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Sample records for programming enzyme specificity

  1. Motif-directed redesign of enzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Borgo, Benjamin; Havranek, James J

    2014-03-01

    Computational protein design relies on several approximations, including the use of fixed backbones and rotamers, to reduce protein design to a computationally tractable problem. However, allowing backbone and off-rotamer flexibility leads to more accurate designs and greater conformational diversity. Exhaustive sampling of this additional conformational space is challenging, and often impossible. Here, we report a computational method that utilizes a preselected library of native interactions to direct backbone flexibility to accommodate placement of these functional contacts. Using these native interaction modules, termed motifs, improves the likelihood that the interaction can be realized, provided that suitable backbone perturbations can be identified. Furthermore, it allows a directed search of the conformational space, reducing the sampling needed to find low energy conformations. We implemented the motif-based design algorithm in Rosetta, and tested the efficacy of this method by redesigning the substrate specificity of methionine aminopeptidase. In summary, native enzymes have evolved to catalyze a wide range of chemical reactions with extraordinary specificity. Computational enzyme design seeks to generate novel chemical activities by altering the target substrates of these existing enzymes. We have implemented a novel approach to redesign the specificity of an enzyme and demonstrated its effectiveness on a model system.

  2. Controlling reaction specificity in pyridoxal phosphate enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Toney, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate enzymes are ubiquitous in the nitrogen metabolism of all organisms. They catalyze a wide variety of reactions including racemization, transamination, decarboxylation, elimination, retro-aldol cleavage, Claisen condensation, and others on substrates containing an amino group, most commonly α-amino acids. The wide variety of reactions catalyzed by PLP enzymes is enabled by the ability of the covalent aldimine intermediate formed between substrate and PLP to stabilize carbanionic intermediates at Cα of the substrate. This review attempts to summarize the mechanisms by which reaction specificity can be achieved in PLP enzymes by focusing on three aspects of these reactions: stereoelectronic effects, protonation state of the external aldimine intermediate, and interaction of the carbanionic intermediate with the protein side chains present in the active site. PMID:21664990

  3. Modelling enzyme reaction mechanisms, specificity and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Adrian J

    2005-10-15

    Modern modelling methods can now give uniquely detailed understanding of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, including the analysis of mechanisms and the identification of determinants of specificity and catalytic efficiency. A new field of computational enzymology has emerged that has the potential to contribute significantly to structure-based design and to develop predictive models of drug metabolism and, for example, of the effects of genetic polymorphisms. This review outlines important techniques in this area, including quantum-chemical model studies and combined quantum-mechanics and molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) methods. Some recent applications to enzymes of pharmacological interest are also covered, showing the types of problems that can be tackled and the insight they can give.

  4. Double clicking for site-specific coupling of multiple enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Cho, Jinhwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-09-14

    A method to site-specifically couple multiple enzymes is reported. The approach is based on the site-specific incorporation of a clickable non-natural amino acid into enzymes and two compatible click reactions. The multi-enzyme reaction system exhibited enhanced catalytic efficiency over the respective free enzymes.

  5. Monobody-mediated alteration of enzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shun-Ichi; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Koide, Akiko; Ishihara, Satoru; Koikeda, Satoshi; Koide, Shohei

    2015-10-01

    Current methods for engineering enzymes modify enzymes themselves and require a detailed mechanistic understanding or a high-throughput assay. Here, we describe a new approach where catalytic properties are modulated with synthetic binding proteins, termed monobodies, directed to an unmodified enzyme. Using the example of a β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans, we efficiently identified monobodies that restricted its substrates for its transgalactosylation reaction and selectively enhanced the production of small oligosaccharide prebiotics.

  6. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  7. Performance Specifications for Occupational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Career Technology and Adult Learning.

    This document lists and discusses the development of Maryland's performance specifications for occupational programs. The introduction explains the process used to develop performance standards and specifications for 10 career cluster majors that were identified by a task force of educators and employers as high-demand occupational areas in…

  8. Logic programming and metadata specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Antonio M., Jr.; Saacks, Marguerite E.

    1992-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) ideas and techniques are critical to the development of intelligent information systems that will be used to collect, manipulate, and retrieve the vast amounts of space data produced by 'Missions to Planet Earth.' Natural language processing, inference, and expert systems are at the core of this space application of AI. This paper presents logic programming as an AI tool that can support inference (the ability to draw conclusions from a set of complicated and interrelated facts). It reports on the use of logic programming in the study of metadata specifications for a small problem domain of airborne sensors, and the dataset characteristics and pointers that are needed for data access.

  9. Site-specific DNA transesterification catalyzed by a restriction enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A; Halford, Stephen E; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2007-02-13

    Most restriction endonucleases use Mg2+ to hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds at specific DNA sites. We show here that BfiI, a metal-independent restriction enzyme from the phospholipase D superfamily, catalyzes both DNA hydrolysis and transesterification reactions at its recognition site. In the presence of alcohols such as ethanol or glycerol, it attaches the alcohol covalently to the 5' terminus of the cleaved DNA. Under certain conditions, the terminal 3'-OH of one DNA strand can attack the target phosphodiester bond in the other strand to create a DNA hairpin. Transesterification reactions on DNA with phosphorothioate linkages at the target bond proceed with retention of stereoconfiguration at the phosphorus, indicating, uniquely for a restriction enzyme, a two-step mechanism. We propose that BfiI first makes a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate, and then it resolves it by a nucleophilic attack of water or an alcohol, to yield hydrolysis or transesterification products, respectively.

  10. O-GlcNAc processing enzymes: catalytic mechanisms, substrate specificity, and enzyme regulation.

    PubMed

    Vocadlo, David J

    2012-12-01

    The addition of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) O-linked to serine and threonine residues of proteins is known as O-GlcNAc. This post-translational modification is found within multicellular eukaryotes on hundreds of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) installs O-GlcNAc onto target proteins and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes O-GlcNAc. Their combined action makes O-GlcNAc reversible and serves to regulate cellular O-GlcNAc levels. Here I review select recent literature on the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes and studies on the molecular basis by which these enzymes identify and process their substrates. Molecular level understanding of how these enzymes work, and the basis for their specificity, should aid understanding how O-GlcNAc contributes to diverse cellular processes ranging from cellular signaling through to transcriptional regulation.

  11. Substrate specificity and enzyme recycling using chitosan immobilized laccase.

    PubMed

    Skoronski, Everton; Fernandes, Mylena; Magalhães, Maria de Lourdes Borba; da Silva, Gustavo Felippe; João, Jair Juarez; Soares, Carlos Henrique Lemos; Júnior, Agenor Fúrigo

    2014-10-17

    The immobilization of laccase (Aspergillus sp.) on chitosan by cross-linking and its application in bioconversion of phenolic compounds in batch reactors were studied. Investigation was performed using laccase immobilized via chemical cross-linking due to the higher enzymatic operational stability of this method as compared to immobilization via physical adsorption. To assess the influence of different substrate functional groups on the enzyme's catalytic efficiency, substrate specificity was investigated using chitosan-immobilized laccase and eighteen different phenol derivatives. It was observed that 4-nitrophenol was not oxidized, while 2,5-xylenol, 2,6-xylenol, 2,3,5-trimethylphenol, syringaldazine, 2,6-dimetoxyphenol and ethylphenol showed reaction yields up 90% at 40 °C. The kinetic of process, enzyme recyclability and operational stability were studied. In batch reactors, it was not possible to reuse the enzyme when it was applied to syringaldazne bioconversion. However, when the enzyme was applied to bioconversion of 2,6-DMP, the activity was stable for eight reaction batches.

  12. Enzyme Substrate Specificity Conferred by Distinct Conformational Pathways.

    PubMed

    Rago, Florencia; Saltzberg, Daniel; Allen, Karen N; Tolan, Dean R

    2015-11-04

    Substrate recognition is one of the hallmarks of enzyme catalysis. Enzyme conformational changes have been linked to selectivity between substrates with little direct evidence. Aldolase, a glycolytic enzyme, must distinguish between two physiologically important substrates, fructose 1-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, and provides an excellent model system for the study of this question. Previous work has shown that isozyme specific residues (ISRs) distant from the active site are responsible for kinetic distinction between these substrates. Notably, most of the ISRs reside in a cluster of five surface α-helices, and the carboxyl-terminal region (CTR), and cooperative interactions among these helices have been demonstrated. To test the hypothesis that conformational changes are at the root of these changes, single surface-cysteine variants were created with the cysteine located on helices of the cluster and CTR. This allowed for site-specific labeling with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore, and subsequent monitoring of conformational changes by fluorescence emission spectrophotometry. These labeled variants revealed different spectra in the presence of saturating amounts of each substrate, which suggested the occurrence of different conformations. Emission spectra collected at various substrate concentrations showed a concentration dependence of the fluorescence spectra, consistent with binding events. Lastly, stopped-flow fluorescence spectrophotometry showed that the rate of these fluorescence changes was on the same time-scale as catalysis, thus suggesting a link between the different fluorescence changes and events during catalysis. On the basis of these results, we propose that different conformational changes may be a common mechanism for dictating substrate specificity in other enzymes with multiple substrates.

  13. Site-specific DNA transesterification catalyzed by a restriction enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A.; Halford, Stephen E.; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2007-01-01

    Most restriction endonucleases use Mg2+ to hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds at specific DNA sites. We show here that BfiI, a metal-independent restriction enzyme from the phospholipase D superfamily, catalyzes both DNA hydrolysis and transesterification reactions at its recognition site. In the presence of alcohols such as ethanol or glycerol, it attaches the alcohol covalently to the 5′ terminus of the cleaved DNA. Under certain conditions, the terminal 3′-OH of one DNA strand can attack the target phosphodiester bond in the other strand to create a DNA hairpin. Transesterification reactions on DNA with phosphorothioate linkages at the target bond proceed with retention of stereoconfiguration at the phosphorus, indicating, uniquely for a restriction enzyme, a two-step mechanism. We propose that BfiI first makes a covalent enzyme–DNA intermediate, and then it resolves it by a nucleophilic attack of water or an alcohol, to yield hydrolysis or transesterification products, respectively. PMID:17267608

  14. Structural studies of the Trypanosoma cruzi Old Yellow Enzyme: insights into enzyme dynamics and specificity.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Mário T; Rodrigues, Nathalia C; Gava, Lisandra M; Honorato, Rodrigo V; Canduri, Fernanda; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Oliva, Glaucius; Borges, Júlio C

    2013-12-31

    The flavoprotein old yellow enzyme of Trypanosoma cruzi (TcOYE) is an oxidoreductase that uses NAD(P)H as cofactor. This enzyme is clinically relevant due to its role in the action mechanism of some trypanocidal drugs used in the treatment of Chagas' disease by producing reactive oxygen species. In this work, the recombinant enzyme TcOYE was produced and collectively, X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular dynamics provided a detailed description of its structure, specificity and hydrodynamic behavior. The crystallographic structure at 1.27Å showed a classical (α/β)8 fold with the FMN prosthetic group buried at the positively-charged active-site cleft. In solution, TcOYE behaved as a globular monomer, but it exhibited a molecular envelope larger than that observed in the crystal structure, suggesting intrinsic protein flexibility. Moreover, the binding mode of β-lapachone, a trypanocidal agent, and other naphthoquinones was investigated by molecular docking and dynamics suggesting that their binding to TcOYE are stabilized mainly by interactions with the isoalloxazine ring from FMN and residues from the active-site pocket.

  15. Sensitivity and Specificity of Histoplasma Antigen Detection by Enzyme Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Lauren; Cook, Audrey; Hanzlicek, Andrew; Harkin, Kenneth; Wheat, Joseph; Goad, Carla; Kirsch, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of an antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA) on urine samples for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs. This retrospective medical records review included canine cases with urine samples submitted for Histoplasma EIA antigen assay between 2007 and 2011 from three veterinary institutions. Cases for which urine samples were submitted for Histoplasma antigen testing were reviewed and compared to the gold standard of finding Histoplasma organisms or an alternative diagnosis on cytology or histopathology. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and the kappa coefficient and associated confidence interval were calculated for the EIA-based Histoplasma antigen assay. Sixty cases met the inclusion criteria. Seventeen cases were considered true positives based on identification of the organism, and 41 cases were considered true negatives with an alternative definitive diagnosis. Two cases were considered false negatives, and there were no false positives. Sensitivity was 89.47% and the negative predictive value was 95.35%. Specificity and the positive predictive value were both 100%. The kappa coefficient was 0.9207 (95% confidence interval, 0.8131-1). The Histoplasma antigen EIA test demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs.

  16. Understanding the Specificity and Random Collision of Enzyme-Substrate Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kin, Ng Hong; Ling, Tan Aik

    2016-01-01

    The concept of specificity of enzyme action can potentially be abstract for some students as they fail to appreciate how the three-dimensional configuration of enzymes and the active sites confer perfect fit for specific substrates. In science text books, the specificity of enzyme-substrate binding is typically likened to the action of a lock and…

  17. Understanding the Specificity and Random Collision of Enzyme-Substrate Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kin, Ng Hong; Ling, Tan Aik

    2016-01-01

    The concept of specificity of enzyme action can potentially be abstract for some students as they fail to appreciate how the three-dimensional configuration of enzymes and the active sites confer perfect fit for specific substrates. In science text books, the specificity of enzyme-substrate binding is typically likened to the action of a lock and…

  18. Different expression and subcellular localization of Phosphoinositide-specific Phospholipase C enzymes in differently polarized macrophages.

    PubMed

    Di Raimo, Tania; Leopizzi, Martina; Mangino, Giorgio; Rocca, Carlo Della; Businaro, Rita; Longo, Lucia; Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita

    2016-12-01

    Macrophages' phenotypic and functional diversity depends on differentiating programs related to local environmental factors. Recent interest was deserved to the signal transduction pathways acting in macrophage polarization, including the phosphoinositide (PI) system and related phospholipase C (PLC) family of enzymes. The expression panel of PLCs and the subcellular localization differs in quiescent cells compared to the pathological counterpart. We analyzed the expression of PLC enzymes in unpolarized (M0), as well as in M1 and M2 macrophages to list the expressed isoforms and their subcellular localization. Furthermore, we investigated whether inflammatory stimulation modified the basal panel of PLCs' expression and subcellular localization. All PLC enzymes were detected within both M1 and M2 cells, but not in M0 cells. M0, as well as M1 and M2 cells own a specific panel of expression, different for both genes' mRNA expression and intracellular localization of PLC enzymes. The panel of PLC genes' expression and PLC proteins' presence slightly changes after inflammatory stimulation. PLC enzymes might play a complex role in macrophages during inflammation and probably also during polarization.

  19. Substrate specificity and some physicochemical properties of autolytic enzymes of the bacterium Lysobacter sp. XL 1.

    PubMed

    Tsfasman, I M; Sitkin, B V; Lysanskaya, V Ya; Stepnaya, O A; Kulaev, I S

    2007-07-01

    The substrate specificity of autolytic enzymes of the bacterium Lysobacter sp. XL 1 has been established. The periplasmic enzyme A8, the cytosolic enzyme A1, and the enzyme A10 solubilized from the cell walls and membranes with Triton X-100 exhibit glucosaminidase activity; the cytosolic enzyme A4 and the enzyme A9 solubilized from the cell walls and membranes with LiCl exhibit the muramidase activity. The cytosolic enzymes A3 and A6 have N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase activity, and the enzyme A5 exhibits the diaminopimelinoyl-alanine endopeptidase activity. Some physicochemical properties of the most active autolytic cytosolic enzymes of Lysobacter sp. XL 1 (endopeptidases A5 and A7 and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase A6) were studied. The enzymes exhibit maximal activity over a wide range of buffer concentrations in weakly alkaline medium and moderate temperatures. The investigated enzymes are comparatively thermolabile proteins.

  20. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the “hot-spot” within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design. PMID:27298067

  1. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the “hot-spot” within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design.

  2. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-06-14

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the "hot-spot" within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design.

  3. Automatic program generation from specifications using Prolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelin, Alex; Morrow, Paul

    1987-01-01

    An automatic program generator which creates Prolog programs from input/output specifications is presented. The generator takes as input descriptions of the input and output data types, a set of tests, a set of transformations and the input/out relation. Abstract data types are used as models. The tests, the transformations and the input/out relation are also specified by equations. The heuristics used by the automatic propram generator in building Prolog programs are discussed.

  4. Automatic program generation from specifications using Prolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelin, Alex; Morrow, Paul

    1987-01-01

    An automatic program generator which creates Prolog programs from input/output specifications is presented. The generator takes as input descriptions of the input and output data types, a set of tests, a set of transformations and the input/out relation. Abstract data types are used as models. The tests, the transformations and the input/out relation are also specified by equations. The heuristics used by the automatic propram generator in building Prolog programs are discussed.

  5. Aptamer capturing of enzymes on magnetic beads to enhance assay specificity and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2011-12-15

    Activity and specificity of enzyme molecules are important to enzymatic reactions and enzyme assays. We describe an aptamer capturing approach that improves the specificity and the sensitivity of enzyme detection. An aptamer recognizing the target enzyme molecule is conjugated on a magnetic bead, increasing the local concentration, and serves as an affinity probe to capture and separate minute amounts of the enzyme. The captured enzymes catalyze the subsequent conversion of fluorogenic substrate to fluorescent products, enabling a sensitive measure of the active enzyme. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated through assays for human alpha thrombin and human neutrophil elastase (HNE), two important enzymes. Thrombin (2 fM) and 100 fM HNE can be detected. The incorporation of two binding events, substrate recognition and aptamer binding, greatly improves assay specificity. With its simplicity, this approach is applicable to biosensing and detection of disease biomarkers.

  6. Certifiable Specification and Verification of C Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüth, Christoph; Walter, Dennis

    A novel approach to the specification and verification of C programs through an annotation language that is a mixture between JML and the language of Isabelle/HOL is proposed. This yields three benefits: specifications are concise and close to the underlying mathematical model; existing Isabelle theories can be reused; and the leap of faith from specification language to encoding in a logic is small. This is of particular relevance for software certification, and verification in application areas such as robotics.

  7. Automatic program generation from specifications using PROLOG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelin, Alex; Morrow, Paul

    1988-01-01

    An automatic program generator which creates PROLOG programs from input/output specifications is described. The generator takes as input descriptions of the input and output data types, a set of transformations and the input/output relation. Abstract data types are used as models for data. They are defined as sets of terms satisfying a system of equations. The tests, the transformations and the input/output relation are also specified by equations.

  8. Site-specific immobilization of enzymes on magnetic nanoparticles and their use in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ching-Ching; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Liang, Chien-Fu; Chien, Wei-Ting; Wu, Huan-Ting; Chang, Tsung-Che; Jan, Fan-Dan; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2012-04-18

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are attractive materials that serve as a support for enzyme immobilization and facilitate separations by applying an external magnetic field; this could facilitate the recycling of enzymes and broaden their applications in organic synthesis. Herein, we report the methods for the immobilization of water-soluble and membrane-bound enzymes, and the activity difference between free and immobilized enzymes is discussed. Sialyltransferase (PmST1, from Pasteurella multocida ) and cytidine monophosphate (CMP)-sialic acid synthetase (CSS, from Neisseria meningitides ) were chosen as water-soluble enzymes and expressed using an intein expression system. The enzymes were site-specifically and covalently immobilized on PEGylated-N-terminal cysteine MNPs through native chemical ligation (NCL). Increasing the length of the PEG linker between the enzyme and the MNP surface increased the activity of the immobilized enzymes relative to the free parent enzymes. In addition, the use of a fluorescent acceptor tag for PmST1 affected enzyme kinetics. In contrast, sialyltransferase from Neisseria gonorrheae (NgST, a membrane-bound enzyme) was modified with a biotin-labeled cysteine at the C-terminus using NCL, and the enzyme was then assembled on streptavidin-functionalized MNPs. Using a streptavidin-biotin interaction, it was possible to immobilize NgST on a solid support under mild ligation conditions, which prevented the enzyme from high-temperature decomposition and provided an approximately 2-fold increase in activity compared to other immobilization methods on MNPs. Finally, the ganglioside GM3-derivative (sialyl-lactose derivative) was synthesized in a one-pot system by combining the use of immobilized PmST1 and CSS. The enzymes retained 50% activity after being reused ten times. Furthermore, the results obtained using the one-pot two-immobilized-enzyme system demonstrated that it can be applied to large-scale reactions with acceptable yields and

  9. Vacuolar processing enzyme in plant programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Yamada, Kenji; Goto-Yamada, Shino; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2015-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) is a cysteine proteinase originally identified as the proteinase responsible for the maturation and activation of vacuolar proteins in plants, and it is known to be an ortholog of animal asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP/VPE/legumain). VPE has been shown to exhibit enzymatic properties similar to that of caspase 1, which is a cysteine protease that mediates the programmed cell death (PCD) pathway in animals. Although there is limited sequence identity between VPE and caspase 1, their predicted three-dimensional structures revealed that the essential amino-acid residues for these enzymes form similar pockets for the substrate peptide YVAD. In contrast to the cytosolic localization of caspases, VPE is localized in vacuoles. VPE provokes vacuolar rupture, initiating the proteolytic cascade leading to PCD in the plant immune response. It has become apparent that the VPE-dependent PCD pathway is involved not only in the immune response, but also in the responses to a variety of stress inducers and in the development of various tissues. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the contribution of VPE to plant PCD and its role in vacuole-mediated cell death, and it also compares VPE with the animal cell death executor caspase 1. PMID:25914711

  10. Homology models guide discovery of diverse enzyme specificities among dipeptide epimerases in the enolase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lukk, Tiit; Sakai, Ayano; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Brown, Shoshana D.; Imker, Heidi J.; Song, Ling; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Toro, Rafael; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Patskovsky, Yury; Vetting, Matthew W.; Nair, Satish K.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid advance in genome sequencing presents substantial challenges for protein functional assignment, with half or more of new protein sequences inferred from these genomes having uncertain assignments. The assignment of enzyme function in functionally diverse superfamilies represents a particular challenge, which we address through a combination of computational predictions, enzymology, and structural biology. Here we describe the results of a focused investigation of a group of enzymes in the enolase superfamily that are involved in epimerizing dipeptides. The first members of this group to be functionally characterized were Ala-Glu epimerases in Eschericiha coli and Bacillus subtilis, based on the operon context and enzymological studies; these enzymes are presumed to be involved in peptidoglycan recycling. We have subsequently studied more than 65 related enzymes by computational methods, including homology modeling and metabolite docking, which suggested that many would have divergent specificities;, i.e., they are likely to have different (unknown) biological roles. In addition to the Ala-Phe epimerase specificity reported previously, we describe the prediction and experimental verification of: (i) a new group of presumed Ala-Glu epimerases; (ii) several enzymes with specificity for hydrophobic dipeptides, including one from Cytophaga hutchinsonii that epimerizes D-Ala-D-Ala; and (iii) a small group of enzymes that epimerize cationic dipeptides. Crystal structures for certain of these enzymes further elucidate the structural basis of the specificities. The results highlight the potential of computational methods to guide experimental characterization of enzymes in an automated, large-scale fashion. PMID:22392983

  11. Specificity of Cryptococcus neoformans factor sera determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and dot enzyme assay.

    PubMed Central

    Belay, T; Cherniak, R; Shinoda, T

    1993-01-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a dot enzyme assay (DEA) were used to determine the specificities of Cryptococcus neoformans factor sera to serotype type-specific capsular polysaccharides, glucuronoxylomannans (GXMs). Pure and chemically characterized GXMs were obtained from representative isolates of C. neoformans serotypes A, B, C, and D. Distinctive specificity patterns and quantitative differences were observed for each factor serum when the selected GXMs were studied by ELISA. The specificity patterns for each factor serum determined by DEA almost completely paralleled the ELISA results. The serotype specificities demonstrated by ELISA and DEA were similar to previously reported results that were obtained by slide agglutination studies of whole cells. On the basis of the ELISA and DEA activity patterns, factor sera 5, 6, and 8 were specific for serotypes B, C, and D, respectively; factor serum 1 was strongly reactive to all serotypes; factor serum 2 was specific for serotypes A, B, and D; factor serum 3 was specific for serotypes A and D; and factor serum 4 was specific for serotypes B and C. The specificity of factor serum 7 for serotype A was demonstrated by DEA only. Structural variation was indicated among the serotype C isolates studied because a unique activity pattern versus factor serum 6 was observed for each isolate. The quantitative differences in the activity of the GXMs from five serotype C isolates suggest that mannopyranoside residues substituted O-2 and O-4 with xylose are essential elements of the determinant responsible for the observed activity of factor 6. No significant differences in activity patterns and specificities of factor serum 6 were observed when O-deacetylated GXMs were substituted for the native GXMs. Our results show that ELISA and DEA are valuable techniques for the serological analysis of cryptococcal factor sera and GXMs. Images PMID:7685739

  12. [Regularities of organ-specific expression of enzyme systems in cattle].

    PubMed

    Tatarenko, O F; Glazko, V I

    1992-01-01

    The organ specificity of creatine kinase, esterase, isocitrate dehydrogenase lactate dehydrogenase, nucleoside phosphorylase, adenylate kinase, hexokinase, malate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase of black-white cattle has been studied. Esterases, creatine kinase, adenylate kinase, hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have a very wide spectrum of the organ variabilities. Liver and heart have the largest specificity of enzymes activity. Some peculiarities of isozyme spectrum are found in ovaries and spleen.

  13. Testing of concurrent programs and partial specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, D.

    1982-12-01

    The testing problems of concurrent systems include those of sequential programs, but there are two additional difficulties: the scheduling of tasks may alter the behavior, making tests misleading; testing may be conducted at an early stage of development, by users who are not software experts. Concurrent process systems can be modeled by a collection of finite-state transducers, in a way that displays their unique problems. The specification languages PAISLey and Gist approach the definition of concurrent systems differently, but both permit users to execute partially defined systems. The declarative language PROLOG, although not explicitly designed for concurrent programming, exhibits similar characteristics. Prototype execution has some unexpected implications for testing, and for final implementation.

  14. Relationship of sequence and structure to specificity in the alpha-amylase family of enzymes.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, E A; Janecek, S; Svensson, B

    2001-03-09

    The hydrolases and transferases that constitute the alpha-amylase family are multidomain proteins, but each has a catalytic domain in the form of a (beta/alpha)(8)-barrel, with the active site being at the C-terminal end of the barrel beta-strands. Although the enzymes are believed to share the same catalytic acids and a common mechanism of action, they have been assigned to three separate families - 13, 70 and 77 - in the classification scheme for glycoside hydrolases and transferases that is based on amino acid sequence similarities. Each enzyme has one glutamic acid and two aspartic acid residues necessary for activity, while most enzymes of the family also contain two histidine residues critical for transition state stabilisation. These five residues occur in four short sequences conserved throughout the family, and within such sequences some key amino acid residues are related to enzyme specificity. A table is given showing motifs distinctive for each specificity as extracted from 316 sequences, which should aid in identifying the enzyme from primary structure information. Where appropriate, existing problems with identification of some enzymes of the family are pointed out. For enzymes of known three-dimensional structure, action is discussed in terms of molecular architecture. The sequence-specificity and structure-specificity relationships described may provide useful pointers for rational protein engineering.

  15. The programming language HAL: A specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    HAL accomplishes three significant objectives: (1) increased readability, through the use of a natural two-dimensional mathematical format; (2) increased reliability, by providing for selective recognition of common data and subroutines, and by incorporating specific data-protect features; (3) real-time control facility, by including a comprehensive set of real-time control commands and signal conditions. Although HAL is designed primarily for programming on-board computers, it is general enough to meet nearly all the needs in the production, verification and support of aerospace, and other real-time applications.

  16. MAIL LOG, program summary and specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    The summary and specifications to obtain the software package, MAIL LOG, developed for the Scout Project Automatic Data System, SPADS are provided. The MAIL LOG program has four modes of operation: (1) input - putting new records into the data base; (2) revise - changing or modifying existing records in the data base; (3) search - finding special records existing in the data base; and (4) archive - store or put away existing records in the data base. The output includes special printouts of records in the data base and results from the input and search modes.

  17. Specific and non-specific enzymes for furanosyl-containing conjugates: biosynthesis, metabolism, and chemo-enzymatic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chlubnova, Ilona; Legentil, Laurent; Dureau, Rémy; Pennec, Alizé; Almendros, Mélanie; Daniellou, Richard; Nugier-Chauvin, Caroline; Ferrières, Vincent

    2012-07-15

    There is no doubt now that the synthesis of compounds of varying complexity such as saccharides and derivatives thereof continuously grows with enzymatic methods. This review focuses on recent basic knowledge on enzymes specifically involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of furanosyl-containing polysaccharides and conjugates. Moreover, and when possible, biocatalyzed approaches, alternative to standard synthesis, will be detailed in order to strengthen the high potential of these biocatalysts to go further with the preparation of rare furanosides. Interesting results will be also proposed with chemo-enzymatic processes based on nonfuranosyl-specific enzymes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enzymic synthesis of steroid sulfates XVI. Specificity and regulation of human adrenal hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    Adams, J B; McDonald, D

    1983-05-01

    Pure hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (EC 2.8.2.2) of human adrenal glands possesses a wide substrate specificity towards steroids. This wide specificity has now been found to extend to simple alcohols; normal aliphatic alcohols from C3 onwards acting as substrates with C9 showing the highest rate. Increased rate was accompanied by a decrease in Km. In marked contrast to the sulfurylation of steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone, which exhibit wave-like kinetics, the kinetics with simple alcohols were of the normal Michaelis-Menten type. By means of enzyme antibody and enzyme stability studies evidence was provided that one and the same enzyme was responsible for sulfurylation of hydroxyls on the 3- and 17- positions of steroids and simple alcohols. The data lend support to previous evidence that the enzyme controls the secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate via steroid-specific binding sites, enabling self-regulation in response to ACTH action.

  19. Integrating Proteomics and Enzyme Kinetics Reveals Tissue-Specific Types of the Glycolytic and Gluconeogenic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Gizak, Agnieszka; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-08-07

    Glycolysis is the core metabolic pathway supplying energy to cells. Whereas the vast majority of studies focus on specific aspects of the process, global analyses characterizing simultaneously all enzymes involved in the process are scarce. Here, we demonstrate that quantitative label- and standard-free proteomics allows accurate determination of titers of metabolic enzymes and enables simultaneous measurements of titers and maximal enzymatic activities (Amax) of all glycolytic enzymes and the gluconeogenic fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase in mouse brain, liver and muscle. Despite occurrence of tissue-specific isoenzymes bearing different kinetic properties, the enzyme titers often correlated well with the Amax values. To provide a more general picture of energy metabolism, we analyzed titers of the enzymes in additional 7 mouse organs and in human cells. Across the analyzed samples, we identified two basic profiles: a "fast glucose uptake" one in brain and heart, and a "gluconeogenic rich" one occurring in liver. In skeletal muscles and other organs, we found intermediate profiles. Obtained data highlighted the glucose-flux-limiting role of hexokinase which activity was always 10- to 100-fold lower than the average activity of all other glycolytic enzymes. A parallel determination of enzyme titers and maximal enzymatic activities allowed determination of kcat values without enzyme purification. Results of our in-depth proteomic analysis of the mouse organs did not support the concepts of regulation of glycolysis by lysine acetylation.

  20. Zymographic approach to determine the intrinsic enzyme specific activity of diamine oxidase in presence of interfering enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ahmadifar, Samaneh; Le, Tien Canh; Marcocci, Lucia; Pietrangeli, Paola; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru

    2017-07-04

    The purpose of this investigation was to elaborate a fast zymographic assay of oxidase enzymes in the presence of interfering enzymes as catalase (which disturbs current dosages based on H2O2 detection). This method also allows the determination of intrinsic specific activity (ISA) of oxidases, such as diamine oxidase (DAO) or glucose oxidase (GOD). The SDS-PAGE gels with entrapped peroxidase have been obtained by polymerization of acrylamide and bis-acrylamide in the presence of horse-radish peroxidase. The entrapped peroxidase was uniformly distributed in the PolyacrylAmide (PAA) material and did not migrate during electrophoresis. The obtained PAA gels allow the electrophoretic separation of various oxidases from contaminating proteins. As an example, to reveal DAO, the resulting PAA-gel should be incubated after the electrophoretic run in the developing solution containing putrescine (a DAO substrate) and o-phenylenediamine (a HRP substrate) to give coloured bands on the gel in the presence of DAO-generated H2O2. The results showed that is possible to determine the DAO in the presence of interfering catalase because they migrate differently. Thus, the H2O2 released in situ by DAO is no more decomposed by catalase because of its different mobility. It was also found that the same electrophoretic gel, after zymography, can be restained by Coomassie Blue for quantitation of proteins corresponding to the zymographic bands. With the obtained enzyme units and protein concentration it is also possible to calculate the intrinsic specific activity of DAO directly from the intensities of enzyme bands in zymography and from those of protein bands (Coomassie Blue staining), quantified by densitometry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Interconversion of the Specificities of Human Lysosomal Enzymes Associated with Fabry and Schindler Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasic, Ivan B.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Clark, Nathaniel E.; Garman, Scott C.

    2010-09-03

    The human lysosomal enzymes {alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and {alpha}-N-acetylgalactosaminidase ({alpha}-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-GAL and {alpha}-NAGAL. The engineered {alpha}-GAL (which we call {alpha}-GALSA) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered {alpha}-NAGAL (which we call {alpha}-NAGAL{sup EL}) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the {alpha}-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} and {alpha}-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease.

  2. DNA-Linked Enzyme-Coupled Assay for Probing Glucosyltransferase Specificity.

    PubMed

    Sukovich, David J; Modavi, Cyrus; de Raad, Markus; Prince, Robin N; Anderson, J Christopher

    2015-07-17

    Traditional enzyme characterization methods are low-throughput and therefore limit engineering efforts in synthetic biology and biotechnology. Here, we propose a DNA-linked enzyme-coupled assay (DLEnCA) to monitor enzyme reactions in a high-throughput manner. Throughput is improved by removing the need for protein purification and by limiting the need for liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) product detection by linking enzymatic function to DNA modification. We demonstrate the DLEnCA methodology using glucosyltransferases as an illustration. The assay utilizes cell free transcription/translation systems to produce enzymes of interest, while UDP-glucose and T4-β-glucosyltransferase are used to modify DNA, which is detected postreaction using qPCR or a similar means of DNA analysis. OleD and two glucosyltransferases from Arabidopsis were used to verify the assay's generality toward glucosyltransferases. We further show DLEnCA's utility by mapping out the substrate specificity for these enzymes.

  3. 14 CFR 91.1017 - Amending program manager's management specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Amending program manager's management... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1017 Amending program manager's management specifications. (a... specifications; or (2) The program manager applies for the amendment of any management specifications, and the...

  4. Design of Peptide Substrate for Sensitively and Specifically Detecting Two Aβ-Degrading Enzymes: Neprilysin and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Ting; Chen, Chao-Long; Lin, Lilian Tsai-Wei; Lo, Chun-Hsien; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Chen, Rita P.-Y.; Wang, Steven S.-S.

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of neprilysin (NEP) to reduce Aβ accumulation in the brain is a promising strategy for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This report describes the design and synthesis of a quenched fluorogenic peptide substrate qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC (with the sequence VHHQKAAC), which has a fluorophore, Alexa-350, linked to the side-chain of its C-terminal cysteine and a quencher, Dabcyl, linked to its N-terminus. This peptide emitted strong fluorescence upon cleavage. Our results showed that qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC is more sensitive to NEP than the previously reported peptide substrates, so that concentrations of NEP as low as 0.03 nM could be detected at peptide concentration of 2 μM. Moreover, qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC had superior enzymatic specificity for both NEP and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), but was inert with other Aβ-degrading enzymes. This peptide, used in conjunction with a previously reported peptide substrate qf-Aβ(1–7)C [which is sensitive to NEP and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE)], could be used for high-throughput screening of compounds that only upregulate NEP. The experimental results of cell-based activity assays using both qf-Aβ(1–7)C and qf-Aβ(12–16)AAC as the substrates confirm that somatostatin treatment most likely upregulates IDE, but not NEP, in neuroblastoma cells. PMID:27096746

  5. Design of Peptide Substrate for Sensitively and Specifically Detecting Two Aβ-Degrading Enzymes: Neprilysin and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Ting; Chen, Chao-Long; Lin, Lilian Tsai-Wei; Lo, Chun-Hsien; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Chen, Rita P-Y; Wang, Steven S-S

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of neprilysin (NEP) to reduce Aβ accumulation in the brain is a promising strategy for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This report describes the design and synthesis of a quenched fluorogenic peptide substrate qf-Aβ(12-16)AAC (with the sequence VHHQKAAC), which has a fluorophore, Alexa-350, linked to the side-chain of its C-terminal cysteine and a quencher, Dabcyl, linked to its N-terminus. This peptide emitted strong fluorescence upon cleavage. Our results showed that qf-Aβ(12-16)AAC is more sensitive to NEP than the previously reported peptide substrates, so that concentrations of NEP as low as 0.03 nM could be detected at peptide concentration of 2 μM. Moreover, qf-Aβ(12-16)AAC had superior enzymatic specificity for both NEP and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), but was inert with other Aβ-degrading enzymes. This peptide, used in conjunction with a previously reported peptide substrate qf-Aβ(1-7)C [which is sensitive to NEP and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE)], could be used for high-throughput screening of compounds that only upregulate NEP. The experimental results of cell-based activity assays using both qf-Aβ(1-7)C and qf-Aβ(12-16)AAC as the substrates confirm that somatostatin treatment most likely upregulates IDE, but not NEP, in neuroblastoma cells.

  6. Simplified assays of lipolysis enzymes for drug discovery and specificity assessment of known inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Jose; Lamontagne, Julien; Erb, Heidi; Gezzar, Sari; Zhao, Shangang; Joly, Erik; Truong, Vouy Linh; Skorey, Kathryn; Crane, Sheldon; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are used as cellular building blocks and condensed energy stores and also act as signaling molecules. The glycerolipid/ fatty acid cycle, encompassing lipolysis and lipogenesis, generates many lipid signals. Reliable procedures are not available for measuring activities of several lipolytic enzymes for the purposes of drug screening, and this resulted in questionable selectivity of various known lipase inhibitors. We now describe simple assays for lipolytic enzymes, including adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), sn-1-diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL), monoacylglycerol lipase, α/β-hydrolase domain 6, and carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) using recombinant human and mouse enzymes either in cell extracts or using purified enzymes. We observed that many of the reported inhibitors lack specificity. Thus, Cay10499 (HSL inhibitor) and RHC20867 (DAGL inhibitor) also inhibit other lipases. Marked differences in the inhibitor sensitivities of human ATGL and HSL compared with the corresponding mouse enzymes was noticed. Thus, ATGListatin inhibited mouse ATGL but not human ATGL, and the HSL inhibitors WWL11 and Compound 13f were effective against mouse enzyme but much less potent against human enzyme. Many of these lipase inhibitors also inhibited human CES1. Results describe reliable assays for measuring lipase activities that are amenable for drug screening and also caution about the specificity of the many earlier described lipase inhibitors.

  7. Substrate Specificity and Diastereoselectivity of Strictosidine Glucosidase, a Key Enzyme in Monoterpene Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yerkes, Nancy; Wu, Jia; McCoy, Elizabeth; Galan, M. Carmen; Chen, Shi; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2008-01-01

    Strictosidine glucosidase (SGD) from Catharanthus roseus catalyzes the deglycosylation of strictosidine, an intermediate from which thousands of monoterpene indole alkaloids are derived. The steady state kinetics of SGD with a variety of strictosidine analogs revealed the substrate preferences of this enzyme at two key positions of the strictosidine substrate. Additionally, SGD from C. roseus turns over both strictosidine and its stereoisomer vincoside, indicating that although this enzyme prefers the naturally occurring diastereomer, the enzyme is not completely diastereoselective. The implications of the substrate specificity of SGD in metabolic engineering efforts of C. roseus are highlighted. PMID:18061449

  8. Substrate specificity and diastereoselectivity of strictosidine glucosidase, a key enzyme in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yerkes, Nancy; Wu, Jia Xin; McCoy, Elizabeth; Galan, M Carmen; Chen, Shi; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2008-05-15

    Strictosidine glucosidase (SGD) from Catharanthus roseus catalyzes the deglycosylation of strictosidine, an intermediate from which thousands of monoterpene indole alkaloids are derived. The steady-state kinetics of SGD with a variety of strictosidine analogs revealed the substrate preferences of this enzyme at two key positions of the strictosidine substrate. Additionally, SGD from C. roseus turns over both strictosidine and its stereoisomer vincoside, indicating that although this enzyme prefers the naturally occurring diastereomer, the enzyme is not completely diastereoselective. The implications of the substrate specificity of SGD in metabolic engineering efforts of C. roseus are highlighted.

  9. Directed evolution of cytochrome P450 enzymes for biocatalysis: exploiting the catalytic versatility of enzymes with relaxed substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Behrendorff, James B Y H; Huang, Weiliang; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2015-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are renowned for their ability to insert oxygen into an enormous variety of compounds with a high degree of chemo- and regio-selectivity under mild conditions. This property has been exploited in Nature for an enormous variety of physiological functions, and representatives of this ancient enzyme family have been identified in all kingdoms of life. The catalytic versatility of P450s makes them well suited for repurposing for the synthesis of fine chemicals such as drugs. Although these enzymes have not evolved in Nature to perform the reactions required for modern chemical industries, many P450s show relaxed substrate specificity and exhibit some degree of activity towards non-natural substrates of relevance to applications such as drug development. Directed evolution and other protein engineering methods can be used to improve upon this low level of activity and convert these promiscuous generalist enzymes into specialists capable of mediating reactions of interest with exquisite regio- and stereo-selectivity. Although there are some notable successes in exploiting P450s from natural sources in metabolic engineering, and P450s have been proven repeatedly to be excellent material for engineering, there are few examples to date of practical application of engineered P450s. The purpose of the present review is to illustrate the progress that has been made in altering properties of P450s such as substrate range, cofactor preference and stability, and outline some of the remaining challenges that must be overcome for industrial application of these powerful biocatalysts.

  10. Prediction of detailed enzyme functions and identification of specificity determining residues by random forests.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Chioko; Nagano, Nozomi; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Determining enzyme functions is essential for a thorough understanding of cellular processes. Although many prediction methods have been developed, it remains a significant challenge to predict enzyme functions at the fourth-digit level of the Enzyme Commission numbers. Functional specificity of enzymes often changes drastically by mutations of a small number of residues and therefore, information about these critical residues can potentially help discriminate detailed functions. However, because these residues must be identified by mutagenesis experiments, the available information is limited, and the lack of experimentally verified specificity determining residues (SDRs) has hindered the development of detailed function prediction methods and computational identification of SDRs. Here we present a novel method for predicting enzyme functions by random forests, EFPrf, along with a set of putative SDRs, the random forests derived SDRs (rf-SDRs). EFPrf consists of a set of binary predictors for enzymes in each CATH superfamily and the rf-SDRs are the residue positions corresponding to the most highly contributing attributes obtained from each predictor. EFPrf showed a precision of 0.98 and a recall of 0.89 in a cross-validated benchmark assessment. The rf-SDRs included many residues, whose importance for specificity had been validated experimentally. The analysis of the rf-SDRs revealed both a general tendency that functionally diverged superfamilies tend to include more active site residues in their rf-SDRs than in less diverged superfamilies, and superfamily-specific conservation patterns of each functional residue. EFPrf and the rf-SDRs will be an effective tool for annotating enzyme functions and for understanding how enzyme functions have diverged within each superfamily.

  11. Prediction of Detailed Enzyme Functions and Identification of Specificity Determining Residues by Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Chioko; Nagano, Nozomi; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Determining enzyme functions is essential for a thorough understanding of cellular processes. Although many prediction methods have been developed, it remains a significant challenge to predict enzyme functions at the fourth-digit level of the Enzyme Commission numbers. Functional specificity of enzymes often changes drastically by mutations of a small number of residues and therefore, information about these critical residues can potentially help discriminate detailed functions. However, because these residues must be identified by mutagenesis experiments, the available information is limited, and the lack of experimentally verified specificity determining residues (SDRs) has hindered the development of detailed function prediction methods and computational identification of SDRs. Here we present a novel method for predicting enzyme functions by random forests, EFPrf, along with a set of putative SDRs, the random forests derived SDRs (rf-SDRs). EFPrf consists of a set of binary predictors for enzymes in each CATH superfamily and the rf-SDRs are the residue positions corresponding to the most highly contributing attributes obtained from each predictor. EFPrf showed a precision of 0.98 and a recall of 0.89 in a cross-validated benchmark assessment. The rf-SDRs included many residues, whose importance for specificity had been validated experimentally. The analysis of the rf-SDRs revealed both a general tendency that functionally diverged superfamilies tend to include more active site residues in their rf-SDRs than in less diverged superfamilies, and superfamily-specific conservation patterns of each functional residue. EFPrf and the rf-SDRs will be an effective tool for annotating enzyme functions and for understanding how enzyme functions have diverged within each superfamily. PMID:24416252

  12. Cryoenzymology in mixed solvents without cosolvent effects on enzyme specific activity.

    PubMed Central

    Douzou, P; Balny, C

    1977-01-01

    Water-soluble polyelectrolytes in interaction with proteins are described. These polyelectrolytes make it possible to investigate enzyme-catalyzed reactions in cooled mixed solvents without the usual effects of their organic solvent component on enzyme specific activity. The applicability of techniques developed is illustrated by results obtained on several systems. The possibility of an electrostatic "sorting out" of solvents and its potentialities in cryoenzymology are discussed. PMID:18734

  13. Identification of a novel class of mammalian phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C enzymes.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Alan J; Mukherjee, Joy; Roberts, Scott J; Lester, Douglas; Farquharson, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Phosphoinositol (PhoIns)-specific phospholipase C enzymes (PLCs) are central to the inositol lipid signaling pathways and contribute to intracellular Ca2+ release and protein kinase C activation. Five distinct classes of PhoIns-specific PLCs are known to exist in mammals, which are activated by membrane receptor-mediated events. Here we have identified a sixth class of PhoIns-specific PLC with a novel domain structure, which we have termed PLC-eta. Two putative PLC-eta enzymes were identified in humans and in mice. Sequence analysis revealed that residues implicated in substrate binding and catalysis from other PhoIns-specific PLCs are conserved in the novel enzymes. PLC-eta enzymes are most closely related to the PLC-delta class and share a close evolutionary relationship with other PLC isozymes. EST analysis and RT-PCR data suggest that PLC-eta enzymes are expressed in several cell types and, by analogy with other mammalian PhoIns-specific PLCs, are likely to be involved in signal transduction pathways.

  14. Combining structure and sequence information allows automated prediction of substrate specificities within enzyme families.

    PubMed

    Röttig, Marc; Rausch, Christian; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2010-01-08

    An important aspect of the functional annotation of enzymes is not only the type of reaction catalysed by an enzyme, but also the substrate specificity, which can vary widely within the same family. In many cases, prediction of family membership and even substrate specificity is possible from enzyme sequence alone, using a nearest neighbour classification rule. However, the combination of structural information and sequence information can improve the interpretability and accuracy of predictive models. The method presented here, Active Site Classification (ASC), automatically extracts the residues lining the active site from one representative three-dimensional structure and the corresponding residues from sequences of other members of the family. From a set of representatives with known substrate specificity, a Support Vector Machine (SVM) can then learn a model of substrate specificity. Applied to a sequence of unknown specificity, the SVM can then predict the most likely substrate. The models can also be analysed to reveal the underlying structural reasons determining substrate specificities and thus yield valuable insights into mechanisms of enzyme specificity. We illustrate the high prediction accuracy achieved on two benchmark data sets and the structural insights gained from ASC by a detailed analysis of the family of decarboxylating dehydrogenases. The ASC web service is available at http://asc.informatik.uni-tuebingen.de/.

  15. Combining Structure and Sequence Information Allows Automated Prediction of Substrate Specificities within Enzyme Families

    PubMed Central

    Röttig, Marc; Rausch, Christian; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    An important aspect of the functional annotation of enzymes is not only the type of reaction catalysed by an enzyme, but also the substrate specificity, which can vary widely within the same family. In many cases, prediction of family membership and even substrate specificity is possible from enzyme sequence alone, using a nearest neighbour classification rule. However, the combination of structural information and sequence information can improve the interpretability and accuracy of predictive models. The method presented here, Active Site Classification (ASC), automatically extracts the residues lining the active site from one representative three-dimensional structure and the corresponding residues from sequences of other members of the family. From a set of representatives with known substrate specificity, a Support Vector Machine (SVM) can then learn a model of substrate specificity. Applied to a sequence of unknown specificity, the SVM can then predict the most likely substrate. The models can also be analysed to reveal the underlying structural reasons determining substrate specificities and thus yield valuable insights into mechanisms of enzyme specificity. We illustrate the high prediction accuracy achieved on two benchmark data sets and the structural insights gained from ASC by a detailed analysis of the family of decarboxylating dehydrogenases. The ASC web service is available at http://asc.informatik.uni-tuebingen.de/. PMID:20072606

  16. Enzyme cascades activated on topologically programmed DNA scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilner, Ofer I.; Weizmann, Yossi; Gill, Ron; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Freeman, Ronit; Willner, Itamar

    2009-04-01

    The ability of DNA to self-assemble into one-, two- and three-dimensional nanostructures, combined with the precision that is now possible when positioning nanoparticles or proteins on DNA scaffolds, provide a promising approach for the self-organization of composite nanostructures. Predicting and controlling the functions that emerge in self-organized biomolecular nanostructures is a major challenge in systems biology, and although a number of innovative examples have been reported, the emergent properties of systems in which enzymes are coupled together have not been fully explored. Here, we report the self-assembly of a DNA scaffold made of DNA strips that include `hinges' to which biomolecules can be tethered. We attach either two enzymes or a cofactor-enzyme pair to the scaffold, and show that enzyme cascades or cofactor-mediated biocatalysis can proceed effectively; similar processes are not observed in diffusion-controlled homogeneous mixtures of the same components. Furthermore, because the relative position of the two enzymes or the cofactor-enzyme pair is determined by the topology of the DNA scaffold, it is possible to control the reactivity of the system through the design of the individual DNA strips. This method could lead to the self-organization of complex multi-enzyme cascades.

  17. Specific point mutations in key redox enzymes are associated with chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Nicole M; Belotte, Jimmy; Saed, Mohammed G; Memaj, Ira; Diamond, Michael P; Morris, Robert T; Saed, Ghassan M

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer. Resistance to chemotherapy presents a significant challenge for ovarian cancer treatment. Specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in key redox enzymes have been associated with ovarian cancer survival and progression. The objective of this study was to determine whether chemotherapy induces point mutations in key redox enzymes that lead to the acquisition of chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Human EOC cell lines and their chemoresistant counterpart were utilized for this study. Specific SNPs in key redox enzymes were analyzed by TaqMan SNP Genotyping. Activities and levels of key redox enzymes were determined by real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and a greiss assay. Point mutations in key redox enzymes were introduced into sensitive EOC cells via the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Cell viability and IC50 for cisplatin were determined by the MTT Cell Proliferation Assay. Data was analyzed with SPSS using Student's two-tailed t-tests and One-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's or Tukey's post hoc tests, p<0.05. Here, we demonstrate that chemoresistant EOC cells are characterized by a further enhancement in oxidative stress as compared to sensitive counterparts. Additionally, chemoresistant EOC cells manifested specific point mutations, which are associated with altered enzymatic activity, in key redox enzymes that are not detected in sensitive counterparts. Supplementation of an antioxidant was able to successfully sensitize EOC cells to chemotherapeutics. Causality was established by the induction of these point mutations in sensitive EOC cells, which resulted in a significant increase in the level of chemoresistance. These findings indicate that chemotherapy induces specific point mutations in key redox enzymes that contribute to the acquisition of chemoresistance in EOC cells, highlighting a potential novel mechanism. Identification of targets for chemoresistance with either

  18. Comparison of enzyme and DNA analysis in a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, H. W.; Astrin, K. H.; Desnick, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (GM2 gangliosidosis, type 1; TSD) is an autosomal recessive GM2 gangliosidosis resulting from the deficient activity of the lysosomal hydrolase beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A). With a carrier frequency estimated at 1 in 25, it is a common lysosomal disorder in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Tay-Sachs disease has provided the prototype for the prevention of severe recessive genetic diseases. Molecular analysis of the Hex A gene (HEXA) of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals affected with Tay-Sachs disease revealed that three common mutations cause the infantile and adult onset forms of the disease; a four base insertion in exon 11, a splice junction mutation in intron 12 and a point mutation in exon 7 (G269S). A study was undertaken to determine whether mutation analysis would be useful in TSD screening programs in identifying carriers and clarifying the status of individuals whose enzyme assays are inconclusive. Ashkenazi Jewish individuals who had been diagnosed as carriers, inconclusives by enzyme assay and non-carriers with low normal enzyme levels in the Mount Sinai Tay-Sachs Disease Prevention Program were examined for the presence of the three mutations using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and allele specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization. The insertion mutation was present in 29 of 34 carriers and 2 of 36 inconclusive individuals, the splice junction mutation was found in 4 of 34 carriers and the G269S mutation was found in 1 of 34 carriers. Of the 313 non-carrier individuals with normal enzyme activity in the lower normal range, one was positive for the splice junction mutation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8343225

  19. Mechanism of sirtuin inhibition by nicotinamide: altering the NAD(+) cosubstrate specificity of a Sir2 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Avalos, José L; Bever, Katherine M; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2005-03-18

    Sir2 enzymes form a unique class of NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases required for diverse biological processes, including transcriptional silencing, regulation of apoptosis, fat mobilization, and lifespan regulation. Sir2 activity is regulated by nicotinamide, a noncompetitive inhibitor that promotes a base-exchange reaction at the expense of deacetylation. To elucidate the mechanism of nicotinamide inhibition, we determined ternary complex structures of Sir2 enzymes containing nicotinamide. The structures show that free nicotinamide binds in a conserved pocket that participates in NAD(+) binding and catalysis. Based on our structures, we engineered a mutant that deacetylates peptides by using nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NAAD) as a cosubstrate and is inhibited by nicotinic acid. The characteristics of the altered specificity enzyme establish that Sir2 enzymes contain a single site that participates in catalysis and nicotinamide regulation and provides additional insights into the Sir2 catalytic mechanism.

  20. Broad specification fuels combustion technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design and development efforts to evolve promising aircraft gas turbine combustor configurations for burning broadened-properties fuels were discussed. Design and experimental evaluations of three different combustor concepts in sector combustor rig tests was conducted. The combustor concepts were a state of the art single-annular combustor, a staged double-annular combustor, and a short single-annular combustor with variable geometry to control primary zone stoichiometry. A total of 25 different configurations of the three combustor concepts were evaluated. Testing was conducted over the full range of CF6-80A engine combustor inlet conditions, using four fuels containing between 12% and 14% hydrogen by weight. Good progress was made toward meeting specific program emissions and performance goals with each of the three combustor concepts. The effects of reduced fuel hydrogen content, including increased flame radiation, liner metal temperature, smoke, and NOx emissions were documented. The most significant effect on the baseline combustor was a projected 33% life reduction, for a reduction from 14% to 13% fuel hydrogen content, due to increased liner temperatures.

  1. Substrate Specificity Profiling of Histone-Modifying Enzymes by Peptide Microarray.

    PubMed

    Cornett, E M; Dickson, B M; Vaughan, R M; Krishnan, S; Trievel, R C; Strahl, B D; Rothbart, S B

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic addition and removal of covalent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) on histone proteins serves as a major mechanism regulating chromatin-templated biological processes in eukaryotic genomes. Histone PTMs and their combinations function by directly altering the physical structure of chromatin and as rheostats for effector protein interactions. In this chapter, we detail microarray-based methods for analyzing the substrate specificity of lysine methyltransferase and demethylase enzymes on immobilized synthetic histone peptides. Consistent with the "histone code" hypothesis, we reveal a strong influence of adjacent and, surprisingly, distant histone PTMs on the ability of histone-modifying enzymes to methylate or demethylate their substrates. This platform will greatly facilitate future investigations into histone substrate specificity and mechanisms of PTM signaling that regulate the catalytic properties of histone-modifying enzymes.

  2. Substrate Specificity Profiling of Histone-Modifying Enzymes by Peptide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Cornett, E.M.; Dickson, B.M.; Vaughan, R.M.; Krishnan, S.; Trievel, R.C.; Strahl, B.D.; Rothbart, S.B.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic addition and removal of covalent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) on histone proteins serves as a major mechanism regulating chromatin-templated biological processes in eukaryotic genomes. Histone PTMs and their combinations function by directly altering the physical structure of chromatin and as rheostats for effector protein interactions. In this chapter, we detail microarray-based methods for analyzing the substrate specificity of lysine methyltransferase and demethylase enzymes on immobilized synthetic histone peptides. Consistent with the “histone code” hypothesis, we reveal a strong influenceof adjacent and,surprisingly,distant histonePTMs onthe ability of histone-modifying enzymes to methylate or demethylate their substrates. This platform will greatly facilitate future investigations into histone substrate specificity and mechanisms of PTM signaling that regulate the catalytic properties of histone-modifying enzymes. PMID:27423856

  3. Vacuolar processing enzyme activates programmed cell death in the apical meristem inducing loss of apical dominance.

    PubMed

    Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Buskila, Yossi; Belausov, Eduard; Wolf, Dalia; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2017-10-01

    The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber is a swollen underground stem that can sprout in an apical dominance (AD) pattern. Bromoethane (BE) induces loss of AD and the accumulation of vegetative vacuolar processing enzyme (S. tuberosum vacuolar processing enzyme [StVPE]) in the tuber apical meristem (TAM). Vacuolar processing enzyme activity, induced by BE, is followed by programmed cell death in the TAM. In this study, we found that the mature StVPE1 (mVPE) protein exhibits specific activity for caspase 1, but not caspase 3 substrates. Optimal activity of mVPE was achieved at acidic pH, consistent with localization of StVPE1 to the vacuole, at the edge of the TAM. Downregulation of StVPE1 by RNA interference resulted in reduced stem branching and retained AD in tubers treated with BE. Overexpression of StVPE1 fused to green fluorescent protein showed enhanced stem branching after BE treatment. Our data suggest that, following stress, induction of StVPE1 in the TAM induces AD loss and stem branching. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Substrate specificity determinants of the methanogen homoaconitase enzyme: structure and function of the small subunit.

    PubMed

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Drevland, Randy M; Gayathri, Dasara Raju; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Graham, David E

    2010-03-30

    The aconitase family of hydro-lyase enzymes includes three classes of proteins that catalyze the isomerization of alpha-hydroxy acids to beta-hydroxy acids. Besides aconitase, isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI) proteins specifically catalyze the isomerization of alpha,beta-dicarboxylates with hydrophobic gamma-chain groups, and homoaconitase (HACN) proteins catalyze the isomerization of tricarboxylates with variable chain length gamma-carboxylate groups. These enzymes' stereospecific hydro-lyase activities make them attractive catalysts to produce diastereomers from unsaturated precursors. However, sequence similarity and convergent evolution among these proteins lead to widespread misannotation and uncertainty about gene function. To find the substrate specificity determinants of homologous IPMI and HACN proteins from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, the small-subunit HACN protein (MJ1271) was crystallized for X-ray diffraction. The structural model showed characteristic residues in a flexible loop region between alpha2 and alpha3 that distinguish HACN from IPMI and aconitase proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis of MJ1271 produced loop-region variant proteins that were reconstituted with wild-type MJ1003 large-subunit protein. The heteromers formed promiscuous hydro-lyases with reduced activity but broader substrate specificity. Both R26K and R26V variants formed relatively efficient IPMI enzymes, while the T27A variant had uniformly lower specificity constants for both IPMI and HACN substrates. The R26V T27Y variant resembles the MJ1277 IPMI small subunit in its flexible loop sequence but demonstrated the broad substrate specificity of the R26V variant. These mutations may reverse the evolution of HACN activity from an ancestral IPMI gene, demonstrating the evolutionary potential for promiscuity in hydro-lyase enzymes. Understanding these specificity determinants enables the functional reannotation of paralogous HACN and IPMI genes in numerous genome sequences. These

  5. Substrate specificity determinants of the methanogen homoaconitase enzyme: structure and function of small subunit residues

    SciTech Connect

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Drevland, Randy; Gayathri, Dasara; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Shinkai, Akeo; Graham, David E

    2010-01-01

    The aconitase family of hydro-lyase enzymes includes three classes of proteins that catalyze the isomerization of -hydroxyacids to -hydroxyacids. Besides aconitase, isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI) proteins specifically catalyze the isomerization of , -dicarboxylates with hydrophobic -chain groups, and homoaconitase (HACN) proteins catalyze the isomerization of tricarboxylates with variable chain length -carboxylate groups. These enzymes stereospecific hydro-lyase activities make them attractive catalysts to produce diastereomers from unsaturated precursors. However, sequence similarity and convergent evolution among these proteins leads to widespread misannotation and uncertainty about gene function. To find the substrate specificity determinants of homologous IPMI and HACN proteins from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, the small-subunit HACN protein (MJ1271) was crystallized for X-ray diffraction. The structural model showed characteristic residues in a flexible loop region between 2 and 3 that distinguish HACN from IPMI and aconitase proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis of MJ1271 produced loop-region variant proteins that were reconstituted with wild-type MJ1003 large-subunit protein. The heteromers formed promiscuous hydro-lyases with reduced activity but broader substrate specificity. Both R26K and R26V variants formed relatively efficient IPMI enzymes, while the T27A variant had uniformly lower specificity constants for both IPMI and HACN substrates. The R26V T27Y variant resembles the MJ1277 IPMI small subunit in its flexible loop sequence, but demonstrated the broad substrate specificity of the R26V variant. These mutations may reverse the evolution of HACN activity from an ancestral IPMI gene, demonstrating the evolutionary potential for promiscuity in hydro-lyase enzymes. Understanding these specificity determinants enables the functional reannotation of paralogous HACN and IPMI genes in numerous genome sequences. These structural and kinetic results will

  6. Development of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay to Detect Chicken Parvovirus Specific Antibodies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we report the development and application of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to detect parvovirus-specific antibodies in chicken sera. We used an approach previously described for other parvoviruses to clone and express viral structural proteins in insect cells from recombinant baculovirus...

  7. Engineered catalytic biofilms: Site-specific enzyme immobilization onto E. coli curli nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Botyanszki, Zsofia; Tay, Pei Kun R; Nguyen, Peter Q; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Joshi, Neel S

    2015-10-01

    Biocatalytic transformations generally rely on purified enzymes or whole cells to perform complex transformations that are used on industrial scale for chemical, drug, and biofuel synthesis, pesticide decontamination, and water purification. However, both of these systems have inherent disadvantages related to the costs associated with enzyme purification, the long-term stability of immobilized enzymes, catalyst recovery, and compatibility with harsh reaction conditions. We developed a novel strategy for producing rationally designed biocatalytic surfaces based on Biofilm Integrated Nanofiber Display (BIND), which exploits the curli system of E. coli to create a functional nanofiber network capable of covalent immobilization of enzymes. This approach is attractive because it is scalable, represents a modular strategy for site-specific enzyme immobilization, and has the potential to stabilize enzymes under denaturing environmental conditions. We site-specifically immobilized a recombinant α-amylase, fused to the SpyCatcher attachment domain, onto E. coli curli fibers displaying complementary SpyTag capture domains. We characterized the effectiveness of this immobilization technique on the biofilms and tested the stability of immobilized α-amylase in unfavorable conditions. This enzyme-modified biofilm maintained its activity when exposed to a wide range of pH and organic solvent conditions. In contrast to other biofilm-based catalysts, which rely on high cellular metabolism, the modified curli-based biofilm remained active even after cell death due to organic solvent exposure. This work lays the foundation for a new and versatile method of using the extracellular polymeric matrix of E. coli for creating novel biocatalytic surfaces. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A computer program for enzyme kinetics that combines model discrimination, parameter refinement and sequential experimental design.

    PubMed Central

    Franco, R; Gavaldà, M T; Canela, E I

    1986-01-01

    A method of model discrimination and parameter estimation in enzyme kinetics is proposed. The experimental design and analysis of the model are carried out simultaneously and the stopping rule for experimentation is deduced by the experimenter when the probabilities a posteriori indicate that one model is clearly superior to the rest. A FORTRAN77 program specifically developed for joint designs is given. The method is very powerful, as indicated by its usefulness in the discrimination between models. For example, it has been successfully applied to three cases of enzyme kinetics (a single-substrate Michaelian reaction with product inhibition, a single-substrate complex reaction and a two-substrate reaction). By using this method the most probable model and the estimates of the parameters can be obtained in one experimental session. The FORTRAN77 program is deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50134 (19 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1986) 233, 5. PMID:3800965

  9. Structure, specificity and function of cyclomaltodextrinase, a multispecific enzyme of the alpha-amylase family.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Kim, T J; Cheong, T K; Kim, J W; Oh, B H; Svensson, B

    2000-05-23

    Cyclomaltodextrinase (CDase, EC 3.2.1.54), maltogenic amylase (EC 3. 2.1.133), and neopullulanase (EC 3.2.1.135) are reported to be capable of hydrolyzing all or two of the following three types of substrates: cyclomaltodextrins (CDs); pullulan; and starch. These enzymes hydrolyze CDs and starch to maltose and pullulan to panose by cleavage of alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds whereas alpha-amylases essentially lack activity on CDs and pullulan. They also catalyze transglycosylation of oligosaccharides to the C3-, C4- or C6-hydroxyl groups of various acceptor sugar molecules. The present review surveys the biochemical, enzymatic, and structural properties of three types of such enzymes as defined based on the substrate specificity toward the CDs: type I, cyclomaltodextrinase and maltogenic amylase that hydrolyze CDs much faster than pullulan and starch; type II, Thermoactinomyces vulgaris amylase II (TVA II) that hydrolyzes CDs much less efficiently than pullulan; and type III, neopullulanase that hydrolyzes pullulan efficiently, but remains to be reported to hydrolyze CDs. These three types of enzymes exhibit 40-60% amino acid sequence identity. They occur in the cytoplasm of bacteria and have molecular masses from 62 to 90 kDa which are slightly larger than those of most alpha-amylases. Multiple amino acid sequence alignment and crystal structures of maltogenic amylase and TVA II reveal the presence of an N-terminal extension of approximately 130 residues not found in alpha-amylases. This unique N-terminal domain as seen in the crystal structures apparently contributes to the active site structure leading to the distinct substrate specificity through a dimer formation. In aqueous solution, most of these enzymes show a monomer-dimer equilibrium. The present review discusses the multiple specificity in the light of the oligomerization and the molecular structures arriving at a clarified enzyme classification. Finally, a physiological role of the enzymes is proposed.

  10. Effects of dissolved oxygen on glycolytic enzyme specific activities in liver and skeletal muscle of Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Abbaraju, Naga V; Rees, Bernard B

    2012-06-01

    Many aquatic habitats are characterized by variable concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), and fish that occur in these habitats respond to changes in DO through behavioral, physiological, and biochemical adjustments. The goal of the present study was to measure the effects of an ecologically relevant range of DO treatments, from severe hypoxia to moderate hyperoxia, on the maximal activities of nine glycolytic enzymes during chronic exposure of the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus. Over the 28 days of exposure period, specific activity was significantly affected by DO for three enzymes in liver and one enzyme in white skeletal muscle, although at specific times of exposure three other muscle enzymes were affected by DO. In general, exposure of fish to severe hypoxia led to higher specific activities in liver, but lower specific activities in skeletal muscle. Exposure to hyperoxia did not elicit changes in enzyme specific activities in either tissue. Surprisingly, exposure duration had strong effects on glycolytic enzyme specific activities in both liver and white skeletal muscle, with specific activities increasing with exposure duration regardless of DO treatment. The results demonstrate that the effects of DO on enzyme specific activities were restricted to a subset of the glycolytic enzymes in liver and white skeletal muscle of F. heteroclitus and that the directions of the changes were opposite in these two tissues. These observations suggest that the mechanisms resulting in these alterations are enzyme- and tissue specific, rather than applying uniformly to all enzymes within the glycolytic pathway.

  11. The effect of enzyme and substrate levels on the specific hydrolysis rate of pretreated poplar wood

    SciTech Connect

    Nutor, J.R.K.; Converse, A.O.

    1991-12-31

    The hydrolysis of pretreated poplar wood was carried out with initial concentrations of 1.26, 2.52, 5.04 mg protein/mL of GC123 Trichoderma reesei cellulose and substrate concentrations of 2.5% w/v, 5% w/v, and 10% w/v at pH 4.8 and 40{degrees}C. The concentration of enzyme protein remaining in solution, the glucose concentration, and the total potential glucose concentrations were measured as a function of time during the hydrolysis. The enzyme rapidly adsorbed initially, reaching a maximum in about 30 min. About 55-75% of the cellulose returned to solution as the remaining cellulose was hydrolyzed. Dilution of the unhydrolyzed residue, largely lignin, did not cause additional desorption of the cellulose. The specific hydrolysis rate (i.e., the rate/amount of adsorbed enzyme) declined significantly with increased conversion, even when corrected for glucose inhibition. At a given initial substrate concentration, the specific rate was found to be largely independent of the total enzyme concentration. However, at a given fractional conversion, the specific rate was found to be reduced by increased substrate concentration.

  12. SigrafW: An Easy-to-Use Program for Fitting Enzyme Kinetic Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leone, Francisco Assis; Baranauskas, Jose Augusto; Furriel, Rosa Prazeres Melo; Borin, Ivana Aparecida

    2005-01-01

    SigrafW is Windows-compatible software developed using the Microsoft[R] Visual Basic Studio program that uses the simplified Hill equation for fitting kinetic data from allosteric and Michaelian enzymes. SigrafW uses a modified Fibonacci search to calculate maximal velocity (V), the Hill coefficient (n), and the enzyme-substrate apparent…

  13. SigrafW: An Easy-to-Use Program for Fitting Enzyme Kinetic Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leone, Francisco Assis; Baranauskas, Jose Augusto; Furriel, Rosa Prazeres Melo; Borin, Ivana Aparecida

    2005-01-01

    SigrafW is Windows-compatible software developed using the Microsoft[R] Visual Basic Studio program that uses the simplified Hill equation for fitting kinetic data from allosteric and Michaelian enzymes. SigrafW uses a modified Fibonacci search to calculate maximal velocity (V), the Hill coefficient (n), and the enzyme-substrate apparent…

  14. Programming Bacteriophages by Swapping Their Specificity Determinants.

    PubMed

    Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2015-12-01

    Bacteriophages, bacteria's natural enemies, may serve as potent antibacterial agents. Their specificity for certain bacterial sub-species limits their effectiveness, but allows selective targeting of bacteria. Lu and colleagues present a platform for such targeting through alteration of bacteriophages' host specificity by swapping specificity domains in their host-recognition ligand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biovar-specific epitopes of the urease enzyme of Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, C R; Henrich, B; Hadding, U

    1996-11-01

    The importance of Ureaplasma urealyticum as a pathogen in premature neonates and patients with a profound defect in humoral immunity has, over the last few years, become well recognised. U. urealyticum is unique amongst the Mycoplasmataceae for its use of urea metabolism as an essential source of energy. The urease enzyme responsible for this is, therefore, of prime importance and any variability in expression of this enzyme may play a role in virulence of the organism. U. urealyticum is divided into 14 serovars comprising two biovars -- the parvo-biovar and T960-biovar. In this study monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against the urease enzyme. Two distinct epitopes of the 72-kDa alpha-subunit were recognised by three different MAbs. Under denaturing conditions both epitopes were shown to be specific for the parvo-biovar.

  16. Specification and Error Pattern Based Program Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Johnson, Scott; Rosu, Grigore; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We briefly present Java PathExplorer (JPAX), a tool developed at NASA Ames for monitoring the execution of Java programs. JPAX can be used not only during program testing to reveal subtle errors, but also can be applied during operation to survey safety critical systems. The tool facilitates automated instrumentation of a program in order to properly observe its execution. The instrumentation can be either at the bytecode level or at the source level when the source code is available. JPaX is an instance of a more general project, called PathExplorer (PAX), which is a basis for experiments rather than a fixed system, capable of monitoring various programming languages and experimenting with other logics and analysis techniques

  17. Positive dermal hypersensitivity and specific antibodies in workers exposed to bio-engineered enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, R.E.; Henningsen, G.M.; Driscoll, R.; MacKenzie, B.A.; Wilcox, T.; Scinto, J.D.; Bernstein, D.M.; Swanson, M. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN )

    1991-03-15

    Thirty-six employees who produced industrial enzymes from bio-engineered strains of bacteria and fungi were evaluated by skin prick testing and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays for specific IgE and IgG antibodies. The workers complained of asthma- and flu-like' symptoms which generally lessened away from work. The enzymes evaluated were {alpha}-amylase from A. niger (ind-AAN), B. licheniformis (ind-AAL) and B. subtilis (ind-AAS); purified {alpha}-amylase from B. subtilis (AAS) and A. niger (AAN); alkaline protease from B. licheniformis (ind-APL) and purified alkaline protease (APL); amylase glucosidase from A. niger (ind-AGN) and purified amylase glucosidase (AGN). Significantly positive skin tests were found for APL, AGN and ind-AAN. Significantly elevated specific IgE results were observed for AAN, AGN, and ind-AAN; elevated specific IgGs were observed for AAN, ind-AAN, ind-AAS, ind-AAL and ind-AGN. Radioimmunoassays of air filter samples (using sera with high Ab titers) for 4 of the ind-enzymes showed only ind-AAN at extremely high environmental levels. These results indicate that occupational exposure to some ind-enzymes causes immediate onset dermal hypersensitivity reactions. The results are equivocal as to whether these reactions are IgE mediated, as IgE titers were low. Contrary to this, IgG titers were extremely high and suggest that these biomarkers can be used as indicators of both individual exposure and environmental analyses.

  18. Chitinosanase: A fungal chitosan hydrolyzing enzyme with a new and unusually specific cleavage pattern.

    PubMed

    Kohlhoff, Markus; Niehues, Anna; Wattjes, Jasper; Bénéteau, Julie; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; El Gueddari, Nour Eddine; Bernard, Frank; Rivera-Rodriguez, Gustavo R; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2017-10-15

    The biological activities of partially acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (paCOS) depend on their degree of polymerization (DP), fraction of acetylation (FA), and potentially their pattern of acetylation (PA). Therefore, analyzing structure-function relationships require fully defined paCOS, but these are currently unavailable. A promising approach for obtaining at least partially defined paCOS is using chitosanolytic enzymes. Here we purified and characterized a novel chitosan-hydrolyzing enzyme from the fungus Alternaria alternata possessing an absolute cleavage specificity, yielding fully defined paCOS. It cleaves specifically after GlcN-GlcNAc pairs and is most active towards moderately acetylated chitosans, but shows no activity against fully acetylated or fully deacetylated substrates. These unique properties match neither those of chitinases nor chitosanases. Therefore, the enzyme represents the first member of a new class of chitosanolytic enzymes that will allow for the production of fully defined paCOS. Additionally, it represents a highly valuable tool for fingerprinting analyses of chitosan polymers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Substrate specificities of hybrid naphthalene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene dioxygenase enzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Parales, R E; Emig, M D; Lynch, N A; Gibson, D T

    1998-05-01

    Bacterial three-component dioxygenase systems consist of reductase and ferredoxin components which transfer electrons from NAD(P)H to a terminal oxygenase. In most cases, the oxygenase consists of two different subunits (alpha and beta). To assess the contributions of the alpha and beta subunits of the oxygenase to substrate specificity, hybrid dioxygenase enzymes were formed by coexpressing genes from two compatible plasmids in Escherichia coli. The activities of hybrid naphthalene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene dioxygenases containing four different beta subunits were tested with four substrates (indole, naphthalene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and 2-nitrotoluene). In the active hybrids, replacement of small subunits affected the rate of product formation but had no effect on the substrate range, regiospecificity, or enantiomeric purity of oxidation products with the substrates tested. These studies indicate that the small subunit of the oxygenase is essential for activity but does not play a major role in determining the specificity of these enzymes.

  20. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-07

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.

  1. Substrate Specificities of Hybrid Naphthalene and 2,4-Dinitrotoluene Dioxygenase Enzyme Systems

    PubMed Central

    Parales, Rebecca E.; Emig, Matthew D.; Lynch, Nancy A.; Gibson, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial three-component dioxygenase systems consist of reductase and ferredoxin components which transfer electrons from NAD(P)H to a terminal oxygenase. In most cases, the oxygenase consists of two different subunits (α and β). To assess the contributions of the α and β subunits of the oxygenase to substrate specificity, hybrid dioxygenase enzymes were formed by coexpressing genes from two compatible plasmids in Escherichia coli. The activities of hybrid naphthalene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene dioxygenases containing four different β subunits were tested with four substrates (indole, naphthalene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and 2-nitrotoluene). In the active hybrids, replacement of small subunits affected the rate of product formation but had no effect on the substrate range, regiospecificity, or enantiomeric purity of oxidation products with the substrates tested. These studies indicate that the small subunit of the oxygenase is essential for activity but does not play a major role in determining the specificity of these enzymes. PMID:9573183

  2. Rethinking Assessment in an Indigenous Specific Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleet, Alma; Kitson, Rosalind

    2009-01-01

    Nonstandard entry programs into higher education include worthy goals and problematic processes. Although effective practices in teacher education would seem to be well established, complications arise when good intentions intersect with university protocols, issues of power, history, rights, and cultural complexities. This article reports on an…

  3. Evolution of substrate specificity in a recipient's enzyme following horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Noda-García, Lianet; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R; Medina-Ruíz, Sofía; Gaytán, Paul; Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Fülöp, Vilmos; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2013-09-01

    Despite the prominent role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in shaping bacterial metabolism, little is known about the impact of HGT on the evolution of enzyme function. Specifically, what is the influence of a recently acquired gene on the function of an existing gene? For example, certain members of the genus Corynebacterium have horizontally acquired a whole l-tryptophan biosynthetic operon, whereas in certain closely related actinobacteria, for example, Mycobacterium, the trpF gene is missing. In Mycobacterium, the function of the trpF gene is performed by a dual-substrate (βα)8 phosphoribosyl isomerase (priA gene) also involved in l-histidine (hisA gene) biosynthesis. We investigated the effect of a HGT-acquired TrpF enzyme upon PriA's substrate specificity in Corynebacterium through comparative genomics and phylogenetic reconstructions. After comprehensive in vivo and enzyme kinetic analyses of selected PriA homologs, a novel (βα)8 isomerase subfamily with a specialized function in l-histidine biosynthesis, termed subHisA, was confirmed. X-ray crystallography was used to reveal active-site mutations in subHisA important for narrowing of substrate specificity, which when mutated to the naturally occurring amino acid in PriA led to gain of function. Moreover, in silico molecular dynamic analyses demonstrated that the narrowing of substrate specificity of subHisA is concomitant with loss of ancestral protein conformational states. Our results show the importance of HGT in shaping enzyme evolution and metabolism.

  4. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the QD-based DNA Nanosensor. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06326d

  5. Specifications and programs for computer software validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, J. C.; Kleir, R.; Davis, T.; Henneman, M.; Haller, A.; Lasseter, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Three software products developed during the study are reported and include: (1) FORTRAN Automatic Code Evaluation System, (2) the Specification Language System, and (3) the Array Index Validation System.

  6. Structure of a Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like Enzyme with an Active Site Specific to the Plant Family Brassicaceae

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Bastian; Wallner, Silvia; Steiner, Barbara; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Kumar, Prashant; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Sensen, Christoph W.; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Berberine bridge enzyme-like (BBE-like) proteins form a multigene family (pfam 08031), which is present in plants, fungi and bacteria. They adopt the vanillyl alcohol-oxidase fold and predominantly show bi-covalent tethering of the FAD cofactor to a cysteine and histidine residue, respectively. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome was recently shown to contain genes coding for 28 BBE-like proteins, while featuring four distinct active site compositions. We determined the structure of a member of the AtBBE-like protein family (termed AtBBE-like 28), which has an active site composition that has not been structurally and biochemically characterized thus far. The most salient and distinguishing features of the active site found in AtBBE-like 28 are a mono-covalent linkage of a histidine to the 8α-position of the flavin-isoalloxazine ring and the lack of a second covalent linkage to the 6-position, owing to the replacement of a cysteine with a histidine. In addition, the structure reveals the interaction of a glutamic acid (Glu426) with an aspartic acid (Asp369) at the active site, which appear to share a proton. This arrangement leads to the delocalization of a negative charge at the active site that may be exploited for catalysis. The structure also indicates a shift of the position of the isoalloxazine ring in comparison to other members of the BBE-like family. The dioxygen surrogate chloride was found near the C(4a) position of the isoalloxazine ring in the oxygen pocket, pointing to a rapid reoxidation of reduced enzyme by dioxygen. A T-DNA insertional mutant line for AtBBE-like 28 results in a phenotype, that is characterized by reduced biomass and lower salt stress tolerance. Multiple sequence analysis showed that the active site composition found in AtBBE-like 28 is only present in the Brassicaceae, suggesting that it plays a specific role in the metabolism of this plant family. PMID:27276217

  7. Structure of a Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like Enzyme with an Active Site Specific to the Plant Family Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Bastian; Wallner, Silvia; Steiner, Barbara; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Kumar, Prashant; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Sensen, Christoph W; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Berberine bridge enzyme-like (BBE-like) proteins form a multigene family (pfam 08031), which is present in plants, fungi and bacteria. They adopt the vanillyl alcohol-oxidase fold and predominantly show bi-covalent tethering of the FAD cofactor to a cysteine and histidine residue, respectively. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome was recently shown to contain genes coding for 28 BBE-like proteins, while featuring four distinct active site compositions. We determined the structure of a member of the AtBBE-like protein family (termed AtBBE-like 28), which has an active site composition that has not been structurally and biochemically characterized thus far. The most salient and distinguishing features of the active site found in AtBBE-like 28 are a mono-covalent linkage of a histidine to the 8α-position of the flavin-isoalloxazine ring and the lack of a second covalent linkage to the 6-position, owing to the replacement of a cysteine with a histidine. In addition, the structure reveals the interaction of a glutamic acid (Glu426) with an aspartic acid (Asp369) at the active site, which appear to share a proton. This arrangement leads to the delocalization of a negative charge at the active site that may be exploited for catalysis. The structure also indicates a shift of the position of the isoalloxazine ring in comparison to other members of the BBE-like family. The dioxygen surrogate chloride was found near the C(4a) position of the isoalloxazine ring in the oxygen pocket, pointing to a rapid reoxidation of reduced enzyme by dioxygen. A T-DNA insertional mutant line for AtBBE-like 28 results in a phenotype, that is characterized by reduced biomass and lower salt stress tolerance. Multiple sequence analysis showed that the active site composition found in AtBBE-like 28 is only present in the Brassicaceae, suggesting that it plays a specific role in the metabolism of this plant family.

  8. Prediction and experimental validation of enzyme substrate specificity in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shivas R.; Erdin, Serkan; Ward, R. Matthew; Lua, Rhonald C.; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Structural Genomics aims to elucidate protein structures to identify their functions. Unfortunately, the variation of just a few residues can be enough to alter activity or binding specificity and limit the functional resolution of annotations based on sequence and structure; in enzymes, substrates are especially difficult to predict. Here, large-scale controls and direct experiments show that the local similarity of five or six residues selected because they are evolutionarily important and on the protein surface can suffice to identify an enzyme activity and substrate. A motif of five residues predicted that a previously uncharacterized Silicibacter sp. protein was a carboxylesterase for short fatty acyl chains, similar to hormone-sensitive-lipase–like proteins that share less than 20% sequence identity. Assays and directed mutations confirmed this activity and showed that the motif was essential for catalysis and substrate specificity. We conclude that evolutionary and structural information may be combined on a Structural Genomics scale to create motifs of mixed catalytic and noncatalytic residues that identify enzyme activity and substrate specificity. PMID:24145433

  9. Prediction and experimental validation of enzyme substrate specificity in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shivas R; Erdin, Serkan; Ward, R Matthew; Lua, Rhonald C; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2013-11-05

    Structural Genomics aims to elucidate protein structures to identify their functions. Unfortunately, the variation of just a few residues can be enough to alter activity or binding specificity and limit the functional resolution of annotations based on sequence and structure; in enzymes, substrates are especially difficult to predict. Here, large-scale controls and direct experiments show that the local similarity of five or six residues selected because they are evolutionarily important and on the protein surface can suffice to identify an enzyme activity and substrate. A motif of five residues predicted that a previously uncharacterized Silicibacter sp. protein was a carboxylesterase for short fatty acyl chains, similar to hormone-sensitive-lipase-like proteins that share less than 20% sequence identity. Assays and directed mutations confirmed this activity and showed that the motif was essential for catalysis and substrate specificity. We conclude that evolutionary and structural information may be combined on a Structural Genomics scale to create motifs of mixed catalytic and noncatalytic residues that identify enzyme activity and substrate specificity.

  10. Demonstration of specific neuronal cell groups in rat brain by beta-galactosidase enzyme histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Hatton, J D; Lin, L

    1992-12-01

    beta-Galactosidase activity as illuminated by the indigogenic X-gal staining method has been used to demonstrate the presence of genetically modified cells carrying the reporter gene lacZ, coding for the E. coli enzyme. Endogenous activity has been assumed to be minimal since the pH optimum for the mammalian enzyme is 3.5-5.5, while the pH optimum for the E. coli enzyme (and thus of the staining procedure usually employed) is 7.3. Background staining has been reported to be limited to pericytes and a few specific neuronal cell groups. In contrast, our investigations of normal rat brain anatomy demonstrate that many specific neuronal cell groups possess endogenous beta-galactosidase activity when staining is performed at physiological pH. This suggests that background staining of endogenous beta-galactosidase activity in the rat brain has been underestimated. In addition, such specific activity would afford an additional means of identification and illustration of these cells.

  11. Specific xyloglucanases as a new class of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Grishutin, Sergey G; Gusakov, Alexander V; Markov, Alexander V; Ustinov, Boris B; Semenova, Margarita V; Sinitsyn, Arkady P

    2004-11-01

    Three specific xyloglucanases (XGs) were isolated from Aspergillus japonicus (32 kDa, pI 2.8), Chrysosporium lucknowense (78 kDa, pI 3.8) and Trichoderma reesei (75-105 kDa, pI 4.1-4.3). The characteristic feature of these enzymes was their high specific activity toward tamarind xyloglucan, whereas the activity against carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and barley beta-glucan was absent or very low. Peptide mass fingerprinting using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry showed that the T. reesei XG represents Cel74A, whose gene has been discovered recently (GenBank accession no. AY281371 ), but the enzyme has not been characterized and described elsewhere. Tryptic peptides from A. japonicus and C. lucknowense xyloglucanases did not show any identity to those from known glycoside hydrolases. All enzymes produced XXXG, XXLG/XLXG and XLLG oligosaccharides as the end products of xyloglucan hydrolysis. A. japonicus XG displayed an endo-type of attack on the polymeric substrate, while the mode of action of two other xyloglucanases was similar to the exo-type, when oligosaccharides containing four glucose residues in the main chain were split off the ends of xyloglucan molecules. These results together with growing literature data allow concluding that specific xyloglucanases may represent a new class of glycoside hydrolases, which are different from regular endo-1,4-beta-glucanases.

  12. Specificity of non-Michaelis-Menten enzymes: necessary information for analyzing metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cornish-Bowden, Athel; Cárdenas, María Luz

    2010-12-16

    The specificity of an enzyme obeying the Michaelis−Menten equation is normally measured by comparing the kcat/Km for different substrates, but this is inappropriate for enzymes with a Hill coefficient h different from 1. The obvious alternative of generalizing Km in the expression as K0.5, the substrate concentration for half-saturation, is better, but it is not entirely satisfactory either, and here we show that kcat/K0.5(h) gives satisfactory results for analyzing the kinetic behavior of metabolic pathways. The importance of using kcat/K0.5(h) increases with the value of h, but even when h is small, it makes an appreciable difference, as illustrated for the mammalian hexokinases. Reinterpretation of data for the specificity of these enzymes in terms of the proposed definition indicates that hexokinase D, often believed highly specific for glucose, and accordingly called “glucokinase”, actually has the lowest preference for glucose over fructose of the four isoenzymes found in mammals.

  13. Sex-specificity in transgenerational epigenetic programming.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Gregory A; Morgan, Christopher P; Bale, Tracy L

    2011-03-01

    Prenatal programming of the epigenome is a critical determinant in offspring outcome and stands at the interface between environment and genetics. Maternal experiences such as stress and obesity are associated with a host of neurodevelopmental and metabolic diseases, some of which have been characterized into the second and third generations. The mechanism through which determinants such as maternal diet or stress contribute to disease development likely involves a complex interaction between the maternal environment, placental changes, and epigenetic programming of the embryo. While we have begun to more fully appreciate and explore the epigenome in determination of disease risk, we know little as to the contribution embryo sex makes in epigenetic regulation. This review discusses the importance of sex differences in the transmission and inheritance of traits that are generated in the prenatal environment using models of maternal stress and diet.

  14. Specificity of a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Aspergillus galactomannan.

    PubMed Central

    Swanink, C M; Meis, J F; Rijs, A J; Donnelly, J P; Verweij, P E

    1997-01-01

    The specificity of a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting Aspergillus galactomannan was tested with exoantigens of 29 fungi cultured from clinical specimens. Cross-reactivity was observed with Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium digitatum, and Paecilomyces variotii. Furthermore, 40 serum samples obtained from bacteremic patients with hematologic malignancies were retrospectively tested by sandwich ELISA. False-positive reactions with the serum were reproducible but did not correspond with the results of culture of specific microorganisms. Moreover, the microorganisms cultured from the blood showed no reactivity by the sandwich ELISA. PMID:8968919

  15. Induction Specificity and Catabolite Repression of the Early Enzymes in Camphor Degradation by Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Hartline, Richard A.; Gunsalus, I. C.

    1971-01-01

    The ability of bornane and substituted bornanes to induce the early enzymes for d(+)-camphor degradation and control of these enzymes by catabolite repression were studied in a strain of a Pseudomonas putida. Bornane and 20 substituted bornane compounds showed induction. Of these 21 compounds, bornane and 8 of the substituted bornanes provided induction without supporting growth. Oxygen, but not nitrogen, enhanced the inductive potency of the unsubstituted bornane ring. All bornanedione isomers caused induction, and those with substituents on each of the three consecutive carbon atoms, including the methyl group at the bridgehead carbon, showed induction without supporting growth. Although it was not possible to obtain experimental data for a case of absolute gratuitous induction by compounds not supporting growth, indirect evidence in support of gratuitous induction is presented. It is proposed that the ability of P. putida to tolerate the unusually high degree of possible gratuitous induction observed for camphor catabolism may be related to the infrequent occurrence of bicyclic ring structures in nature. Survival of an organism with a broad specificity for gratuitous induction is discussed. Glucose and succinate, but not glutamate, produced catabolite repression of the early camphor-degrading enzymes. Pathway enzymes differ in their degree of sensitivity to succinate-provoked catabolite repression. The ability of a compound to produce catabolite repression is not, however, directly related to the duration of the lag period (diauxic lag) between growth on camphor and growth on the repressing compound. PMID:5573731

  16. Quantitative Site-Specific Phosphoproteomics of Trichoderma reesei Signaling Pathways upon Induction of Hydrolytic Enzyme Production.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Yadav, Avinash; Saloheimo, Markku; Corthals, Garry L; Pakula, Tiina M

    2016-02-05

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is used for industrial production of secreted enzymes including carbohydrate active enzymes, such as cellulases and hemicellulases. The production of many of these enzymes by T. reesei is influenced by the carbon source it grows on, where the regulation system controlling hydrolase genes involves various signaling pathways. T. reesei was cultivated in the presence of sorbitol, a carbon source that does not induce the production of cellulases and hemicellulases, and then exposed to either sophorose or spent-grain extract, which are efficient inducers of the enzyme production. Specific changes at phosphorylation sites were investigated in relation to the production of cellulases and hemicellulases using an MS-based framework. Proteome-wide phosphorylation following carbon source exchange was investigated in the early stages of induction: 0, 2, 5, and 10 min. The workflow involved sequential trypsin digestion, TiO2 enrichment, and MS analysis using a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. We report on the identification and quantitation of 1721 phosphorylation sites. Investigation of the data revealed a complex signaling network activated upon induction involving components related to light-mediated cellulase induction, osmoregulation, and carbon sensing. Changes in protein phosphorylation were detected in the glycolytic pathway, suggesting an inhibition of glucose catabolism at 10 min after the addition of sophorose and as early as 2 min after the addition of spent-grain extract. Differential phosphorylation of factors related to carbon storage, intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton, and cellulase gene regulation were also observed.

  17. Gamma-Glutamyl Compounds: Substrate Specificity of Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wickham, Stephanie; West, Matthew B.; Cook, Paul F.; Hanigan, Marie H.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-glutamyl compounds include antioxidants, inflammatory molecules, drug metabolites and neuroactive compounds. Two cell surface enzymes have been identified that metabolize gamma-glutamyl compounds, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT1) and gamma-glutamyl leukotrienase (GGT5). There is controversy in the literature regarding the substrate specificity of these enzymes. To address this issue, we have developed a method for comprehensive kinetics analysis of compounds as substrates for GGT enzymes. Our assay is sensitive, quantitative and is conducted at physiologic pH. We evaluated a series of gamma-glutamyl compounds as substrates for human GGT1 and human GGT5. The Kms for reduced glutathione were 11μM for both GGT1 and GGT5. However, the Km for oxidized glutathione was 9μM for GGT1 and 43μM for GGT5. Our data show that the Kms for leukotriene C4 are equivalent for GGT1 and GGT5 at 10.8μM and 10.2μM, respectively. This assay was also used to evaluate serine-borate, a well-known inhibitor of GGT1, which was 8-fold more potent in inhibiting GGT1 than inhibiting GGT5. These data provide essential information regarding the target enzymes for developing treatments for inflammatory diseases such as asthma and cardiovascular disease in humans. This assay is invaluable for studies of oxidative stress, drug metabolism and other pathways that involve gamma-glutamyl compounds. PMID:21447318

  18. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    PubMed Central

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  19. On the substrate specificity of the rice strigolactone biosynthesis enzyme DWARF27.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mark; Al-Babili, Salim

    2016-06-01

    The β-carotene isomerase OsDWARF27 is stereo- and double bond-specific. It converts bicyclic carotenoids with at least one unsubstituted β-ionone ring. OsDWARF27 may contribute to the formation of α-carotene-based strigolactone-like compounds. Strigolactones (SLs) are synthesized from all-trans-β-carotene via a pathway involving the β-carotene isomerase DWARF27, the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 7 and 8 (CCD7, CCD8), and cytochrome P450 enzymes from the 711 clade (MAX1 in Arabidopsis). The rice enzyme DWARF27 was shown to catalyze the reversible isomerization of all-trans- into 9-cis-β-carotene in vitro. β-carotene occurs in different cis-isomeric forms, and plants accumulate other carotenoids, which may be substrates of DWARF27. Here, we investigated the stereo and substrate specificity of the rice enzyme DWARF27 in carotenoid-accumulating E. coli strains and in in vitro assays performed with heterologously expressed and purified enzyme. Our results suggest that OsDWARF27 is strictly double bond-specific, solely targeting the C9-C10 double bond. OsDWARF27 did not introduce a 9-cis-double bond in 13-cis- or 15-cis-β-carotene. Substrates isomerized by OsDWARF27 are bicyclic carotenoids, including β-, α-carotene and β,β-cryptoxanthin, that contain at least one unsubstituted β-ionone ring. Accordingly, OsDWARF27 did not produce the abscisic acid precursors 9-cis-violaxanthin or -neoxanthin from the corresponding all-trans-isomers, excluding a direct role in the formation of this carotenoid derived hormone. The conversion of all-trans-α-carotene yielded two different isomers, including 9'-cis-α-carotene that might be the precursor of strigolactones with an ε-ionone ring, such as the recently identified heliolactone.

  20. Generating Data Flow Programs from Nonprocedural Specifications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Program Office of Naval Research Under Contract N00014-76-C-0416 DTIC Moore School Report ^ LECTE - S SEP 191983J D Aprow foIu~ 00k Dfat ..bu.. U...single proqram counter. Possible parallelism may be inferred to a limited extent from evaluation of the algorithm. However since wamory cells can hold...addresses . Inherent in the conventional model is the idea of an address [Arvi7S]. The address of a memory cell is invariant, while the value stored in the

  1. Diagnosis of acute toxoplasmosis by an enzyme immunoassay for specific immunoglobulin m antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wielaard, F; van Gruijthuijsen, H; Duermeyer, W; Joss, A W; Skinner, L; Williams, H; van Elven, E H

    1983-01-01

    A recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) class antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii was evaluated with respect to specificity and sensitivity. By using an antibody capture principle and F(ab')2 conjugates, interference of rheumatoid factors was absent. No cross-reactions with anti-toxoplasma IgG occurred, and no interference with antinuclear antibodies was found. A large-scale study with about 1,500 clinical specimens revealed a 100% specificity. By testing 79 sera from patients with acute-phase acquired toxoplasmosis, sensitivity was found to be 97%. In routine clinical practice, the IgM-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay proved to be a more sensitive tool for diagnosis than the immunofluorescent-antibody test. The course of IgM-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibodies in acute patients was studied; IgM reached peak levels within 1 month after onset of illness, and could be demonstrated up to an average of 8 months after onset. PMID:6874915

  2. Switching of self-assembly in a peptide nanostructure with a specific enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Matthew J.; Newcomb, Christina J.; Bitton, Ronit; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-03-14

    Peptide self-assembly has been shown to be a useful tool for the preparation of bioactive nanostructures, and recent work has demonstrated their potential as therapies for regenerative medicine. In principle, one route to make these nanostructures more biomimetic would be to incorporate in their molecular design the capacity for biological sensing. We report here on the use of a reversible enzymatic trigger to control the assembly and disassembly of peptide amphiphile (PA) nanostructures. The PA used in these studies contained a consensus substrate sequence specific to protein kinase A (PKA), a biological enzyme important for intracellular signaling that has also been shown to be an extracellular cancer biomarker. Upon treatment with PKA, this PA molecule becomes phosphorylated causing the high aspect-ratio filamentous PA nanostructures to disassemble. Treatment with an enzyme to cleave the phosphate group results in reformation of the filamentous nanostructures. We also show that disassembly in the presence of PKA allows the enzyme-triggered release of an encapsulated cancer drug. In addition, these drug-loaded nanostructures were found to induce preferential cytotoxicity in a cancer cell line that is known to secrete high levels of PKA. This ability to control nanostructure through an enzymatic switch could allow for the preparation of highly sophisticated and biomimetic materials that incorporate a biological sensing capability to enable therapeutic specificity.

  3. Carotenoids in Rhodoplanes species: variation of compositions and substrate specificity of predicted carotenogenesis enzymes.

    PubMed

    Takaichi, Shinichi; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V; Okamura, Keiko; Hiraishi, Akira

    2012-08-01

    Phototrophic bacteria necessarily contain carotenoids for photosynthesis, and accumulate unusual carotenoids in some cases. The carotenoids in all established species of Rhodoplanes (Rpl.), a representative of phototrophic genera, were identified using spectroscopic methods. The major carotenoid was spirilloxanthin in Rpl. roseus and Rpl. serenus, and rhodopin in "Rpl. cryptolactis". Rpl. elegans contained rhodopin, anhydrorhodovibrin, and spirilloxanthin. Rpl. pokkaliisoli contained not only rhodopin but also 1,1'-dihydroxylycopene and 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin. These variations in carotenoid composition suggested that Rpl. roseus and Rpl. serenus had normal substrate specificity of the carotenogenesis enzymes of CrtC (acyclic carotene 1,2-hydratase), CrtD (acyclic carotenoid 3,4-desaturase), and CrtF (acyclic 1-hydroxycarotenoid methyltransferase). On the other hand, CrtC of Rpl. elegans, CrtD of "Rpl. cryptolactis", and CrtC, CrtD, and CrtF of Rpl. pokkaliisoli might have different characteristics from the usual activity of these normal enzymes in the normal spirilloxanthin pathway. These results suggest that the variation of carotenoids among the species of Rhodoplanes results from modified substrate specificity of the carotenogenesis enzymes involved.

  4. Compartment-specific Control of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging by Antioxidant Pathway Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swati; Sidor, Agnieszka; O'Rourke, Brian

    2016-05-20

    Oxidative stress arises from an imbalance in the production and scavenging rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is a key factor in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and aging. The presence of parallel pathways and multiple intracellular compartments, each having its own ROS sources and antioxidant enzymes, complicates the determination of the most important regulatory nodes of the redox network. Here we quantified ROS dynamics within specific intracellular compartments in the cytosol and mitochondria and determined which scavenging enzymes exert the most control over antioxidant fluxes in H9c2 cardiac myoblasts. We used novel targeted viral gene transfer vectors expressing redox-sensitive GFP fused to sensor domains to measure H2O2 or oxidized glutathione. Using genetic manipulation in heart-derived H9c2 cells, we explored the contribution of specific antioxidant enzymes to ROS scavenging and glutathione redox potential within each intracellular compartment. Our findings reveal that antioxidant flux is strongly dependent on mitochondrial substrate catabolism, with availability of NADPH as a major rate-controlling step. Moreover, ROS scavenging by mitochondria significantly contributes to cytoplasmic ROS handling. The findings provide fundamental information about the control of ROS scavenging by the redox network and suggest novel interventions for circumventing oxidative stress in cardiac cells.

  5. Genome-Scale Analysis of Cell-Specific Regulatory Codes Using Nuclear Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have made it possible for biologists to generate genome-wide profiles of chromatin features at the nucleotide resolution. Enzymes such as nucleases or transposes have been instrumental as a chromatin-probing agent due to their ability to target accessible chromatin for cleavage or insertion. On the scale of a few hundred base pairs, preferential action of the nuclear enzymes on accessible chromatin allows mapping of cell state-specific accessibility in vivo. Such accessible regions contain functionally important regulatory sites, including promoters and enhancers, which undergo active remodeling for cells adapting in a dynamic environment. DNase-seq and the more recent ATAC-seq are two assays that are gaining popularity. Deep sequencing of DNA libraries from these assays, termed genomic footprinting, has been proposed to enable the comprehensive construction of protein occupancy profiles over the genome at the nucleotide level. Recent studies have discovered limitations of genomic footprinting which reduce the scope of detectable proteins. In addition, the identification of putative factors that bind to the observed footprints remains challenging. Despite these caveats, the methodology still presents significant advantages over alternative techniques such as ChIP-seq or FAIRE-seq. Here we describe computational approaches and tools for analysis of chromatin accessibility and genomic footprinting. Proper experimental design and assay-specific data analysis ensure the detection sensitivity and maximize retrievable information. The enzyme-based chromatin profiling approaches represent a powerful and evolving methodology which facilitates our understanding of how the genome is regulated.

  6. The four aldehyde oxidases of Drosophila melanogaster have different gene expression patterns and enzyme substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Dambowsky, Miriam; Bolis, Marco; Georgiou, Marina L; Garattini, Enrico; Missirlis, Fanis; Leimkühler, Silke

    2014-06-15

    In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, four genes coding for aldehyde oxidases (AOX1-4) were identified on chromosome 3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AOX gene cluster evolved via independent duplication events in the vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The functional role and the substrate specificity of the distinct Drosophila AOX enzymes is unknown. Two loss-of-function mutant alleles in this gene region, low pyridoxal oxidase (Po(lpo)) and aldehyde oxidase-1 (Aldox-1(n1)) are associated with a phenotype characterized by undetectable AOX enzymatic activity. However, the genes involved and the corresponding mutations have not yet been identified. In this study we characterized the activities, substrate specificities and expression profiles of the four AOX enzymes in D. melanogaster. We show that the Po(lpo)-associated phenotype is the consequence of a structural alteration of the AOX1 gene. We identified an 11-bp deletion in the Po(lpo) allele, resulting in a frame-shift event, which removes the molybdenum cofactor domain of the encoded enzyme. Furthermore, we show that AOX2 activity is detectable only during metamorphosis and characterize a Minos-AOX2 insertion in this developmental gene that disrupts its activity. We demonstrate that the Aldox-1(n1) phenotype maps to the AOX3 gene and AOX4 activity is not detectable in our assays.

  7. The four aldehyde oxidases of Drosophila melanogaster have different gene expression patterns and enzyme substrate specificities

    PubMed Central

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Dambowsky, Miriam; Bolis, Marco; Georgiou, Marina L.; Garattini, Enrico; Missirlis, Fanis; Leimkühler, Silke

    2014-01-01

    In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, four genes coding for aldehyde oxidases (AOX1–4) were identified on chromosome 3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AOX gene cluster evolved via independent duplication events in the vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The functional role and the substrate specificity of the distinct Drosophila AOX enzymes is unknown. Two loss-of-function mutant alleles in this gene region, low pyridoxal oxidase (Polpo) and aldehyde oxidase-1 (Aldox-1n1) are associated with a phenotype characterized by undetectable AOX enzymatic activity. However, the genes involved and the corresponding mutations have not yet been identified. In this study we characterized the activities, substrate specificities and expression profiles of the four AOX enzymes in D. melanogaster. We show that the Polpo-associated phenotype is the consequence of a structural alteration of the AOX1 gene. We identified an 11-bp deletion in the Polpo allele, resulting in a frame-shift event, which removes the molybdenum cofactor domain of the encoded enzyme. Furthermore, we show that AOX2 activity is detectable only during metamorphosis and characterize a Minos-AOX2 insertion in this developmental gene that disrupts its activity. We demonstrate that the Aldox-1n1 phenotype maps to the AOX3 gene and AOX4 activity is not detectable in our assays. PMID:24737760

  8. Broad specification fuels technology program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Jeroszko, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental evaluation was conducted to assess the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design concepts. Emphasis was placed on establishing the viability of design modifications to current combustor concepts and the use of advanced technology concepts to facilitate operation on Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel while meeting exhaust emissions and performance specifications and maintaining acceptable durability. Three different combustor concepts, representative of progressively more aggressive technology levels, were evaluated. When operated on ERBS rather than Jet A fuel, a single stage combustor typical of that in the most recent versions of the JT9D-7 engine was found to produce excess carbon monoxide emissions at idle and elevated liner temperatures at high power levels that were projected to reduced liner life by 13 percent. The introduction of improved component technology, such as refined fuel injectors and advanced liner cooling concepts were shown to have the potential of enhancing the fuel flexibility of the single stage combustor.

  9. Specifications for the JASPER Program attenuation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, W.W. Jr.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Slater, C.O.; Mukenthaler, F.J.

    1986-12-31

    An integral shielding experiment has been designed to investigate neutron penetration through benchmark and representative mockups of the radial shield designs for advanced sodium-cooled reactor concepts. The experiment will be performed in FY 1986 at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility to study neutron penetration through various combinations of graphite, boron carbide, and steel configurations using representative near-core and sodium-pool source spectra. Detailed configuration descriptions and measurement specifications for the experiment are included.

  10. Development of a Program Specific Locator Test. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benn, Robert J.

    A project was undertaken to develop a series of program-specific vocational locator tests (PSVLTs) that would consist of subject-specific questions in three academic disciplines--writing, reading, and mathematics--for use in predicting vocational students' success in their vocational programs. As a prelude to constructing the tests, project staff…

  11. 42 CFR 457.1180 - Program specific review process: Notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program specific review process: Notice. 457.1180... State Plan Requirements: Applicant and Enrollee Protections § 457.1180 Program specific review process: Notice. A State must provide enrollees and applicants timely written notice of any...

  12. Development of a Program Specific Locator Test. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benn, Robert J.

    A project was undertaken to develop a series of program-specific vocational locator tests (PSVLTs) that would consist of subject-specific questions in three academic disciplines--writing, reading, and mathematics--for use in predicting vocational students' success in their vocational programs. As a prelude to constructing the tests, project staff…

  13. Evolution of substrate specificity in a retained enzyme driven by gene loss.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Vázquez, Ana Lilia; Edirisinghe, Janaka E; Verduzco-Castro, Ernesto A; Michalska, Karolina; Wu, Chenggang; Noda-García, Lianet; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Endres, Michael; Medina-Ruíz, Sofía; Santoyo-Flores, Julián; Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Ton-That, Hung; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Henry, Christopher S; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2017-03-31

    The connection between gene loss and the functional adaptation of retained proteins is still poorly understood. We apply phylogenomics and metabolic modeling to detect bacterial species that are evolving by gene loss, with the finding that Actinomycetaceae genomes from human cavities are undergoing sizable reductions, including loss of L-histidine and L-tryptophan biosynthesis. We observe that the dual-substrate phosphoribosyl isomerase A or priA gene, at which these pathways converge, appears to coevolve with the occurrence of trp and his genes. Characterization of a dozen PriA homologs shows that these enzymes adapt from bifunctionality in the largest genomes, to a monofunctional, yet not necessarily specialized, inefficient form in genomes undergoing reduction. These functional changes are accomplished via mutations, which result from relaxation of purifying selection, in residues structurally mapped after sequence and X-ray structural analyses. Our results show how gene loss can drive the evolution of substrate specificity from retained enzymes.

  14. Nanobiosensors exploiting specific interactions between an enzyme and herbicides in atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Aline C N; Deda, Daiana K; Bueno, Carolina C; Moraes, Ariana S; Da Roz, Alessandra L; Yamaji, Fabio M; Prado, Rogilene A; Viviani, Vadim; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Leite, Fábio L

    2014-09-01

    The development of sensitive methodologies for detecting agrochemicals has become important in recent years due to the increasingly indiscriminate use of these substances. In this context, nanosensors based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are useful because they provide higher sensitivity with operation at the nanometer scale. In this paper we exploit specific interactions between AFM tips functionalized with the enzyme acetolactate synthase (ALS) to detect the ALS-inhibitor herbicides metsulfuron-methyl and imazaquin. Using atomic force spectroscopy (AFS) we could measure the adhesion force between tip and substrate, which was considerably higher when the ALS-functionalized tip (nanobiosensor) was employed. The increase was approximately 250% and 160% for metsulfuron-methyl and imazaquin, respectively, in comparison to unfunctionalized probes. We estimated the specific enzyme-herbicide force by assuming that the measured force comprises an adhesion force according to the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model, the capillary force and the specific force. We show that the specific, biorecognition force plays a crucial role in the higher sensitivity of the nanobiosensor, thus opening the way for the design of similarly engineered tips for detecting herbicides and other analytes.

  15. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czulak, J.; Guerreiro, A.; Metran, K.; Canfarotta, F.; Goddard, A.; Cowan, R. H.; Trochimczuk, A. W.; Piletsky, S.

    2016-05-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates.Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike

  16. Development of a highly specific enzyme immunoassay for oxytocin and its use in plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Haraya, Shiomi; Karasawa, Koji; Sano, Yoshihiro; Ozawa, Kimiko; Kato, Nobumasa; Arakawa, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Background The peptide hormone oxytocin acts in the central nervous system and plays an important role in various complex social behaviours. We report the production of a high affinity and specificity antibody for oxytocin and its use in a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay. Biotin that was chemically bound to oxytocin derivative containing zero to six lysines as bridge was the labelled antigen. Seven labelled antigens were used to develop a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay. Methods Antioxytocin antiserum was obtained by immunization of oxytocin-bovine thyrogloblin conjugate to rabbit. Oxytocin sample was added to the second antibody-coated microtitre plate and allowed to react overnight at 4℃, then biotinylated oxytocin was added 1 h at 4℃, and horseradish peroxidase-labelled avidin was added and incubated for 1 h at room temperature. The plate was then washed. Horseradish peroxidase activity was measured by a colorimetric method using o-phenylenediamine (490 nm). Results The sensitivity of the enzyme immunoassay improved as the number of lysine residues increased; consequently, biotinylated oxytocin bridged with five lysines was used. A standard curve for oxytocin ranged from 1.0 to 1000 pg/assay. The detection limit of the assay was 2.36 pg, and the reproducibility was 3.6% as CV% ( n = 6). Cross-reactivity with vasopressin and vasotocin was less than 0.01%. Conclusion The sensitivity of the enzyme immunoassay could be improved by increasing the number of lysine residues on the biotin-labelled antigen. The proposed method is sensitive and more specific than conventional immunoassays for oxytocin and can be used to determine plasma oxytocin concentrations.

  17. Structural Basis of the Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Catalysis of a Papaver somniferum Tyrosine Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Guan, Huai; Song, Shuaibao; Robinson, Howard; Liang, Jing; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong; Han, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC), a type II pyridoxal 5'-phosphate decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of tyrosine. Due to a generally high sequence identity to other aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs), primary sequence information is not enough to understand substrate specificities with structural information. In this study, we selected a typical TyDC from Papaver somniferum as a model to study the structural basis of AAAD substrate specificities. Analysis of the native P. somniferum TyDC crystal structure and subsequent molecular docking and dynamics simulation provide some structural bases that explain substrate specificity for tyrosine. The result confirmed the previous proposed mechanism for the enzyme selectivity of indolic and phenolic substrates. Additionally, this study yields the first crystal structure for a plant type II pyridoxal-5'-phosphate decarboxylase.

  18. Structural Basis of the Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Catalysis of a Papaver somniferum Tyrosine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Huai; Song, Shuaibao; Robinson, Howard; Liang, Jing; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong; Han, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC), a type II pyridoxal 5′-phosphate decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of tyrosine. Due to a generally high sequence identity to other aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs), primary sequence information is not enough to understand substrate specificities with structural information. In this study, we selected a typical TyDC from Papaver somniferum as a model to study the structural basis of AAAD substrate specificities. Analysis of the native P. somniferum TyDC crystal structure and subsequent molecular docking and dynamics simulation provide some structural bases that explain substrate specificity for tyrosine. The result confirmed the previous proposed mechanism for the enzyme selectivity of indolic and phenolic substrates. Additionally, this study yields the first crystal structure for a plant type II pyridoxal-5'-phosphate decarboxylase. PMID:28232911

  19. A measure of the broad substrate specificity of enzymes based on 'duplicate' catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2012-01-01

    The ability of an enzyme to select and act upon a specific class of compounds with unerring precision and efficiency is an essential feature of life. Simultaneously, these enzymes often catalyze the reaction of a range of similar substrates of the same class, and also have promiscuous activities on unrelated substrates. Previously, we have established a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. In the current work, we quantitatively characterize the active site for the ability to catalyze distinct, yet related, substrates (BRASS). A protein with known structure and active site residues provides the framework for computing 'duplicate' residues, each of which results in slightly modified replicas of the active site scaffold. Such spatial congruence is supplemented by Finite difference Poisson Boltzmann analysis which filters out electrostatically unfavorable configurations. The congruent configurations are used to compute an index (BrassIndex), which reflects the broad substrate profile of the active site. We identify an acetylhydrolase and a methyltransferase as having the lowest and highest BrassIndex, respectively, from a set of non-homologous proteins extracted from the Catalytic Site Atlas. The acetylhydrolase, a regulatory enzyme, is known to be highly specific for platelet-activating factor. In the methyltransferase (PDB: 1QAM), various combinations of glycine (Gly38/40/42), asparagine (Asn101/11) and glutamic acid (Glu59/36) residues having similar spatial and electrostatic profiles with the specified scaffold (Gly38, Asn101 and Glu59) exemplifies the broad substrate profile such an active site may provide. 'Duplicate' residues identified by relaxing the spatial and/or electrostatic constraints can be the target of directed evolution methodologies, like saturation mutagenesis, for modulating the substrate specificity of proteins.

  20. α-Amylase: an enzyme specificity found in various families of glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E Ann

    2014-04-01

    α-Amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) represents the best known amylolytic enzyme. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4-glucosidic bonds in starch and related α-glucans. In general, the α-amylase is an enzyme with a broad substrate preference and product specificity. In the sequence-based classification system of all carbohydrate-active enzymes, it is one of the most frequently occurring glycoside hydrolases (GH). α-Amylase is the main representative of family GH13, but it is probably also present in the families GH57 and GH119, and possibly even in GH126. Family GH13, known generally as the main α-amylase family, forms clan GH-H together with families GH70 and GH77 that, however, contain no α-amylase. Within the family GH13, the α-amylase specificity is currently present in several subfamilies, such as GH13_1, 5, 6, 7, 15, 24, 27, 28, 36, 37, and, possibly in a few more that are not yet defined. The α-amylases classified in family GH13 employ a reaction mechanism giving retention of configuration, share 4-7 conserved sequence regions (CSRs) and catalytic machinery, and adopt the (β/α)8-barrel catalytic domain. Although the family GH57 α-amylases also employ the retaining reaction mechanism, they possess their own five CSRs and catalytic machinery, and adopt a (β/α)7-barrel fold. These family GH57 attributes are likely to be characteristic of α-amylases from the family GH119, too. With regard to family GH126, confirmation of the unambiguous presence of the α-amylase specificity may need more biochemical investigation because of an obvious, but unexpected, homology with inverting β-glucan-active hydrolases.

  1. [Detection of IgE specific for egg yolk by enzyme immunoassay. Description of a case].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Díaz, T; Cuevas Agustín, M; Moneo Goiri, I; Ibáñez Sandín, M D; Ureña Vilardell, V

    1986-01-01

    Food allergy is a common disease in our country, especially affecting atopic children. Egg-white hypersensitivity is frequently found in these patients. However, egg-yolk hypersensitivity is not usually reported in patients with egg allergy. This article describes a young patient with egg-yolk hypersensitivity, a 12 year old female patient with a medical history of contact urticaria, angioedema and severe acute bronchospasm shortly after the intake of small amounts of egg-yolk. All these episodes required treatment in emergency care units because of the severity of the symptoms. The patient did not describe any other food hypersensitivity and remained symptom-free after the intake of boiled or fried egg-white. She had clinical symptoms of grass pollen hypersensitivity and was therefore on specific immunotherapy at the time of the study. The skin prick-tests were positive to grass pollen and egg-yolk and were negative to mites, moulds, animal dander and to the common food tested (milk, fish, peanut, almond and hazel-nut). Total serum IgE was 1.160 UL/ml. The patient had a positive RAST to egg-white (0.0 PRU/ml) as well as to egg-yolk (8.6 PRU/ml). Furthermore, an indirect enzyme immunoassay as well as a reverse enzyme immunoassay also revealed the presence of specific IgE antibodies. The reverse enzyme immunoassay uses microtiter plates as a solid surface. These plates are coated with a monospecific antihuman IgE antibody. Thereafter, the serum samples are incubated overnight in the wells. After several washings, the presence of specific antibodies is revealed by means of a peroxidase conjugated allergen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Structure of Human Dual Specificity Protein Phosphatase 23, VHZ, Enzyme-Substrate/Product Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal,R.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a crucial role in mitogenic signal transduction and regulation of cell growth and differentiation. Dual specificity protein phosphatase 23 (DUSP23) or VHZ mediates dephosphorylation of phospho-tyrosyl (pTyr) and phospho-seryl/threonyl (pSer/pThr) residues in specific proteins. In vitro, it can dephosphorylate p44ERK1 but not p54SAPK-{beta} and enhance activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. Human VHZ, the smallest of the catalytically active protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) reported to date (150 residues), is a class I Cys-based PTP and bears the distinctive active site signature motif HCXXGXXRS(T). We present the crystal structure of VHZ determined at 1.93 angstrom resolution. The polypeptide chain adopts the typical a{beta}a PTP fold, giving rise to a shallow active site cleft that supports dual phosphorylated substrate specificity. Within our crystals, the Thr-135-Tyr-136 from a symmetry-related molecule bind in the active site with a malate ion, where they mimic the phosphorylated TY motif of the MAPK activation loop in an enzyme-substrate/product complex. Analyses of intermolecular interactions between the enzyme and this pseudo substrate/product along with functional analysis of Phe-66, Leu-97, and Phe-99 residues provide insights into the mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis in VHZ.

  3. Reverse enzyme immunoassay for detection of specific anti-Toxoplasma immunoglobulin M antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Franco, E L; Walls, K W; Sulzer, A J

    1981-01-01

    A reverse enzyme immunoassay (R-EIA) is described, in which polystyrene muplates are sensitized with anti-immunoglobulin M (IgM) (mu chain) antibodies and then sequentially allowed to react with patient's serum, peroxidase-labeled Toxoplasma gondii soluble antigen, and substrate. Measurement of activity of the solid-phase bound enzyme conjugate was done by colorimetric reading of the final developed color and kinetically by the initial rate of color development. This R-EIA allowed full resolution between absorbance values of a group of 36 sera which presented positive results in the Toxoplasma IgM immunofluorescence test and the remaining groups, which consisted of 39 normal individuals, 22 rheumatoid factor-positive sera, 8 Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemic sera, 3 infectious mononucleosis samples, and 6 high-titered IgG anti-T. gondii sera. No interference of rheumatoid factor IgM or inhibition by high-titered specific IgG was detected, even in the false IgM immunofluorescence-positive rheumatoid factor samples. Likewise, false-negative IgM immunofluorescence samples gave positive R-EIA even without adsorption with Staphylococcus aureus protein A. The possibility of direct tagging of the antigen with the enzyme eliminates the need for using antigen and anti-antigen conjugates as separate layers, therefore eliminating one step in the assay. PMID:7016911

  4. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on antioxidant enzyme activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strain-specific.

    PubMed

    Bayliak, M; Semchyshyn, H; Lushchak, V

    2006-09-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the survival and activity of antioxidant and associated enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. A difference found in the response of wild-type yeast strains treated with hydrogen peroxide was probably related to the different protective effects of antioxidant enzymes in these strains. Exposure of wild-type YPH250 cells to 0.25 mM H(2)O(2) for 30 min increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 3.4- and 2-fold, respectively. However, no activation of catalase in the EG103 strain, as well as of SOD in the YPH98 and EG103 wild strains was detected, which was in parallel to lower survival of these strains under oxidative stress. There is a strong positive correlation (R(2) = 0.95) between activities of catalase and SOD in YPH250 cells treated with different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. It is conceivable that catalase would protect SOD against inactivation caused by oxidative stress and vice versa. Finally, yeast cell treatment with hydrogen peroxide can lead to either a H(2)O(2)-induced increase in activities of antioxidant and associated enzymes or their decrease depending on the H(2)O(20 concentration used or the yeast strain specificity.

  5. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP.

    PubMed

    Czulak, J; Guerreiro, A; Metran, K; Canfarotta, F; Goddard, A; Cowan, R H; Trochimczuk, A W; Piletsky, S

    2016-06-07

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates.

  6. Specific and pronounced impacts of lisinopril and lisinopril plus simvastatin on erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Yury; Suslikov, Alexander; Kosenko, Elena

    2010-02-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are effective at reducing blood pressure, whereas statins decrease plasma cholesterol impeding atherosclerosis. It is hypothesized that these medications may improve blood pressure and serum cholesterol by modifying the antioxidative status and energy metabolism of erythrocytes. In this study, the effects of 2 treatments are compared: lisinopril alone versus lisinopril + simvastatin, on erythrocyte antioxidant and energy metabolic enzymes. Patients with atherosclerosis and moderate hypertension are randomly assigned to receive lisinopril 10 to 20 mg/d or lisinopril 10 to 20 mg/d plus simvastatin 20 mg/d for 24 weeks. Higher catalase activity and lower glutathione peroxidase activity are observed in 94% to 100% patients from both groups after 12 and 24 weeks of treatment. Superoxide dismutase activity is increased significantly only after 24 weeks. No changes of glutathione reductase, lactate dehydrogenase, and phosphofructokinase activities are found under any conditions indicated. Both treatments decrease systolic and diastolic blood pressure equally. Only lisinopril + simvastatin treatment decreases plasma total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The results show for the first time that lisinopril monotherapy and combined lisinopril + simvastatin therapy exhibit specific and pronounced effects on antioxidant and energy metabolic enzyme activities in erythrocytes of hypertensive patients.

  7. Responses of absolute and specific enzyme activity to consecutive application of composted sewage sludge in a Fluventic Ustochrept.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Guo, Kangli; Huang, Lin; Ji, Zhengyu; Jiang, Huimin; Li, Hu; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    Composted sewage sludge (CS) is considered a rich source of soil nutrients and significantly affects the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of soil, but its effect on specific enzyme activity in soil is disregarded. The present experiment examined the absolute and specific enzyme activity of the enzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles, the diversity of soil microbial functions, and soil community composition in a Fluventic Ustochrept under a maize-wheat rotation system in North China during 2012-2015. Application of CS led to increase in MBC and in its ratio to both total organic carbon (TOC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN). Absolute enzyme activity, except that of phosphatase, increased in CS-treated soils, whereas specific activity of all the enzymes declined, especially at the highest dose of CS (45 t ha-1). The diversity of soil microbial community also increased in CS-treated soils, whereas its functional diversity declined at higher doses of CS owing to the lowered specific enzyme activity. These changes indicate that CS application induced the domination of microorganisms that are not metabolically active and those that use resources more efficiently, namely fungi. Redundancy analysis showed that fundamental alterations in soil enzyme activity depend on soil pH. Soil specific enzyme activity is affected more than absolute enzyme activity by changes in soil properties, especially soil microbial activity and composition of soil microflora (as judged by the following ratios: MBC/TOC, MBC/MBN, and TOC/LOC, that is labile organic carbon) through the Pearson Correlation Coefficient. Specific enzyme activity is thus a more accurate parameter than absolute enzyme activity for monitoring the effect of adding CS on the activities and structure of soil microbial community.

  8. Protein Stabilization and Enzyme Activation in Ionic Liquids: Specific Ion Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    There are still debates on whether the hydration of ions perturbs the water structure, and what is the degree of such disturbance; therefore, the origin of Hofmeister effect on protein stabilization continues being questioned. For this reason, it is suggested to use the ‘specific ion effect’ instead of other misleading terms such as Hofmeister effect, Hofmeister series, lyotropic effect, and lyotropic series. In this review, we firstly discuss the controversial aspect of inorganic ion effects on water structures, and several possible contributors to the specific ion effect of protein stability. Due to recent overwhelming attraction of ionic liquids (ILs) as benign solvents in many enzymatic reactions, we further evaluate the structural properties and molecular-level interactions in neat ILs and their aqueous solutions. Next, we systematically compare the specific ion effects of ILs on enzyme stability and activity, and conclude that (a) the specificity of many enzymatic systems in diluted aqueous IL solutions is roughly in line with the traditional Hofmeister series albeit some exceptions; (b) however, the specificity follows a different track in concentrated or neat ILs because other factors (such as hydrogen-bond basicity, nucelophilicity, and hydrophobicity, etc) are playing leading roles. In addition, we demonstrate some examples of biocatalytic reactions in IL systems that are guided by the empirical specificity rule. PMID:26949281

  9. Closing the Gap Between Specification and Programming: VDM++ and SCALA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We argue that a modern programming language such as Scala offers a level of succinctness, which makes it suitable for program and systems specification as well as for high-level programming. We illustrate this by comparing the language with the Vdm++ specification language. The comparison also identifies areas where Scala perhaps could be improved, inspired by Vdm++. We furthermore illustrate Scala's potential as a specification language by augmenting it with a combination of parameterized state machines and temporal logic, defined as a library, thereby forming an expressive but simple runtime verification framework.

  10. Tissue-specific transcription profiles of sex steroid biosynthesis enzymes and the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, U; Holterhus, P-M; Wünsch, L; Jocham, D; Drechsler, T; Thiele, S; Marschke, C; Hiort, O

    2006-08-01

    17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD) and 5alpha-reductase isoenzymes play a crucial role in the formation and metabolism of sex steroids. Not only the key androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone but also their precursors are potent activators of the androgen receptor and are, therefore, likely to act as determinants of male sexual differentiation and maturation in a differentially regulated way. The aim of the present study was to relatively quantify the expression of the mRNA of 17beta-HSD isoenzymes, namely, type 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 10, together with the 5alpha-reductase type 1 and 2, and the androgen receptor in normal human males and females. RNA was isolated from peripheral blood cells of both sexes and from genital skin fibroblasts (GSFs) of two different localizations (foreskin and scrotal skin) obtained from phenotypically normal males. mRNA expression was semi-quantified by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction with the LightCycler Instrument (Roche). The examined enzymes show statistically significant differences in their transcription pattern between the blood and the GSF RNA samples. Within the GSF samples, there are also significant variations between the two examined localizations in the transcription of 17beta-HSD type 1, 2, 4, and 5 as well as for the androgen receptor. We found large interindividual variation of enzyme transcription patterns in all investigated tissues. In peripheral blood cells, no sex-specific differences were seen. We conclude that sex steroid enzymes are expressed not only in genital primary target tissues but also in peripheral blood. The expression in different target tissues may contribute to both the individual sexual and tissue-specific phenotype in humans.

  11. Papain-catalyzed peptide bond formation: enzyme-specific activation with guanidinophenyl esters.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Roseri J A C; Zarzycka, Barbara; Amatdjais-Groenen, Helene I V; Jans, Sander C B; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; van Delft, Floris L; Nabuurs, Sander B; Rutjes, Floris P J T

    2011-09-19

    The substrate mimetics approach is a versatile method for small-scale enzymatic peptide-bond synthesis in aqueous systems. The protease-recognized amino acid side chain is incorporated in an ester leaving group, the substrate mimetic. This shift of the specific moiety enables the acceptance of amino acids and peptide sequences that are normally not recognized by the enzyme. The guanidinophenyl group (OGp), a known substrate mimetic for the serine proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin, has now been applied for the first time in combination with papain, a cheap and commercially available cysteine protease. To provide insight in the binding mode of various Z-X(AA)-OGp esters, computational docking studies were performed. The results strongly point at enzyme-specific activation of the OGp esters in papain through a novel mode of action, rather than their functioning as mimetics. Furthermore, the scope of a model dipeptide synthesis was investigated with respect to both the amino acid donor and the nucleophile. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to prioritize 22 natural and unnatural amino acid donors for synthesis. Experimental results correlate well with the predicted ranking and show that nearly all amino acids are accepted by papain.

  12. Identification of Specific Inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi Malic Enzyme Isoforms by Target-Based HTS.

    PubMed

    Ranzani, Americo T; Nowicki, Cristina; Wilkinson, Shane R; Cordeiro, Artur T

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The lack of an efficient and safe treatment supports the research into novel metabolic targets, with the malic enzyme (ME) representing one such potential candidate. T. cruzi expresses a cytosolic (TcMEc) and a mitochondrial (TcMEm) ME isoform, with these activities functioning to generate NADPH, a key source of reducing equivalents that drives a range of anabolic and protective processes. To identify specific inhibitors that target TcMEs, two independent high-throughput screening strategies using a diversity library containing 30,000 compounds were employed. IC50 values of 262 molecules were determined for both TcMEs, as well as for three human ME isoforms, with the inhibitors clustered into six groups according to their chemical similarity. The most potent hits belonged to a sulfonamide group that specifically target TcMEc. Moreover, several selected inhibitors of both TcMEs showed a trypanocidal effect against the replicative forms of T. cruzi. The chemical diversity observed among those compounds that inhibit TcMEs activity emphasizes the druggability of these enzymes, with a sulfonamide-based subset of compounds readily able to block TcMEc function at a low nanomolar range.

  13. Optimization of a human papillomavirus-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Karem, Kevin L; Poon, Alysia C; Bierl, Cynthia; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Unger, Elizabeth

    2002-05-01

    A strategy was developed for the control, standardization, and critical evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of human papillomavirus-specific immunoglobulin G in human sera. Control human sera, polyclonal animal sera, and monoclonal antibodies were used to establish optimal assay parameters, including antigen coating, serum dilutions, and criteria for daily reproducibility, monitoring, and rejection of assays. Three evaluation techniques were used in parallel to define an optimal cutoff absorbance value that yields greater than 93% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity in the assay's ability to discriminate positive and negative control sera. This strategy provides an optimal method by which to determine cutoff absorbance values for ELISA.

  14. Optimization of a Human Papillomavirus-Specific Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Karem, Kevin L.; Poon, Alysia C.; Bierl, Cynthia; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Unger, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    A strategy was developed for the control, standardization, and critical evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of human papillomavirus-specific immunoglobulin G in human sera. Control human sera, polyclonal animal sera, and monoclonal antibodies were used to establish optimal assay parameters, including antigen coating, serum dilutions, and criteria for daily reproducibility, monitoring, and rejection of assays. Three evaluation techniques were used in parallel to define an optimal cutoff absorbance value that yields greater than 93% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity in the assay's ability to discriminate positive and negative control sera. This strategy provides an optimal method by which to determine cutoff absorbance values for ELISA. PMID:11986263

  15. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of pectinase enzyme from guava (Psidium guajava) peel: Enzyme recovery, specific activity, temperature, and storage stability.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Murshid, Fara Syazana; Manap, Mohd Yazid; Islam Sarker, Zaidul

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions on the yield, specific activity, temperature, and storage stability of the pectinase enzyme from guava peel. The ultrasound variables studied were sonication time (10-30 min), ultrasound temperature (30-50 °C), pH (2.0-8.0), and solvent-to-sample ratio (2:1 mL/g to 6:1 mL/g). The main goal was to optimize the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions to maximize the recovery of pectinase from guava peel with the most desirable enzyme-specific activity and stability. Under the optimum conditions, a high yield (96.2%), good specific activity (18.2 U/mg), temperature stability (88.3%), and storage stability (90.3%) of the extracted enzyme were achieved. The optimal conditions were 20 min sonication time, 40 °C temperature, at pH 5.0, using a 4:1 mL/g solvent-to-sample ratio. The study demonstrated that optimization of ultrasound-assisted process conditions for the enzyme extraction could improve the enzymatic characteristics and yield of the enzyme.

  16. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of filovirus species-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Eri; Yokoyama, Ayaka; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Igarashi, Manabu; Kishida, Noriko; Matsuno, Keita; Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Heinz; Ito, Kimihito; Saijo, Masayuki; Takada, Ayato

    2010-11-01

    Several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of filovirus-specific antibodies have been developed. However, diagnostic methods to distinguish antibodies specific to the respective species of filoviruses, which provide the basis for serological classification, are not readily available. We established an ELISA using His-tagged secreted forms of the transmembrane glycoproteins (GPs) of five different Ebola virus (EBOV) species and one Marburg virus (MARV) strain as antigens for the detection of filovirus species-specific antibodies. The GP-based ELISA was evaluated by testing antisera collected from mice immunized with virus-like particles as well as from humans and nonhuman primates infected with EBOV or MARV. In our ELISA, little cross-reactivity of IgG antibodies was observed in most of the mouse antisera. Although sera and plasma from some patients and monkeys showed notable cross-reactivity with the GPs from multiple filovirus species, the highest reactions of IgG were uniformly detected against the GP antigen homologous to the virus species that infected individuals. We further confirmed that MARV-specific IgM antibodies were specifically detected in specimens collected from patients during the acute phase of infection. These results demonstrate the usefulness of our ELISA for diagnostics as well as ecological and serosurvey studies.

  17. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for immunoglobulin M specific antibody for the diagnosis of melioidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kunakorn, M; Boonma, P; Khupulsup, K; Petchclai, B

    1990-01-01

    Indirect hemagglutination (IHA) is commonly used for serodiagnosis of melioidosis. However, in endemic areas, high background titers in normal populations and occasional low titers in patients with septicemic melioidosis prompted a search for a more sensitive and more specific method of serodiagnosis. An indirect fluorescent-antibody test for immunoglobulin M (IgM) specific antibody to Pseudomonas pseudomallei was more sensitive and more specific, but fluorescence microscopes are rarely available in the endemic areas. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for IgM antibody is an attractive alternative. An indirect ELISA for IgM antibody (IgM ELISA) and an IgM antibody capture ELISA for melioidosis were developed. Both tests, together with IHA, were evaluated for 153 serum specimens from blood donors and 16 serum specimens from 16 melioidosis patients. It was found that IHA, the IgM ELISA, and the IgM antibody capture ELISA had sensitivities of 88, 88, and 75%, respectively, with specificities of 97.4, 92.2, and 91.5%, respectively. When IHA was combined with IgM ELISA, a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 95.4% were obtained. The IgM ELISA and IHA should be used in combination for serodiagnosis of melioidosis. PMID:2199494

  18. 2 CFR 200.507 - Program-specific audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... auditee must electronically submit to the FAC the data collection form prepared in accordance with § 200... submitted to the FAC. (d) Other sections of this part may apply. Program-specific audits are subject to: (1...

  19. Program Aids Specification Of Multiple-Block Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.; Mccann, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    3DPREP computer program aids specification of multiple-block computational grids. Highly interactive graphical preprocessing program designed for use on powerful graphical scientific computer workstation. Divided into three main parts, each corresponding to principal graphical-and-alphanumerical display. Relieves user of some burden of collecting and formatting many data needed to specify blocks and grids, and prepares input data for NASA's 3DGRAPE grid-generating computer program.

  20. Program Aids Specification Of Multiple-Block Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.; Mccann, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    3DPREP computer program aids specification of multiple-block computational grids. Highly interactive graphical preprocessing program designed for use on powerful graphical scientific computer workstation. Divided into three main parts, each corresponding to principal graphical-and-alphanumerical display. Relieves user of some burden of collecting and formatting many data needed to specify blocks and grids, and prepares input data for NASA's 3DGRAPE grid-generating computer program.

  1. 14 CFR 91.1017 - Amending program manager's management specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amending program manager's management... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional... specifications will set a reasonable period (but not less than 7 days) within which the program manager...

  2. 13 CFR 130.350 - Specific program responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specific program responsibilities. 130.350 Section 130.350 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS... Program policies and procedures to improve the delivery of services by SBDCs to the small...

  3. 47 CFR 76.75 - Specific EEO program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Equal Employment Opportunity Requirements § 76.75 Specific EEO... necessary. Nothing in this section shall be interpreted to require a multichannel video programming...) In addition to using such recruitment sources, a multichannel video programming distributor...

  4. 47 CFR 76.75 - Specific EEO program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Equal Employment Opportunity Requirements § 76.75 Specific EEO... necessary. Nothing in this section shall be interpreted to require a multichannel video programming...) In addition to using such recruitment sources, a multichannel video programming distributor...

  5. 47 CFR 76.75 - Specific EEO program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Equal Employment Opportunity Requirements § 76.75 Specific EEO... necessary. Nothing in this section shall be interpreted to require a multichannel video programming...) In addition to using such recruitment sources, a multichannel video programming distributor...

  6. A quantitative technique for determining proteases and their substrate specificities and pH optima in crude enzyme extracts.

    PubMed

    Budic, Maruska; Kidric, Marjetka; Meglic, Vladimir; Cigić, Blaz

    2009-05-01

    A zymography technique based on native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) has been devised, which enables the substrate specificities, content and pH profiles of proteolytic enzymes to be determined in an unfractionated tissue extract. Enzymes were visualized by exogenous application of small molecule substrates that fluoresce when hydrolyzed. The linearity of response, treatment of background fluorescence, and effects of diffusion of substrate and enzyme were taken into account. Based on these studies, successive application of different substrates on the same gel has enabled the presence and specificity of individual enzymes to be determined. Differences in the concentrations and profiles of enzymes, resulting from environmental factors or ontogeny of the organism, can be assessed from crude extracts on a single gel. The technique was applied to aminopeptidases and peptidases in crude Phaseolus vulgaris leaf extracts. One enzyme active against Ala-AMC (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin), one enzyme active against Z-Arg-AMC, several enzymes active against Leu-AMC, and (for the first time in plants) several enzymes active against Phe-AMC were identified. The technique is very sensitive, and microgram quantities of total protein led to picomoles of liberated AMC, with a linear response over a 32-fold range of concentration. The experimental procedure, including electrophoresis, is rapid, taking approximately 1 h.

  7. Review of Ligand Specificity Factors for CYP1A Subfamily Enzymes from Molecular Modeling Studies Reported to-Date.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Goyal, Navneet; Liu, Jiawang; Foroozesh, Maryam

    2017-07-08

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) family 1A enzymes, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, are two of the most important enzymes implicated in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds through oxidation. These enzymes are also known to metabolize environmental procarcinogens into carcinogenic species, leading to the advent of several types of cancer. The development of selective inhibitors for these P450 enzymes, mitigating procarcinogenic oxidative effects, has been the focus of many studies in recent years. CYP1A1 is mainly found in extrahepatic tissues while CYP1A2 is the major CYP enzyme in human liver. Many molecules have been found to be metabolized by both of these enzymes, with varying rates and/or positions of oxidation. A complete understanding of the factors that govern the specificity and potency for the two CYP 1A enzymes is critical to the development of effective inhibitors. Computational molecular modeling tools have been used by several research groups to decipher the specificity and potency factors of the CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates. In this review, we perform a thorough analysis of the computational studies that are ligand-based and protein-ligand complex-based to catalog the various factors that govern the specificity/potency toward these two enzymes.

  8. Approximated maximum adsorption of His-tagged enzyme/mutants on Ni2+-NTA for comparison of specific activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanli; Long, Gaobo; Yang, Xiaolan; Hu, Xiaolei; Feng, Yiran; Tan, Deng; Xie, Yanling; Pu, Jun; Liao, Fei

    2015-03-01

    By approximating maximum activities of six-histidine (6His)-tagged enzyme/mutants adsorbed on Ni2+-NTA-magnetic-submicron-particle (Ni2+-NTA-MSP), a facile approach was tested for comparing enzyme specific activities in cell lysates. On a fixed quantity of Ni2+-NTA-MSP, the activity of an adsorbed 6His-tagged enzyme/mutant was measured via spectrophotometry; the activity after saturation adsorption (Vs) was predicted from response curve with quantities of total proteins from the same lysate as the predictor; Vs was equivalent of specific activity for comparison. This approach required abundance of a 6His-tagged enzyme/mutant over 3% among total proteins in lysate, an accurate series of quantities of total proteins from the same lysate, the largest activity generated by enzyme occupying over 85% binding sites on Ni2+-NTA-MSP and the minimum activity as absorbance change rates of 0.003 min(-1) for analysis. The prediction of Vs tolerated errors in concentrations of total proteins in lysates and was effective to 6His-tagged alkaline phosphatase and its 6His-tagged mutant in lysates. Notably, of those two 6His-tagged enzymes, Vs was effectively approximated with just one optimized quantity of lysates. Hence, this approach with Ni2+-NTA-MSP worked for comparison of specific activities of 6His-tagged enzyme/mutants in lysates when they had sufficient abundance among proteins and activities of adsorbed enzymes were measurable.

  9. Purification and characterization of cellulase from North Pacific krill (Euphausia pacifica). Analysis of cleavage specificity of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Akihiko; Sato, Shiori; Kondo, Ayumi; Tominaga, Keiko; Yuasa, Keizo

    2012-01-01

    Krill are filter feeders that consume algae, plankton and detritus, indicating that krill possess an adequate cellulose digesting system. However, less is known about the enzymatic properties of crustacean cellulases compared to termite cellulases. In the present study, 48 kDa-cellulase was highly purified from krill (Euphausia pacifica) in an effort to determine the cleavage specificity of the enzyme. The most notable characteristic of the enzyme was its high activity against both lichenan and carboxymethyl cellulose. The enzyme hydrolyzed internal β-1,4 glycosidic bonds within lichenan as well as carboxymethyl cellulose to release oligosaccharides and glucose. The effects of pH and temperature on the activity and stability of both enzyme activities were almost identical. Cello-oligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization of 4-6 were hydrolyzed by the enzyme, and the same endo-products, cellotriose, cellobiose and glucose, were produced from these oligosaccharides. Neither cellotriose nor cellobiose was hydrolyzed by the enzyme. The enzyme digested filter paper and sea lettuce to produce cellobiose, cellotriose and glucose as major products. Although amino acid sequence homology of the enzyme with termite cellulases and the presence of oligosaccharides in the enzyme suggested that the enzyme is produced by krill itself, further analysis is necessary.

  10. The Evolution of Substrate Specificity by tRNA Modification Enzymes.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Katherine M; Rubio, Mary Anne T; Alfonzo, Juan D

    2017-01-01

    All types of nucleic acids in cells undergo naturally occurring chemical modifications, including DNA, rRNA, mRNA, snRNA, and most prominently tRNA. Over 100 different modifications have been described and every position in the purine and pyrimidine bases can be modified; often the sugar is also modified [1]. In tRNA, the function of modifications varies; some modulate global and/or local RNA structure, and others directly impact decoding and may be essential for viability. Whichever the case, the overall importance of modifications is highlighted by both their evolutionary conservation and the fact that organisms use a substantial portion of their genomes to encode modification enzymes, far exceeding what is needed for the de novo synthesis of the canonical nucleotides themselves [2]. Although some modifications occur at exactly the same nucleotide position in tRNAs from the three domains of life, many can be found at various positions in a particular tRNA and their location may vary between and within different tRNAs. With this wild array of chemical diversity and substrate specificities, one of the big challenges in the tRNA modification field has been to better understand at a molecular level the modes of substrate recognition by the different modification enzymes; in this realm RNA binding rests at the heart of the problem. This chapter will focus on several examples of modification enzymes where their mode of RNA binding is well understood; from these, we will try to draw general conclusions and highlight growing themes that may be applicable to the RNA modification field at large. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C: studies on synthetic substrates, inhibitors and a synthetic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Vizitiu, D; Kriste, A G; Campbell, A S; Thatcher, G R

    1996-01-01

    Enzyme inhibition studies on phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from B. Cereus were performed in order to gain an understanding of the mechanism of the PI-PLC family of enzymes and to aid inhibitor design. Inhibition studies on two synthetic cyclic phosphonate analogues (1,2) of inositol cyclic-1:2-monophosphate (cIP), glycerol-2-phosphate and vanadate were performed using natural phosphatidylinositol (PI) substrate in Triton X100 co-micelles and an NMR assay. Further inhibition studies on PI-PLC from B. Cereus were performed using a chromogenic, synthetic PI analogue (DPG-PI), an HPLC assay and Aerosol-OT (AOT), phytic acid and vanadate as inhibitors. For purposes of comparison, a model PI-PLC enzyme system was developed employing a synthetic Cu(II)-metallomicelle and a further synthetic PI analogue (IPP-PI). The studies employing natural PI substrate in Triton X100 co-micelles and synthetic DPG-PI in the absence of surfactant indicate three classes of PI-PLC inhibitors: (1) active-site directed inhibitors (e.g. 1,2); (2) water-soluble polyanions (e.g. tetravanadate, phytic acid); (3) surfactant anions (e.g. AOT). Three modes of molecular recognition are indicated to be important: (1) active site molecular recognition; (2) recognition at an anion-recognition site which may be the active site, and; (3) interfacial (or hydrophobic) recognition which may be exploited to increase affinity for the anion-recognition site in anionic surfactants such as AOT. The most potent inhibition of PI-PLC was observed by tetravanadate and AOT. The metallomicelle model system was observed to mimic PI-PLC in reproducing transesterification of the PI analogue substrate to yield cIP as product and in showing inhibition by phytic acid and AOT.

  12. Altered substrate specificity of the Pterygoplichthys sp. (Loricariidae) CYP1A enzyme.

    PubMed

    Parente, Thiago E M; Urban, Philippe; Pompon, Denis; Rebelo, Mauro F

    2014-09-01

    Ethoxyresorufin is a classical substrate for vertebrate CYP1A enzymes. In Pterygoplichthys sp. (Loricariidae) this enzyme possesses 48 amino acids substitutions compared to CYP1A sequences from other vertebrate species. These substitutions or a certain subset substitution are responsible for the non-detection of the EROD reaction in this species liver microsomes. In the present study, we investigated the catalytic activity of Pterygoplichthys sp. CYP1A toward 15 potential substrates in order to understand the substrate preferences of this modified CYP1A. The fish gene was expressed in yeast and the accumulation of the protein was confirmed by both the characteristic P450-CO absorbance spectra and by detection with monoclonal antibodies. Catalytic activities were assayed with yeast microsomes and four resorufin ethers, six coumarin derivates, three flavones, resveratrol and ethoxyfluoresceinethylester. Results demonstrated that the initial velocity pattern of this enzyme for the resorufin derivatives is different from the one described for most vertebrate CYP1As. The initial velocity for the activity with the coumarin derivatives is several orders of magnitude higher than with the resorufins, i.e. the turnover number (kcat) for ECOD is 400× higher than for EROD. Nonetheless, the specificity constant (kcat/km) for EROD is only slightly higher than for ECOD. EFEE is degraded at a rate comparable to the resorufins. Pterygoplichthys sp. CYP1A also degrades 7-methoxyflavone and β-naphthoflavone but not resveratrol and chrysin. These results indicate a divergent substrate preference for Pterygoplichthys sp. CYP1A, which may be involved in the adaptation of Loricariidae fish to their particular environment and feeding habits.

  13. Stage-specific distribution of oxidative radicals and antioxidant enzymes in the midgut of Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Natraj; Kodrík, Dalibor; Turanli, Ferit; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2007-01-01

    The titers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) represented by superoxide anion and general peroxides, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), are regulated in the midgut of the Colorado potato beetle (CPB) relative to the gut compartment, developmental stage, and food intake. ROS concentration is low in the potato leaves but it is very high in their digest in insect's anterior midgut. It is proposed that intensive ROS production in this gut region is linked to the processing of allelochemicals. SOD and CAT activities, low oxygen tension, and unidentified redox systems that maintain a slightly reducing milieu in the midgut lumen (pe+pH=6.95 declining to 5.36), obviously contribute to the decrease of ROS concentration along the gut length to a minimum in the wall of posterior midgut region. SOD and CAT activities are higher in the potato leaves than in the midgut tissues but the role of plant enzymes in ROS elimination within the gut lumen remains to be shown. A lower level of ROS and a higher antioxidant potential in the adult than in the larval midgut indicate stage specificity in the management of oxidative stress. The antioxidant defense is high in the diapausing adults that contain no detectable superoxide and about ten times less peroxides than the reproducing adults.

  14. Evolution of substrate specificity in a retained enzyme driven by gene loss

    DOE PAGES

    Juárez-Vázquez, Ana Lilia; Edirisinghe, Janaka N.; Verduzco-Castro, Ernesto A.; ...

    2017-03-31

    The connection between gene loss and the functional adaptation of retained proteins is still poorly understood. We apply phylogenomics and metabolic modeling to detect bacterial species that are evolving by gene loss, with the finding that Actinomycetaceae genomes from human cavities are undergoing sizable reductions, including loss of L-histidine and L-tryptophan biosynthesis. We observe that the dual-substrate phosphoribosyl isomerase A or priA gene, at which these pathways converge, appears to coevolve with the occurrence of trp and his genes. Characterization of a dozen PriA homologs shows that these enzymes adapt from bifunctionality in the largest genomes, to a monofunctional,more » yet not necessarily specialized, inefficient form in genomes undergoing reduction. These functional changes are accomplished via mutations, which result from relaxation of purifying selection, in residues structurally mapped after sequence and X-ray structural analyses. Our results show how gene loss can drive the evolution of substrate specificity from retained enzymes.« less

  15. Evolution of Substrate Specificity in A Retained Enzyme Driven by Gene Loss

    DOE PAGES

    Juarez-Vazquez, Ana L.; Edirisinghe, Janaka N.; Verduzco-Castro, Ernesto A.; ...

    2017-03-31

    The connection between gene loss and the functional adaptation of retained proteins is still poorly understood. Here, we apply phylogenomics and metabolic modeling to detect bacterial species that are evolving by gene loss, with the finding that Actinomycetaceae genomes from human cavities are undergoing sizable reductions, including loss of L-histidine and L-tryptophan biosynthesis. We also observe that the dual-substrate phosphoribosyl isomerase A or priA gene, at which these pathways converge, appears to coevolve with the occurrence of trp and his genes. Characterization of a dozen PriA homologs shows that these enzymes adapt from bifunctionality in the largest genomes, to amore » monofunctional, yet not necessarily specialized, inefficient form in genomes undergoing reduction. These functional changes are accomplished via mutations, which result from relaxation of purifying selection, in residues structurally mapped after sequence and X-ray structural analyses. These results show how gene loss can drive the evolution of substrate specificity from retained enzymes.« less

  16. 'Chiral compartmentation' in metabolism: enzyme stereo-specificity yielding evolutionary options.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Pagès, Guilhem; Naumann, Christoph

    2013-09-02

    We introduce the concept of 'chiral compartmentation' in metabolism that emerges from the stereo-specificity of enzymes for their substrate(s). The fully differentiated mammalian erythrocyte has no sub-cellular organelles and yet it displays compartmentation of lactic acid that is generated either by glycolysis or the glyoxalase pathway. A form of 'operational compartmentation' exists, based not on the chemistry of the reactive groups in the molecules but their stereoisomerism. This we call 'chiral compartmentation', and the rationale for its 'natural selection' in the erythrocyte (and presumably in the cytoplasm of other cells) is discussed. Increasing awareness of the presence of d-amino acids in proteins in the otherwise dominant 'L-chiral biosphere', and of the preferential use of one enantiomer of a metabolite versus the other is largely due to recent developments in rapidly-applicable, analytical-chemical methods. We confirmed that the glyoxalase pathway yields D-lactic acid by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of stretched chiral hydrogels. The activities of the two lactate-producing pathways have been described by numerical integration of simultaneous non-linear differential equations, based on enzyme models like that introduced by Michaelis and Menten in 1913. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Controlling substrate specificity and product regio- and stereo-selectivities of P450 enzymes without mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Polic, Vanja; Auclair, Karine

    2014-10-15

    P450 enzymes (P450s) are well known for their ability to oxidize unactivated CH bonds with high regio- and stereoselectivity. Hence, there is emerging interest in exploiting P450s as potential biocatalysts. Although bacterial P450s typically show higher activity than their mammalian counterparts, they tend to be more substrate selective. Most drug-metabolizing P450s on the other hand, display remarkable substrate promiscuity, yet product prediction remains challenging. Protein engineering is one established strategy to overcome these issues. A less explored, yet promising alternative involves substrate engineering. This review discusses the use of small molecules for controlling the substrate specificity and product selectivity of P450s. The focus is on two approaches, one taking advantage of non-covalent decoy molecules, and the other involving covalent substrate modifications.

  18. Influence of fermentation conditions on specific activity of the enzymes alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase from yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, J C; Ortega, J M

    1993-01-01

    The effects of anaerobic, semi-aerobic and short aeration fermentation conditions and the addition of ergosterol and oleic acid to musts on the specific activity of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH and ALDH) from two yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii, were studied. ADH I biosynthesis only occurred during the first few hours of fermentation. ADH II from S. cerevisiae and ALDH-NADP+ from the two yeast species behaved as constitutive enzymes under all fermentation conditions. ADH II from T. delbrueckii was only synthesized in small amounts, and its activity was always lower than in S. cerevisiae, where it was responsible for the termination of alcoholic fermentation during the steady growth phase.

  19. Cell-specific Labeling Enzymes for Analysis of Cell–Cell Communication in Continuous Co-culture*

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Norrie, Ida C.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Lim, Lindsay; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    We report the orthologous screening, engineering, and optimization of amino acid conversion enzymes for cell-specific proteomic labeling. Intracellular endoplasmic-reticulum-anchored Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DDCM.tub-KDEL) confers cell-specific meso-2,6-diaminopimelate-dependent proliferation to multiple eukaryotic cell types. Optimized lysine racemase (LyrM37-KDEL) supports D-lysine specific proliferation and efficient cell-specific isotopic labeling. When ectopically expressed in discrete cell types, these enzymes confer 90% cell-specific isotopic labeling efficiency after 10 days of co-culture. Moreover, DDCM.tub-KDEL and LyrM37-KDEL facilitate equally high cell-specific labeling fidelity without daily media exchange. Consequently, the reported novel enzyme pairing can be used to study cell-specific signaling in uninterrupted, continuous co-cultures. Demonstrating the importance of increased labeling stability for addressing novel biological questions, we compare the cell-specific phosphoproteome of fibroblasts in direct co-culture with epithelial tumor cells in both interrupted (daily media exchange) and continuous (no media exchange) co-cultures. This analysis identified multiple cell-specific phosphorylation sites specifically regulated in the continuous co-culture. Given their applicability to multiple cell types, continuous co-culture labeling fidelity, and suitability for long-term cell–cell phospho-signaling experiments, we propose DDCM.tub-KDEL and LyrM37-KDEL as excellent enzymes for cell-specific labeling with amino acid precursors. PMID:24820872

  20. Sequence-specific cleavage of RNA by Type II restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Iain A.; Stickel, Shawn K.; Roberts, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of 223 Type II restriction endonucleases to hydrolyze RNA–DNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide substrates was assessed. Despite the significant topological and sequence asymmetry introduced when one strand of a DNA duplex is substituted by RNA we find that six restriction enzymes (AvaII, AvrII, BanI, HaeIII, HinfI and TaqI), exclusively of the Type IIP class that recognize palindromic or interrupted-palindromic DNA sequences, catalyze robust and specific cleavage of both RNA and DNA strands of such a substrate. Time-course analyses indicate that some endonucleases hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds in both strands simultaneously whereas others appear to catalyze sequential reactions in which either the DNA or RNA product accumulates more rapidly. Such strand-specific variation in cleavage susceptibility is both significant (up to orders of magnitude difference) and somewhat sequence dependent, notably in relation to the presence or absence of uracil residues in the RNA strand. Hybridization to DNA oligonucleotides that contain endonuclease recognition sites can be used to achieve targeted hydrolysis of extended RNA substrates produced by in vitro transcription. The ability to ‘restrict’ an RNA–DNA hybrid, albeit with a limited number of restriction endonucleases, provides a method whereby individual RNA molecules can be targeted for site-specific cleavage in vitro. PMID:20702422

  1. Stereological assessment of extracellular polymeric substances, exo-enzymes, and specific bacterial strains in bioaggregates using fluorescence experiments.

    PubMed

    Adav, Sunil S; Lin, Justin Chun-Te; Yang, Zhen; Whiteley, Chris G; Lee, Duu-Jong; Peng, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Zhen-Peng

    2010-01-01

    This review addresses the introduction of fluorescent molecular tags into exo-enzymes and extra polymeric substances of bioaggregates and the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to map their role, purpose and quantitative description of the biological processes they undertake. Multiple color staining coupled with CLSM and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) and flow cytometry have identified the individual polymeric substances, whether they are proteins, lipids, polysaccharides, nucleic acids or antibodies, as well as the microorganisms in the bioaggregate. Procedures are presented for simultaneous multicolor staining with seven different fluorochromes - SYTOX Blue for nucleic acids; Nile red for lipids; Calcofluor white [CW] for beta-polysaccharides; concanavalin A [Con A] for alpha-poly-saccharides; fluorescein-isothiocyanate [FITC] for proteins; SYTO 63 for live microbial cells and Calcium Green for monitoring calcium levels in the microbial cells. For the distribution of certain microbial strains, metabolic enzymes and extrapolymeric substances to be quantitatively described the generated colored images are converted into digital forms under specific predefined criteria. Procedures and computer software programs (Amira; MATLAB) are presented in order to quantitatively establish grid patterns from the CLSM images. The image is digitized using a threshholding algorithm followed by a reconstruction of the image as a volumetric grid for finite element simulation. The original color image is first converted to a grey followed by resizing, detection and modification of bilevel images and finally a total reversal of the image colors. The grid file is then used by specific computer software (Gambit, Fluent) for further numerical studies incorporating chemical reactions, transport processes and computational fluid dynamics including intra-bioaggregate fluid flow, and heat and mass transfer within the bioaggregate matrix. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc

  2. SP-10 bacteriophage-specific nucleic acid and enzyme synthesis in Bacillus subtilis W23.

    PubMed Central

    Markewych, O; Boghosian, A; Dosmar, M; Ende, D; Witmer, H

    1977-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis W23 was infected with a clear-plaque variant of SP-10 phage, namely, SP-10c. Exogenous thymidine was not incorporated into phage DNA (even in the presence of deoxyadenosine), nor was there any transfer of thymidine nucleotides from bacterial to viral DNA. The lytic program was unaffected by concentrations of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine sufficient to reduce bacterial DNA synthesis by greater than 95%. Although these data are consistent with the interpretation that thymidine nucleotides are excluded from phage DNA, formic acid digests of SP-10c DNA contained what appeared to be the four conventional bases; however, adenine and thymine were not recovered in equimolar yields. DNA-RNA hybridization and hybridization competition experiments were done. Synthesis of host RNA started to wane moments postinfection and stopped completely by 36 min. SP-10c coded for discrete classes of early and late RNA. The possibility of discrete subclasses of early RNA exists. Replication of the bacterial genome appeared to terminate 12 min postinfection. Degradation of the host DNA to acid-soluble material started at 36 min and, by the end of the latent period, greater than 90% of the host chromosome was hydrolyzed. Four apparent phage-coded enzymes have been identified. A di- and triphosphatase degraded dUTP, dUDP, dTTP, and dTDP (and, to a lesser extent, dCDP and d CTP) to the corresponding monophosphates; the enzyme had no apparent activity on dATP and dGTP. SP10c also coded for a DNA-dependent DNA polymerase, lysozyme, and a nuclease that degrades native bacterial DNA. Judging from the dependence of enzyme synthesis on the time of addition of rifampin (an inhibitor of the initiation of RNA synthesis), messengers for the di- and triphosphatase, as well as the nuclease, are transcribed from promoters that start to function 6 min postinfection. Promoters for polymerase and lysozyme did not become functional until 8 and 16 min postinfection, respectively. PMID:137989

  3. Aspects of Protein Chemistry. Part I: Some Recent Insights Into Enzyme Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Describes some recent advances in enzyme structure and action, including a description of enzyme-substrate interaction. Discusses the methods for determination of amino acid sequences in proteins; the actions of chymotrypsin, trypsin, and elastase; and details of the enzyme-substrate complex derived from kinetic studies and x-ray diffraction…

  4. Aspects of Protein Chemistry. Part I: Some Recent Insights Into Enzyme Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Describes some recent advances in enzyme structure and action, including a description of enzyme-substrate interaction. Discusses the methods for determination of amino acid sequences in proteins; the actions of chymotrypsin, trypsin, and elastase; and details of the enzyme-substrate complex derived from kinetic studies and x-ray diffraction…

  5. Development of species-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diagnosis of Johne's disease in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Vannuffel, P; Gilot, P; Limbourg, B; Naerhuyzen, B; Dieterich, C; Coene, M; Machtelinckx, L; Cocito, C

    1994-01-01

    The previously described (M. De Kesel, P. Gilot, M.-C. Misonne, M. Coene, and C. Cocito, J. Clin. Microbiol., 31:947-954, 1993) a362 recombinant polypeptide of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was used as reagent for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This ELISA, which is endowed with species specificity with respect to the other mycobacteria, was applied to the analysis of bovine paratuberculosis (Johne's disease), an endemic mycobacteriosis of cattle caused by M. paratuberculosis. The distribution of anti-a362 antibodies in the cattle population was analyzed by a computer program (mixture population model) to determine a cutoff value for the test. The prevalence of a362 seropositivity in the Belgian bovine population was estimated to be 12%. The sensitivity of the a362 assay was 70%, as determined with reference sera from the U.S. National Repository of Paratuberculosis Specimens. Some 40% of the animals in the herds with paratuberculosis analyzed were found to be positive by the a362 assay. The latter proved to be 95% specific with respect to both healthy and tuberculous cattle. PMID:8051246

  6. Alterations in Circulatory and Renal Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 in Fetal Programmed Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shaltout, Hossam A.; Figueroa, Jorge P.; Rose, James C.; Diz, Debra I.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Antenatal betamethasone treatment is a widely accepted therapy to accelerate lung development and improve survival in preterm infants. However, there are reports that infants who receive antenatal glucocorticoids exhibit higher systolic blood pressure in their early adolescent years. We have developed an experimental model of programming whereby the offspring of pregnant sheep administered clinically relevant doses of betamethasone exhibit elevated blood pressure. We tested the hypothesis as to whether alterations in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2, and neprilysin in serum, urine, and proximal tubules are associated with this increase in mean arterial pressure. Male sheep were administered betamethasone (2 doses of 0.17 mg/kg, 24 hours apart) or vehicle at the 80th day of gestation and delivered at term. Sheep were instrumented at adulthood (1.8 years) for direct conscious recording of mean arterial pressure. Serum and urine were collected and proximal tubules isolated from the renal cortex. Betamethasone-treated animals had elevated mean arterial pressure (97±3 versus 83±2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and a 25% increase in serum ACE activity (48.4±7.0 versus 36.0±2.7 fmol/mL per minute) but a 40% reduction in serum ACE2 activity (18.8±1.2 versus 31.4±4.4 fmol/mL per minute). In isolated proximal tubules, ACE2 activity and expression were 50% lower in the treated sheep with no significant change in ACE or neprilysin activities. We conclude that antenatal steroid treatment results in the chronic alteration of ACE and ACE2 in the circulatory and tubular compartments, which may contribute to the higher blood pressure in this model of fetal programming-induced hypertension. PMID:19047579

  7. Endotoxin reduces specific pulmonary uptake of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody to angiotensin-converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Muzykantov, V.R.; Puchnina, E.A.; Atochina, E.N.; Hiemish, H.; Slinkin, M.A.; Meertsuk, F.E.; Danilov, S.M. )

    1991-03-01

    The biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (Mab) to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was examined in normal and endotoxin-treated rats. Endotoxin administration at a dose of 4 mg/kg induced mild or middle pulmonary edema. The ACE activity in lung homogenate remained virtually unchanged, while the activity of serum ACE increased 15 hr after endotoxin infusion. In normal rats, anti-ACE Mab accumulates specifically in the lung after i.v. injection. Endotoxin injection induces reduction of specific pulmonary uptake of this antibody. Even in non-edematous endotoxemia, the accumulation of anti-ACE Mab antibody (Mab 9B9) decreased from 19.02 to 11.91% of ID/g of tissue without any change in accumulation of control nonspecific IgG. The antibody distribution in other organs and its blood level were almost the same as in the control. In a case of endotoxemia accompanied by increased microvascular permeability, the lung accumulation of Mab 9B9 was reduced to 9.17% of ID/g of tissue, while the accumulation of nonspecific IgG increased to 1.44% versus 0.89% in the control.

  8. NKT sublineage specification and survival requires the ubiquitin-modifying enzyme TNFAIP3/A20

    PubMed Central

    Verheugen, Eveline; Taghon, Tom; Lambrecht, Bart N.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate lymphocytes that differentiate into NKT1, NKT2, and NKT17 sublineages during development. However, the signaling events that control NKT sublineage specification and differentiation remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ubiquitin-modifying enzyme TNFAIP3/A20, an upstream regulator of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling in T cells, is an essential cell-intrinsic regulator of NKT differentiation. A20 is differentially expressed during NKT cell development, regulates NKT cell maturation, and specifically controls the differentiation and survival of NKT1 and NKT2, but not NKT17, sublineages. Remaining A20-deficient NKT1 and NKT2 thymocytes are hyperactivated in vivo and secrete elevated levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines after TCR ligation in vitro. Defective NKT development was restored by compound deficiency of MALT1, a key downstream component of TCR signaling in T cells. These findings therefore show that negative regulation of TCR signaling during NKT development controls the differentiation and survival of NKT1 and NKT2 cells. PMID:27551157

  9. Lid domain plasticity and lipid flexibility modulate enzyme specificity in human monoacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Laura; Arencibia, Jose M; Bono, Luca; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; De Vivo, Marco

    2017-01-12

    Human monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is a membrane-interacting enzyme that generates pro-inflammatory signaling molecules. For this reason, MAGL inhibition is a promising strategy to treat pain, cancer, and neuroinflammatory diseases. MAGL can hydrolyze monoacylglycerols bearing an acyl chain of different lengths and degrees of unsaturation, cleaving primarily the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Importantly, the enzymatic binding site of MAGL is confined by a 75-amino-acid-long, flexible cap domain, named 'lid domain', which is structurally similar to that found in several other lipases. However, it is unclear how lid domain plasticity affects catalysis in MAGL. By integrating extensive molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments, we here define a lid-domain-mediated mechanism for substrate selection and binding in MAGL catalysis. In particular, we clarify the key role of Phe159 and Ile179, two conserved residues within the lid domain, in regulating substrate specificity in MAGL. We conclude by proposing that other structurally related lipases may share this lid-domain-mediated mechanism for substrate specificity.

  10. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Detection of Equine Antibodies Specific to Sarcocystis neurona Surface Antigens†

    PubMed Central

    Hoane, Jessica S.; Morrow, Jennifer K.; Saville, William J.; Dubey, J. P.; Granstrom, David E.; Howe, Daniel K.

    2005-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a common neurologic disease of horses in the Americas. We have developed a set of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on the four major surface antigens of S. neurona (SnSAGs) to analyze the equine antibody response to S. neurona. The SnSAG ELISAs were optimized and standardized with a sample set of 36 equine sera that had been characterized by Western blotting against total S. neurona parasite antigen, the current gold standard for S. neurona serology. The recombinant SnSAG2 (rSnSAG2) ELISA showed the highest sensitivity and specificity at 95.5% and 92.9%, respectively. In contrast, only 68.2% sensitivity and 71.4% specificity were achieved with the rSnSAG1 ELISA, indicating that this antigen may not be a reliable serological marker for analyzing antibodies against S. neurona in horses. Importantly, the ELISA antigens did not show cross-reactivity with antisera to Sarcocystis fayeri or Neospora hughesi, two other equine parasites. The accuracy and reliability exhibited by the SnSAG ELISAs suggest that these assays will be valuable tools for examining the equine immune response against S. neurona infection, which may help in understanding the pathobiology of this accidental parasite-host interaction. Moreover, with modification and further investigation, the SnSAG ELISAs have potential for use as immunodiagnostic tests to aid in the identification of horses affected by EPM. PMID:16148170

  11. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of equine antibodies specific to Sarcocystis neurona surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Hoane, Jessica S; Morrow, Jennifer K; Saville, William J; Dubey, J P; Granstrom, David E; Howe, Daniel K

    2005-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a common neurologic disease of horses in the Americas. We have developed a set of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on the four major surface antigens of S. neurona (SnSAGs) to analyze the equine antibody response to S. neurona. The SnSAG ELISAs were optimized and standardized with a sample set of 36 equine sera that had been characterized by Western blotting against total S. neurona parasite antigen, the current gold standard for S. neurona serology. The recombinant SnSAG2 (rSnSAG2) ELISA showed the highest sensitivity and specificity at 95.5% and 92.9%, respectively. In contrast, only 68.2% sensitivity and 71.4% specificity were achieved with the rSnSAG1 ELISA, indicating that this antigen may not be a reliable serological marker for analyzing antibodies against S. neurona in horses. Importantly, the ELISA antigens did not show cross-reactivity with antisera to Sarcocystis fayeri or Neospora hughesi, two other equine parasites. The accuracy and reliability exhibited by the SnSAG ELISAs suggest that these assays will be valuable tools for examining the equine immune response against S. neurona infection, which may help in understanding the pathobiology of this accidental parasite-host interaction. Moreover, with modification and further investigation, the SnSAG ELISAs have potential for use as immunodiagnostic tests to aid in the identification of horses affected by EPM.

  12. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program Specification Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hewes, Tom; Peeks, Brady

    2013-02-01

    The DOE research team Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Home Program (NEEM) program administrator, collaborated to research a new specification that would reduce the energy requirements of a NEEM home.This research identified and developed combinations of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that can readily can be deployed in the manufacturing setting that reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50% over the present NEEM specifications.

  13. Languages for Specific Purposes. Program Design and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackay, Ronald, Ed.; Palmer, Joe Darwin, Ed.

    This collection of research on curriculum and program development in languages for special purposes (LSP) contains the following papers: (1) "LSP Curriculum Development--From Policy to Practice," by Ronald Mackay and Maryse Bosquet; (2) "The Problem of Needs Assessment in English for Specific Purposes: Some Theoretical and Practical…

  14. 29 CFR 99.235 - Program-specific audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... control, compliance requirements, suggested audit procedures, and audit reporting requirements. The... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program-specific audits. 99.235 Section 99.235 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits...

  15. 14 CFR 91.1017 - Amending program manager's management specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Administrator determines that safety and the public interest require the amendment of any management... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Amending program manager's management specifications. 91.1017 Section 91.1017 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  16. 14 CFR 91.1017 - Amending program manager's management specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Administrator determines that safety and the public interest require the amendment of any management... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Amending program manager's management specifications. 91.1017 Section 91.1017 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  17. 14 CFR 91.1017 - Amending program manager's management specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Administrator determines that safety and the public interest require the amendment of any management... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Amending program manager's management specifications. 91.1017 Section 91.1017 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  18. Podocyte-specific overexpression of human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 attenuates diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Renisha; Milagres, Rosangela; Dilauro, Marc; Gutsol, Alex; Xiao, Fengxia; Zimpelmann, Joseph; Kennedy, Chris; Wysocki, Jan; Batlle, Daniel; Burns, Kevin D

    2012-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades angiotensin II to angiotensin-(1-7) and is expressed in podocytes. Here we overexpressed ACE2 in podocytes in experimental diabetic nephropathy using transgenic methods where a nephrin promoter drove the expression of human ACE2. Glomeruli from these mice had significantly increased mRNA, protein, and activity of ACE2 compared to wild-type mice. Male mice were treated with streptozotocin to induce diabetes. After 16 weeks, there was no significant difference in plasma glucose levels between wild-type and transgenic diabetic mice. Urinary albumin was significantly increased in wild-type diabetic mice at 4 weeks, whereas albuminuria in transgenic diabetic mice did not differ from wild-type nondiabetic mice. However, this effect was transient and by 16 weeks both transgenic and nontransgenic diabetic mice had similar rates of proteinuria. Compared to wild-type diabetic mice, transgenic diabetic mice had an attenuated increase in mesangial area, decreased glomerular area, and a blunted decrease in nephrin expression. Podocyte numbers decreased in wild-type diabetic mice at 16 weeks, but were unaffected in transgenic diabetic mice. At 8 weeks, kidney cortical expression of transforming growth factor-β1 was significantly inhibited in transgenic diabetic mice as compared to wild-type diabetic mice. Thus, the podocyte-specific overexpression of human ACE2 transiently attenuates the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Single-dilution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for quantification of antigen-specific salmonid antibody

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alcorn, S.W.; Pascho, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed on the basis of testing a single dilution of serum to quantify the level of antibody to the p57 protein of Renibaclerium salmoninarum in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). The levels of antibody were interpolated from a standard curve constructed by relating the optical densities (OD) produced by several dilutions of a high-titer rainbow trout (O. mykiss) antiserum to the p57 protein. The ELISA OD values produced by as many as 36 test sera on each microplate were compared with the standard curve to calculate the antigen-specific antibody activity. Repeated measurements of 36 samples on 3 microplates on each of 6 assay dates indicated that the mean intraassay coefficient of variation (CV) was 6.68% (range, 0-23%) and the mean interassay CV was 8.29% (range, 4-16%). The antibody levels determined for the serum sample from 24 sockeye salmon vaccinated with a recombinant p57 protein generally were correlated with the levels determined by endpoint titration (r2 = 0.936) and with results from another ELISA that was based on extrapolation of antibody levels from a standard curve (r2 = 0.956). The single-dilution antibody ELISA described here increases the number of samples that can be tested on each microplate compared with immunoassays based on analysis of several dilutions of each test serum. It includes controls for interassay standardization and can be used to test fish weighing <3 g.

  20. Inactivation of the ubiquitin-specific protease 19 deubiquitinating enzyme protects against muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Nathalie; Jammoul, Samer; Moore, Tamara; Wykes, Linda; Hallauer, Patricia L; Hastings, Kenneth E M; Stretch, Cynthia; Baracos, Vickie; Chevalier, Stéphanie; Plourde, Marie; Coyne, Erin; Wing, Simon S

    2015-09-01

    The ubiquitin system plays a critical role in muscle wasting. Previous work has focused on the roles of ubiquitination. However, a role for deubiquitination in this process has not been established. Because ubiquitin-specific protease (USP)19 deubiquitinating enzyme is induced in skeletal muscle in many catabolic conditions, we generated USP19 knockout (KO) mice. These mice lost less muscle mass than wild-type (WT) animals in response to glucocorticoids, a common systemic cause of muscle atrophy as well as in response to denervation, a model of disuse atrophy. KO mice retained more strength and had less myofiber atrophy with both type I and type IIb fibers being protected. Rates of muscle protein synthesis were similar in WT and KO mice, suggesting that the sparing of atrophy was attributed to suppressed protein degradation. Consistent with this, expression of the ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1 as well as several autophagy genes was decreased in the muscles of catabolic KO mice. Expression of USP19 correlates with that of MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1 in skeletal muscles from patients with lung cancer or gastrointestinal cancer, suggesting that USP19 is involved in human muscle wasting. Inhibition of USP19 may be a useful approach to the treatment of many muscle-wasting conditions.

  1. Structure of UBE2Z Enzyme Provides Functional Insight into Specificity in the FAT10 Protein Conjugation Machinery*

    PubMed Central

    Schelpe, Julien; Monté, Didier; Dewitte, Frédérique; Sixma, Titia K.; Rucktooa, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    FAT10 conjugation, a post-translational modification analogous to ubiquitination, specifically requires UBA6 and UBE2Z as its activating (E1) and conjugating (E2) enzymes. Interestingly, these enzymes can also function in ubiquitination. We have determined the crystal structure of UBE2Z and report how the different domains of this E2 enzyme are organized. We further combine our structural data with mutational analyses to understand how specificity is achieved in the FAT10 conjugation pathway. We show that specificity toward UBA6 and UBE2Z lies within the C-terminal CYCI tetrapeptide in FAT10. We also demonstrate that this motif slows down transfer rates for FAT10 from UBA6 onto UBE2Z. PMID:26555268

  2. AMPHION: Specification-based programming for scientific subroutine libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael; Philpot, Andrew; Pressburger, Thomas; Underwood, Ian; Waldinger, Richard; Stickel, Mark

    1994-01-01

    AMPHION is a knowledge-based software engineering (KBSE) system that guides a user in developing a diagram representing a formal problem specification. It then automatically implements a solution to this specification as a program consisting of calls to subroutines from a library. The diagram provides an intuitive domain oriented notation for creating a specification that also facilitates reuse and modification. AMPHION'S architecture is domain independent. AMPHION is specialized to an application domain by developing a declarative domain theory. Creating a domain theory is an iterative process that currently requires the joint expertise of domain experts and experts in automated formal methods for software development.

  3. Molecular insights into the surface-specific arrangement of complement C5 convertase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Berends, Evelien T M; Gorham, Ronald D; Ruyken, Maartje; Soppe, Jasper A; Orhan, Hatice; Aerts, Piet C; de Haas, Carla J C; Gros, Piet; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2015-11-09

    Complement is a large protein network in plasma that is crucial for human immune defenses and a major cause of aberrant inflammatory reactions. The C5 convertase is a multi-molecular protease complex that catalyses the cleavage of native C5 into its biologically important products. So far, it has been difficult to study the exact molecular arrangement of C5 convertases, because their non-catalytic subunits (C3b) are covalently linked to biological surfaces through a reactive thioester. Through development of a highly purified model system for C5 convertases, we here aim to provide insights into the surface-specific nature of these important protease complexes. Alternative pathway (AP) C5 convertases were generated on small streptavidin beads that were coated with purified C3b molecules. Site-specific biotinylation of C3b via the thioester allowed binding of C3b in the natural orientation on the surface. In the presence of factor B and factor D, these C3b beads could effectively convert C5. Conversion rates of surface-bound C3b were more than 100-fold higher than fluid-phase C3b, confirming the requirement of a surface. We determine that high surface densities of C3b, and its attachment via the thioester, are essential for C5 convertase formation. Combining our results with molecular modeling explains how high C3b densities may facilitate intermolecular interactions that only occur on target surfaces. Finally, we define two interfaces on C5 important for its recognition by surface-bound C5 convertases. We establish a highly purified model that mimics the natural arrangement of C5 convertases on a surface. The developed model and molecular insights are essential to understand the molecular basis of deregulated complement activity in human disease and will facilitate future design of therapeutic interventions against these critical enzymes in inflammation.

  4. Multicenter evaluation of a fluorometric enzyme immunocapture assay to detect toxoplasma-specific immunoglobulin M in dried blood filter paper specimens from newborns.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, R B; Petersen, E; Seppänen, H; Tuuminen, T

    1996-01-01

    An easy-to-perform fluorometric enzyme immunocapture assay (FEIA) was developed by Labsystems, Helsinki, Finland, to detect toxoplasma-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) in dried blood spots. Assay materials were distributed to two sites that have programs in place designed to identify infants born with congenital toxoplasma infection: the Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark, and the New England Regional Newborn Screening Program, Boston, Mass. Each site tested over 700 dried blood samples from healthy newborns to define a cutoff at the 99.5 percentile (5 enzyme immunounits for Copenhagen and 4 enzyme immunounits for Boston). Each site then applied its own cutoff of interpret results for dried blood spots prepared from either adults with serology suggestive of acute infection (Copenhagen) or infants determined to be congenitally infected on the basis of serological criteria (Boston). In Copenhagen, 35 of 38 adult samples were either positive to a small degree or borderline positive for IgA. These samples thus may not represent acute infection. In Boston, of 26 congenitally infected infants, 22 were positive by FEIA. The four infant specimens not positive by FEIA were either negative or borderline positive by the standard Boston assay. These results demonstrate that the IgM FEIA is a potential alternative to other filter paper assay for toxoplasma-specific IgM currently in use for newborns. PMID:8940462

  5. Rapid induction by fungal elicitor of the synthesis of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, a specific enzyme of lignin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Grand, C; Sarni, F; Lamb, C J

    1987-11-16

    A fivefold increase in the extractable activity of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, an enzyme of phenylpropanoid metabolism specific for lignin synthesis, was observed within 10 h of treatment of cell-suspension cultures of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with a high-molecular-mass elicitor preparation heat-released from mycelial cell walls of the bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. Elicitor caused a rapid, marked but transient increase in the synthesis of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase with maximum rates 2-3 h after elicitation, concomitant with the phase of rapid increase in enzyme activity. There is a close correspondence between increased polysomal mRNA activity encoding cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, as measured by incorporation of [35S]methionine into immunoprecipitable enzyme subunits in vitro, and the stimulation of enzyme synthesis in vivo in response to elicitor. This marked increase in polysomal mRNA activity represents an increase as a proportion of total cellular mRNA activity, indicating that elicitor does not stimulate synthesis of this enzyme by selective recruitment from the total pool of cellular mRNA. Elicitor stimulation of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase activity and enzyme synthesis is more rapid than previously observed for other proteins involved inducible defense mechanisms, such as enzymes of phytoalexin biosynthesis or the apoproteins of cell-wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins.

  6. Structural basis for specificity and promiscuity in a carrier protein/enzyme system from the sulfur cycle

    PubMed Central

    Grabarczyk, Daniel B.; Chappell, Paul E.; Johnson, Steven; Stelzl, Lukas S.; Berks, Ben C.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial Sox (sulfur oxidation) pathway is an important route for the oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds. Intermediates in the Sox pathway are covalently attached to the heterodimeric carrier protein SoxYZ through conjugation to a cysteine on a protein swinging arm. We have investigated how the carrier protein shuttles intermediates between the enzymes of the Sox pathway using the interaction between SoxYZ and the enzyme SoxB as our model. The carrier protein and enzyme interact only weakly, but we have trapped their complex by using a “suicide enzyme” strategy in which an engineered cysteine in the SoxB active site forms a disulfide bond with the incoming carrier arm cysteine. The structure of this trapped complex, together with calorimetric data, identifies sites of protein–protein interaction both at the entrance to the enzyme active site tunnel and at a second, distal, site. We find that the enzyme distinguishes between the substrate and product forms of the carrier protein through differences in their interaction kinetics and deduce that this behavior arises from substrate-specific stabilization of a conformational change in the enzyme active site. Our analysis also suggests how the carrier arm-bound substrate group is able to outcompete the adjacent C-terminal carboxylate of the carrier arm for binding to the active site metal ions. We infer that similar principles underlie carrier protein interactions with other enzymes of the Sox pathway. PMID:26655737

  7. A specific affinity reagent to distinguish aldehyde dehydrogenases and oxidases. Enzymes catalyzing aldehyde oxidation in an adult moth

    SciTech Connect

    Tasayco, M.L.; Prestwich, G.D. )

    1990-02-25

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and oxidase (AO) enzymes from the tissue extracts of male and female tobacco budworm moth (Heliothis virescens) were identified after electrophoretic protein separation. AO activity was visualized using formazan- or horseradish peroxidase-mediated staining coupled to the AO-catalyzed oxidation of benzaldehyde. A set of six soluble AO enzymes with isoelectric points from pI 4.6 to 5.3 were detected primarily in the antennal extracts. Partially purified antennal AO enzymes also oxidized both (Z)-9-tetradecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal, the two major pheromone components of this moth. ALDH activity was detected using a tritium-labeled affinity reagent based on a known irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme. This labeled vinyl ketone, (3H)(Z)-1,11-hexadecadien-3-one, was synthesized and used to covalently modify the soluble ALDH enzymes from tissue extracts. Molecular subunits of potential ALDH enzymes were visualized in the fluorescence autoradiograms of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated proteins of the antenna, head, and leg tissues. Covalent modification of these protein subunits decreased specifically in the presence of excess pheromone aldehyde or benzaldehyde. Labeled vinyl ketones are thus novel tools for the identification of molecular subunits of ALDH enzymes.

  8. Substrate Specificity of Naphthalene Dioxygenase: Effect of Specific Amino Acids at the Active Site of the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Parales, Rebecca E.; Lee, Kyoung; Resnick, Sol M.; Jiang, Haiyan; Lessner, Daniel J.; Gibson, David T.

    2000-01-01

    The three-component naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) enzyme system carries out the first step in the aerobic degradation of naphthalene by Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4. The three-dimensional structure of NDO revealed that several of the amino acids at the active site of the oxygenase are hydrophobic, which is consistent with the enzyme's preference for aromatic hydrocarbon substrates. Although NDO catalyzes cis-dihydroxylation of a wide range of substrates, it is highly regio- and enantioselective. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the contributions of several active-site residues to these aspects of catalysis. Amino acid substitutions at Asn-201, Phe-202, Val-260, Trp-316, Thr-351, Trp-358, and Met-366 had little or no effect on product formation with naphthalene or biphenyl as substrates and had slight but significant effects on product formation from phenanthrene. Amino acid substitutions at Phe-352 resulted in the formation of cis-naphthalene dihydrodiol with altered stereochemistry [92 to 96% (+)-1R,2S], compared to the enantiomerically pure [>99% (+)-1R,2S] product formed by the wild-type enzyme. Substitutions at position 352 changed the site of oxidation of biphenyl and phenanthrene. Substitution of alanine for Asp-362, a ligand to the active-site iron, resulted in a completely inactive enzyme. PMID:10692370

  9. Specific detection and properties of enzyme hydrolyzing phosphonate ester in serum.

    PubMed

    Han, G Y; Fan, X H; Jin, X B; Wang, D P

    1992-03-01

    An enzyme capable of hydrolyzing 4-methylumbelliferyl phenylphosphonate to 4-methylumbelliferone and phenylphosphonic acid has been detected in human serum. It has a Km value of 1.72 x 10(-4) mol/L, has an optimum pH of 8.8-9.1 in Tris buffer, and shows maximum activity at 60 degrees C (30 min). The enzymic activity can be inhibited by Na3PO4, EDTA, and cysteine. We saw no effect of CuSO4, adenosine, thymidine, NaN3, diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate, p-chloromercuribenzoate, isopropyl fluorophosphate, or eserine on the enzymic activity. The enzyme cannot hydrolyze substrates of phosphodiesterase I or alkaline phosphatase. The enzyme is considered a phosphonate esterase.

  10. Cell-specific labeling enzymes for analysis of cell-cell communication in continuous co-culture.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J; Norrie, Ida C; Worboys, Jonathan D; Lim, Lindsay; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2014-07-01

    We report the orthologous screening, engineering, and optimization of amino acid conversion enzymes for cell-specific proteomic labeling. Intracellular endoplasmic-reticulum-anchored Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DDC(M.tub-KDEL)) confers cell-specific meso-2,6-diaminopimelate-dependent proliferation to multiple eukaryotic cell types. Optimized lysine racemase (Lyr(M37-KDEL)) supports D-lysine specific proliferation and efficient cell-specific isotopic labeling. When ectopically expressed in discrete cell types, these enzymes confer 90% cell-specific isotopic labeling efficiency after 10 days of co-culture. Moreover, DDC(M.tub-KDEL) and Lyr(M37-KDEL) facilitate equally high cell-specific labeling fidelity without daily media exchange. Consequently, the reported novel enzyme pairing can be used to study cell-specific signaling in uninterrupted, continuous co-cultures. Demonstrating the importance of increased labeling stability for addressing novel biological questions, we compare the cell-specific phosphoproteome of fibroblasts in direct co-culture with epithelial tumor cells in both interrupted (daily media exchange) and continuous (no media exchange) co-cultures. This analysis identified multiple cell-specific phosphorylation sites specifically regulated in the continuous co-culture. Given their applicability to multiple cell types, continuous co-culture labeling fidelity, and suitability for long-term cell-cell phospho-signaling experiments, we propose DDC(M.tub-KDEL) and Lyr(M37-KDEL) as excellent enzymes for cell-specific labeling with amino acid precursors. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. SigrafW: An easy-to-use program for fitting enzyme kinetic data.

    PubMed

    Leone, Francisco Assis; Baranauskas, José Augusto; Furriel, Rosa Prazeres Melo; Borin, Ivana Aparecida

    2005-11-01

    SigrafW is Windows-compatible software developed using the Microsoft® Visual Basic Studio program that uses the simplified Hill equation for fitting kinetic data from allosteric and Michaelian enzymes. SigrafW uses a modified Fibonacci search to calculate maximal velocity (V), the Hill coefficient (n), and the enzyme-substrate apparent dissociation constant (K). The estimation of V, K, and the sum of the squares of residuals is performed using a Wilkinson nonlinear regression at any Hill coefficient (n). In contrast to many currently available kinetic analysis programs, SigrafW shows several advantages for the determination of kinetic parameters of both hyperbolic and nonhyperbolic saturation curves. No initial estimates of the kinetic parameters are required, a measure of the goodness-of-the-fit for each calculation performed is provided, the nonlinear regression used for calculations eliminates the statistical bias inherent in linear transformations, and the software can be used for enzyme kinetic simulations either for educational or research purposes. Persons interested in receiving a free copy of the software should contact Dr. F. A. Leone. Copyright © 2005 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Moving college students to a better understanding of substrate specificity of enzymes through utilizing multimedia pre-training and an interactive enzyme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Mounir R.

    Scientists' progress in understanding enzyme specificity uncovered a complex natural phenomenon. However, not all of the currently available biology textbooks seem to be up to date on this progress. Students' understanding of how enzymes work is a core requirement in biochemistry and biology tertiary education. Nevertheless, current pre-college science education does not provide students with enough biochemical background to enable them to understand complex material such as this. To bridge this gap, a multimedia pre-training presentation was prepared to fuel the learner's prior knowledge with discrete facts necessary to understand the presented concept. This treatment is also known to manage intrinsic cognitive load during the learning process. An interactive instructional enzyme model was also built to motivate students to learn about substrate specificity of enzymes. Upon testing the effect of this combined treatment on 111 college students, desirable learning outcomes were found in terms of cognitive load, motivation, and achievement. The multimedia pre-training group reported significantly less intrinsic cognitive load, higher motivation, and demonstrated higher transfer performance than the control and post-training groups. In this study, a statistical mediation model is also proposed to explain how cognitive load and motivation work in concert to foster learning from multimedia pre-training. This type of research goes beyond simple forms of "what works" to a deeper understanding of "how it works", thus enabling informed decisions for multimedia instructional design. Multimedia learning plays multiple roles in science education. Therefore, science learners would be some of the first to benefit from improving multimedia instructional design. Accordingly, complex scientific phenomena can be introduced to college students in a motivating, informative, and cognitively efficient learning environment.

  13. NASA broadened-specification fuels combustion technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fear, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    The broadened-Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program's purpose is to evolve and demonstrate the technology required to enable current and next generation high-thrust, high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines to use fuels with broadened properties and to verify the evolved technology in full scale engine tests. The three phases of the program are combustor concept screening, combustor optimization testing, and engine verification testing. Constraints for designing combustion systems are outlined and problems to be expected in the use of broadened properties fuels are listed.

  14. Porcine, mouse and human galactose 3-O-sulphotransferase-2 enzymes have different substrate specificities; the porcine enzyme requires basic compounds for its catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Seko, Akira; Sumiya, Jun-ichi; Yamashita, Katsuko

    2005-10-01

    Sulphation of galactose at the C-3 position is one of the major post-translational modifications of colorectal mucin. Thus we partially purified a Gal 3-O-sulphotransferase from porcine colonic mucosa (pGal3ST) and studied its enzymatic characteristics. The enzyme was purified 48500-fold by sequential chromatographies on hydroxyapatite, Con A (concanavalin A)-Sepharose, porcine colonic mucin-Sepharose, Cu2+-chelating Sepharose and AMP-agarose. Interestingly, the purified pGal3ST required submillimolar concentrations of spermine or basic lipids, such as D-sphingosine and N,N-dimethylsphingosine, for enzymatic activity. pGal3ST recognized Galbeta1-->3GalNAc (core 1) as an optimal substrate, and had weaker activity for Galbeta1-->3GlcNAc (type 1) and Galbeta1-->4GlcNAc (type 2). Substrate competition experiments proved that a single enzyme catalyses sulphation of all three oligosaccharides. Among the four human Gal3STs cloned to date, the substrate specificity of pGal3ST is most similar to that of human Gal3ST-2, which is also strongly expressed in colonic mucosa, although the kinetics of pGal3ST and human Gal3ST-2 were rather different. To determine whether pGal3ST is the orthologue of human Gal3ST-2, a cDNA encoding porcine Gal3ST-2 was isolated and the enzyme was expressed in COS-7 cells for analysis of substrate specificity. This revealed that porcine Gal3ST-2 has the same specificity as pGal3ST, indicating that pGal3ST is indeed the porcine equivalent of Gal3ST-2. The substrate specificity of mouse Gal3ST-2 was also different from those of human and porcine Gal3ST-2 enzymes. Mouse Gal3ST-2 preferred core 1 and type 2 glycans to type 1, and the K(m) values were much higher than those of human Gal3ST-2. These results suggest that porcine Gal3ST-2 requires basic compounds for catalytic activity and that human, mouse and porcine Gal3ST-2 orthologues have diverse substrate specificities.

  15. Evaluation of specificity of indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diagnosis of human Q fever.

    PubMed Central

    Uhaa, I J; Fishbein, D B; Olson, J G; Rives, C C; Waag, D M; Williams, J C

    1994-01-01

    Ninety-five acute- and convalescent-phase serum specimens from 48 patients suspected of having rickettsial or Legionella infections were assayed for antibodies to Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever. To evaluate the specificity of the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human Q fever, we compared the ELISA results with those of the indirect immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) test. The ELISA data were analyzed by two different criteria for a positive test. The first criterion for positive results by ELISA was based upon diagnostic titers established in a study of 150 subjects who had no demonstrable cellular or humoral immune responses to C. burnetii phase I or phase II whole cells or phase I lipopolysaccharide. The second criterion was based upon diagnostic antibody titers in a study of 51 subjects who had been diagnosed as having clinical Q fever and had fourfold or greater rises in humoral immune responses to C. burnetii phase I and phase II whole-cell antigens. A comparison of the ELISA and IFA test results of the 95 serum specimens indicated excellent agreement between the tests (Kappa = 92.9%; P < 0.05). None of the 38 patients whose etiologies were confirmed serologically as Legionnaires' disease or rickettsial diseases other than Q fever were classified as positive for C. burnetii by the ELISA. Only one patient identified by the IFA test as having Q fever was not scored positive by the ELISA. These results suggest that the ELISA is useful for epidemiologic screening and as a diagnostic test for human Q fever. PMID:8077404

  16. Power-free chip enzyme immunoassay for detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in serum.

    PubMed

    Adel Ahmed, Heba; Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2013-11-15

    A power-free, portable "Chip EIA" was designed to render the popular Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) more suitable for point-of-care testing. A number of microfluidic platforms have enabled miniaturization of the conventional microtitre plate ELISA, however, they require external pumping systems, valves, and electric power supply. The Chip EIA platform has eliminated the need for pumps and valves through utilizing a simple permanent magnet and magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticles act as solid support to capture the target and are then moved through chambers harboring different reagents necessary to perform a sandwich ELISA. The use of magnetic nanoparticles increases the volume-to-surface ratio reducing the assay time to 30 min. Changing the color of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrate to green indicates a positive result. In addition, a quantitative read-out was obtained through the use of cellphone camera imaging and analyzing the images using Matlab®. Cell phones, including smart ones, are readily available almost everywhere. The Chip EIA device was used to assay total prostate specific antigen (tPSA) in 19 serum samples. The PSA Chip EIA was tested for accuracy, precision, repeatability, and the results were correlated to the commercial Beckman Colter, Hybritech immunoassay® for determination of tPSA in serum samples with a Pearson correlation coefficient (R(2)=0.96). The lower detection limit of the PSA Chip EIA was 3.2 ng/mL. The assay has 88.9% recovery and good reproducibility (% CV of 6.5). We conclude that the developed Chip EIA can be used for detection of protein biomarkers in biological specimens.

  17. Human c-fgr induces a monocyte-specific enzyme in NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kazushi; Akiyama, Tetsu; Toyoshima, Kumao ); Wongsasant, Budsaba )

    1991-12-01

    The mutant c-fgr protein (p58{sup c-fgr/F523}) containing Phe-523 instead of Tyr-523 exhibited transforming activity in NIH 3T3 cells like other protein-tyrosine kinases of the src family, but normal p58{sup c-fgr} (p58{sup c-fgr/wt}) did not. The mutant protein showed tyrosine kinase activity threefold higher than that of the normal protein in vitro. Surprisingly, transfection of the normal c-fgr gene into NIH 3T3 cells resulted in induction of sodium fluoride (NaF)-sensitive {alpha}-naphthyl butyrate esterase ({alpha}-NBE), marker enzyme of cells of monocytic origin, which was not induced in v-src-, v-fgr-, or lyn-transfected NIH 3T3 cells. The NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE induced in c-fgr transfectants was shown by isoelectric focusing to have a pI of 5.2 to 5.4, a range which was the same as those for thioglycolate-induced murine peritoneal macrophages and 1{alpha}, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-treated WEHI-3B cells. Immunoblotting studies with antophosphotyrosine antibodies revealed that 58-, 62-, 75-, 120-, 200-, and 230-kDa proteins were commonly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in cells transfected with the mutated c-fgr. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of specific cellular substrate proteins is important in induction of NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE and cell transformation by p58{sup c-fgr}.

  18. Detection, quantification, and glycotyping of prion protein in specifically activated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates.

    PubMed

    Triantaphyllidou, I E; Sklaviadis, T; Vynios, D H

    2006-12-15

    The conversion of a normal glycoprotein, prion protein (PrP(C)), to its abnormal protease-resistant isoform (PrP(Sc)) seems to be one of the main factors underlying the pathogenesis of spongiform encephalopathies. There are many studies indicating that PrP interacts with glycosaminoglycans, and we exploited this interaction to develop a sensitive solid phase assay for detection of both PrP forms. Glycosaminoglycans, such as chondroitin sulfate and heparin, were immobilized by their negative charge to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plate wells activated by glutaraldehyde and spermine. PrP in the samples examined (recombinant PrP or tissue homogenate) was allowed to interact with glycans. The interaction of recombinant PrP was more efficient against immobilized chondroitin sulfate of type A, and a linear correlation with concentration was demonstrated. From this curve, the concentration of each one of the PrP isoforms in biological samples can be determined. In addition, and taking into account that glycosylation of prion protein is species specific, we used similarly activated ELISA plate wells to determine different PrP glycoforms. A monoclonal antibody against PrP was immobilized, and PrP present in the samples (brain homogenates) was bound and visualized by various lectins. The most interesting outcome of the study is the differential binding of ricinus communis agglutinin I to the normal and scrapie brain homogenates. Dattura stramonium lectin and wheat germ agglutinin seem to bind almost equally to both samples, and all three have an increased sensitivity to PrP(Sc) after proteinase K digestion.

  19. Virus-Specific mRNA Capping Enzyme Encoded by Hepatitis E Virus

    PubMed Central

    Magden, Julia; Takeda, Naokazu; Li, Tiancheng; Auvinen, Petri; Ahola, Tero; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Merits, Andres; Kääriäinen, Leevi

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a positive-strand RNA virus, is an important causative agent of waterborne hepatitis. Expression of cDNA (encoding amino acids 1 to 979 of HEV nonstructural open reading frame 1) in insect cells resulted in synthesis of a 110-kDa protein (P110), a fraction of which was proteolytically processed to an 80-kDa protein. P110 was tightly bound to cytoplasmic membranes, from which it could be released by detergents. Immunopurified P110 catalyzed transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to GTP and GDP to yield m7GTP or m7GDP. GMP, GpppG, and GpppA were poor substrates for the P110 methyltransferase. There was no evidence for further methylation of m7GTP when it was used as a substrate for the methyltransferase. P110 was also a guanylyltransferase, which formed a covalent complex, P110-m7GMP, in the presence of AdoMet and GTP, because radioactivity from both [α-32P]GTP and [3H-methyl]AdoMet was found in the covalent guanylate complex. Since both methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase reactions are strictly virus specific, they should offer optimal targets for development of antiviral drugs. Cap analogs such as m7GTP, m7GDP, et2m7GMP, and m2et7GMP inhibited the methyltransferase reaction. HEV P110 capping enzyme has similar properties to the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase of alphavirus nsP1, tobacco mosaic virus P126, brome mosaic virus replicase protein 1a, and bamboo mosaic virus (a potexvirus) nonstructural protein, indicating there is a common evolutionary origin of these distantly related plant and animal virus families. PMID:11413290

  20. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Katherine A.; Yasseen, Akeel A.; McKerr, George; Downes, C. S.; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J.

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1+ and TK1- clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumor suppressor (TP53) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene regions, over 1 h after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1+ compared to TK1- cells, a trend also reflected to a lesser degree in genomic DNA repair between the cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK+ cells occurred rapidly, mainly over the first 15 min repair-period. Therefore, TK1 is needed for preferential repair of actively transcribed regions, through a previously unsuspected mechanism. In principle, TK1 could exert its protective effects through supply of a supplementary dTTP pool for accurate repair of damaged genes; but Raji TK1+ cells in thymidine free media still show preferential repair of transcribed regions. TK1 therefore does not exert its protective effects through dTTP pools, but through another unidentified mechanism, which affects sensitivity to and mutagenicity by DNA damaging agents. PMID:25152750

  1. The dynamic determinants of reaction specificity in the IMPDH/GMPR family of (β/α)(8) barrel enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2012-01-01

    The inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH)/guanosine monophosphate reductase (GMPR) family of (β/α)(8) enzymes presents an excellent opportunity to investigate how subtle changes in enzyme structure change reaction specificity. IMPDH and GMPR bind the same ligands with similar affinities and share a common set of catalytic residues. Both enzymes catalyze a hydride transfer reaction involving a nicotinamide cofactor hydride, and both reactions proceed via the same covalent intermediate. In the case of IMPDH, this intermediate reacts with water, while in GMPR it reacts with ammonia. In both cases, the two chemical transformations are separated by a conformational change. In IMPDH, the conformational change involves a mobile protein flap while in GMPR, the cofactor moves. Thus reaction specificity is controlled by differences in dynamics, which in turn are controlled by residues outside the active site. These findings have some intriguing implications for the evolution of the IMPDH/GMPR family.

  2. STAGE 64: OUTPUT PROCESSOR PROGRAMMING SPECIFICATIONS MANUAL, VOLUME I. HISTORY PROGRAMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This volume contains a detailed description of the history programs used in the STAGE 64 Output Processor Programming Specifications. The STAGE ...Output Processor sorts, compiles tallies, and presents the output of the STAGE model in printed form. The complete program presently consists of 38...processes for each side, but in view of the fact that the processes are run under an executive control , new tasks can be added to the model as they are

  3. A Study in Enzyme Kinetics Using an Ion-Specific Electrode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turchi, Sandra; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment on enzyme kinetics using the D-amino acid oxidase system and an ammonia electrode. Preparation of an ammonia standard curve, a sample preparation, and inhibition studies are discussed. (YP)

  4. A Study in Enzyme Kinetics Using an Ion-Specific Electrode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turchi, Sandra; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment on enzyme kinetics using the D-amino acid oxidase system and an ammonia electrode. Preparation of an ammonia standard curve, a sample preparation, and inhibition studies are discussed. (YP)

  5. Biochemical characterization of plasmepsin V from Plasmodium vivax Thailand isolates: Substrate specificity and enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sappakhaw, Khomkrit; Takasila, Ratchaneekorn; Sittikul, Pichamon; Wattana-Amorn, Pakorn; Assavalapsakul, Wanchai; Boonyalai, Nonlawat

    2015-12-01

    Plasmepsin V (PMV) is a Plasmodium aspartic protease responsible for the cleavage of the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is an essential step for export of PEXEL containing proteins and crucial for parasite viability. Here we describe the genetic polymorphism of Plasmodium vivax PMV (PvPMV) Thailand isolates, followed by cloning, expression, purification and characterization of PvPMV-Thai, presenting the pro- and mature-form of PvPMV-Thai. With our refolding and purification method, approximately 1mg of PvPMV-Thai was obtained from 1g of washed inclusion bodies. Unlike PvPMV-Ind and PvPMV-Sal-1, PvPMV-Thai contains a four-amino acid insertion (SVSE) at residues 246-249. We have confirmed that this insertion did not interfere with the catalytic activity as it is located in the long loop (R241-E272) pointing away from the substrate-binding pocket. PvPMV-Thai exhibited similar activity to PfPMV counterparts in which PfEMP2 could be hydrolyzed more efficiently than HRPII. Substrate specificity studies at P1' showed that replacing Ser by Val or Glu of the PfEMP2 peptide markedly reduced the enzyme activity of PvPMV similar to that of PfPMV whereas replacing His by Val or Ser of the HRPII peptide increased the cleavage activity. However, the substitution of amino acids at the P2 position with Glu dramatically reduced the cleavage efficiency by 80% in PvPMV in contrast to 30% in PfPMV, indicating subtle differences around the S2 binding pocket of both PfPMV and PvPMV. Four inhibitors were also evaluated for PvPMV-Thai activity including PMSF, pepstatin A, nelfinavir, and menisporopsin A-a macrocyclic polylactone. We are the first to show that menisporopsin A partially inhibits the PvPMV-Thai activity at high concentration. Taken together, these findings provide insights into recombinant production, substrate specificity and inhibition of PvPMV-Thai. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the cold adapted microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: a low temperature active enzyme with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Florio, Rita; Consalvi, Valerio; Festa, Guido; Pascarella, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  7. Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology Program, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Jeroszko, R. A.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of two advanced technology combustor concepts was conducted to evolve and assess their capability for operation on broadened properties fuels. The concepts were based on the results of Phase 1 of the Broad Specification Fuel Combustor Technology Program which indicated that combustors with variable geometry or staged combustion zones had a flexibility of operation that could facilitate operation on these fuels. Emphasis in defining these concepts included the use of single pipe as opposed to duplex or staged fuels systems to avoid the risk of coking associated with the reduction in thermal stability expected in broadened properties fuels. The first concept was a variable geometry combustor in which the airflow into the primary zone could be altered through valves on the front while the second was an outgrowth of the staged Vorbix combustor, evolved under the NASA/P&W ECCP and EEE programs incorporating simplified fuel and air introduction. The results of the investigation, which involved the use of Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel, indicated that in the form initially conceived, both of these combustor concepts were deficient in performance relative to many of the program goals for performance emissions. However, variations of both combustors were evaluated that incorporated features to simulate conceptual enhancement to demonstrate the long range potential of the combustor. In both cases, significant improvements relative to the program goals were observed.

  8. Plant rhizosphere species-specific stoichiometry and regulation of extracellular enzyme and microbial community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, C. W.; Calderon, F.; Pendall, E.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    control soil samples) were collected on day 28, 78, and 148 (N = 4 /sample period/species). Microbial community structure was quantified using the barcoded pyrosequencing protocols. We measured the potential activity of seven hydrolytic soil enzymes to represent the degradation of C, N, and P-rich substrates. Soil microbial C:N biomass responses to specific plant rhizospheres (MBC and MBN) were measured using the chloroform fumigation extraction method followed by DOC & N analysis. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy was used to assess differences in plant and soil C chemistry. We found that species specific rhizospheres are characteristic of very different soil chemical, edaphic, and microbial properties. These plant species act as gateways that introduce variability into soil C, N, and P ecosystem functional dynamics directly facilitated by rhizosphere - microbe associations. Our results suggest that nutrient stoichiometry within plant species' rhizospheres is a useful tool for identifying intra-ecosystem functional patterns. By identifying what and how specific species rhizospheres differ among the overall plant community, we can better predict how below-ground microbial community function and subsequent ecosystem processes can be influenced by alterations in plant community shifts based on the rhizosphere effects.

  9. Enzyme Kinetics for Complex System Enables Accurate Determination of Specificity Constants of Numerous Substrates in a Mixture by Proteomics Platform.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenzhen; Mao, Jiawei; Wang, Yan; Zou, Hanfa; Ye, Mingliang

    2017-01-01

    Many important experiments in proteomics including protein digestion, enzyme substrate screening, enzymatic labeling, etc., involve the enzymatic reactions in a complex system where numerous substrates coexists with an enzyme. However, the enzyme kinetics in such a system remains unexplored and poorly understood. Herein, we derived and validated the kinetics equations for the enzymatic reactions in complex system. We developed an iteration approach to depict the enzymatic reactions in complex system. It was validated by 630 time-course points from 24 enzymatic reaction experiments and was demonstrated to be a powerful tool to simulate the reactions in the complex system. By applying this approach, we found that the ratio of substrate depletion is independent of other coexisted substrates under specific condition. This observation was then validated by experiments. Based on this striking observation, a simplified model was developed to determine the catalytic efficiencies of numerous competing substrates presented in the complex enzyme reaction system. When coupled with high-throughput quantitative proteomics technique, this simplified model enabled the accurate determination of catalytic efficiencies for 2369 peptide substrates of a protease by using only one enzymatic reaction experiment. Thus, this study provided, in the first time, a validated model for the large scale determination of specificity constants which could enable the enzyme substrate screening approach turned from a qualitative method of identifying substrates to a quantitative method of identifying and prioritizing substrates. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004665. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Generation of novel-substrate-accepting biphenyl dioxygenases through segmental random mutagenesis and identification of residues involved in enzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Marco; Kahl, Silke; Standfuss-Gabisch, Christine; Cámara, Beatriz; Seeger, Michael; Hofer, Bernd

    2006-03-01

    Aryl-hydroxylating dioxygenases are of interest for the degradation of persistant aromatic pollutants, such as polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), or as catalysts for the functionalization of aromatic scaffolds. In order to achieve dioxygenation of technical mixtures of PCBs, enzymes with broadened or altered substrate ranges are essential. To alter the substrate specificity of the biphenyl dioxygenase (BphA) of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, we applied a directed evolution approach that used structure-function relationship data to target random mutageneses to specific segments of the enzyme. The limitation of random amino acid (AA) substitutions to regions that are critical for substrate binding and the exclusion of AA exchanges from positions that are essential for catalytic activity yielded enzyme variants of interest at comparatively high frequencies. After only a single mutagenic cycle, 10 beneficial variants were detected in a library of fewer than 1,000 active enzymes. Compared to the parental BphA, they showed between 5- and 200-fold increased turnover of chlorinated biphenyls, with substituent patterns that rendered them largely recalcitrant to attack by BphA-LB400. Determination of their sequences identified AAs that prevent the acceptance of specific PCBs by the wild-type enzyme, such as Pro334 and Phe384. The results suggest prime targets for subsequent cycles of BphA modification. Correlations with a three-dimensional model of the enzyme indicated that most of the exchanges with major influence on substrate turnover do not involve pocket-lining residues and had not been predictable through structural modeling.

  11. Purification and Characterization of the Crown Gall-specific Enzyme, Octopine Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Hack, Ethan; Kemp, John D.

    1980-01-01

    A single enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of all four N2-(1-carboxyethyl)-amino acid derivatives found in a crown gall tumor tissue induced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens (E. F. Sm. and Town.) Conn strain B6 on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). This enzyme, octopine synthase, has been purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and chromatography on diethylaminoethylcellulose, blue agarose, and hydroxylapatite. The purified enzyme has all the N2-(1-carboxyethyl)-amino acid synthesizing activities found in crude preparations, and the relative activities with six amino acids remain nearly constant during purification. Although the maximum velocities (V) and Michaelis constants (Km) differ, the ratio V/Km is the same for all amino acid substrates. Thus an equimolar mixture of amino acids will give rise to an equimolar mixture of products. The kinetic properties of the enzyme are consistent with a partially ordered mechanism with arginine (NADPH, then arginine or pyruvate). Octopine synthase is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 39,000 by gel filtration and 38,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:16661312

  12. Responses of absolute and specific soil enzyme activities to long term additions of organic and mineral fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Dong, Wenyi; Dai, Xiaoqin; Schaeffer, Sean; Yang, Fengting; Radosevich, Mark; Xu, Lili; Liu, Xiyu; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-12-01

    Long-term phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) applications may seriously affect soil microbial activity. A long-term field fertilizer application trial was established on reddish paddy soils in the subtropical region of southern China in 1998. We assessed the effects of swine manure and seven different rates or ratios of NPK fertilizer treatments on (1) the absolute and specific enzyme activities per unit of soil organic carbon (SOC) or microbial biomass carbon (MBC) involved in C, N, and P transformations and (2) their relationships with soil environmental factors and soil microbial community structures. The results showed that manure applications led to increases in the absolute and specific activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase(βG), β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The absolute and specific acid phosphatase (AP) activities decreased as mineral P fertilizer application rates and ratios increased. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that there were negative correlations between absolute and specific AP activities, pH, and total P contents, while there were positive correlations between soil absolute and specific βG, NAG, and LAP enzyme activities, and SOC and total N contents. RDA showed that the contents of actinomycete and Gram-positive bacterium PLFA biomarkers are more closely related to the absolute and specific enzyme activities than the other PLFA biomarkers (P<0.01). Our results suggest that both the absolute and specific enzyme activities could be used as sensitive soil quality indicators that provide useful linkages with the microbial community structures and environmental factors. To maintain microbial activity and to minimize environmental impacts, P should be applied as a combination of inorganic and organic forms, and total P fertilizer application rates to subtropical paddy soils should not exceed 44 kg P ha(-1) year(-1).

  13. Two potentially novel amylolytic enzyme specificities in the prokaryotic glycoside hydrolase α-amylase family GH57.

    PubMed

    Blesák, Karol; Janeček, Štefan

    2013-12-01

    Glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 57 consists of more than 900 proteins from Archaea (roughly one-quarter) and Bacteria (roughly three-quarters), mostly from thermophiles. Fewer than 20 GH57 members have already been biochemically characterized as real, (almost exclusively) amylolytic enzymes. In addition to a recently described dual-specificity amylopullulanase-cyclomaltodextrinase, five enzyme specificities have been well established in the family--α-amylase, amylopullulanase, branching enzyme, 4-α-glucanotransferase and α-galactosidase--plus a group of the so-called α-amylase-like homologues probably without the enzyme activity. A (β/α)7-barrel succeeded by a bundle of a few α-helices forming the catalytic domain, and five conserved sequence regions (CSRs), are the main characteristics of family GH57. The main goal of the present bioinformatics study was to describe two novel groups within family GH57 that represent potential non-specified amylases (127 sequences mostly from Bacteria) and maltogenic amylases (12 sequences from Archaea). These were collected from sequence databases based on an indication of their biochemical characterization. Although both the non-specified amylases and the maltogenic amylases share the in silico identified catalytic machinery and predicted fold with the experimentally determined GH57 members, the two novel groups may define new GH57 subfamilies. They are distinguishable from the other, previously recognized, subfamilies by specific sequence features present especially in their CSRs (the so-called sequence fingerprints), also reflecting their own evolutionary histories.

  14. An analytical method for determining relative specificities for sequential reactions catalyzed by the same enzyme: general formulation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David Alexander; Carrière, Frédéric; Krieger, Nadia

    2008-04-01

    We present a general formulation of a model that can be used to analyze reaction profiles in systems in which a single enzyme catalyzes several sequential reactions with the same molecular backbone. The analysis of these so-called "repeated-attack systems" allows estimation of the specificities that the enzyme has for the various intermediate substrates that appear in the reaction mixture, relative to the specificity that it has for the initial substrate. Our analytical method has the important advantage that it is not affected by competitive or uncompetitive inhibition, nor by denaturation of the enzyme during the reaction. We carry out case studies in three different systems, the lipase-catalyzed alcoholysis of triacylglycerols, the phytase-catalyzed removal of phosphate groups from phytic acid and the beta-amylase-catalyzed removal of maltose units from maltoheptaose. Our model fits well to all reaction profiles in which the phenomenon of processivity does not occur. It can therefore be used as a general tool for characterizing the relative specificities of "repeated-attack enzymes".

  15. Structure of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific restriction enzyme, AbaSI, in complex with DNA.

    PubMed

    Horton, John R; Borgaro, Janine G; Griggs, Rose M; Quimby, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Zheng, Yu; Zhu, Zhenyu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-07-01

    AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I-family of modification-dependent restriction endonucleases, cleaves deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) containing 5-hydroxymethylctosine (5hmC) and glucosylated 5hmC (g5hmC), but not DNA containing unmodified cytosine. AbaSI has been used as a tool for mapping the genomic locations of 5hmC, an important epigenetic modification in the DNA of higher organisms. Here we report the crystal structures of AbaSI in the presence and absence of DNA. These structures provide considerable, although incomplete, insight into how this enzyme acts. AbaSI appears to be mainly a homodimer in solution, but interacts with DNA in our structures as a homotetramer. Each AbaSI subunit comprises an N-terminal, Vsr-like, cleavage domain containing a single catalytic site, and a C-terminal, SRA-like, 5hmC-binding domain. Two N-terminal helices mediate most of the homodimer interface. Dimerization brings together the two catalytic sites required for double-strand cleavage, and separates the 5hmC binding-domains by ∼70 Å, consistent with the known activity of AbaSI which cleaves DNA optimally between symmetrically modified cytosines ∼22 bp apart. The eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domains bind to DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the hemi-methylated CpG sequence. They make contacts in both the major and minor DNA grooves, and flip the modified cytosine out of the helix into a conserved binding pocket. In contrast, the SRA-like domain of AbaSI, which has no sequence specificity, contacts only the minor DNA groove, and in our current structures the 5hmC remains intra-helical. A conserved, binding pocket is nevertheless present in this domain, suitable for accommodating 5hmC and g5hmC. We consider it likely, therefore, that base-flipping is part of the recognition and cleavage mechanism of AbaSI, but that our structures represent an earlier, pre-flipped stage, prior to actual recognition. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on

  16. Structure of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific restriction enzyme, AbaSI, in complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, John R.; Borgaro, Janine G.; Griggs, Rose M.; Quimby, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Zheng, Yu; Zhu, Zhenyu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-07-03

    AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I-family of modification-dependent restriction endonucleases, cleaves DNA containing 5-hydroxymethylctosine (5hmC) and glucosylated 5hmC (g5hmC), but not DNA containing unmodified cytosine. AbaSI has been used as a tool for mapping the genomic locations of 5hmC, an important epigenetic modification in the DNA of higher organisms. Here we report the crystal structures of AbaSI in the presence and absence of DNA. These structures provide considerable, although incomplete, insight into how this enzyme acts. AbaSI appears to be mainly a homodimer in solution, but interacts with DNA in our structures as a homotetramer. Each AbaSI subunit comprises an N-terminal, Vsr-like, cleavage domain containing a single catalytic site, and a C-terminal, SRA-like, 5hmC-binding domain. Two N-terminal helices mediate most of the homodimer interface. Dimerization brings together the two catalytic sites required for double-strand cleavage, and separates the 5hmC binding-domains by ~ 70 Å, consistent with the known activity of AbaSI which cleaves DNA optimally between symmetrically modified cytosines ~ 22 bp apart. The eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domains bind to DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the hemi-methylated CpG sequence. They make contacts in both the major and minor DNA grooves, and flip the modified cytosine out of the helix into a conserved binding pocket. In contrast, the SRA-like domain of AbaSI, which has no sequence specificity, contacts only the minor DNA groove, and in our current structures the 5hmC remains intra-helical. A conserved, binding pocket is nevertheless present in this domain, suitable for accommodating 5hmC and g5hmC. We consider it likely, therefore, that base-flipping is part of the recognition and cleavage mechanism of AbaSI, but that our structures represent an earlier, pre-flipped stage, prior to actual recognition.

  17. Structure of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific restriction enzyme, AbaSI, in complex with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Horton, John R.; Borgaro, Janine G.; Griggs, Rose M.; Quimby, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Zheng, Yu; Zhu, Zhenyu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I-family of modification-dependent restriction endonucleases, cleaves deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) containing 5-hydroxymethylctosine (5hmC) and glucosylated 5hmC (g5hmC), but not DNA containing unmodified cytosine. AbaSI has been used as a tool for mapping the genomic locations of 5hmC, an important epigenetic modification in the DNA of higher organisms. Here we report the crystal structures of AbaSI in the presence and absence of DNA. These structures provide considerable, although incomplete, insight into how this enzyme acts. AbaSI appears to be mainly a homodimer in solution, but interacts with DNA in our structures as a homotetramer. Each AbaSI subunit comprises an N-terminal, Vsr-like, cleavage domain containing a single catalytic site, and a C-terminal, SRA-like, 5hmC-binding domain. Two N-terminal helices mediate most of the homodimer interface. Dimerization brings together the two catalytic sites required for double-strand cleavage, and separates the 5hmC binding-domains by ∼70 Å, consistent with the known activity of AbaSI which cleaves DNA optimally between symmetrically modified cytosines ∼22 bp apart. The eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domains bind to DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the hemi-methylated CpG sequence. They make contacts in both the major and minor DNA grooves, and flip the modified cytosine out of the helix into a conserved binding pocket. In contrast, the SRA-like domain of AbaSI, which has no sequence specificity, contacts only the minor DNA groove, and in our current structures the 5hmC remains intra-helical. A conserved, binding pocket is nevertheless present in this domain, suitable for accommodating 5hmC and g5hmC. We consider it likely, therefore, that base-flipping is part of the recognition and cleavage mechanism of AbaSI, but that our structures represent an earlier, pre-flipped stage, prior to actual recognition. PMID:24895434

  18. Glucose-specific enzyme IIA has unique binding partners in the vibrio cholerae biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Bradley S; Smith, Daniel R; Watnick, Paula I

    2012-11-06

    Glucose-specific enzyme IIA (EIIA(Glc)) is a central regulator of bacterial metabolism and an intermediate in the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS), a conserved phosphotransfer cascade that controls carbohydrate transport. We previously reported that EIIA(Glc) activates transcription of the genes required for Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation. While EIIA(Glc) modulates the function of many proteins through a direct interaction, none of the known regulatory binding partners of EIIA(Glc) activates biofilm formation. Therefore, we used tandem affinity purification (TAP) to compare binding partners of EIIA(Glc) in both planktonic and biofilm cells. A surprising number of novel EIIA(Glc) binding partners were identified predominantly under one condition or the other. Studies of planktonic cells revealed established partners of EIIA(Glc), such as adenylate cyclase and glycerol kinase. In biofilms, MshH, a homolog of Escherichia coli CsrD, was found to be a dominant binding partner of EIIA(Glc). Further studies revealed that MshH inhibits biofilm formation. This function was independent of the Carbon storage regulator (Csr) pathway and dependent on EIIA(Glc). To explore the existence of multiprotein complexes centered on EIIA(Glc), we also affinity purified the binding partners of adenylate cyclase from biofilm cells. In addition to EIIA(Glc), this analysis yielded many of the same proteins that copurified with EIIA(Glc). We hypothesize that EIIA(Glc) serves as a hub for multiprotein complexes and furthermore that these complexes may provide a mechanism for competitive and cooperative interactions between binding partners. EIIA(Glc) is a global regulator of microbial physiology that acts through direct interactions with other proteins. This work represents the first demonstration that the protein partners of EIIA(Glc) are distinct in the microbial biofilm. Furthermore, it provides the first evidence that EIIA(Glc) may exist in multiprotein complexes with

  19. A Computational Methodology to Overcome the Challenges Associated With the Search for Specific Enzyme Targets to Develop Drugs Against Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Catharina, Larissa; Lima, Carlyle Ribeiro; Franca, Alexander; Guimarães, Ana Carolina Ramos; Alves-Ferreira, Marcelo; Tuffery, Pierre; Derreumaux, Philippe; Carels, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    We present an approach for detecting enzymes that are specific of Leishmania major compared with Homo sapiens and provide targets that may assist research in drug development. This approach is based on traditional techniques of sequence homology comparison by similarity search and Markov modeling; it integrates the characterization of enzymatic functionality, secondary and tertiary protein structures, protein domain architecture, and metabolic environment. From 67 enzymes represented by 42 enzymatic activities classified by AnEnPi (Analogous Enzymes Pipeline) as specific for L major compared with H sapiens, only 40 (23 Enzyme Commission [EC] numbers) could actually be considered as strictly specific of L major and 27 enzymes (19 EC numbers) were disregarded for having ambiguous homologies or analogies with H sapiens. Among the 40 strictly specific enzymes, we identified sterol 24-C-methyltransferase, pyruvate phosphate dikinase, trypanothione synthetase, and RNA-editing ligase as 4 essential enzymes for L major that may serve as targets for drug development. PMID:28638238

  20. Specification for a Program for an Interative Aeroelastic Solution (PIAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.; Donahue, M. J.; Dreisbach, R. L.; Bussoletti, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    An engineering and software specification which was written for a computer program to calculate aeroelastic structural loads including the effects of nonlinear aerodynamics is presented. The procedure used in the program for an iterative aeroelastic solution (PIAS) is to alternately execute two computer codes: one to calculate aerodynamic loads for a specific wing shape, and another to calculate the deflected shape caused by this loading. A significant advantage to the design of PIAS is that the initial aerodynamic module can be replaced with others. The leading edge vortex (LEV) program is used as the aerodynamic module in PIAS. This provides the capability to calculate aeroelastic loads, including the effects of a separation induced leading edge vortex. The finite element method available in ATLAS Integrated structural analysis and design system is used to determine the deflected wing shape for the applied aerodynamics and inertia loads. The data management capabilities in ATLAS are used by the execution control monitor (ECM) of PIAS to control the solution process.

  1. Specific Enzymatic Halogenation-From the Discovery of Halogenated Enzymes to Their Applications In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Weichold, Veit; Milbredt, Daniela; van Pée, Karl-Heinz

    2016-05-23

    During the last 20 years, focus has shifted from haloperoxidases to flavin-dependent and non-heme-iron halogenases because of their proven involvement in the biosynthesis of halogenated metabolites in different organisms and the regioselectivity of their reactions. During the first 10-12 years, the main research topics were the detection of halogenases as well as the elucidation of three-dimensional structures and reaction mechanisms. This Review mainly deals with studies on halogenating enzymes published between 2010 and 2015. It focusses on the elucidation of the involvement of halogenating enzymes in halometabolite biosynthesis, application of halogenases in in vivo and in vitro systems, in vivo modification of biosynthetic pathways in bacteria and plants, improvement of enzyme stability, broadening of substrate specificity, and the combination of biocatalysis with chemical synthesis to produce new compounds. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Voltage-programming-based capillary gel electrophoresis for the fast detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Woo, Nain; Kim, Su-Kang; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-08-01

    A voltage-programming-based capillary gel electrophoresis method with a laser-induced fluorescence detector was developed for the fast and highly sensitive detection of DNA molecules related to angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism, which has been reported to influence predisposition to various diseases such as cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, myocardial infarction, and Alzheimer's disease. Various voltage programs were investigated for fast detection of specific DNA molecules of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism as a function of migration time and separation efficiency to establish the effect of voltage strength to resolution. Finally, the amplified products of the angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism (190 and 490 bp DNA) were analyzed in 3.2 min without losing resolution under optimum voltage programming conditions, which were at least 75 times faster than conventional slab gel electrophoresis. In addition, the capillary gel electrophoresis method also successfully applied to the analysis of real human blood samples, although no polymorphism genes were detected by slab gel electrophoresis. Consequently, the developed voltage-programming capillary gel electrophoresis method with laser-induced fluorescence detection is an effective, rapid analysis technique for highly sensitive detection of disease-related specific DNA molecules.

  3. Degradation kinetics of forchlorfenuron in typical grapevine soils of India and its influence on specific soil enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kaushik; Dasgupta, Soma; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Patil, Sangram H; Adsule, Pandurang G

    2008-05-01

    The rate of degradation of forchlorfenuron, a cytokinin-based plant growth regulator (PGR) was explored in typical grapevine soils of India with simultaneous evaluation of its effect on biochemical attributes of the test soils in terms of the activities of specific soil microbial enzymes. In all the test soils, namely clay, sandy-loam and silty-clay, the dissipation rate was faster at the beginning, which slowed down with time, indicating a non-linear pattern of degradation. Degradation in soils could best be explained by two-compartment 1st+1st order kinetics with half-life ranging between 4-10 days. The results suggest that organic matter might be playing a major role in influencing the rate of degradation of forchlorfenuron in soil. The rate of degradation in sandy-loam soil was fastest followed by clay and silty-clay soils, respectively. Comparison of the rate of degradation in natural against sterilized soils suggests that microbial degradation might be the major pathway of residue dissipation. Changes in soil enzyme activities as a consequence of forchlorfenuron treatment were studied for extra-cellular enzymes namely acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and beta -glucosidase and intracellular enzyme-dehydrogenase. Although small changes in enzyme activities were observed, forchlorfenuron did not have any significant deleterious effect on the enzymatic activity of the test soils. Simple correlation studies between degradation percentage and individual enzyme activities did not establish any significant relationships. The pattern and change of enzyme activity was primarily the effect of the incubation period rather than the effect of forchlorfenuron itself.

  4. Genome scale prediction of substrate specificity for acyl adenylate superfamily of enzymes based on active site residue profiles.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Pankaj; Gokhale, Rajesh S; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2010-01-27

    Enzymes belonging to acyl:CoA synthetase (ACS) superfamily activate wide variety of substrates and play major role in increasing the structural and functional diversity of various secondary metabolites in microbes and plants. However, due to the large sequence divergence within the superfamily, it is difficult to predict their substrate preference by annotation transfer from the closest homolog. Therefore, a large number of ACS sequences present in public databases lack any functional annotation at the level of substrate specificity. Recently, several examples have been reported where the enzymes showing high sequence similarity to luciferases or coumarate:CoA ligases have been surprisingly found to activate fatty acyl substrates in experimental studies. In this work, we have investigated the relationship between the substrate specificity of ACS and their sequence/structural features, and developed a novel computational protocol for in silico assignment of substrate preference. We have used a knowledge-based approach which involves compilation of substrate specificity information for various experimentally characterized ACS and derivation of profile HMMs for each subfamily. These HMM profiles can accurately differentiate probable cognate substrates from non-cognate possibilities with high specificity (Sp) and sensitivity (Sn) (Sn = 0.91-1.0, Sp = 0.96-1.0) values. Using homologous crystal structures, we identified a limited number of contact residues crucial for substrate recognition i.e. specificity determining residues (SDRs). Patterns of SDRs from different subfamilies have been used to derive predictive rules for correlating them to substrate preference. The power of the SDR approach has been demonstrated by correct prediction of substrates for enzymes which show apparently anomalous substrate preference. Furthermore, molecular modeling of the substrates in the active site has been carried out to understand the structural basis of substrate selection. A web

  5. Amazing pancreas: specific regulation of pancreatic secretion of individual digestive enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Maouyo, D; Morisset, J

    1995-02-01

    We investigated the effects of somatostatin (SMS)-201-995, atropine, and MK-329 on the role of cholinergic- and cholecystokinin-related systems and on the secretory relationship between five pancreatic digestive enzymes in rats. Animals kept in restraint cages and provided with pancreatic, biliary, duodenal, and jugular vein cannulas were treated as follows: 1) 0.25 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 caerulein alone, 2) both 0.25 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 caerulein and 100 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 atropine, 3) both caerulein and 5 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 SMS, 4) 91.3 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 carbachol alone, 5) both carbachol and 0.5 mg.kg-1.h-1 MK-329, and 6) both carbachol and 5 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 SMS, respectively. Food, but not water, was denied rats starting 10 h before the experiment and throughout the 6-h experimental period. The secretory patterns over the 6-h experimental period showed noticeably independent regulation of pancreatic secretion of individual digestive enzymes. The relationship between paired enzymes significantly varied according to the treatment. The correlation between chymotrypsinogen and the other enzymes was markedly modulated by MK-329. Our results suggest that SMS is a major "gate-keeper" in the regulation of exocrine pancreatic secretion and that the secretion of each digestive enzyme is individually regulated. Furthermore, they suggest that cholecystokinin and acetylcholine and their respective agonists are essentially initiators of secretory processes of the pancreas. Therefore, the paradigms of the regulation of pancreatic secretion heretofore accepted should be reexamined.

  6. ADA Integrated Environment I Computer Program Development Specification. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    ORM DOCUMENT PROCESSING SHEET L DTIC ocT 70A 4,.. RADC-TR-81-358, Vol II (of seven) Interim Report December 1981 ADA INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENT I...TYPE OF 11EP1ORT & 109R1O0 COVCRRO Interim Report ADA INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENT I COMPUTER 15 Sep 80 - 15 Mar 81 PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT SPECIFICATION a...PERFORMINGs O’qG. REPORT NIUMOER N/A 7. AUTHOR(#) 11- CONTRACT OR GRANT NUIUECRI F30602-80-C-0291 9. PERFORM0111ING ORGANIZATION NAME ANO ADORESS 10

  7. Highly active and selective endopeptidases with programmed substrate specificities

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, Navin; Rodriguez, Sarah; Hwang, Bum-Yeol; Georgiou, George; Iverson, Brent L

    2009-01-01

    A family of engineered endopeptidases has been created that is capable of cleaving a diverse array of peptide sequences with high selectivity and catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM > 104 M−1 s−1). By screening libraries with a selection-counterselection substrate method, protease variants were programmed to recognize amino acids having altered charge, size and hydrophobicity properties adjacent to the scissile bond of the substrate, including Glu↓Arg, a specificity that to our knowledge has not been observed among natural proteases. Members of this artificial protease family resulted from a relatively small number of amino acid substitutions that (at least in one case) proved to be epistatic. PMID:18391948

  8. Screening glycosynthase libraries with a fluoride chemosensor assay independently of enzyme specificity: identification of a transitional hydrolase to synthase mutant.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Eduardo; Aragunde, Hugo; Planas, Antoni

    2014-03-01

    Glycosynthases have become efficient tools for the enzymatic synthesis of oligosaccharides, glycoconjugates and polysaccharides. Enzyme-directed evolution approaches are applied to improve the performance of current glycosynthases and engineer specificity for non-natural substrates. However, simple and general screening methods are required since most of the reported assays are specific for each particular enzyme. In the present paper, we report a general screening assay that is independent of enzyme specificity, and implemented in an HTS (high-throughput screening) format for the screening of cell extracts in directed evolution experiments. Fluoride ion is a general by-product released in all glycosynthase reactions with glycosyl fluoride donors. The new assay is based on the use of a specific chemical sensor (a silyl ether of a fluorogenic methylumbelliferone) to transduce fluoride concentration into a fluorescence signal. As a proof-of-concept, it has been applied to a nucleophile saturation mutant library of Bacillus licheniformis 1,3-1,4-β-glucanase. Beyond the expected mutations at the glutamic acid (catalytic) nucleophile, other variants have been shown to acquire glycosynthase activity. Surprisingly, an aspartic acid for glutamic acid replacement renders a highly active glycosynthase, but still retains low hydrolase activity. It appears as an intermediate state between glycosyl hydrolase and glycosynthase.

  9. Nitric oxide inhibits specific enzymes in the Krebs cycle and the respiratory chain of rat hepatocyte mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Billiar, T.R.; Curran, R.D.; Kim, R.; Simmons, R.L. )

    1990-02-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly-reactive molecule produced from L-arginine as recently described. In macrophages and tumor cells, NO inhibits specific mitochondrial enzymes presumably by attacking their intrinsic 4Fe-4S centers. The susceptible enzymes include aconitase of the Krebs cycle and oxidoreductase (complex II) of the electron transport chain. The authors have recently demonstrated that hepatocytes (HC) produce NO in large amounts in response to endotoxin and inflammatory cytokines. To determine whether HC suffer a similar enzyme inhibition, the authors exposed rat HC to increasing concentrations of NO solutions for 5 minutes. The activity of aconitase, complex 1, complex 2, and complex 4 (cytochrome oxidase) was determined by measuring O{sub 2} consumption after addition of enzyme-specific substrates. An NO concentration-dependent inhibition of aconitase, complex 1, and complex 2 was measured. After exposure to 0.6 mM solution, the activity of aconitase was blocked to non-measurable values while complex 1 was reduced to 11 + 8%, and complex 2 to 36 + 2% of the activity of control HC. Complex 4 of the respiratory chain remained intact at 100 + 8%. These data indicate that HC, like other cell types, are susceptible to inhibition of important steps of energy production by NO. As NO is produced in response to septic stimuli, this mechanism may play a role in the metabolic dysfunction of HC in sepsis.

  10. Retrostatin, a new specific enzyme inhibitor against avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Nishio, M; Kuroda, A; Suzuki, M; Ishimaru, K; Nakamura, S; Nomi, R

    1983-07-01

    A novel enzyme inhibitor against RNA-directed DNA polymerase of avian myeloblastosis virus was produced by an isolate of a new streptomycete for which the name Streptomyces retrostaticus is proposed. This enzyme inhibitor, which was named retrostatin, did not inhibit DNA-directed DNA polymerase of Escherichia coli and DNA-directed RNA polymerase of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. Retrostatin was produced by the microorganism together with streptonigrin. These two substances were extracted from the culture broth with ethyl acetate at acidic pH. Retrostatin is an acidic pH indicator and the free acid was recovered as a red powder. Retrostatin had weak antibiotic activities against Gram-positive bacteria and yeasts.

  11. Development of a highly efficient oil degumming process using a novel phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C enzyme.

    PubMed

    Cerminati, Sebastián; Eberhardt, Florencia; Elena, Claudia E; Peirú, Salvador; Castelli, María E; Menzella, Hugo G

    2017-06-01

    Enzymatic degumming using phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes may be used in environmentally friendly processes with improved oil recovery yields. In this work, phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PIPLC) candidates obtained from an in silico analysis were evaluated for oil degumming. A PIPLC from Lysinibacillus sphaericus was shown to efficiently remove phosphatidylinositol from crude oil, and when combined with a second phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase C, the three major phospholipids were completely hydrolyzed, providing an extra yield of oil greater than 2.1%, compared to standard methods. A remarkably efficient fed-batch Escherichia coli fermentation process producing ∼14 g/L of the recombinant PIPLC enzyme was developed, which may facilitate the adoption of this cost-effective oil-refining process.

  12. Space Research and Technology Program: Program and specific objectives, document approval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A detailed view of the Space Research and Technology program work breakdown structure is provided down to the specific objective level. Goals or objectives at each of these levels are set forth. The specific objective narratives are structured into several parts. First, a short paragraph statement of the specific objective is given. This is followed by a list of subobjectives. A list of targets is then provided for those areas of the specific objective that are amenable to a quantitative description of technical accomplishment and schedule. Fluid and thermal physics, materials and structures, computer science and electronics, space energy conversion, multidisciplinary research, controls and human factors, chemical propulsion, spacecraft systems, transportation systems, platform systems, and spacecraft systems technology comprise the principal research programs.

  13. Filament formation by metabolic enzymes is a specific adaptation to an advanced state of cellular starvation

    PubMed Central

    Petrovska, Ivana; Nüske, Elisabeth; Munder, Matthias C; Kulasegaran, Gayathrie; Malinovska, Liliana; Kroschwald, Sonja; Richter, Doris; Fahmy, Karim; Gibson, Kimberley; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Alberti, Simon

    2014-01-01

    One of the key questions in biology is how the metabolism of a cell responds to changes in the environment. In budding yeast, starvation causes a drop in intracellular pH, but the functional role of this pH change is not well understood. Here, we show that the enzyme glutamine synthetase (Gln1) forms filaments at low pH and that filament formation leads to enzymatic inactivation. Filament formation by Gln1 is a highly cooperative process, strongly dependent on macromolecular crowding, and involves back-to-back stacking of cylindrical homo-decamers into filaments that associate laterally to form higher order fibrils. Other metabolic enzymes also assemble into filaments at low pH. Hence, we propose that filament formation is a general mechanism to inactivate and store key metabolic enzymes during a state of advanced cellular starvation. These findings have broad implications for understanding the interplay between nutritional stress, the metabolism and the physical organization of a cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02409.001 PMID:24771766

  14. Molecular Basis for Lysine Specificity in the Yeast Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme Cdc34 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Martin; Suryadinata, Randy; Lai, Xianning; Heierhorst, Jörg; Sarcevic, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and ubiquitin ligases (E3s) catalyze the attachment of Ub to lysine residues in substrates and Ub during monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination. Lysine selection is important for the generation of diverse substrate-Ub structures, which provides versatility to this pathway in the targeting of proteins to different fates. The mechanisms of lysine selection remain poorly understood, with previous studies suggesting that the ubiquitination site(s) is selected by the E2/E3-mediated positioning of a lysine(s) toward the E2/E3 active site. By studying the polyubiquitination of Sic1 by the E2 protein Cdc34 and the RING E3 Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF) protein, we now demonstrate that in addition to E2/E3-mediated positioning, proximal amino acids surrounding the lysine residues in Sic1 and Ub are critical for ubiquitination. This mechanism is linked to key residues composing the catalytic core of Cdc34 and independent of SCF. Changes to these core residues altered the lysine preference of Cdc34 and specified whether this enzyme monoubiquitinated or polyubiquitinated Sic1. These new findings indicate that compatibility between amino acids surrounding acceptor lysine residues and key amino acids in the catalytic core of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes is an important mechanism for lysine selection during ubiquitination. PMID:20194622

  15. A specific nursing educational program in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Momblán, M Antonia; Gómez, Carmen; Santos, Alicia; Porta, Nuria; Esteve, Julia; Úbeda, Inmaculada; Halperin, Irene; Campillo, Beatriz; Guillaumet, Montserrat; Webb, Susan M; Resmini, Eugenia

    2016-07-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a rare endocrine disease, due to cortisol hypersecretion. CS patients have comorbidities, often still present after biochemical cure. Specific nursing healthcare programs to address this disease and achieve improved health related quality of life (HRQoL) are lacking. Thus, an educational nursing intervention, through the development and promotion of specific educational tools, appears to be justified. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of an educational nursing program in CS patients on HRQoL, clinical parameters, level of pain and physical activity, patterns of rest, and use of health resources. A prospective, randomized study was conducted in two reference hospitals for CS. Sixty-one patients (mean age 47 ± 12.7 years, 83.6 % females) were enrolled and divided into 2 groups: an "intervention" group where educational sessions were performed over 9 months and a "control" group, without these sessions. Specific questionnaires were used at the beginning and end of the study. After educational sessions, the intervention group had a better score in the CushingQoL questionnaire (p < 0.01), reduced level of pain (p < 0.05), improved physical activity (p < 0.01) and healthy lifestyle (p < 0.001) compared to the control group. A correlation between the CushingQoL score and reduced pain (r = 0.46, p < 0.05), improved physical activity (r = 0.89, p < 0.01), and sleep (r = 0.53, p = 0.01) was observed. This educational nursing program improved physical activity, healthy lifestyle, better sleep patterns, and reduced pain in CS patients, influencing HRQoL and reducing consumption of health resources. Moreover, the brief nature of the program suggests it as a good candidate to be used in CS patients.

  16. Lung function, atopy, specific hypersensitivity, and smoking of workers in the enzyme detergent industry over 11 years.

    PubMed Central

    Flood, D F; Blofeld, R E; Bruce, C F; Hewitt, J I; Juniper, C P; Roberts, D M

    1985-01-01

    A study of 2800 workers employed in three factories of the two major manufacturers of enzymatic products in the United Kingdom covering 11 years of operation from 1969 to 1980 showed that 2344 workers had sufficient lung function data to meet the operational criteria and these were analysed in three separate groups by factory locations. Spirometry and prick tests for specific skin reactions to standardised enzyme were performed at six monthly intervals for the first six years of the study and then annually. Factory enzyme dust and total dust measurements were made to determine the degree of dust exposure of the subjects. The lung function of the factory groups was analysed for the effects of working in the detergent industry, the degree of exposure to enzymes, skin prick test positivity to enzymes, atopicity, and smoking. The 4.5% of workers who had experienced respiratory effects from enzymes were analysed separately. Exposure to the enzyme allergen has had no significant long term effect on the lung function of the detergent workers. A higher proportion of atopics than non-atopics became skin test positive to the allergen and more smokers than non-smokers were sensitised. The overall lung function of detergent workers showed 39 ml/year loss in FEV1 on the 11 year longitudinal study and 51 ml/year loss on the lateral (cross sectional) analysis with better lung function in the south east than the north west of England. In the development of the methodology for the study several potential problems were discovered that could remain unrecognised in a cross sectional analysis performed in isolation. PMID:3871157

  17. Substrate specificity and inhibition of brassinin hydrolases, detoxifying enzymes from the plant pathogens Leptosphaeria maculans and Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Minic, Zoran; Sarma-Mamillapalle, Vijay K

    2009-12-01

    Blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans and Leptosphaeria biglobosa) and black spot (Alternaria brassicicola) fungi are devastating plant pathogens known to detoxify the plant defence metabolite, brassinin. The significant roles of brassinin as a crucifer phytoalexin and as a biosynthetic precursor of several other plant defences make it important in plant fitness. Brassinin detoxifying enzymes produced by L. maculans and A. brassicicola catalyse the detoxification of brassinin by hydrolysis of its dithiocarbamate group to indolyl-3-methanamine. The purification and characterization of brassinin hydrolases produced by L. maculans (BHLmL2) and A. brassicicola (BHAb) were accomplished: native BHLmL2 was found to be a tetrameric protein with a molecular mass of 220 kDa, whereas native BHAb was found to be a dimeric protein of 120 kDa. Protein characterization using LC-MS/MS and sequence alignment analyses suggested that both enzymes belong to the family of amidases with the catalytic Ser/Ser/Lys triad. Furthermore, chemical modification of BHLmL2 and BHAb with selective reagents suggested that the amino acid serine was involved in the catalytic activity of both enzymes. The overall results indicated that BHs have new substrate specificities with a new catalytic activity that can be designated as dithiocarbamate hydrolase. Investigation of the effect of various phytoalexins on the activities of BHLmL2 and BHAb indicated that cyclobrassinin was a competitive inhibitor of both enzymes. On the basis of pH dependence, sequence analyses, chemical modifications of amino acid residues and identification of headspace volatiles, a chemical mechanism for hydrolysis of the dithiocarbamate group of brassinin catalysed by BHLmL2 and BHAb is proposed. The current information should facilitate the design of specific synthetic inhibitors of these enzymes for plant treatments against blackleg and black spot fungal infections.

  18. Identification of the Elusive Mammalian Enzyme Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    potentially carrying one or more signature domains (C1: K R; C2: SGH; C3:SR xxH D) found in lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs, enzymes that...cleave the phosphate group off lipids ). Subtask 1b-c: To test the identified cDNA clones for PC-PLC activity in mammalian cells. 2 CDNA clones...publication and a more pure preparation of Lipid A) nerevtheless, none of the different LPS activated PC-PLC. Moreover, we figured out that the PC

  19. Structural Basis for Specificity of Propeptide-Enzyme Interaction in Barley C1A Cysteine Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed. PMID:22615948

  20. Testis-specific TAF homologs collaborate to control a tissue-specific transcription program.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Mark; Chen, Xin; Pringle, M Jodeane; Suchorolski, Martin; Sancak, Yasemin; Viswanathan, Sridhar; Bolival, Benjamin; Lin, Ting-Yi; Marino, Susan; Fuller, Margaret T

    2004-11-01

    Alternate forms of the PolII transcription initiation machinery have been proposed to play a role in selective activation of cell-type-specific gene expression programs during cellular differentiation. The cannonball (can) gene of Drosophila encodes a homolog of a TBP-associated factor (dTAF5) protein expressed only in spermatocytes, where it is required for normal transcription of genes required for spermatid differentiation. We show that Drosophila primary spermatocytes also express four additional tissue-specific TAFs: nht (homolog of dTAF4), mia (homolog of dTAF6), sa (homolog of dTAF8) and rye (homolog of dTAF12). Mutations in nht, mia and sa have similar effects in primary spermatocytes on transcription of several target genes involved in spermatid differentiation, and cause the same phenotypes as mutations in can, blocking both meiotic cell cycle progression and spermatid differentiation. The nht, mia, sa and rye proteins contain histone fold domain dimerization motifs. The nht and rye proteins interact structurally when co-expressed in bacteria, similarly to their generally expressed homologs TAF4 and TAF12, which heterodimerize. Strikingly, the structural interaction is tissue specific: nht did not interact with dTAF12 and dTAF4 did not interact with rye in a bacterial co-expression assay. We propose that the products of the five Drosophila genes encoding testis TAF homologs collaborate in an alternative TAF-containing protein complex to regulate a testis-specific gene expression program in primary spermatocytes required for terminal differentiation of male germ cells.

  1. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 7 Is a Regulator of Ubiquitin-conjugating Enzyme UbE2E1*

    PubMed Central

    Sarkari, Feroz; Wheaton, Keith; La Delfa, Anthony; Mohamed, Majda; Shaikh, Faryal; Khatun, Rahima; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Frappier, Lori; Saridakis, Vivian; Sheng, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7) is a deubiquitinating enzyme found in all eukaryotes that catalyzes the removal of ubiquitin from specific target proteins. Here, we report that UbE2E1, an E2 ubiquitin conjugation enzyme with a unique N-terminal extension, is a novel USP7-interacting protein. USP7 forms a complex with UbE2E1 in vitro and in vivo through the ASTS USP7 binding motif within its N-terminal extension in an identical manner with other known USP7 binding proteins. We show that USP7 attenuates UbE2E1-mediated ubiquitination, an effect that requires the N-terminal ASTS sequence of UbE2E1 as well as the catalytic activity of USP7. Additionally, USP7 is critical in maintaining the steady state levels of UbE2E1 in cells. This study reveals a new cellular mechanism that couples the opposing activities of the ubiquitination machinery and a deubiquitinating enzyme to maintain and modulate the dynamic balance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:23603909

  2. Development of a Highly Sensitive and Specific Blastomycosis Antibody Enzyme Immunoassay Using Blastomyces dermatitidis Surface Protein BAD-1

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, Melinda L.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Brandhorst, T. Tristan; Hage, Chadi A.; Connolly, Patricia A.; Leland, Diane S.; Davis, Thomas E.; Klein, Bruce S.; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Serologic tests for antibodies to Blastomyces dermatitidis are not thought to be useful for the diagnosis of blastomycosis, in part due to the low sensitivity of immunodiffusion and complement fixation. Earlier studies have shown that the enzyme immunoassay improves the sensitivity of antibody detection for the diagnosis of blastomycosis. Microplates coated with the B. dermatitidis surface protein BAD-1 were used for testing sera from patients with proven blastomycosis or histoplasmosis and controls. Semiquantification was accomplished by using standards containing human anti-B. dermatitidis antibodies. The antibodies were detected in 87.8% of the patients with blastomycosis by the enzyme immunoassay compared to 15.0% by immunodiffusion. The specificities were 99.2% for patients with nonfungal infections and healthy subjects and 94.0% for patients with histoplasmosis. The results were highly reproducible on repeat testing. When combined with antigen testing, antibody testing improved the sensitivity from 87.8% to 97.6%. Enzyme immunoassay detection of antibodies against BAD-1 is highly specific, has greatly improved sensitivity over immunodiffusion, and may identify cases with negative results by antigen testing. This assay has the potential to aid in the diagnosis of blastomycosis. PMID:24285817

  3. Development of a highly sensitive and specific blastomycosis antibody enzyme immunoassay using Blastomyces dermatitidis surface protein BAD-1.

    PubMed

    Richer, Sarah M; Smedema, Melinda L; Durkin, Michelle M; Brandhorst, T Tristan; Hage, Chadi A; Connolly, Patricia A; Leland, Diane S; Davis, Thomas E; Klein, Bruce S; Wheat, L Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Serologic tests for antibodies to Blastomyces dermatitidis are not thought to be useful for the diagnosis of blastomycosis, in part due to the low sensitivity of immunodiffusion and complement fixation. Earlier studies have shown that the enzyme immunoassay improves the sensitivity of antibody detection for the diagnosis of blastomycosis. Microplates coated with the B. dermatitidis surface protein BAD-1 were used for testing sera from patients with proven blastomycosis or histoplasmosis and controls. Semiquantification was accomplished by using standards containing human anti-B. dermatitidis antibodies. The antibodies were detected in 87.8% of the patients with blastomycosis by the enzyme immunoassay compared to 15.0% by immunodiffusion. The specificities were 99.2% for patients with nonfungal infections and healthy subjects and 94.0% for patients with histoplasmosis. The results were highly reproducible on repeat testing. When combined with antigen testing, antibody testing improved the sensitivity from 87.8% to 97.6%. Enzyme immunoassay detection of antibodies against BAD-1 is highly specific, has greatly improved sensitivity over immunodiffusion, and may identify cases with negative results by antigen testing. This assay has the potential to aid in the diagnosis of blastomycosis.

  4. A continuous coupled spectrophotometric assay for debranching enzyme activity using reducing end-specific α-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Do, Viet Ha; Tran, Phuong Lan; Ni, Li; Park, Kwan Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A novel continuous spectrophotometric assay to measure the activity of the debranching enzyme and α-amylase has been developed. The assay mixture comprises the debranching enzyme (GlgX from Escherichia coli) or α-amylase (PPA from porcine pancreas), a reducing end-specific α-glucosidase (MalZ), maltodextrin-branched β-cyclodextrin (Glcn-β-CD) as the substrate, and the glucose oxidase/peroxidase system (GOPOD). Due to its high reducing end specificity, the branch chains of the substrates are not hydrolyzed by MalZ. After hydrolysis by GlgX or PPA, the released maltodextrins are immediately hydrolyzed into glucose from the reducing end by MalZ, whose concentration is continuously measured by GOPOD at 510 nm in a thermostat spectrophotometer. The kinetic constants determined for GlgX (Km = 0.66 ± 0.02 mM and kcat = 76.7 ± 1.5 s(-1)) are within a reasonable range compared with those measured using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC). The assay procedure is convenient and sensitive, and it requires lower concentrations of enzymes and substrate compared with dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) and HPAEC analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase TbPDE2C is an essential enzyme in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Zoraghi, Roya; Seebeck, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Chemotherapy of human sleeping sickness, a fatal disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is in a dismal state, and the identification and characterization of new drug targets is an urgent prerequisite for an improvement of the dramatic situation in the field. Over the last several years, inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases have proven to be highly successful drug candidates for an assortment of clinical conditions. Their potential as antiparasitic drugs has not been explored so far. This study reports the characterization of a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase from T. brucei, TbPDE2C. This enzyme is a class I phosphodiesterase, and it is a member of a small enzyme family in T. brucei, TbPDE2. Inhibitors of this enzyme block the proliferation of bloodstream form trypanosomes in culture. RNA interference experiments demonstrated that the TbPDE2 family, and in particular TbPDE2C, are essential for maintaining intracellular cAMP concentrations within a physiological range. Bloodstream form trypanosomes are exquisitely sensitive to elevated concentrations of intracellular cAMP, and a disruption of TbPDE2C function quickly leads to the disruption of nuclear and cellular cell division, and to cell death. TbPDE2C might represent a novel drug target for the development of new and effective trypanocidal drugs. PMID:11930001

  6. Using site-saturation mutagenesis to explore mechanism and substrate specificity in thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Forest H; McLeish, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    For almost 20 years, site-saturation mutagenesis (SSM) has been used to evolve stereoselective enzymes as catalysts for synthetic organic chemistry. Much of this work has focused on enzymes such as lipases and esterases, although the range is rapidly expanding. By contrast, using SSM to study enzyme mechanisms is much less common. Instead, site-directed mutagenesis is more generally employed, with a particular emphasis on alanine variants. In the present review, we provide examples of the growing use of SSM to study not only substrate and reaction selectivity, but also the reaction mechanism of thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes. We report that the use of SSM to examine the roles of the catalytic residues of benzoylformate decarboxylase gave rise to results that were at odds with earlier kinetic and structural studies using alanine substitutions and also questioned their conclusions. SSM was also employed to examine the long held tenet that a bulky hydrophobic residue provides a fulcrum by which the V-conformation of the ThDP cofactor is maintained. X-ray structures showed that ThDP stayed in the V-conformation even when the replacement residues were charged or did not contact the cofactor. We also summarize the results obtained when SSM was used to evolve new substrate specificity and/or enantioselectivity in ThDP-dependent enzymes such as benzoylformate decarboxylase, transketolase, 2-succinyl-5-enolpyruvyl-6-hydroxy-3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylate synthase and the E1 component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex.

  7. Substrate orientation and specificity in xanthine oxidase: crystal structures of the enzyme in complex with indole-3-acetaldehyde and guanine.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongnan; Hall, James; Hille, Russ

    2014-01-28

    Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing hydroxylase that catalyzes the hydroxylation of sp(2)-hybridized carbon centers in a variety of aromatic heterocycles as well as aldehydes. Crystal structures of the oxidase form of the bovine enzyme in complex with a poor substrate indole-3-acetaldehyde and the nonsubstrate guanine have been determined, both at a resolution of 1.6 Å. In each structure, a specific and unambiguous orientation of the substrate in the active site is observed in which the hydroxylatable site is oriented away from the active site molybdenum center. The orientation seen with indole-3-acetaldehyde has the substrate positioned with the indole ring rather than the exocyclic aldehyde nearest the molybdenum center, indicating that the substrate must rotate some 30° in the enzyme active site to permit hydroxylation of the aldehyde group (as observed experimentally), accounting for the reduced reactivity of the enzyme toward this substrate. The principal product of hydroxylation of indole-3-acetaldehyde by the bovine enzyme is confirmed to be indole-3-carboxylic acid based on its characteristic UV-vis spectrum, and the kinetics of enzyme reduction are reported. With guanine, the dominant orientation seen crystallographically has the C-8 position that might be hydroxylated pointed away from the active site molybdenum center, in a configuration resembling that seen previously with hypoxanthine (a substrate that is effectively hydroxylated at position 2). The ∼180° reorientation required to permit reaction is sterically prohibited, indicating that substrate (mis)orientation in the active site is a major factor precluding formation of the highly mutagenic 8-hydroxyguanine.

  8. The selectivity of austocystin D arises from cell-line-specific drug activation by cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Marks, Kevin M; Park, Eun Sun; Arefolov, Alexander; Russo, Katie; Ishihara, Keiko; Ring, Jennifer E; Clardy, Jon; Clarke, Astrid S; Pelish, Henry E

    2011-04-25

    The natural product austocystin D was identified as a potent cytotoxic agent with in vivo antitumor activity and selectivity for cells expressing the multidrug resistance transporter MDR1. We sought to elucidate the mechanism of austocystin D's selective cytotoxic activity. Here we show that the selective cytotoxic action of austocystin D arises from its selective activation by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in specific cancer cell lines, leading to induction of DNA damage in cells and in vitro. The potency and selectivity of austocystin D is lost upon inhibition of CYP activation and does not require MDR1 expression or activity. Furthermore, the pattern of cytotoxicity of austocystin D was distinct from doxorubicin and etoposide and unlike aflatoxin B(1), a compound that resembles austocystin D and is also activated by CYP enzymes to induce DNA damage. Theses results suggest that austocystin D may be of clinical benefit for targeting or overcoming chemoresistance.

  9. Purification and characterization of serine proteinase of the Glu,Asp-specific enzyme family from Thermoactinomyces species.

    PubMed

    Demidyuk, I V; Nosovskaya, E A; Tsaplina, I A; Karavaiko, G I; Kostrov, S V

    1997-02-01

    Enzyme catalyzing hydrolysis of a substrate of Glu,Asp-specific proteinases (Z-Glu-pNA) and cleaving bond Glu13-Ala14 in the oxidized insulin B chain was purified to homogeneity from the culture medium of Thermoactinomyces species using hydrophobic chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose CL 4B as the key purification step. The molecular weight of the proteinase is 23 kD. The enzyme is completely inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate and is stable at pH 5-11. The pH optimum for the hydrolysis of azocasein as substrate is 8.5. The temperature optimum for proteolytic activity is 55 degrees C. The N-terminal sequence of the proteinase is: Ser-Val-Leu-Gly-Thr-Asp-Glu-Arg-Thr-Arg-Val-Thr-Asn-Thr-Thr-Thr-Tyr-Pro- Tyr- Trp-.

  10. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), a specific enzyme that modifies ghrelin with a medium-chain fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masayasu; Hamamoto, Akie; Sato, Takahiro

    2016-10-01

    In the gastric peptide hormone ghrelin, serine 3 (threonine 3 in frogs) is modified, primarily by n-octanoic acid; this modification is essential for ghrelin's activity. The enzyme that transfers n-octanoic acid to Ser3 of ghrelin is ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT). GOAT, the only enzyme known to catalyze acyl modification of ghrelin, specifically modifies serine (or threonine) at the third position and does not modify other serine residues in ghrelin peptides. GOAT prefers n-hexanoyl-CoA over n-octanoyl-CoA as the acyl donor, although in the stomach the n-octanoyl form is the predominant form of acyl-modified ghrelin. GOAT is a promising target for drug development to treat metabolic diseases and eating disorders.

  11. Development of a Plate-Based Screening Assay to Investigate the Substrate Specificity of the PRMT Family of Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hao C; Wang, Min; Salsburg, Andrew; Knuckley, Bryan

    2015-09-14

    There are nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs 1-9) expressed in humans that vary in both subcellular localization and substrate specificity. The variation in substrate specificity between isozymes leads to competing effects that result in either activation or repression of tumor suppressor genes. Current methods used to study substrate specificity for these enzymes utilize radioisotopic labeling of substrates, mass spectrometry analysis of complex samples, or coupled assays that monitor cofactor degradation. Herein, we report the development of a rapid, nonradioactive, and sensitive method for screening multiple peptides in parallel to gain insight into the substrate specificity of PRMT enzymes. Our assay provides a major advantage over other high-throughput screening assays (e.g., ELISA, AlphaScreen chemiluminescence) by eliminating the need for purification of individual peptides and provides a timesaving, cost-effective alternative to the traditional PRMT assays. A one-bead one-compound (OBOC) peptide library was synthesized and subsequently screened against PRMT1 in a 96-well plate. This screen resulted in identification of a novel PRMT1 substrate with kinetic parameters similar to histone H4-21 (e.g., the best-known PRMT1 peptide substrate).

  12. Discovery of specific inhibitors of human USP7/HAUSP deubiquitinating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Reverdy, Céline; Conrath, Susan; Lopez, Roman; Planquette, Cécile; Atmanene, Cédric; Collura, Vincent; Harpon, Jane; Battaglia, Véronique; Vivat, Valérie; Sippl, Wolfgang; Colland, Frédéric

    2012-04-20

    The human USP7 deubiquitinating enzyme was shown to regulate many proteins involved in the cell cycle, as well as tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Thus, USP7 offers a promising, strategic target for cancer therapy. Using biochemical assays and activity-based protein profiling in living systems, we identified small-molecule antagonists of USP7 and demonstrated USP7 inhibitor occupancy and selectivity in cancer cell lines. These compounds bind USP7 in the active site through a covalent mechanism. In cancer cells, these active-site-targeting inhibitors were shown to regulate the level of several USP7 substrates and thus recapitulated the USP7 knockdown phenotype that leads to G1 arrest in colon cancer cells. The data presented in this report provide proof of principle that USP7 inhibitors may be a valuable therapeutic for cancer. In addition, the discovery of such molecules offers interesting tools for studying deubiquitination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis of a Comprehensive Polyprenol Library for Evaluation of Bacterial Enzyme Lipid Substrate Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Baolin; Woodward, Robert; Wen, Liuqing; Wang, Xuan; Zhao, Guohui; Wang, Peng George

    2013-12-01

    Polyprenols, a type of universal glycan lipid carrier, play important roles for glycan bio-assembly in wide variety of living systems. Chemical synthesis of natural polyisoprenols such as undecaprenol and dolichols, but especially their homologs, could serves as a powerful molecular tool to dissect and define the functions of enzymes involved in glycan biosynthesis. In this paper, we report an efficient and reliable method to construct this type of hydrophoic molecule through a base-mediated iterative coupling approach using a key bifunctional (Z, Z)-diisoprenyl building block. The ligation with N-acetyl-D-glactosamine (GalNAc) with a set of the synthesized lipid analogs forming polyprenol pyrophosphate linked GalNAc (GalNAc-PP-lipid) conjugates is also demonstrated.

  14. Crystal structures of Physcomitrella patens AOC1 and AOC2: insights into the enzyme mechanism and differences in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Piotr; Brodhun, Florian; Sauer, Kristin; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Hamberg, Mats; Brinkmann, Jens; Scholz, Julia; Dickmanns, Achim; Feussner, Ivo; Ficner, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    In plants, oxylipins regulate developmental processes and defense responses. The first specific step in the biosynthesis of the cyclopentanone class of oxylipins is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC) that forms cis(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. The moss Physcomitrella patens has two AOCs (PpAOC1 and PpAOC2) with different substrate specificities for C₁₈- and C₂₀-derived substrates, respectively. To better understand AOC's catalytic mechanism and to elucidate the structural properties that explain the differences in substrate specificity, we solved and analyzed the crystal structures of 36 monomers of both apo and ligand complexes of PpAOC1 and PpAOC2. From these data, we propose the following intermediates in AOC catalysis: (1) a resting state of the apo enzyme with a closed conformation, (2) a first shallow binding mode, followed by (3) a tight binding of the substrate accompanied by conformational changes in the binding pocket, and (4) initiation of the catalytic cycle by opening of the epoxide ring. As expected, the substrate dihydro analog cis-12,13S-epoxy-9Z,15Z-octadecadienoic acid did not cyclize in the presence of PpAOC1; however, when bound to the enzyme, it underwent isomerization into the corresponding trans-epoxide. By comparing complex structures of the C₁₈ substrate analog with in silico modeling of the C₂₀ substrate analog bound to the enzyme allowed us to identify three major molecular determinants responsible for the different substrate specificities (i.e. larger active site diameter, an elongated cavity of PpAOC2, and two nonidentical residues at the entrance of the active site).

  15. Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes encode enzymes with contrasting substrate specificity and show divergent gene expression profiles in Fragaria species.

    PubMed

    Miosic, Silvija; Thill, Jana; Milosevic, Malvina; Gosch, Christian; Pober, Sabrina; Molitor, Christian; Ejaz, Shaghef; Rompel, Annette; Stich, Karl; Halbwirth, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    During fruit ripening, strawberries show distinct changes in the flavonoid classes that accumulate, switching from the formation of flavan 3-ols and flavonols in unripe fruits to the accumulation of anthocyanins in the ripe fruits. In the common garden strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) this is accompanied by a distinct switch in the pattern of hydroxylation demonstrated by the almost exclusive accumulation of pelargonidin based pigments. In Fragaria vesca the proportion of anthocyanins showing one (pelargonidin) and two (cyanidin) hydroxyl groups within the B-ring is almost equal. We isolated two dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) cDNA clones from strawberry fruits, which show 82% sequence similarity. The encoded enzymes revealed a high variability in substrate specificity. One enzyme variant did not accept DHK (with one hydroxyl group present in the B-ring), whereas the other strongly preferred DHK as a substrate. This appears to be an uncharacterized DFR variant with novel substrate specificity. Both DFRs were expressed in the receptacle and the achenes of both Fragaria species and the DFR2 expression profile showed a pronounced dependence on fruit development, whereas DFR1 expression remained relatively stable. There were, however, significant differences in their relative rates of expression. The DFR1/DFR2 expression ratio was much higher in the Fragaria×ananassa and enzyme preparations from F.×ananassa receptacles showed higher capability to convert DHK than preparations from F. vesca. Anthocyanin concentrations in the F.×ananassa cultivar were more than twofold higher and the cyanidin:pelargonidin ratio was only 0.05 compared to 0.51 in the F. vesca cultivar. The differences in the fruit colour of the two Fragaria species can be explained by the higher expression of DFR1 in F.×ananassa as compared to F. vesca, a higher enzyme efficiency (Kcat/Km values) of DFR1 combined with the loss of F3'H activity late in fruit development of F.×ananassa.

  16. Human and rodent carboxylesterases: immunorelatedness, overlapping substrate specificity, differential sensitivity to serine enzyme inhibitors, and tumor-related expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingxing; Yang, Dongfang; Liu, Lan; Xue, Bob; Yan, Bingfang

    2002-05-01

    Carboxylesterases hydrolyze numerous endogenous and foreign compounds with diverse structures. Humans and rodents express multiple forms of carboxylesterases, which share a high degree of sequence identity (approximately 70%). Alignment analyses locate in carboxylesterases several functional subsites such the catalytic triad as seen in acetylcholinesterase. The aim of this study was to determine among human and rodent carboxylesterases the immunorelatedness, overlapping substrate specificity, differential sensitivity to serine enzyme inhibitors, tissue distribution, and tumor-related expression. Six antibodies against whole carboxylesterases or synthetic peptides were tested for their reactivity toward 11 human or rodent recombinant carboxylesterases. The antibodies against whole proteins generally exhibited a broader cross-reactivity than the anti-peptide antibodies. All carboxylesterases hydrolyzed para-nitrophenylacetate and para-nitrophenylbutyrate. However, the relative activity varied markedly from enzyme to enzyme (>20-fold), and some carboxylesterases showed a clear substrate preference. Carboxylesterases with the same functional subsites had a similar profile on substrate specificity and sensitivity toward phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and paraoxon, suggesting that these subsites play determinant roles in the recognition of substrates and inhibitors. Among three human carboxylesterases, HCE-1 hydrolyzed both substrates to a similar extent, whereas HCE-2 and HCE-3 showed an opposite substrate preference. All three enzymes were inhibited by PMSF and paraoxon, but they showed a marked difference in relative sensitivities. Based on immunoblotting analyses, HCE-1 was present in all tissues examined, whereas HCE-2 and HCE-3 were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Colon carcinomas expressed slightly higher levels of HCE-1 and HCE-2 than the adjacent normal tissues, whereas the opposite was true with HCE-3.

  17. Goal specificity and learning with a hypermedia program.

    PubMed

    Vollmeyer, Regina; Burns, Bruce D

    2002-01-01

    Problem solving research has found that a nonspecific goal (NSG) leads to better learning than a specific goal (SG). This effect can be understood in terms of dual-space search theories of problem solving. To apply the theory, we studied goal specificity effects with a hypermedia program in which participants had to learn about the outbreak of World War 1, either with the goal to find twenty dates (i.e., SG) or with the goal to explain the reasons for the war (i.e., NSG). As expected, compared to the SG-group, the NSG-group correctly answered more factual questions about the text during the task, spent more time on average per page, and more often looked for extra information. In a final questionnaire with factual and inferential questions, the NSG-group still performed better than the SG-group. The NSG-group may also show better transfer of what they had learnt to a new situation.

  18. A method for predicting individual residue contributions to enzyme specificity and binding-site energies, and its application to MTH1.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James J P

    2016-11-01

    A new method for predicting the energy contributions to substrate binding and to specificity has been developed. Conventional global optimization methods do not permit the subtle effects responsible for these properties to be modeled with sufficient precision to allow confidence to be placed in the results, but by making simple alterations to the model, the precisions of the various energies involved can be improved from about ±2 kcal mol(-1) to ±0.1 kcal mol(-1). This technique was applied to the oxidized nucleotide pyrophosphohydrolase enzyme MTH1. MTH1 is unusual in that the binding and reaction sites are well separated-an advantage from a computational chemistry perspective, as it allows the energetics involved in docking to be modeled without the need to consider any issues relating to reaction mechanisms. In this study, two types of energy terms were investigated: the noncovalent interactions between the binding site and the substrate, and those responsible for discriminating between the oxidized nucleotide 8-oxo-dGTP and the normal dGTP. Both of these were investigated using the semiempirical method PM7 in the program MOPAC. The contributions of the individual residues to both the binding energy and the specificity of MTH1 were calculated by simulating the effect of mutations. Where comparisons were possible, all calculated results were in agreement with experimental observations. This technique provides fresh insight into the binding mechanism that enzymes use for discriminating between possible substrates.

  19. Determining the specificities of TALENs, Cas9, and other genome editing enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Vikram; Guilinger, John P.; Liu, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of programmable site-specific endonucleases has led to a dramatic increase in genome engineering activities for research and therapeutic purposes. Specific loci of interest in the genomes of a wide range of organisms including mammals can now be modified using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like endonucleases (TALENs), and CRISPR-associated Cas9 endonucleases in a site-specific manner, in some cases requiring relatively modest effort for endonuclease design, construction and application. While these technologies have made genome engineering widely accessible, the ability of programmable nucleases to cleave off-target sequences can limit their applicability and raise concerns about therapeutic safety. In this article we review methods to evaluate and improve the DNA cleavage activity of programmable site-specific endonucleases and describe a procedure for a comprehensive off-target profiling method based on the in vitro selection of very large (~1012-membered) libraries of potential nuclease substrates. PMID:25398335

  20. Simple dual-spotting procedure enhances nLC-MALDI MS/MS analysis of digests with less specific enzymes.

    PubMed

    Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Rohmer, Marion; Arrey, Tabiwang N; Mueller, Benjamin F; Beckhaus, Tobias; Bahr, Ute; Barka, Guenes; Karas, Michael

    2011-06-03

    The beneficial effect of high mass accuracy in mass spectrometry is especially pronounced when using less specific enzymes as the number of theoretically possible peptides increases dramatically without any cleavage specificity defined. Together with a preceding chromatographic separation, high-resolution mass spectrometers such as the MALDI-LTQ-Orbitrap are therefore well suited for the analysis of protein digests with less specific enzymes. A combination with fast, automated, and informative MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis has already been shown to yield increased total peptide and protein identifications. Here, a simple method for nLC separation and subsequent alternating spotting on two targets for both a MALDI-LTQ-Orbitrap and a MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument is introduced. This allows for simultaneous measurements on both instruments and subsequent combination of both data sets by an in-house written software tool. The performance of this procedure was evaluated using a mixture of four standard proteins digested with elastase. Three replicate runs were examined concerning repeatability and the total information received from both instruments. A cytosolic extract of C. glutamicum was used to demonstrate the applicability to more complex samples. Database search results showed that an additional 32.3% of identified peptides were found using combined data sets in comparison to MALDI-TOF/TOF data sets.

  1. A family of phase-variable restriction enzymes with differing specificities generated by high-frequency gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Dybvig, K; Sitaraman, R; French, C T

    1998-11-10

    The hsd genes of Mycoplasma pulmonis encode restriction and modification enzymes exhibiting a high degree of sequence similarity to the type I enzymes of enteric bacteria. The S subunits of type I systems dictate the DNA sequence specificity of the holoenzyme and are required for both the restriction and the modification reactions. The M. pulmonis chromosome has two hsd loci, both of which contain two hsdS genes each and are complex, site-specific DNA inversion systems. Embedded within the coding region of each hsdS gene are a minimum of three sites at which DNA inversions occur to generate extensive amino acid sequence variations in the predicted S subunits. We show that the polymorphic hsdS genes produced by gene rearrangement encode a family of functional S subunits with differing DNA sequence specificities. In addition to creating polymorphisms in hsdS sequences, DNA inversions regulate the phase-variable production of restriction activity because the other genes required for restriction activity (hsdR and hsdM) are expressed only from loci that are oriented appropriately in the chromosome relative to the hsd promoter. These data cast doubt on the prevailing paradigms that restriction systems are either selfish or function to confer protection from invasion by foreign DNA.

  2. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Biological Control of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle with Lytic Enzyme-Producing Microorganisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    Lytic enzyme-producing microorganisms Biocontrol Mycoherbicides Hydrilla Induced pathogenicity 20. ASTRACT (Coartinue G rev’wm eft if n*..eeam7 mod...However, no natural enemies of hydrilla have yet been imported that are promising biocontrol candidates. Therefore, a less conventional approach was...of microorganisms that function in the decay process. These microorganisms pro- duce enzymes capable of lysing specific plant components such as

  3. Specific capture of the hydrolysate on magnetic beads for sensitive detecting plant vacuolar processing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Meng; Zeng, Lizhang; Liu, Weipeng; Zhang, Tao; Xing, Da

    2016-05-15

    Conventional plant protease detection always suffers from high background interference caused by the complex coloring metabolites in plant cells. In this study, a bio-modified magnetic beads-based strategy was developed for sensitive and quantitative detection of plant vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) activity. Cleavage of the peptide substrate (ESENCRK-FITC) after asparagine residue by VPE resulted in the 2-cyano-6-amino-benzothiazole (CABT)-functionalized magnetic beads capture of the severed substrate CRK-FITC via a condensation reaction between CABT and cysteine (Cys). The catalytic activity was subsequently obtained by the confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry quantitative analysis. The sensor system integrated advantages of (i) the high efficient enrichment and separation capabilities of magnetic beads and (ii) the catalyst-free properties of the CABT-Cys condensation reaction. It exhibited a linear relationship between the fluorescence signal and the concentration of severed substrate in the range of 10-600 pM. The practical results showed that, compared with normal growth conditions, VPE activity was increased by 2.7-fold (307.2 ± 25.3 μM min(-1)g(-1)) upon cadmium toxicity stress. This platform effectively overcame the coloring metabolites-caused background interference, showing fine applicability for the detection of VPE activity in real samples. The strategy offers great sensitivity and may be further extended to other protease activity detection.

  4. 24 CFR 200.936 - Supplementary specific procedural requirements under HUD building products certification program...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirements under HUD building products certification program for solid fuel type room heaters and fireplace... Supplementary specific procedural requirements under HUD building products certification program for solid fuel... fireplace stoves certified under the HUD Building Products Certification Program shall be...

  5. The fungal cultivar of leaf-cutter ants produces specific enzymes in response to different plant substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Khadempour, Lily; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; White, Richard A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Huang, Eric L.; Smith, Richard D.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2016-10-26

    Herbivores use symbiotic microbes to help gain access to energy and nutrients from plant material. Leaf-cutter ants are a paradigmatic example, having tremendous impact on their ecosystems as dominant generalist herbivores through cultivation of a fungus, Leucoagaricus gongylophorous. Here we examine how this mutualism could facilitate the flexible substrate incorporation of the ants by providing leaf-cutter ant subcolonies four substrate types: leaves, flowers, oats, and a mixture of all three. Through metaproteomic analysis of the fungus gardens, we were able to identify and quantify 1766 different fungal proteins, including 161 biomass-degrading enzymes. This analysis revealed that fungal protein profiles were significantly different between subcolonies fed different substrates with the highest abundance of cellulolytic enzymes observed in the leaf and flower treatments. When the fungus garden is provided with leaves and flowers, which contain the majority of their energy in recalcitrant material, it increases its production of proteins that break down cellulose: endoglucanases, exoglucanase and β-glucosidase. Further, the complete metaproteomes for the leaves and flowers treatments were very similar, the mixed treatment closely resembled the treatment with oats alone. This suggests that when provided a mixture of substrates, the fungus garden preferentially produces enzymes necessary for breakdown of simpler, more digestible substrates. This flexible, substrate-specific response of the fungal cultivar allows the leaf-cutter ants to derive energy from a wide range of substrates, which may contribute to their ability to be dominant generalist herbivores.

  6. Aquifex aeolicus tRNA (Gm18) methyltransferase has unique substrate specificity. TRNA recognition mechanism of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Susumu; Watanabe, Kazunori; Kim, Jong-Myong; Ogasawara, Tomio; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Endo, Yaeta

    2003-07-04

    Transfer RNA (guanosine-2')-methyltransferase (Gm-methylase) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to 2'-OH of G18 in the D-loop of tRNA. Based on their mode of tRNA recognition, Gm-methylases can be divided into the following two types: type I having broad specificity toward the substrate tRNA, and type II that methylates only limited tRNA species. Protein synthesized by in vitro cell-free translation revealed that Gm-methylase encoded in the Aquifex aeolicus genome is a novel type II enzyme. Experiments with chimeric tRNAs and mini- and micro-helix RNAs showed that the recognition region of this enzyme is included within the D-arm structure of tRNALeu and that a bulge is essentially required. Variants of tRNALeu, tRNASer, and tRNAPhe revealed that a combination of certain base pairs in the D-stem is strongly recognized by the enzyme, that 4 bp in the D-stem enhance methyl acceptance activity, and that the Py16Py17G18G19 sequence is important for efficient methyl transfer. The methyl acceptance activities of all the A. aeolicus tRNA genes, which can be classified into 14 categories on the basis of their D-arm structure, were tested. The results clearly showed that the substrate recognition mechanism elucidated by the variant experiments was applicable to their native substrates.

  7. Molecular diversity of tuliposide B-converting enzyme in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana): identification of the root-specific isozyme.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Taiji; Ueno, Ayaka; Ogita, Shinjiro; Kato, Yasuo

    2017-06-01

    6-Tuliposide B (PosB) is a glucose ester accumulated in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana) as a major secondary metabolite. PosB serves as the precursor of the antimicrobial lactone tulipalin B (PaB), which is formed by PosB-converting enzyme (TCEB). The gene TgTCEB1, encoding a TCEB, is transcribed in tulip pollen but scarcely transcribed in other tissues (e.g. roots) even though those tissues show high TCEB activity. This led to the prediction of the presence of a TCEB isozyme with distinct tissue specificity. Herein, we describe the identification of the TgTCEB-R gene from roots via native enzyme purification; this gene is a paralog of TgTCEB1. Recombinant enzyme characterization verified that TgTCEB-R encodes a TCEB. Moreover, TgTCEB-R was localized in tulip plastids, as found for pollen TgTCEB1. TgTCEB-R is transcribed almost exclusively in roots, indicating a tissue preference for the transcription of TCEB isozyme genes.

  8. Development of a specific monoclonal antibody for grouper (Epinephelus guaza) identification by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Asensio, Luis; González, Isabel; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Mayoral, Belén; Lopez-Calleja, Inés; Hernández, Pablo E; García, Teresa; Martín, Rosario

    2003-05-01

    Identification of fish species adulteration is important for consumer protection and the enforcement of food-labeling laws. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) generated against soluble muscle proteins from grouper (Epinephelus guaza) has been used in two indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) formats (microtiter plates and immunostick tubes) for the rapid authentication of grouper fillets. The 3D12 MAb was produced with the use of the hybridoma technique and tested against several commonly consumed fish species by ELISA. The 3D12 MAb specifically reacted with grouper samples and could be useful for the discrimination of grouper among other, less-valued, fish species sold in the marketplace.

  9. Allometric scaling in centrarchid fish: origins of intra- and inter-specific variation in oxidative and glycolytic enzyme levels in muscle.

    PubMed

    Davies, Rhiannon; Moyes, Christopher D

    2007-11-01

    The influence of body size on metabolic rate, muscle enzyme activities and the underlying patterns of mRNA for these enzymes were explored in an effort to explain the genetic basis of allometric variation in metabolic enzymes. We studied two pairs of sister species of centrarchid fish: black bass (largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui) and sunfish (pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus). Our goal was to assess the regulatory basis of both intraspecific and interspecific variation relative to body size, as well as to gain insights into the evolutionary constraints within lineages. Whole animal routine metabolic rate showed scaling coefficients not significantly different from 1, ranging from (+0.87 to +0.96). However, there were significant effects of body size on the specific activities of oxidative and glycolytic enzymes. Mass-specific activity of the oxidative enzyme citrate synthase (CS) scaled negatively with body size in each species, with scaling coefficients ranging from -0.15 to -0.19, whereas the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK) showed positive scaling, with scaling coefficients ranging from +0.08 to +0.23. The ratio of mass-specific enzyme activity in PK to CS increased with body size, whereas the ratio of mRNA transcripts of PK to CS was unaffected, suggesting the enzyme relationships were not due simply to transcriptional regulation of both genes. The mass-dependent differences in PK activities were best explained by transcriptional regulation of the muscle PK gene; PK mRNA was a good predictor of PK specific enzyme activity within species and between species. Conversely, CS mRNA did not correlate with CS specific enzyme activities, suggesting post-transcriptional mechanisms may explain the observed inter-specific and intraspecific differences in oxidative enzymes.

  10. Characterization of the rhesus monkey CYP3A64 enzyme: species comparisons of CYP3A substrate specificity and kinetics using baculovirus-expressed recombinant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian; Norcross, Ryan; Fang, Yulin; Lu, Ping; Rodrigues, A David; Shou, Magang; Rushmore, Tom; Booth-Genthe, Catherine

    2006-10-01

    The rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) is a primate species used extensively as a preclinical safety species in drug development. In this report, we describe the cloning, expression, and characterization of CYP3A64 (AY334551), a CYP3A4 homolog expressed in rhesus liver. The deduced amino acid sequence was found to be 93% similar to human CYP3A4, 83% similar to human CYP3A5, and identical to the previously reported cynomolgus monkey CYP3A8 (Komori et al., 1992). The substrate specificity of CYP3A64 for testosterone (0-250 microM), midazolam (0-200 microM), nifedipine (0-200 microM), and 7-benzoxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (0-200 microM) were compared with recombinant enzymes from rat (CYP3A1, CYP3A2), dog (CYP3A12, CYP3A26), rabbit (CYP3A6), and human (CYP3A4, CYP3A5). Immunoinhibition and chemical inhibition of CYP3A64 was demonstrated using the inhibitory monoclonal antibody (MAb) 10-1-1 (anti-3A4) and ketoconazole (0-10 microM). The utility of CYP3A64 to be used as a standard in monkey induction assays was shown and the concentration of CYP3A64 protein in rhesus liver microsomes was estimated to be 72 pmol/mg protein. In summary, these results support the utilization of rhesus monkey CYP3A64 for in vitro drug metabolism studies and provide a more complete understanding of CYP3A substrate specificities and species differences in metabolic capabilities.

  11. Identification of the Elusive Mammalian Enzyme Phospatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    mammalian protein, phosphatidycholine- specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) in the inflammatory processes involved in progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA...serum, rheumatoid arthritis , transcriptome sequencing, HUVECs, U937 cells 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...aims at identifying novel players that are critically involved in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The identification of these factors

  12. A new test of computational protein design: predicting posttranslational modification specificity for the enzyme SMYD2.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kimberly A

    2015-01-06

    In this issue of Structure, Lanouette and colleagues use a combination of computation and experiment to define a specificity motif for the lysine methyltransferase SMYD2. Using this motif, they predict and experimentally verify four new SMYD2 substrates.

  13. Cardiolipin: a stereospecifically spin-labeled analogue and its specific enzymic hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cable, M B; Jacobus, J; Powell, G L

    1978-01-01

    The spin-labeled cardiolipin 1-(3-sn-phosphatidyl)-3-[1-acyl-2-(16-doxylstearoyl)glycero(3)phosphol]-sn-glycerol has been prepared. The stereoselective synthesis makes use of the monolysocardiolipin 1-(3-sn-phosphatidyl)-3-[1-acyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero(3)phospho]-sn-glycerol, available from the stereospecific hydrolysis of cardiolipin by phospholipase A2 (phosphatide 2-acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.4) of Trimeresurus flavoviridis. The results of treatment of the spin-labeled cardiolipin with the cardiolipin-specific phospholipase D (phosphatidylcholine phosphatidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.4) (Hemophilus parainfluenzae) of known specificity and with phospholipase C (phosphatidylcholine cholinephosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.3) of Bacillus cereus are consistent with the assigned structure. The spin-labeled cardiolipin is further characterized and the unique features of this diastereomer are discussed in the context of the unusual stereochemistry of the natural phospholipid. PMID:274715

  14. Identification of the Elusive Mammalian Enzyme Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Phospholipase C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    processes involved in progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus, the main scopes of this proposal are: 1. to identify the PC-PLC gene and protein...of PC-PLC. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Phosphatidycholine-specific phospholipase C, lipopolisaccharide, oxidized lipoproteins, serum, rheumatoid arthritis ...present proposal aims at identifying novel players that are critically involved in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The identification of

  15. Content and Specifications for the Mod 1 1970 Spelling Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Patricia A.

    This paper briefly describes the organization and content of the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) Mod 1 Spelling Program and its relation to the SWRL Reading Program. The Mod 1 Spelling Program includes 190 words and consists of 22 lessons. Eighteen of the 22 lessons are based on review lists which are composed individually for each…

  16. Tumor-Specific Formation of Enzyme-Instructed Supramolecular Self-Assemblies as Cancer Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Jing; Hu, Hao; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Yan, Xuefeng; Tang, Yuxia; Jin, Albert; Song, Jibin; Niu, Gang; Zhang, Guofeng; Horkay, Ferenc; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the effort of developing various nanodelivery systems, most of them suffer from undesired high uptakes by the reticuloendothelial system, such as liver and spleen. Herein we develop an endogenous phosphatase-triggered coassembly strategy to form tumor-specific indocyanine green (ICG)-doped nanofibers (5) for cancer theranostics. Based on coordinated intermolecular interactions, 5 significantly altered near-infrared absorbance of ICG, which improves the critical photoacoustic and photothermal properties. The phosphatase-instructed coassembly process, as well as its theranostic capability, was successfully conducted at different levels ranging from in vitro, living cell, tissue mimic, to in vivo. Specifically, the tumor uptake of ICG was markedly increased to 15.05 ± 3.78%ID/g, which was 25-fold higher than that of free ICG (0.59 ± 0.24%ID/g) at 4 h after intravenous injection. The resulting ultrahigh T/N ratios (>15) clearly differentiated tumors from the surrounding normal tissue. Complete tumor elimination with high therapeutic accuracy has been successfully achieved upon laser irradiation (0.8 W/cm2, 5 min) within 24–48 h postinjection. As the first example, in vivo formation of tumor-specific ICG-doped nanofiber for PTT theranostics owns the immense potential for clinical translation of personalized nanomedicine with targeted drug delivery as well as for cancer theranostics. PMID:26301492

  17. Novel substrate specificity of glutathione synthesis enzymes from Streptococcus agalactiae and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Kuniki . E-mail: kkino@waseda.jp; Kuratsu, Shoko; Noguchi, Atsushi; Kokubo, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Yuji; Arai, Toshinobu; Yagasaki, Makoto; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2007-01-12

    Glutathione (GSH) is synthesized by {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) and glutathione synthetase (GS) in living organisms. Recently, bifunctional fusion protein, termed {gamma}-GCS-GS catalyzing both {gamma}-GCS and GS reactions from gram-positive firmicutes Streptococcus agalactiae, has been reported. We revealed that in the {gamma}-GCS activity, S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS had different substrate specificities from those of Escherichia coli {gamma}-GCS. Furthermore, S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS synthesized several kinds of {gamma}-glutamyltripeptide, {gamma}-Glu-X{sub aa}-Gly, from free three amino acids. In Clostridium acetobutylicum, the genes encoding {gamma}-GCS and putative GS were found to be immediately adjacent by BLAST search, and had amino acid sequence homology with S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS, respectively. We confirmed that the proteins expressed from each gene showed {gamma}-GCS and GS activity, respectively. C. acetobutylicum GS had broad substrate specificities and synthesized several kinds of {gamma}-glutamyltripeptide, {gamma}-Glu-Cys-X{sub aa}. Whereas the substrate specificities of {gamma}-GCS domain protein and GS domain protein of S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS were the same as those of S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS.

  18. Estimating enzyme kinetic parameters: a computer program for linear regression and non-parametric analysis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S P; Suelter, C H

    1986-09-01

    An IBM computer program, WILMAN4, is described which calculates the estimates, Km, V and Km/V from initial velocity measurements according to one of four statistical methods. Three of these methods involve linear regression analysis using weights given by assuming: (i) constant absolute error (G.N. Wilkinson, 1961, Biochem J., 80, 324-332), (ii) constant relative error (G. Johansen and R. Lumry, 1961, C.R. Trav. Lab. Carlsberg, 32, 185-214) and (iii) an error function in between the above two cases. (A. Cornish-Bowden, 1976, Principles of Enzyme Kinetics, Butterworths Inc, Boston, Mass., pp. 168-193). The fourth method is a non-parametric procedure derived by Eisenthal and Cornish-Bowden (Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 532 (1974) 268-272). Residuals are obtained by subtracting the experimental and the calculated velocities. Outliers, or residuals which are greater than two experimental standard deviations, can be identified and removed from the data set. If the sequence of positive and negative signs of the residuals is random as determined by a statistical probability calculation, the data set is assumed to obey the Michaelis-Menten equation.

  19. KINETICS OF MODULATORY ROLE OF Cyperus esculentus L. ON THE SPECIFIC ACTIVITY OF KEY CARBOHYDRATE METABOLIZING ENZYMES

    PubMed Central

    Sabiu, Saheed; Ajani, Emmanuel Oladipo; Sunmonu, Taofik Olatunde; Ashafa, Anofi Omotayo Tom

    2017-01-01

    Background: The continuous search for new lead compounds as viable inhibitors of specific enzymes linked to carbohydrate metabolism has intensified. Cyperus esculentus L. is one of the therapeutically implicated botanicals against several degenerative diseases including diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated the antioxidant and mechanism(s) of inhibitory potential of aqueous extract of C. esculentus on α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. The extract was investigated for its radical scavenging and hypoglycaemic potentials using standard experimental procedures. Lineweaver-Burke plot was used to predict the manner in which the enzymes were inhibited. Results: The data obtained revealed that the extract moderately and potently inhibited the specific activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase, respectively. The inhibition was concentration-related with respective IC50 values of 5.19 and 0.78 mg/mL relative to that of the control (3.72 and 3.55 mg/mL). The extract also significantly scavenged free radicals and the effects elicited could be ascribed to its phytoconstituents. Conclusion: The respective competitive and non-competitive mode of action of the extract is due to its inhibitory potentials on the activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase. Going forward, in addition to completely characterize the exact compound(s) responsible for the elicited activity in this study, pertinent attention will be given to the in vivo evaluation of the identified constituents. PMID:28638866

  20. KINETICS OF MODULATORY ROLE OF Cyperus esculentus L. ON THE SPECIFIC ACTIVITY OF KEY CARBOHYDRATE METABOLIZING ENZYMES.

    PubMed

    Sabiu, Saheed; Ajani, Emmanuel Oladipo; Sunmonu, Taofik Olatunde; Ashafa, Anofi Omotayo Tom

    2017-01-01

    The continuous search for new lead compounds as viable inhibitors of specific enzymes linked to carbohydrate metabolism has intensified. Cyperus esculentus L. is one of the therapeutically implicated botanicals against several degenerative diseases including diabetes mellitus. This study evaluated the antioxidant and mechanism(s) of inhibitory potential of aqueous extract of C. esculentus on α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. The extract was investigated for its radical scavenging and hypoglycaemic potentials using standard experimental procedures. Lineweaver-Burke plot was used to predict the manner in which the enzymes were inhibited. The data obtained revealed that the extract moderately and potently inhibited the specific activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase, respectively. The inhibition was concentration-related with respective IC50 values of 5.19 and 0.78 mg/mL relative to that of the control (3.72 and 3.55 mg/mL). The extract also significantly scavenged free radicals and the effects elicited could be ascribed to its phytoconstituents. The respective competitive and non-competitive mode of action of the extract is due to its inhibitory potentials on the activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase. Going forward, in addition to completely characterize the exact compound(s) responsible for the elicited activity in this study, pertinent attention will be given to the in vivo evaluation of the identified constituents.

  1. Muscle enzyme and fiber type-specific sarcomere protein increases in serum after inertial concentric-eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Carmona, G; Guerrero, M; Cussó, R; Padullés, J M; Moras, G; Lloret, M; Bedini, J L; Cadefau, J A

    2015-12-01

    Muscle damage induced by inertial exercise performed on a flywheel device was assessed through the serum evolution of muscle enzymes, interleukin 6, and fiber type-specific sarcomere proteins such as fast myosin (FM) and slow myosin (SM). We hypothesized that a model of muscle damage could be constructed by measuring the evolution of serum concentration of muscle proteins following inertial exercise, according to their molecular weight and the fiber compartment in which they are located. Moreover, by measuring FM and SM, the type of fibers that are affected could be assessed. Serum profiles were registered before and 24, 48, and 144 h after exercise in 10 healthy and recreationally active young men. Creatine kinase (CK) and CK-myocardial band isoenzyme increased in serum early (24 h) and returned to baseline values after 48 h. FM increased in serum late (48 h) and remained elevated 144 h post-exercise. The increase in serum muscle enzymes suggests increased membrane permeability of both fast and slow fibers, and the increase in FM reveals sarcomere disruption as well as increased membrane permeability of fast fibers. Consequently, FM could be adopted as a fiber type-specific biomarker of muscle damage. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Detection of Leptospira-Specific Antibodies Using a Recombinant Antigen-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Halsey, Eric S.; Guevara, Carolina; Canal, Enrique; Hall, Eric; Maves, Ryan; Tilley, Drake H.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2013-01-01

    We produced three highly purified recombinant antigens rLipL32, rLipL41, and rLigA-Rep (leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A repeat region) for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of these recombinant antigens was evaluated using 121 human sera. Among them, 63 sera were microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-confirmed positive sera from febrile patients in Peru, 22 sera were indigenous MAT-negative febrile patient sera, and 36 sera were from patients with other febrile diseases from Southeast Asia, where leptospirosis is also endemic. Combining the results of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG detection from these three antigens, the overall sensitivity is close to 90% based on the MAT. These results suggest that an ELISA using multiple recombinant antigens may be used as an alternative method for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies. PMID:24166046

  3. Piezoelectric tuning fork probe for atomic force microscopy imaging and specific recognition force spectroscopy of an enzyme and its ligand.

    PubMed

    Makky, Ali; Viel, Pascal; Chen, Shu-wen Wendy; Berthelot, Thomas; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    Piezoelectric quartz tuning fork has drawn the attention of many researchers for the development of new atomic force microscopy (AFM) self-sensing probes. However, only few works have been done for soft biological materials imaging in air or aqueous conditions. The aim of this work was to demonstrate the efficiency of the AFM tuning fork probe to perform high-resolution imaging of proteins and to study the specific interaction between a ligand and its receptor in aqueous media. Thus, a new kind of self-sensing AFM sensor was introduced to realize imaging and biochemical specific recognition spectroscopy of glucose oxidase enzyme using a new chemical functionalization procedure of the metallic tips based on the electrochemical reduction of diazonium salt. This scanning probe as well as the functionalization strategy proved to be efficient respectively for the topography and force spectroscopy of soft biological materials in buffer conditions.

  4. Hijacking an RNA-editing enzyme to identify cell-specific targets of RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Aoife C; Rahman, Reazur; Jin, Hua; Shen, James L; Fieldsend, Allegra; Luo, Weifei; Rosbash, Michael

    2016-01-01

    RNA transcripts are bound and regulated by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Current methods for identifying in vivo targets of a RBP are imperfect and not amenable to examining small numbers of cells. To address these issues, we developed TRIBE (Targets of RNA-binding proteins Identified By Editing), a technique that couples an RBP to the catalytic domain of the Drosophila RNA editing enzyme ADAR and expresses the fusion protein in vivo. RBP targets are marked with novel RNA editing events and identified by sequencing RNA. We have used TRIBE to identify the targets of three RBPs (Hrp48, dFMR1 and NonA). TRIBE compares favorably to other methods, including CLIP, and we have identified RBP targets from as little as 150 specific fly neurons. TRIBE can be performed without an antibody and in small numbers of specific cells. PMID:27040499

  5. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Specific Identification and Enumeration of Azospirillum brasilense Cd. in Cereal Roots †

    PubMed Central

    Levanony, Hanna; Bashan, Yoav; Kahana, Zvi E.

    1987-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is suggested as a reliable, sensitive, and highly specific method for the identification and enumeration of Azospirillum brasilense Cd. As few as 105 CFU/ml can be practically identified by this method. At higher bacterial numbers, sensitivity increased linearly up to 5 × 108 CFU/ml, yielding useful standard curves. No cross-reaction was found either with different closely related Azospirillum strains or with other rhizosphere bacteria. The method allows for a specific identification of A. brasilense Cd. both in pure cultures and in mixtures with other bacterial species, even when the colony morphology is variable. The method was successfully applied to assess the degree of root colonization on various cereals by A. brasilense Cd. PMID:16347284

  6. 41 CFR 101-29.221 - Federal Specifications, Standards and Commercial Item Description Program (Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Standards and Commercial Item Description Program (Federal Standardization Program). 101-29.221 Section 101... Standardization Program). The Federal Specifications, Standards and Commercial Item Description Program is a standardization program developed under authority of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949...

  7. 41 CFR 101-29.221 - Federal Specifications, Standards and Commercial Item Description Program (Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Standards and Commercial Item Description Program (Federal Standardization Program). 101-29.221 Section 101... Standardization Program). The Federal Specifications, Standards and Commercial Item Description Program is a standardization program developed under authority of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949...

  8. A new sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for IgD.

    PubMed

    Mosedale, David E; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Luan, Jian'an; Goodall, Margaret; Grainger, David J

    2006-06-30

    We have developed a new highly specific ELISA for IgD, and then used it to measure levels of circulating IgD in the serum of 480 un-selected patients from the East Anglia region of UK. The assay is both extremely sensitive and specific, with a minimum detected IgD concentration of 30 pg/ml and more than 10,000-fold specificity for IgD over all other human immunoglobulins. The assay shows linear dilution characteristics with both purified IgD and human serum, and spiking of purified IgD into either purified immunoglobulins or human serum shows c. 100% recovery. Furthermore, intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation for repeated measurements of the same samples are below 10% and 15% respectively. Measurement of IgD levels on the un-selected patient population showed levels to range from <300 pg/ml to over 100 microg/ml, with a geometric mean of 8 microg/ml. The distribution is approximately normal after log transformation. Levels of circulating IgD were higher in men than in women. There was a significant negative correlation between levels of IgD and age in women, but not in men. Moreover, after adjustment for age and sex, there were statistically significantly higher levels of circulating IgD in male (but not female) smokers, compared to their non-smoking counterparts. These results highlight the care that needs to be taken to control for age, sex and cigarette smoking when examining levels of circulating IgD in future studies.

  9. [Diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia by detection of antigenuria using an enzyme immunoassay with 6 antibody specificities].

    PubMed

    Helbig, J H; Lück, P C; Witzleb, W

    1989-10-01

    In patients with microbiologically and clinically suspected Legionella caused pneumonia antigenuria was investigated by means of a direct two-site binding assay (ELISA) with polyclonal antibodies against Legionella (L.) pneumonia serogroup 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 and L. micdadei. By application of antibodies only against L. pneumonia serogroup 1 antigenuria was found in 27 of 66 patients (= 41%). The expanding of the used specificities of antibodies in 47 out of this cases resulted in an increase of positive urinary antigen findings from 38% to 55%. Possibilities and limits of the detection of antigenuria with regard to efficient and rapid diagnostics of legionellosis are discussed.

  10. Heparin/heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfatase from Flavobacterium heparinum: integrated structural and biochemical investigation of enzyme active site and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Myette, James R; Soundararajan, Venkataramanan; Shriver, Zachary; Raman, Rahul; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2009-12-11

    Heparin and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (HSGAGs) comprise a chemically heterogeneous class of sulfated polysaccharides. The development of structure-activity relationships for this class of polysaccharides requires the identification and characterization of degrading enzymes with defined substrate specificity and enzymatic activity. Toward this end, we report here the molecular cloning and extensive structure-function analysis of a 6-O-sulfatase from the Gram-negative bacterium Flavobacterium heparinum. In addition, we report the recombinant expression of this enzyme in Escherichia coli in a soluble, active form and identify it as a specific HSGAG sulfatase. We further define the mechanism of action of the enzyme through biochemical and structural studies. Through the use of defined substrates, we investigate the kinetic properties of the enzyme. This analysis was complemented by homology-based molecular modeling studies that sought to rationalize the substrate specificity of the enzyme and mode of action through an analysis of the active-site topology of the enzyme including identifying key enzyme-substrate interactions and assigning key amino acids within the active site of the enzyme. Taken together, our structural and biochemical studies indicate that 6-O-sulfatase is a predominantly exolytic enzyme that specifically acts on N-sulfated or N-acetylated 6-O-sulfated glucosamines present at the non-reducing end of HSGAG oligosaccharide substrates. This requirement for the N-acetyl or N-sulfo groups on the glucosamine substrate can be explained through eliciting favorable interactions with key residues within the active site of the enzyme. These findings provide a framework that enables the use of 6-O-sulfatase as a tool for HSGAG structure-activity studies as well as expand our biochemical and structural understanding of this important class of enzymes.

  11. Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase Genes Encode Enzymes with Contrasting Substrate Specificity and Show Divergent Gene Expression Profiles in Fragaria Species

    PubMed Central

    Miosic, Silvija; Thill, Jana; Milosevic, Malvina; Gosch, Christian; Pober, Sabrina; Molitor, Christian; Ejaz, Shaghef; Rompel, Annette; Stich, Karl; Halbwirth, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    During fruit ripening, strawberries show distinct changes in the flavonoid classes that accumulate, switching from the formation of flavan 3-ols and flavonols in unripe fruits to the accumulation of anthocyanins in the ripe fruits. In the common garden strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) this is accompanied by a distinct switch in the pattern of hydroxylation demonstrated by the almost exclusive accumulation of pelargonidin based pigments. In Fragaria vesca the proportion of anthocyanins showing one (pelargonidin) and two (cyanidin) hydroxyl groups within the B-ring is almost equal. We isolated two dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) cDNA clones from strawberry fruits, which show 82% sequence similarity. The encoded enzymes revealed a high variability in substrate specificity. One enzyme variant did not accept DHK (with one hydroxyl group present in the B-ring), whereas the other strongly preferred DHK as a substrate. This appears to be an uncharacterized DFR variant with novel substrate specificity. Both DFRs were expressed in the receptacle and the achenes of both Fragaria species and the DFR2 expression profile showed a pronounced dependence on fruit development, whereas DFR1 expression remained relatively stable. There were, however, significant differences in their relative rates of expression. The DFR1/DFR2 expression ratio was much higher in the Fragaria×ananassa and enzyme preparations from F.×ananassa receptacles showed higher capability to convert DHK than preparations from F. vesca. Anthocyanin concentrations in the F.×ananassa cultivar were more than twofold higher and the cyanidin:pelargonidin ratio was only 0.05 compared to 0.51 in the F. vesca cultivar. The differences in the fruit colour of the two Fragaria species can be explained by the higher expression of DFR1 in F.×ananassa as compared to F. vesca, a higher enzyme efficiency (Kcat/Km values) of DFR1 combined with the loss of F3’H activity late in fruit development of F.×ananassa. PMID:25393679

  12. Deadlock and fictitiousness problem in parallel program specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Panfilenko, V.P.

    1995-05-01

    One of the directions of modern programming based on algebraic methods takes its origin in V.M. Glushkov`s theory of systems of algorithmic algebras (SAA). The SAA apparatus with appropriately interpreted operations is used for program design and allows compact structured representation of program schemas in the form of algebraic formulas. Modified systems of algorithmic algebras (SAA-M) additionally represent parallelism description tools.

  13. Specificity and kinetics of 23S rRNA modification enzymes RlmH and RluD.

    PubMed

    Ero, Rya; Leppik, Margus; Liiv, Aivar; Remme, Jaanus

    2010-11-01

    Along the ribosome assembly pathway, various ribosomal RNA processing and modification reactions take place. Stem-loop 69 in the large subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes plays a substantial role in ribosome functioning. It contains three highly conserved pseudouridines synthesized by pseudouridine synthase RluD. One of the pseudouridines is further methylated by RlmH. In this paper we show that RlmH has unique substrate specificity among rRNA modification enzymes. It preferentially methylates pseudouridine and less efficiently uridine. Furthermore, RlmH is the only known modification enzyme that is specific to 70S ribosomes. Kinetic parameters determined for RlmH are the following: The apparent K(M) for substrate 70S ribosomes is 0.51 ± 0.06 μM, and for cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine 27 ± 3 μM; the k(cat) values are 4.95 ± 1.10 min⁻¹ and 6.4 ± 1.3 min⁻¹, respectively. Knowledge of the substrate specificity and the kinetic parameters of RlmH made it possible to determine the kinetic parameters for RluD as well. The K(M) value for substrate 50S subunits is 0.98 ± 0.18 μM and the k(cat) value is 1.97 ± 0.46 min⁻¹. RluD is the first rRNA pseudouridine synthase to be kinetically characterized. The determined rates of RluD- and RlmH-directed modifications of 23S rRNA are compatible with the rate of 50S assembly in vivo. The fact that RlmH requires 30S subunits demonstrates the dependence of 50S subunit maturation on the simultaneous presence of 30S subunits.

  14. Specificity and kinetics of 23S rRNA modification enzymes RlmH and RluD

    PubMed Central

    Ero, Rya; Leppik, Margus; Liiv, Aivar; Remme, Jaanus

    2010-01-01

    Along the ribosome assembly pathway, various ribosomal RNA processing and modification reactions take place. Stem–loop 69 in the large subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes plays a substantial role in ribosome functioning. It contains three highly conserved pseudouridines synthesized by pseudouridine synthase RluD. One of the pseudouridines is further methylated by RlmH. In this paper we show that RlmH has unique substrate specificity among rRNA modification enzymes. It preferentially methylates pseudouridine and less efficiently uridine. Furthermore, RlmH is the only known modification enzyme that is specific to 70S ribosomes. Kinetic parameters determined for RlmH are the following: The apparent KM for substrate 70S ribosomes is 0.51 ± 0.06 μM, and for cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine 27 ± 3 μM; the kcat values are 4.95 ± 1.10 min−1 and 6.4 ± 1.3 min−1, respectively. Knowledge of the substrate specificity and the kinetic parameters of RlmH made it possible to determine the kinetic parameters for RluD as well. The KM value for substrate 50S subunits is 0.98 ± 0.18 μM and the kcat value is 1.97 ± 0.46 min−1. RluD is the first rRNA pseudouridine synthase to be kinetically characterized. The determined rates of RluD- and RlmH-directed modifications of 23S rRNA are compatible with the rate of 50S assembly in vivo. The fact that RlmH requires 30S subunits demonstrates the dependence of 50S subunit maturation on the simultaneous presence of 30S subunits. PMID:20817755

  15. A comprehensive analysis of the geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate synthase enzyme family identifies novel members and reveals mechanisms of substrate specificity and quaternary structure organization.

    PubMed

    Peterhoff, David; Beer, Barbara; Rajendran, Chitra; Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kapetaniou, Evangelia; Guldan, Harald; Wierenga, Rik K; Sterner, Reinhard; Babinger, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate synthase (GGGPS) family enzymes catalyse the formation of an ether bond between glycerol-1-phosphate and polyprenyl diphosphates. They are essential for the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids, but also occur in bacterial species, albeit with unknown physiological function. It has been known that there exist two phylogenetic groups (I and II) of GGGPS family enzymes, but a comprehensive study has been missing. We therefore visualized the variability within the family by applying a sequence similarity network, and biochemically characterized 17 representative GGGPS family enzymes regarding their catalytic activities and substrate specificities. Moreover, we present the first crystal structures of group II archaeal and bacterial enzymes. Our analysis revealed that the previously uncharacterized bacterial enzymes from group II have GGGPS activity like the archaeal enzymes and differ from the bacterial group I enzymes that are heptaprenylglyceryl phosphate synthases. The length of the isoprenoid substrate is determined in group II GGGPS enzymes by 'limiter residues' that are different from those in group I enzymes, as shown by site-directed mutagenesis. Most of the group II enzymes form hexamers. We could disrupt these hexamers to stable and catalytically active dimers by mutating a single amino acid that acts as an 'aromatic anchor'.

  16. Non-hydrolyzable Diubiquitin Probes Reveal Linkage-Specific Reactivity of Deubiquitylating Enzymes Mediated by S2 Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Flierman, Dennis; van der Heden van Noort, Gerbrand J.; Ekkebus, Reggy; Geurink, Paul P.; Mevissen, Tycho E.T.; Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Komander, David; Ovaa, Huib

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin chains are important post-translational modifications that control a large number of cellular processes. Chains can be formed via different linkages, which determines the type of signal they convey. Deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) regulate ubiquitylation status by trimming or removing chains from attached proteins. DUBs can contain several ubiquitin-binding pockets, which confer specificity toward differently linked chains. Most tools for monitoring DUB specificity target binding pockets on opposing sides of the active site; however, some DUBs contain additional pockets. Therefore, reagents targeting additional pockets are essential to fully understand linkage specificity. We report the development of active site-directed probes and fluorogenic substrates, based on non-hydrolyzable diubiquitin, that are equipped with a C-terminal warhead or a fluorogenic activity reporter moiety. We demonstrate that various DUBs in lysates display differential reactivity toward differently linked diubiquitin probes, as exemplified by the proteasome-associated DUB USP14. In addition, OTUD2 and OTUD3 show remarkable linkage-specific reactivity with our diubiquitin-based reagents. PMID:27066941

  17. Quantification of amebae specific antibodies as "Multiple of normal activity (MONA)" with a standardized enzyme immunoassay (EIA).

    PubMed

    Funke, M; Felgner, P; Geister, R

    1981-12-01

    Sera of 853 returnees from tropical countries, of 24 cases with amebic liver abscess and of 172 nonexposed German individuals were tested for antibodies to E. histolytica in the enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Antibody results were expressed as "multiple of normal activity (MONA)". The qualification of the EIA as a routine screening procedure for amebae specific antibodies was investigated and compared to that of the complement fixation test. Based on the symmetric frequency distribution of results from the 172 non-exposed controls the upper one sided limits for 95% (less than 2.8 MONA) and 99% (less than 4.2 MONA) specificity were determined. Routine results below the 95% specificity limit were considered "inconspicuous", such between both limits "borderline" and all MONA values exceeding the 99% specificity limit "conspicuous". The intention was to thereby secure a high degree of sensitivity for amebae antibody in the test. Cases with clinically confirmed liver abscess revealed a one sided lower 95% sensitivity limit (greater than or equal to 1.2 MONA), far above the onset of the defined sensitivity thresholds for conspicuous MONA values.

  18. Deciphering the Substrate Specificity of SbnA, the Enzyme Catalyzing the First Step in Staphyloferrin B Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus assembles the siderophore, staphyloferrin B, from l-2,3-diaminopropionic acid (l-Dap), α-ketoglutarate, and citrate. Recently, SbnA and SbnB were shown to produce l-Dap and α-ketoglutarate from O-phospho-l-serine (OPS) and l-glutamate. SbnA is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme with homology to O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylases; however, SbnA utilizes OPS instead of O-acetyl-l-serine (OAS), and l-glutamate serves as a nitrogen donor instead of a sulfide. In this work, we examined how SbnA dictates substrate specificity for OPS and l-glutamate using a combination of X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics, and site-directed mutagenesis. Analysis of SbnA crystals incubated with OPS revealed the structure of the PLP-α-aminoacrylate intermediate. Formation of the intermediate induced closure of the active site pocket by narrowing the channel leading to the active site and forming a second substrate binding pocket that likely binds l-glutamate. Three active site residues were identified: Arg132, Tyr152, Ser185 that were essential for OPS recognition and turnover. The Y152F/S185G SbnA double mutant was completely inactive, and its crystal structure revealed that the mutations induced a closed form of the enzyme in the absence of the α-aminoacrylate intermediate. Lastly, l-cysteine was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of SbnA by forming a nonproductive external aldimine with the PLP cofactor. These results suggest a regulatory link between siderophore and l-cysteine biosynthesis, revealing a potential mechanism to reduce iron uptake under oxidative stress. PMID:26794841

  19. Decreased H2B monoubiquitination and overexpression of ubiquitin-specific protease enzyme 22 in malignant colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zijing; Zhu, Linlin; Guo, Tianjiao; Wang, Yiping; Yang, Jinlin

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the expression of H2B monoubiquitination enzyme (uH2B) and ubiquitin-specific protease enzyme 22 (USP22) in colon carcinoma and establish a correlation between the expression of these enzymes and clinicopathological parameters. The modification levels of uH2B and USP22 in 20 noncancerous and 129 cancerous colon samples were studied by immunohistochemistry. We used a dual-rated semiquantitative method to classify the expression according to 3 levels and analyzed these results. uH2B was abundant in the normal colon epithelium, but its expression was decreased in colon cancers (P < .001); the uH2B modification level correlated with tumor differentiation (P < .001), lymph node metastasis (P = .017), distant metastasis (P = .036), and tumor stage (P = .039). The USP22 expression in colon carcinoma was higher than that in normal tissues (P = .007) and negatively correlated with the degree of differentiation (P = .006), invasion (P = .025), lymph node metastasis (P = .026), and tumor stage (P = .044). uH2B and USP22 expression negatively correlated (r = -0.401, P < .001). Patients with uH2B-negative and USP22-positive staining were found to have lower survival rates (30.737 ± 2.866 versus 51.667 ± 2.286 months, P < .001). Positive uH2B and negative USP22 expression remained a statistically significant prognostic indicator in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio, 2.557; 95% confidence interval, 1.043-6.269; P = .04). We conclude that uH2B displays differential staining patterns according to progressive stages of colon cancer, indicating that uH2B may play an important inhibitory role in carcinogenesis. Increased USP22 expression in colon cancer correlated with reduced uH2B expression, and this expression pattern may contribute to tumor progression.

  20. 29 CFR 99.235 - Program-specific audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... understanding of internal control and perform tests of internal control over the Federal program consistent with... on internal control related to the Federal program, which shall describe the scope of testing of internal control and the results of the tests; (iii) A report on compliance which includes an opinion...

  1. 29 CFR 99.235 - Program-specific audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... understanding of internal control and perform tests of internal control over the Federal program consistent with... on internal control related to the Federal program, which shall describe the scope of testing of internal control and the results of the tests; (iii) A report on compliance which includes an opinion...

  2. As-built design specification for segment map (Sgmap) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, M. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The segment map program (SGMAP), which is part of the CLASFYT package, is described in detail. This program is designed to output symbolic maps or numerical dumps from LANDSAT cluster/classification files or aircraft ground truth/processed ground truth files which are in 'universal' format.

  3. G-quadruplex RNA binding and recognition by the lysine-specific histone demethylase-1 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Alexander; Martin, William J; Luka, Zigmund; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Reiter, Nicholas J

    2016-08-01

    Lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) is an essential epigenetic regulator in metazoans and requires the co-repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (CoREST) to efficiently catalyze the removal of mono- and dimethyl functional groups from histone 3 at lysine positions 4 and 9 (H3K4/9). LSD1 interacts with over 60 regulatory proteins and also associates with lncRNAs (TERRA, HOTAIR), suggesting a regulatory role for RNA in LSD1 function. We report that a stacked, intramolecular G-quadruplex (GQ) forming TERRA RNA (GG[UUAGGG]8UUA) binds tightly to the functional LSD1-CoREST complex (Kd ≈ 96 nM), in contrast to a single GQ RNA unit ([UUAGGG]4U), a GQ DNA ([TTAGGG]4T), or an unstructured single-stranded RNA. Stabilization of a parallel-stranded GQ RNA structure by monovalent potassium ions (K(+)) is required for high affinity binding to the LSD1-CoREST complex. These data indicate that LSD1 can distinguish between RNA and DNA as well as structured versus unstructured nucleotide motifs. Further, cross-linking mass spectrometry identified the primary location of GQ RNA binding within the SWIRM/amine oxidase domain (AOD) of LSD1. An ssRNA binding region adjacent to this GQ binding site was also identified via X-ray crystallography. This RNA binding interface is consistent with kinetic assays, demonstrating that a GQ-forming RNA can serve as a noncompetitive inhibitor of LSD1-catalyzed demethylation. The identification of a GQ RNA binding site coupled with kinetic data suggests that structured RNAs can function as regulatory molecules in LSD1-mediated mechanisms. © 2016 Hirschi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. Starch-Branching Enzyme I-Deficient Mutation Specifically Affects the Structure and Properties of Starch in Rice Endosperm1

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Hikaru; Nishi, Aiko; Yamashita, Kazuhiro; Takemoto, Yoko; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Hosaka, Yuko; Sakurai, Aya; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2003-01-01

    We have isolated a starch mutant that was deficient in starch-branching enzyme I (BEI) from the endosperm mutant stocks of rice (Oryza sativa) induced by the treatment of fertilized egg cells with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. The deficiency of BEI in this mutant was controlled by a single recessive gene, tentatively designated as starch-branching enzyme mutant 1 (sbe1). The mutant endosperm exhibited the normal phenotype and contained the same amount of starch as the wild type. However, the mutation apparently altered the fine structure of amylopectin. The mutant amylopectin was characterized by significant decrease in both long chains with degree of polymerization (DP) ≥ 37 and short chains with DP 12 to 21, marked increase in short chains with DP ≤ 10 (A chains), and slight increase in intermediate chains with DP 24 to 34, suggesting that BEI specifically synthesizes B1 and B2–3 chains. The endosperm starch from the sbe1 mutant had a lower onset concentration for urea gelatinization and a lower onset temperature for thermo-gelatinization compared with the wild type, indicating that the genetic modification of amylopectin fine structure is responsible for changes in physicochemical properties of sbe1 starch. PMID:14526120

  5. Starch-branching enzyme I-deficient mutation specifically affects the structure and properties of starch in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hikaru; Nishi, Aiko; Yamashita, Kazuhiro; Takemoto, Yoko; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Hosaka, Yuko; Sakurai, Aya; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2003-11-01

    We have isolated a starch mutant that was deficient in starch-branching enzyme I (BEI) from the endosperm mutant stocks of rice (Oryza sativa) induced by the treatment of fertilized egg cells with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. The deficiency of BEI in this mutant was controlled by a single recessive gene, tentatively designated as starch-branching enzyme mutant 1 (sbe1). The mutant endosperm exhibited the normal phenotype and contained the same amount of starch as the wild type. However, the mutation apparently altered the fine structure of amylopectin. The mutant amylopectin was characterized by significant decrease in both long chains with degree of polymerization (DP) > or = 37 and short chains with DP 12 to 21, marked increase in short chains with DP < or = 10 (A chains), and slight increase in intermediate chains with DP 24 to 34, suggesting that BEI specifically synthesizes B1 and B2-3 chains. The endosperm starch from the sbe1 mutant had a lower onset concentration for urea gelatinization and a lower onset temperature for thermo-gelatinization compared with the wild type, indicating that the genetic modification of amylopectin fine structure is responsible for changes in physicochemical properties of sbe1 starch.

  6. [Fibrinogen/fibrin-specific enzymes from copperhead (Agkistrodon halys halys) and cobra (Naja oxiana eichwald) snake venoms].

    PubMed

    Yunusova, E S; Sadykov, E S; Sultanalieva, N M; Shkinev, A V

    2016-03-01

    Ability of fractions of cobra's (Naja oxiana Eichwald) and copperhead snake's (Agkistrodon halys halys) venoms to hydrolyze fibrinogen/fibrin was studied. In cobra's snake a component with molecular mass of nearly 60 kDa was found to hydrolyze a-chain of fibrinogen but failed to hydrolyze casein/azocasein and fibrin. A fibrinogen-specific metalloproteinase, the enzyme was inhibited by EDTA. Cobra's venom reduced the mass of donor's fresh blood clots. The copperhead snake's venom and the fractions obtained by gel-filtration (HW-50) and ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-650) were found to hydrolyze casein/azocasein, a- and b-chains of fibrinogen/fibrin and donor's blood clots. The results from the study of the venom and proteolytically active fractions are the evidence for a thrombolytic potential in a copperhead snake's venom.

  7. Tissue-specific variation in glycation of proteins in diabetes: evidence for a functional role of amadoriase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sarah M; Smith, Della M; Alt, Nadja; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2005-06-01

    The Amadori product fructoselysine (FL), an intermediate in the formation of many advanced glycation end products, may be deglycated by various pathways. These include spontaneous chemical degradation or enzymatic deglycation by amadoriases. This study was designed to compare changes in FL in various tissues in response to changes in glycemia, thereby testing tissue-specific deglycation. FL content in skin collagen, red cell hemoglobin, and total muscle, liver, and brain protein was analyzed by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Mean blood glucose increased over fourfold in diabetic versus control rats, whereas changes in glycation of proteins varied from fivefold in collagen to no change in the liver and brain. These results suggest significant differences among tissues in the activity of deglycating enzymes and/or protein turnover.

  8. Base non-specific acid ribonuclease from Irpex lacteus, primary structure and phylogenetic relationships in RNase T2 family enzyme.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Fauzi, H; Iwama, M; Onda, T; Ohgi, K; Irie, M

    1995-11-01

    Two base non-specific acid RNases (RNase Irp1 and RNase Irp2) were purified from a commercial enzyme, "Driselase" (Irpex lacteus) in a homogenous state on SDS-PAGE by several steps of chromatographic separations. RNAse Irp2 was a simple polypeptide with 235 amino acid residues and RNase Irp1 was a glycopeptide with 248 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequences of both RNases were identified by Edman degradation of the peptides derived from these RNAses. RNase Irp1 was composed of the RNase Irp2 and extra C-terminal 13 residues of peptide. The phylogenetic relation of these RNases with the other fungal RNases already known was discussed. The sequence of RNase Irp2 was very highly homologous (67.5%) with that of RNase Le2 from Lentinus edodes.

  9. Comparison of measles virus-specific antibody titres as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralisation assay.

    PubMed

    van den Hof, Susan; van Gageldonk-Lafeber, Arianne B; van Binnendijk, Robert S; van Gageldonk, Pieter G M; Berbers, Guy A M

    2003-10-01

    We assessed whether measles virus-specific antibody levels in the Dutch population as estimated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were comparable with estimates by virus neutralisation assay (NT), prompted by a relatively low ELISA seroprevalence in the 10-21-year-old group. We tested 791 sera from individuals aged 2-49 years both in ELISA and NT. Seroprevalence in the 10-21-year-old group was 93.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 89.5-97.2%) in ELISA versus 97.2% (CI 94.7-99.6%) in NT. There was good agreement between NT and ELISA seroprevalences in the vaccinated 2-9-year-olds and the unvaccinated 22-49-year-olds.

  10. LYSIS-FROM-WITHOUT OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS STRAINS BY COMBINATIONS OF SPECIFIC PHAGES AND PHAGE-INDUCED LYTIC ENZYMES

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Doris J.; McIvor, Mary

    1964-01-01

    Ralston, Doris J. (University of California, Berkeley) and Mary McIvor. Lysis-from-without of Staphylococcus aureus strains by combinations of specific phages and phage-induced lytic enzymes. J. Bacteriol. 88:676–681. 1964—Several typing phages, adsorbed in sufficient concentrations to their homologous propagating strains, altered the cell surface so as to render the cells sensitive to rapid and synergistic lysis by extra-cellular additions of wall lysins. Lysis was effected both by lysins induced by the individual phages and by phage K1 virolysin. Phage K1 also rendered cells sensitive to the lysins of the typing phages. With the exception of lysins from PS 53, 70, and 77, none of the lysins nor purified phages tested separately caused significant lysis of living cells. Lysis-from-without in Staphylococcus aureus appears to be a stepwise process: sensitization by phage followed by digestion of the wall by lysin. PMID:14208506

  11. Evaluation of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Detection of Mycoplasma bovis-Specific Antibody in Bison Sera

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Randy E.; Olsen, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison. A method for the detection of M. bovis-specific serum antibodies is needed in order to establish prevalence and transmission patterns. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) validated for the detection of M. bovis-specific serum IgG in cattle are commercially available, but their suitability for bison sera has not been determined. A collection of bison sera, most from animals with a known history of infection or vaccination with M. bovis, was tested for M. bovis-specific IgG using commercially available kits as well as an in-house ELISA in which either cattle or bison M. bovis isolates were used as a source of antigen. Comparison of the results demonstrates that ELISAs optimized for cattle sera may not be optimal for the identification of bison seropositive for M. bovis, particularly those with low to moderate antibody levels. The reagent used for the detection of bison IgG and the source of the antigen affect the sensitivity of the assay. Optimal performance was obtained when the capture antigen was derived from bison isolates rather than cattle isolates and when a protein G conjugate rather than an anti-bovine IgG conjugate was used for the detection of bison IgG. PMID:23843427

  12. Effect of hapten structures on specific and sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for N-methylcarbamate insecticide metolcarb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Wu, Yunru; Wang, Limin; Hu, Baishi; Li, Peiwu; Liu, Fengquan

    2008-09-05

    Five different haptens of the N-methylcarbamate insecticide metolcarb were designed and synthesized. All of the haptens were conjugated with ovalbumin (OVA) for the coating antigen, and one hapten containing all of the structure of metolcarb was conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) for the immunogen. Two polyclonal antisera were raised against the BSA conjugate, and ten antibody/coating conjugate combinations were selected for studies of assay sensitivity and specificity for metolcarb. A class-specific combination was found, with the I50 of the assay ranged from 0.64 to 20.98 microg mL(-1) for seven tested N-methylcarbamate insecticides except for pirimicarb. Considering titer, I50 and cross-reactivity of all combinations of antibody/coating conjugate, a competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a homologous system, whose limit of detection (LoD) reached 1.4 ng mL(-1), was presented. The results of competitive ELISAs indicated that coating hapten structure can significantly affect not only assay sensitivity but also its specificity.

  13. Neonatal handling affects learning, reversal learning and antioxidant enzymes activities in a sex-specific manner in rats.

    PubMed

    Noschang, Cristie; Krolow, Rachel; Arcego, Danusa Mar; Toniazzo, Ana Paula; Huffell, Ana Paula; Dalmaz, Carla

    2012-06-01

    Early life experiences have profound influences on behavior and neurochemical parameters in adult life. The aim of this study is to verify neonatal handling-induced sex specific differences on learning and reversal learning as well as oxidative stress parameters in the prefrontal cortex and striatum of adult rats. Litters of rats were non-handled or handled (10 min/day, days 1-10 after birth). In adulthood, learning and reversal learning were evaluated using a Y maze associated with palatable food in male and female rats. Morris water maze reversal learning was verified in males. Oxidative stress parameters were evaluated in both genders. Male neonatal handled animals had a worse performance in the Y maze reversal learning compared to non-handled ones and no difference was observed in the water maze reversal learning task. Regarding females, neonatal handled rats had a better performance during the Y maze learning phase compared to non-handled ones. In addition, neonatal handled female animals showed a decreased SOD/CAT ratio in the PFC compared to non-handled females. We conclude that neonatal handling effects on learning and memory in adult rats are sex and task specific. The sex specific differences are also observed in the evaluation of antioxidant enzymes activities with neonatal handling affecting only females. Copyright © 2012 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of Francisella tularensis-Specific Antibodies in Patients with Tularemia by a Novel Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R2 = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species. PMID:23114700

  15. Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of Mycoplasma bovis-specific antibody in bison sera.

    PubMed

    Register, Karen B; Sacco, Randy E; Olsen, Steven C

    2013-09-01

    Mycoplasma bovis has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison. A method for the detection of M. bovis-specific serum antibodies is needed in order to establish prevalence and transmission patterns. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) validated for the detection of M. bovis-specific serum IgG in cattle are commercially available, but their suitability for bison sera has not been determined. A collection of bison sera, most from animals with a known history of infection or vaccination with M. bovis, was tested for M. bovis-specific IgG using commercially available kits as well as an in-house ELISA in which either cattle or bison M. bovis isolates were used as a source of antigen. Comparison of the results demonstrates that ELISAs optimized for cattle sera may not be optimal for the identification of bison seropositive for M. bovis, particularly those with low to moderate antibody levels. The reagent used for the detection of bison IgG and the source of the antigen affect the sensitivity of the assay. Optimal performance was obtained when the capture antigen was derived from bison isolates rather than cattle isolates and when a protein G conjugate rather than an anti-bovine IgG conjugate was used for the detection of bison IgG.

  16. Clinical Value of Specific Immunoglobulin E Detection by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay in Cases of Acquired and Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Foudrinier, F.; Villena, I.; Jaussaud, R.; Aubert, D.; Chemla, C.; Martinot, F.; Pinon, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The clinical value of immunoenzymatic (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) detection of anti-Toxoplasma immunoglobulin E (IgE) was assessed by studying 2,036 sera from 792 subjects, comprising seronegative controls and subjects with acute, active, reactivated, or congenital toxoplasmosis. Included were nonimmunized adults; pregnant women with recently acquired infection (acute toxoplasmosis); immunocompetent subjects with recently acquired severe infection (active toxoplasmosis) expressed as fever, adenopathies, splenomegaly, pneumonia, meningitis, or disseminated infection; subjects—some of them immunocompromised—whose previously moderate IgG antibody levels rose, suggesting a reactivation of quiescent toxoplasmosis; and infants born to seroconverted mothers and evaluated for diagnosis of congenital infection and therapeutic management. Specific IgE antibodies were never detected in seronegative subjects. They were present in 85.7% of asymptomatic seroconverters and in 100% of seroconverters with overt toxoplasmosis, following two different kinetics: in the former, the specific IgE titer generally presented a brief peak 2 to 3 months postinfection and then fell rapidly, whereas specific IgE persisted at a very high titer for several months in the latter. IgE emerged concomitantly with the increase in IgG during toxoplasmic reactivation. For neonatal diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis, IgE was less informative than IgM and IgA (sensitivities, 59.5, 64.3, and 76.2%, respectively) and had a specificity of 91.9%. Nevertheless, simultaneous measurement of the three isotypes at birth improved the diagnostic yield to 81% relative to the combination of IgA and IgM. Emergence of specific IgE during postnatal treatment for congenital toxoplasmosis is a sign of poor adherence or inadequate dosing. PMID:12682160

  17. Using the Computer as a Specific Information Resource in Computer-Aided Language Learning Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witton, Niclas

    1984-01-01

    Classifies several kinds of readily available foreign language computer programs. Most of the programs fall into either game/activity or testing categories. In all the programs, feedback to the student who has made an error is limited. Sees the computer as a specific information resource in self-directed learning programs. (SED)

  18. 78 FR 17943 - Draft Program-Specific Guidance About Fixed Gauge Licenses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... safety culture, security of radioactive materials, protection of sensitive information, and changes in... NUREG-1556, Volume 4, Revision 1, ``Consolidated Guidance About Materials Licenses: Program-Specific... Materials and Environmental Management Programs; U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC...

  19. Evaluation of monoclonal antibody-based capture enzyme immunoassays for detection of specific antibodies to measles virus.

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, D D; Anderson, L J; Adams, D R; Stewart, J A; Markowitz, L E; Bellini, W J

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to the hemagglutinin protein, fusion protein, phosphoprotein, matrix protein, and nucleoprotein of measles virus were evaluated as detector antibodies in capture enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) for the detection of specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, and IgM antibodies to measles virus. A pool of monoclonal antibodies to hemagglutinin protein and nucleoprotein proved optimal and was further evaluated. Specific IgM was detected in 97% of adolescents with clinical measles, 97% of infants 3 weeks postvaccination, and less than 1% of normal serum specimens. Specific IgA antibodies were found in 97% of adolescents with clinical measles, 97% of infants 3 weeks postvaccination, and less than 1% of normal serum specimens. Specific IgA antibodies were found in 97% of clinical measles cases and vaccinees, in 26% of healthy persons, and in 36% of infants 8 months postvaccination; consequently, IgA antibodies were not a useful indicator of recent measles infection. A significant increase in IgG antibodies between paired specimens was detected in 92% of clinical cases and all vaccinees. Only 59% of infant specimens had persistent IgG antibodies as detected by capture EIA at 8 months postvaccination, whereas all specimens had antibodies as detected by hemagglutination inhibition and plaque neutralization. An alternative indirect EIA, in which antigen was directly absorbed to the solid phase, was more sensitive than the capture design, detecting IgG antibodies in all infants postvaccination. When standardized with a microneutralization assay for the detection of persistent antibodies, the indirect IgG EIA gave predictive values for positive and negative tests exceeding 90%. Our capture IgM and indirect IgG EIAs provide a practical combination of serologic tests for the determination of acute measles virus infection and past exposure to measles virus or vaccine, respectively. PMID:1885743

  20. Detection of HLA class I-specific antibodies by the QuikScreen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, D P; Paparounis, M L; Myers, L; Hart, J M; Zachary, A A

    1997-01-01

    The GTI QuikScreen test is an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses soluble HLA class I antigens as targets. In tests of 5,893 human serum specimens, we evaluated the reliability, sensitivity, and utility of the GTI QuikScreen test for detecting HLA class I-specific antibody. We found that the test could reliably detect HLA-specific antibodies of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) but not the IgM class. The degree of correlation with lymphocytotoxicity testing varied among the different serum sources, with the best correlation achieved with sera from renal transplant candidates (r > 0.7) and the poorest with sera from patients with end-stage liver disease (r = 0.26), possibly because of elevated alkaline phosphatase levels in the liver patients. Test reproducibility was high (96%), and test failure rate was low (1.7%). The test sensitivity is comparable to that of the antiglobulin cytotoxicity and, possibly, even flow cytometric tests. There was a highly significant (P < 0.001) correlation between the optical densities obtained in the ELISA and the percent panel reactive antibody determined by cytotoxicity testing. Therefore, although designed only to determine the presence or absence of HLA-specific antibody, GTI QuikScreen test results also provided an indication of the extent of sensitization. The test is one of the most effective and efficient ways to determine if antibodies producing a positive result in crossmatch tests are specific for HLA class I antigens. As an adjunct to serum screening by cytotoxicity testing, the GTI QuikScreen test can produce a substantial savings of time and effort that reduces the cost to the laboratory and to the patient. PMID:9144358

  1. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Brucella melitensis-specific antibodies in goat milk.

    PubMed

    Funk, N D; Tabatabai, L B; Elzer, P H; Hagius, S D; Martin, B M; Hoffman, L J

    2005-02-01

    Brucella melitensis is the cause of brucellosis in sheep and goats, which often results in abortion. Few cases of B. melitensis infection in goats have occurred in the United States over the last 25 years. However, vigilance must be maintained, as it is for the bovine milk industry, to ensure that brucellosis is not introduced into the U.S. goat population. The objective of this study was to develop a sensitive and specific indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) for the detection of B. melitensis-specific antibodies in goat milk. Brucella salt-extractable protein extract was employed as an antigen, and a horseradish peroxidase-labeled polyclonal anti-goat antibody was used as an anti-species conjugate. Thirteen of 13 (100%) individual infected goat milk samples tested positive and 134 of 134 (100%) uninfected bulk milk samples tested negative by the developed iELISA. Three positive milk samples with high, medium, and low absorbance values were used to simulate one positive animal in an otherwise negative herd. By this estimation, one high-titer animal could be detected in a herd of >1,600 animals. Detection estimates for medium- and low-titer animals were one positive animal per herd of <200 and 50 animals, respectively. Based on this estimation, it is recommended that herds be sampled in groups of 50 animals or less for bulk milk testing. The iELISA developed for this study was found to be sensitive and specific and shows potential for use as a bulk milk test for the detection of B. melitensis-specific antibodies in goat milk.

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2): comparative modeling of the active site, specificity requirements, and chloride dependence.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jodie L; Jackson, Richard M; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2003-11-18

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of ACE, represents a new and potentially important target in cardio-renal disease. A model of the active site of ACE2, based on the crystal structure of testicular ACE, has been developed and indicates that the catalytic mechanism of ACE2 resembles that of ACE. Structural differences exist between the active site of ACE (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase) and ACE2 (carboxypeptidase) that are responsible for the differences in specificity. The main differences occur in the ligand-binding pockets, particularly at the S2' subsite and in the binding of the peptide carboxy-terminus. The model explains why the classical ACE inhibitor lisinopril is unable to bind to ACE2. On the basis of the ability of ACE2 to cleave a variety of biologically active peptides, a consensus sequence of Pro-X-Pro-hydrophobic/basic for the protease specificity of ACE2 has been defined that is supported by the ACE2 model. The dipeptide, Pro-Phe, completely inhibits ACE2 activity at 180 microM with angiotensin II as the substrate. As with ACE, the chloride dependence of ACE2 is substrate-specific such that the hydrolysis of angiotensin I and the synthetic peptide substrate, Mca-APK(Dnp), are activated in the presence of chloride ions, whereas the cleavage of angiotensin II is inhibited. The ACE2 model is also suggestive of a possible mechanism for chloride activation. The structural insights provided by these analyses for the differences in inhibition pattern and substrate specificity among ACE and its homologue ACE2 and for the chloride dependence of ACE/ACE2 activity are valuable in understanding the function and regulation of ACE2.

  3. Affinity electrophoresis as a method for determining substrate-binding specificity of carbohydrate-active enzymes for soluble polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Moraïs, Sarah; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis is a simple and rapid tool for the analysis of protein-binding affinities to soluble polysaccharides. This approach is particularly suitable for the characterization of the carbohydrate-active enzymes that contain a carbohydrate-binding module and for their mutants and chimeras. Knowledge of the binding characteristics of these enzymes can be the first step to elucidate the enzymatic activity of a putative enzyme; moreover in some cases, enzymes are able to bind polysaccharides targets other than their specified substrate, and this knowledge can be essential to understand the basics of the intrinsic mechanism of these enzymes in their natural environment.

  4. 47 CFR 76.75 - Specific EEO program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... employment opportunity program to job applicants, employees, and those with whom it regularly does business... least one job fair with organizations in the business and professional community whose membership... maintenance of web sites that provide counseling on the process of searching for multichannel...

  5. Program Requirements and Design Specifications for the Quincy School Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quincy School Community Council, MA.

    The Quincy School Complex is a unique community facility. A high level of cooperation has led to the planning of this facility whose operation and ownership is divided among several agencies and groups. The introduction to the report on the school complex provides background material for the program itself, and attempts to define the "why" of the…

  6. Gerontology-specific graduate programs in Brazil and Colombia.

    PubMed

    Bos, Angelo J G; Padilha, Dalva Maria Pereira; Bos, Antonio M G; Gómez, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Every year the proportion of elderly people increases at a greater rate compared with other age groups, changing the population structure of most countries. Latin America has been internationally known for its higher percentage of young compared with elderly persons. The United Nations predicts that the proportion of elderly persons in Latin America and the Caribbean will be more similar to world figures in 2020 and even higher in 2040. The increasing elderly population in Latin America has increased the demand for advanced degree professionals with gerontology training. Nevertheless, in spite of training efforts during the last decade, the number of gerontology professionals is still insufficient. In total, the authors were able to locate only ten gerontology programs in Latin America (four in Brazil, two in Argentina, and one each in Uruguay, Peru, Cuba, and Colombia). The programs currently available in Brazil and Colombia are described in an effort to share information on the common characteristics of Master's and PhD degree programs in gerontology in Latin America. The authors concluded that, in Latin America, programs focused exclusively on gerontology are scarce.

  7. Aeronautics research and technology program and specific objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aeronautics research and technology program objectives in fluid and thermal physics, materials and structures, controls and guidance, human factors, multidisciplinary activities, computer science and applications, propulsion, rotorcraft, high speed aircraft, subsonic aircraft, and rotorcraft and high speed aircraft systems technology are addressed.

  8. 47 CFR 76.75 - Specific EEO program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: (1) Recruiting as wide as possible a pool of qualified entrepreneurs from sources such as employee... employment opportunity program to job applicants, employees, and those with whom it regularly does business... places of employment informing employees, and applicants for employment, of their equal employment...

  9. Fluoroimmunoassay for detection of rubella-specific immunoglobulin M: comparison with indirect enzyme immunoassay and mu-chain capture.

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, J M; de Ory, F; Najera, R

    1985-01-01

    The performance of a commercially-available method of fluoroimmunoassay (Rubella M FIAX, International Diagnostic Technology, Santa Clara, Calif.), designed for the detection of rubella-specific immunoglobulin M, was tested with 137 selected sera, including 52 from cases of primary rubella, 29 from healthy pregnant women, 21 containing rheumatoid factor, and 35 from cases of infectious mononucleosis (IM) caused by Epstein-Barr virus. The results were compared with those obtained by commercial indirect enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and EIA anti-mu chain capture tests. The fluoroimmunoassay technique showed a satisfactory level of sensitivity, but low values had to be interpreted with caution as false-positive results were detected with sera with rheumatoid factor and from IM cases, even after preliminary treatment of sera with the anti-human immunoglobulin G antisera provided in the kit. On the other hand, no false-positive results in the analysis of IM sera were seen in the EIA anti-mu chain capture method. Because of its sensitivity and specificity, we recommend the use of the latter technique for the diagnosis of primary rubella. PMID:2995439

  10. Elucidation of Xylem-Specific Transcription Factors and Absolute Quantification of Enzymes Regulating Cellulose Biosynthesis in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Loziuk, Philip L; Parker, Jennifer; Li, Wei; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Wang, Jack P; Li, Quanzi; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L; Muddiman, David C

    2015-10-02

    Cellulose, the main chemical polymer of wood, is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature.1 The ability to perturb the abundance and structure of cellulose microfibrils is of critical importance to the pulp and paper industry as well as for the textile, wood products, and liquid biofuels industries. Although much has been learned at the transcript level about the biosynthesis of cellulose, a quantitative understanding at the proteome level has yet to be established. The study described herein sought to identify the proteins directly involved in cellulose biosynthesis during wood formation in Populus trichocarpa along with known xylem-specific transcription factors involved in regulating these key proteins. Development of an effective discovery proteomic strategy through a combination of subcellular fractionation of stem differentiating xylem tissue (SDX) with recently optimized FASP digestion protocols, StageTip fractionation, as well as optimized instrument parameters for global proteomic analysis using the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer resulted in the deepest proteomic coverage of SDX protein from P. trichocarpa with 9,146 protein groups being identified (1% FDR). Of these, 20 cellulosic/hemicellulosic enzymes and 43 xylem-specific transcription factor groups were identified. Finally, selection of surrogate peptides led to an assay for absolute quantification of 14 cellulosic proteins in SDX of P. trichocarpa.

  11. The mRNA capping enzyme of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has dual specificity to interact with CTD of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Bharati, Akhilendra Pratap; Singh, Neha; Kumar, Vikash; Kashif, Md.; Singh, Amit Kumar; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Tripathi, Timir; Akhtar, Md. Sohail

    2016-01-01

    RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) uniquely possesses an extended carboxy terminal domain (CTD) on its largest subunit, Rpb1, comprising a repetitive Tyr1Ser2Pro3Thr4 Ser5Pro6Ser7 motif with potential phosphorylation sites. The phosphorylation of the CTD serves as a signal for the binding of various transcription regulators for mRNA biogenesis including the mRNA capping complex. In eukaryotes, the 5 prime capping of the nascent transcript is the first detectable mRNA processing event, and is crucial for the productive transcript elongation. The binding of capping enzyme, RNA guanylyltransferases to the transcribing RNAPII is known to be primarily facilitated by the CTD, phosphorylated at Ser5 (Ser5P). Here we report that the Saccharomyces cerevesiae RNA guanylyltransferase (Ceg1) has dual specificity and interacts not only with Ser5P but also with Ser7P of the CTD. The Ser7 of CTD is essential for the unconditional growth and efficient priming of the mRNA capping complex. The Arg159 and Arg185 of Ceg1 are the key residues that interact with the Ser5P, while the Lys175 with Ser7P of CTD. These interactions appear to be in a specific pattern of Ser5PSer7PSer5P in a tri-heptad CTD (YSPTSPPS YSPTSPSP YSPTSPPS) and provide molecular insights into the Ceg1-CTD interaction for mRNA transcription. PMID:27503426

  12. Detection of specific antibody by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and antigenemia by counterimmunoelectrophoresis in humans infected with Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed

    Maddison, S E; Hayes, G V; Slemenda, S B; Norman, L G; Ivey, M H

    1982-06-01

    A urea-soluble extract of cyst-rich material from rat lung heavily infected with Pneumocystis carinii was evaluated in an enzyme-linked immunosorption assay for antibody in 461 human sera. The highest level of reactivity occurred in sera submitted for serodiagnosis from proved or highly suspect cases. However, the range of reactivities in these groups, many of whom were on immunosuppressive therapy, was very wide. A more restricted lower range of reactivity was observed in both hospital-family contacts and healthy Serum Bank donors. Because of the overlap in levels of reactivity between the pneumocystosis and control groups, no concise cutoff value to separate infected from noninfected individuals could be made. Specificity of the reactions was shown by absorption of patients' and control sera with uninfected and P. carinii-infected human and rat lung tissue. The data support the concept that P. carinii is highly prevalent as a latent agent in the general population and is provoked to cause clinically manifest disease in the compromised host. Detection of circulating antigen appeared to be specific and possibly a useful adjunct to diagnosis, as 10 of the 14 proved or highly suspect patients with antigenemia did not have measurable antibody to P. carinii.

  13. Directed evolution of rubisco in Escherichia coli reveals a specificity-determining hydrogen bond in the form II enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Morell, Matthew; Whitney, Spencer M

    2007-12-11

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) occupies a critical position in photosynthetic CO2-fixation and consequently has been the focus of intense study. Crystal-structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis studies have met with limited success in engineering kinetic improvements to Rubisco, highlighting our inadequate understanding of structural constraints at the atomic level that dictate the enzyme's catalytic chemistry. Bioselection provides an alternative random mutagenic approach that is useful for identifying and elucidating imperceptible structure-function relationships. Using the dimeric Form II Rubisco from Rhodospirillum rubrum, its gene (rbcM) was randomly mutated and introduced under positive selection into Escherichia coli cells metabolically engineered to be dependent on Rubisco to detoxify its substrate ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. Thirteen colonies displaying improved fitness were isolated, and all were found to harbor mutations in rbcM at one of two codons, histidine-44 or aspartate-117, that are structurally adjacent amino acids located about 10 A from the active site. Biochemical characterization of the mutant enzymes showed the mutations reduced their CO2/O2 specificity by 40% and decreased their carboxylation turnover rate by 20-40%. Structural analyses showed histidine-44 and aspartate-117 form a hydrogen bond in R. rubrum Rubisco and that the residues are conserved among other Form II Rubiscos. This study demonstrated the utility of directed evolution in E. coli for identifying catalytically relevant residues (in particular nonobvious residues disconnected from active site residues) and their potential molecular interactions that influence Rubisco's catalytic chemistry.

  14. Aeronautics Research and Technology Program and specific objectives, fiscal year 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olstad, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    The Aeronautics Research and Technology program is broken down into two program areas (research and technology base, and systems technology programs) which are further broken down into succeedingly more detailed activities to form a work breakdown structure for the aeronautics program: program area, program/discipline objective, specific objective, and research and technology objective and plan (RTOP). A detailed view of this work breakdown structure down to the specific objective level is provided, and goals or objectives at each of these levels are set forth. What is to be accomplished and why are addressed, but not how. The letter falls within the domain of the RTOP.

  15. Tad1p, a yeast tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase, is related to the mammalian pre-mRNA editing enzymes ADAR1 and ADAR2.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, A; Grosjean, H; Melcher, T; Keller, W

    1998-01-01

    We have identified an RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (termed Tad1p/scADAT1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that selectively converts adenosine at position 37 of eukaryotic tRNAAla to inosine. The activity of purified recombinant Tad1p depends on the conformation of its tRNA substrate and the enzyme was found to be inactive on all other types of RNA tested. Mutant strains in which the TAD1 gene is disrupted are viable but lack Tad1p enzyme activity and their tRNAAla is not modified at position A37. Transformation of the mutant cells with the TAD1 gene restored enzyme activity. Tad1p has significant sequence similarity with the mammalian editing enzymes which act on specific precursor-mRNAs and on long double-stranded RNA. These findings suggest an evolutionary link between pre-mRNA editing and tRNA modification. PMID:9707437

  16. Toward reducing immunogenicity of enzyme replacement therapy: altering the specificity of human β-glucuronidase to compensate for α-iduronidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Huai-Yao; Suen, Ching-Shu; Hwang, Ming-Jing; Roffler, Steve R

    2015-11-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is an effective treatment for many patients with lysosomal storage disorders caused by deficiency in enzymes involved in cell metabolism. However, immune responses that develop against the administered enzyme in some patients can hinder therapeutic efficacy and cause serious side effects. Here we investigated the feasibility of a general approach to decrease ERT immunogenicity by altering the specificity of a normal endogenous enzyme to compensate for a defective enzyme. We sought to identify human β-glucuronidase variants that display α-iduronidase activity, which is defective in mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type I patients. A human β-glucuronidase library was screened by the Enzyme Cleavable Surface-Tethered All-purpose Screen sYstem to isolate variants that exhibited 100-290-fold greater activity against the α-iduronidase substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl α-l-iduronide and 7900-24 500-fold enzymatic specificity shift when compared with wild-type β-glucuronidase. In vitro treatment of MPS I cells with the β-glucuronidase variants significantly restored lysosome appearance similar to treatment with α-iduronidase. Our study suggests that β-glucuronidase variants can be isolated to display α-iduronidase activity and produce significant phenotype improvement of MPS I cells. This strategy may represent a possible approach to produce enzymes that display therapeutic benefits with potentially less immunogenicity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Enzymes, Industrial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enzymes serve key roles in numerous biotechnology processes and products that are commonly encountered in the forms of food and beverages, cleaning supplies, clothing, paper products, transportation fuels, pharmaceuticals, and monitoring devices. Enzymes can display regio- and stereo-specificity, p...

  18. As-built design specification for the CLASFYG program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    This program produces a file with a Universal-formatted header and data records in a nonstandard format. Trajectory coefficients are calculated from 5 to 8 acquisitions of radiance values in the training field corresponding to an agricultural product. These coefficients are then used to calculate a time of emergence and corresponding trajectory coefficients for each pixel in the test field. The time of emergence, two of the coefficients, and the sigma value for each pixel are written to the file.

  19. Stool diagnosis of giardiasis using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay to detect Giardia-specific antigen 65 (GSA 65).

    PubMed

    Rosoff, J D; Sanders, C A; Sonnad, S S; De Lay, P R; Hadley, W K; Vincenzi, F F; Yajko, D M; O'Hanley, P D

    1989-09-01

    A commercially available enzyme immunoassay for the diagnosis of giardiasis was evaluated in a clinical trial. The ProSpecT/Giardia diagnostic test (Alexon, Inc., Mountain View, Calif.) was compared with the standard ova and parasite (O&P) microscopic examination. Additionally, several widely used stool fixatives and a commonly used transport medium were assessed for compatibility with the immunoassay. A total of 325 stool specimens were collected and used to evaluate assay performance. Of those, 93 specimens were collected from symptomatic Giardia O&P-positive patients and 232 specimens were randomly collected from patients as part of a routine health screening procedure. All 93 Giardia O&P-positive stool specimens were strongly positive by visual and spectrophotometric examination using the immunoassay. Of the 232 randomly collected specimens, 16 were positive by O&P examination and immunoassay, 6 were negative by O&P examination but positive by immunoassay, and 1 was positive by O&P examination and negative by immunoassay. There was substantial supportive evidence that indicated that the six immunoassay-positive, O&P-negative specimens were true-positives. When these six specimens were accepted as true-positives, the immunoassay detected almost 30% more cases of Giardia infection than did O&P examination. Its sensitivity and specificity were 96 and 100%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of O&P examination were 74 and 100%, respectively. The immunoassay also performed well on specimens treated with 10% neutral Formalin, sodium acetate-Formalin fixative, and Cary-Blair transport medium. However, the test was not compatible with polyvinyl alcohol-treated specimens. Overall, the ProSpecT/Giardia test was a sensitive, specific immunoassay which was easy to run and interpret. It offers a simple solution to traditional difficulties encountered in diagnosing Giardia infection.

  20. Development of a flatfish-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Fsh using a recombinant chimeric gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Verdura, Sara; Mazón, María José; Boj, Mónica; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-09-15

    In flatfishes with asynchronous and semicystic spermatogenesis, such as the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis), the specific roles of the pituitary gonadotropins during germ cell development, particularly of the follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh), are still largely unknown in part due to the lack of homologous immunoassays for this hormone. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Senegalese sole Fsh was developed by generating a rabbit antiserum against a recombinant chimeric single-chain Fsh molecule (rFsh-C) produced by the yeast Pichia pastoris. The rFsh-C N- and C-termini were formed by the mature sole Fsh β subunit (Fshβ) and the chicken glycoprotein hormone common α subunit (CGA), respectively. Depletion of the antiserum to remove anti-CGA antibodies further enriched the sole Fshβ-specific antibodies, which were used to develop the ELISA using the rFsh-C for the standard curve. The sensitivity of the assay was 10 and 50 pg/ml for Fsh measurement in plasma and pituitary, respectively, and the cross-reactivity with a homologous recombinant single-chain luteinizing hormone was 1%. The standard curve for rFsh-C paralleled those of serially diluted plasma and pituitary extracts of other flatfishes, such as the Atlantic halibut, common sole and turbot. In Senegalese sole males, the highest plasma Fsh levels were found during early spermatogenesis but declined during enhanced spermiation, as found in teleosts with cystic spermatogenesis. In pubertal males, however, the circulating Fsh levels were as high as in adult spermiating fish, but interestingly the Fsh receptor in the developing testis containing only spermatogonia was expressed in Leydig cells but not in the primordial Sertoli cells. These results indicate that a recombinant chimeric Fsh can be used to generate specific antibodies against the Fshβ subunit and to develop a highly sensitive ELISA for Fsh measurements in diverse flatfishes.

  1. Enzyme Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  2. Specification and epigenetic programming of the human germ line.

    PubMed

    Tang, Walfred W C; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Irie, Naoko; Dietmann, Sabine; Surani, M Azim

    2016-10-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs), the precursors of sperm and eggs, are established in perigastrulation-stage embryos in mammals. Signals from extra-embryonic tissues induce a unique gene regulatory network in germline-competent cells for PGC specification. This network also initiates comprehensive epigenome resetting, including global DNA demethylation and chromatin reorganization. Mouse germline development has been studied extensively, but the extent to which such knowledge applies to humans was unclear. Here, we review the latest advances in human PGC specification and epigenetic reprogramming. The overall developmental dynamics of human and mouse germline cells appear to be similar, but there are crucial mechanistic differences in PGC specification, reflecting divergence in the regulation of pluripotency and early development.

  3. Immunocapture-based fluorometric assay for the measurement of neprilysin-specific enzyme activity in brain tissue homogenates and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Miners, James Scott; Verbeek, Marcel M; Rikkert, Marcel Olde; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin; Love, Seth

    2008-01-30

    Neprilysin, a zinc-metalloendopeptidase, has important roles in the physiology and pathology of many diseases such as hypertension, cancer and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed an immunocapture assay to measure the specific enzyme activity of neprilysin in brain tissue homogenates and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The assay uses a neprilysin-specific antibody, previously used in a commercially available ELISA kit, to isolate and immobilise NEP from brain homogenates and CSF, prior to the addition of a fluorogenic peptide substrate (Mca-RPPGFSAFK(Dnp)). This fluorogenic substrate is ordinarily cleaved by multiple enzymes. We have shown that without the immunocapture phase, even under reaction conditions reported to be specific for neprilysin - i.e. in the presence of thiorphan, at pH above 7 - the fluorogenic peptide substrate does not allow neprilysin activity in brain homogenates and CSF to be discriminated from that of other closely related enzymes. The specificity of the immunocapture enzyme activity assay was confirmed by >80% inhibition of substrate cleavage in brain homogenates and CSF in the presence of thiorphan. The assay allows high-throughput analysis and, critically, also ensures a high level of enzyme specificity even when assaying crude tissue homogenates or CSF.

  4. Development of a sensitive and specific indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on a baculovirus recombinant antigen for detection of specific antibodies against Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    López, Lissett; Venteo, Angel; Aguirre, Enara; García, Marga; Rodríguez, Majosé; Amusátegui, Inmaculada; Tesouro, Miguel A; Vela, Carmen; Sainz, Angel; Rueda, Paloma

    2007-11-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on baculovirus recombinant P30 protein of Ehrlichia canis and the 1BH4 anticanine IgG monoclonal antibody was developed and evaluated by examining a panel of 98 positive and 157 negative sera using the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test as the reference technique. The P30-based ELISA appeared to be sensitive and specific (77.55% and 95.54%, respectively) when qualitative results (positive/negative) were compared with those of the IFA test; the coefficient of correlation (R) between the 2 tests was 0.833. Furthermore, it was possible to establish a mathematical formula for use in comparing the results of both techniques. These results indicate that recombinant P30 antigen-based ELISA is a suitable alternative of the IFA test for simple, consistent, and rapid serodiagnosis of canine ehrlichiosis. Moreover, the use of this recombinant protein as antigen offers a great advantage for antigen preparation in comparison with other techniques in which the whole E. canis organism is used as antigen.

  5. The External Quality Assurance Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL) proficiency program for IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot) assay.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ana M; Rountree, Wes; Berrong, Mark; Garcia, Ambrosia; Schuetz, Alexandra; Cox, Josephine; Frahm, Nicole; Manak, Mark; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; D'Souza, M Patricia; Denny, Thomas; Ferrari, Guido

    2014-07-01

    The interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot) assay has been developed and used as an end-point assay in clinical trials for infectious diseases and cancer to detect the magnitude of antigen-specific immune responses. The ability to compare data generated by different laboratories across organizations is pivotal to understand the relative potency of different therapeutic and vaccine strategies. We developed an external proficiency program for the IFN-γ ELISpot assay that evaluates laboratory performance based on five parameters: timeliness for data reporting; ability to handle cellular samples; detection of background (non-specific) responses; accuracy to consensus of the results; and precision of the measurements. Points are awarded for each criterion, and the sum of the points is used to determine a numeric and adjectival performance rating. Importantly, the evaluation of the accuracy to the consensus mean for the detection of antigen-specific responses using laboratory-specific procedures informs each laboratory and its sponsor on the degree of concordance of its results with those obtained by other laboratories. This study will ultimately provide the scientific community with information on how to organize and implement an external proficiency program to evaluate longitudinally the performance of the participating laboratories and, therefore, fulfill the requirements of the GCLP guidelines for laboratories performing end-point IFN-γ ELISpot assay for clinical trials.

  6. Effects of Two Different Weight Training Programs on Swimming Performance and Muscle Enzyme Activities and Fiber Type.

    PubMed

    Belfry, Glen R; Noble, Earl G; Taylor, Albert W

    2016-02-01

    The effects of 2 different weight training programs incorporating bench press (BP) and pullover (PO) exercises on swimming performance, power, enzyme activity, and fiber type distribution were studied on 16 men (age = 23 ± 4 years). A 30-second group (n = 6) performed up to 20 repetitions of BP and PO in 30 seconds. The 2-minute group (n = 6) performed a maximum of 80 repetitions of BP and PO in 2 minutes. As participants reached the prescribed 20 or 80 repetitions, the weight was increased 4.5 kg. A third group (n = 4) served as nontraining controls. Exercise groups trained 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Maximal effort swims of 50 and 200 yd were performed before and after training. Training resulted in increases in work on both exercises in both groups pre- to post-training (BP 30 seconds, 722 ± 236-895 ± 250 kg; PO 30 seconds, 586 ± 252-1,090 ± 677 kg; and BP 2 minutes, 1,530 ± 414-1,940 ± 296; PO 2 minutes, 1,212 ± 406-2,348 ± 194, p ≤ 0.05). Swim performances of the 30-second group improved for both the 50-yd (32.0 ± 6.9 seconds, 30.0 ± 5.9 seconds, p ≤ 0.05) and 200-yd swims 200.0 ± 54 seconds, 182 ± 45.1 seconds (p ≤ 0.05), whereas 2-minute training improved only the 200-yd swim (198.3 ± 32.3 seconds, 186.2 ± 32.2 seconds). No changes in swim performance were observed for the control group. Triceps muscle succinate dehydrogenase activities increased (pre 3.48 ± 1.1 μmol · g(-1) wet weight per minute, post 6.25 ± 1.5 μmoles · g(-1) wet weight per minute, p ≤ 0.05) in only the 30-second training group, whereas phosphofructokinase activities and fiber type distribution did not change in either training group. This study has demonstrated that a 30-second 20-repetition weight training program, specific to the swimming musculature without concurrent swim training, improves swimming performances at both 50- and 200-yd distances.

  7. Rapid Prototyping of Application Specific Signal Processors Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-09

    design are available frcm numerous v-ndors, there is limited standardization and integration of tools exist at this level. Synthesis: Tools that support...case timing analysis I KLey Design Tasks Jxam• IQQ.To Design rule checks Check Mate (TI) Thermal analysis Pacific Numerics Test fault simulation...contracts will promote and fund the interdisciplinary activities of RASSP toward specific RASSP demonstration goals. Teaming between the numerous

  8. Malic enzyme and fatty acid synthase in the uropygial gland and liver of embryonic and neonatal ducklings. Tissue-specific regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Goodridge, A G; Jenik, R A; McDevitt, M A; Morris, S M; Winberry, L K

    1984-04-01

    Malic enzyme [L-malate-NADP oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), EC 1.1.1.40] and fatty acid synthase activities were barely detectable in the uropygial gland of duck embryos until 4 or 5 days before hatching, when they began to increase. These activities increased about 30- and 140-fold, respectively, by the day of hatching. Malic enzyme and fatty acid synthase activities were also very low in embryonic liver. However, hepatic malic enzyme activity did not increase until the newly hatched ducklings were fed. Hepatic fatty acid synthase began to increase the day before hatching and the rate of increase in enzyme activity accelerated markedly when the newly hatched ducklings were fed. Starvation of newly hatched or 12-day-old ducklings had no effect on the activities of malic enzyme and fatty acid synthase in the uropygial gland but markedly inhibited these activities in liver. Changes in the concentrations of both enzymes and in the relative synthesis rates of fatty acid synthase correlated with enzyme activities in both uropygial gland and liver. Developmental patterns for sequence abundance of malic enzyme and fatty acid synthase mRNAs in uropygial gland and liver were similar to those for their respective enzyme activities. Starvation of 4-day-old ducklings had no significant effect on the abundance of these mRNAs in uropygial gland but caused a pronounced decrease in their abundance in liver. It is concluded that developmental and nutritional regulation of these enzymes is tissue specific and occurs primarily at a pretranslational level in both uropygial gland and liver.

  9. Enzyme-mediated methodology for the site-specific radiolabeling of antibodies based on catalyst-free click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zeglis, Brian M; Davis, Charles B; Aggeler, Robert; Kang, Hee Chol; Chen, Aimei; Agnew, Brian J; Lewis, Jason S

    2013-06-19

    An enzyme- and click chemistry-mediated methodology for the site-selective radiolabeling of antibodies on the heavy chain glycans has been developed and validated. To this end, a model system based on the prostate specific membrane antigen-targeting antibody J591, the positron-emitting radiometal (89)Zr, and the chelator desferrioxamine has been employed. The methodology consists of four steps: (1) the removal of sugars on the heavy chain region of the antibody to expose terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues; (2) the incorporation of azide-modified N-acetylgalactosamine monosaccharides into the glycans of the antibody; (3) the catalyst-free click conjugation of desferrioxamine-modified dibenzocyclooctynes to the azide-bearing sugars; and (4) the radiolabeling of the chelator-modified antibody with (89)Zr. The site-selective labeling methodology has proven facile, reproducible, and robust, producing (89)Zr-labeled radioimmunoconjguates that display high stability and immunoreactivity in vitro (>95%) in addition to highly selective tumor uptake (67.5 ± 5.0%ID/g) and tumor-to-background contrast in athymic nude mice bearing PSMA-expressing subcutaneous LNCaP xenografts. Ultimately, this strategy could play a critical role in the development of novel well-defined and highly immunoreactive radioimmunoconjugates for both the laboratory and clinic.

  10. Site-directed Mutagenesis Switching a Dimethylallyl Tryptophan Synthase to a Specific Tyrosine C3-Prenylating Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Aili; Zocher, Georg; Stec, Edyta; Stehle, Thilo; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2 and 7-DMATS (7-dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase) from Aspergillus fumigatus catalyze C4- and C7-prenylation of the indole ring, respectively. 7-DMATS was found to accept l-tyrosine as substrate as well and converted it to an O-prenylated derivative. An acceptance of l-tyrosine by FgaPT2 was also observed in this study. Interestingly, isolation and structure elucidation revealed the identification of a C3-prenylated l-tyrosine as enzyme product. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis led to creation of a mutant FgaPT2_K174F, which showed much higher specificity toward l-tyrosine than l-tryptophan. Its catalytic efficiency toward l-tyrosine was found to be 4.9-fold in comparison with that of non-mutated FgaPT2, whereas the activity toward l-tryptophan was less than 0.4% of that of the wild-type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on an enzymatic C-prenylation of l-tyrosine as free amino acid and altering the substrate preference of a prenyltransferase by mutagenesis. PMID:25477507

  11. The double-domain cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G is a cellular site-specific RNA editing enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shraddha; Patnaik, Santosh K.; Taggart, Robert T.; Baysal, Bora E.

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC3G is a cytidine deaminase with two homologous domains and restricts retroelements and HIV-1. APOBEC3G deaminates single-stranded DNAs via its C-terminal domain, whereas the N-terminal domain is considered non-catalytic. Although APOBEC3G is known to bind RNAs, APOBEC3G-mediated RNA editing has not been observed. We recently discovered RNA editing by the single-domain enzyme APOBEC3A in innate immune cells. To determine if APOBEC3G is capable of RNA editing, we transiently expressed APOBEC3G in the HEK293T cell line and performed transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing. We show that APOBEC3G causes site-specific C-to-U editing of mRNAs from over 600 genes. The edited cytidines are often flanked by inverted repeats, but are largely distinct from those deaminated by APOBEC3A. We verified protein-recoding RNA editing of selected genes including several that are known to be involved in HIV-1 infectivity. APOBEC3G co-purifies with highly edited mRNA substrates. We find that conserved catalytic residues in both cytidine deaminase domains are required for RNA editing. Our findings demonstrate the novel RNA editing function of APOBEC3G and suggest a role for the N-terminal domain in RNA editing. PMID:27974822

  12. Differential recognition of calmodulin-enzyme complexes by a conformation-specific anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R.S.; Beavo, J.A.

    1986-11-05

    An anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody having an absolute requirement for Ca/sup 2 +/ has been produced from mice immunized with a mixture of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins. Radioimmune assays were developed for the determination of its specificity. The epitope for this antibody resides on the COOH-terminal half of the mammalian protein. Plant calmodulin or toponin C had little reactivity. The apparent affinity of the antibody for calmodulin was increased approximately 60-fold in the presence of heart calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase. The presence of heart phosphodiesterase in the radioimmune assay greatly enhanced the sensitivity for calmodulin. The intrinsic calmodulin subunit of phosphorylase kinase and calmodulin which was bound to brain phosphodiesterases was also recognized with high affinity by the antibody. In direct binding experiments, most of the calmodulin-binding proteins studied were unreactive with the antibody. This selectivity allowed purification of heart and two brain calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isozymes on immobilized antibody affinity columns. The data suggest that the binding of ligands to Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin induce conformation changes in calmodulin which alter reactivity with the anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody. The differential antibody reactivity toward calmodulin-enzyme complexes indicates that target proteins either induce very different conformations in calmodulin and/or interact with different geometries relative to the antibody binding site. The anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody should be useful for the purification of other calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterases as well as isozymes of phosphorylase kinase.

  13. Disruption of Tissue-Specific Fucosyltransferase VII, an Enzyme Necessary for Selectin Ligand Synthesis, Suppresses Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Jonathan M.; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Bulgrien, Joshua; Counselman, Jessica; Curtiss, Linda K.; Lowe, John B.; Boisvert, William A.

    2009-01-01

    A hallmark feature of atherosclerosis is that circulating mononuclear cells adhere to the endothelium and migrate into the subendothelial space. This adhesion is mediated by molecules such as selectins that are expressed on the surfaces of both leukocytes and endothelial cells. In this study, we have determined the role of tissue-specific fucosyltransferase VII (FucT-VII), an enzyme necessary for selectin ligand synthesis, in the development of atherosclerosis. We adopted a scheme of transplanting either FucT-VII−/−GFP+ bone marrow into lethally irradiated low-density lipoprotein receptor low density lipoprotein receptor mice or FucT-VII+/+ GFP+ bone marrow into FucT-VII−/−, low density lipoprotein receptor double-mutant mice to evaluate the roles of E- and P-selectin ligands versus L-selectin ligands, respectively, in diet-induced atherosclerosis. GFP was used to track the transplanted cells. Our results indicate that, compared with controls, selective disruption of E- and P-selectin ligand synthesis resulted in a significant reduction in atherosclerosis. Selective disruption of L-selectin ligand production did not reduce atherosclerosis as robustly as disruption of E- and P-selectin ligands. In both groups, however, there was a significant reduction in the accumulation of macrophages in the lesion. These studies indicate that selectin ligands, particularly those for E- and P-selectins, play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by regulating macrophage accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:19056851

  14. An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determination of norfloxacin in waters using a specific polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianlan; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Qiuxin; Yu, Yiyi; Peng, Xianzhi

    2011-02-28

    A specific polyclonal anti-norfloxacin antibody was obtained, and a sensitive indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) was developed for determining trace amounts of norfloxacin in various waters. Good linearity was achieved in the range from 0.1 to 10 μg L(-1). The average IC(50) value was determined to be 2.2 μg L(-1) and the limit of detection was 0.016 μg L(-1) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in phosphate-buffered saline buffer. Recoveries of norfloxacin at various spiking levels ranged from 74 to 105% in groundwater, surface water, treated and untreated wastewater samples, with relative standard deviations of 3-5%. The assay was applied for determining norfloxacin in municipal wastewater, surface water, and groundwater collected in a metropolis of China. Raw wastewater samples were only submitted to filtration and pH adjustment while the other water samples were pre-concentrated by solid phase extraction prior to the icELISA assay. Good agreement of the results obtained by the icELISA and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry further confirmed the reliability and accuracy of the icELISA for rapid detection of norfloxacin in waters. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The double-domain cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G is a cellular site-specific RNA editing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shraddha; Patnaik, Santosh K; Taggart, Robert T; Baysal, Bora E

    2016-12-15

    APOBEC3G is a cytidine deaminase with two homologous domains and restricts retroelements and HIV-1. APOBEC3G deaminates single-stranded DNAs via its C-terminal domain, whereas the N-terminal domain is considered non-catalytic. Although APOBEC3G is known to bind RNAs, APOBEC3G-mediated RNA editing has not been observed. We recently discovered RNA editing by the single-domain enzyme APOBEC3A in innate immune cells. To determine if APOBEC3G is capable of RNA editing, we transiently expressed APOBEC3G in the HEK293T cell line and performed transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing. We show that APOBEC3G causes site-specific C-to-U editing of mRNAs from over 600 genes. The edited cytidines are often flanked by inverted repeats, but are largely distinct from those deaminated by APOBEC3A. We verified protein-recoding RNA editing of selected genes including several that are known to be involved in HIV-1 infectivity. APOBEC3G co-purifies with highly edited mRNA substrates. We find that conserved catalytic residues in both cytidine deaminase domains are required for RNA editing. Our findings demonstrate the novel RNA editing function of APOBEC3G and suggest a role for the N-terminal domain in RNA editing.

  16. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measuring ileal symbiont intracellularis-specific immunoglobulin G response in sera of pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Holyoake, P K; Cutler, R S; Caple, I W; Monckton, R P

    1994-01-01

    Proliferative enteritis (PE) is a common intestinal disease on pig farms. The disease is caused by ileal symbiont (IS) intracellularis (Campylobacter-like organisms) bacteria. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to measure IS intracellularis-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) response in the sera of pigs. The antigen used in the ELISA was filtered, percoll gradient-purified IS intracellularis extracted from the intestines of pigs affected with proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy. The antibody responses of pigs challenged with intestinal homogenates from pigs affected with proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy containing IS intracellularis or percoll-gradient purified IS intracellularis were low and variable. The low IgG titers measured in challenged pigs support previous findings that IgG plays a minor role in the immune response of pigs to IS intracellularis. On a farm in which infection was endemic, pigs seroconverted at between 7 and 24 weeks of age. High IgG titers, indicative of maternally acquired antibody, were present in 3-week-old pigs. The IgG titers in piglets were lowest at 6 weeks of age, which approximates the age of onset of clinical disease. These results suggest that IgG plays a role in determining the susceptibilities of pigs to natural infection. Measurements of seroconversion by the ELISA might aid in epidemiological investigations of PE in naturally infected herds. However, the variable antibody responses in experimentally challenged pigs would seem to limit its usefulness as an antemortem diagnostic test for PE. PMID:7989553

  17. Characterization of a novel debranching enzyme from Nostoc punctiforme possessing a high specificity for long branched chains

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ji-Hye; Lee, Heeseob; Kim, Young-Wan; Park, Jong-Tae; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Kim, Myo-Jeong; Lee, Byong-Hoon

    2009-01-09

    A novel debranching enzyme from Nostoc punctiforme PCC73102 (NPDE) exhibits hydrolysis activity toward both {alpha}-(1,6)- and {alpha}-(1,4)-glucosidic linkages. The action patterns of NPDE revealed that branched chains are released first, and the resulting maltooligosaccharides are then hydrolyzed. Analysis of the reaction with maltooligosaccharide substrates labeled with {sup 14}C-glucose at the reducing end shows that NPDE specifically liberates glucose from the reducing end. Kinetic analyses showed that the hydrolytic activity of NPDE is greatly affected by the length of the substrate. The catalytic efficiency of NPDE increased considerably upon using substrates that can occupy at least eight glycone subsites such as maltononaose and maltooctaosyl-{alpha}-(1,6)-{beta}-cyclodextrin. These results imply that NPDE has a unique subsite structure consisting of -8 to +1 subsites. Given its unique subsite structure, side chains shorter than maltooctaose in amylopectin were resistant to hydrolysis by NPDE, and the population of longer side chains was reduced.

  18. Development of an equine coronavirus-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine serologic responses in naturally infected horses.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Lotte J; Mapes, Samantha M; Pusterla, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Equine coronavirus (EqCoV) infection has been documented in most reports through quantitative qPCR analysis of feces and viral genome sequencing. Although qPCR is used to detect antigen during the acute disease phase, there is no equine-specific antibody test available to study EqCoV seroprevalence in various horse populations. We developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeting antibodies to the spike (S) protein of EqCoV and validated its use, using acute and convalescent sera from 83 adult horses involved in 6 outbreaks. The EqCoV S protein-based ELISA was able to reliably detect antibodies to EqCoV in naturally infected horses. The greatest seroconversion rate was observed in horses with clinical signs compatible with EqCoV infection and EqCoV qPCR detection in feces. The EqCoV S protein-based ELISA could be used effectively for seroepidemiologic studies in order to better characterize the overall infection rate of EqCoV in various horse populations. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. 75 FR 59058 - Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-Formula Federal Assistance Programs-Specific Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ...-Formula Federal Assistance Programs--Specific Administrative Provisions for the New Era Rural Technology... administrative requirements for the New Era Rural Technology Competitive Grants Program (RTP) to supplement the... Provisions for the New Era Rural Technology Competitive Grants Program. In the interim rule, NIFA invited...

  20. A Functional-Notional Approach for English for Specific Purposes (ESP) Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Min

    English for Specific Purposes (ESP) programs, characterized by the special needs of the language learners, are described and a review of the literature on a functional-notional approach to the syllabus design of ESP programs is presented. It is suggested that effective ESP programs should teach the language skills necessary to function and perform…

  1. A Functional-Notional Approach for English for Specific Purposes (ESP) Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Min

    English for Specific Purposes (ESP) programs, characterized by the special needs of the language learners, are described and a review of the literature on a functional-notional approach to the syllabus design of ESP programs is presented. It is suggested that effective ESP programs should teach the language skills necessary to function and perform…

  2. Sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting serum antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in fallow deer.

    PubMed

    Prieto, José M; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Abendaño, Naiara; Fitzgerald, Liam E; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramon A; Alonso-Hearn, Marta

    2014-08-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the diagnostic test most commonly used in efforts to control paratuberculosis in domestic ruminants. However, commercial ELISAs have not been validated for detecting antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in wild animals. In this study, we compared the sensitivities and specificities of five ELISAs using individual serum samples collected from 41 fallow deer with or without histopathological lesions consistent with paratuberculosis. Two target antigenic preparations were selected, an ethanol-treated protoplasmic preparation obtained from a fallow deer M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolate (ELISAs A and B) and a paratuberculosis protoplasmic antigen (PPA3) (ELISAs C and D). Fallow deer antibodies bound to the immobilized antigens were detected by using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-fallow deer IgG antibody (ELISAs A and C) or HRP-conjugated protein G (ELISAs B and D). A commercially available assay, ELISA-E, which was designed to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies in cattle, sheep, and goats, was also tested. Although ELISAs A, C, and E had the same sensitivity (72%), ELISAs A and C were more specific (100%) for detecting fallow deer with lesions consistent with paratuberculosis at necropsy than was the ELISA-E (87.5%). In addition, the ELISA-A was particularly sensitive for detecting fallow deer in the latent stages of infection (62.5%). The antibody responses detected with the ELISA-A correlated with both the severity of enteric lesions and the presence of acid-fast bacteria in gut tissue samples. In summary, our study shows that the ELISA-A can be a cost-effective diagnostic tool for preventing the spread of paratuberculosis among fallow deer populations.

  3. Development and evaluation of a Sarcocystis neurona-specific IgM capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J E; Marsh, A E; Reed, S M; Meadows, C; Bolten, K; Saville, W J A

    2006-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a serious neurologic disease of horses caused primarily by the protozoal parasite Sarcocystis neurona. Currently available antemortem diagnostic testing has low specificity. The hypothesis of this study was that serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of horses experimentally challenged with S neurona would have an increased S neurona-specific IgM (Sn-IgM) concentration after infection, as determined by an IgM capture enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA). The ELISA was based on the S neurona low molecular weight protein SNUCD-1 antigen and the monoclonal antibody 2G5 labeled with horseradish peroxidase. The test was evaluated using serum and CSF from 12 horses experimentally infected with 1.5 million S neurona sporocysts and 16 horses experimentally infected with varying doses (100 to 100,000) of S neurona sporocysts, for which results of histopathologic examination of the central nervous system were available. For horses challenged with 1.5 million sporocysts, there was a significant increase in serum Sn-IgM concentrations compared with values before infection at weeks 2-6 after inoculation (P < .0001). For horses inoculated with lower doses of S neurona, there were significant increases in serum Sn-IgM concentration at various points in time after inoculation, depending on the challenge dose (P < .01). In addition, there was a significant increase between the CSF Sn-IgM concentrations before and after inoculation (P < .0001). These results support further evaluation of the assay as a diagnostic test during the acute phase of EPM.

  4. Development of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Method Specific for the Detection of G-Group Aflatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peiwu; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Haiyan; Zhang, Wen; Ding, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Zhaowei; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    To detect and monitor G-group aflatoxins in agricultural products, we generated class-specific monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognized aflatoxins G1 and G2. Of the final three positive and stable hybridomas obtained, clone 2G6 produced a monoclonal antibody that had equal sensitivity to aflatoxins G1 and G2, and did not cross-react with aflatoxins B1, B2, or M1. Its IC50 values for aflatoxins G1 and G2 were 17.18 ng·mL−1 and 19.75 ng·mL−1, respectively. Using this new monoclonal antibody, we developed a competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CI-ELISA); the method had a limit of detection of 0.06 ng·mL−1. To validate this CI-ELISA, we spiked uncontaminated peanut samples with various amounts of aflatoxins G1 and G2 and compared recovery rates with those determined by a standard HPLC method. The recovery rates of the CI-ELISA ranging from 94% to 103% were comparable to those of the HPLC (92% to 102%). We also used both methods to determine the amounts of G-group aflatoxins in five peanut samples contaminated by aflatoxin B1-positive, and their relative standard deviations ranged from 8.4% to 17.7% (under 20%), which demonstrates a good correlation between the two methods. We further used this CI-ELISA to assess the ability of 126 fungal strains isolated from peanuts or field soils to produce G-group aflatoxins. Among these, seven stains producing different amounts of G-group aflatoxins were identified. Our results showed that the monoclonal antibody 2 G6-based CI-ELISA was suitable for the detection of G-group aflatoxins present in peanuts and also those produced by fungi. PMID:26729164

  5. Detection of Specific Solvent Rearrangement Regions of an Enzyme: NMR and ITC Studies with Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase(3??)-IIIa

    SciTech Connect

    Ozen, C.; Norris, Adrianne; Land, Miriam L; Tjioe, Elina; Serpersu, Engin H

    2008-01-01

    This work describes differential effects of solvent in complexes of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3¢)-IIIa (APH) with different aminoglycosides and the detection of change in solvent structure at specific sites away from substrates. Binding of kanamycins to APH occurs with a larger negative ¢H in H2O relative to D2O (¢¢H(H2O-D2O) < 0), while the reverse is true for neomycins. Unusually large negative ¢Cp values were observed for binding of aminoglycosides to APH. ¢Cp for the APHneomycin complex was -1.6 kcalâmol-1âdeg-1. A break at 30 C was observed in the APH-kanamycin complex yielding ¢Cp values of -0.7 kcalâmol-1âdeg-1 and -3.8 kcalâmol-1âdeg-1 below and above 30 C, respectively. Neither the change in accessible surface area (¢ASA) nor contributions from heats of ionization were sufficient to explain the large negative ¢Cp values. Most significantly, 15N-1H HSQC experiments showed that temperature-dependent shifts of the backbone amide protons of Leu 88, Ser 91, Cys 98, and Leu143 revealed a break at 30 C only in the APH-kanamycin complex in spectra collected between 21 C and 38 C. These amino acids represent solVent reorganization sites that experience a change in solvent structure in their immediate environment as structurally different ligands bind to the enzyme. These residues were away from the substrate binding site and distributed in three hydrophobic patches in APH. Overall, our results show that a large number of factors affect ¢Cp and binding of structurally different ligand groups cause different solvent structure in the active site as well as differentially affecting specific sites away from the ligand binding site.

  6. Sensitive and Specific Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Serum Antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Fallow Deer

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, José M.; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Abendaño, Naiara; Fitzgerald, Liam E.; Garrido, Joseba M.; Juste, Ramon A.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the diagnostic test most commonly used in efforts to control paratuberculosis in domestic ruminants. However, commercial ELISAs have not been validated for detecting antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in wild animals. In this study, we compared the sensitivities and specificities of five ELISAs using individual serum samples collected from 41 fallow deer with or without histopathological lesions consistent with paratuberculosis. Two target antigenic preparations were selected, an ethanol-treated protoplasmic preparation obtained from a fallow deer M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolate (ELISAs A and B) and a paratuberculosis protoplasmic antigen (PPA3) (ELISAs C and D). Fallow deer antibodies bound to the immobilized antigens were detected by using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-fallow deer IgG antibody (ELISAs A and C) or HRP-conjugated protein G (ELISAs B and D). A commercially available assay, ELISA-E, which was designed to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies in cattle, sheep, and goats, was also tested. Although ELISAs A, C, and E had the same sensitivity (72%), ELISAs A and C were more specific (100%) for detecting fallow deer with lesions consistent with paratuberculosis at necropsy than was the ELISA-E (87.5%). In addition, the ELISA-A was particularly sensitive for detecting fallow deer in the latent stages of infection (62.5%). The antibody responses detected with the ELISA-A correlated with both the severity of enteric lesions and the presence of acid-fast bacteria in gut tissue samples. In summary, our study shows that the ELISA-A can be a cost-effective diagnostic tool for preventing the spread of paratuberculosis among fallow deer populations. PMID:24872517

  7. Pneumococcal Type 22F Polysaccharide Absorption Improves the Specificity of a Pneumococcal-Polysaccharide Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Nelydia F.; Frasch, Carl E.

    2001-01-01

    The specificity of the immune response to the 23-valent pneumococcal-polysaccharide (PS) vaccine in healthy adults and to a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in infants was examined by measuring immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the opsonophagocytosis assay. ELISA measures total antipneumococcal IgG titers including the titers of functional and nonfunctional antibodies, while the opsonophagocytosis assay measures only functional-antibody titers. Twenty-four pairs of pre- and post-pneumococcal vaccination sera from adults were evaluated (ELISA) for levels of IgG antibodies against serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F. Twelve of the pairs were also examined (opsonophagocytosis assay) for their functional activities. The correlation coefficients between assay results for most types ranged from 0.75 to 0.90, but the correlation coefficient was only about 0.6 for serotypes 4 and 19F. The specificities of these antibodies were further examined by the use of competitive ELISA inhibition. A number of heterologous polysaccharides (types 11A, 12F, 15B, 22F, and 33A) were used as inhibitors. Most of the sera tested showed cross-reacting antibodies, in addition to those removed by pneumococcal C PS absorption. Our data suggest the presence of a common epitope that is found on most pneumococcal PS but that is not absorbed by purified C PS. Use of a heterologous pneumococcal PS (22F) to adsorb the antibodies to the common epitope increased the correlation between the IgG ELISA results and the opsonophagocytosis assay results. The correlation coefficient improve from 0.66 to 0.92 for type 4 and from 0.63 to 0.80 for type 19F. These common-epitope antibodies were largely absent in infants at 7 months of age, suggesting the carbohydrate nature of the epitope. PMID:11238206

  8. Development of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Method Specific for the Detection of G-Group Aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiwu; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Haiyan; Zhang, Wen; Ding, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Zhaowei; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Zhang, Qi

    2015-12-28

    To detect and monitor G-group aflatoxins in agricultural products, we generated class-specific monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognized aflatoxins G₁ and G₂. Of the final three positive and stable hybridomas obtained, clone 2G6 produced a monoclonal antibody that had equal sensitivity to aflatoxins G₁ and G₂, and did not cross-react with aflatoxins B₁, B₂, or M₁. Its IC50 values for aflatoxins G₁ and G₂ were 17.18 ng·mL(-1) and 19.75 ng·mL(-1), respectively. Using this new monoclonal antibody, we developed a competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CI-ELISA); the method had a limit of detection of 0.06 ng·mL(-1). To validate this CI-ELISA, we spiked uncontaminated peanut samples with various amounts of aflatoxins G₁ and G₂ and compared recovery rates with those determined by a standard HPLC method. The recovery rates of the CI-ELISA ranging from 94% to 103% were comparable to those of the HPLC (92% to 102%). We also used both methods to determine the amounts of G-group aflatoxins in five peanut samples contaminated by aflatoxin B₁-positive, and their relative standard deviations ranged from 8.4% to 17.7% (under 20%), which demonstrates a good correlation between the two methods. We further used this CI-ELISA to assess the ability of 126 fungal strains isolated from peanuts or field soils to produce G-group aflatoxins. Among these, seven stains producing different amounts of G-group aflatoxins were identified. Our results showed that the monoclonal antibody 2 G6-based CI-ELISA was suitable for the detection of G-group aflatoxins present in peanuts and also those produced by fungi.

  9. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

    SciTech Connect

    Laros, James H.,; Kelly, Suzanne M.; Pedretti, Kevin; Grant, Ryan; Olivier, Stephen Lecler; Levenhagen, Michael J.; DeBonis, David

    2014-08-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area [13, 3, 5, 10, 4, 21, 19, 16, 7, 17, 20, 18, 11, 1, 6, 14, 12]. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  10. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program Specification Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hewes, T.; Peeks, B.

    2013-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  11. The Relationship between Institutional, Departmental and Program-Specific Variables and the Academic Performance of Division I FBS Football Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eigenbrot, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the connection between the academic evaluation of Division I FBS football programs and the various social settings that influenced these student-athletes. These social settings were classified as: institutional, departmental and program-specific. The experience of the student-athlete is thought to be impacted by all three…

  12. Employer Specific Training Program for Program Year 1988-89. Annual Report to the Governor and Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    The Employer Specific Skills Training Program helps build the superior work force called for by the National Alliance of Business and other significant employer, union, government, and educational groups. Through a combination of state and federal funds, the New York State Department of Education has crafted a flexible and responsible program.…

  13. Hyperthyroidism in Patients with Graves' Ophthalmopathy, and Thyroidal, Skeletal and Eye Muscle Specific Type 2 Deiodinase Enzyme Activities.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Ildikó; Szentmiklósi, József A; Somogyiné-Vári, Éva

    2017-09-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy is characterized by hyperthyroidism, which is associated with higher serum T3 levels than T4 due to deiodinase enzymes.The effect of Graves' patient's sera (n=52) with elevated thyroid hormone and TSH receptor or thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO) levels was investigated on thyroidal, skeletal and eye muscle type 2 deiodinase enzyme (DII) activities. DII activities were measured with (125)I-T4 substrate, while thyroid hormone and antibody levels with immunoassays.In Graves' ophthalmopathy, sera with elevated FT4 or FT3 levels reduced DII activites remarkably in all tissue fractions. Thyroidal DII activities were lower than those using eye muscle fraction (0.6±0.22 vs 1.14±0.43 pmol/mg/min, P<0.006). Effect of sera with increased FT3 levels demonstrated also reduced DII activities in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy after methimazole therapy compared to those who had no ophthalmopathy (2.88±2 vs 20.42±11.82 pmol/mg/min, P<0.006 for thyroidal fraction, 4.07±2.72 vs 29.22±15.46 pmol/mg/min, P<0.004 for skeletal muscle, 5.3±3.47 vs 37.87±18.82 pmol/mg/min, P<0.003 for eye muscle). Hyperthyroid sera with TSH receptor antibodies resulted in increased DII activities, while sera with anti-TPO antibodies were connected to lower DII activities in Graves' ophthalmopathy.In summary, the actions of hyperthyroid sera derived from patients with Graves' disease were tested on tissue-specific DII activities. Elevated FT4 level-induced DII inactivation is present in Graves' ophthalmopathy, which seems to be also present at the beginning of methimazole therapy. Stimulating TSH receptor antibiodies increased DII activities via their nongenomic effects using sera of hyperthyroid Graves' ophthalmopathy, but anti-TPO antibodies could influence DII activities via altering FT4 levels. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Stereo-specificity for pro-(R) hydrogen of NAD(P)H during enzyme-catalyzed hydride transfer to CL-20

    SciTech Connect

    Bhushan, Bharat; Halasz, Annamaria; Hawari, Jalal . E-mail: jalal.hawari@nrc.ca

    2005-12-02

    A dehydrogenase from Clostridium sp. EDB2 and a diaphorase from Clostridium kluyveri were reacted with CL-20 to gain insights into the enzyme-catalyzed hydride transfer to CL-20, and the enzyme's stereo-specificity for either pro-R or pro-S hydrogens of NAD(P)H. Both enzymes biotransformed CL-20 at rates of 18.5 and 24 nmol/h/mg protein, using NADH and NADPH as hydride-source, respectively, to produce a N-denitrohydrogenated product with a molecular weight of 393 Da. In enzyme kinetics studies using reduced deuterated pyridine nucleotides, we found a kinetic deuterium isotopic effect of 2-fold on CL-20 biotransformation rate using dehydrogenase enzyme against (R)NADD as a hydride-source compared to either (S)NADD or NADH. Whereas, in case of diaphorase, the kinetic deuterium isotopic effect of about 1.5-fold was observed on CL-20 biotransformation rate using (R)NADPD as hydride-source. In a comparative study with LC-MS, using deuterated and non-deuterated NAD(P)H, we found a positive mass-shift of 1 Da in the N-denitrohydrogenated product suggesting the involvement of a deuteride (D{sup -}) transfer from NAD(P)D. The present study thus revealed that both dehydrogenase and diaphorase enzymes from the two Clostridium species catalyzed a hydride transfer to CL-20 and showed stereo-specificity for pro-R hydrogen of NAD(P)H.

  15. Antagonistic Enzymes in a Biocatalytic pH Feedback System Program Autonomous DNA Hydrogel Life Cycles.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Laura; Heuser, Thomas; Steinschulte, Alexander; Walther, Andreas

    2017-08-09

    Enzymes regulate complex functions and active behavior in natural systems and have shown increasing prospect for developing self-regulating soft matter systems. Striving for advanced autonomous hydrogel materials with fully programmable, self-regulated life cycles, we combine two enzymes with an antagonistic pH-modulating effect in a feedback-controlled biocatalytic reaction network (BRN) and couple it to pH-responsive DNA hydrogels to realize hydrogel systems with distinct preprogrammable lag times and lifetimes in closed systems. The BRN enables precise and orthogonal internal temporal control of the "ON" and "OFF" switching times of the temporary gel state by modulation of programmable, nonlinear pH changes. The time scales are tunable by variation of the enzyme concentrations and additional buffer substances. The resulting material system operates in full autonomy after injection of the chemical fuels driving the BRN. The concept may open new applications inherent to DNA hydrogels, for instance, autonomous shape memory behavior for soft robotics. We further foresee general applicability to achieve autonomous life cycles in other pH switchable systems.

  16. Combined effect of improved cell yield and increased specific productivity enhances recombinant enzyme production in genome-reduced Bacillus subtilis strain MGB874.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Kenji; Kageyama, Yasushi; Morimoto, Takuya; Ozawa, Tadahiro; Sawada, Kazuhisa; Endo, Keiji; Tohata, Masatoshi; Ara, Katsutoshi; Ozaki, Katsuya; Ogasawara, Naotake

    2011-12-01

    Genome reduction strategies to create genetically improved cellular biosynthesis machineries for proteins and other products have been pursued by use of a wide range of bacteria. We reported previously that the novel Bacillus subtilis strain MGB874, which was derived from strain 168 and has a total genomic deletion of 874 kb (20.7%), exhibits enhanced production of recombinant enzymes. However, it was not clear how the genomic reduction resulted in elevated enzyme production. Here we report that deletion of the rocDEF-rocR region, which is involved in arginine degradation, contributes to enhanced enzyme production in strain MGB874. Deletion of the rocDEF-rocR region caused drastic changes in glutamate metabolism, leading to improved cell yields with maintenance of enzyme productivity. Notably, the specific enzyme productivity was higher in the reduced-genome strain, with or without the rocDEF-rocR region, than in wild-type strain 168. The high specific productivity in strain MGB874 is likely attributable to the higher expression levels of the target gene resulting from an increased promoter activity and plasmid copy number. Thus, the combined effects of the improved cell yield by deletion of the rocDEF-rocR region and the increased specific productivity by deletion of another gene(s) or the genomic reduction itself enhanced the production of recombinant enzymes in MGB874. Our findings represent a good starting point for the further improvement of B. subtilis reduced-genome strains as cell factories for the production of heterologous enzymes.

  17. Sex-Specific Changes in Renal Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity at Birth and Over the First Year of Life.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Bi, Jianli; Su, Yixin; Chappell, Mark C; Rose, James C

    2016-02-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) are key enzymes of the renin-angiotensin system. We investigated developmental changes in renal ACE and ACE2 gene expression and activity in both male and female sheep. Three groups of sheep (fetus, newborn, and adult) were used. Renal ACE and ACE2 activities, messenger RNA (mRNA), and protein expression were studied. Renal ACE and ACE2 activities increased at 1 year in males, while there were no changes throughout development in females. Renal ACE and ACE2 mRNA and protein showed no sex differences but increased by 1 year of age. There are sex-related differences in the development of renal-converting enzyme activities that may have functional implications in terms of the regulation of blood pressure and renal function in men and women. The difference in the patterns of gene expression and enzyme activity indicates that changes in gene expression may not accurately reflect changes in activity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Tomato nuclear proteome reveals the involvement of specific E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuying; Wang, Weihao; Cai, Jianghua; Zhang, Yanrui; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    Fruits are unique to flowering plants and play a central role in seed maturation and dispersal. Molecular dissection of fruit ripening has received considerable interest because of the biological and dietary significance of fruit. To better understand the regulatory mechanisms underlying fruit ripening, we report here the first comprehensive analysis of the nuclear proteome in tomato fruits. Nuclear proteins were isolated from tomatoes in different stages of ripening, and subjected to iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) analysis. We show that the proteins whose abundances change during ripening stages are involved in various cellular processes. We additionally evaluate changes in the nuclear proteome in the ripening-deficient mutant, ripening-inhibitor (rin), carrying a mutation in the transcription factor RIN. A set of proteins were identified and particular attention was paid to SlUBC32 and PSMD2, the components of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel mobility shift assays, we provide evidence that RIN directly binds to the promoters of SlUBC32 and PSMD2. Moreover, loss of RIN function affects protein ubiquitination in nuclei. SlUBC32 encodes an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and a genome-wide survey of the E2 gene family in tomatoes identified five more E2s as direct targets of RIN. Virus-induced gene silencing assays show that two E2s are involved in the regulation of fruit ripening. Our results uncover a novel function of protein ubiquitination, identifying specific E2s as regulators of fruit ripening. These findings contribute to the unraveling of the gene regulatory networks that control fruit ripening.

  19. Glutathione-dependent detoxifying enzymes in rainbow trout liver: Search for specific biochemical markers of chemical stress

    SciTech Connect

    Petrivalsky, M.; Machala, M.; Nezveda, K.; Piacka, V.; Svobodova, Z. |; Drabek, P.

    1997-07-01

    Activities of trout liver microsomal glutathione S-transferase (GST) and a series of cytosolic glutathione-dependent detoxifying enzymes were determined after a single intraperitoneal treatment with phenobarbital, 2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane (p,p{prime}-DDE), 2,3-dimethoxynaphthoquinone (NQ), or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). This study aimed to find xenobiotic-specific parameters applicable as biochemical markers of the impacts of the prototypal xenobiotics. The effects of xenobiotics on cytosolic GST activities were substrate dependent. The rate of conjugation of p-nitrobenzyl chloride was significantly induced by higher doses of p,p{prime}-DDE or NQ. The conjugation of ethacrynic acid was enhanced by phenobarbital, p,p{prime}-DDE, and NQ. The GST activity against 1,2-epoxy-3-(p-nitrophenoxy)propane was induced only by phenobarbital and by lower doses of p,p{prime}-DDE. The cytosolic GST activity, measured with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as a substrate, was only weakly increased by phenobarbital, TCDD, higher doses of p,p{prime}-DDE, or by NQ at the lowest dose of 1 mg/kg. Although the latter activity is frequently used as a biomarker in ecotoxicology, various factors (including its weak inducibility) indicate that this biochemical parameter is probably not a suitable indicator of contamination in fish. Similarly, cytosolic glutathione peroxidase was not affected by the prototypal xenobiotics and appeared to be an unsuitable bioindicator of oxidative impacts of the tested compounds. On the other hand, microsomal GST activity was nonspecifically increased by phenobarbital, NQ, TCDD, and high doses of p,p{prime}-DDE. Glutathione reductase, another potential biomarker of oxidative stress, was induced by phenobarbital, NQ, and, to a lesser extent, p,p{prime}-DDE; therefore it appeared to be a less sensitive indicator to the exposure to prototypal xenobiotics than the microsomal GST.

  20. Enzyme-free detection of sequence-specific microRNAs based on nanoparticle-assisted signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ru-Dong; Wang, Qian; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-03-15

    Developing direct and convenient methods for microRNAs (miRNAs) analysis is of great significance in understanding biological functions of miRNAs, and early diagnosis of cancers. We have developed a rapid, enzyme-free method for miRNA detection based on nanoparticle-assisted signal amplification coupling fluorescent metal nanoclusters as signal output. The proposed method involves two processes: target miRNA-mediated nanoparticle capture, which consists of magnetic microparticle (MMP) probe and CuO nanoparticle (NP) probe, and nanoparticle-mediated amplification for signal generation, which consists of fluorescent DNA-Cu/Ag nanocluster (NC) and 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). In the presence of target miRNA, MMP probe and NP probe sandwich-capture the target miRNA via their respective complementary sequence. The resultant sandwich complex (MMP probe-miRNA-CuO NP probe) is separated using a magnetic field and further dissolved by acidolysis to turn CuO NP into a great amount of copper (II) ions (Cu(2+)). Cu(2+) could disrupt the interactions between thiol moiety of MPA and the fluorescent Cu/Ag NCs by preferentially reacting with MPA to form a disulfide compound as intermediate. By this way, the fluorescence emission of the DNA-Cu/Ag NCs in the presence of MPA increases upon the increasing concentration of Cu(2+), which is directly proportional to the amount of target miRNA. The proposed method allows quantitative detection of a liver-specific miR-221-5p in the range of 5 pM to 1000 pM with a detection limit of ~0.73 pM, and shows a good ability to discriminate single-base difference. Moreover, the detection assay can be applied to detect miRNA in cancerous cell lysates in excellent agreement with that from a commercial miRNA detection kit.

  1. Effect of formal specifications on program complexity and reliability: An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Amrit L.; Sahoo, Swarupa N.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of an experimental study undertaken to assess the improvement in program quality by using formal specifications. Specifications in the Z notation were developed for a simple but realistic antimissile system. These specifications were then used to develop 2 versions in C by 2 programmers. Another set of 3 versions in Ada were independently developed from informal specifications in English. A comparison of the reliability and complexity of the resulting programs suggests the advantages of using formal specifications in terms of number of errors detected and fault avoidance.

  2. NASIS data base management system - IBM 360/370 OS MVT implementation. 4: Program design specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design specifications for the programs and modules within the NASA Aerospace Safety Information System (NASIS) are presented. The purpose of the design specifications is to standardize the preparation of the specifications and to guide the program design. Each major functional module within the system is a separate entity for documentation purposes. The design specifications contain a description of, and specifications for, all detail processing which occurs in the module. Sub-modules, reference tables, and data sets which are common to several modules are documented separately.

  3. NASIS data base management system: IBM 360 TSS implementation. Volume 4: Program design specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design specifications for the programs and modules within the NASA Aerospace Safety Information System (NASIS) are presented. The purpose of the design specifications is to standardize the preparation of the specifications and to guide the program design. Each major functional module within the system is a separate entity for documentation purposes. The design specifications contain a description of, and specifications for, all detail processing which occurs in the module. Sub-models, reference tables, and data sets which are common to several modules are documented separately.

  4. The Structure of the Bacterial Oxidoreductase Enzyme DsbA in Complex with a Peptide Reveals a Basis for Substrate Specificity in the Catalytic Cycle of DsbA Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Paxman, Jason J.; Borg, Natalie A.; Horne, James; Thompson, Philip E.; Chin, Yanni; Sharma, Pooja; Simpson, Jamie S.; Wielens, Jerome; Piek, Susannah; Kahler, Charlene M.; Sakellaris, Harry; Pearce, Mary; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2010-09-07

    Oxidative protein folding in Gram-negative bacteria results in the formation of disulfide bonds between pairs of cysteine residues. This is a multistep process in which the dithiol-disulfide oxidoreductase enzyme, DsbA, plays a central role. The structure of DsbA comprises an all helical domain of unknown function and a thioredoxin domain, where active site cysteines shuttle between an oxidized, substrate-bound, reduced form and a DsbB-bound form, where DsbB is a membrane protein that reoxidizes DsbA. Most DsbA enzymes interact with a wide variety of reduced substrates and show little specificity. However, a number of DsbA enzymes have now been identified that have narrow substrate repertoires and appear to interact specifically with a smaller number of substrates. The transient nature of the DsbA-substrate complex has hampered our understanding of the factors that govern the interaction of DsbA enzymes with their substrates. Here we report the crystal structure of a complex between Escherichia coli DsbA and a peptide with a sequence derived from a substrate. The binding site identified in the DsbA-peptide complex was distinct from that observed for DsbB in the DsbA-DsbB complex. The structure revealed details of the DsbA-peptide interaction and suggested a mechanism by which DsbA can simultaneously show broad specificity for substrates yet exhibit specificity for DsbB. This mode of binding was supported by solution nuclear magnetic resonance data as well as functional data, which demonstrated that the substrate specificity of DsbA could be modified via changes at the binding interface identified in the structure of the complex.

  5. The structure of the bacterial oxidoreductase enzyme DsbA in complex with a peptide reveals a basis for substrate specificity in the catalytic cycle of DsbA enzymes.

    PubMed

    Paxman, Jason J; Borg, Natalie A; Horne, James; Thompson, Philip E; Chin, Yanni; Sharma, Pooja; Simpson, Jamie S; Wielens, Jerome; Piek, Susannah; Kahler, Charlene M; Sakellaris, Harry; Pearce, Mary; Bottomley, Stephen P; Rossjohn, Jamie; Scanlon, Martin J

    2009-06-26

    Oxidative protein folding in Gram-negative bacteria results in the formation of disulfide bonds between pairs of cysteine residues. This is a multistep process in which the dithiol-disulfide oxidoreductase enzyme, DsbA, plays a central role. The structure of DsbA comprises an all helical domain of unknown function and a thioredoxin domain, where active site cysteines shuttle between an oxidized, substrate-bound, reduced form and a DsbB-bound form, where DsbB is a membrane protein that reoxidizes DsbA. Most DsbA enzymes interact with a wide variety of reduced substrates and show little specificity. However, a number of DsbA enzymes have now been identified that have narrow substrate repertoires and appear to interact specifically with a smaller number of substrates. The transient nature of the DsbA-substrate complex has hampered our understanding of the factors that govern the interaction of DsbA enzymes with their substrates. Here we report the crystal structure of a complex between Escherichia coli DsbA and a peptide with a sequence derived from a substrate. The binding site identified in the DsbA-peptide complex was distinct from that observed for DsbB in the DsbA-DsbB complex. The structure revealed details of the DsbA-peptide interaction and suggested a mechanism by which DsbA can simultaneously show broad specificity for substrates yet exhibit specificity for DsbB. This mode of binding was supported by solution nuclear magnetic resonance data as well as functional data, which demonstrated that the substrate specificity of DsbA could be modified via changes at the binding interface identified in the structure of the complex.

  6. Revisiting the nucleotide and aminoglycoside substrate specificity of the bifunctional aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6')-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2'')-Ia enzyme.

    PubMed

    Frase, Hilary; Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2012-12-21

    The bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6')-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia, or AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia, is the major source of aminoglycoside resistance in gram-positive bacterial pathogens. In previous studies, using ATP as the cosubstrate, it was reported that the APH(2″)-Ia domain of this enzyme is unique among aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having the ability to inactivate an unusually broad spectrum of aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-disubstituted and atypical. We recently demonstrated that GTP, and not ATP, is the preferred cosubstrate of this enzyme. We now show, using competition assays between ATP and GTP, that GTP is the exclusive phosphate donor at intracellular nucleotide levels. In light of these findings, we reevaluated the substrate profile of the phosphotransferase domain of this clinically important enzyme. Steady-state kinetic characterization using the phosphate donor GTP demonstrates that AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia phosphorylates 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides with high efficiency (k(cat)/K(m) = 10(5)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Despite this proficiency, no resistance is conferred to some of these antibiotics by the enzyme in vivo. We now show that phosphorylation of 4,5-disubstituted and atypical aminoglycosides are negligible and thus these antibiotics are not substrates. Instead, these aminoglycosides tend to stimulate an intrinsic GTPase activity of the enzyme. Taken together, our data show that the bifunctional enzyme efficiently phosphorylates only 4,6-disubstituted antibiotics; however, phosphorylation does not necessarily result in bacterial resistance. Hence, the APH(2″)-Ia domain of the bifunctional AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia enzyme is a bona fide GTP-dependent kinase with a narrow substrate profile, including only 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides.

  7. Ligand-binding specificity and promiscuity of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families as revealed by active-site architecture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Liu, Shijia; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Lushan

    2016-01-01

    Biomass can be converted into sugars by a series of lignocellulolytic enzymes, which belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families summarized in CAZy databases. Here, using a structural bioinformatics method, we analyzed the active site architecture of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families. The aromatic amino acids Trp/Tyr and polar amino acids Glu/Asp/Asn/Gln/Arg occurred at higher frequencies in the active site architecture than in the whole enzyme structure. And the number of potential subsites was significantly different among different families. In the cellulase and xylanase families, the conserved amino acids in the active site architecture were mostly found at the −2 to +1 subsites, while in β-glucosidase they were mainly concentrated at the −1 subsite. Families with more conserved binding amino acid residues displayed strong selectivity for their ligands, while those with fewer conserved binding amino acid residues often exhibited promiscuity when recognizing ligands. Enzymes with different activities also tended to bind different hydroxyl oxygen atoms on the ligand. These results may help us to better understand the common and unique structural bases of enzyme-ligand recognition from different families and provide a theoretical basis for the functional evolution and rational design of major lignocellulolytic enzymes. PMID:27009476

  8. Peroxidase from Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don and the biosynthesis of alpha-3',4'-anhydrovinblastine: a specific role for a multifunctional enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sottomayor, M; Ros Barceló, A

    2003-09-01

    We have characterized a basic peroxidase with alpha-3',4'-anhydrovinblastine (AVLB) synthase activity, which was purified from Catharanthus roseus leaves. This enzyme was the single peroxidase isoenzyme detected in C. roseus leaves, and the single AVLB synthase activity detected in C. roseus extracts. It was observed that the monomeric substrates of AVLB, vindoline and catharanthine, are both suitable electron donors for the oxidizing intermediates of the basic peroxidase, compounds I and II. Results also showed that the reaction proceeds by a radical-propagated mechanism. Substrate specificity studies of the enzyme revealed that it was also able to oxidize several common peroxidase substrates, indicating a broad range of substrate specificity that is characteristic of class III plant peroxidases. Cytochemical studies showed that the enzyme is localized in C. roseus mesophyll vacuoles, in individual spots at the inner surface of the tonoplast. This particular location suggests a meaningful spatial organization that led to the proposal of a metabolic channeling model for the peroxidase-mediated synthesis of AVLB. The importance of this type of mechanism in the regulation of peroxidase isoenzyme functions in vivo is discussed. In view of the results obtained it is concluded that the basic peroxidase present in C. roseus leaves fulfills all the requirements to be considered as an AVLB synthase, and it is proposed that this specific function of this multifunctional enzyme is determined by metabolic channeling resulting from specific protein-protein interactions.

  9. Highly broad-specific and sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for screening sulfonamides: Assay optimization and application to milk samples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A broad-specific and sensitive immunoassay for the detection of sulfonamides was developed by optimizing the conditions of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in regard to different monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), assay format, immunoreagents, and several physicochemical factors (pH, salt, de...

  10. Glucose-Specific Enzyme IIA of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Chitin Signaling Pathways in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shouji; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2017-09-15

    In Vibrio cholerae, the genes required for chitin utilization and natural competence are governed by the chitin-responsive two-component system (TCS) sensor kinase ChiS. In the classical TCS paradigm, a sensor kinase specifically phosphorylates a cognate response regulator to activate gene expression. However, our previous genetic study suggested that ChiS stimulates the non-TCS transcriptional regulator TfoS by using mechanisms distinct from classical phosphorylation reactions (S. Yamamoto, J. Mitobe, T. Ishikawa, S. N. Wai, M. Ohnishi, H. Watanabe, and H. Izumiya, Mol Microbiol 91:326-347, 2014, https://doi.org/10.1111/mmi.12462). TfoS specifically activates the transcription of tfoR, encoding a small regulatory RNA essential for competence gene expression. Whether ChiS and TfoS interact directly remains unknown. To determine if other factors mediate the communication between ChiS and TfoS, we isolated transposon mutants that turned off tfoR::lacZ expression but possessed intact chiS and tfoS genes. We demonstrated an unexpected association of chitin-induced signaling pathways with the glucose-specific enzyme IIA (EIIA(glc)) of the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) for carbohydrate uptake and catabolite control of gene expression. Genetic and physiological analyses revealed that dephosphorylated EIIA(glc) inactivated natural competence and tfoR transcription. Chitin-induced expression of the chb operon, which is required for chitin transport and catabolism, was also repressed by dephosphorylated EIIA(glc) Furthermore, the regulation of tfoR and chb expression by EIIA(glc) was dependent on ChiS and intracellular levels of ChiS were not affected by disruption of the gene encoding EIIA(glc) These results define a previously unknown connection between the PTS and chitin signaling pathways in V. cholerae and suggest a strategy whereby this bacterium can physiologically adapt to the existing nutrient status.IMPORTANCE The EIIA

  11. HAL/SM language specification. [programming languages and computer programming for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G. P. W., Jr.; Ross, C.

    1975-01-01

    A programming language is presented for the flight software of the NASA Space Shuttle program. It is intended to satisfy virtually all of the flight software requirements of the space shuttle. To achieve this, it incorporates a wide range of features, including applications-oriented data types and organizations, real time control mechanisms, and constructs for systems programming tasks. It is a higher order language designed to allow programmers, analysts, and engineers to communicate with the computer in a form approximating natural mathematical expression. Parts of the English language are combined with standard notation to provide a tool that readily encourages programming without demanding computer hardware expertise. Block diagrams and flow charts are included. The semantics of the language is discussed.

  12. Structure of an archaeal PCNA1–PCNA2–FEN1 complex: elucidating PCNA subunit and client enzyme specificity

    PubMed Central

    Doré, Andrew S.; Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Jones, Sarah A.; Oliver, Antony W.; Roe, S. Mark; Bell, Stephen D.; Pearl, Laurence H.

    2006-01-01

    The archaeal/eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) toroidal clamp interacts with a host of DNA modifying enzymes, providing a stable anchorage and enhancing their respective processivities. Given the broad range of enzymes with which PCNA has been shown to interact, relatively little is known about the mode of assembly of functionally meaningful combinations of enzymes on the PCNA clamp. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Sulfolobus solfataricus PCNA1–PCNA2 heterodimer, bound to a single copy of the flap endonuclease FEN1 at 2.9 Å resolution. We demonstrate the specificity of interaction of the PCNA subunits to form the PCNA1–PCNA2–PCNA3 heterotrimer, as well as providing a rationale for the specific interaction of the C-terminal PIP-box motif of FEN1 for the PCNA1 subunit. The structure explains the specificity of the individual archaeal PCNA subunits for selected repair enzyme ‘clients’, and provides insights into the co-ordinated assembly of sequential enzymatic steps in PCNA-scaffolded DNA repair cascades. PMID:16945955

  13. ModEnzA: Accurate Identification of Metabolic Enzymes Using Function Specific Profile HMMs with Optimised Discrimination Threshold and Modified Emission Probabilities

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Dhwani K.; Nandi, Soumyadeep; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Lynn, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Various enzyme identification protocols involving homology transfer by sequence-sequence or profile-sequence comparisons have been devised which utilise Swiss-Prot sequences associated with EC numbers as the training set. A profile HMM constructed for a particular EC number might select sequences which perform a different enzymatic function due to the presence of certain fold-specific residues which are conserved in enzymes sharing a common fold. We describe a protocol, ModEnzA (HMM-ModE Enzyme Annotation), which generates profile HMMs highly specific at a functional level as defined by the EC numbers by incorporating information from negative training sequences. We enrich the training dataset by mining sequences from the NCBI Non-Redundant database for increased sensitivity. We compare our method with other enzyme identification methods, both for assigning EC numbers to a genome as well as identifying protein sequences associated with an enzymatic activity. We report a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 95% in identifying EC numbers and annotating enzymatic sequences from the E. coli genome which is higher than any other method. With the next-generation sequencing methods producing a huge amount of sequence data, the development and use of fully automated yet accurate protocols such as ModEnzA is warranted for rapid annotation of newly sequenced genomes and metagenomic sequences. PMID:21541071

  14. Using the SCR Specification Technique in a High School Programming Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Edward; McKim, James C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Presents the underlying ideas of the Software Cost Reduction (SCR) approach to requirements specifications. Results of applying this approach to the teaching of programing to high school students indicate that students perform better in writing programs. An appendix provides two examples of how the method is applied to problem solving. (MDH)

  15. Field Dependence-Independence as Predictor of Specific Reading Skills in Two First Grade Reading Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dermott, R. Allan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Details an investigation of the relative contribution of two dimensions of field dependence-independence to the prediction of specific reading skills for first-grade children in an intensive phonics program and in a basal reader program supplemented with phonics. (FL)

  16. The Rise of International Relations Programs in the Brazilian Federal Universities: Curriculum Specificities and Current Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Marcos Alan S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this reflection is to study the new international relations (IR) programs introduced by Brazilian federal universities, looking comparatively at their curriculum specificities and current challenges. In recent years, Brazil has seen an increase of IR programs launched in several regions. Since 2003, the Ministry of Education is in the…

  17. Programming for the Language Disabled Child: Booklet 3: Specific Programmatic Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Described are three specific instructional programing techniques recommended as a result of Project CHILD, a research effort to validate identification, intervention, and teacher education programs for use with language handicapped children. The three intervention models are thought of as being located at equidistant points on a continuum from…

  18. The Rise of International Relations Programs in the Brazilian Federal Universities: Curriculum Specificities and Current Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Marcos Alan S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this reflection is to study the new international relations (IR) programs introduced by Brazilian federal universities, looking comparatively at their curriculum specificities and current challenges. In recent years, Brazil has seen an increase of IR programs launched in several regions. Since 2003, the Ministry of Education is in the…

  19. Enrichment Double-Antibody Sandwich Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay That Uses a Specific Monoclonal Antibody for Sensitive Detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in Asymptomatic Potato Tubers

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Paola; Gorris, María Teresa; Cambra, Mariano; Palomo, José Luis; Collar, Jesús; López, María M.

    2002-01-01

    Sensitive and specific routine detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in symptomless potato tubers was achieved by efficient enrichment followed by a reliable double-antibody sandwich indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the specific monoclonal antibody 8B-IVIA. This monoclonal antibody reacted with 168 typical R. solanacearum strains and did not recognize 174 other pathogenic or unidentified bacteria isolated from potato. The optimized protocol included an initial enrichment step consisting of shaking the samples in modified Wilbrink broth for 72 h at 29°C. This step enabled specific detection by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of 1 to 10 CFU of R. solanacearum per ml of initial potato extract. Analysis of 233 commercial potato lots by this method provided results that coincided with the results of conventional methods. PMID:12089053

  20. Lysine 190 is the catalytic base in MenF, the menaquinone-specific isochorismate synthase from Escherichia coli: implications for an enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Zwahlen, Jacque; Zhou, Rong; Truglio, James J; Tonge, Peter J; Kisker, Caroline

    2007-01-30

    Menaquinone biosynthesis is initiated by the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, a reaction that is catalyzed by the menaquinone-specific isochorismate synthase, MenF. The catalytic mechanism of MenF has been probed using a combination of structural and biochemical studies, including the 2.5 A structure of the enzyme, and Lys190 has been identified as the base that activates water for nucleophilic attack at the chorismate C2 carbon. MenF is a member of a larger family of Mg2+ dependent chorismate binding enzymes catalyzing distinct chorismate transformations. The studies reported here extend the mechanism recently proposed for this enzyme family by He et al.: He, Z., Stigers Lavoie, K. D., Bartlett, P. A., and Toney, M. D. (2004) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126, 2378-85.

  1. Site-specific bioconjugation of an organometallic electron mediator to an enzyme with retained photocatalytic cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Yoon, Sungho; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-04-07

    Photosynthesis consists of a series of reactions catalyzed by redox enzymes to synthesize carbohydrates using solar energy. In order to take the advantage of solar energy, many researchers have investigated artificial photosynthesis systems mimicking the natural photosynthetic enzymatic redox reactions. These redox reactions usually require cofactors, which due to their high cost become a key issue when constructing an artificial photosynthesis system. Combining a photosensitizer and an Rh-based electron mediator (RhM) has been shown to photocatalytically regenerate cofactors. However, maintaining the high concentration of cofactors available for efficient enzymatic reactions requires a high concentration of the expensive RhM; making this process cost prohibitive. We hypothesized that conjugation of an electron mediator to a redox enzyme will reduce the amount of electron mediators necessary for efficient enzymatic reactions. This is due to photocatalytically regenerated NAD(P)H being readily available to a redox enzyme, when the local NAD(P)H concentration near the enzyme becomes higher. However, conventional random conjugation of RhM to a redox enzyme will likely lead to a substantial loss of cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. In order to avoid this issue, we investigated whether bioconjugation of RhM to a permissive site of a redox enzyme retains cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. As a model system, a RhM was conjugated to a redox enzyme, formate dehydrogenase obtained from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH). A RhM-containing azide group was site-specifically conjugated to p-azidophenylalanine introduced to a permissive site of TsFDH via a bioorthogonal strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition and an appropriate linker. The TsFDH-RhM conjugate exhibited retained cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity.

  2. Crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori MTAN enzyme reveal specific interactions between S-adenosylhomocysteine and the 5’-alkylthio binding subsite

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vidhi; Ronning, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial 5’-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzyme is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-ribosidic bond of at least four different adenosine-based metabolites: S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), 5’methylthioadenosine (MTA), 5’-deoxyadenosine (5’-DOA) and 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine. These activities place the enzyme at the hub of seven fundamental bacterial metabolic pathways: S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) utilization, polyamine biosynthesis, the purine salvage pathway, the methionine salvage pathway, the SAM radical pathways, autoinducer-2 biosynthesis, and menaquinone biosynthesis. The last pathway makes MTAN essential for H. pylori viability. Although structures of various bacterial and plant MTANs have been described, the interactions between the homocysteine moiety of SAH and the 5’-alkylthiol binding site of MTAN have never been resolved. We have solved crystal structures of an inactive mutant form of Helicobacter pylori MTAN bound to MTA and SAH to 1.63 and 1.20 Å, respectively. The active form of MTAN was also crystallized in the presence of SAH allowing structure determination of a ternary enzyme-product complex resolved at 1.50 Å. These structures identify interactions between the homocysteine moiety and the 5’-alkylthiol binding site of the enzyme. This information can be leveraged for the development of species-specific MTAN inhibitors that prevent the growth of H. pylori. PMID:23148563

  3. Effect of differential processing of the native and recombinant α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens JJC33M on specificity and enzyme properties.

    PubMed

    Montor-Antonio, Juan José; Hernández-Heredia, Sarahi; Ávila-Fernández, Ángela; Olvera, Clarita; Sachman-Ruiz, Bernardo; Del Moral, Sandra

    2017-10-01

    AmyJ33, an α-amylase isolated from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens JJC33M, has been characterized as a non-metalloenzyme that hydrolyzes raw starch. In this work, the gene that codifies for AmyJ33 was isolated and cloned. The recombinant α-amylase (AmyJ33r) produced had a molecular weight of 72 kDa, 25 kDa higher than the native α-amylase (AmyJ33). Our results suggest that the C-terminal was processed in a different way in the native and the recombinant enzyme causing the difference observed in the molecular weight. Additionally, the enzyme activity, specificity and biochemical behavior were affected by this larger C-terminal extra region in AmyJ33r, since the enzyme lost the ability to hydrolyze raw starch compared to the native but increased its thermal stability and pH stability, and modified the profile of activity toward alkaline pH. It is suggested that the catalytic domain in recombinant enzyme, AmyJ33r, could be interfered or blocked by the amino acids involved in the C-terminal additional region producing changes in the enzyme properties.

  4. Sex-specific basal and hypoglycemic patterns of in vivo caudal dorsal vagal complex astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Shrestha, Prem; Briski, Karen P

    2014-10-24

    Astrocytes contribute to neurometabolic stability through uptake, catabolism, and storage of glucose. These cells maintain the major brain glycogen reservoir, which is a critical fuel supply to neurons during glucose deficiency and increased brain activity. We used a combinatory approach incorporating immunocytochemistry, laser microdissection, and Western blotting to investigate the hypothesis of divergent expression of key enzymes regulating glycogen metabolism and glycolysis during in vivo normo- and/or hypoglycemia in male versus female hindbrain astrocytes. Glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) levels were both enhanced in dorsal vagal complex astrocytes from vehicle-injected female versus male controls, with incremental increase in GS exceeding GP. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) diminished GS and increased glycogen synthase kinase-3-beta (GSK3β) expression in both sexes, but decreased phosphoprotein phosphatase-1 (PP1) levels only in males. Astrocyte GP content was elevated by IIH in male, but not female rats. Data reveal sex-dependent sensitivity of these enzyme proteins to lactate as caudal hindbrain repletion of this energy substrate fully or incompletely reversed hypoglycemic inhibition of GS and prevented hypoglycemic augmentation of GSK3β and GP in females and males, respectively. Sex dimorphic patterns of glycogen branching and debranching enzyme protein expression were also observed. Levels of the rate-limiting glycolytic enzyme, phosphofructokinase, were unaffected by IIH with or without lactate repletion. Current data demonstrating sex-dependent basal and hypoglycemic patterns of hindbrain astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme expression imply that glycogen volume and turnover during glucose sufficiency and shortage may vary accordingly.

  5. 7 CFR 1755.522 - RUS general specification for digital, stored program controlled central office equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false RUS general specification for digital, stored program controlled central office equipment. 1755.522 Section 1755.522 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE...

  6. 7 CFR 1755.522 - RUS general specification for digital, stored program controlled central office equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false RUS general specification for digital, stored program controlled central office equipment. 1755.522 Section 1755.522 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE...

  7. A reversed genetic approach reveals the coenzyme specificity and other catalytic properties of three enzymes putatively involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulfate.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hisaya; Moll, Johanna; Kahnt, Jörg; Fukui, Manabu; Shima, Seigo

    2014-11-01

    Consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaea and delta-proteobacteria anaerobically oxidize methane coupled to sulfate reduction to sulfide. The metagenome of ANME-1 archaea contains genes homologous to genes otherwise only found in methanogenic archaea, and transcription of some of these genes in ANME-1 cells has been shown. We now have heterologously expressed three of these genes in Escherichia coli, namely those homologous to genes for formylmethanofuran : tetrahydromethanopterin formyltransferase, methenyltetrahydromethanopterin cyclohydrolase (Mch) and coenzyme F420 -dependent methylenetetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase (Mtd), and have characterized the overproduced enzymes with respect to their coenzyme specificity and other catalytic properties. The three enzymes from ANME-1 were found to catalyse the same reactions and with similar specific activities using identical coenzymes as the respective enzymes in methanogenic archaea, the apparent Km for their substrates being in the same concentration range. The results support the proposal that anaerobic oxidation of methane to CO₂in ANME involves the same enzymes and coenzymes as CO₂reduction to methane in methanogenic archaea. Interestingly, the activity of Mch and the stability of Mtd from ANME-1 were found to be dependent on the presence of 0.5-1.0 M potassium phosphate, which suggested that ANME-1 archaea contain high concentrations of lyotropic salts, presumably as compatible solutes.

  8. Diversity and strain specificity of plant cell wall degrading enzymes revealed by the draft genome of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1.

    PubMed

    Berg Miller, Margret E; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A; Rincon, Marco T; Band, Mark; Bari, Albert; Akraiko, Tatsiana; Hernandez, Alvaro; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Borovok, Ilya; Jindou, Sadanari; Lamed, Raphael; Flint, Harry J; Bayer, Edward A; White, Bryan A

    2009-08-14

    Ruminococcus flavefaciens is a predominant cellulolytic rumen bacterium, which forms a multi-enzyme cellulosome complex that could play an integral role in the ability of this bacterium to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides. Identifying the major enzyme types involved in plant cell wall degradation is essential for gaining a better understanding of the cellulolytic capabilities of this organism as well as highlighting potential enzymes for application in improvement of livestock nutrition and for conversion of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuels. The R. flavefaciens FD-1 genome was sequenced to 29x-coverage, based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis estimates (4.4 Mb), and assembled into 119 contigs providing 4,576,399 bp of unique sequence. As much as 87.1% of the genome encodes ORFs, tRNA, rRNAs, or repeats. The GC content was calculated at 45%. A total of 4,339 ORFs was detected with an average gene length of 918 bp. The cellulosome model for R. flavefaciens was further refined by sequence analysis, with at least 225 dockerin-containing ORFs, including previously characterized cohesin-containing scaffoldin molecules. These dockerin-containing ORFs encode a variety of catalytic modules including glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases, and carbohydrate esterases. Additionally, 56 ORFs encode proteins that contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Functional microarray analysis of the genome revealed that 56 of the cellulosome-associated ORFs were up-regulated, 14 were down-regulated, 135 were unaffected, when R. flavefaciens FD-1 was grown on cellulose versus cellobiose. Three multi-modular xylanases (ORF01222, ORF03896, and ORF01315) exhibited the highest levels of up-regulation. The genomic evidence indicates that R. flavefaciens FD-1 has the largest known number of fiber-degrading enzymes likely to be arranged in a cellulosome architecture. Functional analysis of the genome has revealed that the growth substrate drives expression of enzymes

  9. Diversity and Strain Specificity of Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes Revealed by the Draft Genome of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1

    PubMed Central

    Berg Miller, Margret E.; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Rincon, Marco T.; Band, Mark; Bari, Albert; Akraiko, Tatsiana; Hernandez, Alvaro; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Borovok, Ilya; Jindou, Sadanari; Lamed, Raphael; Flint, Harry J.; Bayer, Edward A.; White, Bryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Ruminococcus flavefaciens is a predominant cellulolytic rumen bacterium, which forms a multi-enzyme cellulosome complex that could play an integral role in the ability of this bacterium to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides. Identifying the major enzyme types involved in plant cell wall degradation is essential for gaining a better understanding of the cellulolytic capabilities of this organism as well as highlighting potential enzymes for application in improvement of livestock nutrition and for conversion of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuels. Methodology/Principal Findings The R. flavefaciens FD-1 genome was sequenced to 29x-coverage, based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis estimates (4.4 Mb), and assembled into 119 contigs providing 4,576,399 bp of unique sequence. As much as 87.1% of the genome encodes ORFs, tRNA, rRNAs, or repeats. The GC content was calculated at 45%. A total of 4,339 ORFs was detected with an average gene length of 918 bp. The cellulosome model for R. flavefaciens was further refined by sequence analysis, with at least 225 dockerin-containing ORFs, including previously characterized cohesin-containing scaffoldin molecules. These dockerin-containing ORFs encode a variety of catalytic modules including glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases, and carbohydrate esterases. Additionally, 56 ORFs encode proteins that contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Functional microarray analysis of the genome revealed that 56 of the cellulosome-associated ORFs were up-regulated, 14 were down-regulated, 135 were unaffected, when R. flavefaciens FD-1 was grown on cellulose versus cellobiose. Three multi-modular xylanases (ORF01222, ORF03896, and ORF01315) exhibited the highest levels of up-regulation. Conclusions/Significance The genomic evidence indicates that R. flavefaciens FD-1 has the largest known number of fiber-degrading enzymes likely to be arranged in a cellulosome architecture. Functional analysis of the genome has

  10. Role of pectolytic enzymes in the programmed separation of cells from the root cap of higher plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hawes, M.C.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a model system to study border cell separation in transgenic pea roots. In addition, the hypothesis that genes encoding pectolytic enzymes in the root cap play a role in the programmed separation of root border cells from the root tip was tested. The following objectives have been accomplished: (1) the use of transgenic hairy roots to study border cell separation has been optimized for Pisum sativum; (2) a cDNA encoding a root cap pectinmethylesterase (PME) has been cloned; (3) PME and polygalacturonase activities in cell walls of the root cap have been characterized and shown to be correlated with border cell separation. A fusion gene encoding pectate lyase has also been transformed into pea hairy root cells.

  11. Mathematica program: its use to simulate metabolic irreversible pathways and inhibition of the first enzyme of a pathway by its end product as visualized with the reservoir model.

    PubMed

    López-Cánovas, Francisco; Gomes, Paula J F; Sillero, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    The main objective of this report is to show the usefulness and versatility of the Mathematica program to simulate enzyme linear pathways and to depict the effect of changing the Vmax and/or Km values of one or more enzymes on the course of the reaction. In addition, analysis of the different types of inhibition of the first enzyme of the pathway by its end product is viewed with the reservoir model for enzyme kinetics. All the data shown here are quantitatively related to the kinetic constants of the implicated enzymes. Particular attention has been paid to calculate the time needed to achieve half of the possible total synthesis of the final product of a metabolic pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. FRET microscopy demonstrates molecular association of non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsL-TP) with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in peroxisomes.

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, F S; Bastiaens, P I; Wirtz, K W; Jovin, T M

    1998-01-01

    The fate of fluorescently labeled pre-nsL-TP (Cy3-pre-nsL-TP) microinjected into BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The protein exhibited a distinct punctate fluorescence pattern and colocalized to a high degree with the immunofluorescence pattern for the peroxisomal enzyme acyl-CoA oxidase. Proteolytic removal of the C-terminal leucine of the putative peroxisomal targeting sequence (AKL) resulted in a diffuse cytosolic fluorescence. These results indicate that microinjected Cy3-pre-nsL-TP is targeted to peroxisomes. The association of nsL-TP with peroxisomal enzymes was investigated in cells by measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the microinjected Cy3-pre-nsL-TP and Cy5-labeled antibodies against the peroxisomal enzymes acyl-CoA oxidase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, bifunctional enzyme, PMP70 and catalase. The technique of photobleaching digital imaging microscopy (pbDIM), used to quantitate the FRET efficiency on a pixel-by-pixel basis, revealed a specific association of nsL-TP with acyl-CoA oxidase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase and bifunctional enzyme in the peroxisomes. These observations were corroborated by subjecting a peroxisomal matrix protein fraction to affinity chromatography on Sepharose-immobilized pre-nsL-TP. Acyl-CoA oxidase was retained. These studies provide strong evidence for a role of nsL-TP in the regulation of peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation, e.g. by facilitating the presentation of substrates and/or stabilization of the enzymes. PMID:9857175

  13. Interaction of phospholipase C with liposome: A conformation transition of the enzyme is critical and specific to liposome composition for burst hydrolysis and fusion in concert.

    PubMed

    Patra, Samir Kumar; Sengupta, Dipta; Deb, Moonmoon; Kar, Swayamsiddha; Kausar, Chahat

    2017-02-15

    Phospholipase C (PLC)(1) is known to help the pathogen B. cereus entry to the host cell and human PLC is over expressed in multiple cancers. Knowledge of dynamic activity of the enzyme PLC while in action on membrane lipids is essential and helpful to drug design and delivery. In view of this, interactions of PLC with liposome of various lipid compositions have been visualized by testing enzyme activity and microenvironments around the intrinsic fluorophores of the enzyme. Overall change of the protein's conformation has been monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD). Liposome aggregation and fusion were predicted by increase in turbidity and vesicle size. PLC in solution has high fluorescence and exhibit appreciable shift in its emission maxima, upon gradual change in excitation wavelength towards the red edge of the absorption band. REES fluorescence studies indicated that certain Trp fluorophores of inactive PLC are in motionally restricted compact/rigid environments in solution conformation. PLC fluorescence decreased in association with liposome and Trps loosed rigidity where liposome aggregation and fusion occurred. We argue that the structural flexibility is the cause of decrease of fluorescence, mostly to gain optimum conformation for maximum activity of the enzyme PLC. Further studies deciphered that the enzyme PLC undergoes change of conformation when mixed to LUVs prepared with specific lipids. CD data at the far-UV and near-UV regions of PLC in solution are in excellent agreement with the previous reports. CD analyses of PLC with LUVs, showed significant reduction of α-helices, increase of β-sheets; and confirmed dramatic change of orientations of Trps. In case of liposome composed of lipid raft like composition, the enzyme binds very fast, hydrolyze PC with higher rate, exhibit highest structural flexibility and promote vesicle fusion. These data strongly suggest marked differences in conformation transition induced PLC

  14. Interaction of phospholipase C with liposome: A conformation transition of the enzyme is critical and specific to liposome composition for burst hydrolysis and fusion in concert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Samir Kumar; Sengupta, Dipta; Deb, Moonmoon; Kar, Swayamsiddha; Kausar, Chahat

    2017-02-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC)1 is known to help the pathogen B. cereus entry to the host cell and human PLC is over expressed in multiple cancers. Knowledge of dynamic activity of the enzyme PLC while in action on membrane lipids is essential and helpful to drug design and delivery. In view of this, interactions of PLC with liposome of various lipid compositions have been visualized by testing enzyme activity and microenvironments around the intrinsic fluorophores of the enzyme. Overall change of the protein's conformation has been monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD). Liposome aggregation and fusion were predicted by increase in turbidity and vesicle size. PLC in solution has high fluorescence and exhibit appreciable shift in its emission maxima, upon gradual change in excitation wavelength towards the red edge of the absorption band. REES fluorescence studies indicated that certain Trp fluorophores of inactive PLC are in motionally restricted compact/rigid environments in solution conformation. PLC fluorescence decreased in association with liposome and Trps loosed rigidity where liposome aggregation and fusion occurred. We argue that the structural flexibility is the cause of decrease of fluorescence, mostly to gain optimum conformation for maximum activity of the enzyme PLC. Further studies deciphered that the enzyme PLC undergoes change of conformation when mixed to LUVs prepared with specific lipids. CD data at the far-UV and near-UV regions of PLC in solution are in excellent agreement with the previous reports. CD analyses of PLC with LUVs, showed significant reduction of α-helices, increase of β-sheets; and confirmed dramatic change of orientations of Trps. In case of liposome composed of lipid raft like composition, the enzyme binds very fast, hydrolyze PC with higher rate, exhibit highest structural flexibility and promote vesicle fusion. These data strongly suggest marked differences in conformation transition induced PLC

  15. The isolation and purification of a specific "protector" protein which inhibits enzyme inactivation by a thiol/Fe(III)/O2 mixed-function oxidation system.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Kim, I H; Lee, K Y; Rhee, S G; Stadtman, E R

    1988-04-05

    Mixed-function oxidation systems comprised of Fe3+, O2, and electron donors such as thiol compounds, ascorbate, NAD(P)H/NAD(P)H oxidase, and xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine, catalyze the inactivation of many enzymes. This report describes the isolation and purification of a soluble protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which specifically inhibits the inactivation of various enzymes by a nonenzymatic Fe3+/O2/thiol mixed-function oxidase system. When thiol is replaced with another electron donor (e.g. ascorbate), this specific protein no longer protects against iron (or copper)/O2-dependent radical-induced enzyme inactivation. Purification steps included a polyethylene glycol precipitation followed sequentially by a chromatography on DE52 and high pressure liquid chromatography on phenyl, DEAE, and gel-filtrated columns. The final gel filtration step yielded two protein peaks exhibiting protector activity and possessing a Mr of 500,000 and 90,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of these two fractions gave a single band at 27 kDa suggesting that these protein species simply represent different oligomeric structures. The protector protein did not possess catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, or iron chelation activities. Since the protection activity reported herein is specific for mixed-function oxidation systems containing thiols, we propose that the protector protein functions as a sulfur radical scavenger.

  16. Site-specific bioconjugation of a murine dihydrofolate reductase enzyme by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition with retained activity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Mizuta, Yukina; Takasu, Akinori; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2014-01-01

    Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is an efficient reaction linking an azido and an alkynyl group in the presence of copper catalyst. Incorporation of a non-natural amino acid (NAA) containing either an azido or an alkynyl group into a protein allows site-specific bioconjugation in mild conditions via CuAAC. Despite its great potential, bioconjugation of an enzyme has been hampered by several issues including low yield, poor solubility of a ligand, and protein structural/functional perturbation by CuAAC components. In the present study, we incorporated an alkyne-bearing NAA into an enzyme, murine dihydrofolate reductase (mDHFR), in high cell density cultivation of Escherichia coli, and performed CuAAC conjugation with fluorescent azide dyes to evaluate enzyme compatibility of various CuAAC conditions comprising combination of commercially available Cu(I)-chelating ligands and reductants. The condensed culture improves the protein yield 19-fold based on the same amount of non-natural amino acid, and the enzyme incubation under the optimized reaction condition did not lead to any activity loss but allowed a fast and high-yield bioconjugation. Using the established conditions, a biotin-azide spacer was efficiently conjugated to mDHFR with retained activity leading to the site-specific immobilization of the biotin-conjugated mDHFR on a streptavidin-coated plate. These results demonstrate that the combination of reactive non-natural amino acid incorporation and the optimized CuAAC can be used to bioconjugate enzymes with retained enzymatic activity.

  17. Site-Specific Bioconjugation of a Murine Dihydrofolate Reductase Enzyme by Copper(I)-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition with Retained Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Mizuta, Yukina; Takasu, Akinori; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2014-01-01

    Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) is an efficient reaction linking an azido and an alkynyl group in the presence of copper catalyst. Incorporation of a non-natural amino acid (NAA) containing either an azido or an alkynyl group into a protein allows site-specific bioconjugation in mild conditions via CuAAC. Despite its great potential, bioconjugation of an enzyme has been hampered by several issues including low yield, poor solubility of a ligand, and protein structural/functional perturbation by CuAAC components. In the present study, we incorporated an alkyne-bearing NAA into an enzyme, murine dihydrofolate reductase (mDHFR), in high cell density cultivation of Escherichia coli, and performed CuAAC conjugation with fluorescent azide dyes to evaluate enzyme compatibility of various CuAAC conditions comprising combination of commercially available Cu(I)-chelating ligands and reductants. The condensed culture improves the protein yield 19-fold based on the same amount of non-natural amino acid, and the enzyme incubation under the optimized reaction condition did not lead to any activity loss but allowed a fast and high-yield bioconjugation. Using the established conditions, a biotin-azide spacer was efficiently conjugated to mDHFR with retained activity leading to the site-specific immobilization of the biotin-conjugated mDHFR on a streptavidin-coated plate. These results demonstrate that the combination of reactive non-natural amino acid incorporation and the optimized CuAAC can be used to bioconjugate enzymes with retained enzymatic activity. PMID:24887377

  18. Computer Program Development Specification for IDAMST Operational Flight Program Executive, Software Type B5. Addendum 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-30

    shall perform a processor self -test and initiate the BCIU self -test. The Processor Control Panel (PCP) discretes shall be read and the processor...Applicable Documents 7 3.0 Requirements 8 3.1 Program Definition 8 3.1.1 Hardware Interfaces 8 * 3.1.1.1 Bus Control Interface Unit (BCIU) 8 3.1.1.1.1...Functions 27 3.1.1.3 Processor Control Panel (PCP) 28 3.1.2 Software Interfaces 30 3.1.2.1 Events 31 3.1.2.2 Tasks 31 3.1.2.3 Comsubs 35 3.1.2.4

  19. Gender-specific socioeconomic impacts of development programs in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Stoeckel, J; Sirisena, N L

    1988-10-01

    Data from a Sri Lanka national sample survey -- 3597 households stratified on the basis of development program areas -- were analyzed to compare impacts of 3 national development programs and their combinations upon the occupational and income status of females and males in Sri Lanka. These programs, implemented over the last 30 years, are guaranteed price schemes that develop markets for agricultural produce, land settlement schemes that include irrigation, and rural electrification. To date, no attempt has been made to assess the gender-specific socioeconomic impacts of these individual programs and their combinations. It was hypothesized that the utilization of development program outputs will exert a gender-differential impact upon occupational and income status, but the magnitude and direction of the impacts remain to be determined. Path analysis was applied to estimate the model for each development program and their mixes for males and females separated. A multistage stratified sampling design was utilized. All of the development programs and their mixes exhibited significant effect of educational attainment upon participation in nonagricultural occupations. Rural electrification (RE) was the only program whose effect was positive; in combinations with education it accounted for 15% of the variation in occupation. Among the programs that were negatively related to male participation in nonagricultural occupations, the most important predictors were the land settlement (LS) and guarantee price scheme (GPS) programs. Each program contributed to over 1/5 of the variation in occupation net of educational attainment. RE was the only program that was not significantly related to female participation in nonhousehold occupations. All of the remaining programs exerted a positive effect upon occupation. 3 of these programs -- RE + LS, GPS, and LS + GPS -- were of almost equally high importance in predicting participation of females in nonhousehold occupations, and in

  20. Stimulation of hepatic mitochondrial alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme by L-triiodothyronine. Characteristics of the response with specific nuclear thyroid hormone binding sites fully saturated.

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, J H; Silva, E; Schwartz, H L; Surks, M I

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were designed to analyze the relationship of a single i.v. dose of triiodothyronine (T3), the level of plasma and hepatic nuclear T3 attained, and the tissue response as reflected in increased activity of hepatic mitochondrial alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-GPD) and cytosol "malic enzyme" (ME). These studied were carried out in euthyroid rats by varying the dose of T3 injected and the time at which the animals were killed and the enzyme levels measured. The plasma T3 concentration was determined and the fraction of nuclear sites occupied at any time t was calculated from the known plasma:nuclear relationship. As a first step, the analysis was confined to the limiting situation in which all nuclear sites were effectively saturated. The following additional information was required and obtained: A proportional relationship between the half-neutralizing volume of a specific antiserum to malic enzyme and the activity of malic enzyme was established, thus confirming previous reports that the increase in enzyme activity induced by T3 is due to increased enzyme mass. The absolute refractory period immediately after i.v. injection of T3, during which no enzyme response could be detected, was determined. This was shown to be 13.4 h for alpha-GPD and 8.2 h for ME. Lastly, the t1/2 of the enzyme decay after pulse injection of T3 was measured. This was similar for both enzymes, 2.8+/-0.6 (SD) days for alpha-GPD and 2.7+/-0.6 (SD) days for ME. The results of these studies indicated that the extent of hepatic response appears limited by full occupancy of a set of intracellular receptor sites by T3 which is in rapid equilibrium with the plasma hormone pool. The kinetic properties of the receptors, as functionally defined in these studies, resemble those associated with the recently described specific nuclear T3 sites. These data per se are thus compatible with but do not prove a nuclear site of initiation of hormone effect. Thye do allow the development

  1. [Comparative research into sensitivity and specificity of immune-enzyme analysis with chemiluminescence and colorimetric detection for detecting antigens and antibodies to avian influenza viruses and newcastle disease].

    PubMed

    Vitkova, O N; Kapustina, T P; Mikhailova, V V; Safonov, G A; Vlasova, N N; Belousova, R V

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to demonstrate the results of the development of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent tests with chemiluminescence detection and colorimetric detection of specific viral antigens and antibodies for identifying the avian influenza and the Newcastle disease viruses: high sensitivity and specificity of the immuno- chemiluminescence assay, which are 10-50 times higher than those of the ELISA colorimetric method. The high effectiveness of the results and the automation of the process of laboratory testing (using a luminometer) allow these methods to be recommended for including in primary screening tests for these infectious diseases.

  2. Crystal Structures of the Helicobacter pylori MTAN Enzyme Reveal Specific Interactions between S-Adenosylhomocysteine and the 5'-Alkylthio Binding Subsite

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Vidhi; Ronning, Donald R.

    2012-11-13

    The bacterial 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzyme is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-ribosidic bond of at least four different adenosine-based metabolites: S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), 5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-DOA), and 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine. These activities place the enzyme at the hub of seven fundamental bacterial metabolic pathways: S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) utilization, polyamine biosynthesis, the purine salvage pathway, the methionine salvage pathway, the SAM radical pathways, autoinducer-2 biosynthesis, and menaquinone biosynthesis. The last pathway makes MTAN essential for Helicobacter pylori viability. Although structures of various bacterial and plant MTANs have been described, the interactions between the homocysteine moiety of SAH and the 5'-alkylthiol binding site of MTAN have never been resolved. We have determined crystal structures of an inactive mutant form of H. pylori MTAN bound to MTA and SAH to 1.63 and 1.20 Å, respectively. The active form of MTAN was also crystallized in the presence of SAH, allowing the determination of the structure of a ternary enzyme–product complex resolved at 1.50 Å. These structures identify interactions between the homocysteine moiety and the 5'-alkylthiol binding site of the enzyme. This information can be leveraged for the development of species-specific MTAN inhibitors that prevent the growth of H. pylori.

  3. Screening of white-rot fungi manganese peroxidases: a comparison between the specific activities of the enzyme from different native producers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this study manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzymes from selected white-rot fungi were isolated and compared for potential future recombinant production. White-rot fungi were cultivated in small-scale in liquid media and a simplified process was established for the purification of extracellular enzymes. Five lignin degrading organisms were selected (Bjerkandera sp., Phanerochaete (P.) chrysosporium, Physisporinus (P.) rivulosus, Phlebia (P.) radiata and Phlebia sp. Nf b19) and studied for MnP production in small-scale. Extracellular MnP activity was followed and cultivations were harvested at proximity of the peak activity. The production of MnPs varied in different organisms but was clearly regulated by inducing liquid media components (Mn2+, veratryl alcohol and malonate). In total 8 different MnP isoforms were purified. Results of this study reinforce the conception that MnPs from distinct organisms differ substantially in their properties. Production of the extracellular enzyme in general did not reach a substantial level. This further suggests that these native producers are not suitable for industrial scale production of the enzyme. The highest specific activities were observed with MnPs from P. chrysosporium (200 U mg-1), Phlebia sp. Nf b19 (55 U mg-1) and P. rivulosus (89 U mg-1) and these MnPs are considered as the most potential candidates for further studies. The molecular weight of the purified MnPs was estimated to be between 45–50 kDa. PMID:23190610

  4. Site- and horizon-specific patterns of microbial community structure and enzyme activities in permafrost-affected soils of Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Gittel, Antje; Bárta, Jiří; Kohoutová, Iva; Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Čapek, Petr; Kaiser, Christina; Torsvik, Vigdis L.; Richter, Andreas; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost-affected soils in the Northern latitudes store huge amounts of organic carbon (OC) that is prone to microbial degradation and subsequent release of greenhouse gasses to the atmosphere. In Greenland, the consequences of permafrost thaw have only recently been addressed, and predictions on its impact on the carbon budget are thus still highly uncertain. However, the fate of OC is not only determined by abiotic factors, but closely tied to microbial activity. We investigated eight soil profiles in northeast Greenland comprising two sites with typical tundra vegetation and one wet fen site. We assessed microbial community structure and diversity (SSU rRNA gene tag sequencing, quantification of bacteria, archaea and fungi), and measured hydrolytic and oxidative enzyme activities. Sampling site and thus abiotic factors had a significant impact on microbial community structure, diversity and activity, the wet fen site exhibiting higher potential enzyme activities and presumably being a hot spot for anaerobic degradation processes such as fermentation and methanogenesis. Lowest fungal to bacterial ratios were found in topsoils that had been relocated by cryoturbation (“buried topsoils”), resulting from a decrease in fungal abundance compared to recent (“unburied”) topsoils. Actinobacteria (in particular Intrasporangiaceae) accounted for a major fraction of the microbial community in buried topsoils, but were only of minor abundance in all other soil horizons. It was indicated that the distribution pattern of Actinobacteria and a variety of other bacterial classes was related to the activity of phenol oxidases and peroxidases supporting the hypothesis that bacteria might resume the role of fungi in oxidative enzyme production and degradation of phenolic and other complex substrates in these soils. Our study sheds light on the highly diverse, but poorly-studied communities in permafrost-affected soils in Greenland and their role in OC degradation. PMID

  5. Site- and horizon-specific patterns of microbial community structure and enzyme activities in permafrost-affected soils of Greenland.

    PubMed

    Gittel, Antje; Bárta, Jiří; Kohoutová, Iva; Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Capek, Petr; Kaiser, Christina; Torsvik, Vigdis L; Richter, Andreas; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost-affected soils in the Northern latitudes store huge amounts of organic carbon (OC) that is prone to microbial degradation and subsequent release of greenhouse gasses to the atmosphere. In Greenland, the consequences of permafrost thaw have only recently been addressed, and predictions on its impact on the carbon budget are thus still highly uncertain. However, the fate of OC is not only determined by abiotic factors, but closely tied to microbial activity. We investigated eight soil profiles in northeast Greenland comprising two sites with typical tundra vegetation and one wet fen site. We assessed microbial community structure and diversity (SSU rRNA gene tag sequencing, quantification of bacteria, archaea and fungi), and measured hydrolytic and oxidative enzyme activities. Sampling site and thus abiotic factors had a significant impact on microbial community structure, diversity and activity, the wet fen site exhibiting higher potential enzyme activities and presumably being a hot spot for anaerobic degradation processes such as fermentation and methanogenesis. Lowest fungal to bacterial ratios were found in topsoils that had been relocated by cryoturbation ("buried topsoils"), resulting from a decrease in fungal abundance compared to recent ("unburied") topsoils. Actinobacteria (in particular Intrasporangiaceae) accounted for a major fraction of the microbial community in buried topsoils, but were only of minor abundance in all other soil horizons. It was indicated that the distribution pattern of Actinobacteria and a variety of other bacterial classes was related to the activity of phenol oxidases and peroxidases supporting the hypothesis that bacteria might resume the role of fungi in oxidative enzyme production and degradation of phenolic and other complex substrates in these soils. Our study sheds light on the highly diverse, but poorly-studied communities in permafrost-affected soils in Greenland and their role in OC degradation.

  6. NASA Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program - Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Phase I results and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with increases in the cost of fuels and the reduced availability of high quality petroleum crude, a modification of fuel specifications has been considered to allow acceptance of poorer quality fuels. To obtain the information upon which a selection of appropriate fuels for aircraft can be based, the Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program was formulated by NASA. A description is presented of program-related investigations conducted by an American aerospace company. The specific objective of Phase I of this program has been to evaluate the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design through comprehensive combustor rig testing. Attention is given to combustor concepts, experimental evaluation, results obtained with single stage combustors, the stage combustor concept, and the capability of a variable geometry combustor.

  7. NASA Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program - Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Phase I results and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with increases in the cost of fuels and the reduced availability of high quality petroleum crude, a modification of fuel specifications has been considered to allow acceptance of poorer quality fuels. To obtain the information upon which a selection of appropriate fuels for aircraft can be based, the Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program was formulated by NASA. A description is presented of program-related investigations conducted by an American aerospace company. The specific objective of Phase I of this program has been to evaluate the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design through comprehensive combustor rig testing. Attention is given to combustor concepts, experimental evaluation, results obtained with single stage combustors, the stage combustor concept, and the capability of a variable geometry combustor.

  8. [Specificity of activity antioxidative enzymes at protein deficiency and excessive content Cu, Zn, Mn, Se in the food].

    PubMed

    Ivakhnenko, V I; Mal'tsev, G Iu; Vasil'ev, A V; Gmoshinskiĭ, I V

    2007-01-01

    The research of kinetic properties (Km u Vmax) of two enzymes: Superoxide Dismutase and Glutathione Peroxidase from rats liver and blood and lipid peroxidation induced by both a low protein diet (8%) and 2-fold concentration Cu, Zn, Mn, Se in diet. There was a change of Km and Vmax: the reduction of Km(GPH) was in liver at 28 d and the increase of Km(SOD) was in liver in group with 2-fold concentration Cu, Zn, Mn, Se in diet. The analysis of Km and Vmax of Superoxide Dismutase and Glutathione Peroxidase in different alimentary influence may be as one of methods for assessment individualization of diet therapy.

  9. Programmed death in a unicellular organism has species-specific fitness effects.

    PubMed

    Durand, Pierre M; Choudhury, Rajdeep; Rashidi, Armin; Michod, Richard E

    2014-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an ancient phenomenon and its origin and maintenance in unicellular life is unclear. We report that programmed death provides differential fitness effects that are species specific in the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Remarkably, PCD in this organism not only benefits others of the same species, but also has an inhibitory effect on the growth of other species. These data reveal that the fitness effects of PCD can depend upon genetic relatedness.

  10. Exploring Product-Specific Attributes of a Community Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in an Asian Urban City.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Yu Heng; Yap, Angela Frances; Tay, Hung Yong; Lim, Cindy; Chan, Sui Yung; Fong, Warren

    2017-05-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been proven to improve long-term outcomes for patients. Despite its benefits, its uptake throughout the world is poor. Factors affecting the motivation and barriers impeding an individual from participating in a CR program have been extensively studied. Nevertheless, knowledge of product-specific factors in affecting participation is lacking. To find out cultural-specific product attributes that are important to those contemplating participation in a community-based CR program using Consolidated criteria for Reporting Qualitative research (COREQ) as an anchor. Participants were recruited from attendees of the CR program at the Singapore Heart Foundation. A literature review was done to identify product-specific attributes that affected participation in CR programs. An interview guide was developed on the basis of the list of product attributes. The analysis was done by two independent analysts using NVivo version 11 (QSR International, Melbourne, Australia) via an inductive approach. Data analysis was carried out with recruitment and interviews ongoing until thematic saturation was reached. In total, 13 male and 9 female participants (16 Chinese, 4 Indian, 1 Malay, and 1 Eurasian) aged between 47 and 89 years were interviewed. A total of 8 categories (System, Infrastructure, Environment, Monitoring, Activity, Program, Staff, and Companionship) with 30 subcategories were identified. New themes that have not been explored by previous studies were discovered under five different categories: System, Infrastructure, Environment, Program, and Companionship. This study allows a better understanding of product-specific factors affecting participation in CR programs and serves as a springboard for further research to improve participation in community-based CR programs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Structural and functional analysis of tomato β-galactosidase 4: insight into the substrate specificity of the fruit softening-related enzyme.

    PubMed

    Eda, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Ishimaru, Megumi; Tada, Toshiji

    2016-05-01

    Plant β-galactosidases hydrolyze cell wall β-(1,4)-galactans to play important roles in cell wall expansion and degradation, and turnover of signaling molecules, during ripening. Tomato β-galactosidase 4 (TBG4) is an enzyme responsible for fruit softening through the degradation of β-(1,4)-galactan in the pericarp cell wall. TBG4 is the only enzyme among TBGs 1-7 that belongs to the β-galactosidase/exo-β-(1,4)-galactanase subfamily. The enzyme can hydrolyze a wide range of plant-derived (1,4)- or 4-linked polysaccharides, and shows a strong ability to attack β-(1,4)-galactan. To gain structural insight into its substrate specificity, we determined crystal structures of TBG4 and its complex with β-d-galactose. TBG4 comprises a catalytic TIM barrel domain followed by three β-sandwich domains. Three aromatic residues in the catalytic site that are thought to be important for substrate specificity are conserved in GH35 β-galactosidases derived from bacteria, fungi and animals; however, the crystal structures of TBG4 revealed that the enzyme has a valine residue (V548) replacing one of the conserved aromatic residues. The V548W mutant of TBG4 showed a roughly sixfold increase in activity towards β-(1,6)-galactobiose, and ~0.6-fold activity towards β-(1,4)-galactobiose, compared with wild-type TBG4. Amino acid residues corresponding to V548 of TBG4 thus appear to determine the substrate specificities of plant β-galactosidases towards β-1,4 and β-1,6 linkages.

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of the T4 endonuclease V gene: Mutations which enhance enzyme specific activity at low salt concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.S.; Augustine, M.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Previous structure/function analyses of the DNA repair enzyme, T4 endonuclease V, have suggested that the extreme carboxyl portion of the enzyme is associated with pyrimidine dimer-specific binding. Within the final 11 amino acids there are 5 aromatic, 2 basic, and no acidic residues and it has been proposed that these residues stack with and electrostatically interact with the kinked DNA at the site of a pyrimidine dimer. The role of the tyrosine residue at position 129 has been investigated by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis in which the codon for Tyr-129 has been altered to reflect conservative changes of Trp and Phe and more dramatic changes of Ser, a stop codon, deletion of the codon or introduction of a frameshift. Both changes to the aromatic amino acids resulted in proteins which accumulated well in E. coli and not only significantly enhanced the UV survival of repair-deficient cells but also complemented a defective denV gene within UV-irradiated T4 phage. Partially purified preparations of the Tyr-129----Trp and Tyr-129----Phe mutants were assayed for their ability to processively incise UV-irradiated plasmid DNA (a nicking reaction carried out at low 25 mM salt concentrations). The mutant enzymes Tyr-129----Phe and Tyr-129----Trp displayed a 1000% and 500% enhanced specific nicking activity, respectively. These reactions were also shown to be completely processive. Assays performed at higher (100 mM) salt concentrations reduced the specific activities of the mutant enzymes approximately to that of wild type for the Tyr-129----Phe mutant and to 20% that of wild type for the Tyr-129----Trp mutant.

  13. Binding of MmeI restriction-modification enzyme to its specific recognition sequence is stimulated by S-adenosyl-L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Nakonieczna, Joanna; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W; Banecki, Bogdan; Podhajska, Anna J

    2007-10-01

    Restriction endonucleases serve as a very good model for studying specific protein-DNA interaction. MmeI is a very interesting restriction endonuclease, but although it is useful in Serial Analysis of Gene Expression, still very little is known about the mechanism of its interaction with DNA. MmeI is a unique enzyme as besides cleaving DNA it also methylates specific sequence. For endonucleolytic activity MmeI requires Mg(II) and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet). AdoMet is a methyl donor in the methylation reaction, but its requirement for DNA cleavage remains unclear. In the present article we investigated MmeI interaction with DNA with the use of numerous methods. Our electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed formation of two types of specific protein-DNA complexes. We speculate that faster migrating complex consists of one protein molecule and one DNA fragment whereas, slower migrating complex, which appears in the presence of AdoMet, may be a dimer or multimer form of MmeI interacting with specific DNA. Additionally, using spectrophotometric measurements we showed that in the presence of AdoMet, MmeI protein undergoes conformational changes. We think that such change in the enzyme structure, upon addition of AdoMet, may enhance its specific binding to DNA. In the absence of AdoMet MmeI binds DNA to the much lower extent.

  14. Computer Program Development Specification for IDAMST Operational Flight Programs. Addendum 3. Error Handling and Recovery Software.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    LABORATORYDT AIR FORCE SYSTEM COMMAND D I "pUNITED STATES AIR FORCE ELECTE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, OHIO 45PR143903 80 4 15 0 60’ 1 FOREWORD This specification...OF FIGURES vi LIST OF TABLES vii ABBREVIATIONS viii 1.0 SCOPE 1 1.1 IDENTIFICATION 1 1.2 FUNCTIONAL SUMMARY 1 1.2.1 ORGANIZATION 1 2.0 APPLICABLE...LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE NO. TITLE Page 3.1- 1 IDAMST ERROR DETECTION MECHANISMS 6 3.1-2 EHAR PROCESSOR INTERNAL ERROR HANDLING BY

  15. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Busser, Brian W; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Shokri, Leila; Tansey, Terese R; Gamble, Caitlin E; Bulyk, Martha L; Michelson, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Homeodomain (HD) proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs) having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs), but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs)). Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs) for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin) as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory networks

  16. [The rapid specific characterization of clinical isolates of the genus Mycobacterium by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis].

    PubMed

    Cuende, J I; Jaime, M L; Gómez, M T; Del Campo, F; Alba, A; Pérez de Diego, I J

    1995-02-18

    Typing at species level of Mycobacterium is usually performed by microbiological and biochemical methods that require a long time and/or sufficient amount of bacteria. Molecular biology can avoid these problems using different techniques. A colony growth of the following mycobacteria has been analyzed: M. tuberculosis, M. kansasii, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. gordonae, M. phlei, M. aurum, M. fortuitum, M. flavescens, M. marinum, M. xenopi, M. nonchromogenicum, M. terrae and M. chelonei. Strains were grown in Löwenstein-Jensen medium. DNA was obtained by proteolytic digestion and fenol extraction. The 16S rRNA gen was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the amplification was digested by HaeIII, HpaII, RsaI and AluI restriction enzymes. Restriction fragment patterns were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and UV transillumination. The combination of the patterns obtained with HpaII and RsaI was sufficient to generate 13 different combined ones. The patterns of M. intracellulare and M. avium were the same. PCR and restriction enzyme analysis is an useful method for typing at species level of clinical isolates of mycobacteria.

  17. Elucidation of insulin degrading enzyme catalyzed site specific hydrolytic cleavage of amyloid beta peptide: a comparative density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Bora, Ram Prasad; Ozbil, Mehmet; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2010-05-01

    In this B3LYP study, the catalytic mechanisms for the hydrolysis of the three different peptide bonds (Lys28-Gly29, Phe19-Phe20, and His14-Gln15) of Alzheimer amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) have been elucidated. For all these peptides, the nature of the substrate was found to influence the structure of the active enzyme-substrate complex. The catalytic mechanism is proposed to proceed through the following three steps: (1) activation of the metal-bound water molecule, (2) formation of the gem-diol intermediate, and (3) cleavage of the peptide bond. With the computed barrier of 14.3, 18.8, and 22.3 kcal/mol for the Lys28-Gly29, Phe19-Phe20, and His14-Gln15 substrates, respectively, the process of water activation was found to be the rate-determining step for all three substrates. The computed energetics show that IDE is the most efficient in hydrolyzing the Lys28-Gly29 (basic polar-neutral nonpolar) peptide bond followed by the Phe19-Phe20 (neutral nonpolar-neutral nonpolar) and His14-Gln15 (basic polar-neutral polar) bonds of the Abeta substrate.

  18. Curve Generation for the RF Systems of the Antiproton Source Console Program Specification and Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1984-11-01

    The RF curves program is a PDP-11 console application to calculate the time dependence of amplitude, frequency, and phase for the RF systems of the Antiproton Source. The results of the calculation are formatted and scaled for the curve generator hardware. The user interface of the program is highly flexible with respect to the choice of parameters used to specify the desired curve. It consists of file management, plotting, editing, and hardware loading phases which are implemented as separate pages on the console display. This document provides the functional specification of the program and a discussion of the status of its implementation.

  19. SLS-SPEC-159 Cross-Program Design Specification for Natural Environments (DSNE) Revision D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2015-01-01

    This document is derived from the former National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Constellation Program (CxP) document CxP 70023, titled "The Design Specification for Natural Environments (DSNE), Revision C." The original document has been modified to represent updated Design Reference Missions (DRMs) for the NASA Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Programs. The DSNE completes environment-related specifications for architecture, system-level, and lower-tier documents by specifying the ranges of environmental conditions that must be accounted for by NASA ESD Programs. To assure clarity and consistency, and to prevent requirements documents from becoming cluttered with extensive amounts of technical material, natural environment specifications have been compiled into this document. The intent is to keep a unified specification for natural environments that each Program calls out for appropriate application. This document defines the natural environments parameter limits (maximum and minimum values, energy spectra, or precise model inputs, assumptions, model options, etc.), for all ESD Programs. These environments are developed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (MSFC organization code: EV44). Many of the parameter limits are based on experience with previous programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program. The parameter limits contain no margin and are meant to be evaluated individually to ensure they are reasonable (i.e., do not apply unrealistic extreme-on-extreme conditions). The natural environments specifications in this document should be accounted for by robust design of the flight vehicle and support systems. However, it is understood that in some cases the Programs will find it more effective to account for portions of the environment ranges by operational mitigation or acceptance of risk in accordance with an appropriate program risk management plan and/or hazard analysis process. The DSNE is not intended

  20. 2.3.7.8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin Induced Immunosuppression: Its Possible Alteration by In Vivo Administration of Specific Hepatic Enzyme Inducers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-27

    England .2 LIST OF ACOREVIAT:CNS AND SYMBOLS TCDD =2.3.7.8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxtn TCDF = 2.3.7 8-IOetrachlo’dibenzofuran 3MC =3-methyicholanthrene...this research program was to clarify whether drugs that in vitro inhibit TCDD binding to the hepatic cytosolic Ah "rec3ptor" such as 3MC , PNF and TCDF...these enzymes has also been performed. The study of this year has been concentrated on the effects of only two inducers, that is TCDF and 3MC , since

  1. Energy star product specification development framework: Using data and analysis to make program decisions

    SciTech Connect

    McWhinney, Marla; Fanara, Andrew; Clark, Robin; Hershberg, Craig; Schmeltz, Rachel; Roberson, Judy

    2003-09-12

    The Product Development Team (PD) in the US Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR Labeling Program fuels the long-term market transformation process by delivering new specifications. PD's goal is to expand the reach and visibility of ENERGY STAR as well as the market for new energy-efficient products. Since 2000, PD has launched nine new ENERGY STAR specifications and continues to evaluate new program opportunities. To evaluate the ENERGY STAR carbon savings potential for a diverse group of products, PD prepared a framework for developing new and updating existing specifications that rationalizes new product opportunities and draws upon the expertise and resources of other stakeholders, including manufacturers, utilities, environmental groups and other government agencies. By systematically reviewing the potential of proposed product areas, PD makes informed decisions as to whether or not to proceed with developing a specification. In support of this strategy, PD ensures that new product specifications are consistent with the ENERGY STAR guidelines and that these guidelines are effectively communicated to stakeholders during the product development process. To date, the framework has been successful in providing consistent guidance on collecting the necessary information on which to base sound program decisions. Through the application of this framework, PD increasingly recognizes that each industry has unique market and product characteristics that can require reconciliation with the ENERGY STAR guidelines. The new framework allows PD to identify where reconciliation is needed to justify program decisions.

  2. Genomic-Based Restriction Enzyme Selection for Specific Detection of Piscirickettsia salmonis by 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Glasner, Benjamín; Maldonado, Jonathan; Aravena, Pamela; González, Mauricio; Cambiazo, Verónica; Pulgar, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    The gram negative facultative bacterium P. salmonis is the etiological agent of Salmonid Rickettsial Septicaemia (SRS), a severe disease that causes important economic losses in the global salmon farmer industry. Despite efforts to control this disease, the high frequency of new epizootic events indicate that the vaccine and antibiotics treatments have limited effectiveness, therefore the preventive and diagnostic approaches must be improved. A comparison of several methodologies for SRS diagnostic indicate differences in their specificity and its capacity to detect other bacteria coexisting with P. salmonis in culture media (contamination) and fish samples (coinfection), aspects relevant for research, vaccine development and clinical diagnostic. By computer-simulation analyses, we identified a group of restriction enzymes that generate unique P. salmonis 16S rDNA band patterns, distinguishable from all other bacteria. From this information, we designed and developed a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay, which was validated using 16S rDNA universal primers and restriction enzyme PmaCI for the amplification and digestion, respectively. Experimental validation was performed by comparing the restriction pattern of P. salmonis with the restriction patterns generated by bacteria that cohabit with P. salmonis (fish bacterial isolates and culture media contaminants). Our results indicate that the restriction enzyme selection pipeline was suitable to design a more specific, sensible, faster and cheaper assay than the currently used P. salmonis detection methodologies.

  3. Targeted metabolomics connects thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) to mitochondrial fuel selection and regulation of specific oxidoreductase enzymes in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    DeBalsi, Karen L; Wong, Kari E; Koves, Timothy R; Slentz, Dorothy H; Seiler, Sarah E; Wittmann, April H; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Stevens, Robert D; Perry, Christopher G R; Lark, Daniel S; Hui, Simon T; Szweda, Luke; Neufer, P Darrell; Muoio, Deborah M

    2014-03-21

    Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is an α-arrestin family member involved in redox sensing and metabolic control. Growing evidence links TXNIP to mitochondrial function, but the molecular nature of this relationship has remained poorly defined. Herein, we employed targeted metabolomics and comprehensive bioenergetic analyses to evaluate oxidative metabolism and respiratory kinetics in mouse models of total body (TKO) and skeletal muscle-specific (TXNIP(SKM-/-)) Txnip deficiency. Compared with littermate controls, both TKO and TXNIP(SKM-/-) mice had reduced exercise tolerance in association with muscle-specific impairments in substrate oxidation. Oxidative insufficiencies in TXNIP null muscles were not due to perturbations in mitochondrial mass, the electron transport chain, or emission of reactive oxygen species. Instead, metabolic profiling analyses led to the discovery that TXNIP deficiency causes marked deficits in enzymes required for catabolism of branched chain amino acids, ketones, and lactate, along with more modest reductions in enzymes of β-oxidation and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The decrements in enzyme activity were accompanied by comparable deficits in protein abundance without changes in mRNA expression, implying dysregulation of protein synthesis or stability. Considering that TXNIP expression increases in response to starvation, diabetes, and exercise, these findings point to a novel role for TXNIP in coordinating mitochondrial fuel switching in response to nutrient availability.

  4. Targeted Metabolomics Connects Thioredoxin-interacting Protein (TXNIP) to Mitochondrial Fuel Selection and Regulation of Specific Oxidoreductase Enzymes in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    DeBalsi, Karen L.; Wong, Kari E.; Koves, Timothy R.; Slentz, Dorothy H.; Seiler, Sarah E.; Wittmann, April H.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Stevens, Robert D.; Perry, Christopher G. R.; Lark, Daniel S.; Hui, Simon T.; Szweda, Luke; Neufer, P. Darrell; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is an α-arrestin family member involved in redox sensing and metabolic control. Growing evidence links TXNIP to mitochondrial function, but the molecular nature of this relationship has remained poorly defined. Herein, we employed targeted metabolomics and comprehensive bioenergetic analyses to evaluate oxidative metabolism and respiratory kinetics in mouse models of total body (TKO) and skeletal muscle-specific (TXNIPSKM−/−) Txnip deficiency. Compared with littermate controls, both TKO and TXNIPSKM−/− mice had reduced exercise tolerance in association with muscle-specific impairments in substrate oxidation. Oxidative insufficiencies in TXNIP null muscles were not due to perturbations in mitochondrial mass, the electron transport chain, or emission of reactive oxygen species. Instead, metabolic profiling analyses led to the discovery that TXNIP deficiency causes marked deficits in enzymes required for catabolism of branched chain amino acids, ketones, and lactate, along with more modest reductions in enzymes of β-oxidation and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The decrements in enzyme activity were accompanied by comparable deficits in protein abundance without changes in mRNA expression, implying dysregulation of protein synthesis or stability. Considering that TXNIP expression increases in response to starvation, diabetes, and exercise, these findings point to a novel role for TXNIP in coordinating mitochondrial fuel switching in response to nutrient availability. PMID:24482226

  5. Genomic-Based Restriction Enzyme Selection for Specific Detection of Piscirickettsia salmonis by 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Glasner, Benjamín; Maldonado, Jonathan; Aravena, Pamela; González, Mauricio; Cambiazo, Verónica; Pulgar, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    The gram negative facultative bacterium P. salmonis is the etiological agent of Salmonid Rickettsial Septicaemia (SRS), a severe disease that causes important economic losses in the global salmon farmer industry. Despite efforts to control this disease, the high frequency of new epizootic events indicate that the vaccine and antibiotics treatments have limited effectiveness, therefore the preventive and diagnostic approaches must be improved. A comparison of several methodologies for SRS diagnostic indicate differences in their specificity and its capacity to detect other bacteria coexisting with P. salmonis in culture media (contamination) and fish samples (coinfection), aspects relevant for research, vaccine development and clinical diagnostic. By computer-simulation analyses, we identified a group of restriction enzymes that generate unique P. salmonis 16S rDNA band patterns, distinguishable from all other bacteria. From this information, we designed and developed a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction—Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay, which was validated using 16S rDNA universal primers and restriction enzyme PmaCI for the amplification and digestion, respectively. Experimental validation was performed by comparing the restriction pattern of P. salmonis with the restriction patterns generated by bacteria that cohabit with P. salmonis (fish bacterial isolates and culture media contaminants). Our results indicate that the restriction enzyme selection pipeline was suitable to design a more specific, sensible, faster and cheaper assay than the currently used P. salmonis detection methodologies. PMID:27242682

  6. Selective restoration of male fertility in mice lacking angiotensin-converting enzymes by sperm-specific expression of the testicular isozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Ramaraj, P; Kessler, S P; Colmenares, C; Sen, G C

    1998-01-01

    Although angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been studied primarily in the context of its role in blood pressure regulation, this widely distributed enzyme has many other physiological functions. The ACE gene encodes two isozymes. The somatic isozyme is expressed in many tissues, including vascular endothelial cells, renal epithelial cells, and testicular Leydig cells, whereas the testicular or germinal angiotensin-converting enzyme is expressed only in sperm. The ACE gene knockout mice lack both isozymes and they exhibit low blood pressure, kidney dysfunctions, and male infertility. Here, we report the use of a sperm-specific promoter and interbreeding of transgenic and gene knockout mice for generating a mouse strain that expressed ACE only in sperm. The experimental mice maintained the kidney defects of ACE-/- mice, but unlike the knockout strain, the males were fertile. Thus, we established that the role of ACE in male fertility is completely dependent on its exclusive expression in sperm. Our study clearly demonstrated how transgenic and knockout techniques can be combined for ascribing a specific physiological function to the expression of a multifunctional protein in a given tissue. PMID:9664078

  7. Computer Program Development Specification for IDAMST Operational Test Program, Software Type B5. Addendum 4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-30

    UNCLASSIFIED AFAL-TR 76-209ADO- NL " NONhEI/ENl MENhhE 0EIt lllEll/lllllEI AFAL-TR-76-209, Addendum #4 SPECIFICATION NUMBER SD 2043 A b)E r4DOKCODEMIENT PART 1 ...JU/ 7 I/n ¢-2.3. DTIC • E APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED O඘ I i5 06 AIR FORCE AVIONICS LABORATORY AFAL/AAA- 1 WRIGHT-PATTERSON...AFB, OHIO 45433 TABLE OF CONTENTS PARAGRAPH PAGE 1.0 SCOPE 1 1.1 Identification 1 1.2 Functional Summary 1 2.0 APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS 1 3.0 REQUIREMENTS

  8. Global Gene Expression Profiling of Endothelium Exposed to Heme Reveals an Organ-Specific Induction of Cytoprotective Enzymes in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianwei; Li, Yuhua; Adisa, Olufolake; Mosunjac, Mario; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by hemolysis, vaso-occlusion and ischemia reperfusion injury. These events cause endothelial dysfunction and vasculopathies in multiple systems. However, the lack of atherosclerotic lesions has led to the idea that there are adaptive mechanisms that protect the endothelium from major vascular insults in SCD patients. The molecular bases for this phenomenon are poorly defined. This study was designed to identify the global profile of genes induced by heme in the endothelium, and assess expression of the heme-inducible cytoprotective enzymes in major organs impacted by SCD. Methods and Findings Total RNA isolated from heme-treated endothelial monolayers was screened with the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 chip, and the microarray data analyzed using multiple bioinformatics software. Hierarchical cluster analysis of significantly differentially expressed genes successfully segregated heme and vehicle-treated endothelium. Validation studies showed that the induction of cytoprotective enzymes by heme was influenced by the origin of endothelial cells, the duration of treatment, as well as the magnitude of induction of individual enzymes. In agreement with these heterogeneities, we found that induction of two major Nrf2-regulated cytoprotective enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 is organ-specific in two transgenic mouse models of SCD. This data was confirmed in the endothelium of post-mortem lung tissues of SCD patients. Conclusions Individual organ systems induce unique profiles of cytoprotective enzymes to neutralize heme in SCD. Understanding this heterogeneity may help to develop effective therapies to manage vasculopathies of individual systems. PMID:21483798

  9. SLS-SPEC-159 Cross-Program Design Specification for Natural Environments (DSNE) Revision E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2017-01-01

    The DSNE completes environment-related specifications for architecture, system-level, and lower-tier documents by specifying the ranges of environmental conditions that must be accounted for by NASA ESD Programs. To assure clarity and consistency, and to prevent requirements documents from becoming cluttered with extensive amounts of technical material, natural environment specifications have been compiled into this document. The intent is to keep a unified specification for natural environments that each Program calls out for appropriate application. This document defines the natural environments parameter limits (maximum and minimum values, energy spectra, or precise model inputs, assumptions, model options, etc.), for all ESD Programs. These environments are developed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (MSFC organization code: EV44). Many of the parameter limits are based on experience with previous programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program. The parameter limits contain no margin and are meant to be evaluated individually to ensure they are reasonable (i.e., do not apply unrealistic extreme-on-extreme conditions). The natural environments specifications in this document should be accounted for by robust design of the flight vehicle and support systems. However, it is understood that in some cases the Programs will find it more effective to account for portions of the environment ranges by operational mitigation or acceptance of risk in accordance with an appropriate program risk management plan and/or hazard analysis process. The DSNE is not intended as a definition of operational models or operational constraints, nor is it adequate, alone, for ground facilities which may have additional requirements (for example, building codes and local environmental constraints). "Natural environments," as the term is used here, refers to the environments that are not the result of intended human activity or intervention. It

  10. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method specific for the detection of G-group aflatoxins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To detect and monitor G-group aflatoxins in agricultural products, we generated class-specific monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognized aflatoxins G1 and G2. Of the final three positive and stable hybridomas obtained, hybridoma 2G6 produced a monoclonal antibody that did not cross-react wi...

  11. Heterologous expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of raucaffricine glucosidase, a plant enzyme specifically involved in Rauvolfia alkaloid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, Martin; Panjikar, Santosh; Barleben, Leif; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2006-03-01

    Raucaffricine glucosidase, an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids in the plant Rauvolfia serpentina, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG4000 as precipitant. The crystals diffract to 2.3 Å resolution and belong to space group I222. Raucaffricine glucosidase (RG) is an enzyme that is specifically involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloids from the plant Rauvolfia serpentina. After heterologous expression in Escherichia coli cells, crystals of RG were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique at 293 K with 0.3 M ammonium sulfate, 0.1 M sodium acetate pH 4.6 buffer and 11% PEG 4000 as precipitant. Crystals belong to space group I222 and diffract to 2.30 Å, with unit-cell parameters a = 102.8, b = 127.3, c = 215.8 Å.

  12. PpASCL, a moss ortholog of anther-specific chalcone synthase-like enzymes, is a hydroxyalkylpyrone synthase involved in an evolutionarily conserved sporopollenin biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Kim, Sung Soo; Posehn, Sarah E; Jepson, Christina; Kim, Sun Young; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Reski, Ralf; Wee, Andrew G H; Douglas, Carl J; Suh, Dae-Yeon

    2011-12-01

    Sporopollenin is the main constituent of the exine layer of spore and pollen walls. Recently, several Arabidopsis genes, including polyketide synthase A (PKSA), which encodes an anther-specific chalcone synthase-like enzyme (ASCL), have been shown to be involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis. The genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens contains putative orthologs of the Arabidopsis sporopollenin biosynthesis genes. We analyzed available P.patens expressed sequence tag (EST) data for putative moss orthologs of the Arabidopsis genes of sporopollenin biosynthesis and studied the enzymatic properties and reaction mechanism of recombinant PpASCL, the P.patens ortholog of Arabidopsis PKSA. We also generated structure models of PpASCL and Arabidopsis PKSA to study their substrate specificity. Physcomitrella patens orthologs of Arabidopsis genes for sporopollenin biosynthesis were found to be expressed in the sporophyte generation. Similarly to Arabidopsis PKSA, PpASCL condenses hydroxy fatty acyl-CoA esters with malonyl-CoA and produces hydroxyalkyl α-pyrones that probably serve as building blocks of sporopollenin. The ASCL-specific set of Gly-Gly-Ala residues predicted by the models to be located at the floor of the putative active site is proposed to serve as the opening of an acyl-binding tunnel in ASCL. These results suggest that ASCL functions together with other sporophyte-specific enzymes to provide polyhydroxylated precursors of sporopollenin in a pathway common to land plants.

  13. Structure of ALD1, a plant-specific homologue of the universal diaminopimelate aminotransferase enzyme of lysine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Vladimir; Edelman, Marvin; Dym, Orly; Unger, Tamar; Albeck, Shira; Kirma, Menny; Galili, Gad

    2013-02-01

    Diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DAP-AT) is an enzyme in the lysine-biosynthesis pathway. Conversely, ALD1, a close homologue of DAP-AT in plants, uses lysine as a substrate in vitro. Both proteins require pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) for their activity. The structure of ALD1 from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtALD1) was solved at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Comparison of AtALD1 with the previously solved structure of A. thaliana DAP-AT (AtDAP-AT) revealed similar interactions with PLP despite sequence differences within the PLP-binding site. However, sequence differences between the binding site of AtDAP-AT for malate, a purported mimic of substrate binding, and the corresponding site in AtALD1 led to different interactions. This suggests that either the substrate itself, or the substrate-binding mode, differs in the two proteins, supporting the known in vitro findings.

  14. DNA Polymerases of Low-GC Gram-Positive Eubacteria: Identification of the Replication-Specific Enzyme Encoded by dnaE

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Marjorie H.; Miller, Shelley D.; Brown, Neal C.

    2002-01-01

    dnaE, the gene encoding one of the two replication-specific DNA polymerases (Pols) of low-GC-content gram-positive bacteria (E. Dervyn et al., Science 294:1716-1719, 2001; R. Inoue et al., Mol. Genet. Genomics 266:564-571, 2001), was cloned from Bacillus subtilis, a model low-GC gram-positive organism. The gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant product displayed inhibitor responses and physical, catalytic, and antigenic properties indistinguishable from those of the low-GC gram-positive-organism-specific enzyme previously named DNA Pol II after the polB-encoded DNA Pol II of E. coli. Whereas a polB-like gene is absent from low-GC gram-positive genomes and whereas the low-GC gram-positive DNA Pol II strongly conserves a dnaE-like, Pol III primary structure, it is proposed that it be renamed DNA polymerase III E (Pol III E) to accurately reflect its replicative function and its origin from dnaE. It is also proposed that DNA Pol III, the other replication-specific Pol of low-GC gram-positive organisms, be renamed DNA polymerase III C (Pol III C) to denote its origin from polC. By this revised nomenclature, the DNA Pols that are expressed constitutively in low-GC gram-positive bacteria would include DNA Pol I, the dispensable repair enzyme encoded by polA, and the two essential, replication-specific enzymes Pol III C and Pol III E, encoded, respectively, by polC and dnaE. PMID:12081953

  15. Crystal Structures of Physcomitrella patens AOC1 and AOC2: Insights into the Enzyme Mechanism and Differences in Substrate Specificity1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Piotr; Brodhun, Florian; Sauer, Kristin; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Hamberg, Mats; Brinkmann, Jens; Scholz, Julia; Dickmanns, Achim; Feussner, Ivo; Ficner, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    In plants, oxylipins regulate developmental processes and defense responses. The first specific step in the biosynthesis of the cyclopentanone class of oxylipins is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC) that forms cis(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. The moss Physcomitrella patens has two AOCs (PpAOC1 and PpAOC2) with different substrate specificities for C18- and C20-derived substrates, respectively. To better understand AOC’s catalytic mechanism and to elucidate the structural properties that explain the differences in substrate specificity, we solved and analyzed the crystal structures of 36 monomers of both apo and ligand complexes of PpAOC1 and PpAOC2. From these data, we propose the following intermediates in AOC catalysis: (1) a resting state of the apo enzyme with a closed conformation, (2) a first shallow binding mode, followed by (3) a tight binding of the substrate accompanied by conformational changes in the binding pocket, and (4) initiation of the catalytic cycle by opening of the epoxide ring. As expected, the substrate dihydro analog cis-12,13S-epoxy-9Z,15Z-octadecadienoic acid did not cyclize in the presence of PpAOC1; however, when bound to the enzyme, it underwent isomerization into the corresponding trans-epoxide. By comparing complex structures of the C18 substrate analog with in silico modeling of the C20 substrate analog bound to the enzyme allowed us to identify three major molecular determinants responsible for the different substrate specificities (i.e. larger active site diameter, an elongated cavity of PpAOC2, and two nonidentical residues at the entrance of the active site). PMID:22987885

  16. Synergistic binding of transcription factors to cell-specific enhancers programs motor neuron identity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Esteban O; Mahony, Shaun; Closser, Michael; Morrison, Carolyn A; Nedelec, Stephane; Williams, Damian J; An, Disi; Gifford, David K; Wichterle, Hynek

    2013-01-01

    Efficient transcriptional programming promises to open new frontiers in regenerative medicine. However, mechanisms by which programming factors transform cell fate are unknown, preventing more rational selection of factors to generate desirable cell types. Three transcription factors, Ngn2, Isl1 and Lhx3, were sufficient to program rapidly and efficiently spinal motor neuron identity when expressed in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells. Replacement of Lhx3 by Phox2a led to specification of cranial, rather than spinal, motor neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation–sequencing analysis of Isl1, Lhx3 and Phox2a binding sites revealed that the two cell fates were programmed by the recruitment of Isl1-Lhx3 and Isl1-Phox2a complexes to distinct genomic locations characterized by a unique grammar of homeodomain binding motifs. Our findings suggest that synergistic interactions among transcription factors determine the specificity of their recruitment to cell type–specific binding sites and illustrate how a single transcription factor can be repurposed to program different cell types. PMID:23872598

  17. Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay Detection of Mumps-Specific Antibody-Secreting B Cells as an Alternative Method of Laboratory Diagnosis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Latner, Donald R.; McGrew, Marcia; Williams, Nobia; Lowe, Luis; Werman, Roniel; Warnock, Eli; Gallagher, Kathleen; Doyle, Peter; Smole, Sandra; Lett, Susan; Cocoros, Noelle; DeMaria, Alfred; Konomi, Raimond; Brown, Cedric J.; Rota, Paul A.; Bellini, William J.; Hickman, Carole J.

    2011-01-01

    Although high measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination coverage has been successful in dramatically reducing mumps disease in the United States, mumps (re)infections occasionally occur in individuals who have been either previously vaccinated or naturally infected. Standard diagnostics that detect virus or virus-specific antibody are dependable for confirming primary mumps infection in immunologically naïve persons, but these methods perform inconsistently for individuals with prior immune exposure. We hypothesized that detection of activated mumps-specific antibody-secreting B cells (ASCs) by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay could be used as a more reliable diagnostic. To test this, a time course of virus-specific ASC responses was measured by ELISPOT assay following MMR vaccination of 16 previously vaccinated or naturally exposed adult volunteers. Mumps-specific ASCs were detectable in 68% of these individuals at some point during the first 3 weeks following revaccination. In addition, mumps-specific ASCs were detected in 7/7 previously vaccinated individuals who recently had been infected as part of a confirmed mumps outbreak. These data suggest that ELISPOT detection of mumps-specific ASCs has the potential for use as an alternative method of diagnosis when suspect cases cannot be confirmed by detection of IgM or virus. In addition, it was determined that mumps-specific memory B cells are detected at a much lower frequency than measles- or rubella-specific cells, suggesting that mumps infection may not generate robust B-cell memory. PMID:21047998

  18. 24 CFR 200.936 - Supplementary specific procedural requirements under HUD building products certification program...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Supplementary specific procedural... stoves. 200.936 Section 200.936 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Minimum Property Standards §...

  19. 42 CFR 457.1130 - Program specific review process: Matters subject to review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... review process: Matters subject to review. (a) Eligibility or enrollment matter. A State must ensure that... services matter. A State must ensure that an enrollee has an opportunity for external review of a— (1... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program specific review process: Matters subject...

  20. 43 CFR 1821.13 - What if the specific program regulations conflict with these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What if the specific program regulations conflict with these regulations? 1821.13 Section 1821.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) APPLICATION PROCEDURES General Informatio...

  1. 43 CFR 1821.13 - What if the specific program regulations conflict with these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What if the specific program regulations conflict with these regulations? 1821.13 Section 1821.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) APPLICATION PROCEDURES General Informatio...

  2. Productive High Performance Parallel Programming with Auto-tuned Domain-Specific Embedded Languages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-02

    68 9.3.2 Multicore-specific Optimizations and Code Generation . . . . . . . . . . . 69 9.3.3 CUDA ...11.2 Visitor function for BFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 11.3 Vertex function for the BSP model...Algebra Subroutines CMOS Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor CPU Central Processing Unit CUDA Programming platform for Nvidia GPUs DFS Depth-First

  3. 42 CFR 457.1140 - Program specific review process: Core elements of review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program specific review process: Core elements of review. 457.1140 Section 457.1140 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... review process: Core elements of review. In adopting the procedures for review of matters described in...

  4. 42 CFR 457.1140 - Program specific review process: Core elements of review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program specific review process: Core elements of... review process: Core elements of review. In adopting the procedures for review of matters described in... decisions are written; and (d) Applicants and enrollees have an opportunity to— (1) Represent themselves...

  5. 42 CFR 457.1170 - Program specific review process: Continuation of enrollment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program specific review process: Continuation of... review process: Continuation of enrollment. A State must ensure the opportunity for continuation of... decision to disenroll for failure to pay cost sharing....

  6. Technical Specifications for Hardware and Software, and Maintenance in Support of Computer Literacy Program. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC.

    Designed for use by vendors, this guide provides an overview of the objectives for the 5-year computer literacy program to be implemented in the District of Columbia Public Schools; outlines requirements which are mandatory elements of vendors' bids unless explicitly designated "desirable"; and details specifications for computing…

  7. 42 CFR 457.1140 - Program specific review process: Core elements of review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program specific review process: Core elements of review. 457.1140 Section 457.1140 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... review process: Core elements of review. In adopting the procedures for review of matters described...

  8. 42 CFR 457.1130 - Program specific review process: Matters subject to review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... review process: Matters subject to review. (a) Eligibility or enrollment matter. A State must ensure that... services matter. A State must ensure that an enrollee has an opportunity for external review of a— (1... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Program specific review process: Matters subject to...

  9. Exceptional Children Conference Papers: Specific Subject Programs for EMRs and TMRs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    Eight papers focus upon specific subject programs for educable and trainable mentally retarded (EMR and TMR) students. Three of the papers, concerning driver education and traffic safety education for EMR students, cover driver education guidelines and materials developed in a Michigan state institute involving teachers of EMR and teachers of…

  10. FORTRAN program for calculating total efficiency - specific speed characteristics of centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvas, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program for predicting design point specific speed - efficiency characteristics of centrifugal compressors is presented with instructions for its use. The method permits rapid selection of compressor geometry that yields maximum total efficiency for a particular application. A numerical example is included to demonstrate the selection procedure.

  11. Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas in space (AMPS) spacelab payload definition study. Volume 4. Part 1, AMPS program specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    The AMPS Program Specification delineates the AMPS Program requirements consistent with the resources defined in the AMPS Project Plan. All subsidiary specifications and requirements shall conform to the requirements presented. The requirements hierarchy for the AMPS program is illustrated. A brief description of each of the requirements documents and their intended use is provided.

  12. Sex-specific differences and developmental programming for diseases in later life.

    PubMed

    Sundrani, Deepali P; Roy, Suchitra S; Jadhav, Anjali T; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2017-04-06

    Epidemiological data indicate that developmental programming of various non-communicable diseases (NCDs) occurs as a consequence of altered maternal metabolic and physiological status due to a number of environmental insults during pregnancy. Sex-specific differences have also been reported in most NCDs. Evidence suggests that beginning from conception, the maternal and neonatal metabolic environment, including hormones, contributes to sex-specific placental development. The placenta then regulates the sex-specific differences in NCDs via the epigenetic mechanisms that are further affected by hormones. Male and female embryos have been reported to exhibit sex-specific transcriptional regulation, and it is suggested that their development can be considered as separate processes beginning from conception. This review summarises various animal and human studies examining sex-specific differences in NCDs due to differential placental epigenetic developmental programming. An overview of possible mechanisms underlying this is also discussed. Further, the review describes sex-specific changes in the structure and function of the placenta in pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction, pre-eclampsia and preterm birth. Thus, because sex-specific differences are associated with fetal outcome and survival, future studies need to take into consideration the sex of the fetus while explaining the concept of the developmental origins of health and disease.

  13. Factors that influence residency applicants in the selection of a specific program.

    PubMed

    Senst, B L; Scott, B E

    1990-05-01

    The relative importance of factors that influenced residency applicants in the selection of a specific program was determined through a national survey. A four-page questionnaire was developed through a series of focus groups with current and former pharmacy residents. A total of 370 questionnaires were mailed to the preceptors of all residencies participating in the 1987 ASHP Resident Matching Program; the preceptors were instructed to forward the questionnaires to all first-year residents in their programs. Respondents were asked to provide demographic information and to rate (using a seven-point Likert scale) the importance of 19 factors that might have influenced their choice of residency program. The respondents also were asked to list which 4 of the 19 factors had been most important to them in their choice. Most of the 243 respondents had entered the residency programs with little or no postgraduate pharmacy experience. The average residency candidate applied to 2.8 programs; approximately half of the respondents had accepted a residency position in the state in which they currently lived. The reputation of the residency program as a good learning program was rated most important by all groups. ASHP accreditation was rated slightly higher by residents in general programs, whereas the type of medical services provided by the hospital and the university teaching affiliation were rated slightly higher by respondents in clinical and specialty programs. Factors with low importance ratings included desirable climate and total number of residency hours worked. Residency preceptors can use the results of this study to focus their marketing and recruiting strategies.

  14. Identification of Protein Substrates of Specific PARP Enzymes Using Analog-Sensitive PARP Mutants and a "Clickable" NAD(+) Analog.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Bryan A; Kraus, W Lee

    2017-01-01

    The PARP family of ADP-ribosyl transferases contains 17 members in human cells, most of which catalyze the transfer of the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD(+) onto their target proteins. This posttranslational modification plays important roles in cellular signaling, especially during cellular stresses, such as heat shock, inflammation, unfolded protein responses, and DNA damage. Knowing the specific proteins that are substrates for individual PARPs, as well as the specific amino acid residues in a given target protein that are ADP-ribosylated, is a key step in understanding the biology of individual PARPs. Recently, we developed a robust NAD(+) analog-sensitive approach for PARPs, which allows PARP-specific ADP-ribosylation of substrates that is suitable for subsequent copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition ("click chemistry") reactions. When coupled with proteomics and mass spectrometry, the analog-sensitive PARP approach can be used to identify the specific amino acids that are ADP-ribosylated by individual PARP proteins. In this chapter, we describe the key facets of the experimental design and application of the analog-sensitive PARP methodology to identify site-specific modification of PARP target proteins.

  15. Specificity changes in the evolution of type II restriction endonucleases: a biochemical and bioinformatic analysis of restriction enzymes that recognize unrelated sequences.

    PubMed

    Pingoud, Vera; Sudina, Anna; Geyer, Hildegard; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Lurz, Rudi; Lüder, Gerhild; Morgan, Richard; Kubareva, Elena; Pingoud, Alfred

    2005-02-11

    How restriction enzymes with their different specificities and mode of cleavage evolved has been a long standing question in evolutionary biology. We have recently shown that several Type II restriction endonucleases, namely SsoII (downward arrow CCNGG), PspGI (downward arrow CCWGG), Eco-RII (downward arrow CCWGG), NgoMIV (G downward arrow CCGGC), and Cfr10I (R downward arrow CCGGY), which recognize similar DNA sequences (as indicated, where the downward arrows denote cleavage position), share limited sequence similarity over an interrupted stretch of approximately 70 amino acid residues with MboI, a Type II restriction endonuclease from Moraxella bovis (Pingoud, V., Conzelmann, C., Kinzebach, S., Sudina, A., Metelev, V., Kubareva, E., Bujnicki, J. M., Lurz, R., Luder, G., Xu, S. Y., and Pingoud, A. (2003) J. Mol. Biol. 329, 913-929). Nevertheless, MboI has a dissimilar DNA specificity (downward arrow GATC) compared with these enzymes. In this study, we characterize MboI in detail to determine whether it utilizes a mechanism of DNA recognition similar to SsoII, PspGI, EcoRII, NgoMIV, and Cfr10I. Mutational analyses and photocross-linking experiments demonstrate that MboI exploits the stretch of approximately 70 amino acids for DNA recognition and cleavage. It is therefore likely that MboI shares a common evolutionary origin with SsoII, PspGI, EcoRII, NgoMIV, and Cfr10I. This is the first example of a relatively close evolutionary link between Type II restriction enzymes of widely different specificities.

  16. Herpes simplex virus 1-infected cell protein 0 contains two E3 ubiquitin ligase sites specific for different E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hagglund, Ryan; Van Sant, Charles; Lopez, Pascal; Roizman, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) of herpes simplex virus 1, a multifunctional ring finger protein, enhances the expression of genes introduced into cells by infection or transfection, interacts with numerous cellular and viral proteins, and is associated with the degradation of several cellular proteins. Sequences encoded by exon 2 of ICP0 (residues 20–241) bind the UbcH3 (cdc34) ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, and its carboxy terminus expresses a ubiquitin ligase activity demonstrable by polyubiquitylation of cdc34 in vitro. We report that: (i) The physical interaction of cdc34 and ICP0 leads to its degradation. Thus, substitution of ICP0 aspartate 199 with alanine attenuates the degradation of cdc34 and its binding to the ICP0 ring finger domain. (ii) Substitution of residue 620 reported to abolish the interaction with a ubiquitin-specific protease has no effect on the function of ubiquitin ligase. (iii) ICP0 contains an additional distinct E3 ligase activity specific for the UbcH5a- and UbcH6 E2-conjugating enzymes mapping to the ring finger domain. This is, to our knowledge, the first identification of a viral protein with at least two physically separated E3 ligase activities with different E2 specificities. The results suggest that each activity may target different proteins. PMID:11805320

  17. Enzyme-labeled Antigen Method: Development and Application of the Novel Approach for Identifying Plasma Cells Locally Producing Disease-specific Antibodies in Inflammatory Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakurai, Kouhei; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory lesions of autoimmune and infectious diseases, plasma cells are frequently observed. Antigens recognized by antibodies produced by the plasma cells mostly remain unclear. A new technique identifying these corresponding antigens may give us a breakthrough for understanding the disease from a pathophysiological viewpoint, simply because the immunocytes are seen within the lesion. We have developed an enzyme-labeled antigen method for microscopic identification of the antigen recognized by specific antibodies locally produced in plasma cells in inflammatory lesions. Firstly, target biotinylated antigens were constructed by the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system or through chemical biotinylation. Next, proteins reactive to antibodies in tissue extracts were screened and antibody titers were evaluated by the AlphaScreen method. Finally, with the enzyme-labeled antigen method using the biotinylated antigens as probes, plasma cells producing specific antibodies were microscopically localized in fixed frozen sections. Our novel approach visualized tissue plasma cells that produced 1) autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, 2) antibodies against major antigens of Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis or radicular cyst, and 3) antibodies against a carbohydrate antigen, Strep A, of Streptococcus pyogenes in recurrent tonsillitis. Evaluation of local specific antibody responses expectedly contributes to clarifying previously unknown processes in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27006517

  18. Protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase: a wide substrate specificity enzyme isolated from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KB2 as a useful tool in aromatic acid biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Urszula; Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Sitnik, Małgorzata; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenases (P34Os) catalyze the reaction of the ring cleavage of aromatic acid derivatives. It is a key reaction in many xenobiotic metabolic pathways. P34Os characterize narrow substrate specificity. This property is an unfavorable feature in the biodegradation process because one type of pollution is rarely present in the environment. Thus, the following study aimed at the characterization of a P34O from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KB2, being able to utilize a wide spectrum of aromatic carboxylic acids. A total of 3 mM vanillic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoate were completely degraded during 8 and 4.5 h, respectively. When cells of strain KB2 were grown on 9 mM 4-hydroxybenzoate, P34O was induced. Biochemical analysis revealed that the examined enzyme was similar to other known P34Os, but showed untypical wide substrate specificity. A high activity of P34O against 2,4- and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate was observed. As these substrates do not possess ortho configuration hydroxyl groups, it is postulated that their cleavage could be connected with their monodentate binding of substrate to the active site. Since this enzyme characterizes untypical wide substrate specificity it makes it a useful tool in applications for environmental clean-up purposes. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Individual chitin synthase enzymes synthesize microfibrils of differing structure at specific locations in the Candida albicans cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Lenardon, Megan D; Whitton, Rhian K; Munro, Carol A; Marshall, Deborah; Gow, Neil A R

    2007-01-01

    The shape and integrity of fungal cells is dependent on the skeletal polysaccharides in their cell walls of which β(1,3)-glucan and chitin are of principle importance. The human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans has four genes, CHS1, CHS2, CHS3 and CHS8, which encode chitin synthase isoenzymes with different biochemical properties and physiological functions. Analysis of the morphology of chitin in cell wall ghosts revealed two distinct forms of chitin microfibrils: short microcrystalline rodlets that comprised the bulk of the cell wall; and a network of longer interlaced microfibrils in the bud scars and primary septa. Analysis of chitin ghosts of chs mutant strains by shadow-cast transmission electron microscopy showed that the long-chitin microfibrils were absent in chs8 mutants and the short-chitin rodlets were absent in chs3 mutants. The inferred site of chitin microfibril synthesis of these Chs enzymes was corroborated by their localization determined in Chsp–YFP-expressing strains. These results suggest that Chs8p synthesizes the long-chitin microfibrils, and Chs3p synthesizes the short-chitin rodlets at the same cellular location. Therefore the architecture of the chitin skeleton of C. albicans is shaped by the action of more than one chitin synthase at the site of cell wall synthesis. PMID:17971081

  20. Combination of Xylanase and Debranching Enzymes Specific to Wheat Arabinoxylan Improve the Growth Performance and Gut Health of Broilers.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhao; Shao, Yuxin; Yin, Xiaonan; Yin, Dafei; Guo, Yuming; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-06-22

    Arabinoxylan (AX) is the major antinutritional factor of wheat. This study evaluated the synergistic effects of xylanase and debranching enzymes (arabinofuranosidase [ABF] and feruloyl esterase [FAE]) on AX. During in vitro tests, the addition of ABF or FAE accelerated the hydrolysis of water-soluble AX (WE-AX) and water-insoluble AX (WU-AX) and produced more xylan oligosaccharides (XOS) than xylanase alone. XOS obtained from WE-AX stimulated greater proliferation of Lactobacillus brevis and Bacillus subtilis than did fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and glucose. During in vivo trials, xylanase increased the average daily growth (ADG), decreased the feed-conversion ratio (FCR), and reduced the digesta viscosity of jejunum and intestinal lesions of broilers fed a wheat-based diet on day 36. ABF or FAE additions further improved these effects. Broilers fed a combination of xylanase, ABF, and FAE exhibited the best growth. In conclusion, the synergistic effects among xylanase, ABF, and FAE increased AX degradation, which improve the growth performance and gut health of broilers.

  1. Site-specific inhibition of the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 selectively impairs SUMO chain formation.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Svenja; Gärtner, Anne; Kniss, Andreas; Stengl, Andreas; Behrends, Christian; Rogov, Vladimir V; Rodriguez, Manuel S; Dötsch, Volker; Müller, Stefan; Ernst, Andreas

    2017-08-07

    Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) regulate many cellular processes, including genome integrity, gene expression, and ribosome biogenesis. The E2-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 catalyzes the conjugation of SUMOs to ϵ-amino groups of lysine residues in target proteins. Attachment of SUMO moieties to internal lysines in Ubc9 itself can further lead to the formation of polymeric SUMO chains. Mono- and poly-SUMOylations of target proteins provide docking sites for distinct adapter and effector proteins important for regulating discrete SUMO-regulated pathways. However, molecular tools to dissect pathways depending on either mono- or poly-SUMOylation are largely missing. Using a protein-engineering approach, we generated high-affinity SUMO2 variants by phage display that bind the backside of Ubc9 and function as SUMO-based Ubc9 inhibitors (SUBINs). Importantly, we found that distinct SUBINs primarily inhibit poly-SUMO chain formation, while mono-SUMOylation is not impaired. Proof-of-principle experiments demonstrated that in a cellular context, SUBINs largely prevent heat shock-triggered poly-SUMOylation. Moreover, SUBINs abrogated arsenic-induced degradation of promyelocytic leukemia protein. We propose that the availability of the new chain-selective SUMO inhibitors reported here will enable thorough investigation of poly-SUMO-mediated cellular processes, such as DNA damage responses and cell cycle progression. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. Compound- and enzyme-specific phosphodiester hydrolysis mechanisms revealed by δ18O of dissolved inorganic phosphate: Implications for marine P cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yuhong; Blake, Ruth E.

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the oxygen isotope signature of inorganic phosphate (P i) generated by hydrolysis of nucleic acid phosphodiester (P-diester) compounds by cell-free enzymes (Deoxyribonuclease 1, Phosphodiesterase 1, Alkaline phosphatase) and microbial cultures at natural isotopic abundances. We demonstrate that the diesterase-catalyzed hydrolytic step leads to incorporation of at least one water O into released P i for a total of two O atoms from water incorporated into P i released from P-diesters. In the presence of Phosphodiesterase 1, 16O is preferentially incorporated into nucleotides released from DNA; whereas 18O is preferentially incorporated into nucleotides released from RNA. A strong consistency between predicted O-isotope regeneration signatures based on results of cell-free enzyme experiments and measured isotopic signatures from independent experiments with E. coli cultures was observed and confirms proposed models for phosphoester hydrolysis. Results from these studies made at natural 18O abundance levels provide a new tool, enzyme-specific O-isotope fractionation, for investigations of organophosphate metabolism and phosphorus cycling pathways in natural aquatic systems.

  3. Guanine-decorated graphene nanostructures for sensitive monitoring of neuron-specific enolase based on an enzyme-free electrocatalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Zhou; Tian, Feng

    2013-01-01

    A new and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay protocol was developed for the sensitive electronic monitoring of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) on a monoclonal mouse anti-human NSE antibody (mAb)-modified glassy carbon electrode, using guanine-decorated graphene nanostructures (GGN) as nanotags. To construct such an enzyme-free immunoassay format, guanine and polyclonal rabbit anti-human NSE antibody (pAb) were co-immobilized on the graphene nanostructures through the carbodiimide coupling. Based on a sandwich-type immunoassay mode, the assay was carried out in 0.1 M pH 7.4 PBS containing 5 μM Ru(bpy)3(2+) through the catalytic oxidation of Ru(bpy)3(2+) toward the guanine on the GGN. The presence of graphene nanostructures increased the immobilized amount of guanine, thus amplifying a detectable electronic signal. The covalent conjugation of guanine and pAb on the GGN resulted in a good repeatability and intermediate reproducibility down to 9.5%. Under optimal conditions, the dynamic concentration range of the developed immunoassay spanned from 0.005 to 80 ng mL(-1) NSE with a detection limit of 1.0 pg mL(-1) at the 3S(blank) level. In addition, the methodology was evaluated by assaying the spiking serum samples, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) between the electrochemical immunoassay and a commercialized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were 2.8-7.0%.

  4. A pH/enzyme-responsive polymer film consisting of Eudragit FS 30 D and arabinoxylane as a potential material formulation for colon-specific drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Rabito, Mirela Fulgencio; Reis, Adriano Valim; Freitas, Adonilson dos Reis; Tambourgi, Elias Basile; Cavalcanti, Osvaldo Albuquerque

    2012-01-01

    Polymer film based on pH-dependent Eudragit FS 30 D acrylic polymer in association with arabinoxylane, a polysaccharide issued from gum psyllium, was produced by way of solvent casting. Physical-chemical characterization of the polymer film samples was performed by means of thermogravimetry (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, water-equilibrium swelling index (I(s)) and weight loss of the films in KCl buffer solution of pH 1.2, in KH(2)PO(4) buffer solution of pH 5.0, or in KH(2)PO(4) buffer solution of pH 5.0 consisting of 4% enzyme Pectinex 3X-L (w/v) were also carried out for the film characterization. No chemical interactions between the Eudragit FS 30 D and the arabinoxylane polymer chains were evidenced, thus suggesting that the film-forming polymer structure was obtained from a physical mixture of both polymers. The arabinoxylane-loader films showed a more pronounced weight loss after their immersion in buffer solution containing enzyme Pectinex 3X-L. The introduction of the arabinoxylane makes the film more susceptible to undergo an enzymatic degradation. This meant that the enzyme-dependent propriety issued from the arabinoxylane has been imprinted into the film formulation. This type of polymer film is an interesting system for applications in colon-specific drug delivery system.

  5. Development of a fibrinogen-specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay microarray assay for distinguishing between blood plasma and serum samples.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Rachel M; Zhang, Qibin; Zangar, Richard C; Smith, Richard D; Metz, Thomas O

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a fibrinogen-specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray assay for use in qualitatively distinguishing between blood plasma and serum samples. Three capture antibodies (49D2, HPA001900, and F8512) were evaluated in conjunction with 1D6 as the detection antibody. The data show that 49D2 and (to a lesser extent) F8512 successfully identify previously unknown plasma and serum samples based on approximately a 28-fold difference in signal intensity between the sample types. This assay has utility in rapidly identifying previously archived clinical samples with incomplete annotation in a high-throughput manner prior to proteomic analyses.

  6. 25 CFR 39.137 - May schools operate a language development program without a specific appropriation from Congress?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May schools operate a language development program... Formula Language Development Programs § 39.137 May schools operate a language development program without a specific appropriation from Congress? Yes, a school may operate a language development program...

  7. Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of Mycoplasma bovis-Specific antibody in bison sera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycoplasma bovis has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison. This report demonstrates that ELISAs for detection of M. bovis-specific antibody in cattle are not optimal for identification of seropositive bison. An ELISA optimized for use with bison sera is ...

  8. Label-Free and Enzyme-Free Homogeneous Electrochemical Biosensing Strategy Based on Hybridization Chain Reaction: A Facile, Sensitive, and Highly Specific MicroRNA Assay.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ting; Li, Wei; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Feng

    2015-11-17

    Homogenous electrochemical biosensing strategies have attracted substantial attention, because of their advantages of being immobilization-free and having rapid response and improved recognition efficiency, compared to heterogeneous biosensors; however, the high cost of labeling and the strict reaction conditions of tool enzymes associated with current homogeneous electrochemical methods limit their potential applications. To address these issues, herein we reported, for the first time, a simple label-free and enzyme-free homogeneous electrochemical strategy based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for sensitive and highly specific detection of microRNA (miRNA). The target miRNA triggers the HCR of two species of metastable DNA hairpin probes, resulting in the formation of multiple G-quadruplex-incorporated long duplex DNA chains. Thus, with the electrochemical indicator Methylene Blue (MB) selectively intercalated into the duplex DNA chain and the multiple G-quadruplexes, a significant electrochemical signal drop is observed, which is dependent on the concentration of the target miRNA. Thus, using this "signal-off" mode, a simple, label-free and enzyme-free homogeneous electrochemical strategy for sensitive miRNA assay is readily realized. This strategy also exhibits excellent selectivity to distinguish even single-base mismatched miRNA. Furthermore, this method also exhibits additional advantages of simplicity and low cost, since both expensive labeling and sophisticated probe immobilization processes are avoided. Therefore, the as-proposed label-free and enzyme-free homogeneous electrochemical strategy may become an alternative method for simple, sensitive, and selective miRNA detection, and it has great potential to be applied in miRNA-related clinical diagnostics and biochemical research.

  9. Correlation between antibodies to bisphenol A, its target enzyme protein disulfide isomerase and antibodies to neuron‐specific antigens

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Aristo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Evidence continues to increase linking autoimmunity and other complex diseases to the chemicals commonly found in our environment. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic monomer used widely in many forms, from food containers to toys, medical products and many others. The potential for BPA to participate as a triggering agent for autoimmune diseases is likely due to its known immunological influences. The goal of this research was to determine if immune reactivity to BPA has any correlation with neurological antibodies. BPA binds to a target enzyme called protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) are neuronal antigens that are target sites for neuroinflammation and neuroautoimmunity. We determined the co‐occurrence of anti‐MBP and anti‐MOG antibodies with antibodies made against BPA bound to human serum albumin in 100 healthy human subjects. Correlation between BPA to PDI, BPA to MOG, BPA to MBP, PDI to MBP and PDI to MOG were all highly statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The outcome of our study suggests that immune reactivity to BPA‐human serum albumin and PDI has a high degree of statistical significance with substantial correlation with both MBP and MOG antibody levels. This suggests that BPA may be a trigger for the production of antibodies against PDI, MBP and MOG. Immune reactivity to BPA bound to human tissue proteins may be a contributing factor to neurological autoimmune disorders. Further research is needed to determine the exact relationship of these antibodies with neuroautoimmunities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27610592

  10. Species-specific responsiveness of four enzymes to endosulfan and predation risk questions their usefulness as general biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Trekels, Hendrik; Van de Meutter, Frank; Bervoets, Lieven; Stoks, Robby

    2012-01-01

    General biochemical biomarkers are widely used in current ecotoxicology and may function as early warning signals. We have, however, poor knowledge on how ecologically similar species differ in their biomarker responsiveness and how predation risk may affect these biomarkers, potentially in an interactive way with pesticides. We evaluated this by exposing four corixid water bug species to combinations of endosulfan and predation risk and quantifying the activity of four general enzymatic biomarkers: acetylcholinesterase (AChE), phenoloxidase (PO), catalase (CAT) and superoxidedismutase (SOD). AChE activity was inhibited at an endosulfan concentration of 2 μg l(-1) and this did not differ significantly among species. Predation risk inhibited AChE activity with the same magnitude as endosulfan in one species, S. striata. Reduction in the investment of immune function following pesticide exposure, as measured by the activity of PO, was only observed in C. coleoptrata at 8 μg l(-1) while we observed an increase of PO levels in S. striata. Overall, PO was suppressed under predation risk at 8 μg l(-1) endosulfan. For SOD we observed a pesticide-induced increase across all species under predation risk, while for CAT the pesticide-induced increase was only present without predation risk. These results indicate that even within this group of ecologically similar and closely related species opposing biomarker responses may exist, as observed for PO. Effects of predation risk on all four enzymes, at a similar magnitude as the pesticide effects, further question their usefulness as general biomarkers.

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Blocking Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Avian Metapneumovirus Type C-Specific Antibodies in Multiple Domestic Avian Species

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, Elizabeth A.; Lauer, Dale C.; Swayne, David E.

    2003-01-01

    The first cases of infection caused by avian metapneumoviruses (aMPVs) were described in turkeys with respiratory disease in South Africa during 1978. The causative agent was isolated and identified as a pneumovirus in 1986. aMPVs have been detected in domestic nonpoultry species in Europe, but tests for the detection of these viruses are not available in the United States. To begin to understand the potential role of domestic ducks and geese and wild waterfowl in the epidemiology of aMPV, we have developed and evaluated a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA) for the detection of aMPV type C (aMPV-C)-specific antibodies. This assay method overcomes the species-specific platform of indirect ELISAs to allow detection of aMPV-C-specific antibodies from potentially any avian species. The bELISA was initially tested with experimental turkey serum samples, and the results were found to correlate with those of virus neutralization assays and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA). One thousand serum samples from turkey flocks in Minnesota were evaluated by our bELISA, and the level of agreement of the results of the bELISA and those of the iELISA was 94.9%. In addition, we were able to show that the bELISA could detect aMPV-C-specific antibodies from experimentally infected ducks, indicating its usefulness for the screening of serum samples from multiple avian species. This is the first diagnostic assay for the detection of aMPV-C-specific antibodies from multiple avian species in the United States. PMID:12904358

  12. The Importance of a Role-Specific, In-Hospital Ward Clerk Education Program.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Maggie

    2016-01-01

    Ward clerks are essential members of the healthcare team, providing administrative and organizational support to acute care units and clinics. This role influences such matters as nurses' direct patient-care time, timeliness of patient discharges, and patient safety. To support ward clerks in the varying responsibilities and complex scope of this role, a formal orientation and ongoing education program is imperative. Whereas corporate orientation informs new employees of overall organizational processes, a ward clerk-specific workplace education program prepares individuals for the demands of the position, ultimately supporting the healthcare team and patient safety.

  13. NASA broad-specification fuels combustion technology program: Status and description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fear, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    The program presented is a contracted effort to evolve and demonstrate the technology required to utilize broad-specification fuels in current and next generation commercial Conventional Takeoff and Landing aircraft engines, and to verify this technology in full-scale engine tests in 1983. The program consists of three phases: Combustor Concept Screening, Combustor Optimization Testing, and Engine Verification Testing. The development and screening of the combustion system designs for the CF6-80 engine and the JT9D-7 engine, respectively, in high-pressure sector test rigs are reported.

  14. Sperm-specific expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is mediated by a 91-base-pair promoter containing a CRE-like element.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, T; Balogh, R; Overbeek, P; Bernstein, K E

    1993-01-01

    The gene encoding the testis isozyme of angiotensin-converting enzyme (testis ACE) is one example of the many genes expressed uniquely during spermatogenesis. This protein is expressed by developing germ cells late in their development and results from the activation of a sperm-specific promoter that is located within intron 12 of the gene encoding the somatic isozyme of ACE. In vitro transcription, DNase footprinting, gel shift assays, and transgenic mouse studies have been used to define the minimal testes ACE promoter and to characterize DNA-protein interactions mediating germ cell-specific expression. These studies show that proper cell- and stage-specific expression of testis ACE requires only a small portion of the immediate upstream sequence extending to -91. A critical motif within this core promoter is a cyclic AMP-responsive element sequence that interacts with a testis-specific transactivating factor. Since this putative cyclic AMP-responsive element has been conserved within the testis ACE promoters of different species and is found at the same site in other genes that are expressed specifically in the testis, it may provide a common mechanism for the recognition of sperm-specific promoters. Images PMID:8380220

  15. [Intrafollicular levels of sexual steroids and their relation with the antioxidant enzymes on the oocyte quality in an in vitro fertilization program].

    PubMed

    Kably Ambe, Alberto; Ruiz Anguas, Julián; Carballo Mondragón, Esperanza; Karchmer Krivitsky, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    To establish a correlation between intrafollicular superoxide dismutase enzyme concentrations, activity with oestradiol levels, and the effects on oocyte quality and maturity. Prospective, descriptive and observational. Forty-one patients underwent IVF-ET program. The ovarian stimulation protocol was made with recombinant FSH and GnRH antagonists. All follicles were aspirated one by one, and the follicular fluid was stored at a -20 degrees C room temperature. We retrieved 120 follicular fluids and performed the measurement of oestradiol and superoxide dismutase enzyme on each follicular fluid and its correlation with fertilization and cleavage rates. Statistical analysis was carried out with ANOVA, t Student, chi2 and P Pearson tests. Patients' mean age was of 33.74 +/- 5.04 years, the mean of enzyme activity was of 76.89%, and the mean concentration of superoxide dismutase enzyme was of 68.71 UI/L. According to oocyte quality or maturity, no statistical differences were observed when comparing oestradiol levels with superoxide dismutase enzyme concentrations. But when we analized both variables, we observed a positive correlation in metaphase 2 oocytes (p = 0.236). When we correlated the superoxide dismutase enzyme activity with oestradiol concentrations in relation to oocyte quality, a positive correlation in good quality oocytes was observed too (p = 0.218). We perceived a strong correlation between SOD concentrations and oestradiol intrafollicular measurements in good quality oocytes. Oocyte maturity and development are conditionated by a close relationship between SOD and intrafollicular oestradiol.

  16. Siddhartha: Domain-specific unit test generation for "low-testibility" programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Arthur Alexander

    This Dissertation validates the hypothesis that domain-specific language (DSL) methodology can provide essential automation support for specification-based testing (SBT) of computer program units expressed in difficult-to-test (i.e., "low-testability"), domain-specific design styles. This Dissertation presents Siddhartha, an extension to DSL methodology for development of program synthesizers to support SBT methods in novel application domains. Synthesizers map formal test data specifications (TestSpecs) into unit test driver procedures (Drivers). Both TestSpecs and Driver reference designs are represented via DSLs. Synthesizer development is iterative and example-driven. A Domain Designer applying the Siddhartha methodology in a novel application domain first selects a collection of general, example TestSpecs, then manually codes a collection of corresponding Drivers. Each Driver is expressed in a different reference design that specifically accommodates difficult-to-test, domain-specific program unit under test (UUT) design styles. After selecting the most promising Driver reference design, the set of (TestSpec, Driver) pairs become test cases for the synthesizer under development. The Domain Designer then designs a TestSpec→Driver translation function. The translation function maps TestSpecs to Driver kernels in the selected reference design. The translation function design simplifies DSL development by modularizing both TestSpec and Driver reference design DSLs into syntactic productions. This effectively optimizes DSL representations to support efficient TestSpec→Driver synthesis. This Dissertation validates the hypothesis by answering the question "What are the relative costs and benefits of applying DSL methods to generate requirements-based and regression Drivers for a flight control system expressed in