodoo death.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2009-01-01

    Scholarly writing on voodoo death is reviewed. Criticisms that voodoo deaths in indigenous societies have never been well documented are refuted with cases medically documented in developed nations. The work of Cannon and Richter on sudden death in animals is reviewed and dismissed as irrelevant for understanding voodoo death. The role of starvation and dehydration is discussed, and it is suggested that the given-up/giving-up hypothesis best fits the phenomenon of voodoo death. Hypotheses for future research are suggested.

  11. Moyamoya syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the most prevalent autosomal dominant genetic disorder among humans. NF1 vasculopathy is a significant but underrecognized complication of the disease, affecting both arterial and venous blood vessels of all sizes. Moyamoya syndrome is a cerebral vasculopathy that is only rarely observed in association with NF1, particularly in the pediatric age range. Herein, we report of a 5-year-old female with NF1 and moyamoya syndrome and we briefly review the existing literature. PMID:24952383

  12. Cognitive profile of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Levine, Terry M; Materek, April; Abel, Jessica; O'Donnell, Madeline; Cutting, Laurie E

    2006-03-01

    General consensus has yet to be reached with regard to the exact cognitive profile of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The current overview seeks to provide a more comprehensive review of the literature by examining studies that have specifically compared individuals with NF1 to siblings, controls, and/or norms. We also examined results of studies that compared individuals with NF1 with various manifestations to each other. Consistent with previous reviews, no clear cognitive profile emerged; however, greater insight into patterns was obtained. Additionally, future directions for research on NF1 were suggested.

  13. Type 1 diabetes pathogenesis – Prevention???

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, C. S. Muralidhara; Srikanta, S.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes is multi-faceted, including, autoimmunity, genetics and environment. Autoimmunity directed against pancreatic islet cells results in slowly progressive selective beta-cell destruction (“Primary autoimmune insulitis”), culminating over years in clinically manifested insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Circulating serum autoantibodies directed against the endocrine cells of the islets of Langerhans (Islet cell autoantibodies - ICAb) are an important hallmark of this disease. Assays for islet cell autoantibodies have facilitated the investigation and understanding of several facets in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. Their applications have extended into clinical practice and have opened new avenues for early preclinical prediction and preventive prophylaxis in IDDM/type 1 DM. Recently, surprisingly, differences in insulin content between T1DM islets, as well as, ‘patchy’ or ‘lobular’ destruction of islets have been described. These unique pathobiological phenomena, suggest that beta cell destruction may not always be inexorable and inevitably complete/total, and thus raise hopes for possible therapeutic interruption of beta cell autoimmunity – destruction and cure of type 1 diabetes. “Recurrent or secondary autoimmune insulitis” refers to the rapid reappearance of islet cell autoantibodies post pancreas transplant, and selective islet beta cell destruction in the grafted pancreas [never forgetting or “anamnestic” beta cell destructive memory], in the absence of any graft pancreas rejection [monozygotic twin to twin transplantation]. The one definite environmental factor is congenital rubella, because of which a subset of children subsequently develop type 1 diabetes. The putative predisposing factors are viruses, gluten and cow's milk. The putative protective factors include gut flora, helminths, viral infections, and Vitamin D. Prevention of T1DM can include: Primary prevention strategies before

  14. The 19-kilodalton adenovirus E1B transforming protein inhibits programmed cell death and prevents cytolysis by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    White, E; Sabbatini, P; Debbas, M; Wold, W S; Kusher, D I; Gooding, L R

    1992-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A and E1B proteins are required for transformation of primary rodent cells. When expressed in the absence of the 19,000-dalton (19K) E1B protein, however, the E1A proteins are acutely cytotoxic and induce host cell chromosomal DNA fragmentation and cytolysis, analogous to cells undergoing programmed cell death (apoptosis). E1A alone can efficiently initiate the formation of foci which subsequently undergo abortive transformation whereby stimulation of cell growth is counteracted by continual cell death. Cell lines with an immortalized growth potential eventually arise with low frequency. Coexpression of the E1B 19K protein with E1A is sufficient to overcome abortive transformation to produce high-frequency transformation. Like E1A, the tumoricidal cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) evokes a programmed cell death response in many tumor cell lines by inducing DNA fragmentation and cytolysis. Expression of the E1B 19K protein by viral infection, by transient expression, or in transformed cells completely and specifically blocks this TNF-alpha-induced DNA fragmentation and cell death. Cosegregation of 19K protein transforming activity with protection from TNF-alpha-mediated cytolysis demonstrates that both activities are likely the consequence of the same function of the protein. Therefore, we propose that by suppressing an intrinsic cell death mechanism activated by TNF-alpha or E1A, the E1B 19K protein enhances the transforming activity of E1A and enables adenovirus to evade TNF-alpha-dependent immune surveillance. Images PMID:1317006

  15. Examination of the leaf proteome during flooding stress and the induction of programmed cell death in maize

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maize is a major economic crop worldwide, with substantial crop loss attributed to flooding. During a stress response, programmed cell death (PCD) can be an effective way for plants better adapt. To identify flooding stress related PCD proteins in maize leaves, proteomic analysis was performed using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry. Results Comparative proteomics was combined with physiological and biochemical analysis of maize leaves under flooding stress. Fv/Fm, qP, qN and relative water content (RWC) were found to be altered in response to flooding stress, with an increase in H2O2 content noted in vivo. Furthermore, DNA ladder detection indicated that PCD had occurred under flooding treatment. The maize leaf proteome was analyzed via 2D-DIGE gel, with a total of 32 differentially expressed spots isolated, 31 spots were successfully identified via MALDI-TOF/TOF MS which represent 28 proteins. The identified proteins were related to energy metabolism and photosynthesis, PCD, phytohormones and polyamines. To better characterize the role of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) in PCD during a stress response, mRNA expression was examined in different plants by stress-induced PCD. These included heat stress induced rice protoplasts, Tobacco Mosaic Virus infected tobacco leaves and dark induced rice and Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, all of which showed active PCD, and TCTP expression was increased in different degrees. Moreover, S-adenosylmethionine synthase 2 (SAMS2) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) mRNA expression were also increased, but ACC synthase (ACS) and ACC oxidase (ACO) mRNA expression were not found in maize leaves following flooding. Lastly, ethylene and polyamine concentrations were increased in response to flooding treatment in maize leaves. Conclusions Following flooding stress, the photosynthetic systems were damaged, resulting in a disruption in energy

  16. High Specificity in Circulating Tumor Cell Identification Is Required for Accurate Evaluation of Programmed Death-Ligand 1

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Zachery D.; Warrick, Jay W.; Guckenberger, David J.; Pezzi, Hannah M.; Sperger, Jamie M.; Heninger, Erika; Saeed, Anwaar; Leal, Ticiana; Mattox, Kara; Traynor, Anne M.; Campbell, Toby C.; Berry, Scott M.; Beebe, David J.; Lang, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Expression of programmed-death ligand 1 (PD-L1) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is typically evaluated through invasive biopsies; however, recent advances in the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may be a less invasive method to assay tumor cells for these purposes. These liquid biopsies rely on accurate identification of CTCs from the diverse populations in the blood, where some tumor cells share characteristics with normal blood cells. While many blood cells can be excluded by their high expression of CD45, neutrophils and other immature myeloid subsets have low to absent expression of CD45 and also express PD-L1. Furthermore, cytokeratin is typically used to identify CTCs, but neutrophils may stain non-specifically for intracellular antibodies, including cytokeratin, thus preventing accurate evaluation of PD-L1 expression on tumor cells. This holds even greater significance when evaluating PD-L1 in epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) positive and EpCAM negative CTCs (as in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)). Methods To evaluate the impact of CTC misidentification on PD-L1 evaluation, we utilized CD11b to identify myeloid cells. CTCs were isolated from patients with metastatic NSCLC using EpCAM, MUC1 or Vimentin capture antibodies and exclusion-based sample preparation (ESP) technology. Results Large populations of CD11b+CD45lo cells were identified in buffy coats and stained non-specifically for intracellular antibodies including cytokeratin. The amount of CD11b+ cells misidentified as CTCs varied among patients; accounting for 33–100% of traditionally identified CTCs. Cells captured with vimentin had a higher frequency of CD11b+ cells at 41%, compared to 20% and 18% with MUC1 or EpCAM, respectively. Cells misidentified as CTCs ultimately skewed PD-L1 expression to varying degrees across patient samples. Conclusions Interfering myeloid populations can be differentiated from true CTCs with additional staining criteria

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα)-induced Ceramide Generation via Ceramide Synthases Regulates Loss of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Corbacho, María José; Canals, Daniel; Adada, Mohamad M; Liu, Mengling; Senkal, Can E; Yi, Jae Kyo; Mao, Cungui; Luberto, Chiara; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2015-10-16

    Ceramide synthases (CerS1-CerS6), which catalyze the N-acylation of the (dihydro)sphingosine backbone to produce (dihydro)ceramide in both the de novo and the salvage or recycling pathway of ceramide generation, have been implicated in the control of programmed cell death. However, the regulation of the de novo pathway compared with the salvage pathway is not fully understood. In the current study, we have found that late accumulation of multiple ceramide and dihydroceramide species in MCF-7 cells treated with TNFα occurred by up-regulation of both pathways of ceramide synthesis. Nevertheless, fumonisin B1 but not myriocin was able to protect from TNFα-induced cell death, suggesting that ceramide synthase activity is crucial for the progression of cell death and that the pool of ceramide involved derives from the salvage pathway rather than de novo biosynthesis. Furthermore, compared with control cells, TNFα-treated cells exhibited reduced focal adhesion kinase and subsequent plasma membrane permeabilization, which was blocked exclusively by fumonisin B1. In addition, exogenously added C6-ceramide mimicked the effects of TNFα that lead to cell death, which were inhibited by fumonisin B1. Knockdown of individual ceramide synthases identified CerS6 and its product C16-ceramide as the ceramide synthase isoform essential for the regulation of cell death. In summary, our data suggest a novel role for CerS6/C16-ceramide as an upstream effector of the loss of focal adhesion protein and plasma membrane permeabilization, via the activation of caspase-7, and identify the salvage pathway as the critical mechanism of ceramide generation that controls cell death.

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα)-induced Ceramide Generation via Ceramide Synthases Regulates Loss of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Programmed Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Corbacho, María José; Canals, Daniel; Adada, Mohamad M.; Liu, Mengling; Senkal, Can E.; Yi, Jae Kyo; Mao, Cungui; Luberto, Chiara; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide synthases (CerS1–CerS6), which catalyze the N-acylation of the (dihydro)sphingosine backbone to produce (dihydro)ceramide in both the de novo and the salvage or recycling pathway of ceramide generation, have been implicated in the control of programmed cell death. However, the regulation of the de novo pathway compared with the salvage pathway is not fully understood. In the current study, we have found that late accumulation of multiple ceramide and dihydroceramide species in MCF-7 cells treated with TNFα occurred by up-regulation of both pathways of ceramide synthesis. Nevertheless, fumonisin B1 but not myriocin was able to protect from TNFα-induced cell death, suggesting that ceramide synthase activity is crucial for the progression of cell death and that the pool of ceramide involved derives from the salvage pathway rather than de novo biosynthesis. Furthermore, compared with control cells, TNFα-treated cells exhibited reduced focal adhesion kinase and subsequent plasma membrane permeabilization, which was blocked exclusively by fumonisin B1. In addition, exogenously added C6-ceramide mimicked the effects of TNFα that lead to cell death, which were inhibited by fumonisin B1. Knockdown of individual ceramide synthases identified CerS6 and its product C16-ceramide as the ceramide synthase isoform essential for the regulation of cell death. In summary, our data suggest a novel role for CerS6/C16-ceramide as an upstream effector of the loss of focal adhesion protein and plasma membrane permeabilization, via the activation of caspase-7, and identify the salvage pathway as the critical mechanism of ceramide generation that controls cell death. PMID:26318452

  19. Glucose transporter type1 (GLUT-1) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Neil; Newton, Richard W

    2003-10-01

    Glucose transporter type1 (GLUT-1) deficiency may be rare, but it is a preventable cause of severe learning difficulties; and therefore there is an urgency in making an early diagnosis. Suspicions must be roused when intractable seizures occur in infancy. These may be associated with acquired microcephaly and developmental delay. The finding of low glucose sugar levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, but not in the blood will identify the condition. The gene encoding the GLUT-1 protein is located on the short arm of chromosome 1, and inheritance is by a dominant trait. Patients with this syndrome can have heterozygous mutations, with one allele being a normal wild type and one being mutant. An efficient transport of glucose across the blood-brain barrier is essential as it is such an important fuel for the brain, and this is provided by glucose transporter type1 in the endothelial cells of the brain capillaries. Another minor contribution to the symptomatology of GLUT-1 may be impaired transport of an oxidised form of vitamin C. Treatment with anti-epileptic drugs may be needed, and the ketogenic diet may reduce symptoms, as ketosis can provide an alternative source of fuel for the brain. It has also been suggested that antioxidant thioctic acid may be of benefit. Substances such as caffeine and phenobarbitone should be avoided as they inhibit glucose transport.

  20. Restoring insulin production for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tudurí, Eva; Bruin, Jennifer E; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Current therapies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes include daily administration of exogenous insulin and, less frequently, whole-pancreas or islet transplantation. Insulin injections often result in inaccurate insulin doses, exposing the patient to hypo- and/or hyperglycemic episodes that lead to long-term complications. Islet transplantation is also limited by lack of high-quality islet donors, early graft failure, and chronic post-transplant immunosuppressive treatment. These barriers could be circumvented by designing a safe and efficient strategy to restore insulin production within the patient's body. Porcine islets have been considered as a possible alternative source of transplantable insulin-producing cells to replace human cadaveric islets. More recently, embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells have also been examined for their ability to differentiate in vitro into pancreatic endocrine cells. Alternatively, it may be feasible to generate new β-cells by ectopic expression of key transcription factors in endogenous non-β-cells. Finally, engineering surrogate β-cells by in vivo delivery of the insulin gene to specific tissues is also being studied as a possible therapy for type 1 diabetes. In the present review, we discuss these different approaches to restore insulin production.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... bile acid synthesis defect type 1 congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1 is a disorder characterized ...

  2. Impact of the Family Health Program on the quality of vital information and reduction of child unattended deaths in Brazil: an ecological longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vital information, despite of being an important public health instrument for planning and evaluation, in most of the developing countries have still low quality and coverage. Brazil has recently implemented the Family Health Program (PSF), one of the largest comprehensive primary health care programs in the world, which demonstrated effectiveness on the reduction of infant mortality. In the present study we evaluate the impact of the PSF on mortality rates related to the quality of vital information: the under-five mortality rate due to ill-defined causes and unattended death. Methods Data on mortality rates and PSF coverage was obtained for the total 5,507 Brazilian municipalities from 2000 to 2006. A multivariate regression analysis of panel data was carried out with a negative binomial response by using fixed effects models that control for relevant covariates. Results A statistically significant negative association was observed between PSF coverage levels, classified in none (0%, the reference category), low (<30.0%), intermediate (≥ 30.0% and <70.0%) and high (≥ 70.0%), and all analysed mortalities rates, with a reduction of 17% (Rate Ratio [RR]: 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79 - 0.88), 35% (RR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.61-0.68) and 50% (RR: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.47-0.53) on under-five mortality due to ill-defined causes, respectively. In the mortality rate for unattended death the reduction was even greater, reaching 60% (RR: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.37-0.44) in the municipalities with the highest PSF coverage. The PSF effect on unattended deaths was slightly stronger in municipalities with a higher human development index. Conclusions The PSF, a primary health care program developed mostly in rural and deprived areas, had an important role on reducing the unattended deaths and improving the quality of vital information in Brazil. PMID:20587036

  3. The freetext matching algorithm: a computer program to extract diagnoses and causes of death from unstructured text in electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Electronic health records are invaluable for medical research, but much information is stored as free text rather than in a coded form. For example, in the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD), causes of death and test results are sometimes recorded only in free text. Free text can be difficult to use for research if it requires time-consuming manual review. Our aim was to develop an automated method for extracting coded information from free text in electronic patient records. Methods We reviewed the electronic patient records in GPRD of a random sample of 3310 patients who died in 2001, to identify the cause of death. We developed a computer program called the Freetext Matching Algorithm (FMA) to map diagnoses in text to the Read Clinical Terminology. The program uses lookup tables of synonyms and phrase patterns to identify diagnoses, dates and selected test results. We tested it on two random samples of free text from GPRD (1000 texts associated with death in 2001, and 1000 general texts from cases and controls in a coronary artery disease study), comparing the output to the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s MetaMap program and the gold standard of manual review. Results Among 3310 patients registered in the GPRD who died in 2001, the cause of death was recorded in coded form in 38.1% of patients, and in the free text alone in 19.4%. On the 1000 texts associated with death, FMA coded 683 of the 735 positive diagnoses, with precision (positive predictive value) 98.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 97.2, 99.2) and recall (sensitivity) 92.9% (95% CI 90.8, 94.7). On the general sample, FMA detected 346 of the 447 positive diagnoses, with precision 91.5% (95% CI 88.3, 94.1) and recall 77.4% (95% CI 73.2, 81.2), which was similar to MetaMap. Conclusions We have developed an algorithm to extract coded information from free text in GP records with good precision. It may facilitate research using free text in electronic patient records

  4. Nocturnal Sleep Dynamics Identify Narcolepsy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Iloti, Martina; Franceschini, Christian; Liguori, Rocco; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the reliability of nocturnal sleep dynamics in the differential diagnosis of central disorders of hypersomnolence. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients: One hundred seventy-five patients with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 (NT1, n = 79), narcolepsy type 2 (NT2, n = 22), idiopathic hypersomnia (IH, n = 22), and “subjective” hypersomnolence (sHS, n = 52). Interventions: None. Methods: Polysomnographic (PSG) work-up included 48 h of continuous PSG recording. From nocturnal PSG conventional sleep macrostructure, occurrence of sleep onset rapid eye movement period (SOREMP), sleep stages distribution, and sleep stage transitions were calculated. Patient groups were compared, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to test the diagnostic utility of nocturnal PSG data to identify NT1. Results: Sleep macrostructure was substantially stable in the 2 nights of each diagnostic group. NT1 and NT2 patients had lower latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and NT1 patients showed the highest number of awakenings, sleep stage transitions, and more time spent in N1 sleep, as well as most SOREMPs at daytime PSG and at multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) than all other groups. ROC curve analysis showed that nocturnal SOREMP (area under the curve of 0.724 ± 0.041, P < 0.0001), percent of total sleep time spent in N1 (0.896 ± 0.023, P < 0.0001), and the wakefulness-sleep transition index (0.796 ± 0.034, P < 0.0001) had a good sensitivity and specificity profile to identify NT1 sleep, especially when used in combination (0.903 ± 0.023, P < 0.0001), similarly to SOREMP number at continuous daytime PSG (0.899 ± 0.026, P < 0.0001) and at MSLT (0.956 ± 0.015, P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Sleep macrostructure (i.e. SOREMP, N1 timing) including stage transitions reliably identifies hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 among central disorders of hypersomnolence. Citation: Pizza F, Vandi S

  5. Direct observation of type 1 fimbrial switching.

    PubMed

    Adiciptaningrum, Aileen M; Blomfield, Ian C; Tans, Sander J

    2009-05-01

    The defining feature of bacterial phase variation is a stochastic 'all-or-nothing' switching in gene expression. However, direct observations of these rare switching events have so far been lacking, obscuring possible correlations between switching events themselves, and between switching and other cellular events, such as division and DNA replication. We monitored the phase variation of type 1 fimbriae in individual Escherichia coli in real time and simultaneously tracked the chromosome replication process. We observed distinctive patterns of fim (fimbriae) expression in multiple genealogically related lineages. These patterns could be explained by a model that combines a single switching event with chromosomal fim replication, as well as the epigenetic inheritance of expressed fim protein and RNA, and their dilution by growth. Analysis of the moment of switching at sub-cell-cycle resolution revealed a correlation between fim switching and cell age, which challenges the traditional idea of phase variation as a random Poissonian phenomenon.

  6. Perioperative Management of Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Charles J.; Tomajian, Samir; Kaye, Aaron J.; Russo, Stephanie; Abadie, Jacqueline Volpi; Kaye, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (neurofibromatosis-1), a relatively common single-gene disorder, is caused by a mutation of the NF1 gene that results in a loss of activity or in a nonfunctional neurofibromin protein. Clinical anesthesiologists may find patients with neurofibromatosis-1 challenging because this condition may affect most organ systems and result in a wide variety of presentations and clinical implications. Current neurofibromatosis-1 research studies include genotype-phenotype correlations, investigation of the pathoetiology behind the different clinical manifestations of neurofibromatosis-1, and the search for treatment options for the different features of the disorder. Neurofibromatosis-1–associated complications of the central nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems all present various degrees of considerations for anesthesiologists. Additionally, neurofibromatosis-1 has dramatic implications for pregnant women. PMID:22778675

  7. The Gut Microbiota and Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gülden, Elke; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is a multifactorial, immune-mediated disease, which is characterized by the progressive destruction of autologous insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. The risk of developing T1D is determined by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. In the past few decades there has been a continuous rise in the incidence of T1D, which cannot be explained by genetic factors alone. Changes in our lifestyle that include diet, hygiene, and antibiotic usage have already been suggested to be causal factors for this rising T1D incidence. Only recently have microbiota, which are affected by all these factors, been recognized as key environmental factors affecting T1D development. In this review we will summarize current knowledge on the impact of gut microbiota on T1D development and give an outlook on the potential to design new microbiota-based therapies in the prevention and treatment of T1D. PMID:26051037

  8. Cellular therapies for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, D D; Grossman, E; Chong, A S

    2008-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a disease that results from the selective autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta-cells. This disease process lends itself to cellular therapy because of the single cell nature of insulin production. Murine models have provided opportunities for the study of cellular therapies for the treatment of diabetes, including the investigation of islet transplantation, and also the possibility of stem cell therapies and islet regeneration. Studies in islet transplantation have included both allo- and xeno-transplantation and have allowed for the study of new approaches for the reversal of autoimmunity and achieving immune tolerance. Stem cells from hematopoietic sources such as bone marrow and fetal cord blood, as well as from the pancreas, intestine, liver, and spleen promise either new sources of islets or may function as stimulators of islet regeneration. This review will summarize the various cellular interventions investigated as potential treatments of T1DM.

  9. [Management of craniofacial type 1 neurofibromatosis].

    PubMed

    Bachelet, J T; Combemale, P; Devic, C; Foray, N; Jouanneau, E; Breton, P

    2015-09-01

    Type I neurofibromatosis (NF) is the most common autosomal dominant disease. It concerns one in 3000 births, the penetrance is close to 100% and 50% of new cases are de novo mutations (17q11.2 chromosome 17 location). Cranio-maxillofacial region is concerned in 10% of the cases, in different forms: molluscum neurofibroma, plexiform neurofibroma, cranio-orbital neurofibroma, parotido-jugal neurofibroma, cervical neurofibroma. These lesions have different prognosis depending on the craniofacial localization: ocular functional risk, upper airway compressive risk, nerve compression risk, aesthetic and social impact. The maxillofacial surgeon in charge of patients with type I NF should follow the patient from the diagnosis and organize the different surgical times in order to take care about the different issues: vital, functional and aesthetic. We describe the treatment of facial localizations of type 1 NF as it is done at the University Hospital of Lyon and at the Rhône-Alpes-Auvergne neurofibromatosis reference center.

  10. The intestinal microbiome in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, J L; Triplett, E W; Gevers, D; Xavier, R; Insel, R; Danska, J; Atkinson, M A

    2014-01-01

    Few concepts in recent years have garnered more disease research attention than that of the intestinal (i.e. ‘gut’) microbiome. This emerging interest has included investigations of the microbiome's role in the pathogenesis of a variety of autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Indeed, a growing number of recent studies of patients with T1D or at varying levels of risk for this disease, as well as in animal models of the disorder, lend increasing support to the notion that alterations in the microbiome precede T1D onset. Herein, we review these investigations, examining the mechanisms by which the microbiome may influence T1D development and explore how multi-disciplinary analysis of the microbiome and the host immune response may provide novel biomarkers and therapeutic options for prevention of T1D. PMID:24628412

  11. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type 1.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Steven; Johnson, Aaron; Pearson, Waylon

    2016-06-16

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type 1 (MOPD1) is an uncommon cause of microcephaly and intrauterine growth retardation in a newborn. Early identifying features include but are not limited to sloping forehead, micrognathia, sparse hair, including of eyebrows and short limbs. Immediate radiological findings may include partial or complete agenesis of the corpus callosum, interhemispheric cyst and shallow acetabula leading to dislocation. Genetic testing displaying a mutation in RNU4ATAC gene is necessary for definitive diagnosis. Early identification is important as MOPD1 is an autosomal recessive condition and could present in subsequent pregnancies. The purpose of this case is to both identify and describe some common physical findings related to MOPD1. We present a case of MOPD1 in a girl born to non-consanguineous parents that was distinct for subglottic stenosis and laryngeal cleft.

  12. Physical Activity and Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R.; Laan, Remmert; Dassau, Eyal; Kerr, David

    2015-01-01

    While being physically active bestows many health benefits on individuals with type 1 diabetes, their overall blood glucose control is not enhanced without an effective balance of insulin dosing and food intake to maintain euglycemia before, during, and after exercise of all types. At present, a number of technological advances are already available to insulin users who desire to be physically active with optimal blood glucose control, although a number of limitations to those devices remain. In addition to continued improvements to existing technologies and introduction of new ones, finding ways to integrate all of the available data to optimize blood glucose control and performance during and following exercise will likely involve development of “smart” calculators, enhanced closed-loop systems that are able to use additional inputs and learn, and social aspects that allow devices to meet the needs of the users. PMID:25568144

  13. The intestinal microbiome in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dunne, J L; Triplett, E W; Gevers, D; Xavier, R; Insel, R; Danska, J; Atkinson, M A

    2014-07-01

    Few concepts in recent years have garnered more disease research attention than that of the intestinal (i.e. 'gut') microbiome. This emerging interest has included investigations of the microbiome's role in the pathogenesis of a variety of autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Indeed, a growing number of recent studies of patients with T1D or at varying levels of risk for this disease, as well as in animal models of the disorder, lend increasing support to the notion that alterations in the microbiome precede T1D onset. Herein, we review these investigations, examining the mechanisms by which the microbiome may influence T1D development and explore how multi-disciplinary analysis of the microbiome and the host immune response may provide novel biomarkers and therapeutic options for prevention of T1D.

  14. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carmody, David; Doyle, Aoife; Firth, Richard G R; Byrne, Maria M; Daly, Sean; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala; Foley, Micheal; Coulter-Smith, Samuel; Kinsley, Brendan T

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  15. IRE1α induces thioredoxin-interacting protein to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome and promote programmed cell death during endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Alana G.; Upton, John-Paul; Praveen, P.V.K.; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Igbaria, Aeid; Shen, Sarah; Nguyen, Vinh; Backes, Bradley J.; Heiman, Myriam; Heintz, Nathaniel; Greengard, Paul; Hui, Simon; Tang, Qizhi; Trusina, Ala; Oakes, Scott A.; Papa, Feroz R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY When unfolded proteins accumulate to irremediably high levels within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), intracellular signaling pathways called the unfolded protein response (UPR) become hyperactivated to cause programmed cell death. We discovered that thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is a critical node in this “Terminal UPR.” TXNIP becomes rapidly induced by IRE1α, an ER bifunctional kinase/endoribonuclease (RNase). Hyperactivated IRE1α increases TXNIP mRNA stability by reducing levels of a TXNIP destabilizing micro-RNA, miR-17. In turn, elevated TXNIP protein activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, causing Caspase-1 cleavage and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) secretion. Txnip gene deletion reduces pancreatic β-cell death during ER stress, and suppresses diabetes caused by proinsulin misfolding in the Akita mouse. Finally, small molecule IRE1α RNase inhibitors suppress TXNIP production to block IL-1β secretion. In summary, the IRE1α-TXNIP pathway is used in the terminal UPR to promote sterile inflammation and programmed cell death, and may be targeted to develop effective treatments for cell degenerative diseases. PMID:22883233

  16. Cot Deaths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Shelagh

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the tragedy of crib deaths, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)

  17. DPL-1 DP, LIN-35 Rb and EFL-1 E2F act with the MCD-1 zinc-finger protein to promote programmed cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Reddien, Peter W; Andersen, Erik C; Huang, Michael C; Horvitz, H Robert

    2007-04-01

    The genes egl-1, ced-9, ced-4, and ced-3 play major roles in programmed cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans. To identify genes that have more subtle activities, we sought mutations that confer strong cell-death defects in a genetically sensitized mutant background. Specifically, we screened for mutations that enhance the cell-death defects caused by a partial loss-of-function allele of the ced-3 caspase gene. We identified mutations in two genes not previously known to affect cell death, dpl-1 and mcd-1 (modifier of cell death). dpl-1 encodes the C. elegans homolog of DP, the human E2F-heterodimerization partner. By testing genes known to interact with dpl-1, we identified roles in cell death for four additional genes: efl-1 E2F, lin-35 Rb, lin-37 Mip40, and lin-52 dLin52. mcd-1 encodes a novel protein that contains one zinc finger and that is synthetically required with lin-35 Rb for animal viability. dpl-1 and mcd-1 act with efl-1 E2F and lin-35 Rb to promote programmed cell death and do so by regulating the killing process rather than by affecting the decision between survival and death. We propose that the DPL-1 DP, MCD-1 zinc finger, EFL-1 E2F, LIN-35 Rb, LIN-37 Mip40, and LIN-52 dLin52 proteins act together in transcriptional regulation to promote programmed cell death.

  18. Apoptosis: A Functional Paradigm for Programmed Plant Cell Death Induced by a Host-Selective Phytotoxin and Invoked during Development.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Li, J; Bostock, RM; Gilchrist, DG

    1996-01-01

    The host-selective AAL toxins secreted by Alternaria alternata f sp lycopersici are primary chemical determinants in the Alternaria stem canker disease of tomato. The AAL toxins are members of a new class of sphinganine analog mycotoxins that cause cell death in both animals and plants. Here, we report detection of stereotypic hallmarks of apoptosis during cell death induced by these toxins in tomato. DNA ladders were observed during cell death in toxin-treated tomato protoplasts and leaflets. The intensity of the DNA ladders was enhanced by Ca2+ and inhibited by Zn2+. The progressive delineation of fragmented DNA into distinct bodies, coincident with the appearance of DNA ladders, also was observed during death of toxin-treated tomato protoplasts. In situ analysis of cells dying during development in both onion root caps and tomato leaf tracheary elements revealed DNA fragmentation localized to the dying cells as well as the additional formation of apoptotic-like bodies in sloughing root cap cells. We conclude that the fundamental elements of apoptosis, as characterized in animals, are conserved in plants. The apoptotic process may be expressed during some developmental transitions and is the functional process by which symptomatic lesions are formed in the Alternaria stem canker disease of tomato. Sphinganine analog mycotoxins may be used to characterize further signaling pathways leading to apoptosis in plants. PMID:12239387

  19. Can plant oncogenes inhibit programmed cell death? The rolB oncogene reduces apoptosis-like symptoms in transformed plant cells.

    PubMed

    Gorpenchenko, Tatiana Y; Aminin, Dmitry L; Vereshchagina, Yuliya V; Shkryl, Yuri N; Veremeichik, Galina N; Tchernoded, Galina K; Bulgakov, Victor P

    2012-09-01

    The rolB oncogene was previously identified as an important player in ROS metabolism in transformed plant cells. Numerous reports indicate a crucial role for animal oncogenes in apoptotic cell death. Whether plant oncogenes such as rolB can induce programmed cell death (PCD) in transformed plant cells is of particular importance. In this investigation, we used a single-cell assay based on confocal microscopy and fluorescent dyes capable of discriminating between apoptotic and necrotic cells. Our results indicate that the expression of rolB in plant cells was sufficient to decrease the proportion of apoptotic cells in steady-state conditions and diminish the rate of apoptotic cells during induced PCD. These data suggest that plant oncogenes, like animal oncogenes, may be involved in the processes mediating PCD.

  20. Glaucoma Associated with Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kamyar, Roheena; Weizer, Jennifer S.; de Paula, Fernando Heitor; Stein, Joshua D.; Moroi, Sayoko E.; John, Denise; Musch, David C.; Mian, Shahzad I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate outcomes of the Boston Type 1 keratoprosthesis (KPro) and associated incidence of glaucoma. Design Retrospective cohort study. Participants All patients who underwent KPro surgery at one institution from 2003-2009 with at least 3 months follow-up. Methods Preoperative visual acuity, diagnosis, history of glaucoma, intraoperative and postoperative parameters were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed to identify factors that may influence increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) and glaucoma development or progression after surgery. Main Outcome Measures Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), IOP, postoperative medical and surgical treatments for glaucoma, and KPro retention and complications. Results Thirty-six KPro procedures were performed in 30 eyes of 29 patients with mean (± SD) follow-up of 17±19 months (range 3-67 months). The main indication for KPro implantation was corneal graft failure (77%). Primary KPros were performed in 23% of eyes for limbal stem cell deficiency secondary to chemical burns and aniridia, and for herpetic disease. Median preoperative BCVA was hand motions with an overall improvement to 20/330 (range 20/20 to hand motions) at nine months postoperatively; mean BCVA was 20/600 (range 20/40 to NLP) at last follow-up. Twenty eyes (67%) had a preoperative history of glaucoma with eight of those eyes (40%) having undergone prior glaucoma surgery. Twenty-one eyes (70%) underwent concomitant glaucoma surgery. Postoperative increased IOP (22 mmHg or higher) was noted in 15 eyes (50%) while definite glaucoma development or progression was noted in 7 of those 15 eyes (23% of total eyes). Mean BCVA at last follow-up in eyes with glaucoma development or progression was 3/200 compared to 20/563 in the remaining 23 eyes. Six patients (20%) required repeat KPro implantation, and retroprosthetic membranes developed in 23 eyes (77%). No patient developed vitritis or infectious endophthalmitis. Conclusions The Boston Type 1 KPro

  1. Stem cell treatment for type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Ikehara, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a common chronic disease in children, characterized by a loss of β cells, which results in defects in insulin secretion and hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia causes diabetic complications, including diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Curative therapies mainly include diet and insulin administration. Although hyperglycemia can be improved by insulin administration, exogenous insulin injection cannot successfully mimic the insulin secretion from normal β cells, which keeps blood glucose levels within the normal range all the time. Islet and pancreas transplantation achieves better glucose control, but there is a lack of organ donors. Cell based therapies have also been attempted to treat T1DM. Stem cells such as embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and tissue stem cells (TSCs) such as bone marrow-, adipose tissue-, and cord blood-derived stem cells, have been shown to generate insulin-producing cells. In this review, we summarize the most-recently available information about T1DM and the use of TSCs to treat T1DM. PMID:25364717

  2. Outpatient Management of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cogen, Fran R.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM) continues to rise within the pediatric population. However, T1DM remains the most prevalent form diagnosed in children. It is critical that health-care professionals understand the types of diabetes diagnosed in pediatrics, especially the distinguishing features between T1DM and T2DM, to ensure proper treatment. Similar to all individuals with T1DM, lifelong administration of exogenous insulin is necessary for survival. However, children have very distinct needs and challenges compared to those in the adult diabetes population. Accordingly, treatment, goals, and age-appropriate requirements must be individually addressed. The main objectives for the treatment of pediatric T1DM include maintaining glucose levels as close to normal as possible, avoiding acute complications, and preventing long-term complications. In addition, unique to pediatrics, facilitating normal growth and development is important to comprehensive care. To achieve these goals, a careful balance of insulin therapy, medical nutrition therapy, and exercise or activity is necessary. Pharmacological treatment options consist of various insulin products aimed at mimicking prior endogenous insulin secretion while minimizing adverse effects. This review focuses on the management of pediatric T1DM in the outpatient environment, highlighting pharmacotherapy management strategies. PMID:26472948

  3. Adjunct therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lebovitz, Harold E

    2010-06-01

    Insulin replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is nonphysiologic. Hyperinsulinemia is generated in the periphery to achieve normal insulin concentrations in the liver. This mismatch results in increased hypoglycemia, increased food intake with weight gain, and insufficient regulation of postprandial glucose excursions. Islet amyloid polypeptide is a hormone synthesized in pancreatic beta cells and cosecreted with insulin. Circulating islet amyloid polypeptide binds to receptors located in the hindbrain and increases satiety, delays gastric emptying and suppresses glucagon secretion. Thus, islet amyloid polypeptide complements the effects of insulin. T1DM is a state of both islet amyloid polypeptide and insulin deficiency. Pramlintide, a synthetic analog of islet amyloid polypeptide, can replace this hormone in patients with T1DM. When administered as adjunctive therapy to such patients treated with insulin, pramlintide decreases food intake and causes weight loss. Pramlintide therapy is also associated with suppression of glucagon secretion and delayed gastric emptying, both of which decrease postprandial plasma glucose excursions. Pramlintide therapy improves glycemic control and lessens weight gain. Agents that decrease intestinal carbohydrate digestion (alpha-glucosidase inhibitors) or decrease insulin resistance (metformin) might be alternative adjunctive therapies in T1DM, though its benefits are marginally supported by clinical data.

  4. The Streetlight Effect in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly 100 years since the discovery of therapeutic insulin, significant research efforts have been directed at finding the underlying cause of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and developing a “cure” for the disease. While progress has clearly been made toward each of these goals, neither vision has been fulfilled. With increasing pressure from both public and private funders of diabetes research, growing impatience of those with T1D at the lack of practical discoveries, increased competition for research funds, uncertainties on the reproducibility of published scientific data, and questions regarding the value of animal models, the current research environment has become extraordinarily difficult to traverse from the perspective of investigators. As a result, there is an increasing pressure toward performance of what might be considered “safe” research, where the aim is to affirm existing dogmas rather than to pioneer efforts involving unconventional thought. Psychologists refer to this practice as “observational bias” while cartoonists label the process the “streetlight effect.” In this Perspective, we consider notions in T1D research that should be subject to bold question and provide additional concepts, many somewhat orphan to research efforts, whose investigation could lead to a means for truly identifying the cause of and a cure for T1D. PMID:25805758

  5. Orthopaedic manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Feldman, David S; Jordan, Charles; Fonseca, Lauren

    2010-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) is an autosomal dominant disease that affects 1 in 3,000 persons worldwide. Café-au-lait macules and peripheral nerve sheath tumors (ie, neurofibromas) are the most commonly recognized manifestations of NF-1. However, NF-1 affects multiple organ systems, and a multidisciplinary approach to treatment is required. Management of the orthopaedic manifestations of NF-1 is often difficult. The most complex manifestations are scoliosis (dystrophic and nondystrophic), congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia, and problems related to soft-tissue tumors. Metabolic bone disease is common; many patients are frankly osteopenic, which further complicates treatment. Dystrophic scoliosis, which may be caused by either bony dysplasia or intraspinal pathology, is characterized by early presentation and rapid progression. Pseudarthrosis is common even after instrumented fusion. Nondystrophic scoliosis tends to behave like adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, although it may present earlier and is associated with a higher rate of pseudarthrosis. Congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia is a long-bone dysplasia that afflicts patients with NF-1. Management of this osseous deformity is challenging. Failure to achieve union and refracture are common.

  6. [Pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy type 1].

    PubMed

    Magaña, Jonathan J; Leyva-García, Norberto; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2009-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults, affecting 1/8000 individuals. DM1 is a dominant disorder characterized by multisystemic clinical features affecting skeletal muscle, heart and the nervous and endocrine systems. DM1 is caused by an expansion of CTG trinucleotide repeats within the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the DMPK gene. This repeat is polymorphic in normal individuals with alleles ranging from 5 to 37 in length. Repeats exceeding a threshold of approximately 50 and reaching up to a number of 4,000 result in disease. This review offers a detailed description of the scientific findings that have allowed the establishment of the molecular basis of the DM1 in the muscle and nervous systems. Currently, it is known that mutant DM1 transcript accumulates in the nucleus of muscle and neuronal cells sequestering nuclear proteins, such as splicing regulators and transcription factors to form nuclear foci that are observed under inmunofluorescence techniques. This event disturbs the expression of several muscular and neuronal genes impairing cell differentiation, which may explain the multiple symptoms of the disease. Finally, the main findings towards the development of a gene therapy for DM1 are discussed.

  7. Equatorial Staphyloma Associated with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yoshiaki; Horiguchi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with a recently self-detected lump under his left eyebrow. Previous ophthalmological history was unremarkable except for unilateral high myopia (left eye) since childhood. The appearance of the left eye was seemingly normal; however, with the top lid pulled up on downward gaze, a dark brown bulge emerged. The bulge was 10 × 7 mm and approximately 4 mm in height, and was covered by the extended superior rectus muscle. The diagnosis of equatorial staphyloma was made after coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the orbit revealed the dilatation of the vitreous cavity. Ocular movements were fully maintained and visual acuity was largely spared: 20/15 in the right eye without correction and 20/25 in the left eye with −10.00 spheres and −4.00 × 80 degrees cylinders. His past and family histories were unremarkable; however, small neurofibromas and café au lait spots all over his body led to the diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). From this case, similar to previous reports, we suggest that manifestations of NF1 are extremely variable and unpredictable. PMID:27721788

  8. Outpatient Management of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Beck, Joni K; Cogen, Fran R

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM) continues to rise within the pediatric population. However, T1DM remains the most prevalent form diagnosed in children. It is critical that health-care professionals understand the types of diabetes diagnosed in pediatrics, especially the distinguishing features between T1DM and T2DM, to ensure proper treatment. Similar to all individuals with T1DM, lifelong administration of exogenous insulin is necessary for survival. However, children have very distinct needs and challenges compared to those in the adult diabetes population. Accordingly, treatment, goals, and age-appropriate requirements must be individually addressed. The main objectives for the treatment of pediatric T1DM include maintaining glucose levels as close to normal as possible, avoiding acute complications, and preventing long-term complications. In addition, unique to pediatrics, facilitating normal growth and development is important to comprehensive care. To achieve these goals, a careful balance of insulin therapy, medical nutrition therapy, and exercise or activity is necessary. Pharmacological treatment options consist of various insulin products aimed at mimicking prior endogenous insulin secretion while minimizing adverse effects. This review focuses on the management of pediatric T1DM in the outpatient environment, highlighting pharmacotherapy management strategies.

  9. [NARCOLEPSY WITH CATAPLEXY: TYPE 1 NARCOLEPSY].

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Lopez, Régis

    2016-06-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy or narcolepsy type 1 in a rare, disabling sleep disorder, with a prevalence of 20 to 30 per 100,000. Its onset peaks in the second decade. The main features are excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy or sudden less of muscle tone triggered by emotional situations. Other less consistent symptoms include hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, disturbed nighttime sleep, and weight gain. Narcolepsy with cataplexy remains a clinical diagnosis but nighttime and daytime polysomnography (multiple sleep latency tests) are useful to document mean sleep latency below 8 min and at least two sleep-onset REM periods. HLA typing shows an association with HLA DQB1*0602 in more than 92% of cases but was not included in the new diagnostic criteria. In contrast, a low hypocretin-1/orexin-A levels (values below 110 pg/mL) in the cerebrospinal fluid was highly specific for narcolepsy with cataplexy and was included in the recent diagnostic criteria for narcolepsy. The deficiency of the hypocretin system is well-established in human narcoleptics with a reduction of cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin levels in relation with an early loss of hypocretin neurons. The cause of human narcolepsy remains unknown, however an autoimmune process in most probable acting on a highly genetic background with environmental factors such as streptococcal infections, and H1N1 AS03-adjuvanted vaccine named Pandemrix.

  10. Helminth Infection and Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zaccone, Paola; Hall, Samuel W.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune diseases in industrialized countries cannot be exclusively explained by genetic factors. Human epidemiological studies and animal experimental data provide accumulating evidence for the role of environmental factors, such as infections, in the regulation of allergy and autoimmune diseases. The hygiene hypothesis has formally provided a rationale for these observations, suggesting that our co-evolution with pathogens has contributed to the shaping of the present-day human immune system. Therefore, improved sanitation, together with infection control, has removed immunoregulatory mechanisms on which our immune system may depend. Helminths are multicellular organisms that have developed a wide range of strategies to manipulate the host immune system to survive and complete their reproductive cycles successfully. Immunity to helminths involves profound changes in both the innate and adaptive immune compartments, which can have a protective effect in inflammation and autoimmunity. Recently, helminth-derived antigens and molecules have been tested in vitro and in vivo to explore possible applications in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including T1D. This exciting approach presents numerous challenges that will need to be addressed before it can reach safe clinical application. This review outlines basic insight into the ability of helminths to modulate the onset and progression of T1D, and frames some of the challenges that helminth-derived therapies may face in the context of clinical translation. PMID:23804266

  11. Cannabinoid receptor type-1: breaking the dogmas

    PubMed Central

    Busquets Garcia, Arnau; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is abundantly expressed in the brain. This system regulates a plethora of physiological functions and is composed of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of endocannabinoids. In this review, we highlight the new advances in cannabinoid signaling, focusing on a key component of the ECS, the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB 1). In recent years, the development of new imaging and molecular tools has demonstrated that this receptor can be distributed in many cell types (e.g., neuronal or glial cells) and intracellular compartments (e.g., mitochondria). Interestingly, cellular and molecular effects are differentially mediated by CB 1 receptors according to their specific localization (e.g., glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons). Moreover, this receptor is expressed in the periphery, where it can modulate periphery-brain connections. Finally, the better understanding of the CB 1 receptor structure led researchers to propose interesting and new allosteric modulators. Thus, the advances and the new directions of the CB 1 receptor field will provide new insights and better approaches to profit from its interesting therapeutic profile. PMID:27239293

  12. Novel autoantigens in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuhong; Donelan, William; Wang, Hai; Reeves, Westley; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by recognition of beta cell proteins as self-antigens, called autoantigens (AAgs), by patients’ own CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and/or the products of self-reactive B cells, called autoantibodies. These AAgs are divided into two categories on the basis of beta-cell-specificity. The list of the targets associated with beta cell-specific AAgs is continuously growing. Many T1DM-associated AAgs are well characterized and have important clinical applications for disease prediction, diagnosis, and antigen-specific tolerance immunotherapy. Identification of T1DM-associated AAgs provides insight into the pathogenesis of T1DM and to understanding the clinical aspects of the disease. Since many excellent reviews have covered the previously identified T1DM-associated AAgs exhaustedly, here we only focus on several recently discovered T1DM-AAgs (PDX1, ZnT8, CHGA, and IAAP). PMID:23724162

  13. Obesity and type 1 diabetes mellitus management.

    PubMed

    Chillarón, J J; Benaiges, D; Mañé, L; Pedro-Botet, J; Flores Le-Roux, J A

    2015-03-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) traditionally had a low body mass index and microangiopathic complications were common. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, published in 1993, demonstrated that therapy aimed at maintaining HbA1c levels as close to normal as feasible reduced the incidence of microangiopathy. Since then, the use of intensive insulin therapy to optimise metabolic control became generalised, with two main side effects: a higher rate of severe hypoglycaemia and increased weight gain. Approximately 50% of patients with T1DM are currently obese or overweight, which reduces or nullifies the benefits of good metabolic control, and which has other negative consequences; therefore, strategies to achieve weight control in patients with T1DM are necessary. At present, treatment with GLP-1 and SGLT-2 inhibitors has yielded promising short-term results that need to be confirmed in studies with larger numbers of patients and long-term follow-up. It is possible that, in coming years, the applicability of bariatric surgery in obese patients with T1DM will be similar to that of the general population or T2DM.

  14. Improved prognosis of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken L; Carstensen, Bendix; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Hovind, Peter; Hansen, Tine W; Rossing, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The natural history of diabetic nephropathy offered an average survival of only 5-7 years. During the past decades, multiple changes in therapy and lifestyle have occurred. The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy after implementing stricter control of blood pressure (including increased use of long-term renin-angiotensin system inhibition), lipids, and glycemia, along with less smoking and other lifestyle and treatment advancements, is inadequately analyzed. To clarify this, we studied 497 patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy at the Steno Diabetes Center and compared them with previous data, obtained using identical criteria at our hospital. The glomerular filtration rate, measured yearly by 51Cr-EDTA plasma clearance, was a mean of 71 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at baseline. The mean glomerular filtration rate decline was significantly reduced by 19% (95% confidence interval 5-34) from previously 4.0 to 3.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2/year. During a median follow-up of 9.1 years, 29% of participants doubled their plasma creatinine or developed end-stage renal disease. Mortality risk was similar to our prior study (hazard ratio 1.05 (0.76-1.43). However, after age adjustment, as both diabetes and nephropathy onset occurred later in life, mortality was reduced by 30%. Risk factors for decline in glomerular filtration rate, death, and other renal end points were generally in agreement with prior studies. Thus, with current treatment of nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, the prognosis and loss of renal function has improved along with better control of modifiable risk factors.

  15. Further Evidence of Sebaceous Differentiation Uniqueness: Holocrine Secretion of Sebocytes Is a Multistep, Cell-Specific Lysosomal DNase2-Mediated Mode of Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, Christos C

    2017-03-01

    Holocrine secretion by sebocytes does not occur via increased cell volume, but rather from programmed DNA fragmentation and death, which differs from apoptosis. Moreover, it can be enhanced with increased rates of induced terminal sebocyte differentiation. Fischer et al. address the mode of holocrine sebocyte secretion, and they demonstrate that its mechanism differs from that of apoptosis, necroptosis, and cornification, being a multistep, cell-specific lysosomal DNase2-mediated mode of programmed cell death.

  16. Silencing of Hsp27 and Hsp72 in glioma cells as a tool for programmed cell death induction upon temozolomide and quercetin treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna; Langner, Ewa; Bądziul, Dorota; Wertel, Iwona; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether silencing of Hsp27 or Hsp72 expression in glioblastoma multiforme T98G and anaplastic astrocytoma MOGGCCM cells increases their sensitivity to programmed cell death induction upon temozolomide and/or quercetin treatment. Transfection with specific siRNA was performed for the Hsp gene silencing. As revealed by microscopic observation and flow cytometry, the inhibition of Hsp expression was correlated with severe apoptosis induction upon the drug treatment studied. No signs of autophagy were detected. This was correlated with a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased level of cytochrome c in the cytoplasm, and activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9. All these results suggest that the apoptotic signal was mediated by an internal pathway. Additionally, in a large percentage of cells treated with temozolomide, with or without quercetin, granules within the ER system were found, which was accompanied by an increased level of caspase 12 expression. This might be correlated with ER stress. Quercetin and temozolomide also changed the shape of nuclei from circular to “croissant like” in both transfected cell lines. Our results indicate that blocking of Hsp27 and Hsp72 expression makes T98G cells and MOGGCCM cells extremely vulnerable to apoptosis induction upon temozolomide and quercetin treatment and that programmed cell death is initiated by an internal signal. - Highlights: • Hsps gene silencing induced severe apoptosis upon temozolomide–quercetin treatment • Apoptosis in transfected glioma cells was initiated by internal signal • Programmed cell death was preceded by ER stress • Temozolomide–quercetin treatment changed nuclei shape in transfected glioma cells.

  17. Endogenous programmed death ligand-1 restrains the development and onset of Sjӧgren’s syndrome in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Jin, Jun-O.; Kawai, Toshihisa; Yu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) down-modulates various immune responses by engaging the co-inhibitory receptor programmed death-1. Expression of PD-L1 and programmed death-1 is elevated in the salivary glands of patients with Sjögren’s syndrome (SS). The objective of this study is to define the role of endogenous PD-L1 in SS pathogenesis in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of this disease. We inhibited endogenous PD-L1 function by intraperitoneal administration of a blocking antibody to 6 week-old female NOD/ShiLtJ mice repeatedly during a 9-day period. PD-L1 blockade accelerated leukocyte infiltration and caspase-3 activation in the submandibular gland (SMG), production of antinuclear and anti-M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) autoantibodies and impairment of saliva secretion, indicative of accelerated development and onset of SS. The effect of PD-L1 blockade was associated with increased T- and B cells and T helper 1 cytokine IFN-γ in the SMG. Local administration of exogenous IFN-γ to the SMG led to impaired salivary secretion accompanied by down-regulation of aquaporin 5 and an increase in anti-M3R autoantibodies. Conversely, neutralization of IFN-γ markedly improved salivary secretion and aquaporin 5 expression in anti-PD-L1-treated NOD/ShiLtJ mice. Hence, endogenous PD-L1 hinders the development and onset of SS in NOD mice, in part by suppressing IFN-γ production. PMID:27966604

  18. Structure and function of the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Adams, T E; Epa, V C; Garrett, T P; Ward, C W

    2000-07-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), a transmembrane tyrosine kinase, is widely expressed across many cell types in foetal and postnatal tissues. Activation of the receptor following binding of the secreted growth factor ligands IGF-1 and IGF-2 elicits a repertoire of cellular responses including proliferation, and the protection of cells from programmed cell death or apoptosis. As a result, signalling through the IGF-1R is the principal pathway responsible for somatic growth in foetal mammals, whereas somatic growth in postnatal animals is achieved through the synergistic interaction of growth hormone and the IGFs. Forced overexpression of the IGF-1R results in the malignant transformation of cultured cells: conversely, downregulation of IGF-1R levels can reverse the transformed phenotype of tumour cells, and may render them sensitive to apoptosis in vivo. Elevated levels of IGF-IR are observed in a variety of human tumour types, whereas epidemiological studies implicate the IGF-1 axis as a predisposing factor in the pathogenesis of human breast and prostate cancer. The IGF-1R has thus emerged as a therapeutic target for the development of antitumour agents. Recent progress towards the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the extracellular domain of the IGF-1R represents an opportunity for the rational assembly of small molecule antagonists of receptor function for clinical use.

  19. Increased intramuscular nerve branching and inhibition of programmed cell death of chick embryo motoneurons by immunoglobulins from patients with motoneuron disease.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sara; Texidó, Laura; Calderó, Jordi; Ciutat, Dolors; Piedrafita, Lídia; Casanovas, Anna; Blasi, Joan; Solsona, Carles; Povedano, Mònica; Rojas, Ricardo; Illa, Isabel; Caress, James; Prevette, David; Oppenheim, Ronald W; Milligan, Carol; Esquerda, Josep E

    2010-12-15

    Massive programmed cell death (PCD) of developing chick embryo motoneurons (MNs) occurs in a well defined temporal and spatial sequence between embryonic day (E) 6 and E10. We have found that, when administered in ovo, either circulating immunoglobulins G (IgGs) or cerebrospinal fluid from patients with MN disease can rescue a significant number of chick embryo MNs from normally occurring PCD. An increase of branching of intramuscular nerves was also observed that may account for the rescuing effects of pathologic IgGs. Proteomic analysis and further analysis by ELISA indicated that these effects may be mediated by the interaction of circulating human immunoglobulins with proteins of the semaphorin family.

  20. Mining for Dust in Type 1 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Gallagher, S. C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Hewett, Paul C.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Hall, P. B.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the extinction/reddening of ˜35,000 uniformly selected quasars with 0\\lt z≤slant 5.3 in order to better understand their intrinsic optical/ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions. Using rest-frame optical-UV photometry taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s (SDSS) 7th data release, cross-matched to WISE in the mid-infrared, 2MASS and UKIDSS in the near-infrared, and GALEX in the UV, we isolate outliers in the color distribution and find them well described by an SMC-like reddening law. A hierarchical Bayesian model with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling method was used to find distributions of power law indices and E(B-V) consistent with both the broad absorption line (BAL) and non-BAL samples. We find that, of the ugriz color-selected type 1 quasars in SDSS, 2.5% (13%) of the non-BAL (BAL) sample are consistent with E(B-V)\\gt 0.1 and 0.1% (1.3%) with E(B-V)\\gt 0.2. Simulations show both populations of quasars are intrinsically bluer than the mean composite, with a mean spectral index ({{α }λ }) of -1.79 (-1.83). The emission and absorption-line properties of both samples reveal that quasars with intrinsically red continua have narrower Balmer lines and stronger high-ionization emission lines, the latter indicating a harder continuum in the extreme-UV and the former pointing to differences in black hole mass and/or orientation.

  1. Sanguinarine-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis-like programmed cell death(AL-PCD) in root meristem cells of Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Żabka, Aneta; Winnicki, Konrad; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Maszewski, Janusz

    2017-03-01

    A vast number of studies on plant cell systems clearly indicate that various biotic and abiotic stresses give rise to the uncontrolled increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excess concentrations of ROS result in damage to proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and DNA, which may lead, in consequence, to the apoptotic cell death. The current study investigates the effects of sanguinarine (SAN), a natural alkaloid derived from the roots of Sanguinaria canadensis, on root apical meristem cells of Allium cepa. It is shown that SAN treatment generated large amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion (O2·-). Oxidative stress induced in SAN-treated cells was correlated with DNA fragmentation, formation of micronuclei (MN), altered and 'degenerated' chromatin structures characteristic of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD). The experiments with SAN + MG132 (a proteasome inhibitor engaged in Topo II-mediated formation of cleavable complexes) and SAN + ascorbic acid (AA; H2O2 scavenger) seem to suggest, however, that the high level of H2O2 is not the only factor responsible for changes observed at the chromatin level and for the consequent cell death. Our findings imply that Topo II-DNA covalent complexes and 26S proteasomes are also involved in SAN-induced DNA damage.

  2. Features of Programmed Cell death in Intact Xenopus Oocytes and Early Embryos Revealed by Near-Infrared Fluorescence and Real-time Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carrie E.; Freel, Christopher D.; Kornbluth, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Factors influencing apoptosis of vertebrate eggs and early embryos have been studied in cell-free systems and in intact embryos by analyzing individual apoptotic regulators or caspase activation in static samples. Described here is a novel method for monitoring caspase activity in living Xenopus oocytes and early embryos. The approach, utilizing microinjection of a near-infrared caspase substrate that emits fluorescence only after its proteolytic cleavage by active effector caspases, has enabled the elucidation of otherwise cryptic aspects of apoptotic regulation. In particular, we demonstrate that brief caspase activity (ten minutes) is sufficient to cause apoptotic death in this system. We illustrate a cytochrome c dose threshold in the oocyte, which is lowered by Smac, a protein that binds thereby neutralizing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. We show that meiotic oocytes develop resistance to cytochrome c, and that eventual death of oocytes arrested in meiosis is caspase-independent. Finally, data acquired through imaging caspase activity in the Xenopus embryo suggests that apoptosis in very early development is not cell-autonomous. These studies both validate this assay as a useful tool for apoptosis research and reveal subtleties in the cell death program during early development. Moreover, this method offers a potentially valuable screening modality for identifying novel apoptotic regulators. PMID:19730443

  3. Programmed cell death in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma treated with yttrium-90 and doxorubicin-loaded beads.

    PubMed

    Meller, Robert; Galvan, Lorena; Lan, Jing Quan; Han, Esther; Bauer, Jason; Morris, Katherine T

    2013-10-01

    Molecular analysis of apoptosis and autophagy pathways was performed from a single hepatocellular carcinoma treated with yttrium-90 and doxorubicin-loaded beads before resection and compared with normal liver tissue from the margins. Both bead formulations activated apoptosis-associated mechanisms and increased autophagy pathway protein levels. Increased DNA fragmentation and autophagy markers were seen in tumor treated with drug-eluting beads compared with yttrium-90-treated tumor. These results suggest that both microembolic therapies activate cell death signaling, although differences in apoptosis and autophagy pathways were seen in this patient. Knowledge of mechanisms of action for each treatment may enhance future therapeutic strategies.

  4. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  5. Equid Herpesvirus Type 1 Activates Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  6. [Glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency].

    PubMed

    Cano, A; Ticus, I; Chabrol, B

    2008-11-01

    Impaired glucose transport across the blood brain barrier results in glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency syndrome, first described in 1991. It is characterized by infantile seizures refractory to anticonvulsive treatments, microcephaly, delays in mental and motor development, spasticity, ataxia, dysarthria and other paroxysmal neurologic phenomena, often occurring prior to meals. Affected infants are normal at birth following an uneventful pregnancy and delivery. Seizures usually begin between the age of one and four months and can be preceded by apneic episodes or abnormal eyes movements. Patients with atypical presentations such as mental retardation and intermittent ataxia without seizures, or movement disorders characterized by choreoathetosis and dystonia, have also been described. Glucose is the principal fuel source for the brain and GLUT-1 is the only vehicle by which glucose enters the brain. In case of GLUT-1 deficiency, the risk of clinical manifestations is increased in infancy and childhood, when the brain glucose demand is maximal. The hallmark of the disease is a low glucose concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid in a presence of normoglycemia (cerebrospinal fluid/blood glucose ratio less than 0.4). The GLUT-1 defect can be confirmed by molecular analysis of the SCL2A1 gene or in erythrocytes by glucose uptake studies and GLUT-1 immunoreactivity. Several heterozygous mutations, with a majority of de novo mutations, resulting in GLUT-1 haploinsufficiency, have been described. Cases with an autosomal dominant transmission have been established and adults can exhibit symptoms of this deficiency. Ketogenic diet is an effective treatment of epileptic manifestations as ketone bodies serve as an alternative fuel for the developing brain. However, this diet is not effective on cognitive impairment and other treatments are being evaluated. The physiopathology of this disorder is partially unclear and its understanding could explain the clinical

  7. Markers for Risk of Type 1 Diabetes in Relatives of Alsacian Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sapin, Remi; Pinget, Michel; Belcourt, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Background: The cytotoxic T lymphocyteassociated antigen 4 gene (CTLA-4) encode the T cell receptor involved in the control of T cell proliferation and mediates T cell apoptosis. The receptor protein is a specific T lymphocyte surface antigen that is detected on cells only after antigen presentation. Thus, CTLA-4 is directly involved in both immune and autoimmune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders. There is polymorphism at position 49 in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene, providing an A-G exchange. Moreover, we assessed the CTLA-4 49 (Thr/Ala) polymorphism in diabetic patients and first-degree relatives as compared to control subjects. Research design and methods: Three loci (HLA-DQB1, DQA1 and CTLA-4) were analysed in 62 type 1 diabetic patients, 72 firstdegree relatives and 84 nondiabetic control subjects by means of PCR-RFLP. Results: A significant enrichment in DQB1 alleles encoding for an amino acid different from Asp in position 57 (NA) and DQA1 alleles encoding for Arg in position 52 was observed in diabetic subjects and first-degree relatives as compared to controls. The genotype and allele frequencies of these polymorphisms in type 1 diabetic patients and firstdegree relatives differed significantly from those of controls (p< 0.001 and 0.05 respectively). CTLA-49 Ala alleles frequencies were 75.8% in type 1 diabetic patients and 68.1% in first-degree relatives in comparison to 35.7% in control subjects. The Ala/Ala genotype conferred a relative risk of 18.8 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The CTLA-4 49 Ala allele confers an increased risk of type 1 diabetes, independent of age and HLA-DQ genetic markers. PMID:11900275

  8. Autophagy induction by histone deacetylase inhibitors inhibits HIV type 1.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Grant R; Bruckman, Rachel S; Chu, Yen-Lin; Spector, Stephen A

    2015-02-20

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being evaluated in a "shock-and-kill" therapeutic approach to reverse human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) latency from CD4(+) T cells. Using this approach, HDACi have induced HIV RNA synthesis in latently infected cells from some patients. The hope is that the increase in viral production will lead to killing of the infected cell either by the virus itself or by the patient's immune system, a "sterilizing cure." Although administered within the context of combination antiretroviral therapy, the infection of bystander cells remains a concern. In this study, we investigated the effect of HDACi (belinostat, givinostat, panobinostat, romidepsin, and vorinostat) on the productive infection of macrophages. We demonstrate that the HDACi tested do not alter the initial susceptibility of macrophages to HIV infection. However, we demonstrate that HDACi decrease HIV release from macrophages in a dose-dependent manner (belinostat < givinostat < vorinostat < panobinostat < romidepsin) via degradation of intracellular HIV through the canonical autophagy pathway. This mechanism involves unc-51-like autophagy-activating kinase 1 (ULK1) and the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin and requires the formation of autophagosomes and their maturation into autolysosomes in the absence of increased cell death. These data provide further evidence in support of a role for autophagy in the control of HIV infection and suggest that careful consideration of off-target effects will be essential if HDACi are to be a component of a multipronged approach to eliminate latently infected cells.

  9. Strategies for clinical trials in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Mario R

    2016-07-01

    During the past one to two decades, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the immunopathology of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and the potential for immune interventions that can alter the natural history of the disease. This progress has resulted from the use of standardized study designs, endpoints, and, to a certain extent, mechanistic analyses in intervention trials in the setting of new-onset T1D. To date, most of these trials have involved single-agent interventions but, increasingly, future trials will test therapeutic combinations that are based on a compelling scientific rationale and testable mechanistic hypotheses. These increasingly complex trials will benefit from novel trial designs (such as factorial or adaptive designs), enhanced clinical endpoints that more directly assess islet pathology (such as β-cell death assays and islet or pancreatic imaging), improved responder analyses, and sophisticated mechanistic assays that provide deep phenotyping of lymphocyte subsets, gene expression profiling, in vitro T cell functional assessments, and antigen-specific responses. With this developing armamentarium of enhanced trial designs, endpoints, and clinical and mechanistic response analyses, we can expect substantial progress in better understanding the breakdown in immunologic tolerance in T1D and how to restore it to achieve significant and long-lasting preservation of islet function.

  10. Silencing of Hsp27 and Hsp72 in glioma cells as a tool for programmed cell death induction upon temozolomide and quercetin treatment.

    PubMed

    Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna; Langner, Ewa; Bądziul, Dorota; Wertel, Iwona; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether silencing of Hsp27 or Hsp72 expression in glioblastoma multiforme T98G and anaplastic astrocytoma MOGGCCM cells increases their sensitivity to programmed cell death induction upon temozolomide and/or quercetin treatment. Transfection with specific siRNA was performed for the Hsp gene silencing. As revealed by microscopic observation and flow cytometry, the inhibition of Hsp expression was correlated with severe apoptosis induction upon the drug treatment studied. No signs of autophagy were detected. This was correlated with a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased level of cytochrome c in the cytoplasm, and activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9. All these results suggest that the apoptotic signal was mediated by an internal pathway. Additionally, in a large percentage of cells treated with temozolomide, with or without quercetin, granules within the ER system were found, which was accompanied by an increased level of caspase 12 expression. This might be correlated with ER stress. Quercetin and temozolomide also changed the shape of nuclei from circular to "croissant like" in both transfected cell lines. Our results indicate that blocking of Hsp27 and Hsp72 expression makes T98G cells and MOGGCCM cells extremely vulnerable to apoptosis induction upon temozolomide and quercetin treatment and that programmed cell death is initiated by an internal signal.

  11. New-onset third-degree atrioventricular block because of autoimmune-induced myositis under treatment with anti-programmed cell death-1 (nivolumab) for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Behling, Juliane; Kaes, Joachim; Münzel, Thomas; Grabbe, Stephan; Loquai, Carmen

    2017-04-01

    There has been considerable progress in treating malignant melanoma over the last few years. The immune-checkpoint-inhibitors nivolumab and pembrolizumab have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2014 for the therapy of metastatic melanoma. Anti-programmed cell death-1-blocking antibodies are known to cause immune-related adverse events. Physicians should be aware of common and rare side effects and pay attention to new ones. We therefore report a severe and life-threatening side effect of anti-programmed cell death-1 immunotherapy with nivolumab that has not been previously reported: the development of a third-degree atrioventricular block. After a second infusion with nivolumab, our patient developed a troponin I-positive and autoantibody-positive myositis and a few days later a new-onset third-degree atrioventricular block. This is most likely because of an autoimmune-induced myositis with a cardiac impairment in terms of a myocarditis, which led to an impairment of the conduction of cardiac electrical stimuli.

  12. Immunological effects of sublingual immunotherapy: clinical efficacy is associated with modulation of programmed cell death ligand 1, IL-10, and IgG4.

    PubMed

    Piconi, Stefania; Trabattoni, Daria; Rainone, Veronica; Borgonovo, Linda; Passerini, Simone; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Frati, Franco; Iemoli, Enrico; Clerici, Mario

    2010-12-15

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is an alternate route of administration of allergen-specific immunotherapy with an improved safety profile; to clarify the immune mechanisms elicited by this therapy, we analyzed the clinical and immunologic effects of SLIT in patients with a clinical history of ragweed sensitization. To analyze possible difference among immunotherapeutic protocols, we also compared patients receiving preseasonal, seasonal, or prolonged sublingual therapy (≥ 3 y); patients receiving symptomatic therapy alone were enrolled as well in the study. Clinical and immunological parameters were measured twice in and out of the pollination period. Clinical benefits, as measured by the visual analog scale for symptoms and for use of drugs, were evident in all three groups of individuals receiving immunotherapy, but were significantly better in patients undergoing prolonged SLIT. Immunologically, SLIT resulted in increased IL-10 production, programmed cell death ligand 1 expression, and concentration of allergen-specific IgG4, as well as in the reduction of CD80 and CD86 expression and IL-4 production. SLIT, thus, is associated with modulation of programmed cell death ligand 1 expression and IL-10 synthesis and favors the production of allergen-specific IgG4. These effects are evident from the first pollen season, independently from therapeutic regimen (preseasonal or seasonal) even if a prolonged treatment is necessary to obtain full clinical efficacy. A more detailed understanding of the interaction of allergen and APCs within the oral mucosa will allow improved targeting of allergy vaccine.

  13. Transcriptome-Wide Mapping of Pea Seed Ageing Reveals a Pivotal Role for Genes Related to Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Colville, Louise; Lorenzo, Oscar; Graeber, Kai; Küster, Helge; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard; Kranner, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of seed ageing, which leads to viability loss during storage, is vital for ex situ plant conservation and agriculture alike. Yet the potential for regulation at the transcriptional level has not been fully investigated. Here, we studied the relationship between seed viability, gene expression and glutathione redox status during artificial ageing of pea (Pisum sativum) seeds. Transcriptome-wide analysis using microarrays was complemented with qRT-PCR analysis of selected genes and a multilevel analysis of the antioxidant glutathione. Partial degradation of DNA and RNA occurred from the onset of artificial ageing at 60% RH and 50°C, and transcriptome profiling showed that the expression of genes associated with programmed cell death, oxidative stress and protein ubiquitination were altered prior to any sign of viability loss. After 25 days of ageing viability started to decline in conjunction with progressively oxidising cellular conditions, as indicated by a shift of the glutathione redox state towards more positive values (>−190 mV). The unravelling of the molecular basis of seed ageing revealed that transcriptome reprogramming is a key component of the ageing process, which influences the progression of programmed cell death and decline in antioxidant capacity that ultimately lead to seed viability loss. PMID:24205239

  14. Spent Pot Liner (SPL) induced DNA damage and nuclear alterations in root tip cells of Allium cepa as a consequence of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Vieira, L F; Gedraite, L S; Campos, J M S; Davide, L C

    2011-05-01

    There are various toxic effects of environmental pollutants, including apoptosis and carcinogenesis. Spent Pot Liner (SPL) is solid waste from the aluminum industry. It has a highly variable composition, including cyanide, fluoride, organics and metals. Preliminary characterizations of the effect of SPL on Allium cepa show the presence of condensed nuclei. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the toxic effect of SPL in A. cepa root meristem in the context of programmed cell death (PCD). A lot of specific features of this process such as DNA fragmentation, condensed chromatin, spherical nuclei and the formation of apoptotic-like bodies were observed in root meristem after SPL treatment. Root meristem treated with SPL 25% solution exhibited an alteration in antioxidant enzyme activities; a reduction in NCR as a consequence of high percentage of condensed nuclei; DNA fragmentation, detected by electrophoresis and TUNEL assay; cytoplasm vacuolization and also a disturbance in root morphology. These features are associated with programmed cell death (PCD) under abiotic stress. Therefore, these data show that SPL induces apoptosis-like PCD in root meristem cells of A. cepa.

  15. Distinct temporal programming of naive CD4+ T cells for cell division versus TCR-dependent death susceptibility by antigen-presenting macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schrum, Adam G; Palmer, Ed; Turka, Laurence A

    2005-02-01

    Naive T cells become programmed for clonal expansion and contraction during the early hours of antigenic signaling. Recent studies support an 'autopilot' model, wherein the commitment to proliferate and the magnitude of the proliferative response are simultaneously determined during a single, brief period of antigen exposure. Here, we have examined whether the proliferation of naive CD4+ T cells must occur on 'autopilot', or whether extended periods of antigenic signaling can impact primary proliferative responses to antigen-presenting macrophages (macrophage APC). We found that a single exposure to antigen (18 h) simultaneously committed T cells to (1) up-regulate surface TCR above the level expressed on naive T cells, (2) undergo minimal cell division, and (3) acquire susceptibility to TCR-dependent activation-induced cell death. However, continued antigenic signaling between 18 and 72 h was required to amplify the number of daughter cells derived from the already committed T cells. Thus, a discrete commitment time was followed by a 'tuning' period, where extended antigenic signaling determined the volume of the proliferative response. We conclude that T cell commitment to full clonal expansion versus TCR-dependent death susceptibility represent two separate programming events whose timing can be segregated by macrophage APC.

  16. The MYB80 Transcription Factor Is Required for Pollen Development and the Regulation of Tapetal Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Huy Anh; Iacuone, Sylvana; Li, Song F.; Parish, Roger W.

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana MYB80 (formerly MYB103) is expressed in the tapetum and microspores between anther developmental stages 6 and 10. MYB80 encodes a MYB transcription factor that is essential for tapetal and pollen development. Using microarray analysis of anther mRNA, we identified 404 genes differentially expressed in the myb80 mutant. Employing the glucocorticoid receptor system, the expression of 79 genes was changed when MYB80 function was restored in the myb80 mutant following induction by dexamethasone. Thirty-two genes were analyzed using chromatin immunoprecipitation, and three were identified as direct targets of MYB80. The genes encode a glyoxal oxidase (GLOX1), a pectin methylesterase (VANGUARD1), and an A1 aspartic protease (UNDEAD). All three genes are expressed in the tapetum and microspores. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that MYB80 binds to all three target promoters, with the preferential binding site containing the CCAACC motif. TUNEL assays showed that when UNDEAD expression was silenced using small interfering RNA, premature tapetal and pollen programmed cell death occurred, resembling the myb80 mutant phenotype. UNDEAD possesses a mitochondrial targeting signal and may hydrolyze an apoptosis-inducing protein(s) in mitochondria. The timing of tapetal programmed cell death is critical for pollen development, and the MYB80/UNDEAD system may regulate that timing. PMID:21673079

  17. Transcriptome-wide mapping of pea seed ageing reveals a pivotal role for genes related to oxidative stress and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongying; Osuna, Daniel; Colville, Louise; Lorenzo, Oscar; Graeber, Kai; Küster, Helge; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard; Kranner, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of seed ageing, which leads to viability loss during storage, is vital for ex situ plant conservation and agriculture alike. Yet the potential for regulation at the transcriptional level has not been fully investigated. Here, we studied the relationship between seed viability, gene expression and glutathione redox status during artificial ageing of pea (Pisum sativum) seeds. Transcriptome-wide analysis using microarrays was complemented with qRT-PCR analysis of selected genes and a multilevel analysis of the antioxidant glutathione. Partial degradation of DNA and RNA occurred from the onset of artificial ageing at 60% RH and 50°C, and transcriptome profiling showed that the expression of genes associated with programmed cell death, oxidative stress and protein ubiquitination were altered prior to any sign of viability loss. After 25 days of ageing viability started to decline in conjunction with progressively oxidising cellular conditions, as indicated by a shift of the glutathione redox state towards more positive values (>-190 mV). The unravelling of the molecular basis of seed ageing revealed that transcriptome reprogramming is a key component of the ageing process, which influences the progression of programmed cell death and decline in antioxidant capacity that ultimately lead to seed viability loss.

  18. Inhibition of programmed cell death impairs in vitro vascular-like structure formation and reduces in vivo angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Segura, Inmaculada; Serrano, Antonio; De Buitrago, Gonzalo González; González, Manuel A; Abad, Jose Luis; Clavería, Cristina; Gómez, Lucio; Bernad, Antonio; Martínez-A, Carlos; Riese, Hans H

    2002-06-01

    Tissue remodeling during embryonic development and in the adult organism relies on a subtle balance between cell growth and apoptosis. As angiogenesis involves restructuring of preexisting endothelium, we examined the role of apoptosis in new vessel formation. We show that apoptosis occurs before capillary formation but not after vessels have assembled. Using the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) in vitro Matrigel angiogenesis model, we show that vascular-like structure formation requires apoptotic cell death through activation of a caspase-dependent mechanism and mitochondrial cytochrome c release. Vascular-like structure formation was further blocked by caspase inhibitors such as z-VAD or Ac-DEVD-CHO, using HUVEC and human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Overexpression of anti-apoptotic human Bcl-2 or baculovirus p35 genes in HUVEC altered endothelial cell rearrangement during in vitro angiogenesis, causing impaired vessel-like structure formation. Caspase inhibitors blocked VEGF- or bFGF-induced HUVEC angiogenesis on 2- or 3-D collagen gels, respectively, confirming that apoptosis was not the result of nonspecific cell death after seeding on the matrix. In an in vivo angiogenesis assay, caspase inhibitors blocked VEGF-dependent vascular formation at the alignment step, as demonstrated histologically. This evidence indicates that endothelial cell apoptosis may be relevant for precise vascular tissue rearrangement in in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis.

  19. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and nutritional compounds in early type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert P

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in patients with type 1 diabetes. Vascular endothelial dysfunction is an early pathophysiological precursor of cardiovascular disease. There is extensive evidence that hyperglycemia causes acute perturbations in endothelial function likely due to increases in oxidative damage. Interestingly, oscillating hyperglycemia may cause more damage than persistent hyperglycemia. Many, but not all, studies indicate that vascular endothelial dysfunction occurs early in the course of type 1 diabetes and is present even in adolescents. Ascorbic acid has been shown to diminish the acute effects of hyperglycemia on endothelial function in type 1 diabetes and in conjunction with euglycemia to restore endothelial function to normal values in adults with well-controlled diabetes. In vitro and in vivo animal evidence suggests potential benefit from two other small molecule antioxidants, nicotinamide and taurine. Early studies suggested that folate supplementation may improve endothelial function in adolescents with type 1 diabetes but this has not been confirmed by more recent studies. Epidemiological evidence suggests a possible role for vitamin D therapy although intervention studies in type 2 diabetes have yielded varying results and have not been done in type 1 diabetes. Further exploration of these and other compounds is clearly appropriate if we are to reduce cardiovascular risk in type 1 diabetes.

  20. Type-1 interferon signaling mediates neuro-inflammatory events in models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Juliet M; Minter, Myles R; Newman, Andrew G; Zhang, Moses; Adlard, Paul A; Crack, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    A neuro-inflammatory response has been implicated in human patients and animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Type-1 interferons are pleiotropic cytokines involved in the initiation and regulation of the pro-inflammatory response; however, their role in AD is unknown. This study investigated the contribution of type-1 IFN signaling in the neuro-inflammatory response to amyloid-beta (Aβ) in vitro and in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed a 2-fold increase in IFNα in APP/PS1 brains compared with control brains. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction also identified increased IFNα and IFNβ expression in human pre-frontal cortex from AD patients. In vitro studies in primary neurons demonstrated Aβ-induced type-1 IFN expression preceded that of other classical pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL1-β, and IL-6. Significantly, ablation of type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 expression in BE(2)M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary neurons afforded protection against Aβ-induced toxicity. This study supports a role for type-1 interferons in the pro-inflammatory response and neuronal cell death in AD and suggests that blocking type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 maybe a therapeutic target to limit the disease progression.

  1. Invariant death.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    In nematodes, environmental or physiological perturbations alter death's scaling of time. In human cancer, genetic perturbations alter death's curvature of time. Those changes in scale and curvature follow the constraining contours of death's invariant geometry. I show that the constraints arise from a fundamental extension to the theories of randomness, invariance and scale. A generalized Gompertz law follows. The constraints imposed by the invariant Gompertz geometry explain the tendency of perturbations to stretch or bend death's scaling of time. Variability in death rate arises from a combination of constraining universal laws and particular biological processes.

  2. FEATURE A, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, SOUTH SIDE, REST MOSTLY COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE A, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, SOUTH SIDE, REST MOSTLY COVERED BY VEGETATION AND SAND, VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Shore Pillbox Complex-Type 1 Pillbox, Along shoreline, seaward of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Common Virus May Have Ties to Type 1 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162969.html Common Virus May Have Ties to Type 1 Diabetes But ... least some cases of type 1 diabetes. The viruses are known as enteroviruses. These viruses cause a ...

  4. Ultrastructural changes and programmed cell death of trophocytes in the gonad of Isohypsibius granulifer granulifer Thulin, 1928 (Tardigrada, Eutardigrada, Isohypsibiidae).

    PubMed

    Poprawa, Izabela; Hyra, Marta; Kszuk-Jendrysik, Michalina; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena Maria

    2015-03-01

    The studies on the fates of the trophocytes, the apoptosis and autophagy in the gonad of Isohypsibius granulifer granulifer have been described using transmission electron microscope, light and fluorescent microscopes. The results presented here are the first that are connected with the cell death of nurse cells in the gonad of tardigrades. However, here we complete the results presented by Węglarska (1987). The reproductive system of I. g. granulifer contains a single sack-like hermaphroditic gonad and a single gonoduct. The gonad is composed of three parts: a germarium filled with proliferating germ cells (oogonia); a vitellarium that has clusters of female germ cells (the region of oocytes development); and a male part filled with male germ cells in which the sperm cells develop. The trophocytes (nurse cells) show distinct alterations during all of the stages of oogenesis: previtello-, vitello- and choriogenesis. During previtellogenesis the female germ cells situated in the vitellarium are connected by cytoplasmic bridges, and form clusters of cells. No ultrastructural differences appear among the germ cells in a cluster during this stage of oogenesis. In early vitellogenesis, the cells in each cluster start to grow and numerous organelles gradually accumulate in their cytoplasm. However, at the beginning of the middle of vitellogenesis, one cell in each cluster starts to grow in order to differentiate into oocyte, while the remaining cells are trophocytes. Eventually, the cytoplasmic bridges between the oocyte and trophocytes disappear. Autophagosomes also appear in the cytoplasm of nurse cells together with many degenerating organelles. The cytoplasm starts to shrink, which causes the degeneration of the cytoplasmic bridges between trophocytes. Apoptosis begins when the cytoplasm of these cells is full of autophagosomes/autolysosomes and causes their death.

  5. The transcription factors ADR1 or CAT8 are required for RTG pathway activation and evasion from yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death in raffinose

    PubMed Central

    Laera, Luna; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marzulli, Domenico; Liu, Zhengchang; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), but evades PCD when grown in raffinose. This is due to concomitant relief of carbon catabolite repression (CCR) and activation of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway causing up-regulation of various nuclear target genes, such as CIT2, encoding peroxisomal citrate synthase, dependent on the positive regulator RTG2 in response to mitochondrial dysfunction. CCR down-regulates genes mainly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. In this work, we investigated the relationships between the RTG and CCR pathways in the modulation of AA-PCD sensitivity under glucose repression or de-repression conditions. Yeast single and double mutants lacking RTG2 and/or certain factors regulating carbon source utilization, including MIG1, HXK2, ADR1, CAT8, and HAP4, have been analyzed for their survival and CIT2 expression after acetic acid treatment. ADR1 and CAT8 were identified as positive regulators of RTG-dependent gene transcription. ADR1 and CAT8 interact with RTG2 and with each other in inducing cell resistance to AA-PCD in raffinose and controlling the nature of cell death. In the absence of ADR1 and CAT8, AA-PCD evasion is acquired through activation of an alternative factor/pathway repressed by RTG2, suggesting that RTG2 may play a function in promoting necrotic cell death in repressing conditions when RTG pathway is inactive. Moreover, our data show that simultaneous mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation and SNF1-dependent relief of CCR have a key role in central carbon metabolism reprogramming which modulates the yeast acetic acid-stress response. PMID:28357334

  6. ZBP1/DAI is an innate sensor of influenza virus triggering the NLRP3 inflammasome and programmed cell death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Teneema; Man, Si Ming; Malireddi, R.K. Subbarao; Karki, Rajendra; Kesavardhana, Sannula; Place, David E.; Neale, Geoffrey; Vogel, Peter; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-01-01

    The interferon-inducible protein Z-DNA binding protein 1 (ZBP1, also known as DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI) and DLM-1) was identified as a dsDNA sensor, which instigates innate immune responses. However, this classification has been disputed and whether ZBP1 functions as a pathogen sensor during an infection has remained unknown. Herein, we demonstrated ZBP1-mediated sensing of the influenza A virus (IAV) proteins NP and PB1, triggering cell death and inflammatory responses via the RIPK1–RIPK3–Caspase-8 axis. ZBP1 regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation as well as induction of apoptosis, necroptosis and pyroptosis in IAV-infected cells. Importantly, ZBP1 deficiency protected mice from mortality during IAV infection owing to reduced inflammatory responses and epithelial damage. Overall, these findings indicate that ZBP1 is an innate immune sensor of IAV and highlight its importance in the pathogenesis of IAV infection. PMID:27917412

  7. Quasi-programmed aging of budding yeast: a trade-off between programmed processes of cell proliferation, differentiation, stress response, survival and death defines yeast lifespan.

    PubMed

    Arlia-Ciommo, Anthony; Piano, Amanda; Leonov, Anna; Svistkova, Veronika; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that evolutionarily distant organisms share the key features of the aging process and exhibit similar mechanisms of its modulation by certain genetic, dietary and pharmacological interventions. The scope of this review is to analyze mechanisms that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae underlie: (1) the replicative and chronological modes of aging; (2) the convergence of these 2 modes of aging into a single aging process; (3) a programmed differentiation of aging cell communities in liquid media and on solid surfaces; and (4) longevity-defining responses of cells to some chemical compounds released to an ecosystem by other organisms populating it. Based on such analysis, we conclude that all these mechanisms are programs for upholding the long-term survival of the entire yeast population inhabiting an ecological niche; however, none of these mechanisms is a "program of aging" - i.e., a program for progressing through consecutive steps of the aging process.

  8. The Rice Dynamin-Related Protein OsDRP1E Negatively Regulates Programmed Cell Death by Controlling the Release of Cytochrome c from Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xueping

    2017-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) mediated by mitochondrial processes has emerged as an important mechanism for plant development and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. However, the role of translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol during PCD remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the rice dynamin-related protein 1E (OsDRP1E) negatively regulates PCD by controlling mitochondrial structure and cytochrome c release. We used a map-based cloning strategy to isolate OsDRP1E from the lesion mimic mutant dj-lm and confirmed that the E409V mutation in OsDRP1E causes spontaneous cell death in rice. Pathogen inoculation showed that dj-lm significantly enhances resistance to fungal and bacterial pathogens. Functional analysis of the E409V mutation showed that the mutant protein impairs OsDRP1E self-association and formation of a higher-order complex; this in turn reduces the GTPase activity of OsDRP1E. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed that the E409V mutation impairs localization of OsDRP1E to the mitochondria. The E409V mutation significantly affects the morphogenesis of cristae in mitochondria and causes the abnormal release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytoplasm. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the mitochondria-localized protein OsDRP1E functions as a negative regulator of cytochrome c release and PCD in plants. PMID:28081268