Science.gov

Sample records for programs lessons learned

  1. ACES program - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Victoria L.; Rice, Sally C.; Waites, Henry B.

    1988-01-01

    The ACES Program involved the experimental evaluation of three LSS (large space structures) control design techniques at the LSS GTF (ground test facility) at NASA/MSFC. The three techniques were developed under the ACOSS (active control of space structures) Program specifically for application to LSS. The techniques included FAMESS (filter accommodated model error sensitivity suppression), HAC/LAC (high authority control/low authority control), and positivity. Some of the lessons that have been learned during the course of the ACES program are examined.

  2. Lessons learned from RTG programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinstrom, Robert M.; Cockfield, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    During the Cassini Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program, the heritage RTG design was reviewed and modified to incorporate lessons learned. Design changes were made both to resolve problems as they occurred and to correct difficulties noted in earlier missions. Topics addressed in this paper included problems experienced previously at the launch facility in attaching the pressure relief device to the generators, and the open circuit conditions that occurred at times in the resistance temperature device wiring harness. Also discussed is a problem caused by mistakes in software configuration management. How lessons learned refined the RTG design and integration with the spacecraft are discussed and the adopted solutions are described.

  3. Lessons learned from RTG programs

    SciTech Connect

    Reinstrom, R.M.; Cockfield, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    During the Cassini Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program, the heritage RTG design was reviewed and modified to incorporate lessons learned. Design changes were made both to resolve problems as they occurred and to correct difficulties noted in earlier missions. Topics addressed in this paper included problems experienced previously at the launch facility in attaching the pressure relief device to the generators, and the open circuit conditions that occurred at times in the resistance temperature device wiring harness. Also discussed is a problem caused by mistakes in software configuration management. How lessons learned refined the RTG design and integration with the spacecraft are discussed and the adopted solutions are described. {copyright} {ital 1998 Lockheed Martin Missles and Space, reproduced with permission.}

  4. Constellation Program Lessons Learned. Volume 2; Detailed Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer; Neubek, Deborah J.; Thomas, L. Dale

    2011-01-01

    These lessons learned are part of a suite of hardware, software, test results, designs, knowledge base, and documentation that comprises the legacy of the Constellation Program. The context, summary information, and lessons learned are presented in a factual format, as known and described at the time. While our opinions might be discernable in the context, we have avoided all but factually sustainable statements. Statements should not be viewed as being either positive or negative; their value lies in what we did and what we learned that is worthy of passing on. The lessons include both "dos" and "don ts." In many cases, one person s "do" can be viewed as another person s "don t"; therefore, we have attempted to capture both perspectives when applicable and useful. While Volume I summarizes the views of those who managed the program, this Volume II encompasses the views at the working level, describing how the program challenges manifested in day-to-day activities. Here we see themes that were perhaps hinted at, but not completely addressed, in Volume I: unintended consequences of policies that worked well at higher levels but lacked proper implementation at the working level; long-term effects of the "generation gap" in human space flight development, the need to demonstrate early successes at the expense of thorough planning, and the consequences of problems and challenges not yet addressed because other problems and challenges were more immediate or manifest. Not all lessons learned have the benefit of being operationally vetted, since the program was cancelled shortly after Preliminary Design Review. We avoid making statements about operational consequences (with the exception of testing and test flights that did occur), but we do attempt to provide insight into how operational thinking influenced design and testing. The lessons have been formatted with a description, along with supporting information, a succinct statement of the lesson learned, and

  5. Army Programs: Army Lessons Learned Program: System Development and Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-10

    Army Regulation 11–33 Army Programs Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application Headquarters Department of the Army Washington...Army Programs: Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s...Pages 14 SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 11–33 Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application This revision-- o Establishes a system to identify

  6. An Alternative Professional Development Program: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erklenz-Watts, Michelle; Westbay, Theresa; Lynd-Balta, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    This article describes how a group of small liberal arts college faculty embraced the opportunity to create a faculty learning circle as an alternative professional development program. We provide a review of the program, discuss the lessons learned, and offer recommendations for future efforts in developing a similar faculty development program.…

  7. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  8. Lessons learned on the Skylab program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Lessons learned in the Skylab program and their application and adaptation to other space programs are summarized. Recommendations and action taken on particular problems are described. The use of Skylab recommendations to identify potential problems of future space programs is discussed.

  9. Military Housing Privatization Initiative Lessons Learned Program: An Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    lessons previously documented within the lessons learned system, which were relearned at the POM/NPS project. Given this data, the lessons learned program is...a partial success but overall has a positive impact on the MHPI. The current lessons learned program improves each new privatization project

  10. Lessons Learned While Conducting Educational Program Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Olivia; Jones, Irma S.; Pena, Eli E.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment, accountability, and strategic planning are all processes that are included in accreditation for colleges and universities. For most colleges and universities, starting the reaffirmation process means identifying current assessment practices and reports from academic units and programs. This paper discusses the lessons learned during a…

  11. LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie C.

    2007-05-24

    This document provides requirements and guidelines for conducting a Lessons Learned and Best Practices Program within Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to ensure ongoing improvement of safety and reliability, prevent the recurrence of significant adverse events/trends, and determine implementation strategies that will help LBNL successfully meet the missions and goals set forth by the Department of Energy (DOE).

  12. Formulation and Use of Lessons Learned in NAVSEASYSCOM Acquisition Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    learned program . The stated purpose of REEF POINTS, and lessons learned documents in other commands as well, is to aid project managers. Interviews...This report presents a study of Ship Acquisition Reef Points, a Naval Sea Systems Command document presenting lessons learned and an ongoing lessons

  13. Lessons Learned in Architecting Human Spaceflight Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Brian; Thomas, Dale

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamentals of architecting a major human spaceflight program and the lessons that can be learned from Constellation. Constellation is/was NASA's program to implement a new generation of human exploration missions to the moon and beyond. It is/was a tightly-coupled program where a unique set of architectural challenges can be seen and evaluated to better understand how architecting of such systems can be improved upon in the future. While the specific issues discussed in this paper derive from the current Constellation architecture they share threads with previously-crewed systems including Apollo and Shuttle and are likely to be common to any human exploration system or system of significant technical and programmatic complexity.

  14. SOFIA Program SE and I Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ronald J.; Fobel, Laura J.; Brignola, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Once a "Troubled Project" threatened with cancellation, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Program has overcome many difficult challenges and recently achieved its first light images. To achieve success, SOFIA had to overcome significant deficiencies in fundamental Systems Engineering identified during a major Program restructuring. This presentation will summarize the lessons learn in Systems Engineering on the SOFIA Program. After the Program was reformulated, an initial assessment of Systems Engineering established the scope of the problem and helped to set a list of priorities that needed to be work. A revised Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) was written to address the new Program structure and requirements established in the approved NPR7123.1A. An important result of the "Technical Planning" effort was the decision by the Program and Technical Leadership team to re-phasing the lifecycle into increments. The reformed SOFIA Program Office had to quickly develop and establish several new System Engineering core processes including; Requirements Management, Risk Management, Configuration Management and Data Management. Implementing these processes had to consider the physical and cultural diversity of the SOFIA Program team which includes two Projects spanning two NASA Centers, a major German partnership, and sub-contractors located across the United States and Europe. The SOFIA Program experience represents a creative approach to doing "System Engineering in the middle" while a Program is well established. Many challenges were identified and overcome. The SOFIA example demonstrates it is never too late to benefit from fixing deficiencies in the System Engineering processes.

  15. Does the Weekly Lesson Program Affect the Language Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engin, Ali Osman

    2006-01-01

    The subject we research is, "Does the weekly lesson program affect the language learning?". Our aim is to indicate the importance of the weekly lesson program in learning. And the research we made is for understanding the importance of the curriculum on students' successes. We have chosen questionnaire method and prepared a questionnaire…

  16. Army Medical Department Lessons Learned Program marks 25th anniversary.

    PubMed

    Cannon, David W; McCollum, Jeffery

    2011-11-01

    The year 2010 marked the 25th anniversary of the Center for Army Lessons Learned (CALL) as well as the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) Center and School's Lessons Learned Division. In the aftermath of Operation Urgent Fury in 1983, the Army recognized the need to create an organization whose sole purpose was to collect, review, and analyze lessons learned and created the CALL in 1985 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The AMEDD followed suit and established the Medical Information System/AMEDD Lessons Learned office under the Directorate of Evaluation and Standardization to research and compile lessons learned as the AMEDD's point of contact for the CALL program. Over these past 25 years the AMEDD Center and School Lessons Learned program evolved and underwent organizational realignments, but the overall mission continues to promote changes either directly or indirectly in the AMEDD's Doctrine, Organizations, Training, Leader Development, Materiel, Personnel and Facilities domains and capabilities to provide combat health service support on the battlefield.

  17. Web Cast on Arsenic Demonstration Program: Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web cast presentation covered 10 Lessons Learned items selected from the Arsenic Demonstration Program with supporting information. The major items discussed include system design and performance items and the cost of the technologies.

  18. Web Cast on Arsenic Demonstration Program: Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web cast presentation covered 10 Lessons Learned items selected from the Arsenic Demonstration Program with supporting information. The major items discussed include system design and performance items and the cost of the technologies.

  19. Efficient or Effective? An Assessment of the Army Lessons Learned Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-26

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT EFFICIENT OR EFFECTIVE? AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ARMY LESSONS LEARNED PROGRAM by... Lessons Learned Program FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 26 March 2007 WORD COUNT: 6,100 PAGES: 20 KEY TERMS: Army Lessons Learned...EFFICIENT OR EFFECTIVE? AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ARMY LESSONS LEARNED PROGRAM General Scott Wallace, the Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC

  20. Constellation Program: Lessons Learned. Volume 1; Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    This document (Volume I) provides an executive summary of the lessons learned from the Constellation Program. A companion Volume II provides more detailed analyses for those seeking further insight and information. In this volume, Section 1.0 introduces the approach in preparing and organizing the content to enable rapid assimilation of the lessons. Section 2.0 describes the contextual framework in which the Constellation Program was formulated and functioned that is necessary to understand most of the lessons. Context of a former program may seem irrelevant in the heady days of new program formulation. However, readers should take some time to understand the context. Many of the lessons would be different in a different context, so the reader should reflect on the similarities and differences in his or her current circumstances. Section 3.0 summarizes key findings developed from the significant lessons learned at the program level that appear in Section 4.0. Readers can use the key findings in Section 3.0 to peruse for particular topics, and will find more supporting detail and analyses in Section 4.0 in a topical format. Appendix A contains a white paper describing the Constellation Program formulation that may be of use to readers wanting more context or background information. The reader will no doubt recognize some very similar themes from previous lessons learned, blue-ribbon committee reviews, National Academy reviews, and advisory panel reviews for this and other large-scale human spaceflight programs; including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Shuttle/Mir, and the ISS. This could represent an inability to learn lessons from previous generations; however, it is more likely that similar challenges persist in the Agency structure and approach to program formulation, budget advocacy, and management. Perhaps the greatest value of these Constellation lessons learned can be found in viewing them in context with these previous efforts to guide and advise the Agency and its

  1. Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) Program Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenmoyer, Alan; Horkachuck, Mike; Shotwell, Gwynne; Manners, Bruce; Culbertson, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This report has been developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) Risk Management team in close coordination with the COTS Program. This document provides a point-in-time, cumulative, summary of actionable key lessons learned derived from the design project. Lessons learned invariably address challenges and risks and the way in which these areas have been addressed. Accordingly the risk management thread is woven throughout the document.

  2. Building a Better Lessons Learned Program - White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Charles Frederick

    2002-04-01

    Lessons learned are more in vogue today than at any time in our history. You can’t tune into a news broadcast without hearing a reference to the concept – and for good reason. People are finally accepting the idea that they may be able to benefit from the experiences of others. Corporations, government departments, and even the military are actively using lessons learned information to help them to achieve their varied goals. The Department of Energy is one of the government departments that has a Lessons Learned Program and requires its contractors to develop a program of their own. Unfortunately, adequate guidance is not available to enable contractors to design a fully mature program (i.e., a program that will immediately meet their every need) and to ensure that it is implemented such that it will be deemed acceptable during subsequent assessments. The purpose of this paper is to present the reader with information that might help him or her better plan and develop a new or upgraded Lessons Learned Program. The information is based on the actual development and implementation of a “second generation” lessons learned program and is presented as a chronicle of the steps taken to build the rudimentary system and the subsequent events and problems that led to the programs present-day configuration.

  3. Noncombatant Evacuation Operations: Department of State’s Lessons Learned Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    NONCOMBATANT EVACUATION OPERATIONS: DEPARTMENT OF STATE’S LESSONS LEARNED PROGRAM A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S...Thesis Title: Noncombatant Evacuation Operations: Department of State’s Lessons Learned Program Approved by: , Thesis Committee... LEARNED PROGRAM , by Jeffrey M. Titus, 81 pages. Adequately capturing lessons learned from noncombatant evacuation operations is crucial to improving

  4. Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Have you participated in professional development (PD) programs that never met your expectations? Have you found it difficult to find a program that fits well with your academic and pedagogical needs? If so, the author shares your sentiment. In this article, he describes three lessons learned while developing and conducting a PD partnership…

  5. Program Evaluation: Lessons To be Learned from a District-Wide Middle School Tutorial Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Candace; LeBlanc, Patrice; Collins, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates Palm Beach County School District's Safe School Center tutorial program, a summer-school program for middle-school students who failed subjects during the academic year. Describes program successes, failures, and lessons learned. (Contains 38 references.) (PKP)

  6. Lessons learned -- NREL Village Power Program

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, L.

    1998-07-01

    In 1993, a workshop was convened at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to discuss the issues of applying renewable energy in a sustainable manner to international rural development. One of the summary recommendations was that NREL could assist in the renewable energy for rural electrification effort by developing and supplying six related activities: resource assessment, comparative analysis and modeling, performance monitoring and analysis, pilot project development, internet-based project data, communications, and training. In response to this recommendation, NREL launched its Village Power Program consisting of these activities that cut across NREL technologies and disciplines. Currently NREL is active in 20 countries, with pilot projects in 12 of those countries. At this time the technologies include photovoltaics, wind, biomass, and hybrids. The rural applications include home lighting and communications, water pumping, schools and health posts, battery charging stations, ecotourism, and village systems. These pilot projects are central to the renewable energy village power development through the demonstration of three aspects critical to replication and implementation of the projects on a significant scale. The three aspects are technical functionality, economic competitiveness, and institutional sustainability. It is important to note that the pilot projects from which NREL's experience has been gained were funded and, in many cases, developed by other organizations and agencies. NREL's role has been one of technical assistance or project management or both. The purpose of this paper is to describe the lessons NREL staff has gleaned from their participation in the various pilot projects. The author hopes that these lessons will help the Renewable Energy-Based Rural Electrification (RERE) community in implementing sustainable projects that lead to replication.

  7. Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Norris M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses lessons learned in the implementation of James Comer's School Development Program including: (1) leadership; (2) overcoming resistance to change; (3) time required for change; (4) creating a supportive climate; (5) staff commitment and staff time; (6) personnel and staff training; (7) parent involvement; (8) connecting school and…

  8. Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Norris M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses lessons learned in the implementation of James Comer's School Development Program including: (1) leadership; (2) overcoming resistance to change; (3) time required for change; (4) creating a supportive climate; (5) staff commitment and staff time; (6) personnel and staff training; (7) parent involvement; (8) connecting school and…

  9. Savannah River Site environmental restoration lessons learned program

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, R.A.; Leibfarth, E.C.; Treger, T.M.; Blackmon, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    For the past three years environmental restoration has been formally consolidated at Savannah River Site. Accomplishments include waste site investigations to closure activities. Positive, as well as negatively impacting, events have occurred. Until recently, lessons learned were captured on a less than formal basis. Now, a program based upon critiques, evaluations and corrective actions is being used. This presentation reviews the development, implementation and use of that program.

  10. Lessons Learned from the NREL Village Power Program

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.

    1998-07-01

    Renewable energy solutions for village power applications can be economical, functional, and sustainable. Pilot projects are an appropriate step in the development of a commercially viable market for rural renewable energy solutions. Moreover, there are a significant number of rural electrification projects under way that employ various technologies, delivery mechanisms, and financing arrangements. These projects, if properly evaluated, communicated, and their lessons incorporated in future projects and programs, can lead the way to a future that includes a robust opportunity for cost-effective, renewable-based village power systems. This paper summarizes some of NRELs recent experiences and lessons learned.

  11. Lessons learned from the NREL village power program

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.W.

    1998-09-01

    Renewable energy solutions for village power applications can be economical, functional, and sustainable. Pilot projects are an appropriate step in the development of a commercially viable market for rural renewable energy solutions. Moreover, there are a significant number of rural electrification projects under way that employ various technologies, delivery mechanisms, and financing arrangements. These projects, if properly evaluated, communicated, and their lessons incorporated in future projects and programs, can lead the way to a future that includes a robust opportunity for cost-effective, renewable-based village power systems. This paper summarizes some of NREL`s recent experiences and lessons learned.

  12. Outcomes and lessons learned from evaluating TRICARE's disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Dall, Timothy M; Askarinam Wagner, Rachel C; Zhang, Yiduo; Yang, Wenya; Arday, David R; Gantt, Cynthia J

    2010-06-01

    To share outcomes and lessons learned from an evaluation of disease management (DM) programs for asthma, congestive heart failure (CHF), and diabetes for TRICARE patients. Multiyear evaluation of participants in voluntary, opt-out DM programs. Patient-centered programs, administered by 3 regional contractors, provide phone-based consultations with a care manager, educational materials, and newsletters. The study sample consisted of 23,793 asthma, 4092 CHF, and 29,604 diabetes patients with at least 6 months' tenure in the program. Medical claims were analyzed to quantify program effect on healthcare utilization, medical costs, and clinical outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis with an historical control group was used to predict patient outcomes in the absence of DM. The difference between actual and predicted DM patient outcomes was attributed to the program. A patient survey collected data on program satisfaction and perceived usefulness of program information and services. Modest improvements in patient outcomes included reduced inpatient days and medical costs, and (with few exceptions) increased percentages of patients receiving appropriate medications and tests. Annual per patient reductions in medical costs were $453, $371, and $783 for asthma, CHF, and diabetes program participants, respectively. The estimated return on investment was $1.26 per $1.00 spent on DM services. Findings suggest that the DM programs more than pay for themselves, in addition to improving patient health and quality of life. Lessons learned in program design, implementation, effectiveness, and evaluation may benefit employers contemplating DM, DM providers, and evaluators of DM programs.

  13. Lessons Learned from the Arizona Galileoscope Star Party Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, R. T.; Dugan, C.; Walker, C. E.

    2013-01-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory has joined together multiple audiences in various communities to conduct outreach using Galileoscopes. The audience consists of 5th grade students and teachers, their families and friends, and anyone else who wants to attend a special star party led by students using Galileoscopes. However, across one community there are many subcultures that one should be responsive to in the program design. The program model, which has been independently evaluated, combines professional development and classroom visits by NOAO education practitioners with the goal of a community star party. We have conducted the program in several mid-sized Arizona cities after an initial prototype star party held near the state capitol building in Phoenix. In this program, with Galileoscopes purchased with funding from Science Foundation Arizona, we have now held Galileoscope star parties in Flagstaff, Safford, and Globe, with two programs in Yuma, Arizona. We will discuss planning efforts, professional development plans and lessons learned, and specific logistical issues that have arisen in the program. Although the professional development component for teachers is rather traditional, the overall lessons learned are applicable to many astronomy programs for non-traditional audiences.

  14. Lessons Learned from Program Review Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mets, Lisa A.

    1995-01-01

    Review of literature concerning the use of program review in higher education lists sources discussing the review process, focusing on the links between program review and other institutional processes, and addressing application of program review principles and practices to different higher education settings. Critical factors for successful use…

  15. Lessons learned from IRIS EPO program evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2012-12-01

    Evaluating the overall impact of EPO programs that include activities ranging from formal education through broad public outreach, is a complex issue. The impact of education activities targeted at narrowly defined audiences is generally easier to quantify than the national impact of outreach activities conducted by a relatively small program. For educational activities, our approach has been to leverage the best-practices identified through research and to continuously assess the individual elements internally with the intention of making improvements based on the data generated and the existing research. By constructing our elements on the best practices identified by the research community we feel that internal formative evaluation is a valid means to determine if an activity is effective, particularly when the results are compared to similar programs. For example, effective practices of professional development are well documented in the literature. As a result, this allows us to shape our programs and our evaluations to monitor elements that have been identified as key by the educational research community. Further, such actions allow us to avoid allocating significant resources with the intention of pinning down direct causal relationships between our programs and consumers, when similar interventions (conducted by others) have already shown such relationships. Ongoing review by an EPO advisory committee also provides regular oversight of program impact. While we find internal and external formative evaluation extremely useful in shaping the program and documenting its impact, we also recognize the value of a summative evaluation process. For example, an external summative evaluation of the IRIS EPO program was conducted in 2009, followed by an external panel review, as part of the regular review of IRIS programs. We found that the most valuable part of the external evaluation was our preparation, including clarifying the goals of each of the elements of the

  16. The Clean Coal Technology Program: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program is a unique partnership between the federal government and industry that has as its primary goal the successful introduction of new clean coal utilization technologies into the energy marketplace. Clean coal technologies being demonstrated under the CCT Program are establishing a technology base that will enable the nation to meet more stringent energy and environmental goals. Most of the, demonstrations are being conducted at commercial scale, in actual user environments, and under circumstances typical of commercial operations. These features allow the potential of the technologies to be evaluated in their intended commercial applications. Each application addresses one of the following four market sectors: advanced electric power generation; environmental control devices; coal processing for clean fuels; and industrial applications. The purpose of this report is fourfold: Explain the CCT program as a model for successful joint government industry partnership for selecting and demonstrating technologies that have promise for adaptation to the energy marketplace; set forth the process by which the process has been implemented and the changes that have been made to improve that process; outline efforts employed to inform potential users and other interested parties about the technologies being developed; and examine some of the questions which must be considered in determining if the CCT Program model can be applied to other programs.

  17. Next Generation Launch Technology Program Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Stephen; Tyson, Richard

    2005-01-01

    In November 2002, NASA revised its Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP) to evolve the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) to serve as a theme for two emerging programs. The first of these, the Orbital Space Plane (OSP), was intended to provide crew-escape and crew-transfer functions for the ISS. The second, the NGLT Program, developed technologies needed for safe, routine space access for scientific exploration, commerce, and national defense. The NGLT Program was comprised of 12 projects, ranging from fundamental high-temperature materials research to full-scale engine system developments (turbine and rocket) to scramjet flight test. The Program included technology advancement activities with a broad range of objectives, ultimate applications/timeframes, and technology maturity levels. An over-arching Systems Engineering and Analysis (SE&A) approach was employed to focus technology advancements according to a common set of requirements. Investments were categorized into three segments of technology maturation: propulsion technologies, launch systems technologies, and SE&A.

  18. Evaluating the Learning Opportunities Program: Some Challenges and Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Shannon; Newberry, Jason; McManus, Kelly; Korabik, Karen; Evans, Mary Ann

    2000-01-01

    Describes the program developed at the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada, to promote the academic and workplace success and social and emotional adjustment of students with learning disabilities. Presents details of the evaluation planned for this program, emphasizing the importance of flexibility. (SLD)

  19. Pollution prevention program for new projects -- Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, J.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to relay the experience of the Office of New Production Reactors (NP) in developing and implementing its pollution prevention program. NP was established to plan, design, and construct a new safe and environmentally acceptable nuclear reactor capacity necessary to provide an assured supply of tritium to maintain the nation`s long-term deterrent capability. The Program offered the Department of Energy an opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to environmental protection via minimization of environmental releases; new design offers the best opportunity for pollution prevention. The NP pollution prevention program was never fully implemented because NP`s tritium production design activity was recovery terminated. The information in this paper represented lessons learned from the last three years of NP operation.

  20. The computerization of programming: Ada (R) lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struble, Dennis D.

    1986-01-01

    One of the largest systems yet written in Ada has been constructed. This system is the Intermetrics Ada compiler. Many lessons have been learned during the implementation of this Ada compiler. Some of these lessons, concentrating on those lessons relevant to large system implementations are described. The characteristics of the Ada compiler implementation project at Intermetrics are also described. Some specific experiences during the implementation are pointed out.

  1. License renewal demonstration program: NRC observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, R.J.; Kuo, P.T.; Newberry, S.F.

    1996-12-01

    This report summarizes the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff`s observations and lessons learned from the five License Renewal Demonstration Program (LRDP) site visits performed by the staff from March 25, 1996, through August 16, 1996. The LRDP was a Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) program intended to assess the effectiveness of the guidance provided by NEI 95-10, Revision 0, {open_quotes}Industry Guideline for Implementing the Requirements of 10 CFR Part 54 - The License Renewal Rule,{close_quotes} to implement the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 54 (10 CFR Part 54), {open_quotes}Requirements for Renewal of Operating Licenses for Nuclear Power Plants.{close_quotes} In general, NEI 95-10 appeared to contain the basic guidance needed for scoping, screening, identifying aging effects, developing aging management programs, and performing time-limited aging analyses. However, inconsistent implementation of this guidance in some areas was an indication that clarification of existing guidance and/or the inclusion-of some new guidance may be needed for applicants to develop a license renewal program that is consistent with the intent of the rule.

  2. Moving Nursing Program Portfolio Assessment From Midterm to End of Program: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Kari; Rossetti, Jeanette; Oldenburg, Nancy; Abendroth, Maryann; Uhlken, Connie; Musker, Kathleen; Peters, Bradley; Paramore, Patricia

    2016-11-01

    Portfolio assessment promotes a culture of evidence, evaluates program outcomes, and provides an opportunity to assess the acquisition of knowledge and skills that are not easily assessed by examinations and other traditional assessment methods in nursing curricula. The portfolio program of 1 Midwestern school of nursing recently moved portfolio assessment to the end of program. The process of this change including logistics, rubric development, and lessons learned is highlighted.

  3. NASA's In Space Propulsion Technology Program Accomplishments and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les C.; Harris, David

    2008-01-01

    funding for over half of the technologies in the original portfolio. In addition, the frequency at which the application requirements for the program changed exceeded the development time required to mature technologies: forcing sometimes radical rescoping of research efforts already halfway (or more) to completion. At the end of its fifth year, both the scope and funding of the program were at a minimum despite the program successfully meeting all of it's initial high priority objectives. This paper will describe the program, its requirements, technology portfolio, and technology maturation processes. Also discussed will be the major technology milestones achieved and the lessons learned from managing a $100M+ technology program.

  4. NASA's In Space Propulsion Technology Program Accomplishments and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les C.; Harris, David

    2008-01-01

    funding for over half of the technologies in the original portfolio. In addition, the frequency at which the application requirements for the program changed exceeded the development time required to mature technologies: forcing sometimes radical rescoping of research efforts already halfway (or more) to completion. At the end of its fifth year, both the scope and funding of the program were at a minimum despite the program successfully meeting all of it's initial high priority objectives. This paper will describe the program, its requirements, technology portfolio, and technology maturation processes. Also discussed will be the major technology milestones achieved and the lessons learned from managing a $100M+ technology program.

  5. Lessons learned and their application to program development and cultural issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Gilbert L.

    1991-01-01

    The main objectives of space product assurance are, in effect, the same as those of Total Quality Management (TQM) or its many variants. The most significant ingredients are the lessons learned and their application to ongoing and future programs as they are affected by changes in the cultural environment. The cultural issues which affect almost everything done in technical programs and projects are considered. Understanding the lessons learned and the synergism which results from this combination of knowledge, culture, and lessons learned is identified as crucial. A brief discussion of the closed loop linkage that should exist between the world of hands on activities and that of educational institutions is presented.

  6. Denmark's Master of Public Governance Program: Assessment and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greve, Carsten; Pedersen, Anne Reff

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on Denmark's Master of Public Governance and its assessments and lessons learned. Denmark is seen to have an efficient economy and public sector, a digitalized public service delivery system, and an advanced work-life balance. The Danish government invested substantial resources into developing a Master of Public Governance…

  7. Assessment and Program Accountability in Early Childhood Education: Lessons Learned in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boat, Mary; Zorn, Debbie; Austin, James T.

    2005-01-01

    Ensuring that children, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds, start school ready to learn is an important goal. This paper presents lessons learned from the state of Ohio's multi-year program to develop a standards-based assessment system for programs delivering state-funded early childhood education (ECE) through programs receiving…

  8. Blended learning: strengths, challenges, and lessons learned in an interprofessional training program.

    PubMed

    Lotrecchiano, G R; McDonald, P L; Lyons, L; Long, T; Zajicek-Farber, M

    2013-11-01

    This field report outlines the goals of providing a blended learning model for an interdisciplinary training program for healthcare professionals who care for children with disabilities. The curriculum blended traditional face-to-face or on-site learning with integrated online interactive instruction. Credit earning and audited graduate level online coursework, community engagement experiences, and on-site training with maternal and child health community engagement opportunities were blended into a cohesive program. The training approach emphasized adult learning principles in different environmental contexts integrating multiple components of the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities Program. This paper describes the key principles adopted for this blended approach and the accomplishments, challenges, and lessons learned. The discussion offers examples from training content, material gathered through yearly program evaluation, as well as university course evaluations. The lessons learned consider the process and the implications for the role of blended learning in this type of training program with suggestions for future development and adoption by other programs.

  9. Developing built environment programs in local health departments: lessons learned from a nationwide mentoring program.

    PubMed

    Rube, Kate; Veatch, Maggie; Huang, Katy; Sacks, Rachel; Lent, Megan; Goldstein, Gail P; Lee, Karen K

    2014-05-01

    Local health departments (LHDs) have a key role to play in developing built environment policies and programs to encourage physical activity and combat obesity and related chronic diseases. However, information to guide LHDs' effective engagement in this arena is lacking. During 2011-2012, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) facilitated a built environment peer mentoring program for 14 LHDs nationwide. Program objectives included supporting LHDs in their efforts to achieve built environment goals, offering examples from DOHMH's built environment work to guide LHDs, and building a healthy built environment learning network. We share lessons learned that can guide LHDs in developing successful healthy built environment agendas.

  10. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Program Overview and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Stan R.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) program is provided with a summary of lessons learned since the first test firing in 1977. Fifteen different lessons learned are discussed that fundamentally changed the motor's design, processing, and RSRM program risk management systems. The evolution of the rocket motor design is presented including the baseline or High Performance Solid Rocket Motor (HPM), the Filament Wound Case (FWC), the RSRM, and the proposed Five-Segment Booster (FSB).

  11. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Program Overview and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Stan R.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) program is provided with a summary of lessons learned since the first test firing in 1977. Fifteen different lessons learned are discussed that fundamentally changed the motor's design, processing, and RSRM program risk management systems. The evolution of the rocket motor design is presented including the baseline or High Performance Solid Rocket Motor (HPM), the Filament Wound Case (FWC), the RSRM, and the proposed Five-Segment Booster (FSB).

  12. Sharing lessons learned - what have we learned?

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, J.C., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

    1997-11-26

    A set of viewgraphs for presenting what has been learned from experience with the Department of Energy`s Lessons Learned program, covering a brief history, the system and tools for sharing and accessing Lessons Learned, and how Lessons Learned can help the audience.

  13. Lessons Learned in Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. C.; Ryan, R. S.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations.

  14. Hepatocyte transplantation program: Lessons learned and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Ibars, Eugenia Pareja; Cortes, Miriam; Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, Maria José; López, Slivia; Castell, José Vicente; Mir, José

    2016-01-14

    This review aims to share the lessons we learned over time during the setting of the hepatocyte transplantation (HT) program at the Hepatic Cell Therapy Unit at Hospital La Fe in Valencia. New sources of liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation have been explored. The hepatocyte isolation and cryopreservation procedures have been optimized and quality criteria for assessment of functionality of hepatocyte preparations and suitability for HT have been established. The results indicate that: (1) Only highly viable and functional hepatocytes allow to recover those functions lacking in the native liver; (2) Organs with steatosis (≥ 40%) and from elderly donors are declined since low hepatocyte yields, viability and cell survival after cryopreservation, are obtained; (3) Neonatal hepatocytes are cryopreserved without significant loss of viability or function representing high-quality cells to improve human HT; (4) Cryopreservation has the advantage of providing hepatocytes constantly available and of allowing the quality evaluation and suitability for transplantation; and (5) Our results from 5 adults with acute liver failure and 4 from children with inborn metabolic diseases, indicate that HT could be a very useful and safe cell therapy, as long as viable and metabolically functional human hepatocytes are used.

  15. Hepatocyte transplantation program: Lessons learned and future strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ibars, Eugenia Pareja; Cortes, Miriam; Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, Maria José; López, Slivia; Castell, José Vicente; Mir, José

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to share the lessons we learned over time during the setting of the hepatocyte transplantation (HT) program at the Hepatic Cell Therapy Unit at Hospital La Fe in Valencia. New sources of liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation have been explored. The hepatocyte isolation and cryopreservation procedures have been optimized and quality criteria for assessment of functionality of hepatocyte preparations and suitability for HT have been established. The results indicate that: (1) Only highly viable and functional hepatocytes allow to recover those functions lacking in the native liver; (2) Organs with steatosis (≥ 40%) and from elderly donors are declined since low hepatocyte yields, viability and cell survival after cryopreservation, are obtained; (3) Neonatal hepatocytes are cryopreserved without significant loss of viability or function representing high-quality cells to improve human HT; (4) Cryopreservation has the advantage of providing hepatocytes constantly available and of allowing the quality evaluation and suitability for transplantation; and (5) Our results from 5 adults with acute liver failure and 4 from children with inborn metabolic diseases, indicate that HT could be a very useful and safe cell therapy, as long as viable and metabolically functional human hepatocytes are used. PMID:26811633

  16. Sharing Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, Bryan L.

    2004-09-01

    Workplace safety is inextricably tied to the culture – the leadership, management and organization – of the entire company. Nor is a safety lesson fundamentally different from any other business lesson. With these points in mind, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recast its lessons learned program in 2000. The laboratory retained elements of a traditional lessons learned program, such as tracking and trending safety metrics, and added a best practices element to increase staff involvement in creating a safer, healthier work environment. Today, the Lessons Learned/Best Practices program offers the latest business thinking summarized from current external publications and shares better ways PNNL staff have discovered for doing things. According to PNNL strategic planning director Marilyn Quadrel, the goal is to sharpen the business acumen, project management ability and leadership skills of all staff and to capture the benefits of practices that emerge from lessons learned. A key tool in the PNNL effort to accelerate learning from past mistakes is one that can be easily implemented by other firms and tailored to their specific needs. It is the weekly placement of Lessons Learned/Best Practices articles in the lab’s internal electronic newsletter. The program is equally applicable in highly regulated environments, such as the national laboratories, and in enterprises that may have fewer external requirements imposed on their operations. And it is cost effective, using less than the equivalent of one fulltime person to administer.

  17. Early Lessons Learned from Extramural School Programs That Offer HPV Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Kim A.; Entzel, Pamela; Berger, Wendy; Caskey, Rachel N.; Shlay, Judith C.; Stubbs, Brenda W.; Smith, Jennifer S.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There has been little evaluation of school-located vaccination programs that offer human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in US schools without health centers (ie, extramural programs). This article summarizes lessons learned from such programs. Methods: In July to August 2010, 5 programs were identi?ed. Semistructured, in-depth telephone…

  18. Early Lessons Learned from Extramural School Programs That Offer HPV Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Kim A.; Entzel, Pamela; Berger, Wendy; Caskey, Rachel N.; Shlay, Judith C.; Stubbs, Brenda W.; Smith, Jennifer S.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There has been little evaluation of school-located vaccination programs that offer human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in US schools without health centers (ie, extramural programs). This article summarizes lessons learned from such programs. Methods: In July to August 2010, 5 programs were identi?ed. Semistructured, in-depth telephone…

  19. The Division Command Lessons Learned Program: What Division Commanders Can Teach Mid-Level Officers about Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    tlkmud (o" opM pIuIlidoi ind it US ber dhU by the appwpuate atay nauMOO or lgwm t qem. THE DIVISION COMMAND LESSONS LEARNED PROGRAM : WHAT DIVISION... LESSONS LEARNED PROGRAM WHAT DIVISION COMMANDERS CAN TEACH MID-LEVEL OFFICERS ABOUT SUCCESS AN INDIVIDUAL STUDY PROJECT by Colonel Dennis L. Cripps United...Approved for public release; distribution in unlimitede. ABSTRACT AUTHOR: Dennis L. Cripps, COL, USA TITLE: The Division Command Lessons Learned Program : What

  20. Lessons learned bulletin. Number 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    During the past four years, the Department of Energy -- Savannah River Operations Office and the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program completed various activities ranging from waste site investigations to closure and post closure projects. Critiques for lessons learned regarding project activities are performed at the completion of each project milestone, and this critique interval allows for frequent recognition of lessons learned. In addition to project related lessons learned, ER also performs lessons learned critiques. T`he Savannah River Site (SRS) also obtains lessons learned information from general industry, commercial nuclear industry, naval nuclear programs, and other DOE sites within the complex. Procedures are approved to administer the lessons learned program, and a database is available to catalog applicable lessons learned regarding environmental remediation, restoration, and administrative activities. ER will continue to use this database as a source of information available to SRS personnel.

  1. Lessons Learned Developing an Extension-Based Training Program for Farm Labor Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roka, Fritz M.; Thissen, Carlene A.; Monaghan, Paul F.; Morera, Maria C.; Galindo-Gonzalez, Sebastian; Tovar-Aguilar, Jose Antonio

    This article outlines a four-step model for developing a training program for farm labor supervisors. The model draws on key lessons learned during the development of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Farm Labor Supervisor Training program. The program is designed to educate farm supervisors on farm labor laws…

  2. Learning Communities and First-Year Programs: Lessons for Planners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, William E.

    2003-01-01

    Bowling Green State University, Ohio, carried out a study of learning communities and first-year programs to determine their success in facilitating student success, increasing engagement, and promoting connections. Findings from 10 learning communities show the overall success of these programs and provide favorable cost estimates. (SLD)

  3. STGT program: Ada coding and architecture lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usavage, Paul; Nagurney, Don

    1992-01-01

    STGT (Second TDRSS Ground Terminal) is currently halfway through the System Integration Test phase (Level 4 Testing). To date, many software architecture and Ada language issues have been encountered and solved. This paper, which is the transcript of a presentation at the 3 Dec. meeting, attempts to define these lessons plus others learned regarding software project management and risk management issues, training, performance, reuse, and reliability. Observations are included regarding the use of particular Ada coding constructs, software architecture trade-offs during the prototyping, development and testing stages of the project, and dangers inherent in parallel or concurrent systems, software, hardware, and operations engineering.

  4. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Program - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccool, A. A.; Ray, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is given of the most important lessons learned concerning the Space Shuttle's Solid Rocket Motors with respect to flight safety, reuse requirements, system reliability, structural integrity, and hardware damage due to reentry, water impact, and retrieval. Within the major categories of flight safety, performance, and reuse/cost, priorities are identified for implementation of envisioned improvements; schedule and cost considerations are noted to have been substantially downgraded in favor of flight safety. The consequences of the primacy of flight safety are discussed in the areas of primary systems design, redundant systems, manufacturing and assembly processing, and launch constraints.

  5. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Program - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccool, A. A.; Ray, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is given of the most important lessons learned concerning the Space Shuttle's Solid Rocket Motors with respect to flight safety, reuse requirements, system reliability, structural integrity, and hardware damage due to reentry, water impact, and retrieval. Within the major categories of flight safety, performance, and reuse/cost, priorities are identified for implementation of envisioned improvements; schedule and cost considerations are noted to have been substantially downgraded in favor of flight safety. The consequences of the primacy of flight safety are discussed in the areas of primary systems design, redundant systems, manufacturing and assembly processing, and launch constraints.

  6. Developing Built Environment Programs in Local Health Departments: Lessons Learned From a Nationwide Mentoring Program

    PubMed Central

    Rube, Kate; Veatch, Maggie; Huang, Katy; Lent, Megan; Goldstein, Gail P.; Lee, Karen K.

    2014-01-01

    Local health departments (LHDs) have a key role to play in developing built environment policies and programs to encourage physical activity and combat obesity and related chronic diseases. However, information to guide LHDs’ effective engagement in this arena is lacking. During 2011–2012, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) facilitated a built environment peer mentoring program for 14 LHDs nationwide. Program objectives included supporting LHDs in their efforts to achieve built environment goals, offering examples from DOHMH’s built environment work to guide LHDs, and building a healthy built environment learning network. We share lessons learned that can guide LHDs in developing successful healthy built environment agendas. PMID:24625166

  7. The Replication of Lessons Learned (ROLL) Program in Russia: A Reputational Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayerl, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    Describes the processes used in the Replication of Lessons Learned (ROLL) program in Russia, which was designed in 1996 to increase the impact of environmental projects already tested in pilot sites by replicating the most successful ones at new sites. Emphasizes the multilevel collaborative partnerships established in the program and describes…

  8. Summer Learning Programs Yield Key Lessons for Districts and Policymakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustine, Catherine H.; McCombs, Jennifer Sloan

    2015-01-01

    The Wallace Foundation is funding a multiyear demonstration project to determine whether voluntary, district summer learning programs can stem summer learning loss for low-income students. Six districts--Boston, Cincinnati, Dallas, Duval County (Florida), Pittsburgh, and Rochester, New York--were selected for the demonstration project and…

  9. Summer Learning Programs Yield Key Lessons for Districts and Policymakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustine, Catherine H.; McCombs, Jennifer Sloan

    2015-01-01

    The Wallace Foundation is funding a multiyear demonstration project to determine whether voluntary, district summer learning programs can stem summer learning loss for low-income students. Six districts--Boston, Cincinnati, Dallas, Duval County (Florida), Pittsburgh, and Rochester, New York--were selected for the demonstration project and…

  10. The Hubble Education and Public Outreach Program: Best Practices and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Jirdeh, H.; Knisely, L.; McCallister, D.; Ryer, H.; Smith, D.

    2014-07-01

    This paper highlights examples of best practices and lessons learned from the Hubble EPO program. Scientists and educators work side-by-side to identify the aspects of cutting-edge Hubble discoveries, data, and technology most relevant to STEM education and public understanding of science. The strategy has allowed us to bring Hubble science to the EPO community on a national scale. On this journey, we have identified and refined best practices and lessons learned in program staffing, meeting audience needs, translating cutting-edge science for a variety of diverse audiences, and achieving national reach.

  11. Piloting an information literacy program for staff nurses: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Peri; Salazar-Riera, Noraliza; Vieira, Dorice

    2002-01-01

    Intrinsic to all models of evidence-based practice is the need for information literacy and the critical assessment of information. As part of a house-wide evidence-based practice initiative, the objective of this pilot project was to develop the information literacy skills of staff nurses to increase their ability to find and assess available electronic resources for clinical decision making. An intensive care unit was chosen to pilot a unit-based approach to educate staff nurses to perform patient care-related electronic literature searches. An additional goal was to determine the effectiveness of unit-based training sessions on the frequency and quality of electronic literature searches by participating nurses. In addition to the unit-based instruction, nursing and library staff collaborated to develop a Web-based tutorial to supplement and reinforce the content of the training sessions. A pretest-post-test design was used to evaluate the initiative and to assess the effect of the educational intervention over time. Among the lessons learned from this pilot study was that unit-based instruction presents significant obstacles for effective learning of new technological skills for staff nurses.

  12. Empowering programs with evaluation technical assistance: outcomes and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Deborah A; Hawkins, Stephanie R; Clinton-Sherrod, A Monique; Noonan, Rita K

    2009-01-01

    Although empowerment evaluation has gained widespread currency, few reports have described its outcomes. This article combines perspectives of participants and technical assistance providers to describe the process and outcomes of the Evaluation Assistance for Sexual Violence Programs project. Participating programs reported substantial enhancements in evaluation capacity, resources devoted to evaluation, and the extent and sophistication of their evaluation practice, as well as numerous examples of the application of evaluation findings to program improvement. Experiences from evaluation technical assistance providers identified aspects of the process that were particularly useful in achieving these outcomes, including investing in collaborative relationships, maximizing participation among program staff, tailoring the content and form of technical assistance to program preferences, and combining structured learning with program-specific technical assistance.

  13. The Space Shuttle focused-technology program - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, P. E., Jr.; Gabris, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a focused technology program (FTP), its management structure, the development of the Space Shuttle, and lessons applicable to future space programs such as a space station are discussed. A committee was formed by NASA in 1969 to define the technologies necessary for a reusable spacecraft. Basic and applied research assessments were featured at the beginning of the process. Working groups were established to cover all necessary areas, e.g., Operations, Structures and Materials, Aerothermodynamics, etc., and tasks were distributed to appropriate NASA centers. Funding was drawn from existing budgets. The FTP proceeded successfully because of an understanding of the respective roles of industry and government, the willingness of industry to invest early in a new technology, and the unclassified status of information generated by the program. The in-house design and technology transfer methods that brought the project to a technology demonstration phase are explored, noting the necessity for users to take part in the development within their field.

  14. The Space Shuttle focused-technology program - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, P. E., Jr.; Gabris, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a focused technology program (FTP), its management structure, the development of the Space Shuttle, and lessons applicable to future space programs such as a space station are discussed. A committee was formed by NASA in 1969 to define the technologies necessary for a reusable spacecraft. Basic and applied research assessments were featured at the beginning of the process. Working groups were established to cover all necessary areas, e.g., Operations, Structures and Materials, Aerothermodynamics, etc., and tasks were distributed to appropriate NASA centers. Funding was drawn from existing budgets. The FTP proceeded successfully because of an understanding of the respective roles of industry and government, the willingness of industry to invest early in a new technology, and the unclassified status of information generated by the program. The in-house design and technology transfer methods that brought the project to a technology demonstration phase are explored, noting the necessity for users to take part in the development within their field.

  15. Lessons learned from the CDC's Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program.

    PubMed

    Seeff, Laura C; Rohan, Elizabeth A

    2013-08-01

    This report briefly summarizes 13 articles in this dedicated supplement to Cancer documenting the full implementation and evaluation of CDC's Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program (CRCSDP). The supplement includes 3 articles that describe clinical and quality outcomes; 2 articles that describe programmatic and clinical costs; 3 that were based on a multiple case study, using qualitative methods to describe the overall implementation experience of this initiative; and 4 articles written by and about individual program sites. The comprehensive, multi-methods evaluation conducted alongside the program produced many important lessons regarding the design, start-up, and implementation of colorectal cancer screening in this high-need population, and paved the way for the CDC to establish a larger, population-based colorectal cancer control initiative, broadly aligned with expectations of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act through its population-based emphasis on using a health systems approach to increase colorectal cancer screening. Cancer 2013;119(15 suppl):2817-9. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  16. MSFC Skylab lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Key lessons learned during the Skylab Program that could have impact on on-going and future programs are presented. They present early and sometimes subjective opinions; however, they give insights into key areas of concern. These experiences from a complex space program management and space flight serve as an early assessment to provide the most advantage to programs underway. References to other more detailed reports are provided.

  17. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM: RECENT RESULTS: LESSONS LEARNED AND FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the EPA sponsored AML workshop, a number of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) projects will be presented in order to highlight the most successful technology demonstrations. Recent results, lesson learned and future opportunities will be presented. The MWTP projects includ...

  18. Lessons learned and their application to program development and cultural issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Gilbert L.

    1991-01-01

    The knowledge used today is contained in an untold number of technical and managerial handbooks. This knowledge is derived from the known strengths and weaknesses experienced during the execution of programs and projects that are being used today. The purpose is to stir up thought, not on specific experiences, but on implementation of lessons learned from these experiences.

  19. Y&E Lessons in Learning: Youth and Education Program News, Summer 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cournoyer, David, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This Summer 2003 issue of "Y&E Lessons in Learning" contains the following articles: (1) Playgrounds Where All Kids Are Able to Play; (2) Kellogg Foundation Promotes Youth Voices in Special Comic Book; (3) Families for Kids: A Powerful Approach to System Reform; (4) New Program Focuses Community Leaders on Educational Change; (5)…

  20. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM: RECENT RESULTS: LESSONS LEARNED AND FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the EPA sponsored AML workshop, a number of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) projects will be presented in order to highlight the most successful technology demonstrations. Recent results, lesson learned and future opportunities will be presented. The MWTP projects includ...

  1. Quality Improvement: Lessons Learned from an Infant Mental Health-based Early Head Start Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy-Herb, Holly; Schiffman, Rachel; McKelvey, Lorraine; Cunningham-DeLuca, Mary; Hawver, Marshelle

    2001-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement efforts are vital to high-quality early intervention services. This article describes an ongoing quality improvement project within an infant mental health-based Early Head Start program. Both strategies and challenges in implementing issues and lessons learned in the initial 2-year phase of the quality improvement…

  2. Project management lessons learned on SDIO's Delta Star and Single Stage Rocket Technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klevatt, Paul L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: a Delta Star (Delta 183) Program Overview, lessons learned, and rapid prototyping and the Single Stage Rocket Technology (SSRT) Program. The basic objective of the Strategic Defense Initiative Programs are to quickly reduce key uncertainties to a manageable range of parameters and solutions, and to yield results applicable to focusing subsequent research dollars on high payoff areas.

  3. Lessons Learned: Accessing the Voice of Nurses to Improve a Novice Nurse Program.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Roseann; Eggenberger, Terry; Moffa, Christine; Newman, David

    2015-01-01

    A novice nurse program was developed to address the need for educational and clinical support for entry-level nurses in a community hospital setting. A focus group was used to assess the novice nurses' perception of the program and to synthesize lessons learned. Nursing professional development specialists are advised to access the voice of novice nurse participants to meaningfully evaluate and further develop residency programs.

  4. Establishing a measurement based maintenance improvement program - Lessons learned in the SEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rombach, H. Dieter; Ulery, Bradford T.

    1989-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is a joint venture between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Maryland, and Computer Sciences Corporation. The use of a goal-oriented approach to measurement to establish a maintenance improvement program within the SEL is discussed. Differences are found to exist between the initial phase of the program and its routine application. This approach is demonstrated through concrete examples, and lessons learned in the establishment of a measurement based, maintenance improvement program are summarized.

  5. Project management lessons learned on SDIO's Delta Star and Single Stage Rocket Technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klevatt, Paul L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: a Delta Star (Delta 183) Program Overview, lessons learned, and rapid prototyping and the Single Stage Rocket Technology (SSRT) Program. The basic objective of the Strategic Defense Initiative Programs are to quickly reduce key uncertainties to a manageable range of parameters and solutions, and to yield results applicable to focusing subsequent research dollars on high payoff areas.

  6. Lessons Learned Process Ensures Future Operations Build on Successes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    which is accomplished through the application of the Lessons Learned Process.” AR 11-33, Army Lessons Learned Program 43Army Communicator develop...equipment fielding.” AR 11-33, Army Lessons Learned Program . I quoted the LLP directly from AR 11-33, because it clearly articulates the LL process...Capabilities Manager-Stryker Lessons Learned Program • Other Center of Excellence Lessons Learned Programs Note: The Signal Lessons Learned Process

  7. DSCOVR Contamination Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graziani, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    The Triana observatory was built at NASA GSFC in the late 1990's, then placed into storage. After approximately ten years it was removed from storage and repurposed as the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR). This presentation outlines the contamination control program lessons learned during the integration, test and launch of DSCOVR.

  8. A Study of the Handling of Lessons Processing in Lessons Learned Systems and Application to Lessons Learned System Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Lessons Learned Program ................................................................70...Learned System is guided by a standard. The standard is DOE-STD-7501-99, The DOE Corporate Lessons Learned Program , December 1999. The following...to avoid recurrence. These defining aspects of the Department of Energy Lessons Learned Program are consistent with aspects of the Center for

  9. Prehospital blood transfusion programs: Capabilities and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Martin D; Stubbs, James R; Berns, Kathleen S; Glassberg, Elon; Murdock, Alan D; Shinar, Eilat; Sunde, Geir Arne; Williams, Steve; Yazer, Mark H; Zietlow, Scott; Jenkins, Donald H

    2017-03-22

    The Trauma and Hemostasis Oxygenation Research (THOR) network has met in Bergen, Norway every summer over the past six years in an effort to have experts in transfusion, blood banking, military medicine, and trauma surgery exchange ideas, share their experiences, and set an agenda to move the science of remote damage control resuscitation forward. In this manuscript, we supply the lessons shared from the authors/speakers to the reader. These lessons include the experiences of the Norwegian Military with freeze dried plasma and whole blood resuscitation, lessons from extreme remote damage control resuscitation situations on oceanic cruises, and remote blood product resuscitation techniques at Mayo Clinic and the University of Pittsburgh.

  10. Expanding the Lessons Learned Program to Include Corps Support Command Commanders and Theater Army Area Command Commanders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-10

    il !wi# c’t~ red by the apptwpriate MilitIfty 80rncc or EXPANDING T"I’l LESSONS LEARNED PROGRAM TO INCLUDECORI 3 St3PPOFT COMMAND COMHADERS A𔃻 THEATER...COVERED EXPANDING THE LESSONS LEARNED PROGRAM . . . Study Project 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NCMBER 7. AUTHOR(&) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(a) LTC Kenneth M...publication until It has been cleared by the sppropriate mlitary Gervice or goverrment agency. EXPANDING THE LESSONS LEARNED PROGRAM TO INCLUDE CORPS

  11. Lesson Learning at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  12. Lesson Learning at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  13. Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    The public health nurses’ scope of practice explicitly includes child protection within their role, which places them in a prime position to identify child protection concerns. This role compliments that of other professions and voluntary agenices who work with children. Public health nurses are in a privileged position as they form a relationship with the child’s parent(s)/guardian(s) and are able to see the child in its own environment, which many professionals cannot. Child protection in Ireland, while influenced by other countries, has progressed through a distinct pathway that streamlined protocols and procedures. However, despite the above serious failures have occurred in the Irish system, and inquiries over the past 20 years persistently present similar contributing factors, namely, the lack of standardized and comprehensive service responses. Moreover, poor practice is compounded by the lack of recognition of the various interactional processes taking place within and between the different agencies of child protection, leading to psychological barriers in communication. This article will explore the lessons learned for public health nurses practice in safeguarding children in the Republic of Ireland. PMID:27335944

  14. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, far right, is pictured with panelists from the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned event in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the center, are Ernie Reyes, retired, former Apollo 1 senior operations manager; and John Tribe, retired, former Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. At far left is Zulie Cipo, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program event support team lead. The theme of the program was "To there and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  15. Lessons Learned about Educational Programming Associated with Space Science Traveling Exhibits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C.; Edwards, C.; McLain, B.; Dusenbery, P.

    Events such as the Mars rover landings bring much public attention and provide excellent reasons for substantive educational outreach to educators and the public. In the fall of 2003, the Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado (USA) led the refurbishment and redeployment of the 5000 sq. ft MarsQuest traveling exhibition. Prior to this, MarsQuest had completed a highly successful 3-year tour of the US. Earlier in 2003, SSI launched the 600 sq. ft. ``mini-MarsQuest'' exhibit called Destination Mars. This paper will report on the lessons we have learned regarding the educational programming associated with these exhibits. In this context, ``educational programming'' refers to: 1) workshops for museum educators and docents at exhibit host sites; 2) workshops for local educators who will bring their students to visit the exhibit; 3) materials and resources to support science center programming such as school-group visits, family days, and camp-ins; and 4) public talks by scientists. We will focus this paper on our 3 years of experience with the Mars exhibits, plus the results of a formal evaluation being conducted in collaboration with Randi Korn & Associates. The lessons learned will be of great value to the educational programming of future SSI traveling exhibits. In addition, we expect that many of our lessons learned will be of broader value to any scientist or educator who works in collaboration with science centers and museums.

  16. Lesson Plans and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliffe, J. A.; Whitlock, L. A.; Boyd, P. T.; Lochner, J. C.; Granger, K.

    1997-12-01

    For the past 18 months, responding to a growing demand by the public, the X-ray branch of the Laboratory for High- Energy Astrophysics has created a successful web-based education/outreach program aimed at K-12 students. The High- Energy Astrophysics Learning Center and StarChild were launched in 1996; since then the sites have also been put on CD-ROM and distributed to over ten thousand teachers nationwide. In the Fall of 1997, the "High-Energy Astrophysics Learning Center" was reincarnated as "Imagine the Universe!". The changes were brought about for a number of reasons, such as to expand the scope outside X-ray and and gamma-ray astronomy, to remove a name that often intimidated potential users, and to implement an abundance of user feedback. We present the new Imagine the Universe! web site and the lessons learned from our experience in the education/ outreach arena. Imagine the Universe! focuses on what scientists know about the structures in, and the evolution of, our Universe. It also investigates how scientists know these things, the remaining mysteries, and how answers might be found. At present, only the X-ray and gamma-ray approaches to these issues are active in the site. However, radio, microwave, infrared, ultraviolet, and cosmic ray information will be added over the next year. In keeping with the trend in education to base curriculum on national standards, all of the science topics presented are listed with the national mathematics and science standards to which they relate. The same is true of the revamped Teacher's Corner and the growing list of lesson plans found there. What works, what does not work, and the kind of feedback you get when you have a K-12 astronomy education web site will be presented.

  17. K12 Education Program Lessons Learned at the Center for Earthquake Research and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, G. L.; Dry, M.

    2003-12-01

    The Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis has been committed to increasing awareness for Seismic Hazard, Earthquake Engineering, and Earth Science among Mid-America's policy-makers, engineers, emergency managers, the general public, and K-12 teachers and students for nearly three decades. During that time we have learned many lessons related to providing effective education and outreach programs, especially for K-12 students. The lessons learned from these activities may be particularly appropriate for other regions where large earthquakes occur infrequently but have disproportionately high consequence areas due to low attenuation of seismic waves. Effective education programs in these settings must provide a consistent message across many states to a wide variety of socio-economic groups and professional communities through the leveraged resources of various groups and agencies. It is also beneficial to hire and train staff with K-12 teaching experience to work directly K-12 education organizations, and science curriculum coordinators.

  18. Nevada Test Site Decontamination and Decommissioning Program History, Regulatory Framework, and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic, Bechtel Nevada; Patrick S. Morris, Bechtel Nevada; Jerel G. Nelson, Polestar Applied Technology, Inc.

    2005-08-07

    Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of radiologically and/or chemically contaminated facilities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. Facilities identified for D&D are listed in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and closed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act process. This paper discusses the NTS D&D program, including facilities history, D&D regulatory framework, and valuable lessons learned.

  19. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murai, Mitsuya; Kitamura, Kazuya; Fetters, Michael D

    2005-09-15

    While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments). Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1) circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2) approach to starting the program; 3) how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4) future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1) few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2) developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3) start with undergraduates; 4) emphasize clinical skills; and 5) train in the community. While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training.

  20. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Mitsuya; Kitamura, Kazuya; Fetters, Michael D

    2005-01-01

    Background While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments). Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. Methods This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1) circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2) approach to starting the program; 3) how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4) future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Results Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1) few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2) developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3) start with undergraduates; 4) emphasize clinical skills; and 5) train in the community. Conclusion While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training. PMID:16162298

  1. Lessons Learned in Engineering. Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, James C.; Ryan, Robert S.; Schultzenhofer, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations. The supplemental CD contains accompanying PowerPoint presentations.

  2. Lessons Learned in Engineering. Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, James C.; Ryan, Robert S.; Schultzenhofer, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations. The supplemental CD contains accompanying PowerPoint presentations.

  3. 2000 Worldwide Joint Lessons Learned Conference. Forging a Future Joint Lessons Learned System. (Joint Center for Lessons Learned Special Bulletin. Volume 3, Special Issue 1, January 2001)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    for the Joint Lessons Learned Program Configuration Management Board ...................... 6 Advanced Lessons Management System (ALMS... lessons learned program can succeed in isolation. The success of the conference was largely due to the interaction and contribution of the attendees...governing instruction for the Joint Lessons Learned Program (JLLP). The modified instruction now serves as a comprehensive, single-source reference

  4. Lessons learned from the former Soviet biological warfare program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Debra A.

    The purpose of this doctoral project was to develop the most credible educational tool openly available to enhance the understanding and the application of biological weapons threat analysis. The theory governing the effectiveness of biological weapons was integrated from publications, lectures, and seminars primarily provided by Kenneth Alibek and William C. Patrick III, the world's foremost authorities on the topic. Both experts validated the accuracy of the theory compiled from their work and provided forewords. An exercise requiring analysis of four national intelligence estimates of the former Soviet biological warfare program was included in the form of educational case studies to enhance retention, experience, and confidence by providing a platform against which the reader can apply the newly learned theory. After studying the chapters on BW theory, the reader can compare his/her analysis of the national intelligence estimates against the analysis provided in the case studies by this researcher. This training aid will be a valuable tool for all who are concerned with the threat posed by biological weapons and are therefore seeking the most reliable source of information in order to better understand the true nature of the threat.

  5. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, at left, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, presents a certificate to Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team, during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  6. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, at left, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, presents a certificate to John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer, during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the program was "To there and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  7. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned program manager, at left, presents a certificate to Ernie Reyes, retired, former Apollo 1 senior operations manager, during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the program was "To there and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  8. Leveraging Lesson Learning in Tactical Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    WALLP Wartime Army Lessons Learned Program VI CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Vignette One: Learning in Bosnia-Herzegovina (1995-96) In December of 1995...and cannot rest completely on the shoulders of CALL. Army Regulation (AR) 11-33, Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application...focal point for the Army Lessons Learned Program .4 AR 11-33 clearly establishes the requirement for major Army commands (MACOM) to provide AARs to

  9. Lessons Learned From Expansion of a Public Health Nursing Doctorate in Nursing Practice Program.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Nathan G; Speck, Patricia M; Bowdre, Trimika L; Connor, Pamela D

    Despite nurses' demonstrated expertise in the public health workforce, there has been a continued erosion of public health nursing (PHN) positions in health departments and academe. The need for a strong public health infrastructure and well-educated public health workforce remains vital in meeting PHN research challenges. In response to these needs, our college of nursing undertook a six-year Health Resources and Services Administration-funded expansion of the PHN Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program. This article illustrates program evaluation, lessons learned, and PHN DNP graduate and workforce outcomes related to supplying culturally diverse PHN leaders, assuring quality improvement, creating sustainable partnerships, and improving poor health outcomes.

  10. Evaluating minority retention programs: problems encountered and lessons learned from the Ohio science and engineering alliance.

    PubMed

    White, Jeffry L; Altschuld, James W; Lee, Yi-Fang

    2008-08-01

    The retention rates for African-Americans, Hispanics, and Native-Americans in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are lower than those of White or Asian college students. In response, the National Science Foundation formed statewide partnerships of universities to develop programs to address this disparity. The deliberations and experiences in evaluating one such partnership are retrospectively reviewed. Problems and issues encountered during conceptualization and implementation are presented. Lessons learned from this endeavor should generalize to similar situations and provide guidance for others new to or interested in evaluating STEM retention programs as well as those evaluating collaborative endeavors.

  11. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. As part of the NASA Technical Standards Program activities, engineering lessons learned datasets have been identified from a number of sources. These are being searched and screened for those having a relation to Technical Standards. This paper will address some of these Systems Engineering Lessons Learned and how they are being related to Technical Standards within the NASA Technical Standards Program, including linking to the Agency's Interactive Engineering Discipline Training Courses and the life cycle for a flight vehicle development program.

  12. St. Louis FUSRAP Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Eberlin, J.; Williams, D.; Mueller, D.

    2003-02-26

    The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learned from fours years' experience conducting Remedial Investigation and Remedial Action activities at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Many FUSRAP sites are experiencing challenges conducting Remedial Actions within forecasted volume and budget estimates. The St. Louis FUSRAP lessons learned provide insight to options for cost effective remediation at FUSRAP sites. The lessons learned are focused on project planning (budget and schedule), investigation, design, and construction.

  13. MPH program at Manipal University, India-experiences, challenges, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Hattangadi Vinod; Kamath, Ramachandra; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar; Delzell, Elizabeth; Tipre, Meghan; Upadhyay, Divvy Kant; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    The UAB-ITREOH program has initiated a skill-based MPH program at Manipal University (MU), India, in 2009, to address the critical need for trained public health professionals and build institutional public health training capacity in the country. Funds from Fogarty have supported the curriculum development and specialized training of MU faculty to teach in the MPH program. The program has been successfully launched and is gaining momentum. The lessons learned from our experiences as well as several challenges faced from the initialization to execution of the program are described in the article. Government support is crucial for raising the profile of this program by accreditation, creating job opportunities and by recognizing these professionals as leaders in the public health sector. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Home Visiting Start-Up: Lessons Learned From Program Replication in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, M Rebecca; Cannon, Jill S

    2015-08-01

    Growth in federal, state, and private funding is fueling the initiation of home visiting programs around the country. As communities expand home visiting programs, they need information to help them successfully start up new sites. This paper documents lessons learned about home visiting installation and initial implementation from the replication of the First Born(®) Program in six counties in New Mexico. Specifically, we examine how well sites met staffing, family referral and enrollment, program model fidelity, and financing goals in the first year of providing services. Data come from semi-structured interviews with program staff and document review. The findings are likely to be valuable to a wide spectrum of communities starting or expanding home visiting services, as well as to public and private funders of programs.

  15. MPH Program at Manipal University, India - Experiences, Challenges and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, H. Vinod; Kamath, Ramachandra; Arunkumar, G; Delzell, Elizabeth; Tipre, Meghan; Upadhyay, Divvy Kant; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Background The UAB-ITREOH program has initiated a skill-based MPH program at Manipal University (MU), India, in 2009, to address the critical need for trained public health professionals and build institutional public health training capacity in the country. Methods Funds from Fogarty have supported the curriculum development and specialized training of MU faculty to teach in the MPH program. Results The program has been successfully launched and is gaining momentum. The lessons learned from our experiences as well as several challenges faced from the initialization to execution of the program are described in the paper. Conclusions Government support is crucial for raising the profile of this program by accreditation, creating job opportunities and by recognizing these professionals as leaders in the public health sector. PMID:22467350

  16. Redesigning Personnel Preparation: Lessons Learned and Considerations for Program Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mary E.; Sobel, Donna; McCray, Erica D.; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Changing legal requirements, economic demands, accountability, and student demographics focus the need for reform among personnel preparation programs. Although redesign efforts in general and special education teacher preparation programs have increased, little evidence from research describes enhancement initiatives. In this article, the authors…

  17. Evaluating Multiple Prevention Programs: Methods, Results, and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler-Baeder, Francesca; Kerpelman, Jennifer; Griffin, Melody M.; Schramm, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Extension faculty and agents/educators are increasingly collaborating with local and state agencies to provide and evaluate multiple, distinct programs, yet there is limited information about measuring outcomes and combining results across similar program types. This article explicates the methods and outcomes of a state-level evaluation of…

  18. Lessons Learned: The Evolution of an Undergraduate Research Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory; Laker, Lauren; Tesch, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate research programs are commonplace at many universities. However, little research has been conducted to evaluate their ongoing and long-term effectiveness from the standpoint of the undergraduate student researcher. In an effort to gain perspective from the student researcher, including their thoughts on such a program, a survey was…

  19. Redesigning Personnel Preparation: Lessons Learned and Considerations for Program Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mary E.; Sobel, Donna; McCray, Erica D.; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Changing legal requirements, economic demands, accountability, and student demographics focus the need for reform among personnel preparation programs. Although redesign efforts in general and special education teacher preparation programs have increased, little evidence from research describes enhancement initiatives. In this article, the authors…

  20. Lessons Learned Class

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2005-02-11

    Basic laser safety training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is provided through a multiple module web-based course. The web-based course presents a wide and detailed review of laser safety topics including: biological effects, laser protective eyewear, fiber optic laser use, control measures, and more. It opens with a re-enactment of a laser accident. While supportive of this web-based course and actively involved in its development, the NIF Directorate has developed a classroom presentation adjunct to the course for laser users working in NIF. This author considers the LLNL web-based laser safety course to be one of, if not the best, such course available. Still, experience has shown that a ''lessons learned program'' is a great re-enforcer of laser safety. What-is-more, the laser lessons learned class provides important ''face-to-face'' interactions and discussion. The object of the ''laser lessons learned course'' is not to repeat the web course but present laser related lessons learned to the staff. In this author's opinion, lessons learned is the strongest safety re-enforcement one can present to the laser user community. For example, it can show how a practice that might be common to laser users can lead to a dramatic injury and a programmatic long-term work stoppage. The course outline is as follows: (1) A video of laser application with minimum safety practices; (2) Who is typically involved in laser incidents; (3) Commonly given reasons for violating laser safety procedures; (4) A review of perceived hazard incidents (i.e. flashlamp light mistaken for laser scatter); (5) A review of several laser accidents; (6) What to do if an injury is suspected and what we can do about injuries; (7) Discussion of whether laser accidents can be eliminated (and of course they can be eliminated); and (8) Summation. To date, the class has received positive feedback from experienced and inexperienced laser users. This, along with the broader lessons learned

  1. Lessons Learned from the Everglades Collaborative Adaptive Management Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent technical papers explore whether adaptive management (AM) is useful for environmental management and restoration efforts and discuss the many challenges to overcome for successful implementation, especially for large-scale restoration programs (McLain and Lee 1996; Levine ...

  2. Lessons Learned from the Everglades Collaborative Adaptive Management Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent technical papers explore whether adaptive management (AM) is useful for environmental management and restoration efforts and discuss the many challenges to overcome for successful implementation, especially for large-scale restoration programs (McLain and Lee 1996; Levine ...

  3. Design and Implementation of a Pilot Obesity Prevention Program in a Low-Resource School: Lessons Learned and Research Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskin, Monica L.; Zunker, Christie; Worley, Courtney B.; Dial, Brenda; Kimbrough, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to describe the design, implementation, and lessons learned from an obesity prevention pilot program delivered in a low resource school in the USA. Design/methodology/approach: A planned program evaluation was conducted to: document explicitly the process of designing and implementing the program; and assess the…

  4. Design and Implementation of a Pilot Obesity Prevention Program in a Low-Resource School: Lessons Learned and Research Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskin, Monica L.; Zunker, Christie; Worley, Courtney B.; Dial, Brenda; Kimbrough, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to describe the design, implementation, and lessons learned from an obesity prevention pilot program delivered in a low resource school in the USA. Design/methodology/approach: A planned program evaluation was conducted to: document explicitly the process of designing and implementing the program; and assess the…

  5. The UNISAT program: Lessons learned and achieved results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoni, Fabio; Piergentili, Fabrizio; Graziani, Filippo

    2009-07-01

    More than ten years experience in hands-on space education has been achieved at Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale of Università di Roma "la Sapienza", where the UNISAT program was established in the early nineties. The students participating in this program are involved in a microsatellite design, manufacturing, test, launch and operation in orbit activity, from initial mission concept to operation in orbit. The microsatellite program develops in a two years timeline, fitting with the graduate student program curricular activity at Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale. Four microsatellites have been launched every other year since 2000 from the Baikonour Cosmodrome by the DNEPR LV. In this way there was the opportunity to exploit the UNISAT platform to perform small scientific and technological experiments in orbit. Besides education, a main goal of the UNISAT program is testing in orbit commercial off-the-shelf components, which allow to keep the program cost low and compatible with the University research budget. The main spacecraft subsystems, including the in orbit technological and scientific experiments, and the ground station operations are briefly described in the paper, focussing on the education and research aspects.

  6. DISINVESTING FROM INEFFECTIVE TECHNOLOGIES: LESSONS LEARNED FROM CURRENT PROGRAMS.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Julia; Nachtnebel, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Many of the currently used health technologies have never been systematically assessed or are misused, overused or superseded. Therefore, they may be ineffective. Active identification of ineffectiveness in health care is gaining importance to facilitate best care for patients and optimal use of limited resources. The present research analyzed processes and experiences of programs for identifying ineffective health technologies. The goal of this study was to elucidate factors that facilitate implementation. Based on an overview article, a systematic literature search and unsystematic hand-search were conducted. Further information was gained from international experts. Seven programs were identified that include identification, prioritization and assessment of ineffective health technologies and dissemination of recommendations. The programs are quite similar regarding their goals, target groups and criteria for identification and prioritization. Outputs, mainly HTA reports or lists, are mostly disseminated by means of the internet. Top-down and bottom-up programs both have benefits in terms of implementation of recommendations, either as binding guidelines and decisions or as nonbinding information for physicians and other stakeholders. Crucial facilitators of implementation are political will, transparent processes and broad stakeholder involvement focusing on physicians. All programs can improve the quality of health care and enable cost reduction in supportive surrounding conditions. Physicians and patients must be continuously involved in the process of evaluating health technologies. Additionally, decision makers must support programs and translate recommendations into concrete actions.

  7. The Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program: impact and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Whyte, John; Boninger, Michael; Helkowski, Wendy; Braddom-Ritzler, Carolyn

    2009-03-01

    Physician scientists are seen as important in healthcare research. However, the number of physician scientists and their success in obtaining National Institutes of Health funding have been declining for many years. The shortage of physician scientists in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation is particularly severe and can be attributed to many of the same factors that affect physician scientists in general, as well as to the lack of well-developed models for research training. In 1995, the Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program was funded by a K12 grant from the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, as one strategy for increasing the number of research-productive physiatrists. The Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program's structure was revised in 2001 to improve the level of preparation of incoming trainees and to provide a stronger central mentorship support network. We describe the original and revised structure of the Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program and review subjective and objective data on the productivity of the trainees who have completed the program. These data suggest that Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program trainees are, in general, successful in obtaining and maintaining academic faculty positions and that the productivity of the cohort trained after the revision, in particular, shows impressive growth after about 3 yrs of training.

  8. An Analysis of Division Commander Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-24

    Department of the Army. Division Command Lessons Learned Program : Experiences in Division Command. Carlisle Barracks: U.S. Army Military History Institute...1985. 2. U.S. Department of the Army. Division Command Lessons Learned Program : Experiences in Division Command. Carlisle Barracks: U.S. Army...Military History Institute, 1986. 3. U.S. Department of the Army. Division Command Lessons Learned Program : Experiences in Division Command. Carlisle 4

  9. Army Acquisition Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    analysis on the lessons learned. Acquisition Lessons Learned Portal (ALLP) and Lessons Learned Collection CAALL has established the ALLP as the...PEOs) and their project offices, as well as the broader acquisition community. The primary function of the portal is to allow easy input and retrieval...download- able form that can be completed offline and then uploaded to the portal . This allows the form to be filled out and distrib- uted through

  10. Environmentally-driven Materials Obsolescence: Material Replacements and Lessons Learned from NASA's Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinhold, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program was terminated in 2011 with the last flight of the Shuttle Endeavour. During the 30 years of its operating history, the number of domestic and international environmental regulations increased rapidly and resulted in materials obsolescence risks to the program. Initial replacement efforts focused on ozone depleting substances. As pressure from environmental regulations increased, Shuttle worked on the replacement of heavy metals. volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Near the end of the program. Shuttle identified potential material obsolescence driven by international regulations and the potential for suppliers to reformulate materials. During the Shuttle Program a team focused on environmentally-driven materials obsolescence worked to identify and mitigate these risks. Lessons learned from the Shuttle experience can be applied to new NASA Programs as well as other high reliability applications.

  11. Lessons learned from and the future for NASA's Small Explorer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, George P.

    1991-01-01

    NASA started the Small Explorer Program to provide space scientists with an opportunity to conduct space science research in the Explorer Program using scientific payloads launched on small-class expendable launch vehicles. A series of small payload, scientific missions was envisioned that could be launched at the rate of one to two missions per year. Three missions were selected in April 1989: Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer, Fast Auroral Snapshot Explorer, and Sub-millimeter Wave Astronomy. These missions are planned for launch in June 1992, September 1994 and June 1995, respectively. At a program level, this paper presents the history, objectives, status, and lessons learned which may be applicable to similar programs, and discusses future program plans.

  12. Lessons learned from and the future for NASA's Small Explorer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, George P.

    1991-01-01

    NASA started the Small Explorer Program to provide space scientists with an opportunity to conduct space science research in the Explorer Program using scientific payloads launched on small-class expendable launch vehicles. A series of small payload, scientific missions was envisioned that could be launched at the rate of one to two missions per year. Three missions were selected in April 1989: Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer, Fast Auroral Snapshot Explorer, and Sub-millimeter Wave Astronomy. These missions are planned for launch in June 1992, September 1994 and June 1995, respectively. At a program level, this paper presents the history, objectives, status, and lessons learned which may be applicable to similar programs, and discusses future program plans.

  13. Paraprofessional Roles in an Adolescent Reading Program: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasburn-Moses, Leah; Chun, Euljung; Kaldenberg, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Paraprofessionals are critical to special education service delivery in inclusive classrooms where they are used to support teachers in reading instruction. This qualitative case study examines the use of paraprofessionals in reading instruction in an adolescent reading program. The study focuses on their roles, training, and the feedback…

  14. Paraprofessional Roles in an Adolescent Reading Program: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasburn-Moses, Leah; Chun, Euljung; Kaldenberg, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Paraprofessionals are critical to special education service delivery in inclusive classrooms where they are used to support teachers in reading instruction. This qualitative case study examines the use of paraprofessionals in reading instruction in an adolescent reading program. The study focuses on their roles, training, and the feedback…

  15. A Gerontology Practitioner Continuing Education Certificate Program: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englehardt, Jacqueline; Hash, Kristina M.; Mankowski, Mariann; Harper-Dorton, Karen V.; Pilarte, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a school of social work survey assessing the geriatric training needs of social workers and other professionals in aging and the need for a gerontology practitioner's continuing education (CE) certificate program. A total of 391 professionals, the majority of whom were social workers, participated in an online…

  16. Implementing Evidence-Based Programs: Lessons Learned from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jane; Maley, Mary; Purington, Amanda; Schantz, Karen; Dotterweich, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based programs (EBPs) are used in many health promotion efforts to ensure that the intended positive behavioral and health outcomes will be achieved. However, because EBPs are developed and tested in research settings, the contextual elements of real world implementation play an important role in their successful delivery in communities.…

  17. Lessons Learned in Kindergarten Go the Distance: Occupational Program Sharing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Beth; Budjac, Susan

    In 1993, in response to declining resources and demand for dental hygienists at other technical colleges, Wisconsin's Northcentral Technical College (NTC) converted its dental hygienist program from a traditional format to a distance format that uses interactive television and is shared between NTC and three other colleges. The framework used by…

  18. Implementing Evidence-Based Programs: Lessons Learned from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jane; Maley, Mary; Purington, Amanda; Schantz, Karen; Dotterweich, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based programs (EBPs) are used in many health promotion efforts to ensure that the intended positive behavioral and health outcomes will be achieved. However, because EBPs are developed and tested in research settings, the contextual elements of real world implementation play an important role in their successful delivery in communities.…

  19. A Gerontology Practitioner Continuing Education Certificate Program: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englehardt, Jacqueline; Hash, Kristina M.; Mankowski, Mariann; Harper-Dorton, Karen V.; Pilarte, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a school of social work survey assessing the geriatric training needs of social workers and other professionals in aging and the need for a gerontology practitioner's continuing education (CE) certificate program. A total of 391 professionals, the majority of whom were social workers, participated in an online…

  20. Some lessons learned from the DOE site operator program

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.F.; Helton, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Performance of electric vehicles (EVs) is being studied in an ongoing Site Operator Program, as part of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than 200 EVs are being operated by Site Operators in various geographical and climatic regions of the United States. Cold-weather operation of EVs is of particular interest. As expected, low temperatures affect a battery`s ability to accept a charge, which decreases EV range and increases operating costs. Battery types other than lead-acid are being evaluated such as nickel-iron, gelled electrolyte lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and sodium-sulfur. Also, improved methods of collecting EV performance data are being implemented, thermal management systems are being tested, and a prototype ultracapacitor is being tested as a possible alternative to conventional batteries.

  1. Burnside’s Bridge and Lessons Learned for Program Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    ISO 9000/ 9001 are examples of programs implemented with varying levels of success. The point of this article is not to discuss the merits and...Alliance employees were mandated to use ISO -9000/ 9001 sampling processes to verify that each step of the maintenance processes was followed during space...product. As quoted in the CAIB report, “While the ISO -9000/ 9001 quality system is appro- priate for many processes and organizations, it was not for

  2. Cleared for Launch - Lessons Learned from the OSIRIS-REx System Requirements Verification Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Craig; Adams, Angela; Williams, Bradley; Goodloe, Colby

    2017-01-01

    Requirements verification of a large flight system is a challenge. It is especially challenging for engineers taking on their first role in space systems engineering. This paper describes our approach to verification of the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) system requirements. It also captures lessons learned along the way from developing systems engineers embroiled in this process. We begin with an overview of the mission and science objectives as well as the project requirements verification program strategy. A description of the requirements flow down is presented including our implementation for managing the thousands of program and element level requirements and associated verification data. We discuss both successes and methods to improve the managing of this data across multiple organizational interfaces. Our approach to verifying system requirements at multiple levels of assembly is presented using examples from our work at instrument, spacecraft, and ground segment levels. We include a discussion of system end-to-end testing limitations and their impacts to the verification program. Finally, we describe lessons learned that are applicable to all emerging space systems engineers using our unique perspectives across multiple organizations of a large NASA program.

  3. Orbiter Entry Heating Lessons Learned from Development Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, J. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter's thermal protection system (TPS), designed mainly on the basis of wind tunnel test data, has successfully completed its design, development, and flight test program. The flight test data provide an exceptional opportunity to evaluate the use of wind tunnel test data for the design of TPS for reentry vehicles. Comparisons of flight test data against wind tunnel data used to design the orbiter's TPS were developed. These flight data, though still in the preliminary analysis phases, generally support the use of wind tunnel test data in the design of TPS for hypersonic reentry vehicles.

  4. Lessons Learned from NASA UAV Science Demonstration Program Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, Steven S.; Schoenung, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, two airborne missions were flown as part of a NASA Earth Science Enterprise program to demonstrate the use of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) to perform earth science. One mission, the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES), successfully measured lightning storms in the vicinity of Key West, Florida, during storm season using a high-altitude Altus(TM) UAV. In the other, a solar-powered UAV, the Pathfinder Plus, flew a high-resolution imaging mission over coffee fields in Kauai, Hawaii, to help guide the harvest.

  5. Constellation Program Design Challenges as Opportunities for Educational Outreach- Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The Texas Space Grant Consortium (TSGC) and the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Education Office both have programs that present design challenges for university senior design classes that offer great opportunities for educational outreach and workforce development. These design challenges have been identified by NASA engineers and scientists as actual design problems faced by the Constellation Program in its exploration missions and architecture. Student teams formed in their senior design class select and then work on a design challenge for one or two semesters. The senior design class follows the requirements set by their university, but it must also comply with the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) in order to meet the class academic requirements. Based on a one year fellowship at a TSGC university under the NASA Administrator's Fellowship Program (NAFP) and several years of experience, lessons learned are presented on the NASA Design Challenge Program.

  6. Constellation Program Lessons Learned in the Quantification and Use of Aerodynamic Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eric L.; Hemsch, Michael J.; Pinier, Jeremy T.; Bibb, Karen L.; Chan, David T.; Hanke, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program has worked for the past five years to develop a re- placement for the current Space Transportation System. Of the elements that form the Constellation Program, only two require databases that define aerodynamic environments and their respective uncertainty: the Ares launch vehicles and the Orion crew and launch abort vehicles. Teams were established within the Ares and Orion projects to provide repre- sentative aerodynamic models including both baseline values and quantified uncertainties. A technical team was also formed within the Constellation Program to facilitate integra- tion among the project elements. This paper is a summary of the collective experience of the three teams working with the quantification and use of uncertainty in aerodynamic environments: the Ares and Orion project teams as well as the Constellation integration team. Not all of the lessons learned discussed in this paper could be applied during the course of the program, but they are included in the hope of benefiting future projects.

  7. A customizable model for chronic disease coordination: Lessons learned from the coordinated chronic disease program

    SciTech Connect

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-03-31

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. Furthermore, these elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs.

  8. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  9. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program.

    PubMed

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-03-31

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs.

  10. Collaborative academic-practice transition program for new graduate RNs in community settings: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Jones-Bell, Jessie; Karshmer, Judith; Berman, Audrey; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn; West, Nikki

    2014-06-01

    In 2010-2011, leaders from California academic and practice settings and additional community partners collaboratively developed four 12- to 16-week transition programs for 345 new registered nurse (RN) graduates who had not yet found employment as nurses. Program goals were to increase participants' confidence, competence, and employability and expand the employment landscape to nontraditional new graduate settings. One program focused exclusively on community-based settings and was completed by 40 participants at clinics and school sites; all participants secured RN jobs. Key lessons learned go beyond the impact for participants and relate to changing the nursing culture about career path models for new graduates, troubleshooting regulatory issues, the potential for new graduates to help transform nursing, and advancing academic-practice partnerships and supporting practice sites. The community-based transition program continues to provide opportunities for new RN graduates and model an approach for transforming nursing practice. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP): Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, Luisa M.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Squires, Gordon K.

    2017-01-01

    NITARP, the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program, gets teachers involved in authentic astronomical research. We partner small groups of educators with a professional astronomer mentor for a year-long original research project. The teams echo the entire research process, from writing a proposal, to doing the research, to presenting the results at an American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting. The program runs from January through January. Applications are available annually in May and are due in September. The educators’ experiences color their teaching for years to come, influencing hundreds of students per teacher. In support of other teams planning programs similar to NITARP, in this poster we present our top lessons learned from running NITARP for more than 10 years. Support is provided for NITARP by the NASA ADP program.

  12. Development of a Teen-Friendly Health Education Program on Facebook: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Park, Bu Kyung; Nahm, Eun-Shim; Rogers, Valerie E

    2016-01-01

    Facebook is the most popular online platform among adolescents and can be an effective medium to deliver health education. Although Korean American (KA) adolescents are at risk of obesity, a culturally tailored health education program is not available for them. Thus, our research team developed a health education program for KA adolescents on Facebook called "Healthy Teens." The aim of this study was to discuss important lessons learned through the program development process. This program includes culturally tailored learning modules about healthy eating and physical activity. The program was developed on the basis of the social cognitive theory, and the online program was developed by applying Web usability principles for adolescents. Upon completion, the usability of the program was assessed using heuristic evaluation. The findings from the heuristic evaluation showed that the Healthy Teens program was usable for KA adolescents. The findings from this study will assist researchers who are planning to build similar Facebook-based health education programs. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient Navigation Program for Colorectal Cancer Screening in Chinese Americans at an Urban Community Health Center: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Vora, Shalini; Lau, Jennifer D; Kim, Esther; Sim, Shao-Chee; Oster, Ady; Pong, Perry

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer-related deaths in Asian Americans, yet Asian Americans have the lowest colorectal cancer screening rates in New York City. The Charles B. Wang Community Health Center implemented a patient navigation program to increase colorectal cancer screening. This report describes the lessons learned from the program.

  14. An Online Program for Caregivers of Persons Living With Dementia: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Mariya; Blevins, Lindsey; Griffiths, Patricia C; Hepburn, Kenneth

    2017-04-01

    The population of individuals living with dementia and their caregivers and the need to provide caregiver training will increase in the next several decades. In-person caregiver educational programs are delimited by logistical and resource boundaries that could be overcome with online programs. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the acceptability and ways to improve the content and delivery of an online 7-week psychoeducational pilot program-Tele-Savvy. Thirty-six caregivers who completed the pilot were interviewed about their experience with Tele-Savvy and their suggestions for its improvement. Conventional content analysis allowed for the identification of three themes: barriers and facilitators to establishing rapport with participants and instructors, content enrichment and diversification, and structural refinement. These lessons learned directly from the caregivers provide evidence to guide the refinement of analogous online interventions and highlight the need for their wider availability.

  15. Lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses my early years, education, and life experiences, including aspects of my career at McCormick & Co., Inc. A major intensive effort, one that greatly influenced my career, was helping the flavor industry cope with the passage of the Food Additives Amendment to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. It resulted in a program now in its 51st year that is unique in the food industry. Other activities took me further into the fields of toxicology, structure/activity relationships, food safety, nutrition, and biotechnology. The paper closes with some observations on current challenges, and the steps that, in my opinion, we must take to meet them.

  16. Lesson Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    ASA will begin naming "a few hundred" engineers soon who will constitute the Independent. Technical Authority (ITA) recommended by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board to pro- vide an effective check and balance on space programs for safety. Within the next month, the directors of Johnson and Kennedy space centers will name "a couple of dozen at each place" to backstop human spaceflight engineers, according to Theron M. Bradley, Jr., NASA chief engineer. By the time the new fiscal year begins Oct. 1, the ITA should be fully staffed across the agency, with a system of "warrants" delineating who is an expert in what. Overseeing the whole organization

  17. Developing a quality and safety curriculum for fellows: lessons learned from a neonatology fellowship program.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Munish; Ringer, Steve; Tess, Anjala; Hansen, Anne; Zupancic, John

    2014-01-01

    Formal training in health care quality and safety has become an important component of medical education at all levels, and quality and safety are core concepts within the practice-based learning and system-based practice medical education competencies. Residency and fellowship programs are rapidly attempting to incorporate quality and safety curriculum into their training programs but have encountered numerous challenges and barriers. Many program directors have questioned the feasibility and utility of quality and safety education during this stage of training. In 2010, we adopted a quality and safety educational module in our neonatal fellowship program that sought to provide a robust and practical introduction to quality improvement and patient safety through a combination of didactic and experiential activities. Our module has been successfully integrated into the fellowship program's curriculum and has been beneficial to trainees, faculty, and our clinical services, and our experience suggests that fellowship may be particularly well suited to incorporation of quality and safety training. We describe our module and share tools and lessons learned during our experience; we believe these resources will be useful to other fellowship programs seeking to improve the quality and safety education of their trainees. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Constellation Lessons Learned Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Neubek, Deb

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the lessons learned from the Constellation Program (CxP) and identified several factors that contributed to the inability of the CxP to meet the cost and schedule commitments. The review includes a significant section on the context in which the CxP operated since new programs are likely to experience the same constraints.

  19. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Joh B

    2010-01-01

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  20. The Benefits of Physician Training Programs for Rural Communities: Lessons Learned from the Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education Program.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marshala; Newton, Helen; Smith, Tracey; Crawford, Malena; Kepley, Hayden; Regenstein, Marsha; Chen, Candice

    2016-01-01

    Rural communities disproportionately face preventable chronic diseases and death from treatable conditions. Health workforce shortages contribute to limited health care access and health disparities. Efforts to address workforce shortages have included establishing graduate medical education programs with the goal of recruiting and retaining physicians in the communities in which they train. However, rural communities face a number of challenges in developing and maintaining successful residency programs, including concerns over financial sustainability and the integration of resident trainees into existing clinical practices. Despite these challenges, rural communities are increasingly interested in investing in residency programs; those that are successful see additional benefits in workforce recruitment, access, and quality of care that have immediate and direct impact on the health of rural communities. This commentary examines the challenges and benefits of rural residency programs, drawing from lessons learned from the Health Resources and Services Administration's Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education program.

  1. Lessons Learned for Cx PRACA. Constellation Program Problem Reporting, Analysis and Corrective Action Process and System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelle, Pido I.; Ratterman, Christian; Gibbs, Cecil

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Constellation Program Problem Reporting, Analysis and Corrective Action Process and System (Cx PRACA). The goal of the Cx PRACA is to incorporate Lessons learned from the Shuttle, ISS, and Orbiter programs by creating a single tool for managing the PRACA process, that clearly defines the scope of PRACA applicability and what must be reported, and defines the ownership and responsibility for managing the PRACA process including disposition approval authority. CxP PRACA is a process, supported by a single information gathering data module which will be integrated with a single CxP Information System, providing interoperability, import and export capability making the CxP PRACA a more effective and user friendly technical and management tool.

  2. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, welcomes participants to the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." Guest panelists included Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team; Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  3. Strategic Program Planning Lessons Learned In Developing The Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, B.W.; Hanson, D.J.; Matthern, G.E.

    2003-04-24

    Technology roadmapping is a strategic planning method used by companies to identify and plan the development of technologies necessary for new products. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management has used this same method to refine requirements and identify knowledge and tools needed for completion of defined missions. This paper describes the process of applying roadmapping to clarify mission requirements and identify enhancing technologies for the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) of polluted sites after site cleanup has been completed. The nature of some contamination problems is such that full cleanup is not achievable with current technologies and some residual hazards remain. LTS maintains engineered contaminant barriers and land use restriction controls, and monitors residual contaminants until they no longer pose a risk to the public or the environment. Roadmapping was used to clarify the breadth of the LTS mission, to identify capability enhancements needed to improve mission effectiveness and efficiency, and to chart out the research and development efforts to provide those enhancements. This paper is a case study of the application of roadmapping for program planning and technical risk management. Differences between the planned and actual application of the roadmapping process are presented along with lessons learned. Both the process used and lessons learned should be of interest for anyone contemplating a similar technology based planning effort.

  4. Strategic Program Planning Lessons Learned in Developing the LTS S&T Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Duane Hanson; Brent Dixon; Gretchen Matthern

    2003-07-01

    Technology roadmapping is a strategic planning method used by companies to identify and plan the development of technologies necessary for new products. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management has used this same method to refine requirements and identify knowledge and tools needed for completion of defined missions. This paper describes the process of applying roadmapping to clarify mission requirements and identify enhancing technologies for the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) of polluted sites after site cleanup has been completed. The nature of some contamination problems is such that full cleanup is not achievable with current technologies and some residual hazards remain. LTS maintains engineered contaminant barriers and land use restriction controls, and monitors residual contaminants until they no longer pose a risk to the public or the environment. Roadmapping was used to clarify the breadth of the LTS mission, to identify capability enhancements needed to improve mission effectiveness and efficiency, and to chart out the research and development efforts to provide those enhancements. This paper is a case study of the application of roadmapping for program planning and technical risk management. Differences between the planned and actual application of the roadmapping process are presented along with lessons learned. Both the process used and lessons learned should be of interest for anyone contemplating a similar technology based planning effort.

  5. Improving Access to Healthy Foods for Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders: Lessons Learned from the STRIVE Program

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Simona C.; Rideout, Catlin; Patel, Shilpa; Arista, Pedro; Tepporn, Edward; Lipman, Jesse; Kunkel, Sarah; Le, Daniel Q.; Chin, Kathy Ko; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-01-01

    Summary Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs) experience a large burden from certain chronic disease-related risk factors. The STRIVE Program funded four AANHPI community-based organizations (CBOs) to implement culturally adapted community gardens and farmers' markets to increase access to healthy foods. CBO key informant interviews were conducted to understand processes and lessons learned. PMID:25981093

  6. Improving Access to Healthy Foods for Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders: Lessons Learned from the STRIVE Program.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Simona C; Rideout, Catlin; Patel, Shilpa; Arista, Pedro; Tepporn, Edward; Lipman, Jesse; Kunkel, Sarah; Le, Daniel Q; Chin, Kathy Ko; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-05-01

    Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs) experience a large burden from certain chronic disease-related risk factors. The STRIVE Program funded four AANHPI community-based organizations (CBOs) to implement culturally adapted community gardens and farmers' markets to increase access to healthy foods. Key CBO informant interviews were conducted to understand processes and lessons learned.

  7. Animal use and lessons learned in the U.S. High Production Volume Chemicals Challenge Program.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Patricia L; Manuppello, Joseph R; Willett, Catherine E; Sandler, Jessica T

    2012-12-01

    Launched by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1998, the High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program was developed to address the perceived gap in basic hazard information for the 2,800 chemicals produced or imported into the United States in quantities of ≥ 1 million pounds per year. Health and environmental effects data obtained from either existing information or through new vertebrate animal testing were voluntarily submitted by chemical companies (sponsors) to the U.S. EPA. Despite the potential for extensive animal testing, animal welfare guidelines were not provided until after the start of the program. We evaluated compliance with the animal welfare principles that arose from an agreement reached between the U.S. EPA and animal protection organizations and tracked the HPV program's use of animals for testing. Under a worst-case scenario, the HPV program had the potential to consume 3.5 million animals in new testing. After application of animal-saving measures, approximately 127,000 were actually used. Categorization of chemicals based on similar structure-activity and application of read-across, along with use of existing test data, were the most effective means of reducing animal testing. However, animal-saving measures were inconsistently used by both sponsors and the U.S. EPA. Lessons learned from the HPV program can be applied to future programs to minimize animal testing and promote more human-relevant chemical risk assessment.

  8. Dimensions of Capacity Building: Lessons Learned from the NASA Applied Sciences Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searby, N. D.; Irwin, D.; Ruiz, M.; Prados, A. I.; Armstrong, D.

    2012-12-01

    Extending the use of NASA's Earth science data to end-users and stakeholders globally has yielded many insights. This overview highlights the opportunities, challenges, success stories, and lessons learned in NASA's SERVIR, DEVELOP, Applied Remote Sensing Training, and Gulf of Mexico Initiative capacity building programs. In order to build the capacity to use Earth science data and observations in daily decision and policy-making, multiple dimensions of capacity need to be strengthened. End-users need to expand scientific and technological capacity. Human, institutional, organizational, and improved data-driven decision-making capacity is required to enable sustainable results. Metrics need to be established and clearly defined during the entire process. To ensure desired outcomes are achieved, impacts must be evaluated and measured against desired results. Recent successes in building capacity across several societal benefit areas are described.

  9. Animal Use and Lessons Learned in the U.S. High Production Volume Chemicals Challenge Program

    PubMed Central

    Manuppello, Joseph R.; Willett, Catherine E.; Sandler, Jessica T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Launched by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1998, the High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program was developed to address the perceived gap in basic hazard information for the 2,800 chemicals produced or imported into the United States in quantities of ≥ 1 million pounds per year. Health and environmental effects data obtained from either existing information or through new vertebrate animal testing were voluntarily submitted by chemical companies (sponsors) to the U.S. EPA. Despite the potential for extensive animal testing, animal welfare guidelines were not provided until after the start of the program. Objectives: We evaluated compliance with the animal welfare principles that arose from an agreement reached between the U.S. EPA and animal protection organizations and tracked the HPV program’s use of animals for testing. Discussion: Under a worst-case scenario, the HPV program had the potential to consume 3.5 million animals in new testing. After application of animal-saving measures, approximately 127,000 were actually used. Categorization of chemicals based on similar structure–activity and application of read-across, along with use of existing test data, were the most effective means of reducing animal testing. However, animal-saving measures were inconsistently used by both sponsors and the U.S. EPA. Conclusions: Lessons learned from the HPV program can be applied to future programs to minimize animal testing and promote more human-relevant chemical risk assessment. PMID:23033452

  10. A Youth-Leader Program in Baltimore City Recreation Centers: Lessons Learned and Applications.

    PubMed

    Trude, Angela C B; Anderson Steeves, Elizabeth; Shipley, Cara; Surkan, Pamela J; Sato, Priscila de Morais; Estep, Tracey; Clanton, Stella; Lachenmayr, Lisa; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2017-09-01

    Peer-led interventions may be an effective means of addressing the childhood obesity epidemic; however, few studies have looked at the long-term sustainability of such programs. As part of a multilevel obesity prevention intervention, B'More Healthy Communities for Kids, 16 Baltimore college students were trained as youth-leaders (YLs) to deliver a skill-based nutrition curriculum to low-income African American children (10-14 years old). In April 2015, formative research was used to inform sustainability of the YL program in recreation centers. In-depth interviews were conducted with recreation center directors ( n = 4) and the YLs ( n = 16). Two focus groups were conducted with YLs ( n = 7) and community youth-advocates ( n = 10). Barriers to this program included difficulties with transportation, time constraints, and recruiting youth. Lessons learned indicated that improving trainings and incentives to youth were identified as essential strategies to foster continuity of the youth-led program and capacity building. High school students living close to the centers were identified as potential candidates to lead the program. Based on our findings, the initial intervention will be expanded into a sustainable model for implementation, using a train-the-trainer approach to empower community youth to be change agents of the food environment and role models.

  11. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Ernie Reyes, retired, former Apollo 1 senior operations manager, signs a book for a worker after the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the program was "To there and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  12. Lessons learned from the scaling-up of a weekly multimicronutrient supplementation program in the integrated food security program (PISA).

    PubMed

    Lechtig, Aarón; Gross, Rainer; Vivanco, Oscar Aquino; Gross, Ursula; López de Romaña, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Weekly multimicronutrient supplementation was initiated as an appropriate intervention to protect poor urban populations from anemia. To identify the lessons learned from the Integrated Food Security Program (Programa Integrado de Seguridad Alimentaria [PISA]) weekly multimicronutrient supplementation program implemented in poor urban populations of Chiclayo, Peru. Data were collected from a 12-week program in which multimicronutrient supplements were provided weekly to women and adolescent girls 12 through 44 years of age and children under 5 years of age. A baseline survey was first conducted. Within the weekly multimicronutrient supplementation program, information was collected on supplement distribution, compliance, biological effectiveness, and cost. Supplementation, fortification, and dietary strategies can be integrated synergistically within a micronutrient intervention program. To ensure high cost-effectiveness of a weekly multimicronutrient supplementation program, the following conditions need to be met: the program should be implemented twice a year for 4 months; the program should be simultaneously implemented at the household (micro), community (meso), and national (macro) levels; there should be governmental participation from health and other sectors; and there should be community and private sector participation. Weekly multimicronutrient supplementation programs are cost effective options in urban areas with populations at low risk of energy deficiency and high risk of micronutrient deficiencies.

  13. Lessons Learned for Improving Spacecraft Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Michael; Henderson, Gena; Stambolian, Damon

    2013-01-01

    NASA policy requires each Program or Project to develop a plan for how they will address Lessons Learned. Projects have the flexibility to determine how best to promote and implement lessons learned. A large project might budget for a lessons learned position to coordinate elicitation, documentation and archival of the project lessons. The lessons learned process crosses all NASA Centers and includes the contactor community. o The Office of The Chief Engineer at NASA Headquarters in Washington D.C., is the overall process owner, and field locations manage the local implementation. One tool used to transfer knowledge between program and projects is the Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). Most lessons come from NASA in partnership with support contractors. A search for lessons that might impact a new design is often performed by a contractor team member. Knowledge is not found with only one person, one project team, or one organization. Sometimes, another project team, or person, knows something that can help your project or your task. Knowledge sharing is an everyday activity at the Kennedy Space Center through storytelling, Kennedy Engineering Academy presentations and through searching the Lessons Learned Information system. o Project teams search the lessons repository to ensure the best possible results are delivered. o The ideas from the past are not always directly applicable but usually spark new ideas and innovations. Teams have a great responsibility to collect and disseminate these lessons so that they are shared with future generations of space systems designers. o Leaders should set a goal for themselves to host a set numbers of lesson learned events each year and do more to promote multiple methods of lessons learned activities. o High performing employees are expected to share their lessons, however formal knowledge sharing presentation are not the norm for many employees.

  14. The Benefits of Intergenerational Learning in Higher Education: Lessons Learned from Two Age Friendly University Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pstross, Mikulas; Corrigan, Trudy; Knopf, Richard C.; Sung, HeeKyung; Talmage, Craig A.; Conroy, Carmel; Fowley, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on the role of universities in the promotion of intergenerational learning and the facilitation of reciprocal sharing of expertise among learners of all ages. The principles of the Age Friendly University are used as a particular lens for interpreting two university programs, one in the United States and one in Ireland. Though…

  15. A customizable model for chronic disease coordination: Lessons learned from the coordinated chronic disease program

    DOE PAGES

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-03-31

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managedmore » resources, and 6) relationship building. Furthermore, these elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs.« less

  16. Reducing HIV-related stigma: lessons learned from Horizons research and programs.

    PubMed

    Pulerwitz, Julie; Michaelis, Annie; Weiss, Ellen; Brown, Lisanne; Mahendra, Vaishali

    2010-01-01

    Since the early years of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, stigma has been understood to be a major barrier to successful HIV prevention, care, and treatment. This article highlights findings from more than 10 studies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America-conducted from 1997 through 2007 as part of the Horizons program-that have contributed to clarifying the relationship between stigma and HIV, determining how best to measure stigma among varied populations, and designing and evaluating the impact of stigma reduction-focused program strategies. Studies showed significant associations between HIV-related stigma and less use of voluntary counseling and testing, less willingness to disclose test results, and incorrect knowledge about transmission. Programmatic lessons learned included how to assist institutions with recognizing stigma, the importance of confronting both fears of contagion and negative social judgments, and how best to engage people living with HIV in programs. The portfolio of work reveals the potential and importance of directly addressing stigma reduction in HIV programs.

  17. Addressing gender dynamics and engaging men in HIV programs: lessons learned from Horizons research.

    PubMed

    Pulerwitz, Julie; Michaelis, Annie; Verma, Ravi; Weiss, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    In the field of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention, there has been increasing interest in the role that gender plays in HIV and violence risk, and in successfully engaging men in the response. This article highlights findings from more than 10 studies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America--conducted from 1997 through 2007 as part of the Horizons program--that have contributed to understanding the relationship between gender and men's behaviors, developing useful measurement tools for gender norms, and designing and evaluating the impact of gender-focused program strategies. Studies showed significant associations between support for inequitable norms and risk, such as more partner violence and less condom use. Programmatic lessons learned ranged from insights into appropriate media messages, to strategies to engage men in critically reflecting upon gender inequality, to the qualities of successful program facilitators. The portfolio of work reveals the potential and importance of directly addressing gender dynamics in HIV- and violence-prevention programs for both men and women.

  18. National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program: Successes and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is widely recognized in the earth science community as possessing extensive collections of geologic and geophysical materials gathered by its research personnel. Since the USGS was established in 1879, hundreds of thousands of samples have been gathered in collections that range from localized, geographically-based assemblages to ones that are national or international in scope. These materials include, but are not limited to, rock and mineral specimens; fossils; drill cores and cuttings; geochemical standards; and soil, sediment, and geochemical samples. The USGS National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program (NGGDPP) was established with the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Since its implementation, the USGS NGGDPP has taken an active role in providing opportunities to inventory, archive and preserve geologic and geophysical samples, and to make these samples and ancillary data discoverable on the Internet. Preserving endangered geoscience collections is more cost effective than recollecting this information. Preserving these collections, however, is only one part of the process - there also needs to be a means to facilitate open discovery and access to the physical objects and the ancillary digital records. The NGGDPP has celebrated successes such as the development of the USGS Geologic Collections Management System (GCMS), a master catalog and collections management plan, and the implementation and advancement of the National Digital Catalog, a digital inventory and catalog of geological and geophysical data and collections held by the USGS and State geological surveys. Over this period of time there has been many lessons learned. With the successes and lessons learned, NGGDPP is poised to take on challenges the future may bring.

  19. Lessons Learned from FUSRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, Darina; Carpenter, Cliff; Miller, Michele

    2016-03-06

    The US DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the long-term steward for 90 sites remediated under numerous regulatory regimes including the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites. In addition, LM holds considerable historical information, gathered in the 1970s, to determine site eligibility for remediation under FUSRAP. To date, 29 FUSRAP sites are in LM’s inventory of sites for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M), and 25 are with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for remediation or in the process of being transitioned to LM. It is forecasted that 13 FUSRAP sites will transfer from the USACE to LM over the next 10 years; however, the timing of the transfers is strongly dependent upon federal funding of the ongoing remedial actions. Historically, FUSRAP sites were generally cleaned up for “unrestricted” industrial use or remediated to the “cleanup standards” at that time, and their use remained unchanged. Today, these sites as well as the adjacent properties are now changing or envisioned to have changes in land use, typically from industrial to commercial or residential uses. The implication of land-use change affects DOE’s LTS&M responsibility for the sites under LM stewardship as well as the planning for the additional sites scheduled to transition in time. Coinciding with land-use changes at or near FUSRAP sites is an increased community awareness of these sites. As property development increases near FUSRAP sites, the general public and interested stakeholders regularly inquire about the sufficiency of cleanups that impact their neighborhoods and communities. LM has used this experience to address a series of lessons learned to improve our program management in light of the changing conditions of our sites. We describe these lessons learned as (1) improved stakeholder relations, (2) enhanced LTS&M requirements for the sites, and (3) greater involvement in the transition process.

  20. Report on Lessons Learned from the NP 2010 Early Site Permit Program FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-26

    This report provides a summary of lessons learned from the demonstration of the licensing process for three Early Site Permit (ESP) applications supported as part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010) program. The ESP process was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to enable completion of the site evaluation component of nuclear power plant licensing under 10 CFR Part 52 before a utility makes a decision to build a plant. Early Site Permits are valid for 10 to 20 years and can be renewed for an additional 10 to 20 years. NRC review of an ESP application addresses site safety issues, environmental protection issues, and plans for coping with emergencies. Successful completion of the ESP process will establish that a site is suitable for possible future construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Most importantly, an ESP resolves significant site-related safety and environmental issues early in the decision process and helps achieve acceptance by the public. DOE competitively selected Dominion Nuclear Energy North Anna, LLC (Dominion); System Energy Resources, Inc. (an Entergy subsidiary); and Exelon Generation Company, LLC (Exelon) in 2002 to demonstrate the ESP process and provided cost-shared support through the NP 2010 program. Dominion pursued an ESP for the North Anna site in Virginia; System Energy Resources, Inc. pursued an ESP for the Grand Gulf site in Mississippi; and Exelon pursued an ESP for the Clinton site in Illinois. After successfully demonstrating the process, the NRC issued an ESP for Clinton on March 17, 2007; Grand Gulf on April 5, 2007; and North Anna on November 27, 2007. As with all successful projects, there are lessons to be learned from the NP 2010 early site permitting demonstration that can help improve future implementation guidance documents and regulatory review standards. In general, these lessons pertain to the effectiveness of the regulatory process, experience related to

  1. Impact of a national antimicrobial stewardship mentoring program: Insights and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Goff, Debra A; Karam, George H; Haines, Stuart T

    2017-02-15

    The impact of an interprofessional mentoring program to advance antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) in selected U.S. hospitals and lessons learned are described. A seven-step mentoring process with self-assessment, telephone calls, continuing education, a one-day onsite visit, action plan, and outcome data collection and analysis was provided to ASP teams at nine hospitals. Six hospitals completed the program. A significant improvement in the timeliness and appropriateness of i.v. antibiotic therapy (defined as a hang time within one hour after prescriber order entry and broad-spectrum coverage for gram-negative pathogens administered first when combination therapy was used) was observed in patients with sepsis over the 12-month period after implementation of the mentoring program. As a result of requiring hospital administration's participation in the mentoring program, increased funding became available at three hospitals for the microbiology laboratory to provide new rapid diagnostic tests and for pharmacist and physician time to devote to ASP activities. The collaboration and engagement of ASP team members, inclusion of hospital administrators and pharmacy directors in the onsite mentoring visits, and an experienced mentor team with an infectious diseases (ID) physician and ID pharmacist contributed to ASP success. Challenges included insufficient time to collect outcome metrics due to competing hospital priorities and loss of momentum over time. A mentoring program for antimicrobial stewardship provided the perspective that comes from experience. Engagement of hospital administration was a key factor for both developing and sustaining a stewardship program. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Overdose prevention for injection drug users: Lessons learned from naloxone training and distribution programs in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Tinka Markham; Rudenstine, Sasha; Stancliff, Sharon; Sherman, Susan; Nandi, Vijay; Clear, Allan; Galea, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    Background Fatal heroin overdose is a significant cause of mortality for injection drug users (IDUs). Many of these deaths are preventable because opiate overdoses can be quickly and safely reversed through the injection of Naloxone [brand name Narcan], a prescription drug used to revive persons who have overdosed on heroin or other opioids. Currently, in several cities in the United States, drug users are being trained in naloxone administration and given naloxone for immediate and successful reversals of opiate overdoses. There has been very little formal description of the challenges faced in the development and implementation of large-scale IDU naloxone administration training and distribution programs and the lessons learned during this process. Methods During a one year period, over 1,000 participants were trained in SKOOP (Skills and Knowledge on Opiate Prevention) and received a prescription for naloxone by a medical doctor on site at a syringe exchange program (SEP) in New York City. Participants in SKOOP were over the age of 18, current participants of SEPs, and current or former drug users. We present details about program design and lessons learned during the development and implementation of SKOOP. Lessons learned described in the manuscript are collectively articulated by the evaluators and implementers of the project. Results There were six primary challenges and lessons learned in developing, implementing, and evaluating SKOOP. These include a) political climate surrounding naloxone distribution; b) extant prescription drug laws; c) initial low levels of recruitment into the program; d) development of participant appropriate training methodology; e) challenges in the design of a suitable formal evaluation; and f) evolution of program response to naloxone. Conclusion Other naloxone distribution programs may anticipate similar challenges to SKOOP and we identify mechanisms to address them. Strategies include being flexible in program planning and

  3. Rotary's PolioPlus Program: Lessons Learned, Transition Planning, and Legacy.

    PubMed

    Sever, John L; McGovern, Michael; Scott, Robert; Pandak, Carol; Edwards, Amy; Goodstone, David

    2017-07-01

    Hundreds of thousands of Rotary volunteers have provided support for polio eradication activities and continue to this day by making financial contributions to the Rotary PolioPlus program, participating in national immunization days, assisting with surveillance, working on local, national, and international advocacy programs for polio eradication, assisting at immunization posts and clinics, and mobilizing their communities for immunization activities (including poliovirus and other vaccines) and other health benefits. Rotary has contributed more than $1.61 billion for the global eradication of polio and has committed to provide an additional $35 million each year until 2018 (all dollar amounts represent US dollars). Its unwavering commitment to eradicate polio has been vital to the success of the program. Rotary is providing additional support for routine immunization and healthcare. When polio is finally gone, we will have the knowledge from the lessons learned with PolioPlus, such as the value of direct involvement by local Rotarians, the program for emergency funding, innovative tactics, and additional approaches for tackling other global issues, even those beyond public health. Rotary has already transitioned its grants program to include 6 areas of focus: disease prevention and treatment, water and sanitation, maternal and child health, basic education and literacy, economic and community development, and peace and conflict prevention/resolution. Funding for these grants in 2015-2016 was $71 million. The legacy of the polio program will be the complete eradication of poliovirus and the elimination of polio for all time. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  4. Piloting a nationally disseminated, interactive human subjects protection program for community partners: unexpected lessons learned from the field.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Stephanie; Bullock, Sherita; Calhoun, Karen; Crosby, Lori; Eakin, Brenda; Franco, Zeno; Hardwick, Emily; Holland, Samuel; Leinberger-Jabari, Andrea; Newton, Gail; Odell, Jere; Paberzs, Adam; Spellecy, Ryan

    2014-04-01

    Funders, institutions, and research organizations are increasingly recognizing the need for human subjects protections training programs for those engaged in academic research. Current programs tend to be online and directed toward an audience of academic researchers. Research teams now include many nonacademic members, such as community partners, who are less likely to respond to either the method or the content of current online trainings. A team at the CTSA-supported Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research at the University of Michigan developed a pilot human subjects protection training program for community partners that is both locally implemented and adaptable to local contexts, yet nationally consistent and deliverable from a central administrative source. Here, the developers of the program and the collaborators who participated in the pilot across the United States describe 10 important lessons learned that align with four major themes: The distribution of the program, the implementation of the program, the involvement of community engagement in the program, and finally lessons regarding the content of the program. These lessons are relevant to anyone who anticipates developing or improving a training program that is developed in a central location and intended for local implementation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Piloting a Nationally Disseminated, Interactive Human Subjects Protection Program for Community Partners: Unexpected Lessons Learned from the Field

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Sherita; Calhoun, Karen; Crosby, Lori; Eakin, Brenda; Franco, Zeno; Hardwick, Emily; Leinberger‐Jabari, Andrea; Newton, Gail; Odell, Jere; Paberzs, Adam; Spellecy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Funders, institutions, and research organizations are increasingly recognizing the need for human subjects protections training programs for those engaged in academic research. Current programs tend to be online and directed toward an audience of academic researchers. Research teams now include many nonacademic members, such as community partners, who are less likely to respond to either the method or the content of current online trainings. A team at the CTSA‐supported Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research at the University of Michigan developed a pilot human subjects protection training program for community partners that is both locally implemented and adaptable to local contexts, yet nationally consistent and deliverable from a central administrative source. Here, the developers of the program and the collaborators who participated in the pilot across the United States describe 10 important lessons learned that align with four major themes: The distribution of the program, the implementation of the program, the involvement of community engagement in the program, and finally lessons regarding the content of the program. These lessons are relevant to anyone who anticipates developing or improving a training program that is developed in a central location and intended for local implementation. PMID:24720349

  6. From empower to Green Dot : successful strategies and lessons learned in developing comprehensive sexual violence primary prevention programming.

    PubMed

    Cook-Craig, Patricia G; Millspaugh, Phyllis H; Recktenwald, Eileen A; Kelly, Natalie C; Hegge, Lea M; Coker, Ann L; Pletcher, Tisha S

    2014-10-01

    This case study describes Kentucky's partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) EMPOWER (Enhancing and Making Programs Work to End Rape) program to enhance the mission and services of existing rape crisis centers to include comprehensive primary prevention programming to reduce rates of sexual violence perpetration. The planning process and the successful implementation of a statewide, 5-year, randomized control trial study of a bystander prevention program (Green Dot), and its evaluation are described. Lessons learned in generating new questions, seeking funding, building relationships and capacity, and disseminating knowledge are presented. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. An update on the NASA Planetary Science Division R&A Program: Historical trends, ROSES 2012 statistics, and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Christina

    2013-10-01

    This presentation will provide historical trends of the Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) awards for the Planetary Science Division’s R&A program, including a detailed analysis of the 2012 call selections (and lessons learned). An overview of the submission process via NSPIRES will be provided, as well as an overview of the review process and information on how to volunteer for review panels (via the SARA site). Additional details will be provided on the Cassini Data Analysis Program (CDAPS) and Origins of Solar System Program (SSO, Planetary Science Division), for which Dr. Richey is the Program Officer.

  8. The UK Expert Patients Program: lessons learned and implications for cancer survivors' self-care support programs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patricia M

    2008-03-01

    Globally, the enablement of self-care is increasingly being recognised as an essential component of chronic disease management. Within the UK a key self-care policy initiative is the Expert Patients Program. Developed from the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, this is a 6 week self-management education program for people with different chronic diseases, facilitated by lay volunteers. As an example of a major public health initiative designed to enhance self-management in long-term conditions, this paper draws on evaluations of the EPP and CDSMP and analyzes the implications for the development of similar programs for cancer survivors. There are a number of evaluations of the CDSMP which suggest significant improvement in participants' chronic disease management self-efficacy and some evidence of healthcare utilization reduction. However, whilst the national evaluation of the EPP demonstrated similar improvements in self-efficacy and health status, there was no significant effect on healthcare utilization. Trials of such programs need to be treated with some caution as participants are often not typical of the general population, and as a complex intervention effectiveness is inherently difficult to assess. Qualitative evaluations revealed that the EPP's strength was derived mainly through peer support and learning. Nevertheless, a number of contextual problems were identified including recruitment, clinicians' lack of engagement with the program and inflexible course materials. Lay-led self-care support programs such as the EPP have a significantly positive effect on self-efficacy which could be of benefit to cancer survivors. However, a number of lessons should be learned from the EPP when developing similar initiatives for cancer survivors.

  9. Evaluation of a cross-cultural training program for Pakistani educators: Lessons learned and implications for program planning.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Rebecca; Woodland, Rebecca H

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, we share the results of a summative evaluation of PEILI, a US-based adult professional development/training program for secondary school Pakistani teachers. The evaluation was guided by the theories of cultural competence (American Psychological Association, 2003; Bamberger, 1999; Wadsworth, 2001) and established frameworks for the evaluation of professional development/training and instructional design (Bennett, 1975; Guskey, 2002; King, 2014; Kirkpatrick, 1967). The explicit and implicit stakeholder assumptions about the connections between program resources, activities, outputs, and outcomes are described. Participant knowledge and skills were measured via scores on a pre/posttest of professional knowledge, and a standards-based performance assessment rubric. In addition to measuring short-term program outcomes, we also sought to incorporate theory-driven thinking into the evaluation design. Hence, we examined participant self-efficacy and access to social capital, two evidenced-based determinants or "levers" that theoretically explain the transformative space between an intervention and its outcomes (Chen, 2012). Data about program determinants were collected and analyzed through a pre/posttest of self-efficacy and social network analysis. Key evaluation findings include participant acquisition of new instructional skills, increased self-efficacy, and the formation of a nascent professional support network. Lessons learned and implications for the design and evaluation of cross-cultural teacher professional development programs are discussed.

  10. Lessons learned in using realist evaluation to assess maternal and newborn health programming in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Adams, Alayne; Sedalia, Saroj; McNab, Shanon; Sarker, Malabika

    2016-03-01

    Realist evaluation furnishes valuable insight to public health practitioners and policy makers about how and why interventions work or don't work. Moving beyond binary measures of success or failure, it provides a systematic approach to understanding what goes on in the 'Black Box' and how implementation decisions in real life contexts can affect intervention effectiveness. This paper reflects on an experience in applying the tenets of realist evaluation to identify optimal implementation strategies for scale-up of Maternal and Newborn Health (MNH) programmes in rural Bangladesh. Supported by UNICEF, the three MNH programmes under consideration employed different implementation models to deliver similar services and meet similar MNH goals. Programme targets included adoption of recommended antenatal, post-natal and essential newborn care practices; health systems strengthening through improved referral, accountability and administrative systems, and increased community knowledge. Drawing on focused examples from this research, seven steps for operationalizing the realist evaluation approach are offered, while emphasizing the need to iterate and innovate in terms of methods and analysis strategies. The paper concludes by reflecting on lessons learned in applying realist evaluation, and the unique insights it yields regarding implementation strategies for successful MNH programming.

  11. Research Administration: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dummer, George H.

    1995-01-01

    The ways in which accountability issues have affected federal-university relationships, particularly in the area of academic research, are examined. Lessons university administrators have learned since issuance of Office of Management and Budget Circular A-21 in 1958, Congressional hearings on the operations of the National Institutes of Health…

  12. Online Conferencing: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lyndsay

    This guide summarizes lessons learned from the author's experience of organizing and moderating five non-pedagogical online conferences that use World Wide Web-based conferencing software, whether synchronous or asynchronous. Seven sections cover the following topics: (1) the pros and cons of online conferencing; (2) setting objectives; (3)…

  13. Lessons Learned from a Small Grants Program. Undergraduate Rseearch Fund of Indiana University South Bend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettetal, Gwynn; And Others

    An Undergraduate Research Fund (URF) at Indiana University South Bend that has supported over 100 projects and distributed over $25,000 to students since 1989 has yielded several lessons regarding the program's success. URF not only funded student projects but provided small grants to faculty mentors who encouraged and worked with students. Three…

  14. Assuring that Lessons Learned Critical to Mission Success Get Used

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA has an established process for documenting and disseminating lessons learned from spaceflight missions and related activities. However, independent assessments of the NASA lessons learned process conducted in 2002, 2003, and 2011 have concluded that NASA programs and projects are failing to heed and apply these lessons learned. JPL recently completed implementation of a three-pronged approach to assure that NASA lessons learned get used by JPL spaceflight projects.

  15. Assuring that Lessons Learned Critical to Mission Success Get Used

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA has an established process for documenting and disseminating lessons learned from spaceflight missions and related activities. However, independent assessments of the NASA lessons learned process conducted in 2002, 2003, and 2011 have concluded that NASA programs and projects are failing to heed and apply these lessons learned. JPL recently completed implementation of a three-pronged approach to assure that NASA lessons learned get used by JPL spaceflight projects.

  16. The National Cancer Institute's Community Networks Program Initiative to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities: Outcomes and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Braun, Kathryn L; Stewart, Susan; Baquet, Claudia; Berry-Bobovski, Lisa; Blumenthal, Daniel; Brandt, Heather M; Buchwald, Dedra S; Campbell, Janis E; Coe, Kathryn; Cooper, Leslie C; Espinoza, Paula; Henry-Tillman, Ronda; Hargreaves, Margaret; James, Aimee; Salmon Kaur, Judith; Viswanath, K; Ma, Grace X; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Meade, Cathy; Ramirez, Amelie; Scarinci, Isabel; Park Tanjasiri, Sora; Thompson, Beti; Vines, Anissa I; Dignan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We describe reach, partnerships, products, benefits, and lessons learned of the 25 Community Network Programs (CNPs) that applied community-based participatory research (CBPR) to reduce cancer health disparities. Quantitative and qualitative data were abstracted from CNP final reports. Qualitative data were grouped by theme. Together, the 25 CNPs worked with more than 2,000 academic, clinical, community, government, faith-based, and other partners. They completed 211 needs assessments, leveraged funds for 328 research and service projects, trained 719 new investigators, educated almost 55,000 community members, and published 991 articles. Qualitative data illustrated how use of CBPR improved research methods and participation; improved knowledge, interventions, and outcomes; and built community capacity. Lessons learned related to the need for time to nurture partnerships and the need to attend to community demand for sustained improvements in cancer services. Findings demonstrate the value of government-supported, community-academic, CBPR partnerships in cancer prevention and control research.

  17. Savannah River Site, Liquid Waste Program, Savannah River Remediation American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Benefits and Lessons Learned - 12559

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Mark A.; Crouse, Thomas N.

    2012-07-01

    Utilizing funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River site successfully executed forty-one design, procurement, construction, and operating activities in the period from September 2009 through December 2011. Project Management of the program included noteworthy practices involving safety, integrated project teams, communication, and cost, schedule and risk management. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure were accomplished. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually identified and applied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. The funding of a portion of the Liquid Waste Program at SRS by ARRA was a major success. Significant upgrades to plant capacity, progress toward waste tank closure and procurement of needed infrastructure was accomplished. Integrated Project Teams ensured quality products and services were provided to the Operations customers. Over 1.5 million hours were worked without a single lost work day case. Lessons Learned were continually reviewed and reapplied to enhance the program. Investment of Recovery Act monies into the Liquid Waste Program has ensured continued success in the disposition of radioactive wastes and the closure of high level waste tanks at SRS. (authors)

  18. EDSN Development Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartres, James; Sanchez, Hugo S.; Hanson, John

    2014-01-01

    The Edison Demonstration of Smallsat Networks (EDSN) is a technology demonstration mission that provides a proof of concept for a constellation or swarm of satellites performing coordinated activities. Networked swarms of small spacecraft will open new horizons in astronomy, Earth observations and solar physics. Their range of applications include the formation of synthetic aperture radars for Earth sensing systems, large aperture observatories for next generation telescopes and the collection of spatially distributed measurements of time varying systems, probing the Earths magnetosphere, Earth-Sun interactions and the Earths geopotential. EDSN is a swarm of eight 1.5U Cubesats with crosslink, downlink and science collection capabilities developed by the NASA Ames Research Center under the Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP) within the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). This paper describes the concept of operations of the mission and planned scientific measurements. The development of the 8 satellites for EDSN necessitated the fabrication of prototypes, Flatsats and a total of 16 satellites to support the concurrent engineering and rapid development. This paper has a specific focus on the development, integration and testing of a large number of units including the lessons learned throughout the project development.

  19. Lessons Learned From a Program Evaluation of a Statewide Continuing Education Program for Staff Members Working in Assisted Living and Adult Day Care Centers in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Tracey L; Pryor, Jennifer M; Welleford, E Ayn

    2016-02-01

    The number of older adults residing in assisted living facilities (ALF) and utilizing adult day care services is expanding with the increasing population of older adults. Currently, there are no standardized requirements for continuing education for assisted living and adult day care service staff at a national level. Given that 62% of states within the United States require continuing education for ALF staff and/or administrators, a more formalized system is needed that provides evidence-based gerontological training to enhance the quality of care and services provided to older adults. This article describes the challenges and lessons learned from conducting a program evaluation of a Statewide Training and Continuing Education Program for Assisted Living Facility and Adult Day Care Service staff in Virginia. Survey evaluation data from a 6-year period was examined and a formative program evaluation was conducted. The findings from the survey evaluation and formative evaluation are discussed as are the lessons learned.

  20. Lessons Learned: What the WAY Program Can Teach Us about Program Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Nan; Baker, Amy, J. L.; Racine, David

    This report describes challenges, opportunities, and pitfalls that exist when attempting to replicate successful youth programs, focusing on the replication of a program originally developed by the Children's Village, Dobbs Ferry, New York. The program was designed to motivate youth in the child welfare system's residential treatment program to…

  1. Community-academic partnerships: lessons learned from replicating a salon-based health education and promotion program.

    PubMed

    Browne, Ruth; Vaughn, Nicole A; Siddiqui, Nadia; Brown, Necole; Delmoor, Ernestine; Randleman, Paul; Randleman, Shirley; Gonzalez, Laura; Lewis, Jack; Lourie, Rita; Foster, Gwen; Brown, Humberto; Fraser-White, Marilyn; Banks, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    We present a model of a community-academic partnership formed to replicate a unique salon-based health education and promotion program among African-American and Latino communities in Philadelphia. The purpose of this article is to describe the partnership principles established and lessons learned in replicating the salon-based program that sought to develop a cadre of community-academic partners and build community-based organizations' (CBOs) capacity to implement and evaluate the program. As the lead organization, the Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health (AAIUH), formed a partnership with two CBOs, three universities, and 17 salons. Guiding principles were established to manage the large collaborative and ensure success. By embracing a common mission and principles of understanding, co-learning, building capacity and sharing responsibility and recognition, this partnership was able to achieve positive outcomes. Challenges faced were related to replication, CBO infrastructure, data management capacity, and other process issues. Despite challenges, we created and sustained an enduring partnership and brought positive change to the community. Lessons learned highlight issues to examine before furthering this work such as fostering trust and building meaningful relationships.

  2. Lessons learned from small store programs to increase healthy food access.

    PubMed

    Gittelsohn, Joel; Laska, Melissa N; Karpyn, Allison; Klingler, Kristen; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2014-03-01

    To document implementation challenges and opportunities associated with small store interventions. Case study analysis of small store interventions conducted in 4 regions of the US. We systematically generated matrices to compare and contrast lessons learned to advance implementation science. Seven thematic areas were identified including: establishing relationships with stores, store owner and customer relationships, selection of intervention approaches, stocking healthier foods, evaluation, maintenance of changes, and dissemination. This information provides guidance to researchers and practitioners wishing to design, implement, and evaluate small store interventions.

  3. Lessons Learned From Small Store Programs to Increase Healthy Food Access

    PubMed Central

    Gittelsohn, Joel; Laska, Melissa N.; Karpyn, Allison; Klingler, Kristen; Ayala, Guadalupe X.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To document implementation challenges and opportunities associated with small store interventions. Methods Case study analysis of small store interventions conducted in 4 regions of the US. We systematically generated matrices to compare and contrast lessons learned to advance implementation science. Results Seven thematic areas were identified including: establishing relationships with stores, store owner and customer relationships, selection of intervention approaches, stocking healthier foods, evaluation, maintenance of changes, and dissemination. Conclusions This information provides guidance to researchers and practitioners wishing to design, implement, and evaluate small store interventions. PMID:24629559

  4. Quality Indicators for Adult Education Programs: Lessons Learned from Other Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condelli, Larry; Kutner, Mark

    As a preliminary to developing criteria to meet quality control requirements of the National Literacy Act of 1991, a study examined federal and state development of measures of program quality and performance standards for programs funded under the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA), the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education…

  5. Apollo Lesson Sampler: Apollo 13 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a two-part case study of the Apollo 13 accident. The first lesson contains an overview of the electrical system hardware on the Apollo spacecraft, providing a context for the details of the oxygen tank explosion, and the failure chain reconstruction that led to the conditions present at the time of the accident. Given this background, the lesson then covers the tank explosion and immediate damage to the spacecraft, and the immediate response of Mission Control to what they saw. Part 2 of the lesson picks up shortly after the explosion of the oxygen tank on Apollo 13, and discusses how Mission Control gained insight to and understanding of the damage in the aftermath. Impacts to various spacecraft systems are presented, along with Mission Control's reactions and plans for in-flight recovery leading to a successful entry. Finally, post-flight vehicle changes are presented along with the lessons learned.

  6. Apollo Lesson Sampler: Apollo 13 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a two-part case study of the Apollo 13 accident. The first lesson contains an overview of the electrical system hardware on the Apollo spacecraft, providing a context for the details of the oxygen tank explosion, and the failure chain reconstruction that led to the conditions present at the time of the accident. Given this background, the lesson then covers the tank explosion and immediate damage to the spacecraft, and the immediate response of Mission Control to what they saw. Part 2 of the lesson picks up shortly after the explosion of the oxygen tank on Apollo 13, and discusses how Mission Control gained insight to and understanding of the damage in the aftermath. Impacts to various spacecraft systems are presented, along with Mission Control's reactions and plans for in-flight recovery leading to a successful entry. Finally, post-flight vehicle changes are presented along with the lessons learned.

  7. Lessons Learned: A review of utility experience with conservation and load management programs for commercial and industrial customers

    SciTech Connect

    Nadel, S.

    1990-10-01

    This report examines utility experience with conservation and load management (C LM) programs of commercial and industrial (C I) customers in order to summarize the lessons learned from program experiences to date and what these teach us about how to operate successful programs in the future. This analysis was motivated by a desire to learn about programs which achieve high participation rates and high electricity savings while remaining cost effective. Also, we wanted to review the very latest experiences with innovative program approaches -- approaches that might prove useful to utilities as they scale up their C LM activities. Specific objectives of this phase of the study are threefold: (1) To disseminate information on utility C LM experience to a nationwide audience. (2) To review current New York State utility programs and make suggestions on how these programs can be improved. (3) To collect data for the final phase of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy/New York State Energy Research and Development Authority project, which will examine the savings that are achievable if C LM programs are pushed to the limit'' of current knowledge on how to structure and run cost-effective C LM programs. 19 tabs.

  8. Lessons learned using a values-engaged approach to attend to culture, diversity, and equity in a STEM program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Ayesha S

    2017-10-01

    Evaluation must attend meaningfully and respectfully to issues of culture, race, diversity, power, and equity. This attention is especially critical within the evaluation of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educational programming, which has an explicit agenda of broadening participation. The purpose of this article is to report lessons learned from the implementation of a values-engaged, educative (Greene et al., 2006) evaluation within a multi-year STEM education program setting. This meta-evaluation employed a case study design using data from evaluator weekly systematic reflections, review of evaluation and program artifacts, stakeholder interviews, and peer review and assessment. The main findings from this study are (a) explicit attention to culture, diversity, and equity was initially challenged by organizational culture and under-developed evaluator-stakeholder professional relationship and (b) evidence of successful engagement of culture, diversity, and equity emerged in formal evaluation criteria and documents, and informal dialogue and discussion with stakeholders. The paper concludes with lessons learned and implications for practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Extension Learning Exchange: Lessons from Nicaragua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treadwell, Paul; Lachapelle, Paul; Howe, Rod

    2013-01-01

    There is a clear need to support global professional development, international education, and collaborative learning opportunities in Extension. The program described here established an international learning exchange in Nicaragua to lead to global professional development and future international collaboration. The primary lessons and outcomes…

  10. Joint Center for Lessons Learned. Quarterly Bulletin, Volume 3, Issue 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    Learned Program �A Com- mon Framework, by Col Egon Hawrylak, USA, details the purpose and framework of the Chairman�s Joint Lessons Learned Program . Our...Joint Lessons Learned Conference and the Joint Lessons Learned Program Configu- ration Management Board. Mr. Mike Barker JCLL Director v Joint Center...CURRENT DOCTRINE ADEQUATE? (Section 3) .... 18 The Joint Lessons Learned Program � Building a Common Framework ...................................... 23

  11. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana welcomes participants to the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." Guest panelists included Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team; Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  12. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team, speaks to participants during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." Other guest panelists included Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  13. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Suzy Cunningham, with the Communication and Public Engagement Directorate, sings the National Anthem before the start of the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." Guest panelists included Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team; Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  14. Human Factors Throughout the Life Cycle: Lessons Learned from the Shuttle Program. [Human Factors in Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    2011-01-01

    With the ending of the Space Shuttle Program, it is critical that we not forget the Human Factors lessons we have learned over the years. At every phase of the life cycle, from manufacturing, processing and integrating vehicle and payload, to launch, flight operations, mission control and landing, hundreds of teams have worked together to achieve mission success in one of the most complex, high-risk socio-technical enterprises ever designed. Just as there was great diversity in the types of operations performed at every stage, there was a myriad of human factors that could further complicate these human systems. A single mishap or close call could point to issues at the individual level (perceptual or workload limitations, training, fatigue, human error susceptibilities), the task level (design of tools, procedures and aspects of the workplace), as well as the organizational level (appropriate resources, safety policies, information access and communication channels). While we have often had to learn through human mistakes and technological failures, we have also begun to understand how to design human systems in which individuals can excel, where tasks and procedures are not only safe but efficient, and how organizations can foster a proactive approach to managing risk and supporting human enterprises. Panelists will talk about their experiences as they relate human factors to a particular phase of the shuttle life cycle. They will conclude with a framework for tying together human factors lessons-learned into system-level risk management strategies.

  15. Escalation of the Study-Abroad Experience: Lessons from a Hyper-Intensive Integrated Learning Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William B.; Huq, Faizul

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss an innovative study-abroad program implemented by a large university in the Midwestern United States. In partnership with a French business school, a program was established incorporating project-based learning, a multi-national student population, and a three-month residency in France by U.S.-based students and faculty.…

  16. Translating an evidence-based lifestyle intervention program into primary care: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Blonstein, Andrea C; Yank, Veronica; Stafford, Randall S; Wilson, Sandra R; Rosas, Lisa Goldman; Ma, Jun

    2013-07-01

    The E-LITE (Evaluation of Lifestyle Interventions to Treat Elevated Cardiometabolic Risk in Primary Care) trial evaluated the feasibility and potential effectiveness of translating an evidence-based lifestyle intervention for the management of obesity and related risk factors in a primary care setting. Delivered by allied health care providers, the intervention promoted at least 7% weight loss and at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity through gradual, sustainable lifestyle changes. Activities included interactive group lessons, food tasting, guided physical activity, and technology-mediated self-monitoring and behavioral counseling. This article discusses insights and potential areas for improvement to strengthen program implementation for dissemination of the E-LITE program to other primary care settings. We focus on (a) the role of allied health professionals in program delivery, (b) strengthening program integration within a primary care clinic, and (c) the use of information technology to extend the reach and impact of the program. Our experience shows the feasibility of implementing an evidence-based lifestyle intervention program combining group-delivered nutrition and behavioral counseling, physical activity training, and technology-mediated follow-up in a primary care setting. Challenges remain, and we offer possible solutions to overcome them.

  17. Developing and Sustaining Partnerships: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Joan L.; Kaufmann, Barbara A.

    This paper reports on a study that examined skill standards pilot programs to identify lessons learned in the selection and involvement of representatives from the various stakeholder communities and the potential for sustaining the efforts of the pilot programs. Data were gathered through structured conversations with staff and committee members…

  18. GPS lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Global geodesy has improved dramatically over the past decade starting with the GPS for IERS and Geodynamics demonstration campaign in 1991 (GIG 91). At the time it took over a week of CPU time to process a network solution based on 21 global receivers and orbit overlaps were in the 40 cm range. Today it is possible to process a network solution based on 80 global receivers in less then one day of CPU time and orbit overlaps are in the 4 cm range. Special methods are under development for efficient processing of increasingly large regional networks which may contain hundreds or thousands of GPS receivers. Along the way there have been many lessons learned about GPS satellites, receivers, monuments, antennas, radomes, analysis, reference frames, error sources, and interpretation. A wide range of scientific disciplines have been impacted including studies of plate motion, post-glacial rebound, seasonal loading, deformation in plate boundary zones, coseismic displacements due to major earthquakes, postseiemic relaxation, and interseismic strain accumulation related to assessment of seismic hazards. Lessons learned will be presented in the context of new dense networks such as the Plate Boundary Observation (PBO).

  19. GPS lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Global geodesy has improved dramatically over the past decade starting with the GPS for IERS and Geodynamics demonstration campaign in 1991 (GIG 91). At the time it took over a week of CPU time to process a network solution based on 21 global receivers and orbit overlaps were in the 40 cm range. Today it is possible to process a network solution based on 80 global receivers in less then one day of CPU time and orbit overlaps are in the 4 cm range. Special methods are under development for efficient processing of increasingly large regional networks which may contain hundreds or thousands of GPS receivers. Along the way there have been many lessons learned about GPS satellites, receivers, monuments, antennas, radomes, analysis, reference frames, error sources, and interpretation. A wide range of scientific disciplines have been impacted including studies of plate motion, post-glacial rebound, seasonal loading, deformation in plate boundary zones, coseismic displacements due to major earthquakes, postseiemic relaxation, and interseismic strain accumulation related to assessment of seismic hazards. Lessons learned will be presented in the context of new dense networks such as the Plate Boundary Observation (PBO).

  20. Space Shuttle Program Primary Avionics Software System (PASS) Success Legacy -Major Accomplishments and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, James K.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation has shown the accomplishments of the PASS project over three decades and highlighted the lessons learned. Over the entire time, our goal has been to continuously improve our process, implement automation for both quality and increased productivity, and identify and remove all defects due to prior execution of a flawed process in addition to improving our processes following identification of significant process escapes. Morale and workforce instability have been issues, most significantly during 1993 to 1998 (period of consolidation in aerospace industry). The PASS project has also consulted with others, including the Software Engineering Institute, so as to be an early evaluator, adopter, and adapter of state-of-the-art software engineering innovations.

  1. Low-Temperature Projects of the Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program: Evaluation and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Tom; Snyder, Neil; Gosnold, Will

    2016-10-23

    This paper discusses opportunities and challenges related to the technical and economic feasibility of developing power generation from geothermal resources at temperatures of 150 degrees C and lower. Insights from projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Geothermal Technologies Office inform these discussions and provide the basis for some lessons learned to help guide decisions by DOE and the industry in further developing this resource. The technical basis for low-temperature geothermal energy is well established and the systems can be economic today in certain situations. However, these applications are far from a 'plug and play' product; successful development today requires a good knowledge of geothermal system design and operation.

  2. Insights in Public Health: Initiating Bicycle Sharing in Hawai'i: Lessons Learned from a Small Pilot Bike Share Program.

    PubMed

    Choy, Lehua B; Smith, Heidi Hansen; Espiritu, Justine; Higa, Earl; Lee, Thomas; Maddock, Jay

    2015-10-01

    In 2011, a small pilot bike share program was established in the town core of Kailua, Hawai'i, with funding from the Hawai'i State Department of Health. The Kailua system consisted of two stations with 12 bicycles, and the goal was to secure additional funding to expand the station network in the future. Community feedback consistently indicated support for the bike share program. However, system metrics showed low levels of usage, averaging 41.5 rides per month (2011-2014). From observational data, users were primarily tourists. With minimal local staff, the bike share program had limited resources for promotion and education, which may have hindered potential use by local residents. Management of station operations and bike maintenance were additional, ongoing barriers to success. Despite the challenges, the pilot bike share program was valuable in several ways. It introduced the bike share concept to Hawai'i, thereby helping to build awareness and connect an initial network of stakeholders. Furthermore, the pilot bike share program informed the development of a larger bike share program for urban Honolulu. As limited information exists in the literature about the experiences of smaller bike share programs and their unique considerations, this article shares lessons learned for other communities interested in starting similar bike share programs.

  3. Lessons learned from new construction utility demand side management programs and their implications for implementing building energy codes

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, B.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Danko, S.L.; Gilbride, T.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) through its Building Energy Standards Program (BESP). The purpose of this task was to identify demand-side management (DSM) strategies for new construction that utilities have adopted or developed to promote energy-efficient design and construction. PNL conducted a survey of utilities and used the information gathered to extrapolate lessons learned and to identify evolving trends in utility new-construction DSM programs. The ultimate goal of the task is to identify opportunities where states might work collaboratively with utilities to promote the adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy-efficient building energy codes.

  4. The National Cancer Institute’s Community Networks Program Initiative to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities: Outcomes and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Stewart, Susan; Baquet, Claudia; Berry-Bobovski, Lisa; Blumenthal, Daniel; Brandt, Heather M.; Buchwald, Dedra S.; Campbell, Janis E.; Coe, Kathryn; Cooper, Leslie C.; Espinoza, Paula; Henry-Tillman, Ronda; Hargreaves, Margaret; James, Aimee; Kaur, Judith Salmon; Viswanath, K.; Ma, Grace X.; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Meade, Cathy; Ramirez, Amelie; Scarinci, Isabel; Tanjasiri, Sora Park; Thompson, Beti; Vines, Anissa I.; Dignan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background We describe reach, partnerships, products, benefits, and lessons learned of the 25 Community Network Programs (CNPs) that applied community-based participatory research (CBPR) to reduce cancer health disparities. Methods Quantitative and qualitative data were abstracted from CNP final reports. Qualitative data were grouped by theme. Results Together, the 25 CNPs worked with more than 2,000 academic, clinical, community, government, faith-based, and other partners. They completed 211 needs assessments, leveraged funds for 328 research and service projects, trained 719 new investigators, educated almost 55,000 community members, and published 991 articles. Qualitative data illustrated how use of CBPR improved research methods and participation; improved knowledge, interventions, and outcomes; and built community capacity. Lessons learned related to the need for time to nurture partnerships and the need to attend to community demand for sustained improvements in cancer services. Implications Findings demonstrate the value of government-supported, community–academic, CBPR partnerships in cancer prevention and control research. PMID:26213401

  5. Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, William A.; DeWeck, Olivier; Laufer, Deanna; Shull, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration sets out a number of goals, involving both strategic and tactical objectives. These include returning the Space Shuttle to flight, completing the International Space Station, and conducting human expeditions to the Moon by 2020. Each of these goals has profound logistics implications. In the consideration of these objectives,a need for a study on NASA logistics lessons learned was recognized. The study endeavors to identify both needs for space exploration and challenges in the development of past logistics architectures, as well as in the design of space systems. This study may also be appropriately applied as guidance in the development of an integrated logistics architecture for future human missions to the Moon and Mars. This report first summarizes current logistics practices for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and the International Space Station (ISS) and examines the practices of manifesting, stowage, inventory tracking, waste disposal, and return logistics. The key findings of this examination are that while the current practices do have many positive aspects, there are also several shortcomings. These shortcomings include a high-level of excess complexity, redundancy of information/lack of a common database, and a large human-in-the-loop component. Later sections of this report describe the methodology and results of our work to systematically gather logistics lessons learned from past and current human spaceflight programs as well as validating these lessons through a survey of the opinions of current space logisticians. To consider the perspectives on logistics lessons, we searched several sources within NASA, including organizations with direct and indirect connections with the system flow in mission planning. We utilized crew debriefs, the John Commonsense lessons repository for the JSC Mission Operations Directorate, and the Skylab Lessons Learned. Additionally, we searched the public version of the Lessons Learned

  6. A New Lesson for eLearning Programs: "E" Is for Entrepreneurship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Evan T.

    2002-01-01

    Considers how much entrepreneurship should be included in electronic learning (elearning) programs in higher education. Discusses planning; knowledge of the market; available resources in a usable form; considering new audiences; measuring ROI (return on investment); and alternative sources of revenue. (LRW)

  7. Teachers' Use of Technology: Lessons Learned from the Teacher Education Program to the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Vivian H.; Wilson, Elizabeth K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes 10 teachers' perceptions of technology integration and technology use in their classrooms, five years after their graduation from a teacher education program which encouraged technology use in teaching and learning. The researchers used Hooper and Rieber's (1999) five phases of technology use (familiarization, utilization,…

  8. Adult Literacy: Policies, Programs and Practices. Lessons Learned. Final Report = Alphabetisation des adultes: politiques, programmes et pratiques. Etude bilan. Rapport final.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    Studies and reports examining the problems associated with adult literacy and efforts to address those problems were reviewed to identify lessons for adult literacy programs in Canada and elsewhere. Low literacy levels were linked to above-average rates of personal and/or learning difficulties, low self-esteem, associated social problems, and…

  9. Findings From the Early College High School Initiative: A Look at Best Practices and Lessons Learned Regarding a Dual Enrollment Program. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National High School Center, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This research brief on the Early College High School Initiative (ECHSI), examines lessons learned and best practices gleaned from an evaluation specific to the ECHSI, "Early College High School Initiative 2003-2005 Evaluation Report." These findings help inform those interested in developing or implementing dual enrollment programs as a strategy…

  10. The Program Evaluation Committee in Action: Lessons Learned From a General Surgery Residency's Experience.

    PubMed

    Deal, Shanley B; Seabott, Heather; Chang, Lily; Alseidi, Adnan A

    2017-07-19

    To evaluate the success of the annual program evaluation process and describe the experience of a Program Evaluation Committee for a General Surgery residency program. We conducted a retrospective review of the Program Evaluation Committee's meeting minutes, data inputs, and outcomes from 2014 to 2016. We identified top priorities by year, characterized supporting data, summarized the improvement plans and outcome measures, and evaluated whether the outcomes were achieved at 1 year. Virginia Mason Medical Center General Surgery Residency Program. Program Evaluation Committee members including the Program Director, 2 Associate Program Directors, 2 Senior Faculty Members, and 1 Resident. All outcome measures were achieved or still in progress at 1 year. This included purchasing a GI mentor to improve endoscopic simulation training, establishing an outpatient surgery rotation to increase the volume of cases, and implementing a didactic course on adult learning principles for faculty development to improve intraoperative teaching. Primary reasons for slow progress were lack of follow-through by delegates or communication breakdown. The annual program evaluation process has been successful in identifying top priorities, developing action plans, and achieving outcome measures using our systematic evaluation process. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Empowering Adolescent Girls in Socially Conservative Settings: Impacts and Lessons Learned from the Ishraq Program in Rural Upper Egypt.

    PubMed

    Sieverding, Maia; Elbadawy, Asmaa

    2016-06-01

    In rural Upper Egypt, adolescence is a critical period in girls' transition to adulthood during which they are at risk for a number of negative outcomes, including restricted mobility and early marriage and childbearing. This study evaluates and presents lessons learned from Ishraq, an educational program that established safe spaces for out-of-school adolescent girls in rural Upper Egypt. Baseline and endline surveys were administered to all households containing an eligible girl in the program areas. We analyze the predictors of program enrollment and dropout and use difference-in-differences estimation to evaluate the impact of the program on participants as compared to non-participating eligible girls. Although we find positive impacts on literacy, attitudes toward sports, and reproductive health knowledge, little impact was found on broader indicators of empowerment, and no impact on the attitudes of participants' mothers or brothers. The experience of the Ishraq program highlights several key challenges facing safe spaces programs for adolescent girls, including targeting of a dispersed population with restricted mobility, reaching girls at a young age, achieving community-level attitudinal change, and the need for long-term follow-up of participants to measure behavioral change. © 2016 The Population Council, Inc.

  12. Higher Education ERP: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Dave; Orgill, Ken

    2001-01-01

    Shares experiences and lessons learned by chief information officers of large universities about enterprise resource planning (ERP). Specifically, provides a framework for approaching an ERP that could save universities millions of dollars. (EV)

  13. Higher Education ERP: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Dave; Orgill, Ken

    2001-01-01

    Shares experiences and lessons learned by chief information officers of large universities about enterprise resource planning (ERP). Specifically, provides a framework for approaching an ERP that could save universities millions of dollars. (EV)

  14. Lessons learned and applied

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Corey Joseph; Hall, Corey M.; Odoms, La’ Nyia J.

    2012-01-01

    Most vaccines available in the United States (US) have been incorporated into vaccination schedules for infants and young children, age groups particularly at risk of contracting infectious diseases. High universal vaccination coverage is responsible for substantially reducing or nearly eliminating many of the diseases that once killed thousands of children each year in the US. Despite the success of infant vaccinations, periods of low vaccination coverage and the limited immunogenicity and duration of protection of certain vaccines have resulted in sporadic outbreaks, allowing some diseases to spread in communities. These challenges suggest that expanded vaccination coverage to younger infants and adolescents, and more immunogenic vaccines, may be needed in some instances. This review focuses on the importance of infant immunization and explores the successes and challenges of current early childhood vaccination programs and how these lessons may be applied to other invasive diseases, such as meningococcal disease. PMID:22617834

  15. t4 workshop report--lessons learned, challenges, and opportunities: the U.S. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program.

    PubMed

    Juberg, Daland R; Borghoff, Susan J; Becker, Richard A; Casey, Warren; Hartung, Thomas; Holsapple, Michael P; Marty, M Sue; Mihaich, Ellen M; Van Der Kraak, Glen; Wade, Michael G; Willett, Catherine E; Andersen, Melvin E; Borgert, Christopher J; Coady, Katherine K; Dourson, Michael L; Fowle, John R; Gray, L Earl; Lamb, James C; Ortego, Lisa S; Schug, Thaddeus T; Toole, Colleen M; Zorrilla, Leah M; Kroner, Oliver L; Patterson, Jacqueline; Rinckel, Lori A; Jones, Brett R

    2014-01-01

    In 1996, the U.S. Congress passed the Food Quality Protection Act and amended the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) requiring the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to implement a screening program to investigate the potential of pesticide chemicals and drinking water contaminants to adversely affect endocrine pathways. Consequently, the EPA launched the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) to develop and validate estrogen, androgen, and thyroid (EAT) pathway screening assays and to produce standardized and harmonized test guidelines for regulatory application. In 2009, the EPA issued the first set of test orders for EDSP screening and a total of 50 pesticide actives and 2 inert ingredients have been evaluated using the battery of EDSP Tier 1 screening assays (i.e., five in vitro assays and six in vivo assays). To provide a framework for retrospective analysis of the data generated and to collect the insight of multiple stakeholders involved in the testing, more than 240 scientists from government, industry, academia, and non-profit organizations recently participated in a workshop titled "Lessons Learned, Challenges, and Opportunities: The U.S. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program." The workshop focused on the science and experience to date and was organized into three focal sessions: (a) Performance of the EDSP Tier 1 Screening Assays for Estrogen, Androgen, and Thyroid Pathways; (b) Practical Applications of Tier 1 Data; and (c) Indications and Opportunities for Future Endocrine Testing. A number of key learnings and recommendations related to future EDSP evaluations emanated from the collective sessions.

  16. Lessons Learned on "Scaling Up" of Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Having developed a technology-based teaching unit on weather that appeared to work well for middle school students, Nancy Butler Songer and her colleagues at the University of Michigan decided in the late 1990s to take the next logical step in their research program: They scaled up. This article discusses lessons learned by several faculty…

  17. Lessons Learned on "Scaling Up" of Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Having developed a technology-based teaching unit on weather that appeared to work well for middle school students, Nancy Butler Songer and her colleagues at the University of Michigan decided in the late 1990s to take the next logical step in their research program: They scaled up. This article discusses lessons learned by several faculty…

  18. Lessons learned: program messaging in gender-transformative work with men and boys in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Viitanen, Amanda P.; Colvin, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to traditional notions of masculinity has been identified as an important driver in the perpetuation of numerous health and social problems, including gender-based violence and HIV. With the largest generalized HIV epidemic in the world and high rates of violence against women, the need for gender-transformative work in South Africa is broadly accepted in activist circles and at the national and community level. Because of the integral role men play in both of these epidemics, initiatives and strategies that engage men in promoting gender equality have emerged over the last decade and the evidence base supporting the effectiveness of masculinities-based interventions is growing. However, little research exists on men's receptivity to the messages delivered in these programs. Objective This article examines the current practices among a set of gender-transformation initiatives in South Africa to see what lessons can be derived from them. We look at how South African men participating in these programs responded to three thematic messages frequently found in gender-transformative work: 1) the ‘costs of masculinity’ men pay for adherence to harmful gender constructs; 2) multiple forms of masculinity; and 3) the human rights framework and contested rights. Design This article synthesizes qualitative findings from in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, and ethnographic research with men participating in several gender- and health-intervention programs in South Africa. The data were collected between 2007 and 2011 and synthesized using some of the basic principles of meta-ethnography. Results and conclusions Overall, men were receptive to the three thematic messages reviewed; they were able to see them in the context of their own lives and the messages facilitated rich dialog among participants. However, some men were more ambivalent toward shifting gender notions and some even adamantly resisted engaging in discussions over gender

  19. Lessons learned: program messaging in gender-transformative work with men and boys in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, Amanda P; Colvin, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to traditional notions of masculinity has been identified as an important driver in the perpetuation of numerous health and social problems, including gender-based violence and HIV. With the largest generalized HIV epidemic in the world and high rates of violence against women, the need for gender-transformative work in South Africa is broadly accepted in activist circles and at the national and community level. Because of the integral role men play in both of these epidemics, initiatives and strategies that engage men in promoting gender equality have emerged over the last decade and the evidence base supporting the effectiveness of masculinities-based interventions is growing. However, little research exists on men's receptivity to the messages delivered in these programs. This article examines the current practices among a set of gender-transformation initiatives in South Africa to see what lessons can be derived from them. We look at how South African men participating in these programs responded to three thematic messages frequently found in gender-transformative work: 1) the 'costs of masculinity' men pay for adherence to harmful gender constructs; 2) multiple forms of masculinity; and 3) the human rights framework and contested rights. This article synthesizes qualitative findings from in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, and ethnographic research with men participating in several gender- and health-intervention programs in South Africa. The data were collected between 2007 and 2011 and synthesized using some of the basic principles of meta-ethnography. Overall, men were receptive to the three thematic messages reviewed; they were able to see them in the context of their own lives and the messages facilitated rich dialog among participants. However, some men were more ambivalent toward shifting gender notions and some even adamantly resisted engaging in discussions over gender equality. More research is needed to gauge the long-term impact

  20. Lessons learned: program messaging in gender-transformative work with men and boys in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, Amanda P; Colvin, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to traditional notions of masculinity has been identified as an important driver in the perpetuation of numerous health and social problems, including gender-based violence and HIV. With the largest generalized HIV epidemic in the world and high rates of violence against women, the need for gender-transformative work in South Africa is broadly accepted in activist circles and at the national and community level. Because of the integral role men play in both of these epidemics, initiatives and strategies that engage men in promoting gender equality have emerged over the last decade and the evidence base supporting the effectiveness of masculinities-based interventions is growing. However, little research exists on men's receptivity to the messages delivered in these programs. Objective This article examines the current practices among a set of gender-transformation initiatives in South Africa to see what lessons can be derived from them. We look at how South African men participating in these programs responded to three thematic messages frequently found in gender-transformative work: 1) the 'costs of masculinity' men pay for adherence to harmful gender constructs; 2) multiple forms of masculinity; and 3) the human rights framework and contested rights. Design This article synthesizes qualitative findings from in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, and ethnographic research with men participating in several gender- and health-intervention programs in South Africa. The data were collected between 2007 and 2011 and synthesized using some of the basic principles of meta-ethnography. Results and conclusions Overall, men were receptive to the three thematic messages reviewed; they were able to see them in the context of their own lives and the messages facilitated rich dialog among participants. However, some men were more ambivalent toward shifting gender notions and some even adamantly resisted engaging in discussions over gender equality

  1. Summative evaluation results and lessons learned from the Aligning Forces for Quality program.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Alexander, Jeffrey A; McHugh, Megan; Beich, Jeff; Christianson, Jon B; Greene, Jessica; Jean-Jacques, Muriel; Leitzell, Brigitt; Shi, Yunfeng; Wolf, Laura J

    2016-08-01

    variation in alliance sustainability and intervention strength. These include differing acceptance of the AF4Q initiative's theory of change, variation in the experience and capacity of the alliance communities selected for the program, differences in alliances' local healthcare market context, and the changing programmatic requirements for alliances participating in the AF4Q initiative. The variation in AF4Q program outcomes offers important lessons for those engaged in regional health improvement work.

  2. The National Astronomy Consortium: Lessons learned from a program to support underrepresented students in pursuing STEM careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Sheth, Kartik; Giles, Faye; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Brisbin, Drew; Boyd, Patricia T.; Benjamin, Robert A.; NAC Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program partnering physics and astronomy departments in majority and minority-serving institutions across the country. The primary aim of this program is to support traditionally underrepresented students interested in pursuing a career in STEM through a 9-10 week summer astronomy research project and a year of additional mentoring after they return to their home institution. Students are also given an opportunity to apply for a second year in this program, often at a different site. In addition to providing research and professional experience, the NAC also seeks to strengthen ties between the majority and minority-serving institutions in order to better serve these students throughout their careers. I will report on lessons learned from the second year of hosting a cohort at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. I will discuss the program structure during and after the summer, mentoring challenges, and ways that these challenges were addressed, including organizing a series of guest speakers and connecting students with a broader community of remote mentors.

  3. Over a Decade of Lessons Learned from an REU Program in the Science of Global Change and Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersh, E. S.; James, E. W.; Banner, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    and lessons learned over twelve years, such as strategies to increase cohort diversity, innovative activities, and results from long-term program evaluation on attitudes toward STEM careers and program outcomes.

  4. The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance Program: lessons learned and future directions.

    PubMed

    Shiboski, C H; Webster-Cyriaque, J Y; Ghannoum, M; Dittmer, D P; Greenspan, J S

    2016-04-01

    The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance (OHARA) was established in 2006 to provide the capacity to investigate the oral complications associated with HIV/AIDS within the ACTG infrastructure. Its goals were to explore the effects of potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the development of opportunistic infections, and variation and resistance of opportunistic pathogens in the context of immune suppression and long-term ART. The objectives of this talk, presented as part of a plenary session at the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS, were to (i) provide an overview of OHARA's most recent research agenda, and how it evolved since OHARA's inception; (ii) describe OHARA's main accomplishments, including examples of research protocols completed and their key findings; and (iii) describe spin-off projects derived from OHARA, lessons learned, and future directions. OHARA has met its central goal and made key contributions to the field in several ways: (i) by developing/updating diagnostic criteria for oral disease endpoints commonly measured in OHARA protocols and in HIV/AIDS research in general and has creating standardized training modules, both for measuring these oral disease endpoints across clinical specialties, and for collecting oral fluid specimens; (ii) by implementing a total of nine protocols, six of which are completed. Three protocols involved domestic research sites, while three involved international research sites (in Africa, India, and South America); (iii) and by developing and validating a number of laboratory assays used in its protocols and in the field of oral HIV/AIDS research. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Downsizing with VXIbus - Lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlidge, Leslie A.

    AAI has adapted VXIbus technology under its internal research and development program for a broad range of military test system applications. The goals of this project are to provide optimum test capability, system interoperability, and a user-friendly test development environment, and to ensure ease of module interchangeability. Problem areas encountered during the development include: module interoperability/interchangeability; the unit under test (UUT) interface/interconnection device; and application software development ease. AAI has developed solutions and strategies to deal with each of these problem areas. The author discusses AAI's findings and the lessons learned in the development of downsized test equipment utilizing VXIbus technology. The following considerations in VXIbus instrument selection and test system design are examined: instrument performance, chassis considerations, interface connector assembly considerations, controller capabilities, compliance with VXIbus Specification 1.3, instrument interoperability and interchangeability, application software development tools, and manufacturer support.

  6. Joint Center for Lessons Learned Quarterly Bulletin. Volume 6, Issue 2, March 2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    published shortly. Finally, the outline for the re- structuring of the Joint Lessons Learned Program continues on track and is being briefed to senior mili... lessons learned program while institutionalizing the current lessons learned efforts. This will be done in order to develop a vibrant, synergistic system

  7. Piloting a stress management and mindfulness program for undergraduate nursing students: student feedback and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    van der Riet, Pamela; Rossiter, Rachel; Kirby, Dianne; Dluzewska, Teresa; Harmon, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Widespread reports of high stress levels and mental health problems among university student populations indicate the use of interventions to facilitate stress reduction and support student resilience and wellbeing. There is growing evidence that regular mindfulness practice may confer positive health benefits and reduced stress levels. The aim of this pilot project was to explore the impact of a seven-week stress management and mindfulness program as a learning support and stress reduction method for nursing and midwifery students. The program was conducted at a large regional university in Australia. Fourteen first-year undergraduate nursing and midwifery students agreed to attend the program and to participate in a follow-up focus group. A descriptive qualitative design was utilised to examine the impact of the program. A semi-structured focus group interview was conducted with a thematic analysis undertaken of the transcript and process notes. Ten students completed the research component of this project by participating in the focus group interview. Three main themes capture the participants' experience: attending to self, attending to others and attending to program related challenges. Data indicate a positive impact on sleep, concentration, clarity of thought and a reduction in negative cognitions. Participants also identified challenges related to timetabling, program structure and venue. Overall, this pilot program enhanced the participants' sense of well-being. Despite the challenges, benefits were identified on a personal and professional level. Valuable feedback was provided that will be used to further develop and expand stress management and mindfulness programs offered to students attending this university. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. 24/7 Online Learning: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    It is evident that the more people believe, the more they can conquer. This is true especially in moving instructors and students into the world of online and blended learning environments. There are a number of things to consider when moving courses to an online learning format. In this article, the author writes about the lessons learned at…

  9. The Effects of Web 2.0 Technologies Usage in Programming Languages Lesson on the Academic Success, Interrogative Learning Skills and Attitudes of Students towards Programming Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gençtürk, Abdullah Tarik; Korucu, Agah Tugrul

    2017-01-01

    It is observed that teacher candidates receiving education in the department of Computer and Instructional Technologies Education are not able to gain enough experience and knowledge in "Programming Languages" lesson. The goal of this study is to analyse the effects of web 2.0 technologies usage in programming languages lesson on the…

  10. Addressing the Neglected Tropical Disease Podoconiosis in Northern Ethiopia: Lessons Learned from a New Community Podoconiosis Program

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Sara; Tamiru, Abreham; Davey, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite its great public health importance, few control initiatives addressing podoconiosis (non-filarial elephantiasis, a geochemical neglected tropical disease) exist. In June 2010, the first podoconiosis program in Northern Ethiopia, consisting of prevention, awareness, and care and support activities, began in Debre Markos, Northern Ethiopia. This study aims to document and disseminate the lessons learned from a new community podoconiosis program in Debre Markos. Methods/Principal Findings We used a content analysis approach to examine and evaluate data from a series of sources. These sources include conducted interview transcripts, a focus group discussion transcript and secondary sources including monitoring and evaluation field reports, observation notes, and research obtained from a literature review. Themes were identified and grouped into matrix tables. Overall, sixteen program steps were identified and grouped into 6 domains: Initial preparation, training and sensitization, foundation building, treatment activity implementation, awareness, and follow-up. Emphasis is placed on the need for baseline data, effective training, local leadership, experience-sharing, mass-awareness, cross-cutting sector issues (i.e., water and waste management), and integration with government health systems. Related successes and challenges are also described, as are stakeholder roles and misconceptions and socio-cultural challenges affecting the program start-up. Many of the identified successes and challenges are relevant to the aim of the podoconiosis program to be sustainable and community-led. Conclusions/Significance Much of this information has already been used to improve the Debre Markos program. We also anticipate that the domains and steps identified will be useful in guiding new programs in other settings where podoconiosis is highly prevalent. We hope to encourage partnerships and collaboration among podoconiosis stakeholders in future growth and

  11. Training Partnership Dyads for Community-Based Participatory Research: Strategies and Lessons Learned From the Community Engaged Scholars Program

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jeannette O.; Cox, Melissa J.; Newman, Susan D.; Gillenwater, Gwen; Warner, Gloria; Winkler, Joyce A.; White, Brandi; Wolf, Sharon; Leite, Renata; Ford, Marvella E.; Slaughter, Sabra

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, evaluation framework, and initial outcomes of a unique campus–community training initiative for community-based participatory research (CBPR). The South Carolina Clinical & Translational Research Center for Community Health Partnerships, which functions as the institution’s Clinical Translational and Science Award Community Engagement Program, leads the training initiative known as the Community Engaged Scholars Program (CES-P). The CES-P provides simultaneous training to CBPR teams, with each team consisting of at least one community partner and one academic partner. Program elements include 12 months of monthly interactive group sessions, mentorship with apprenticeship opportunities, and funding for a CBPR pilot project. A modified RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) framework guides the process, impact, and outcome evaluation plan. Lessons learned include challenges of group instruction with varying levels of readiness among the CBPR partners, navigating the institutional review board process with community co-investigators, and finding appropriate academic investigators to match community research interests. Future directions are recommended for this promising and unique dyadic training of academic and community partners. PMID:23091303

  12. Training partnership dyads for community-based participatory research: strategies and lessons learned from the Community Engaged Scholars Program.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jeannette O; Cox, Melissa J; Newman, Susan D; Gillenwater, Gwen; Warner, Gloria; Winkler, Joyce A; White, Brandi; Wolf, Sharon; Leite, Renata; Ford, Marvella E; Slaughter, Sabra

    2013-07-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, evaluation framework, and initial outcomes of a unique campus-community training initiative for community-based participatory research (CBPR). The South Carolina Clinical & Translational Research Center for Community Health Partnerships, which functions as the institution's Clinical Translational and Science Award Community Engagement Program, leads the training initiative known as the Community Engaged Scholars Program (CES-P). The CES-P provides simultaneous training to CBPR teams, with each team consisting of at least one community partner and one academic partner. Program elements include 12 months of monthly interactive group sessions, mentorship with apprenticeship opportunities, and funding for a CBPR pilot project. A modified RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) framework guides the process, impact, and outcome evaluation plan. Lessons learned include challenges of group instruction with varying levels of readiness among the CBPR partners, navigating the institutional review board process with community co-investigators, and finding appropriate academic investigators to match community research interests. Future directions are recommended for this promising and unique dyadic training of academic and community partners.

  13. Lessons to Be Learned from Past Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Store Consulting FAQ Tools About Us Contact Us Lessons to Be Learned from Past Errors The following ... medicines safely General Advice on Safe Medication Use Lessons to Be Learned from Past Errors Preventing Drug ...

  14. Launch Vehicle Propulsion Life Cycle Cost Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar; Rhodes, Russell E.; Robinson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will review lessons learned for space transportation systems from the viewpoint of the NASA, Industry and academia Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST). The paper provides the basic idea and history of "lessons learned". Recommendations that are extremely relevant to NASA's future investments in research, program development and operations are"'provided. Lastly, a novel and useful approach to documenting lessons learned is recommended, so as to most effectively guide future NASA investments. Applying lessons learned can significantly improve access to space for cargo or people by focusing limited funds on the right areas and needs for improvement. Many NASA human space flight initiatives have faltered, been re-directed or been outright canceled since the birth of the Space Shuttle program. The reasons given at the time have been seemingly unique. It will be shown that there are common threads as lessons learned in many a past initiative.

  15. To what extent can PBL principles be applied in blended learning: Lessons learned from health master programs.

    PubMed

    de Jong, N; Krumeich, J S M; Verstegen, D M L

    2017-02-01

    Maastricht University has been actively exploring blended learning approaches to PBL in Health Master Programs. Key principles of PBL are, learning should be constructive, self-directed, collaborative, and contextual. The purpose is to explore whether these principles are applicable in blended learning. The programs, Master of Health Services Innovation (case 1), Master Programme in Global Health (case 2), and the Master of Health Professions Education (case 3), used a Virtual Learning Environment for exchanging material and were independently analyzed. Quantitative data were collected for cases 1 and 2. Simple descriptive analyses such as frequencies were performed. Qualitative data for cases 1 and 3 were collected via (focus group) interviews. All PBL principles could be recognized in case 1. Case 2 seemed to be more project-based. In case 3, collaboration between students was not possible because of a difference in time-zones. Important educational aspects: agreement on rules for (online) sessions; visual contact (student-student and student-teacher), and frequent feedback. PBL in a blended learning format is perceived to be an effective strategy. The four principles of PBL can be unified in PBL with a blended learning format, although the extent to which each principle can be implemented can differ.

  16. Structuring learning environments: Lessons from the organization of post-literacy programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Peter A.

    1989-12-01

    New conceptual and historical work on the nature of literacy and information on several bellwether post-literacy efforts in developing countries furnish a basis for diagnosing some of the deficiencies in current approaches to post-literacy programming. The key issue is the design of a `literate environment'. Heretofore attention has been concentrated too exclusively on the reading materials and continuing education side of the problem, and insufficient attention has been given to the more critical and difficult aspect: ensuring adequate opportunities for the application of new literate skills. The availability of these functional opportunities is closely related to the possibilities for accumulation and reinvestment of economic surplus in the environment, and to the way in which the related activities are organized. Literacy programs can unite skills relevant to management of local resources with strategies of cultural, political or religious revitalization that mobilize people to use their human resources. They therefore continue to offer an attractive means of initiating a reinvestment spiral from limited initial capital. To realize these potentials at the post-literacy stage, however, requires planning post-literacy before literacy, broadening programs to address primary school leavers as well, and paying greatly increased attention to the economic and social structure of the learning environment.

  17. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Caulfield, R.

    2012-07-12

    The purpose of lessons learned is to identify insight gained during a project – successes or failures – that can be applied on future projects. Lessons learned can contribute to the overall success of a project by building on approaches that have worked well and avoiding previous mistakes. Below are examples of lessons learned during ERDF’s ARRA-funded expansion project.

  18. The Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) Initiative: Lessons Learned form Implementing Comprehensive Youth Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, Michael; Paige, Leslie Z.; Osher, David

    2003-01-01

    Provides an overview of this special issue that examines the implementation of the Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) Initiative in seven local communities. An overview of the SS/HS Initiative is provided. Critical lessons learned from the seven sites are discussed with a focus on the special role that school psychologists can play in…

  19. MSL Lessons Learned and Knowledge Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buxbaum, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Program has recently been informed of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee (PPS) recommendation, which was endorsed by the NAC, concerning Mars Science Lab (MSL) lessons learned and knowledge capture. The Mars Program has not had an opportunity to consider any decisions specific to the PPS recommendation. Some of the activities recommended by the PPS would involve members of the MSL flight team who are focused on cruise, entry descent & landing, and early surface operations; those activities would have to wait. Members of the MSL planetary protection team at JPL are still available to support MSL lessons learned and knowledge capture; some of the specifically recommended activities have already begun. The Mars Program shares the PPS/NAC concerns about loss of potential information & expertise in planetary protection practice.

  20. MSL Lessons Learned and Knowledge Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buxbaum, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Program has recently been informed of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee (PPS) recommendation, which was endorsed by the NAC, concerning Mars Science Lab (MSL) lessons learned and knowledge capture. The Mars Program has not had an opportunity to consider any decisions specific to the PPS recommendation. Some of the activities recommended by the PPS would involve members of the MSL flight team who are focused on cruise, entry descent & landing, and early surface operations; those activities would have to wait. Members of the MSL planetary protection team at JPL are still available to support MSL lessons learned and knowledge capture; some of the specifically recommended activities have already begun. The Mars Program shares the PPS/NAC concerns about loss of potential information & expertise in planetary protection practice.

  1. Starting a robotic program in general thoracic surgery: why, how, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Cerfolio, Robert J; Bryant, Ayesha S; Minnich, Douglas J

    2011-06-01

    We report our experience in starting a robotic program in thoracic surgery. We retrospectively reviewed our experience in starting a robotic program in general thoracic surgery on a consecutive series of patients. Between February 2009 and September 2010, 150 patients underwent robotic operations. Types of procedures were lobectomy in 62, thymectomy in 30, and benign esophageal procedures in 6. No thymectomy or esophageal procedures required conversion. One conversion was needed for suspected bleeding for a mediastinal mass. Twelve patients were converted for lobectomy (none for bleeding, 1 in the last 24). Median operative time for robotic thymectomy was 119 minutes, and median length of stay was 1 day. The median time for robotic lobectomy was 185 minutes, and median length of stay was 2 days. There were no operative deaths. Morbidity occurred in 23 patients (15%). All patients with cancer had R0 resections and resection of all visible mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. Robotic surgery is safe and oncologically sound. It requires training of the entire operating room team. The learning curve is steep, involving port placement, availability of the proper instrumentation, use of the correct robotic arms, and proper patient positioning. The robot provides an ideal surgical approach for thymectomy and other mediastinal tumors. Its advantage over thoracoscopy for pulmonary resection is unproven; however, we believe complete thoracic lymph node dissection and teaching is easier. Importantly, defined credentialing for surgeons and cost analysis studies are needed. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lessons Learned from Safety Events

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Steven C.; Fassbender, Linda L.

    2012-11-01

    The Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned website (www.h2incidents.org) was launched in 2006 as a database-driven resource for sharing lessons learned from hydrogen-related safety events to raise safety awareness and encourage knowledge-sharing. The development of this database, its first uses and subsequent enhancements have been described at the Second and Third International Conferences on Hydrogen Safety. [1,2] Since 2009, continuing work has not only highlighted the value of safety lessons learned, but enhanced how the database provides access to another safety knowledge tool, Hydrogen Safety Best Practices (http://h2bestpractices.org). Collaborations with the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) Task 19 – Hydrogen Safety and others have enabled the database to capture safety event learnings from around the world. This paper updates recent progress, highlights the new “Lessons Learned Corner” as one means for knowledge-sharing and examines the broader potential for collecting, analyzing and using safety event information.

  3. Lessons Learned About Recruiting and Retention of a Diverse Faculty During 5 Years of the University of Michigan ADVANCE Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, S. B.; Stride Committee, U.

    2007-12-01

    The University of Michigan obtained funding from the NSF ADVANCE Program for 2001-2006 to devise and implement strategies to improve representation and climate for its tenure-track women faculty in the natural sciences departments and the College of Engineering. This project was launched with a campus-wide survey to pinpoint problem areas, followed by the appointment of a committee of senior faculty now known as "Science and Technology Recruiting to Improve Diversity and Excellence" or STRIDE to provide information and advice about practices that will maximize the likelihood that well-qualified female and minority candidates for faculty positions will be identified, and, if selected for offers, recruited, retained, and promoted. This presentation will review the lessons learned and progress made during the 5-year period of NSF funding which ended in December 2006. It will also cover the steps taken to institutionalize the UM ADVANCE Program with financial support from the Provost's Office for the next 5 years, and the challenges and opportunities presented by Michigan's Proposition 2 to ban Affirmative Action programs. In its present form, the UM ADVANCE Program now has the mandate to address issues concerning both gender and underrepresented minorities, and also to engage all academic departments in the University, not only those in the STEM fields. As a result, the acronym STRIDE has been changed to mean Strategies and Tactics for Recruiting to Improve Diversity and Excellence. A case will be made that the institutional transformations underway at UM allow greater administrative success, particularly for women and underrepresented minorities.

  4. CYGNSS: Lessons We are Learning from a Class D Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumlinson, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    CYGNSS: Lessons Learned from NASA Class D Mission and how they selected their parts for the program to include balance between cost, risk, schedule and technology available as well as balancing cost restraints with mission risk profile.

  5. EMU Lessons Learned Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Kevin M., Jr.; Crocker, Lori; Cupples, J. Scott

    2011-01-01

    As manned space exploration takes on the task of traveling beyond low Earth orbit, many problems arise that must be solved in order to make the journey possible. One major task is protecting humans from the harsh space environment. The current method of protecting astronauts during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is through use of the specially designed Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). As more rigorous EVA conditions need to be endured at new destinations, the suit will need to be tailored and improved in order to accommodate the astronaut. The Objective behind the EMU Lessons Learned Database(LLD) is to be able to create a tool which will assist in the development of next-generation EMUs, along with maintenance and improvement of the current EMU, by compiling data from Failure Investigation and Analysis Reports (FIARs) which have information on past suit failures. FIARs use a system of codes that give more information on the aspects of the failure, but if one is unfamiliar with the EMU they will be unable to decipher the information. A goal of the EMU LLD is to not only compile the information, but to present it in a user-friendly, organized, searchable database accessible to all familiarity levels with the EMU; both newcomers and veterans alike. The EMU LLD originally started as an Excel database, which allowed easy navigation and analysis of the data through pivot charts. Creating an entry requires access to the Problem Reporting And Corrective Action database (PRACA), which contains the original FIAR data for all hardware. FIAR data are then transferred to, defined, and formatted in the LLD. Work is being done to create a web-based version of the LLD in order to increase accessibility to all of Johnson Space Center (JSC), which includes converting entries from Excel to the HTML format. FIARs related to the EMU have been completed in the Excel version, and now focus has shifted to expanding FIAR data in the LLD to include EVA tools and support hardware such as

  6. Process evaluation of a mHealth program: lessons learned from Stop My Smoking USA, a text messaging-based smoking cessation program for young adults.

    PubMed

    Ybarra, Michele L; Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Prescott, Tonya L; Strong, David

    2014-11-01

    Report lessons learned in an RCT of Stop My Smoking (SMS) USA, a mHealth smoking cessation program for young adult smokers. 164 18-24-year-olds were recruited nationally, online in 2011. Program evaluation data were provided at 12-week post-Quit Day. (1) Inviting participants to complete a brief text messaging survey and then asking them to complete a longer online survey resulted in the highest response rate (89%). (2) The positive tone of program messages was the most commonly noted program strength. (3) Suggested improvements included more social connectivity and additional assistance overcoming stressful situations. (4) Half of intervention participants moved through the program linearly and half went through various paths that reflected multiple relapses. Suggestions to use pharmacotherapy resulted in 22% of heavy smokers to utilize it. Participant feedback provided concrete ways in which this and other young adult-focused interventions can improve messaging and program features to be even more salient. Future young adult mHealth interventions could: Integrate models that are flexible to different "paths" of behavior change; address stressful life events directly and comprehensively; integrate proactive messaging that promotes pharmacotherapy options; and use text messaging as a gateway to longer online surveys. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Lessons Learned from ISS Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, C.

    2002-01-01

    Forty years of human spaceflight activities are now culminating in the International Space Station program (ISS). The ISS involves fifteen nations, working together to create a permanently occupied orbital facility that will support scientific and potentially, commercial endeavours. The assembly of the ISS is scheduled to be completed later in this decade, after which it will be operated for at least ten years. At the strategic level, such a complex international project is highly dependent on the fifteen Partners' respective internal politics and foreign policies. On the operational level, Partners still have certain difficulties in issuing and agreeing to common technical procedures. As with almost all aspects of International Space Station cooperation, the Partners are going through a constant learning process, where they have to deal with complex political, legal and operational differences. Intergovernmental Agreement and the Memoranda of Understanding, the instruments forming the legal backbone of the International Space Station cooperation, are still lacking a fair number of arrangements that need to be created for completing and operating the Station. The whole endeavour is also a constant learning process at the operational level, as astronauts, cosmonauts, engineers and technicians on the ground with different cultural and educational backgrounds, learn to work together. One recent Space Shuttle mission to the Station showed the importance of standardising even trivial system components such as packaging labels, as it took the astronauts half a day more than planned to correctly unpack the equipment. This paper will provide a synthesis of some of the main lessons learned during the first few years of International Space Station's lifetime. Important political, legal and operational issues will be addressed and combined. This analysis will provide some guidelines and recommendations for future international space projects, such as an international human

  8. Early experience and lessons learned in a new minimally invasive esophagectomy program.

    PubMed

    Mungo, Benedetto; Lidor, Anne O; Stem, Miloslawa; Molena, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) is gaining increasing popularity in the treatment of esophageal cancer. In fact, while surgical and oncologic outcomes are not inferior to those achieved through a traditional open approach, patients undergoing MIE benefit from shorter length of stay, lesser pain and prompter recovery. This technique is, however, highly challenging, and the development of a MIE program, even in the setting of a tertiary center, requires time and progressive honing of surgical skills. We use a minimally invasive Ivor Lewis approach. The abdominal phase of the procedure includes complete celiac lymphadenectomy and tubularization of the stomach, which will constitute the neo-esophagus. The video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery portion of the operation takes place in left lateral decubitus and allows for optimal thoracic lymphadenectomy and anastomosis. From October 2011 to January 2015, we treated 52 patients with the above-described procedure. The evolution of our anastomotic technique included a first group of circular stapled anastomosis with Orvil™ and 3.5-mm EEA™ (n = 16 patients), subsequently abandoned in favor of a linear anastomosis (n = 12), before going back to the Orvil™ coupled with 4.8-mm EEA™ (n = 22) in more recent times. There were also an additional two anastomoses that did not fall under any of these categories. We experienced two postoperative deaths. The overall leak rate was 14%, but fell down to 4% in the last group. Median LOS was 9 days. Lymph node retrieval was adequate throughout the whole series. Developing a MIE program requires a significant learning curve before the results plateau. Only once a technique of choice is refined and mastered, the advantages granted by MIE become apparent.

  9. NASA Materials Related Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Danny; Gill, Paul S.; Vaughan, William W.

    2003-01-01

    Lessons Learned have been the basis for our accomplishments throughout the ages. They have been passed down from father to son, mother to daughter, teacher to pupil, and older to younger worker. Lessons Learned have also been the basis for the nation s accomplishments for more than 200 years. Both government and industry have long recognized the need to systematically document and utilize the knowledge gained from past experiences in order to avoid the repetition of failures and mishaps. Through the knowledge captured and recorded in Lessons Learned from more than 80 years of flight in the Earth s atmosphere, NASA s materials researchers are constantly working to develop stronger, lighter, and more durable materials that can withstand the challenges of space. The Agency s talented materials engineers and scientists continue to build on that rich tradition by using the knowledge and wisdom gained from past experiences to create futuristic materials and technologies that will be used in the next generation of advanced spacecraft and satellites that may one day enable mankind to land men on another planet or explore our nearest star. These same materials may also have application here on Earth to make commercial aircraft more economical to build and fly. With the explosion in technical accomplishments over the last decade, the ability to capture knowledge and have the capability to rapidly communicate this knowledge at lightning speed throughout an organization like NASA has become critical. Use of Lessons Learned is a principal component of an organizational culture committed to continuous improvement.

  10. NASA Materials Related Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Danny; Gill, Paul S.; Vaughan, William W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Lessons Learned have been the basis for our accomplishments throughout the ages. They have been passed down from father to son, mother to daughter, teacher to pupil, and older to younger worker. Lessons Learned have also been the basis for the nation's accomplishments for more than 200 years. Both government and industry have long recognized the need to systematically document and utilize the knowledge gained from past experiences in order to avoid the repetition of failures and mishaps. Through the knowledge captured and recorded in Lessons Learned from more than 80 years of flight in the Earth's atmosphere, NASA's materials researchers are constantly working to develop stronger, lighter, and more durable materials that can withstand the challenges of space. The Agency's talented materials engineers and scientists continue to build on that rich tradition by using the knowledge and wisdom gained from past experiences to create futurist materials and technologies that will be used in the next generation of advanced spacecraft and satellites that may one day enable mankind to land men on another planet or explore our nearest star. These same materials may also have application here on Earth to make commercial aircraft more economical to build and fly. With the explosion in technical accomplishments over the last decade, the ability to capture knowledge and have the capability to rapidly communicate this knowledge at lightning speed throughout an organization like NASA has become critical. Use of Lessons Learned is a principal component of an organizational culture committed to continuous improvement.

  11. Lessons learned from hospice care.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2013-10-01

    Pharmaceutical care of the hospice patient offers unique challenges in the management of pain and other symptoms. Lessons learned in providing hospice care can be used in the care of nonterminal patients as well to optimize patient-specific care, regardless of care setting or life expectancy.

  12. Lessons learned in crisis management.

    PubMed

    Olson, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This paper will explore lessons learned following a series of natural and man-made disasters affecting the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company and/or its subsidiaries. The company employs a team of certified continuity professionals who are charged with overseeing resilience on behalf of the enterprise and leading recovery activities wherever and whenever necessary.

  13. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer, answers questions during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned event in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the presentation was "To There and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  14. WHC significant lessons learned 1993--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, J.C.

    1997-12-12

    A lesson learned as defined in DOE-STD-7501-95, Development of DOE Lessons Learned Programs, is: A ``good work practice`` or innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat applications or an adverse work practice or experience that is captured and shared to avoid a recurrence. The key word in both parts of this definition is ``shared``. This document was published to share a wide variety of recent Hanford experiences with other DOE sites. It also provides a valuable tool to be used in new employee and continuing training programs at Hanford facilities and at other DOE locations. This manual is divided into sections to facilitate extracting appropriate subject material when developing training modules. Many of the bulletins could be categorized into more than one section, however, so examination of other related sections is encouraged.

  15. Improved Lesson Planning with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courey, Susan Joan; Tappe, Phyllis; Siker, Jody; LePage, Pam

    2013-01-01

    Efficient lesson planning with universal design for learning (UDL) enables teachers to more effectively meet students' individual needs. In this study, a comparison of lesson plans by teacher candidates in a teacher preparation program before and after UDL training is presented. After training, teachers (n = 45) incorporated more differentiated…

  16. Academic Competitiveness and SMART Grant Programs: First-Year Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Susan P.; Berkner, Lutz; Lee, John; Topper, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    The "Higher Education Reconciliation Act of 2005" created two new grant programs for undergraduates: the Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) program and National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent (National SMART) Grant program. The ACG program is intended to encourage students to take challenging courses in high school and thus…

  17. Multicultural Environments of Academic versus Internship Training Programs: Lessons to Be Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Heather J.; Krumm, Angela J.; Gonzales, Rufus R.; Gunter, Kensa K.; Paez, Karen N.; Zygowicz, Sharon D.; Haggins, Kristee L.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology training programs have a responsibility to train multiculturally competent psychologists. Predoctoral interns were surveyed to compare the multicultural environment of academic and internship programs. Internship programs were perceived as more multicultural than were academic programs. Factors contributing to differences are examined,…

  18. Multicultural Environments of Academic versus Internship Training Programs: Lessons to Be Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Heather J.; Krumm, Angela J.; Gonzales, Rufus R.; Gunter, Kensa K.; Paez, Karen N.; Zygowicz, Sharon D.; Haggins, Kristee L.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology training programs have a responsibility to train multiculturally competent psychologists. Predoctoral interns were surveyed to compare the multicultural environment of academic and internship programs. Internship programs were perceived as more multicultural than were academic programs. Factors contributing to differences are examined,…

  19. Methodological Challenges in International Comparative Post-Secondary Assessment Programs: Lessons Learned and the Road Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Raffaela; Zahner, Doris; Benjamin, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of student learning outcomes in the tertiary school sector has seen an increase in global popularity in recent years. Measurement instruments that target higher order skills are on the rise, whereas assessments that foster the recall of factual knowledge are declining. The Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO)…

  20. Methodological Challenges in International Comparative Post-Secondary Assessment Programs: Lessons Learned and the Road Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Raffaela; Zahner, Doris; Benjamin, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of student learning outcomes in the tertiary school sector has seen an increase in global popularity in recent years. Measurement instruments that target higher order skills are on the rise, whereas assessments that foster the recall of factual knowledge are declining. The Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO)…

  1. Visualizing Boundaries and Embodying Conflicts: Lessons Learned from a Theatrical Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundy, Amrit; Chan, Judy

    2013-01-01

    In the 2011-2012 academic year, the Organizational Development and Learning unit and the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology at the University of British Columbia co-developed an interactive theatre project, Conflict Theatre, to engage in discussion around conflict with our audience and to allow us to explore, engage with, and build…

  2. Proceedings for air quality management programs: A workshop on lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    The coordinators of this project at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo proposed a workshop to bring together an international group of experts to present both the lessons of history and the current practices in air quality management around the world. The workshop would also serve as a forum for presenting the accomplishments and plans of this project and for receiving comments from the assembled group. The workshop was favored with an outstanding set of speakers who represented a broad spectrum of experience. Their papers are presented in this volume. The total attendance was forty-four (see List of Participants) with representation from numerous interested Mexican institutions. Individual reports are processed separately for the database.

  3. Life and Death of a Gifted Program: Lessons Not Yet Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starko, Alane J.

    1990-01-01

    The study investigates factors influencing the establishment, operation, and elimination of an elementary enriched/accelerated program existing from 1958-69. The program's life cycle and perceived effects on students were investigated to determine factors that may continue to affect programing for the gifted/talented. (Author/JDD)

  4. FRMAC-93 lessons learned report

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, K.C.

    1994-03-01

    FRMAC-93 simulated a radiological accident at the Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant, 25 miles north of Omaha, Nebraska. The exercise involved the state Iowa and Nebraska, NRC as the lead Federal agency, FRMAC (Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center), and several federal agencies with statutory emergency responsibility. FRMAC-93 was a major 2-day field exercise designed to determine the effectiveness, coordination, and operations of a DOE-managed FRMAC. Other objectives were to ensure that appropriate priorities were established and assistance was provided to the states and the lead Federal agency by FRMAC. Day 1 involved the Fort Calhoun evaluated plume phase exercise. On Day 2, the flow of data, which was slow initially, improved so that confidence of states and other federal responders in FRMAC support capabilities was high. The impact and lessons learned from FRMAC-93 provided the necessary impetus to make organizational and operational changes to the FRMAC program, which were put into effect in the DOE exercise FREMONT at Hanford 3 months later.

  5. Increasing the Availability of Physical Activity Programs for Older Adults: Lessons Learned From Texercise Stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Alan B; Thiel, Shannon B; Thorud, Jennifer L; Smith, Matthew Lee; Howell, Doris; Cargill, Jessica; Swierc, Suzanne M; Ory, Marcia G

    2016-01-01

    Many initiatives have been developed to facilitate older adults' engagement in physical activity (PA) and document its benefits. One example is Texercise, a 12-week program with a focus on increasing participants' self-efficacy. The goal of this paper is to augment the knowledgebase of PA program implementation and dissemination by elucidating the experience of Texercise implementation as perceived by multiple stakeholders. We conducted 28 semistructured stakeholder interviews and categorized the responses into four preset themes: (1) program delivery and advocacy; (2) value/merit of the program; (3) successes/challenges of offering and sustaining the program; and (4) recommendations for enhancing implementation and delivery. We identified emergent subthemes through further analysis. Many perceptions that are broadly applicable to community organizations emerged. Our findings highlight the importance of stakeholder support when embedding PA programs in communities. Furthermore, the findings are crucial to understanding underlying processes that support widespread program dissemination and sustainability.

  6. Learning from Experience, Volume 1: Lessons from the Submarine Programs of the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    e.g., the use of the supplier of the Oberon periscopes). 2 The MOD has recognized the complexity of the initial contract requirements and is using...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2011 2 . REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Learning from...descrip- tions of the specific case studies and the lessons garnered from them: • MG-1128/ 2 -NAVY, Learning from Experience, Volume II: Les- sons from the

  7. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model

    PubMed Central

    Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D.; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility. PMID:27232234

  8. Driving social impact with common global indicators for healthy lifestyle programs: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nicole R; Gin, Julia; Kamath-Jha, Shilpa; Infantes, Michel; Hernandez, Ricardo; Alberg-Seberich, Michael; Suri, Devika; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2014-09-01

    Partnerships between corporate entities and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) involved in delivering community focused health and well-being programs are becoming increasingly valuable especially in the context of promoting healthy lifestyles around the globe. The Mondelēz International Foundation (MIF) has funded healthy lifestyles community based programs targeting children and youth through partnership with seven global NGOs. To assess collective impact of these programs, it is crucial to identify best practices and common impact indicators that can be measured across programs. MIF therefore organized the Healthy Lifestyles Evaluation Workshop to explore these pertinent questions. Share best practices and identify common impact indicators to measure the success of current and future MIF funded healthy lifestyles programs. Analysis of the Program Impact Pathways (PIPs) and measured output of each of the seven programs. Individual and combined analysis of PIPs of the seven NGO programs led to identification of three critical impact indicators: nutrition knowledge, physical activity, and healthier eating, and also enabled NGOs to identify pathways to improve program delivery among the target population. This workshop enabled MIF and partner NGOs to came together to align on metrics and future engagement approaches for promoting and evaluating community based healthy lifestyles programs.

  9. Lessons Learned from the First Two Years of Nature's Notebook, the USA National Phenology Network's Plant and Animal Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Rosemartin, A.; Denny, E. G.; Weltzin, J. F.; Marsh, L.

    2010-12-01

    Nature’s Notebook is the USA National Phenology Network’s (USA-NPN) national-scale plant and animal phenology observation program. The program was launched in March 2009 focusing only on plants; 2010 saw the addition of animals and the name and identity “Nature’s Notebook.” Over these two years, we have learned much about how to effectively recruit, train, and retain participants. We have engaged several thousand participants and can report a retention rate, reflected in the number of registered individuals that report observations, of approximately 25%. In 2009, participants reported observations on 133 species of plants on an average of nine days of the year, resulting in over 151,000 records in the USA-NPN phenology database. Results for the 2010 growing season are still being reported. Some of our most valuable lessons learned have been gleaned from communications with our observers. Through an informal survey, participants indicated that they would like to see more regular and consistent communications from USA-NPN program staff; clear, concise, and readily available training materials; mechanisms to keep them engaged and continuing to participate; and quick turn-around on data summaries. We are using this feedback to shape our program into the future. Another key observation we’ve made about our program is the value of locally and regionally-based efforts to implement Nature’s Notebook; some of our most committed observers are participating through partner programs such as the University of California-Santa Barbara Phenology Stewardship Program, Arbor Day Foundation, and the Great Sunflower Project. Future plans include reaching out to more partner organizations and improving our support for locally-based implementations of the Nature’s Notebook program. We have also recognized that the means for reaching and retaining potential participants in Nature’s Notebook vary greatly across generations. As the majority of our participants to

  10. The Marine Corps Lesson Learned System: An Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    system. Organizational learning , Lessons learned, After action reports, Information systems....and investigates what changes in organizational functioning can be attributed to MCLLS. The research shows that MCLLS has improved organizational ... learning but has room for improvement. The thesis contains recommendations to improve program use by addressing the needs of the potential users of the

  11. Shuttle Lesson Learned - Toxicology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    This is a script for a video about toxicology and the space shuttle. The first segment is deals with dust in the space vehicle. The next segment will be about archival samples. Then we'll look at real time on-board analyzers that give us a lot of capability in terms of monitoring for combustion products and the ability to monitor volatile organics on the station. Finally we will look at other issues that are about setting limits and dealing with ground based lessons that pertain to toxicology.

  12. Safeguards Culture: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2009-05-27

    Abstract: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper builds on that theoretical discussion to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Paper: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop on “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges,” in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper, coauthored by Karyn R. Durbin and Andrew Van Duzer, described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper updates that theoretical discussion, and seeks to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Implicit in this discussion is an understanding that improving a culture is not an end in itself, but is one method of improving the underlying discipline, that is safety, security, or safeguards. Culture can be defined as a way of life, or general customs and beliefs of a particular group of people at a particular time. There are internationally accepted definitions of safety culture and nuclear security culture. As yet, there is no official agreed upon definition of safeguards culture. At the end of the paper I will propose my definition. At the Santa Fe Workshop the summary by the Co-Chairs of Working Group 1, “The Further Evolution of Safeguards,” noted: “It is clear that ‘safeguards culture

  13. Improving Undergraduate Research Experiences With An Intentional Mentoring Program: Lessons Learned Through Assessment of Keck Geology Consortium Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, K. R.; Garver, J. I.; Greer, L.; Pollock, M.; Varga, R. J.; Davidson, C. M.; Frey, H. M.; Hubbard, D. K.; Peck, W. H.; Wobus, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Keck Geology Consortium, with support from the National Science Foundation (REU Program) and ExxonMobil, is a collaborative effort by 18 colleges to improve geoscience education through high-quality research experiences. Since its inception in 1987 more than 1350 undergraduate students and 145 faculty have been involved in 189 yearlong research projects. This non-traditional REU model offers exceptional opportunities for students to address research questions at a deep level, to learn and utilize sophisticated analytical methods, and to engage in authentic collaborative research that culminates in an undergraduate research symposium and published abstracts volume. The large numbers of student and faculty participants in Keck projects also affords a unique opportunity to study the impacts of program design on undergraduate research experiences in the geosciences. Students who participate in Keck projects generally report significant gains in personal and professional dimensions, as well as in clarification of educational and career goals. Survey data from student participants, project directors, and campus advisors identify mentoring as one of the most critical and challenging elements of successful undergraduate research experiences. Additional challenges arise from the distributed nature of Keck projects (i.e., participants, project directors, advisors, and other collaborators are at different institutions) and across the span of yearlong projects. In an endeavor to improve student learning about the nature and process of science, and to make mentoring practices more intentional, the Consortium has developed workshops and materials to support both project directors and campus research advisors (e.g., best practices for mentoring, teaching ethical professional conduct, benchmarks for progress, activities to support students during research process). The Consortium continues to evolve its practices to better support students from underrepresented groups.

  14. Turning Operational Lessons Learned into Design Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of a particular system design are well known by the people who operate it. Operational workarounds, operational notes and lessons learned are traditional methods for dealing with and documenting design shortcomings. The beginning of each new program brings the hope that hard-learned lessons will be incorporated into the next new system. But often operations personnel find their well-intentioned efforts frustrated by an inability to have their inputs considered by design personnel who have strictly-scoped requirements that are coupled with ambitious cost and schedule targets. There is a way for operational inputs to make it into the design, but the solution involves a combination of organizational culture and technical data. Any organization that utilizes this approach can realize significant benefits over the life cycle of their project.

  15. Turning Operational Lessons Learned into Design Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of a particular system design are well known by the people who operate it. Operational workarounds, operational notes and lessons learned are traditional methods for dealing with and documenting design shortcomings. The beginning of each new program brings the hope that hard-learned lessons will be incorporated into the next new system. But often operations personnel find their well-intentioned efforts frustrated by an inability to have their inputs considered by design personnel who have strictly-scoped requirements that are coupled with ambitious cost and schedule targets. There is a way for operational inputs to make it into the design, but the solution involves a combination of organizational culture and technical data. Any organization that utilizes this approach can realize significant benefits over the life cycle of their project.

  16. Lessons Learned from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Contamination Control Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hedgeland, Randy J.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Contamination Control Program has evolved from a ground-based integration program to a space-based science-sustaining program. The contamination controls from the new-generation Scientific Instruments and Orbital Replacement Units were incorporated into the HST Contamination Control Program to maintain scientific capability over the life of the telescope. Long-term on-orbit scientific data has shown that these contamination controls implemented for the instruments, Servicing Mission activities (Orbiter, Astronauts, and mission), and on-orbit operations successfully protected the HST &om contamination and the instruments from self-contamination.

  17. Lessons Learned from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Contamination Control Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Hedgeland, Randy J.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Contamination Control Program has evolved from a ground-based integration program to a space-based science-sustaining program. The contamination controls from the new-generation Scientific Instruments and Orbital Replacement Units were incorporated into the HST Contamination Control Program to maintain scientific capability over the life of the telescope. Long-term on-orbit scientific data has shown that these contamination controls implemented for the instruments, Servicing Mission activities (Orbiter, Astronauts, and mission), and on-orbit operations successfully protected the HST from contamination and the instruments from self-contamination.

  18. Implementing Writing Assessment in a Degree Completion Program: Key Issues and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Jeff E.; Allred, Ellen R.; Hunt, Rob

    2010-01-01

    This article details the advantages and challenges of implementing writing assessment in a degree completion program; it describes the steps involved in the writing assessment process. Study results demonstrate that graduates from a degree completion program generally have adequate writing skills; nevertheless, many could improve their…

  19. Infusing NBPTS Entries To Redesign a University Master's Degree Program: Sharing Our Journey and Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckmier, Janice; Ericson, Bonnie; Huetinck, Linda; Sato, Kyoko

    2003-01-01

    Makes a case for using the tenets of National Board for Professional Teaching Standards in redesigning the Mathematics and English Subject Specialist Master's Programs at California State University, Northridge, by going through the constructed cohort program semester by semester, discussing coursework and portfolio activities, highlighting the…

  20. Developing a System of Program Assessment within Teacher Education: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viesca, Kara Mitchell; Reagan, Emilie Mitescu; Enterline, Sarah; Gleeson, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    Our intention in this article is to present one institution's efforts to take on program assessment and respond to calls for accountability. To do so, the teacher education program simultaneously sought to address the narrowly defined measures called for by policy makers and politicians, while at the same time broadening and expanding…

  1. Public Policy and Public/Private Partnerships: Lessons Learned from Apprenticeship Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrington, Carolyn; Mandolong, Nadine

    1991-01-01

    A descriptive study of 11 apprenticeship programs in Florida found a lack of clear government policies regarding schools' relationship with the private sector in terms of contractual arrangements and program financing. The potential exists for a lack of accountability of publicly funded equipment, personnel, and facilities. (SK)

  2. Statewide Efforts to Enhance Early Childhood Personnel Preparation Programs to Support Inclusion: Overview and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winton, Pam; Catlett, Camille

    2009-01-01

    Inclusion is a federal and state mandate, making it critical that early childhood teachers have adequate preparation in their preservice program for serving young children with disabilities. One of the challenges states face in increasing the availability of high-quality inclusive programs is ensuring adequate numbers of confident, competent…

  3. The Community College and Career Training Grant Program: Lessons Learned from the Field and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhalde, Ray; Kazis, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The new Community College and Career Training Grant Program to be launched this fall presents an important opportunity to help more American workers find better long-term employment more efficiently, through the promotion of innovative training and education programs that incorporate the best of what works for dislocated and unemployed adult…

  4. Recruiting and Retaining Secondary Mathematics Teachers: Lessons Learned from an Innovative Four-Year Undergraduate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artzt, Alice F.; Curcio, Frances R.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the critical shortage of qualified mathematics teachers in the U.S., the TIME 2000 Program was created with funds from the National Science Foundation, at Queens College of the City University of New York. Now institutionalized, the program is designed to support the recruitment, preparation, and retention of prospective teachers…

  5. Developing a System of Program Assessment within Teacher Education: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viesca, Kara Mitchell; Reagan, Emilie Mitescu; Enterline, Sarah; Gleeson, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    Our intention in this article is to present one institution's efforts to take on program assessment and respond to calls for accountability. To do so, the teacher education program simultaneously sought to address the narrowly defined measures called for by policy makers and politicians, while at the same time broadening and expanding…

  6. The Leadership Development Network: Lessons Learned from a Field-Based Program for Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiessen, Dennis

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Leadership Development Network (LDN) in Canada, a field-based program for principals. Through a school improvement project, leadership development journal, meetings, and communication with other program participants, LDN engages principals in their own development as leaders and in the development of teachers who implement school…

  7. Recruiting and Retaining Secondary Mathematics Teachers: Lessons Learned from an Innovative Four-Year Undergraduate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artzt, Alice F.; Curcio, Frances R.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the critical shortage of qualified mathematics teachers in the U.S., the TIME 2000 Program was created with funds from the National Science Foundation, at Queens College of the City University of New York. Now institutionalized, the program is designed to support the recruitment, preparation, and retention of prospective teachers…

  8. A pilot videoconference group stress management program in cancer survivors: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Eric S; Partridge, Ann H; Blackmon, Jaime E; Morgan, Evan; Recklitis, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a challenging experience and there is evidence that psychosocial interventions are effective at improving adjustment following treatment. At our cancer center, 14 cancer survivors (breast, prostate and blood cancers) completed a four-session cognitive-behavioral stress program. The first session was delivered at the survivor's local cancer center, where they were provided with a loaner tablet. The three subsequent sessions were delivered through group-based videoconference on the tablet. Session content was supplemented with a tailored ebook, designed specifically for this program. Participants provided feedback about the program as well as a standardized measure of perceived stress. Despite evidence that psychosocial programs are effective, there are significant barriers to dissemination, particularly for those residing in rural areas who do not live near academic medical centers where such programming is more readily available. Our experiences delivering a group-based videoconference program in cancer survivors are described, including positives and challenges associated with its design and implementation. Study participants enrolled from across four different US states, and the majority reported at least a 30-minute commute to their cancer center. This travel burden played a meaningful role in their desire to participate in our videoconference-based program. Although participants reported that session content was well suited to addressing stress management concerns, and session facilitators were able to effectively teach program techniques (eg progressive muscle relaxation, cognitive-reframing) and that the program was helpful overall, only modest improvements in perceived stress were seen. Participants noted challenges of the delivery including feeling disconnected from others, difficulty focusing, technical problems, and a desire for a longer program. Thus, although the novel delivery of a group-based, psychosocial program using tablet

  9. System safety management lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Piatt, J.A.

    1989-05-01

    The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop ''lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Outcome Assessment of a Management Program Using a Portfolio Approach: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drost, Donald; Hanson, Lee; Molstady, Clark; Peake, Lloyd; Newman, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Over the past two decades the interest and use of student portfolios for assessing student learning outcomes has grown considerably. This paper presents an overview of the portfolio approach to outcome assessment adopted by the Department of Management at California State University, San Bernardino and discusses major issues encountered over six…

  11. Adults with Learning Disabilities in the Workforce: Lessons for Secondary Transition Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madaus, Joseph W.; Gerber, Paul J.; Price, Lynda A.

    2008-01-01

    Now almost 15 years after the implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) data are emerging in the literature related to job entry and employment outcomes of adults with learning disabilities (LD). Although these data are derived from varying methodologies, they converge in three critical areas: Knowledge of the ADA, realities of…

  12. Adults with Learning Disabilities in the Workforce: Lessons for Secondary Transition Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madaus, Joseph W.; Gerber, Paul J.; Price, Lynda A.

    2008-01-01

    Now almost 15 years after the implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) data are emerging in the literature related to job entry and employment outcomes of adults with learning disabilities (LD). Although these data are derived from varying methodologies, they converge in three critical areas: Knowledge of the ADA, realities of…

  13. Implementing hospital pay-for-performance: Lessons learned from the French pilot program.

    PubMed

    Girault, Anne; Bellanger, Martine; Lalloué, Benoît; Loirat, Philippe; Moisdon, Jean-Claude; Minvielle, Etienne

    2017-04-01

    Despite a wide implementation of pay-for-performance (P4P) programs, evidence on their impact in hospitals is still limited. Our objective was to assess the implementation of the French P4P pilot program (IFAQ1) across 222 hospitals. The study consisted of a questionnaire among four leaders in each enrolled hospital, combined with a qualitative analysis based on 33 semi-structured interviews conducted with staff in four participating hospitals. For the questionnaire results, descriptive statistics were performed and responses were analyzed by job title. For the interviews, transcripts were analysed using coding techniques. Survey results showed that leaders were mostly positive about the program and reported a good level of awareness, in contrast to the frontline staff, who remained mostly unaware of the program's existence. The main barriers were attributed to lack of clarity in program rules, and to time constraints. Different strategies were then suggested by leaders. The qualitative results added further explanations for low program adoption among hospital staff, so far. Ultimately, although paying for quality is still an intuitive approach; gaps in program awareness within enrolled hospitals may pose an important challenge to P4P efficacy. Implementation evaluations are therefore necessary for policymakers to better understand P4P adoption processes among hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Implementing a lessons learned process at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Fosshage, Erik D.; Drewien, Celeste A.; Eras, Kenneth; Hartwig, Ronald Craig; Post, Debra S.; Stoecker, Nora Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Lessons Learned Process Improvement Team was tasked to gain an understanding of the existing lessons learned environment within the major programs at Sandia National Laboratories, identify opportunities for improvement in that environment as compared to desired attributes, propose alternative implementations to address existing inefficiencies, perform qualitative evaluations of alternative implementations, and recommend one or more near-term activities for prototyping and/or implementation. This report documents the work and findings of the team.

  15. Translating Strong for Life Into the Community Care Program: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Danilovich, Margaret K.; Hughes, Susan L.; Corcos, Daniel M.; Marquez, David X.; Eisenstein, Amy R.

    2016-01-01

    We used a randomized controlled trial to test the implementation of Strong for Life (SFL), a resistance exercise intervention, using 32 home care aides (HCAs) as exercise leaders with their 42 homebound older adult clients enrolled in the Community Care Program, a Medicaid 1915(c) waiver program. Mixed-methods were used to analyze outcomes of program satisfaction rates, training session evaluations, program fidelity, and job descriptive index scores. Results indicate that it is feasible for HCAs to implement SFL safely with clients. Participants viewed SFL as highly satisfactory and HCAs were able to adapt SFL for their clients. HCAs have high job satisfaction, and leading SFL enhances work achievement and pride. Our results show it is possible to train HCAs to implement SFL with their clients in addition to providing usual care services, participation positively affects both care partners, and this is a feasible and practical delivery model to provide exercise for adults receiving home- and community-based services. PMID:26912729

  16. Rethinking Combat Identification. Joint Center for Lessons Learned Quarterly Bulletin. Volume 4, Issue 3, June 2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    assigned forces. Let�s start with what we call the Joint Lessons Learned Program (JLLP) Feedback Loop. In general terms, the joint community, to include...CID system, and the fact that many of these issues (and proposed solutions) have been documented in the Joint Lessons Learned Program (JLLP), the U.S...capabilities. A further search of current joint doctrine reveals that the output of the Joint Lessons Learned Program (JLLP) on CID issues has not been

  17. [Feasibility of a geriatric multidisciplinary outpatient rehabilitation program-lessons learned].

    PubMed

    Mak, Rachel G; de Groot, Aafke J; Vreeburg, Ellen M; Smalbrugge, Martin; Depla, Marja F I A

    2016-04-01

    To describe the feasibility of a geriatric multidisciplinary outpatient rehabilitation program, developed in Vivium Naarderheem. A prospective pilot study using a pretest-posttest design with measurements of the level of (social) participation, health related quality of life, and caregiver strain at the start (T0) and the end (T1) of the program. Feasibility was studied by structured interviews with participants, professionals and management. We included 18 patients, fifteen of which were admitted after stroke. The program was highly appreciated by patients. Management and professionals thought that factors of influence on the program were transportation of patients, adequate planning and deployment of staff, and adequate financing. The program was regarded feasible. Although some patients reported a higher level of participation, the only statistically significant finding was a deterioration in self-perceived health. In this study most of the patients participated after stroke. The geriatric multidisciplinary outpatient rehabilitation program, following inpatient geriatric rehabilitation, was highly appreciated by patients, and considered feasible by management and professionals.

  18. Postpartum depression screening in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: program development, implementation, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Amanda S; Blucker, Ryan T; Thornberry, Timothy S; Hetherington, Carla; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this project were to describe the development of a postpartum depression screening program for mothers of infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and assess the implementation of the screening program. Screening began at 14 days postpartum and was implemented as part of routine medical care. A nurse coordinator facilitated communication with mothers for increasing screen completion, review of critical self-harm items, and making mental health referrals. During the 18-month study period, 385 out of 793 eligible mothers completed the screen. Approximately 36% of mothers had a positive screen that resulted in a mental health referral and an additional 30% of mothers had screening results indicating significant symptoms. Several barriers were identified, leading to adjustments in the screening process, and ultimately recommendations for future screening programs and research. Development of a postpartum depression screening process in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit involves support, training, implementation, and coordination from administrators, medical staff, new mothers, and mental health specialists. Several predictable challenges to program development require ongoing assessment and response to these challenges. This study highlights the expanding role of the psychologist and behavioral health providers in health care to intervene as early as possible in the life of a child and family with medical complications through multidisciplinary program development and implementation, as well as key considerations for institutions initiating such a program.

  19. Lessons learned in evaluating the Familias Fuertes program in three countries in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Orpinas, Pamela; Ambrose, Ashley; Maddaleno, Matilde; Vulanovic, Lauren; Mejia, Martha; Butrón, Betzabé; Gutierrez, Gonzalo Sosa; Soriano, Ismael

    2014-12-01

    This report describes 1) the evaluation of the Familias Fuertes primary prevention program in three countries (Bolivia, Colombia, and Ecuador) and 2) the effect of program participation on parenting practices. Familias Fuertes was implemented in Bolivia (10 groups, 96 parents), Colombia (12 groups, 173 parents), and Ecuador (five groups, 42 parents) to prevent the initiation and reduce the prevalence of health-compromising behaviors among adolescents by strengthening family relationships and enhancing parenting skills. The program consists of seven group sessions (for 6-12 families) designed for parents/caregivers and their 10-14-year-old child. Parents/caregivers answered a survey before the first session and at the completion of the program. The survey measured two important mediating constructs: "positive parenting" and "parental hostility." The Pan American Health Organization provided training for facilitators. After the program, parents/caregivers from all three countries reported significantly higher mean scores for "positive parenting" and significantly lower mean scores for "parental hostility" than at the pre-test. "Positive parenting" practices paired with low "parental hostility" are fundamental to strengthening the relationship between parents/caregivers and the children and reducing adolescents' health-compromising behaviors. More research is needed to examine the long-term impact of the program on adolescent behaviors.

  20. Postpartum depression screening in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: program development, implementation, and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Amanda S; Blucker, Ryan T; Thornberry, Timothy S; Hetherington, Carla; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this project were to describe the development of a postpartum depression screening program for mothers of infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and assess the implementation of the screening program. Methods Screening began at 14 days postpartum and was implemented as part of routine medical care. A nurse coordinator facilitated communication with mothers for increasing screen completion, review of critical self-harm items, and making mental health referrals. During the 18-month study period, 385 out of 793 eligible mothers completed the screen. Results Approximately 36% of mothers had a positive screen that resulted in a mental health referral and an additional 30% of mothers had screening results indicating significant symptoms. Conclusion Several barriers were identified, leading to adjustments in the screening process, and ultimately recommendations for future screening programs and research. Development of a postpartum depression screening process in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit involves support, training, implementation, and coordination from administrators, medical staff, new mothers, and mental health specialists. Several predictable challenges to program development require ongoing assessment and response to these challenges. Relevance This study highlights the expanding role of the psychologist and behavioral health providers in health care to intervene as early as possible in the life of a child and family with medical complications through multidisciplinary program development and implementation, as well as key considerations for institutions initiating such a program. PMID:26937199

  1. Deployment of computer-based training programs via a hospital intranet: methods used, lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Covell, Christine L; Lemay, Claude; Gaumond, Denis

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the methods used to implement computer-based training via a hospital intranet. Extensive consultation with the members of the Nursing Staff Development Team throughout the five campuses and a close working relationship with Information Services contributed to the success of the project. This article could serve as a valuable resource for nurses who are interested in using hospital intranets for learning.

  2. Impact of health care adversity on providers: Lessons learned from a staff support program.

    PubMed

    Trent, Maxine; Waldo, Kimberly; Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Williams, Daniel; Hegefeld, Wendy; Havens, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Health care providers often experience traumatic events and adversity that can have negative emotional impacts on the profession and on patients. These impacts are typically multifaceted and can result from many different events, such as unanticipated outcomes, licensing board complaints, claims, and litigation. Because health care providers are exposed to diverse situations, they require adequate and timely support, imperative for provider resilience and patient safety. This study evaluated the success of an institution's second victim health care support program and best practices in responding to these traumatic experiences effectively. Twenty faculty and medical residents who utilized the support program at a large hospital system located in Central Texas from 2001 to 2012 participated in 1 of 6 focus groups. Qualitative data were collected from these groups to describe program requirements for the adequate delivery of health care adversity support and necessary program improvements. Responses were first transcribed verbatim. Each research team member analyzed data using a thematic framework approach. This approach helped to characterize traumatic experiences and to design a support system. The results revealed that (1) provider experiences are traumatic, (2) it is necessary to communicate an adverse event in a confidential and timely manner, preferably with a peer, (3) preemptive education regarding risk management and the legal process is helpful, and (4) there is a need for further support of the specific experience of a board complaint. Focus group data indicated the complexity of the emotional impact of traumatic experiences. Specific program components are needed to create best practices for providers affected by health care adversity, including support when providers face board complaints. The program's unique combination of support and education allowed us to expand upon leading national health care adversity programs. © 2016 American Society for

  3. A Summer Math and Physics Program for High School Students: Student Performance and Lessons Learned in the Second Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timme, Nicholas; Baird, Michael; Bennett, Jake; Fry, Jason; Garrison, Lance; Maltese, Adam

    2013-05-01

    For the past two years, the Foundations in Physics and Mathematics (FPM) summer program has been held at Indiana University in order to fulfill two goals: provide additional physics and mathematics instruction at the high school level, and provide physics graduate students with experience and autonomy in designing curricula and teaching courses. In this paper we will detail changes made to the program for its second year and the motivation for these changes, as well as implications for future iterations of the program. We gauge the impact of the changes on student performance using pre-/post-test scores, student evaluations, and anecdotal evidence. These data show that the program has a positive impact on student knowledge and this impact was greater in magnitude in the second year of the program. We attribute this improvement primarily to the inclusion of more inquiry-driven activities. All activities, worksheets, and lesson plans used in the program are available online.

  4. Early lessons learned in implementing a women's health educational and virtual consultation program in VA.

    PubMed

    Cordasco, Kristina M; Zuchowski, Jessica L; Hamilton, Alison B; Kirsh, Susan; Veet, Laure; Saavedra, Joann O; Altman, Lisa; Knapp, Herschel; Canning, Mark; Washington, Donna L

    2015-04-01

    Many Veterans Health Administration primary care providers (PCPs) have small female patient caseloads, making it challenging for them to build and maintain their women's health (WH) knowledge and skills. To address this issue, we implemented a longitudinal WH-focused educational and virtual consultation program using televideo conferencing. To perform a formative evaluation of the program's development and implementation. We used mixed methods including participant surveys, semi-structured interviews, stakeholder meeting field notes, and participation logs. We conducted qualitative content analysis for interviews and field notes, and quantitative tabulation for surveys and logs. Veterans Health Administration WH PCPs. In 53 postsession surveys received, 47(89%) agreed with the statement, "The information provided in the session would influence my patient care." Among 18 interviewees, all reported finding the program useful for building and maintaining WH knowledge. All interviewees also reported that sessions being conducted during their lunch hour limited consistent participation. Logs showed that PCPs participated more consistently in the 1 health care system that provided time specifically allocated for this program. Key stakeholder discussions revealed that rotating specialists and topics across the breadth of WH limited submission of cases. Our WH education and virtual consultation program is a promising modality for building and maintaining PCP knowledge of WH, and influencing patient care. However, allocated time for PCPs to participate is essential for robust and consistent participation. Narrowing the modality's focus to gynecology, rather than covering the breadth WH topics, may facilitate PCPs having active cased-based questions for sessions.

  5. Benefits gained and lessons learned from NASA's Small Explorer (SMEX) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, David

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Small Explorer Program (SMEX) is a sustained program of scientific satellites limited in mass to 200-300 kg (depending on orbital inclination) for a 500-km circular orbit. The SMEX program was undertaken to obtain the benefits of scientific yield, short development time, and high flight rate, with the goal to launch a mission every year. NASA also uses the program to train engineers and managers in designing and developing spacecraft. The phases of a SMEX mission life cycle are described including the competitive selection of missions through announcement of opportunity and evaluation of proposals, the definition of mission and system requirements, design and development of the spacecraft, testing, launch, and operations. Program content of some SMEX missions is then reviewed. The first SMEX mission was the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer, which confirmed that anomalous cosmic rays are only partially ionized atoms. The Fast Auroral Snapshot Explorer was intended to measure the electric, magnetic, and time-variable fields and to record particle flow in the auroral acceleration region. A future mission is the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite to examine low-level molecular transitions.

  6. Lessons Learned and Legacy of the Stop Transmission of Polio Program.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Yinka; Mailhot, Melinda; Williams, Alford A J; Swezy, Virginia; Quick, Linda; Tangermann, Rudolf H; Ward, Kirsten; Benke, Amalia; Callaghan, Anna; Clark, Kathleen; Emery, Brian; Nix, Jessica; Aydlotte, Eleanor; Newman, Charlotte; Nkowane, Benjamin

    2017-07-01

    In 1988, the by the World Health Assembly established the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, which consisted of a partnership among the World Health Organization (WHO), Rotary International, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the United Nations Children's Fund. By 2016, the annual incidence of polio had decreased by >99.9%, compared with 1988, and at the time of writing, only 3 countries in which wild poliovirus circulation has never been interrupted remain: Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan. A key strategy for polio eradication has been the development of a skilled and deployable workforce to implement eradication activities across the globe. In 1999, the Stop Transmission of Polio (STOP) program was developed and initiated by the CDC, in collaboration with the WHO, to train and mobilize additional human resources to provide technical assistance to polio-endemic countries. STOP has also informed the development of other public health workforce capacity to support polio eradication efforts, including national STOP programs. In addition, the program has diversified to address measles and rubella elimination, data management and quality, and strengthening routine immunization programs. This article describes the STOP program and how it has contributed to polio eradication by building global public health workforce capacity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  7. Assessing Learning Communities: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Debra

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to develop an effective assessment process for learning communities, including initial considerations, the value of student involvement, questions guiding the study, data management, and considerations for future studies. (EV)

  8. Lessons Learned on University Education Programs of Chemical Engineering Principles for Nuclear Plant Operations - 13588

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Jun-hyung

    2013-07-01

    University education aims to supply qualified human resources for industries. In complex large scale engineering systems such as nuclear power plants, the importance of qualified human resources cannot be underestimated. The corresponding education program should involve many topics systematically. Recently a nuclear engineering program has been initiated in Dongguk University, South Korea. The current education program focuses on undergraduate level nuclear engineering students. Our main objective is to provide industries fresh engineers with the understanding on the interconnection of local parts and the entire systems of nuclear power plants and the associated systems. From the experience there is a huge opportunity for chemical engineering disciple in the context of giving macroscopic overview on nuclear power plant and waste treatment management by strengthening the analyzing capability of fundamental situations. (authors)

  9. National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Disparities Research Partnership Program: Experience and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rosemary S. L.; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Govern, Frank S.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Maguire, Patrick D.; Clarkson, Maggie R.; Heron, Dwight E.; Coleman, C. Norman

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To increase access of underserved/health disparities communities to National Cancer Institute (NCI) clinical trials, the Radiation Research Program piloted a unique model – the Cancer Disparities Research Partnership (CDRP) program. CDRP targeted community hospitals with a limited past NCI funding history and provided funding to establish the infrastructure for their clinical research program. Methods: Initially, 5-year planning phase funding was awarded to six CDRP institutions through a cooperative agreement (U56). Five were subsequently eligible to compete for 5-year implementation phase (U54) funding and three received a second award. Additionally, the NCI Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities supported their U56 patient navigation programs. Results: Community-based hospitals with little or no clinical trials experience required at least a year to develop the infrastructure and establish community outreach/education and patient navigation programs before accrual to clinical trials could begin. Once established, CDRP sites increased their yearly patient accrual mainly to NCI-sponsored cooperative group trials (~60%) and Principal Investigator/mentor-initiated trials (~30%). The total number of patients accrued on all types of trials was 2,371, while 5,147 patients received navigation services. Conclusion: Despite a historical gap in participation in clinical cancer research, underserved communities are willing/eager to participate. Since a limited number of cooperative group trials address locally advanced diseases seen in health disparities populations; this shortcoming needs to be rectified. Sustainability for these programs remains a challenge. Addressing these gaps through research and public health mechanisms may have an important impact on their health, scientific progress, and efforts to increase diversity in NCI clinical trials. PMID:25405101

  10. Lessons learned from domestic and international human papillomavirus vaccination programs: a review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kathryn; Dilley, Sarah E; Huh, Warner K

    2017-09-06

    Since the development of the human papillomavirus vaccine, many countries have created implementation programs to bolster vaccination rates and protect their populations. Despite demonstrated efficacy with decreased human papillomavirus-related disease abroad, the vaccine's potential to prevent morbidity and mortality in the United States is not being met. The purpose of this review is to discuss strategies of both international and domestic vaccination programs, their impact on human papillomavirus-related diseases, the unique obstacles faced by the United States, and future directions for success. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Planning a School-Based Mentoring Program. Lessons Learned. Volume 1, Issue 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garringer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    School-based mentoring (SBM) has exploded in popularity in recent years: Today approximately one fourth of the youth mentoring programs in the country use a school-based format (Herrera, Grossman, Kauh, Feldman, & McMaken, 2007). In SBM, a K-12 student is paired with an adult from the community or an older (usually high school) student in a…

  12. Videotape Education on a Controversial Issue--Pesticides in Food. Lessons Learned on Issues Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftis, Jim C.; Kendall, Patricia A.

    1991-01-01

    A videotape/bulletin package to promote rational alertness regarding pesticides and food was tested with 146 people. Although 68 percent judged the presentation balanced, developers found that programing about risk/benefit issues requires special attention to the way information is communicated. (SK)

  13. The Writing Portfolio and English Program Assessment: Of Bumps, Bruises, and Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Robert L.

    In January 1986, the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) issued several recommendations with far-reaching implications for Virginia's colleges and universities, namely, "that all state-supported institutions of higher education establish procedures and programs to measure student achievement." By all accounts the…

  14. County Clustering for the California 4-H Youth Development Program: Impacts and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Aarti; Dasher, Harry Steve; Young, Jane Chin

    2012-01-01

    In response to budgetary constraints, a new staffing structure, the Pilot Leadership Plan, was proposed for California's 4-H Youth Development Program. County clusters were formed, each led by a coordinator. The plan was piloted for 2 years to provide insight into how county clustering could support Extension staff to increase and enhance program…

  15. The Impact of and Lessons Learned from NITARP, the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, L. M.; Nitarp Team

    2014-07-01

    NITARP, the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program, gets teachers involved in authentic astronomical research. We partner small groups of educators with a professional astronomer mentor for a year-long original research project. The teams echo the entire research process, from writing a proposal, to doing the research, to presenting the results at an American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting. The program runs from January through January. Applications are available annually in May and are due in September. The educators' experiences color their teaching for years to come, influencing hundreds of students per teacher. This program differs from other programs we know of that get real astronomy data into the classroom in three ways. First, each team works on an original, unique project. There are no canned labs here! Second, each team presents their results in posters in science sessions at an American Astronomical Society meeting alongside other researchers' work (participants are not given a “free pass” because they are educators or students). Third, the “product” is the scientific result, not any sort of curriculum packet. The teachers adapt their project and their experiences to fit in their classroom environment. NITARP changes the way teachers think about science and scientists. More information is available online at http://nitarp.ipac.caltech.edu/.

  16. Programmed Instruction versus Meaningful Learning Theory in Teaching Basic Structured Query Language (SQL) in Computer Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efendioglu, Akin; Yelken, Tugba Yanpar

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two different methods on primary school teacher candidates' academic achievements and attitudes toward computer-based education, and to define their views on these methods. Both the first experimental group, programmed instruction (PI), and the second experimental group, meaningful…

  17. Implementation of a Distance MS-CIS Program: Lessons Learned and Principles for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    The Master of Science in Computer Information Systems (MS-CIS) program at Colorado State University (CSU) was one of the first in the country when it was established in 1967 according to the model provided by the Data Processing Management Association (DPMA). Beginning in 1967, CSU initiated delivery of its MBA at a distance and graduated the…

  18. "Buy-In" vs. "Allowed In": Lessons Learned in Family Engagement Program Recruitment and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetzer-Anderson, Susan; Roessler, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    With support from a federal Investing in Innovation (i3) grant, the FAST (Families and Schools Together) program has been implemented in thirty Philadelphia schools to improve family engagement and, by extension, advance school turnaround. The project team includes the nonprofit Families and Schools Together, Inc.; the Early Childhood Education…

  19. Partnerships at Work: Lessons Learned from Programs and Practices of Families, Professionals and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kathleen Kirk, Ed.; Taylor, Mary Skidmore, Ed.; Arango, Polly, Ed.

    Designed to celebrate family/interprofessional collaborative partnerships, this publication describes high-quality examples of how families and professionals at the family, community, state, and national levels have worked together to create programs and practices that are family-friendly and responsive to what families have said they want and…

  20. Are We Making a Difference? Lessons Learned from VINE Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollweg, Karen S.

    The Volunteer-led Investigations of Neighborhood Ecology, or VINE Program, gives children opportunities to discover and investigate the plants, animals, and ecological relationships that exist right in their own neighborhoods through hands-on natural science investigations. It was established by Denver Audubon Society members as an urban education…

  1. THE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT - LESSONS LEARNED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program's National Coastal Assessment is to estimate the current status, extent, changes, and trends in ecological indicators of the condition of the nation's coastal resources on a state, regional and national basis. Bas...

  2. Team Teaching in an Early Childhood Interdisciplinary Program: A Decade of Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestenes, Linda L.; Laparo, Karen; Scott-Little, Catherine; Chakravarthi, Swetha; Lower, Joanna K.; Cranor, Angie; Cassidy, Deborah J.; Niemeyer, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Preparing students in the early childhood field to work with children both with and without disabilities and to collaborate with different professionals is an important endeavor for colleges and universities. The purpose of this paper is to articulate a unique model of program collaboration between early childhood special education and early…

  3. The Universality of Administrative Competencies: Lessons Learned from the Doctoral Leadership Program at Seattle University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Constance Carter

    Seattle University's three-year doctoral program in educational leadership both teaches and tests the hypothesis that universal behaviors exist which are generic to effective leadership in any organization in any field. Leadership effectiveness research shows that the critical factor lies in appropriately integrating both task-oriented and…

  4. Team Teaching in an Early Childhood Interdisciplinary Program: A Decade of Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestenes, Linda L.; Laparo, Karen; Scott-Little, Catherine; Chakravarthi, Swetha; Lower, Joanna K.; Cranor, Angie; Cassidy, Deborah J.; Niemeyer, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Preparing students in the early childhood field to work with children both with and without disabilities and to collaborate with different professionals is an important endeavor for colleges and universities. The purpose of this paper is to articulate a unique model of program collaboration between early childhood special education and early…

  5. Lessons Learned from the Delivery of a Graduate Business Degree Program Utilizing Interactive Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Thomas S.; Moon, Donald K.

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with 3 distance education administrators, 9 faculty, and 24 students who used the Iowa Communications Network for graduate study identified the following: need for well-articulated policy, value of financial incentives, benefits of institutional cooperation, importance of a student orientation program and faculty training, and use of…

  6. Encouraging Wildland Fire Preparedness: Lessons Learned from Three Wildfire Education Programs

    Treesearch

    Victoria Sturtevant; Sarah McCaffrey

    2006-01-01

    Managers may often wonder why some people do not choose to adopt defensible space practices despite understanding the benefits of doing so. Research has sought to understand why a new practice or innovation is or is not adopted. This paper will briefly discuss factors found to influence adoption rates and describe how three different fire education programs - Firewise...

  7. Lessons Learned from a Data-Driven College Access Program: The National College Advising Corps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horng, Eileen L.; Evans, Brent J.; antonio, anthony l.; Foster, Jesse D.; Kalamkarian, Hoori S.; Hurd, Nicole F.; Bettinger, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the collaboration between a national college access program, the National College Advising Corps (NCAC), and its research and evaluation team at Stanford University. NCAC is currently active in almost four hundred high schools and through the placement of a recent college graduate to serve as a college adviser provides…

  8. Teaching Statistical Research Methods to Graduate Students: Lessons Learned from Three Different Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekmekci, Ozgur; Hancock, Adrienne B.; Swayze, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the challenge of teaching statistical research methods in three master's degree programs at a private university based in Washington, DC. We, as three professors teaching at this university, discuss the way we employ innovative approaches to deal with this challenge. We ground our discussion within the theoretical framework of…

  9. Implementing hospital-based communication-and-resolution programs: lessons learned in New York City.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michelle M; Senecal, Susan K; Kuznetsov, Yelena; Cohn, Janet S

    2014-01-01

    In 2010 five New York City hospitals implemented a communication-and-resolution program (CRP) in general surgery. The program's goals were to improve reporting of serious adverse events to risk management, support clinical staff in discussing these events with patients, rapidly investigate why injuries occurred, communicate to patients what was discovered, and offer apologies and compensation when the standard of care was not met. We report the hospitals' experiences with implementing the CRP over a twenty-two-month period. We found that all five hospitals improved disclosure and surveillance of adverse events but were not able to fully implement the program's compensation component. These experiences suggest that strong support from top leadership at the hospital and insurer levels, and adequate staff resources, are critical for the success of CRPs. Hospitals considering adopting a CRP should ensure that their organizations can tolerate risk, their leaders are willing to reinforce CRP implementation, and resources are in place to educate clinical staff about how the program can benefit them.

  10. Are We Making a Difference? Lessons Learned from VINE Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollweg, Karen S.

    The Volunteer-led Investigations of Neighborhood Ecology, or VINE Program, gives children opportunities to discover and investigate the plants, animals, and ecological relationships that exist right in their own neighborhoods through hands-on natural science investigations. It was established by Denver Audubon Society members as an urban education…

  11. Integrating Assistive Technology into Teacher Education Programs: Trials, Tribulations, and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Laarhoven, Toni; Munk, Dennis D.; Chandler, Lynette K.; Zurita, Leslie; Lynch, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes several stages in the integration of assistive technology (AT) into and across the curriculum of a teacher education program. The multi-year initiative included several projects and strategies that differentially affected faculty ability to integrate training and evaluation in using AT in their coursework. All strategies…

  12. THE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT - LESSONS LEARNED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program's National Coastal Assessment is to estimate the current status, extent, changes, and trends in ecological indicators of the condition of the nation's coastal resources on a state, regional and national basis. Bas...

  13. Programmed Instruction versus Meaningful Learning Theory in Teaching Basic Structured Query Language (SQL) in Computer Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efendioglu, Akin; Yelken, Tugba Yanpar

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two different methods on primary school teacher candidates' academic achievements and attitudes toward computer-based education, and to define their views on these methods. Both the first experimental group, programmed instruction (PI), and the second experimental group, meaningful…

  14. Videotape Education on a Controversial Issue--Pesticides in Food. Lessons Learned on Issues Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftis, Jim C.; Kendall, Patricia A.

    1991-01-01

    A videotape/bulletin package to promote rational alertness regarding pesticides and food was tested with 146 people. Although 68 percent judged the presentation balanced, developers found that programing about risk/benefit issues requires special attention to the way information is communicated. (SK)

  15. Critical Elements of Scientist-Teacher Partnerships and Lessons Learned About Partnership Program Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, B.; Hall, M. K.; Regens, N. L.

    2006-05-01

    Partnerships between scientists and K-12 teachers have the potential for long-term impacts, but there are many barriers to forming sustainable relationships between these two work environment cultures. By analyzing data from an NSF GK-12 program that pairs graduate and undergraduate students (fellows) with K-12 teachers, we identified several key attributes of effective partnerships. Our data indicate that communicating openly about goals, roles, and dissatisfaction is the foundation of successful partnership evolution. Although it was possible to develop strong communication, goals, and roles over time, partnership pairs that achieved these elements through deliberate and early action experienced less frustration than those who did not. Undefined goals and roles represented major barriers to partnership formation. Often, dissatisfaction was related to one partner perceiving the other as being uninvested in the relationship. Direct communication about dissatisfaction was rare, but the majority of fellows and teachers who discussed their frustrations benefited. Communicating openly demonstrated partners' desire and commitment to collaborate and led to increased planning time, a shared division of labor, the exchange of scientific and pedagogical resources, and the development of new knowledge and skills. Program design is an influential factor in developing sustainable partnerships as well. We will give examples of how the GK-12 program studied has been modified over the last five years to promote the partnership characteristics that we identified. We will also discuss program elements that facilitate communication, goal setting, role definition, and planning time.

  16. Strategies for Broadening Participation in the Geosciences: Lessons Learned From the UCAR-SOARSr Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    Broadening participation in the geosciences will advance our research, enhance our education and training, and improve our ability to meet societal needs. By attracting more diverse students, we will be better postioned to provide all our students the increasingly necessary and relevant experience of working in diverse teams. Because some traditionally underrepresented groups, particularly Latinos & Hispanics, are growing much faster than the population as a whole, broader participation will enlarge the pool of talented individuals contributing to the next generation of research. Finally the geosciences will be more effective and credible when the diversity of our nation is reflected in our workforce, especially as civic discourse includes more and more complex decisions about society's interactions with the Earth and its resources. The Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) seeks to broaden participation in geosciences by helping undergraduate students successfully transition to graduate programs in the atmospheric and related sciences. SOARS combines multiple research experiences, multifaceted mentoring, an encouraging community, and financial support to help students enter and succeed in graduate school. A central feature of the SOARS program is a ten-week summer immersion program in which protégés (SOARS participants) conduct scientific research at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) or at laboratories of SOARS sponsors. During this summer research experience, SOARS protégés are supported by up to four mentors: a science research mentor, a writing mentor, a community mentor, and a peer mentor. SOARS protégés collaborate with their mentors to perform original research, prepare scientific papers, and present their research at a colloquium. SOARS also provides extensive leadership and communication training; support for conference presentations and for graduate school; and a strong scholarly community that

  17. Implementing a collaborative protocol in a sepsis intervention program: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Casserly, Brian; Baram, Michael; Walsh, Patricia; Sucov, Andrew; Ward, Nicholas S; Levy, Mitchell M

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this prospective cohort study was to see the effect of the implementation of a Sepsis Intervention Program on the standard processes of patient care using a collaborative approach between the Emergency Department (ED) and Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU). This was performed in a large urban tertiary-care hospital, with no previous experience utilizing a specific intervention program as routine care for septic shock and which has services and resources commonly available in most hospitals. The study included 106 patients who presented to the ED with severe sepsis or septic shock. Eighty-seven of those patients met the inclusion criteria for complete data analysis. The ED and MICU staff underwent a 3-month training period followed by implementation of a protocol for sepsis intervention program over 6 months. In the first 6 months of the program's implementation, 106 patients were admitted to the ED with severe sepsis and septic shock. During this time, the ED attempted to initiate the sepsis intervention protocol in 76% of the 87 septic patients who met the inclusion criteria. This was assessed by documentation of a central venous catheter insertion for continuous SvO(2) monitoring in a patient with sepsis or septic shock. However, only 48% of the eligible patients completed the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) protocol. Our data showed that the in-hospital mortality rate was 30.5% for the 87 septic shock patients with a mean APACHE II score of 29. This was very similar to a landmark study of EGDT (30.5% mortality with mean APACHE II of 21.5). Data collected on processes of care showed improvements in time to fluid administration, central venous access insertion, antibiotic administration, vasopressor administration, and time to MICU transfer from ED arrival in our patients enrolled in the protocol versus those who were not. Further review of our performance data showed that processes of care improved steadily the longer the protocol was in

  18. Long-Term Care Nurse Residency Program: Evaluation of New Nurse Experiences and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Salmond, Susan W; Cadmus, Edna; Black, Katherine Kuren; Bohnarczyk, Nancy; Hassler, Linda

    2017-10-01

    Transitioning to long-term care environments presents a significant challenge for new nurses and their directors of nursing. The complexity of this environment, instability of the workforce, and the lack of support structures frequently affect a new nurse's decision not to apply to long-term care, but to look for positions in acute care hospitals. To address these issues, a long-term care new nurse residency program was developed, implemented, and evaluated in New Jersey through the work of the New Jersey Action Coalition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the residency program on new nurses' confidence, competence, retention, job satisfaction, and perceptions of organizational safety. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(10):474-484. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Lessons Learned From a Partnership to Evaluate a School Food Program.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Avik; Daftary, Genevieve; Gatison, Lenward; Gillman, Matthew W

    In 2013, leadership at a Boston school approached academic investigators for help with assessing their new school food program. The community-academic partnership implemented a two-phase community-based participatory research (CBPR) assessment. The qualitative phase involved key stakeholder focus groups. The quantitative assessment involved height/weight measurement and dietary recalls at the beginning and end of the year. The qualitative assessment revealed low stakeholder engagement in the food program and resulted in substantive changes. In the quantitative phase, the partnership terminated the study after recruitment goals were not met. The quantitative assessment faced administrative hurdles to conducting school-based research and obtaining institutional review board (IRB) approval of CBPR projects, low recruitment, and diminished partnership strength. The constant effort to sustain partnerships, IRB processes mal adapted for CBPR, and training needs for community investigators are challenges and opportunities for success. CBPR can be useful for school-based research, but key process changes could increase its effectiveness.

  20. Managed care in the public sector: lessons learned from the Los Angeles PARTNERS program.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, G; Young, A S; Fortney, S; Tillipman, D; Murata, D; Koegel, P

    2001-05-01

    PARTNERS is the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health's capitated managed care treatment program. To explore the context in which public sector managed care reforms are occurring and to understand the obstacles to implementing such programs, qualitative data were collected from administrators, case managers, and clients. Administrators were found to need assistance in negotiating managed care contracts and in tracking costs. Case managers, although concerned about increased clinical demands, enjoyed the flexibility and creativity their new roles allowed. Clients were satisfied with their increased independence, even though many had to change their site of care. Beyond considering these concerns, the range of community stakeholders who may be affected by such interventions must be addressed.

  1. WALK Community Grants Scheme: lessons learned in developing and administering a health promotion microgrants program.

    PubMed

    Caperchione, Cristina; Mummery, W Kerry; Joyner, Kelly

    2010-09-01

    The Women's Active Living Kits (WALK) Community Grant Scheme was a key component of a federally funded Australian initiative aimed at increasing local capacity to promote and engage priority women's groups in health-related physical activity. Under the program, community groups and organizations were provided with the opportunity to apply and receive small grants to support the development of women's walking groups with the aim of increasing physical activity participation levels in women, supporting innovative community ideas for increasing women's physical activity by improving social structures and environments, or both. This article describes the development and administration of the WALK Community Grant Scheme, outlines challenges and barriers encountered throughout the grant program process, and provides practical insights for replicating this initiative.

  2. Brownfields City of Cleveland: Deconstruction Lessons Learned Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical memorandum presents an overview of Cleveland’s current deconstruction initiative goals and lessons learned (in the Cleveland area) and potential strategies for addressing lessons learned.

  3. Afghan National Police Training Program: Lessons Learned During the Transition of Contract Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-15

    currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 15 AUG 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Afghan...description of the Afghan National Police (ANP) training program that included: (A) components, planning, and scope; (B) cost to DoD and DOS; (C...allocation of DoD and DOS funding, oversight, and execution responsibilities; (D) personnel requirements; and (E) an assessment of the cost , performance

  4. Defense Acquisitions: Application of Lessons Learned and Best Practices in the Presidential Helicopter Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-25

    GAO-11-380R Presidential Helicopter Program Page 1 United States Government Accountability Office Washington, DC 20548 March...acquisition and has been initiated to develop aircraft to replace the current, aging presidential helicopter fleet. The Ike Skelton National Defense...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Government Accountability Office,441 G Street NW

  5. Public health implications of a North American publicly funded in vitro fertilization program; lessons to learn.

    PubMed

    Shaulov, Talya; Belisle, Serge; Dahan, Michael H

    2015-09-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to determine trends in practice and outcomes that occurred since the implementation of the publicly funded in vitro fertilization (IVF) and single embryo transfer (SET) program in Quebec, in August, 2010. Data presented was extracted from an advisory report by the Health and Welfare Commissioner, and from a report by the Ministry of Health and Social Services published in June 2014 and October 2013, respectively. This data is publicly available, and was collected from all six private and three public-assisted reproduction centers in Quebec providing IVF services. Data pertains to all IVF cycles performed from the 2009-2010 to 2012-2013 fiscal years. SET was performed in 71 % of cycles in 2012. The number of children born from IVF was 1057 in 2009-2010 and 1723 in 2012-2013 (p < 0.0001). Multiple birth rates from IVF were 24 % in 2009-2010 (before the program began) and 9.45 % in 2012-2013 (p < 0.0001). The proportions of IVF babies that were premature, that were the result of multiple births, or that required neonatal intensive care unit admission (NICU) all decreased by 35.5 % (p < 0.0001), 55 % (p < 0.0001), and 37 % (p < 0.0001), respectively, from 2009-2010 to 2012-2013. The cost per NICU admission for an IVF baby increased from $19,990 to $28,418 from 2009-2010 to 2011-2012. This first North American publicly funded IVF program with a SET policy shows that such a program contributes substantially to number of births. It has also succeeded in increasing access to treatment and decreasing perinatal morbidity by decreasing multiple birth rates from IVF. A substantial increase in global public health care costs occurred as well.

  6. Learning from Experience, Volume 3: Lessons from the United Kingdom’s Astute Submarine Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    responsibilities of the pri- vate sector would lead to skilled personnel migrating from the public to the private sector. This did not happen because...incentives to take proactive risk mitigation actions early in the program. Getting this wrong, as happened with the original Astute contract, can...http://web.cenet.org.cn/upfile/53072.pdf Kincaid, Bill, Dinosaur in Permafrost, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey, England, The Sauras Ltd., 2002. Macdonald

  7. NASA Technical Standards Program and Implications for Lessons Learned and Technical Standard Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Agency consists of fourteen Facilities throughout the United States. They are organized to support the Agency's principal Enterprises: (1) Space Science, (2) Earth Science, (3) Aerospace Technology, (4) Human Exploration and Development of Space, and (5) Biological and Physical Research. Technical Standards are important to the activities of each Enterprise and have been an integral part in the development and operation of NASA Programs and Projects since the Agency was established in 1959. However, for years each Center was responsible for its own standards development and selection of non-NASA technical standards that met the needs of Programs and Projects for which they were responsible. There were few Agencywide applicable Technical Standards, mainly those in area of safety. Department of Defense Standards and Specifications were the foundation and main source for Technical Standards used by the Agency. This process existed until about 1997 when NASA embarked on a Program to convert NASA's Center-developed Technical Standards into Agencywide endorsed NASA Preferred Technical Standards. In addition, action was taken regarding the formal adoption of non-NASA Technical Standards (DOD, SAE, ASTM, ASME, IEEE, etc.) as NASA Preferred Technical Standards.

  8. X-31 Mishap: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    , and the program was successfully completed without incident. This presentation also shows a video of the mishap including lessons learned, and the changes that were made to resume the flight-test program are presented.

  9. X-31 Mishap: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    , and the program was successfully completed without incident. This presentation also shows a video of the mishap including lessons learned, and the changes that were made to resume the flight-test program are presented.

  10. Exposure to ''lessons learned'': A tool for laser safety

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K.; Kelly, S.E. )

    1994-12-01

    This article outlines the value and steps to follow for establishing a ''lessons learned program,'' with specific application to a laser safety program. As a communication tool and preventive measure for laser safety issues, the program is an effective means of turning accident investigation into a proactive rather than a reactive exercise by emphasizing corrective rather than disciplinary (looking for someone to blame) actions.

  11. Lessons learned from narrative feedback of students on a geriatric training program.

    PubMed

    van de Pol, Marjolein H J; Lagro, Joep; Koopman, Elise L; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L M

    2016-02-17

    Geriatrics continues to draw insufficient numbers of medical students today. Currently, little is known regarding how education can motivate students to choose geriatrics. The authors' aim was to examine geriatrics from the students' perspective to identify elements that can be useful in education and improving attitudes toward, interest in, and knowledge about geriatrics. The authors analyzed narrative reflection essays of 36 students and clarified the themes from the essays during focus group sessions. Four overarching themes that influenced students' perspective on geriatrics were identified: professional identity, perception of geriatrics, geriatric-specific problems, and learning environment. Students have an inaccurate image of clinical practice and the medical professional identity, which has a negative impact on their attitude toward, interest in, and knowledge of geriatrics. Furthermore, this study yielded the important role of the hidden curriculum on professional identity, the novelty of geriatric-specific problems to students, and the importance of educational approach and good role models.

  12. The evolution of a community-based telepsychiatry program in rural Alabama: lessons learned-a brief report.

    PubMed

    Ulzen, Thaddeus; Williamson, Lloyda; Foster, Pamela Payne; Parris-Barnes, Kelley

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the partnership between a community-based rural mental health clinic and an academic health center to provide telepsychiatry services in rural Alabama. The partnership was developed to meet the needs of a clinic that serves an underserved rural population with limited psychiatric services. This paper offers valuable lessons learned for mental health practitioners who may be considering the benefits and challenges of forming community-based partnerships in use of telepsychiatry to build capacity to deliver clinical mental health services to rural mental health shortage areas.

  13. How to successfully implement a robotic pediatric surgery program: lessons learned after 96 procedures.

    PubMed

    de Lambert, Guénolée; Fourcade, Laurent; Centi, Joachim; Fredon, Fabien; Braik, Karim; Szwarc, Caroline; Longis, Bernard; Lardy, Hubert

    2013-06-01

    Both our teams were the first to implement pediatric robotic surgery in France. The aim of this study was to define the key points we brought to light so other pediatric teams that want to set up a robotic surgery program will benefit. We reviewed the medical records of all children who underwent robotic surgery between Nov 2007 and June 2011 in both departments, including patient data, installation and changes, operative time, hospital stay, intraoperative complications, and postoperative outcome. The department's internal organization, the organization within the hospital complex, and cost were evaluated. A total of 96 procedures were evaluated. There were 38 girls and 56 boys with average age at surgery of 7.6 years (range, 0.7-18 years) and average weight of 26 kg (range, 6-77 kg). Thirty-six patients had general surgery, 57 patients urologic surgery, and 1 thoracic surgery. Overall average operative time was 189 min (range, 70-550 min), and average hospital stay was 6.4 days (range, 2-24 days). The procedures of 3 patients were converted. Median follow-up was 18 months (range, 0.5-43 months). Robotic surgical procedure had an extra cost of 1934 compared to conventional open surgery. Our experience was similar to the findings described in the literature for feasibility, security, and patient outcomes; we had an overall operative success rate of 97 %. Three main actors are concerned in the implementation of a robotic pediatric surgery program: surgeons and anesthetists, nurses, and the administration. The surgeon is at the starting point with motivation for minimally invasive surgery without laparoscopic constraints. We found that it was possible to implement a long-lasting robotic surgery program with comparable quality of care.

  14. Small arms video sight for the "German Army Soldier-of-the-Future Program": lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledertheil, Bernd H.; Berlips, Carsten; Ohlmann, Marco

    2009-05-01

    The Small Arms Video Sight is part of the optronical sights developed for the German IdZ-ES program (German Army Soldier-of-the Future Program - Enhanced System) [1]. The aim of the development was to use this highly integrated sight on three different rifles (G36 = the assault rifle of the German soldier optional with a 40mm underslung grenade launcher, MG 4 = a light machine gun , PZF3 = a 60mm / 110mm bazooka). The Video Sight will be used for observation, target detection, recognition and identification, direct and indirect aiming and shooting with ballistic calculation and aiming mark correction, still and video picture capturing and wireless transmission, determination of a located target position by distance and angle to the own position and so on. To perform all these tasks the Video Sight is equipped with an uncooled IR and a CCD camera, a laser range finder, a digital compass, angle sensors, electronic display, all this sensors highly integrated and controlled by an operating system.

  15. Lessons learned about monitor performance from Acid Rain Program emissions data

    SciTech Connect

    Mangus, N.J. III

    1997-12-31

    Affected utilities began collecting emissions data for allowance accounting under the Acid Rain Program in January 1995. The monitor quality assurance requirements and the missing data substitution procedures are major tenets of the program. This paper highlights some coarse statistics from a preliminary analysis of relative accuracy results and the amount of missing data substitution for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and flow monitors. Relative accuracy test audit (RATA) results from 1/1/95 through 6/30/96 are examined. Of all RATAs performed, 98.1% were passed and 94.5% resulted in the monitor meeting the reduced frequency standard. The analysis of missing data considers only data from second quarter 1996 (4/1/96 - 6/30/96). 5.32 million hourly records were reported, with missing data substituted less than 3% of the time and an average availability for all monitors of 96%. The median percent monitor availability reported for all SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and flow monitors at the end of the quarter was an even higher 98%.

  16. Software Carpentry: lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Since its start in 1998, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to improve researchers' computing skills. This paper explains what we have learned along the way, the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future. PMID:24715981

  17. Lessons Learned (Vietnam)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-01-01

    bocn zzoc~zived czt orgcnizational level originally designated for eitYher -Ll., 20th lnoer Dattalion (CIA) or the 584th Engineer C~npc~r (LL) n~m~t!e...in standard field ranuals. Several are cited here only to con-firr that a les- son to Le learned is that these techniques and principles are b- asically

  18. Evaluation of a sexually transmissible infections education program: Lessons for general practice learning.

    PubMed

    Reath, Jennifer; Abbott, Penelope; Dadich, Ann; Hosseinzadeh, Hassan; Hu, Wendy; Kang, Melissa; Usherwood, Tim; Murray, Carolyn; Bourne, Chris

    2016-03-01

    The New South Wales (NSW) Sexually Transmissible Infections Program Unit (STIPU) produced nine resources to support the diagnosis and management of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) in general practice. In this study, we explored the processes of developing the resources and outcomes achieved. We analysed project documents and undertook a focus group interview with the STIPU Working Group to evaluate resource development and dissemination. Interviews with general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses (PNs), combined with previously reported survey findings, provided an outcomes evaluation. STIPU used a rigorous, multimodal approach to develop evidence-based clinical resources. GPs and PNs received information opportunistically rather than through targeted searches unless they had a particular interest. GPs were less aware of online re-sources. STIPU's best practice translation of clinical guidelines could be enhanced by promotion of online resources, links through general practice software, strong engagement with general practice organisations, and developing the role of PNs.

  19. Lessons learned regarding recruitment to the National African American Alzheimer Disease Health Literacy Program.

    PubMed

    Rexroth, Daniel F; Friedland, Robert P

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that patients with poor health literacy generally do not fare as well from a health perspective because they lack understanding of health information and are unaware of the steps involved in preventative health care. There are also unique issues with regard to the recruitment of minority participants into research. The National African American Alzheimer Disease Health Literacy Program was a research project whose purpose was to increase the health literacy of African American adults by providing objective scientific and educational information to the African American community of patients, families, and caregivers about dementia and Alzheimer disease. The target audience was the African American communities of Chicago, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Newark, and Washington D.C. Reaching into these communities for participants was challenging for a variety of reasons and provided insight into potential strategies for working with the population of elderly African Americans. This article discusses the successes and challenges of the work conducted in Indianapolis.

  20. Lessons learned while implementing an HIV/AIDS care and treatment program in rural Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Troy D.; Burlison, Janeen R.; Sidat, Mohsin; Pires, Paulo; Silva, Wilson; Solis, Manuel; Rocha, Michele; Arregui, Chiqui; Manders, Eric J.; Vergara, Alfredo E.; Vermund, Sten H.

    2014-01-01

    Mozambique has severe resource constraints, yet with international partnerships, the nation has placed over 145,000 HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapies (ART) through May-2009. HIV clinical services are provided at > 215 clinical venues in all 11 of Mozambique’s provinces. Friends in Global Health (FGH), affiliated with Vanderbilt University in the United States (US), is a locally licensed non-governmental organization (NGO) working exclusively in small city and rural venues in Zambézia Province whose population reaches approximately 4 million persons. Our approach to clinical capacity building is based on: 1) technical assistance to national health system facilities to implement ART clinical services at the district level, 2) human capacity development, and 3) health system strengthening. Challenges in this setting are daunting, including: 1) human resource constraints, 2) infrastructure limitations, 3) centralized care for large populations spread out over large distances, 4) continued high social stigma related to HIV, 5) limited livelihood options in rural areas and 6) limited educational opportunities in rural areas. Sustainability in rural Mozambique will depend on transitioning services from emergency foreign partners to local authorities and continued funding. It will also require “wrap-around” programs that help build economic capacity with agricultural, educational, and commercial initiatives. Sustainability is undermined by serious health manpower and infrastructure limitations. Recent U.S. government pronouncements suggest that the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief will support concurrent community and business development. FGH, with its Mozambican government counterparts, see the evolution of an emergency response to a sustainable chronic disease management program as an essential and logical step. We have presented six key challenges that are essential to address in rural Mozambique. PMID:25097450

  1. Causes and consequences of continental breakup in the South Atlantic: lessons learned from the SAMPLE program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbull, Robert B.

    2014-05-01

    Since 2009 the SAMPLE program (www.spp-sample.de) provides a platform for research into the causes and effects of continental breakup and the evolution of passive margins. SAMPLE encompasses 28 projects from 13 German institutions and many international partnerships. The 6-year program will run through 2015. At the core of the program are observational studies that are interlinked by modelling projects examining the interplay of deep mantle dynamics, lithospheric stress fields, pre-rift fabric and melt-weaking on localizing rifting. Geophysics teams collect and integrate existing data from wide-angle seismic profiles, reprocessed multichannel seismics, as well as gravity, magnetics and heat-flow studies to construct self-consistent lithospheric-scale 3-D models along the conjugate margins. Key interests are variations in margin architecture, distribution of magmatic features and the evolution of sedimentary basins (subsidence and thermal histories). An exciting new contribution of SAMPLE geophysics is a linked set of seismic, seismologic and magnetotelluric experiments along the Walvis Ridge, including onshore NW Namibia and the Tristan da Cunha hotspot. In the deep mantle, we examine evidence from global seismic tomography for dramatic low seismic-velocity regions near the core-mantle boundary beneath southern Africa and their implications for dynamics in the deep Earth and the thermo-chemical nature of plumes. Petrologic studies focus on near-primary mantle melts represented by Mg-rich mafic dikes. Projects address the origin of magmas and crust-mantle interaction, and the environmental impact of mega-scale volcanism during breakup. Thermobarometry results from the African margin reveal a N-to-S decrease in mantle potential temperatures from 1520°C (N) to 1380° (S), which supports a thermal plume origin for excessive melt production in the north. Thermochronology data from both conjugate margins reveal complex and puzzling patterns in the denudation history

  2. Somalia Operations: Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    Ft. McNafr, Wauhingbon, DC ~ 44~Y _ _ A National Defense Unio-=ty Prea Publicatoks "To increase general knowledge and Inform discussion, the Ins Utute ...for National Strategic Studies . through its publication arrn the NDU Press. publishes McNalr Papers: proceedings of Unlvevsity- and Institute...in the spring of 1994. In the months that followed, we have studied what the Somalia cxpcrlericc can teach us about peace m !sslons and learned how we

  3. Lessons Learned From a Healthful Vending Pilot Program in Delaware State Agency Buildings, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Laura; Trotter, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Changes in food availability in worksites can result in changes in eating behavior and weight status. Nemours Health and Prevention Services, in conjunction with partners in Delaware, conducted a 6-month pilot program to assess the feasibility and impact of requiring that 75% of the items in vending machines in 3 state agency buildings have healthful items. Methods We collected process evaluation data from October 2011 through April 2012 by taking weekly photographs of all machines to record the number of healthful items available. Outcomes were measured through sales reports designed to enumerate changes in number and type of items sold and overall profit from each building. Results We found challenges in fully implementing the 75% goal. In one of the 3 buildings, all machines were compliant within 7 weeks; in another, full compliance did not occur until week 19. Despite these challenges, the number of items sold in each machine was comparable to numbers from the previous year. Total profits from each building varied across the 3 sites and during the pilot. One building had a 51% increase in profits in January 2012 compared with profits averaged for January 2011 and January 2010. In contrast, monthly profit at another building fluctuated from an increase of 6% to a loss of 30%. Conclusion Overall, our results suggest that collaborative efforts can result in a feasible intervention with little negative influence on profits. PMID:25144678

  4. Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labeling Programs in China: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, Andre

    2010-08-01

    After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer's production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

  5. Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labelling Programs in China: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, André

    2010-06-11

    After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer?s production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

  6. Building blocks for peer success: lessons learned from a train-the-trainer program.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Carol R; Downes, Alicia; Eddens, Shalini; Ruiz, John

    2012-01-01

    The National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) calls for a reduction in health disparities, a reduction in new HIV infections, and improved retention in HIV care and treatment. It acknowledges that HIV-positive peers can play an important role in supporting these aims. However, peer training must be comprehensive enough to equip peers with the knowledge and skills needed for this work. This article describes the development of a national train the trainer (TTT) model for HIV peer educators, and the results of its implementation and replication. A mixed methods evaluation identified who was trained locally as a result of TTT implementation, what aspects of the TTT were most useful to trainers in implementing local training sessions, and areas for improvement. Over the course of 1 year, 91 individuals were trained at 1 of 6 TTT sessions. These individuals then conducted 26 local training sessions for 272 peers. Factors that facilitated local replication training included the teach-back/feedback model, faculty modeling of facilitation styles, financial support for training logistics, and faculty support in designing and implementing the training. The model could be improved by providing instruction on how to incorporate peers as part of the training team. TTT programs that are easily replicable in the community will be an important asset in developing a peer workforce that can help implement the National AIDS Strategy.

  7. Severe asthma: lessons learned from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Severe Asthma Research Program.

    PubMed

    Jarjour, Nizar N; Erzurum, Serpil C; Bleecker, Eugene R; Calhoun, William J; Castro, Mario; Comhair, Suzy A A; Chung, Kian Fan; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Dweik, Raed A; Fain, Sean B; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Gaston, Benjamin M; Israel, Elliot; Hastie, Annette; Hoffman, Eric A; Holguin, Fernando; Levy, Bruce D; Meyers, Deborah A; Moore, Wendy C; Peters, Stephen P; Sorkness, Ronald L; Teague, W Gerald; Wenzel, Sally E; Busse, William W

    2012-02-15

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) has characterized over the past 10 years 1,644 patients with asthma, including 583 individuals with severe asthma. SARP collaboration has led to a rapid recruitment of subjects and efficient sharing of samples among participating sites to conduct independent mechanistic investigations of severe asthma. Enrolled SARP subjects underwent detailed clinical, physiologic, genomic, and radiological evaluations. In addition, SARP investigators developed safe procedures for bronchoscopy in participants with asthma, including those with severe disease. SARP studies revealed that severe asthma is a heterogeneous disease with varying molecular, biochemical, and cellular inflammatory features and unique structure-function abnormalities. Priorities for future studies include recruitment of a larger number of subjects with severe asthma, including children, to allow further characterization of anatomic, physiologic, biochemical, and genetic factors related to severe disease in a longitudinal assessment to identify factors that modulate the natural history of severe asthma and provide mechanistic rationale for management strategies.

  8. Desert Storm and the Lessons of Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    lessons one learns are influenced-for better or worse- by interests, ideology, and perception. What’s good for the goose may seem foul to the gander...Foreign Policy (New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 1973), especially pp. ix-xiv. For a practical guide for using history in decisionmaking, see Richard E ...Lessons Learned: A Historical Perspective," in Robert E . Harkavy and Stephanie G. Neuman, eds., The Lessons ofRecent Wars in the Third World

  9. Institutionalizing Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBrayer, Robert O.; Thomas, Dale

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Integrated Action Team (NIAT) was formed by the NASA Administrator in March 2000. The purpose of this team was to identify the actions that NASA must take to address systemic findings reported in 4 different anomaly investigations. Team membership represented senior managers from all the field centers and NASA Headquarters. NIAT report addressed 165 findings and developed 17 action plans that are described in five themes: people and teams, technology, risk, formulation rigor, and communications. The NIAT actions present a systems solution for strengthening formulation and implementation of programs and improving the environment for their support. NIAT results included: enhancing success by avoiding failures that could have been prevented through good planning and sound practice; ensuring that prudent risks do not compromise safety; and ensuring that mission risks are objectively assessed, appropriately mitigated and consciously accepted by the program team and customers. Definitions of Faster, Better, Cheaper and Success Criteria were also developed and included as part of the NIAT report. As a result of the NIAT report, program and project management process changes were incorporated into NASA's quality system documentation, including NPG 7120.513, "NASA Program and Project Management Processes and Requirements. This paper describes the NIAT results and the resulting updates to NPG 7120.5 that keep this program and project management description a living process.

  10. Institutionalizing Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBrayer, Robert O.; Thomas, Dale

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Integrated Action Team (NIAT) was formed by the NASA Administrator in March 2000. The purpose of this team was to identify the actions that NASA must take to address systemic findings reported in 4 different anomaly investigations. Team membership represented senior managers from all the field centers and NASA Headquarters. NIAT report addressed 165 findings and developed 17 action plans that are described in five themes: people and teams, technology, risk, formulation rigor, and communications. The NIAT actions present a systems solution for strengthening formulation and implementation of programs and improving the environment for their support. NIAT results included: enhancing success by avoiding failures that could have been prevented through good planning and sound practice; ensuring that prudent risks do not compromise safety; and ensuring that mission risks are objectively assessed, appropriately mitigated and consciously accepted by the program team and customers. Definitions of Faster, Better, Cheaper and Success Criteria were also developed and included as part of the NIAT report. As a result of the NIAT report, program and project management process changes were incorporated into NASA's quality system documentation, including NPG 7120.513, "NASA Program and Project Management Processes and Requirements. This paper describes the NIAT results and the resulting updates to NPG 7120.5 that keep this program and project management description a living process.

  11. The X-43A Flight Research Program: Lessons Learned on the Road to Mach 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peebles, Curtis

    2007-01-01

    During an aerospace engineer's undergraduate studies, he or she will attend classes in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, structures, stability and control, dynamics, design, propulsion, and computer science, along with the related courses in mathematics, physics, statistics, and chemistry required to understand the material. Upon graduation, the new engineer will have acquired a basic knowledge of how to build an aerospace vehicle. What only comes through experience, however, is the understanding of the inevitable imperfect process through which an aerospace vehicle is built. This is the adventure of turning a basic concept into functional hardware. Engineers working on a project must often deal with ambiguous situations. They are routinely asked by management to provide risk assessments of a project, yet even after careful analysis uncertainties remain. The project must be accomplished within finite limits of time and money. The question an engineer answers is whether the solution to potential problem is worth the cost and schedule delay, or if the solution might actually be worse than the problem it is meant to solve. Review protocols are established to ensure that an unknown has not been overlooked. But these cannot protect against an unknown unknown. Examples of these situations can be found in the history of the X-43A Hyper-X (Hypersonic Experiment) program. In this NASA project, a supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) engine was flight tested on a subscale vehicle. The X-43A Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) was launched from a B-52B mothership, then boosted to the test speed by a modified Pegasus rocket first stage, called the Hyper-X Launch Vehicle (HXLV). Once at the proper speed and altitude, the X-43A separated from the booster, stabilized itself, and then the engine test began. Although wind-tunnel scramjet engine tests had begun in the late 1950s, before the Hyper-X program there had never been an actual in-flight test of such an engine integrated with an

  12. The implementation of national action program diabetes in the Netherlands: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Lieke G M; Kremers, Stef P J; Schaper, Nicolaas C; de Weerdt, Inge; Martens, Marloes K; Hesselink, Arlette E; de Vries, Nanne K

    2015-06-03

    Over the past decade, the National Action program Diabetes (NAD) was implemented in the Netherlands. Its aim was to introduce the Care Standard (CS) for diabetes by means of a specific implementation plan and piloting in several regions. This study aimed to provide insight into the implementation of the NAD as, coupled with the introduction of the CS, it may function as an example for similar approaches in other countries. A series of quantitative studies (participants 2010: N = 1726, participants 2013: N = 1370 & participants pilot regions 2013: N = 168) and qualitative studies (participants 2010: N = 18 and participants 2013: N = 4) was conducted among health care professionals (HCPs). In addition, two quantitative studies were conducted among type 1 and 2 patients (participants 2010: N = 573; participants 2013: N = 5056). Overall, positive changes in diabetes care were detected in the period 2010 - 2013. In 2013 significantly more HCPs were familiar with the CS (43.7 versus 37.6 %) and more HCPs perceived themselves to be working largely or completely in accordance with the CS (89.2 versus 79.0 %) than in 2010. A comparison of the results in specific pilot regions with the rest of the country revealed that HCPs in these regions scored significantly more positively on implementation and appreciation of the CS. This positive trend was reflected by the high levels of reported patient satisfaction and involvement in treatment. HCPs who were in possession of the CS had significantly better scores on the implementation of several elements of the CS than HCPs who were not in possession of the CS. The CS has become more prominent and embedded in daily health care practice. In retrospect the CS has provided momentum for the realization of various processes relating to the wider implementation of standards to improve the care for people with other chronic diseases in the Netherlands. Experiences with the NAD and CS underline the need to move towards an integrated

  13. Lessons learned from preparticipation cardiovascular screening in a state funded program.

    PubMed

    Zeltser, Ilana; Cannon, Bryan; Silvana, Lawrence; Fenrich, Arnold; George, Jayni; Schleifer, Jessica; Garcia, Michelle; Barnes, Aliessa; Rivenes, Shannon; Patt, Hanoch; Rodgers, George; Scott, William

    2012-09-15

    In 2007, the Texas legislature appropriated money for a pilot study to evaluate cardiovascular screening of student athletes to identify those who might be at risk of sudden death using a questionnaire, physical examination, electrocardiography, and limited echocardiography. We sought to determine (1) the feasibility of a state-wide cardiovascular screening program, (2) the ability to reliably identify at-risk subjects, and (3) problems in implementing screening state wide. The data were analyzed using established pediatric electrocardiographic and echocardiographic criteria. Positive results were confirmed by a blinded reviewer. In 31 venues (2,506 students), the electrocardiographic findings met the criteria for cardiovascular disease in 57 (2.3%), with 33 changes suggestive of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 14 with long QT syndrome, 7 with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and 3 with potential ischemic findings related to a coronary anomaly. Of the 2,051 echocardiograms, 11 had findings concerning for disease (9 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 1 with dilated cardiomyopathy). In patients with electrocardiographic findings consistent with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the limited echocardiograms were normal in 24 of 33. Of the 33 who remained at risk of sudden death on the electrocardiogram or echocardiogram, 25 (65.8%) pursued the recommended evaluation, which confirmed long QT syndrome in 4, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in 7, and dilated cardiomyopathy in 1. The interobserver agreement was 100% for electrocardiography and 79% for echocardiography. The questionnaire identified 895 (35% of the total) potentially at-risk students, with disease confirmed in 11 (1.23%). In conclusion, in this large state-funded project, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic screening identified 11 of 2,506 patients potentially at risk of cardiovascular disease. The questionnaire was of limited value and had a large number of false-positive results. Interobserver variation was

  14. Reducing health care-associated infections (HAIs): lessons learned from a national collaborative of regional HAI programs.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Catherine Amber; Flanagan, Mindy E; Hoke, Shawn C; Doebbeling, Bradley N; Herwaldt, Loreen

    2012-02-01

    Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a leading cause of death in United States health care settings, with an overall estimated annual incidence of 1.7 million. As antimicrobial resistance has increased, so too have efforts to reduce HAI rates. The objective of this study was to identify commonly cited lessons learned across a wide variety of HAI projects and hospital settings. Thirty-three hospitals participated in 5 different regional collaboratives supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Data on hospitals' successes, challenges, and lessons learned were collected via key informant interviews and structured, standardized case report forms. Seven commonly cited themes were identified: foster change by first understanding resistance; commit to regular strategic communication and join a collaborative; start small and tailor implementation to local needs and cultures; engage frontline staff by involving them in the project and enlisting champions; educate and reeducate; convince administration to provide leadership, funds, and dedicated staff and assign accountability; and provide timely, relevant feedback and celebrate successes. Despite the diversity of hospital settings, cultures, personnel, and HAI reduction projects, we found that hospitals encounter similar challenges and facilitators across projects. We offer a model of 7 process elements shown to be important to successful implementation. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) - Evolution and Lessons Learned During the Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, Howard S.; Freeland, Donna M.; Olson, Derek T.; Wood, T. David; Vaccaro, Mark V.

    2011-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) element integrates all the subsystems needed for ascent flight, entry, and recovery of the combined Booster and Motor system. These include the structures, avionics, thrust vector control, pyrotechnic, range safety, deceleration, thermal protection, and retrieval systems. This represents the only human-rated, recoverable and refurbishable solid rocket ever developed and flown. Challenges included subsystem integration, thermal environments and severe loads (including water impact), sometimes resulting in hardware attrition. Several of the subsystems evolved during the program through design changes. These included the thermal protection system, range safety system, parachute/recovery system, and others. Obsolescence issues occasionally required component recertification. Because the system was recovered, the SRB was ideal for data and imagery acquisition, which proved essential for understanding loads and system response. The three main parachutes that lower the SRBs to the ocean are the largest parachutes ever designed, and the SRBs are the largest structures ever to be lowered by parachutes. SRB recovery from the ocean was a unique process and represented a significant operational challenge; requiring personnel, facilities, transportation, and ground support equipment. The SRB element achieved reliability via extensive system testing and checkout, redundancy management, and a thorough postflight assessment process. Assembly and integration of the booster subsystems was a unique process and acceptance testing of reused hardware components was required for each build. Extensive testing was done to assure hardware functionality at each level of stage integration. Because the booster element is recoverable, subsystems were available for inspection and testing postflight, unique to the Shuttle launch vehicle. Problems were noted and corrective actions were implemented as needed. The postflight assessment process was quite detailed and a

  16. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned and technical standards. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. Systems Engineering has been defined (EINIS-632) as "an interdisciplinary approach encompassing the entire technical effort to evolve and verify an integrated and life-cycle balanced set of system people, product, and process solutions that satisfy customer needs". Designing reliable space-based systems has always been a goal for NASA, and many painful lessons have been learned along the way. One of the continuing functions of a system engineer is to compile development and operations "lessons learned" documents and ensure their integration into future systems development activities. They can produce insights and information for risk identification identification and characterization. on a new project. Lessons learned files from previous projects are especially valuable in risk

  17. We Have Not Yet Learned Our Lesson

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-15

    Potential to Use Lessons Learned to Avoid Past Mistakes is Largely Untapped, 18. 20 Mark A. Silvia , Collection and Analysis Section Head...email message to the author, 10 April 10 2014. 25 Silvia , email message. 26 GAO Report, Potential to Use Lessons Learned to Avoid Past Mistakes

  18. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned and technical standards. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. Systems Engineering has been defined (EINIS-632) as "an interdisciplinary approach encompassing the entire technical effort to evolve and verify an integrated and life-cycle balanced set of system people, product, and process solutions that satisfy customer needs". Designing reliable space-based systems has always been a goal for NASA, and many painful lessons have been learned along the way. One of the continuing functions of a system engineer is to compile development and operations "lessons learned" documents and ensure their integration into future systems development activities. They can produce insights and information for risk identification identification and characterization. on a new project. Lessons learned files from previous projects are especially valuable in risk

  19. Orbiter Water Dump Nozzles Redesign Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotter, Hank

    2017-01-01

    Hank Rotter, NASA Technical Fellow for Environmental Control and Life Support System, will provide the causes and lessons learned for the two Space Shuttle Orbiter water dump icicles that formed on the side of the Orbiter. He will present the root causes and the criticality of these icicles, along with the redesign of the water dump nozzles and lessons learned during the redesign phase.

  20. Project Choice: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    Project Choice began with a simple goal: to increase the number of inner-city students who graduate from high school on time and become productive members of society. To that end, Ewing M. Kauffman, his Foundation, and associates designed and implemented a program that promised postsecondary education or training to some students in the Kansas…

  1. Applying Universal Design for Learning to Instructional Lesson Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhie-Richmond, Donna; Sung, Andrew N.

    2013-01-01

    Universal Design for Learning is a framework for developing inclusive instructional lesson plans. The effects of introducing Universal Design for Learning Principles and Guidelines in a university teacher education program with pre-service and practicing teachers were explored in a mixed methods approach. The results indicate that the study…

  2. Implementation of Prevention Programs: Lessons for Future Research and Practice--A Commentary on Social and Emotional Learning-- Promoting the Development of All Students, a Chapter by Joseph E. Zins and Maurice J. Elias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanyu, Manolya

    2007-01-01

    Zins and his colleagues pointed out that understanding implementation of school-based prevention programs is a critical issue as we get more sophisticated about strategies to promote children's social and emotional skill development. This commentary discusses school-based program implementation, challenges, lessons learned, and future directions…

  3. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana, at left, moderates a panel discussion during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned event in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the presentation was "To There and Back Again." Answering questions are Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  4. ESO's User Portal: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, A. M.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Peron, M.; Sogni, F.; Dorigo, D.; Nass, P.; Fourniol, N.; Sforna, D.; Haggouchi, K.; Dolensky, M.

    2008-07-01

    ESO introduced a User Portal for its scientific services in November 2007. Registered users have a central entry point for the Observatory's offerings, the extent of which depends on the users' roles - see [1]. The project faced and overcame a number of challenging hurdles between inception and deployment, and ESO learned a number of useful lessons along the way. The most significant challenges were not only technical in nature; organization and coordination issues took a significant toll as well. We also indicate the project's roadmap for the future.

  5. Lessons learned from Hurricane Ike.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Laurie; Anderle, Diane; Nastally, Kathleen; Sarver, Troy; Hafner-Burton, Tana; Owens, Sheron

    2009-06-01

    After the poorly planned evacuation for Hurricane Rita in 2005, many health care systems in the Houston area updated the disaster plans they would implement in the event of a major disaster. In September 2008, Texas health care systems in the Houston-Galveston area had the opportunity to execute those plans when Hurricane Ike made landfall. Despite hours of hurricane preparation at the Texas Orthopedic Hospital in Houston, TX, before the storm, we found that there were still lessons to be learned from Hurricane Ike that can be used by other health care systems to prepare for disaster.

  6. Lessons learned{emdash}DC-X

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    The DC-X was conceived and developed specifically to lay the ground work, for developing a data base of {open_quote}{open_quote}lessons learned{close_quote}{close_quote}, for significantly lowering the cost of space operations. Program content and execution as well as technical solutions were addressed. Additionally, methods and solutions used in the past (50s and 60s) were exercised to expose to a new generation the possibilities of what we now call rapid prototyping. (The first Thor was launched less than a year from contract start. The operational countdown achieved 3 years later was less than 15 minutes.) {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. International Space Station Materials: Selected Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program is of such complexity and scale that there have been numerous issues addressed regarding safety of materials: from design to manufacturing, test, launch, assembly on-orbit, and operations. A selection of lessons learned from the ISS materials perspective will be provided. Topics of discussion are: flammability evaluation of materials with connection to on-orbit operations; toxicity findings for foams; compatibility testing for materials in fluid systems; and contamination control in precision clean systems and critical space vehicle surfaces.

  8. X-29 flight control system: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Robert; Burken, John J.; Bosworth, John T.; Bauer, Jeffery E.

    1994-01-01

    Two X-29A aircraft were flown at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center over a period of eight years. The airplanes' unique features are the forward-swept wing, variable incidence close-coupled canard and highly relaxed longitudinal static stability (up to 35-percent negative static margin at subsonic conditions). This paper describes the primary flight control system and significant modifications made to this system, flight test techniques used during envelope expansion, and results for the low- and high-angle-of-attack programs. Through out the paper, lessons learned will be discussed to illustrate the problems associated with the implementation of complex flight control systems.

  9. Lessons learned from case studies of inhalation exposures of workers to radioactive aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, M.D.; Fencl, A.F.; Newton, G.J.

    1995-12-01

    Various Department of Energy requirements, rules, and orders mandate that lessons learned be identified, evaluated, shared, and incorporated into current practices. The recently issued, nonmandatory DOE standard for Development of DOE Lessons Learned Program states that a DOE-wide lessons learned program will {open_quotes}help to prevent recurrences of negative experiences, highlight best practices, and spotlight innovative ways to solve problems or perform work more safely, efficiently, and cost effectively.{close_quotes} Additional information about the lessons learned program is contained in the recently issued DOE handbook on Implementing U.S. Department of Energy Lessons Learned Programs and in October 1995 DOE SAfety Notice on Lessons Learned Programs. This report summarizes work in progress at ITRI to identify lessons learned for worker exposures to radioactive aerosols, and describes how this work will be incorporated into the DOE lessons learned program, including a new technical guide for measuring, modeling, and mitigating airborne radioactive particles. Follow-on work is focusing on preparation of {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} training materials for facility designers, managers, health protection professionals, line supervisors, and workers.

  10. Improving Healthy Living Youth Development Program Outreach in Extension: Lessons Learned from the 4-H Health Rocks! Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumaran, Muthusami; Fogarty, Kate; Fung, Whitney M.; Terminello, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a qualitative evaluation of the Florida 4-H Health Rocks! program aimed at youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use prevention. A questionnaire was distributed to Extension professionals across Florida to gain insight into the strengths and barriers they faced with programming. Programmatic strengths included targeting a…

  11. Improving Healthy Living Youth Development Program Outreach in Extension: Lessons Learned from the 4-H Health Rocks! Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumaran, Muthusami; Fogarty, Kate; Fung, Whitney M.; Terminello, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a qualitative evaluation of the Florida 4-H Health Rocks! program aimed at youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use prevention. A questionnaire was distributed to Extension professionals across Florida to gain insight into the strengths and barriers they faced with programming. Programmatic strengths included targeting a…

  12. Comparison of Program Activities and Lessons Learned among 19 School Resource Officer (SRO) Programs. Document Number 209272

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; Shively, Michael; McDevitt, Jack; Lassiter, William; Rich, Tom

    2005-01-01

    There has been growing interest in placing sworn law enforcement officers in schools as School Resource Officers (SROs) to improve school safety and improve relations between police officers and youth. The purpose of this National Assessment was to identify what program "models" have been implemented, how programs have been implemented, and what…

  13. Planetary protection: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perek, L.

    Planetary protection is a very wide subject because of the variety of physical conditions on individual planets and their moons. At present, we have good photographs or imagery, as well as other evidence, from most planets and from a selection of their moons. The most important factor is the presence or absence of any form of life. Material samples are available from the Moon and possibly, in the form of a few meteorites, from Mars. The danger of contamination has been recognized in the past and it became clear that some measures would have to be taken. The adoption of measures will have to be universal in mssions to planets and their moons because for an undesirablei contamination to occur, one failed measure of protection may be enough. The question is, if we can learn from experience gained in the last forty years in adopting laws, rules or unbinding recommendations for space activities. Several examples will be discussed, such as the amount of knowledge at a time when international treaties on space law were adopted, the consequences of the failed discussion at the United Nations on the definition of outer space, or of the break-up of Cosmos 954. Special attention will be devoted to the ongoing discussion of space debris in the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its relevance for planetary protection, to the general compliance with the Registration Convention and to the experience gained with the recommendation to re-orbit geostationary satellites.

  14. Planetary protection: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perek, L.

    2004-01-01

    Planetary protection is a very wide subject because of the variety of physical conditions on individual planets and their moons. At present, we have good photographs or imagery, as well as other evidence, from most planets and from a selection of their moons. The most important factor is the presence or absence of any form of life. Material samples are available from the Moon and possibly, in the form of a few meteorites, from Mars. The danger of contamination has been recognized in the past and it became clear that some measures would have to be taken. The adoption of measures will have to be universal in missions to planets and their moons because for an undesirable contamination to occur, one failed measure of protection may be enough. The question is, if we can learn from experience gained in the last forty years in adopting laws, rules or unbinding recommendations for space activities. Several examples will be discussed, such as the amount of knowledge at a time when international treaties on space law were adopted, the consequences of the failed discussion at the United Nations on the definition of outer space, or of the break-up of Cosmos 954. Special attention will be devoted to the ongoing discussion of space debris in the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its relevance for planetary protection, to the general compliance with the Registration Convention and to the experience gained with the recommendation to re-orbit geostationary satellites.

  15. Successful Community Nutrition Programming: Lessons from Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannotti, Lora; Gillespie, Stuart

    This report on the key findings from a series of assessments of successful community nutrition programming conducted in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda between 1999 and 2000. The aim of the assessments was to identify key lessons learned from the successful processes and outcomes in these programs. The report is divided into eight chapters: (1)…

  16. Sinclair Community College Fast Forward Center-Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, David L., II

    2011-01-01

    Many journal articles provide success stories of initiatives or programs. However, few outline the lessons learned in the building of those programs that may be beneficial to any reader who is interested in duplicating a similar initiative. Thus, the purpose of this article is threefold. The first section will provide the reader with history of…

  17. Sinclair Community College Fast Forward Center-Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, David L., II

    2011-01-01

    Many journal articles provide success stories of initiatives or programs. However, few outline the lessons learned in the building of those programs that may be beneficial to any reader who is interested in duplicating a similar initiative. Thus, the purpose of this article is threefold. The first section will provide the reader with history of…

  18. Low-Temperature Projects of the Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program: Evaluation and Lessons Learned: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Tom; Snyder, Neil; Gosnold, Will

    2016-12-01

    This paper discusses opportunities and challenges related to the technical and economic feasibility of developing power generation from geothermal resources at temperatures of 150 degrees C and lower. Insights from projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Geothermal Technologies Office inform these discussions and provide the basis for some lessons learned to help guide decisions by DOE and the industry in further developing this resource. The technical basis for low-temperature geothermal energy is well established and the systems can be economic today in certain situations. However, these applications are far from a 'plug and play' product; successful development today requires a good knowledge of geothermal system design and operation.

  19. Lessons for Community College Leaders in the Development of a Cooperative Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Teng's (2007) article entitled "Lessons Learned from Initiating a Community College Learning Community Program" provided a foundation for community college leaders who are interested in working with faculty in creating a learning community on campus. Teng (2007) listed the five lessons that may be useful guidelines to other colleges who…

  20. Lessons for Community College Leaders in the Development of a Cooperative Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Teng's (2007) article entitled "Lessons Learned from Initiating a Community College Learning Community Program" provided a foundation for community college leaders who are interested in working with faculty in creating a learning community on campus. Teng (2007) listed the five lessons that may be useful guidelines to other colleges who…

  1. Dynamics of Knowledge Transfer in Organizations: Implications for Design of Lessons Learned Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-12

    consultants had found to a variety of problems, a kind of "best practices" and " lessons learned " program . In the first test of Notes, information technology... lessons learned program to distinguish between the need for tacit, complex knowledge and explicit, codified knowledge. Transferring complex knowledge

  2. Introduction to Evidence Centered Design and Lessons Learned from Its Application in a Global E-Learning Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, John T.; Mislevy, Robert J.; Bauer, Malcolm; Williamson, David M.; Levy, Roy

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces the assessment and deployment contexts of the Networking Performance Skill System (NetPASS) project and the articles in this section that report on findings from this endeavor. First, the educational context of the Cisco Networking Academy Program is described. Second, the basic outline of Evidence Centered Design is…

  3. Introduction to Evidence Centered Design and Lessons Learned from Its Application in a Global E-Learning Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, John T.; Mislevy, Robert J.; Bauer, Malcolm; Williamson, David M.; Levy, Roy

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces the assessment and deployment contexts of the Networking Performance Skill System (NetPASS) project and the articles in this section that report on findings from this endeavor. First, the educational context of the Cisco Networking Academy Program is described. Second, the basic outline of Evidence Centered Design is…

  4. An Investigation of Certain U.S. Government ’Lessons Learned’ Processes and Their Application to USAF Research, Development, and Acquisition Project Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Primary Responsibility (OPR) for the Air Force Lessons Learned Program (which was formerly controlled by the Directorate for Lessons Learned and...only, the Air Force Lessons Learned Program (AFLLP) shall be considered LSE’s main responsibility. The mission of the AFLLP, as stated in a 1991 AFLLP...Learned (45); lower level management is encouraged to "support the Air Force Lessons Learned Program " (40). In support of this PMLLP, AFSC/XRMA has been

  5. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model.

    PubMed

    Moore, Julia E; Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E

    2016-05-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility. Copyright © 2016 Longwoods Publishing.

  6. Establishing and sustaining a prospective screening program for breast cancer-related lymphedema at the massachusetts general hospital: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Brunelle, Cheryl; Skolny, Melissa; Ferguson, Chantal; Swaroop, Meyha; O'Toole, Jean; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2015-05-20

    There has been an increasing call to prospectively screen patients with breast cancer for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) following their breast cancer treatment. While the components of a prospective screening program have been published, some centers struggle with how to initiate, establish, and sustain a screening program of their own. The intent of this manuscript is to share our experience and struggles in establishing a prospective surveillance program within the infrastructure of our institution. It is our hope that by sharing our history other centers can learn from our mistakes and successes to better design their own prospective screening program to best serve their patient population.

  7. MTI system design & operations lessons learned.

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Max Louis; Kay, Randolph Rex; Brock, Brian C.

    2003-06-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI), launched on March 12, 2000, has now surpassed its one-year mission requirement and its three-year mission goal. Primary and secondary program objectives regarding the development and evaluation of space-based multispectral and thermal imaging technology for nonproliferation treaty monitoring and other national security and civilian application have been met. Valuable lessons have also been learned, both from things that worked especially well and from shortcomings and anomalies encountered. This paper addresses lessons associated with the satellite, ground station and system operations, while companion papers address lessons associated with radiometric calibration, band-to-band registration and scientific processes and results. Things addressed in this paper that went especially well include overall satellite design, ground station design, system operations, and integration and test. Anomalies and other problems addressed herein include gyro and mass storage unit failures, battery under-voltage trips, a blown fuse, unexpected effects induced by communication link noise, ground station problems, and anomalies resulting from human error. In spite of MTI's single-string design, the operations team has been successful in working around these problems, and the satellite continues to collect valuable mission data.

  8. MTI system design and operations lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Max L.; Kay, R. R.; Brock, Brian C.

    2004-01-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI), launched on March 12, 2000, has now surpassed its one-year mission requirement and its three-year mission goal. Primary and secondary program objectives regarding the development and evaluation of space-based multispectral and thermal imaging technology for nonproliferation treaty monitoring and other national security and civilian application have been met. Valuable lessons have also been learned, both from things that worked especially well and from shortcomings and anomalies encountered. This paper addresses lessons associated with the satellite, ground station and system operations, while companion papers address lessons associated with radiometric calibration, band-to-band registration and scientific processes and results. Things addressed in this paper that went especially well include overall satellite design, ground station design, system operations, and integration and test. Anomalies and other problems addressed herein include gyro and mass storage unit failures, battery under-voltage trips, a blown fuse, unexpected effects induced by communication link noise, ground station problems, and anomalies resulting from human error. In spite of MTI"s single-string design, the operations team has been successful in working around these problems, and the satellite continues to collect valuable mission data.

  9. MTI system design and operations lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Max L.; Kay, R. R.; Brock, Brian C.

    2003-12-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI), launched on March 12, 2000, has now surpassed its one-year mission requirement and its three-year mission goal. Primary and secondary program objectives regarding the development and evaluation of space-based multispectral and thermal imaging technology for nonproliferation treaty monitoring and other national security and civilian application have been met. Valuable lessons have also been learned, both from things that worked especially well and from shortcomings and anomalies encountered. This paper addresses lessons associated with the satellite, ground station and system operations, while companion papers address lessons associated with radiometric calibration, band-to-band registration and scientific processes and results. Things addressed in this paper that went especially well include overall satellite design, ground station design, system operations, and integration and test. Anomalies and other problems addressed herein include gyro and mass storage unit failures, battery under-voltage trips, a blown fuse, unexpected effects induced by communication link noise, ground station problems, and anomalies resulting from human error. In spite of MTI"s single-string design, the operations team has been successful in working around these problems, and the satellite continues to collect valuable mission data.

  10. Historical problem areas: Lessons learned for expendable and reusable vehicle propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fester, Dale A.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: expendable launch vehicle lessons learned, upper stage/transfer vehicle lessons learned, shuttle systems - reuse, and reusable system issues and lessons learned.

  11. Lessons learned for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Lessons learned for composite structures are presented in three technology areas: materials, manufacturing, and design. In addition, future challenges for composite structures are presented. Composite materials have long gestation periods from the developmental stage to fully matured production status. Many examples exist of unsuccessful attempts to accelerate this gestation period. Experience has shown that technology transition of a new material system to fully matured production status is time consuming, involves risk, is expensive and should not be undertaken lightly. The future challenges for composite materials require an intensification of the science based approach to material development, extension of the vendor/customer interaction process to include all engineering disciplines of the end user, reduced material costs because they are a significant factor in overall part cost, and improved batch-to-batch pre-preg physical property control. Historical manufacturing lessons learned are presented using current in-service production structure as examples. Most producibility problems for these structures can be traced to their sequential engineering design. This caused an excessive emphasis on design-to-weight and schedule at the expense of design-to-cost. This resulted in expensive performance originated designs, which required costly tooling and led to non-producible parts. Historically these problems have been allowed to persist throughout the production run. The current/future approach for the production of affordable composite structures mandates concurrent engineering design where equal emphasis is placed on product and process design. Design for simplified assembly is also emphasized, since assembly costs account for a major portion of total airframe costs. The future challenge for composite manufacturing is, therefore, to utilize concurrent engineering in conjunction with automated manufacturing techniques to build affordable composite structures

  12. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part I: Program Implementation and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, David C.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Roper, Jerry M.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding environmental manganese exposure since high exposures have been associated with neurological disorders. The USA Environmental Protection Agency most recent human health risk assessment of inhaled manganese conducted in 1993 identified specific areas of uncertainty regarding manganese pharmacokinetics. This led to the development of a test rule under the USA Clean Air Act that required the generation of pharmacokinetic information on the inorganic manganese combustion products of the organometallic fuel additive methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT). The Alternative Tier 2 testing program for MMT, described in this paper, has yielded substantial pharmacokinetic data and has enabled the generation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for manganese. These models are capable of predicting tissue manganese concentrations across a variety of dose routes, levels, and durations while accounting for factors such as age, gender, and reproductive status, enabling the consideration of tissue dosimetry in future risk assessments. PMID:22545047

  13. Lessons Learned from Mir - A Payload Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uri, John J.; Nygren, Richard W.; Cardenas, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01

    Among the principal objectives of the Phase 1 NASA/Mir program were for the United States to gain experience working with an international partner, to gain working experience in long-duration space flight, and to gain working experience in planning for and executing research on a long-duration space platform. The Phase 1 program was to provide to the US early experience prior to the construction and operation of the International Space Station (Phase 2 and 3). While it can be argued that Mir and ISS are different platforms and that programmatically Phase 1 and ISS are organized differently, it is also clear that many aspects of operating a long-duration research program are platform independent. This can be demonstrated by a review of lessons learned from Skylab, a US space station program of the mid-1970's, many of which were again "learned" on Mir and are being "learned" on ISS. Among these are optimum crew training strategies, on-orbit crew operations, ground support, medical operations and crew psychological support, and safety certification processes

  14. Standing Joint Force Headquarters. Joint Center for Lessons Learned Quarterly Bulletin. Volume 6, Issue 3, June 2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Conference, scheduled for 13- 14 July 2004. The focus of this conference is to brief and discuss the changes to the Joint Lessons Learned Program (JLLP...JCOA-LL that are already having an impact on the warfighter; and introduce the draft CJCS Instruction for the lessons learned program . Also, the...the majority of these through JFCOM’s legacy program based in CJCS Instruction 3150.25A “Joint Lessons Learned Program ” (Ref. 4). 39Joint Center for

  15. Team Collaboration: Lessons Learned Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arterberrie, Rhonda Y.; Eubanks, Steven W.; Kay, Dennis R.; Prahst, Stephen E.; Wenner, David P.

    2005-01-01

    An Agency team collaboration pilot was conducted from July 2002 until June 2003 and then extended for an additional year. The objective of the pilot was to assess the value of collaboration tools and adoption processes as applied to NASA teams. In an effort to share knowledge and experiences, the lessons that have been learned thus far are documented in this report. Overall, the pilot has been successful. An entire system has been piloted - tools, adoption, and support. The pilot consisted of two collaboration tools, a team space and a virtual team meeting capability. Of the two tools that were evaluated, the team meeting tool has been more widely accepted. Though the team space tool has been met with a lesser degree of acceptance, the need for such a tool in the NASA environment has been evidenced. Both adoption techniques and support were carefully developed and implemented in a way that has been well received by the pilot participant community.

  16. A Quasi-Randomized Trial of a School-Wide Universal Prevention Program: Results and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodin, Maria C.; South, Sandra H.; Ingemarson, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Prevention in School (PS) is a comprehensive program which aims to improve the learning climate and reduce problem behavior in elementary schools. Core components are teaching of school rules, praise and rewards to support prosocial behavior, and a forum involving parents. This trial investigated the effects of PS on its intended outcomes, and…

  17. A Quasi-Randomized Trial of a School-Wide Universal Prevention Program: Results and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodin, Maria C.; South, Sandra H.; Ingemarson, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Prevention in School (PS) is a comprehensive program which aims to improve the learning climate and reduce problem behavior in elementary schools. Core components are teaching of school rules, praise and rewards to support prosocial behavior, and a forum involving parents. This trial investigated the effects of PS on its intended outcomes, and…

  18. From Vision to Reality--Developing World Language Programs in Elementary Grades: Lessons Learned. Report To TEACH Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conzemius, Anne; Sandrock, Paul

    The TEACH Grant--Foreign Language in Elementary Schools (FLES) project assisted six Wisconsin elementary schools in developing and delivering unique model programs demonstrating the innovative use of a variety of technologies to support foreign language teaching and learning. The project involved a collaboration between the Wisconsin TEACH Board…

  19. Emotional Well-Being and Mental Health Services: Lessons Learned by Early Head Start Region VIII Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Sandy; Bair, Katherine; Sullivan, Anita

    2004-01-01

    This article examines two programs chosen by the Early Head Start National Resource Center (EHSNRC) Pathways to Prevention (PTP) initiative to participate in a study of their mental health services. Both Wyoming's The Learning Center and Colorado's Developmental Opportunities found that working with the PTP mental health consultant catalyzed…

  20. Rethinking Curriculum and Instruction: Lessons from an Integrated Learning Program and Its Impact on Students and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Dennis; Huie Hofstetter, Carolyn; Kendig, Julie; Strick, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    CoTA (Collaborations: Teachers and Artists) is a professional development program that empowers teachers to access the arts in everyday instruction to support student achievement. CoTA schools commit to intense, 3-year collaborations for ten weeks each year where teachers learn to capitalize on arts content and strategies to promote knowledge and…

  1. Emotional Well-Being and Mental Health Services: Lessons Learned by Early Head Start Region VIII Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Sandy; Bair, Katherine; Sullivan, Anita

    2004-01-01

    This article examines two programs chosen by the Early Head Start National Resource Center (EHSNRC) Pathways to Prevention (PTP) initiative to participate in a study of their mental health services. Both Wyoming's The Learning Center and Colorado's Developmental Opportunities found that working with the PTP mental health consultant catalyzed…

  2. Flight Planning Branch Space Shuttle Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Jennifer B.; Scott, Tracy A.; Hyde, Crystal M.

    2011-01-01

    Planning products and procedures that allow the mission flight control teams and the astronaut crews to plan, train and fly every Space Shuttle mission have been developed by the Flight Planning Branch at the NASA Johnson Space Center. As the Space Shuttle Program ends, lessons learned have been collected from each phase of the successful execution of these Shuttle missions. Specific examples of how roles and responsibilities of console positions that develop the crew and vehicle attitude timelines will be discussed, as well as techniques and methods used to solve complex spacecraft and instrument orientation problems. Additionally, the relationships and procedural hurdles experienced through international collaboration have molded operations. These facets will be explored and related to current and future operations with the International Space Station and future vehicles. Along with these important aspects, the evolution of technology and continual improvement of data transfer tools between the shuttle and ground team has also defined specific lessons used in the improving the control teams effectiveness. Methodologies to communicate and transmit messages, images, and files from Mission Control to the Orbiter evolved over several years. These lessons have been vital in shaping the effectiveness of safe and successful mission planning that have been applied to current mission planning work in addition to being incorporated into future space flight planning. The critical lessons from all aspects of previous plan, train, and fly phases of shuttle flight missions are not only documented in this paper, but are also discussed as how they pertain to changes in process and consideration for future space flight planning.

  3. Sharing lessons learned to prevent incorrect surgery.

    PubMed

    Neily, Julia; Mills, Peter D; Paull, Douglas E; Mazzia, Lisa M; Turner, James R; Hemphill, Robin R; Gunnar, William

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to discuss surgical adverse event lessons learned and to recommend action. Examples of incorrect surgical adverse events managed in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patient safety system and results of a survey regarding the impact of the surgery lessons learned process are provided. The VHA implemented a process for sharing deidentified stories of surgical lessons learned. The cases are in-operating room selected examples from lessons learned from October 1, 2009, to June 30, 2011. Examples selected illustrate helpful human factors principles. To learn more about the awareness and impact of the lessons learned, we conducted a survey with Chiefs of Surgery in the VHA. The types of examples of adverse events include wrong eye implants, incorrect nerve blocks, and wrong site excisions of lesions. These are accompanied by human factors recommendations and change concepts such as designing the system to prevent mistakes, using differentiation, minimizing handoffs, and standardizing how information is communicated. The survey response rate was 76 per cent (88 of 132). Of those who had seen the surgical lessons learned (76% [67 of 88]), the majority (87%) reported they were valuable and 85% that they changed or reinforced patient safety behaviors in their facility as a result of surgical lessons learned. Simply having a policy will not ensure patient safety. When reviewing adverse events, human factors must be considered as a cause for error and for the failure to follow policy without assigning blame. VHA surgeons reported that the surgery lessons learned were valuable and impacted practice.

  4. Lessons from the Child Survival/Fair Start Home-Visiting Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larner, Mary

    This presentation discusses the effectiveness of a home-visiting program staffed by community workers in providing education and support for parents in poor, underserved areas. Six lessons learned by program staff about ways to successfully implement this type of program are discussed. The first lesson is that it is important to listen to the…

  5. What Is Gained from a Randomized Controlled Trial and What Is Lost? Planning, Policy, and Fear: Effects and Lessons Learned from a Cluster-Randomized Trial Assessing a Community-Advocacy Program's Professional Development Initiative for Early Childhood Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, Kim; Glantz, Fred; Raya-Carlton, Pamela; Schilder, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Rigorous research provides information that will allow ECE (Early Childhood Educator) programs to select interventions that have a scientifically based track record of effectiveness in increasing teachers' skills and teaching quality. This paper shares implementation and impact results as well as the lessons learned in conducting an evaluation of…

  6. Lessons learned in organizing for performance

    SciTech Connect

    Long, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Lessons learned from the Three Mile Island accident are described. The effectiveness of the General Public Utilities Corporation in the decontamination/support issues and restart of the three mile unit-1 reactor, is discussed.

  7. Planning and Budgeting for Nutrition Programs in Tanzania: Lessons Learned From the National Vitamin A Supplementation Program.

    PubMed

    Lyatuu, Margaret Benjamin; Mkumbwa, Temina; Stevenson, Raz; Isidro, Marissa; Modaha, Francis; Katcher, Heather; Dhillon, Christina Nyhus

    2016-05-03

    -driven VAS funding in Tanzania continues to be allocated by districts consistently, although adequacy of funding is a concern. However, regular administrative data point to fairly high and consistent coverage rates for VAS across the country (over 80% over the last 10 years). Although this analysis may have omitted some nutrition-specific funding not identified in district budget data, it represents a reliable reflection of the nutrition funding landscape in FY 2010. For this year, total district nutrition allocations add up to only 2% of the amount needed to implement nutrition services at scale according to Tanzania's National Nutrition Strategy Implementation Plan. VASD advocacy and planning support at the district level has succeeded in ensuring district allocations for the program. To promote sustainable implementation of other nutrition interventions in Tanzania, more funds must be allocated and guidance must be accompanied by tools that enable planning and budgeting at the district level.

  8. Planning and Budgeting for Nutrition Programs in Tanzania: Lessons Learned From the National Vitamin A Supplementation Program

    PubMed Central

    Lyatuu, Margaret Benjamin; Mkumbwa, Temina; Stevenson, Raz; Isidro, Marissa; Modaha, Francis; Katcher, Heather; Dhillon, Christina Nyhus

    2016-01-01

    child) was just 21%. Discussion: District-driven VAS funding in Tanzania continues to be allocated by districts consistently, although adequacy of funding is a concern. However, regular administrative data point to fairly high and consistent coverage rates for VAS across the country (over 80% over the last 10 years). Although this analysis may have omitted some nutrition-specific funding not identified in district budget data, it represents a reliable reflection of the nutrition funding landscape in FY 2010. For this year, total district nutrition allocations add up to only 2% of the amount needed to implement nutrition services at scale according to Tanzania’s National Nutrition Strategy Implementation Plan. Conclusion: VASD advocacy and planning support at the district level has succeeded in ensuring district allocations for the program. To promote sustainable implementation of other nutrition interventions in Tanzania, more funds must be allocated and guidance must be accompanied by tools that enable planning and budgeting at the district level. PMID:27694649

  9. Lessons learned from the implementation of a time-limited, large-scale nicotine replacement therapy giveaway program in New York City.

    PubMed

    Davis, Karen A; Coady, Micaela H; Mbamalu, Ijeoma G; Sacks, Rachel; Kilgore, Elizabeth A

    2013-09-01

    Since 2006, the New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has conducted the Nicotine Patch and Gum Program (NPGP) in collaboration with 311, NYC's non-emergency information line. In two prior years, the program was conducted in collaboration with the New York State (NYS) Smokers' Quitline and with community-based organizations. The NPGP is an annual, brief, population-based nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) giveaway for NYC residents, complementing the NYS Quitline's year-round NRT distribution program. Since 2006, 168,000 smokers have enrolled, with the largest number of enrollees in 2010 (n = 40,000) and the smallest number in 2009 (n = 28,000). A 2003 program evaluation demonstrated that smokers who received NRT through the NPGP had higher quit rates than smokers who did not receive NRT; these results were replicated in 2006 and 2008. Lessons learned from implementing the NPGP include: 1) time-limited NRT interventions are important complements to year-round NRT distribution; 2) expanding NRT distribution to light smokers increases treatment reach; and 3) employing multiple enrollment mechanisms, including telephone and online options, extends program reach to diverse groups of smokers. The NPGP provides a model for other jurisdictions considering implementing time-limited, population-based NRT programs as a complementary strategy to enhance ongoing tobacco control efforts.

  10. Food commodity pipeline management in transitional settings: challenges and lessons learned from the first USAID food development program in South Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Tappis, Hannah; Doocy, Shannon; Amoako, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite decades of support for international food assistance programs by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Food for Peace, relatively little is known about the commodity pipeline and management issues these programs face in post-conflict and politically volatile settings. Based on an audit of the program's commodity tracking system and interviews with 13 key program staff, this case study documents the experiences of organizations implementing the first USAID-funded non-emergency (development) food assistance program approved for Sudan and South Sudan. Key challenges and lessons learned in this experience about food commodity procurement, transport, and management may help improve the design and implementation of future development food assistance programs in a variety of complex, food-insecure settings around the world. Specifically, expanding shipping routes in complex political situations may facilitate reliable and timely commodity delivery. In addition, greater flexibility to procure commodities locally, rather than shipping U.S.-procured commodities, may avoid unnecessary shipping delays and reduce costs. PMID:25276532

  11. Food commodity pipeline management in transitional settings: challenges and lessons learned from the first USAID food development program in South Sudan.

    PubMed

    Tappis, Hannah; Doocy, Shannon; Amoako, Stephen

    2013-08-01

    Despite decades of support for international food assistance programs by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Food for Peace, relatively little is known about the commodity pipeline and management issues these programs face in post-conflict and politically volatile settings. Based on an audit of the program's commodity tracking system and interviews with 13 key program staff, this case study documents the experiences of organizations implementing the first USAID-funded non-emergency (development) food assistance program approved for Sudan and South Sudan. Key challenges and lessons learned in this experience about food commodity procurement, transport, and management may help improve the design and implementation of future development food assistance programs in a variety of complex, food-insecure settings around the world. Specifically, expanding shipping routes in complex political situations may facilitate reliable and timely commodity delivery. In addition, greater flexibility to procure commodities locally, rather than shipping U.S.-procured commodities, may avoid unnecessary shipping delays and reduce costs.

  12. Space Station Control Moment Gyroscope Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurrisi, Charles; Seidel, Raymond; Dickerson, Scott; Didziulis, Stephen; Frantz, Peter; Ferguson, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Four 4760 Nms (3510 ft-lbf-s) Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyroscopes (DGCMG) with unlimited gimbal freedom about each axis were adopted by the International Space Station (ISS) Program as the non-propulsive solution for continuous attitude control. These CMGs with a life expectancy of approximately 10 years contain a flywheel spinning at 691 rad/s (6600 rpm) and can produce an output torque of 258 Nm (190 ft-lbf)1. One CMG unexpectedly failed after approximately 1.3 years and one developed anomalous behavior after approximately six years. Both units were returned to earth for failure investigation. This paper describes the Space Station Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyroscope design, on-orbit telemetry signatures and a summary of the results of both failure investigations. The lessons learned from these combined sources have lead to improvements in the design that will provide CMGs with greater reliability to assure the success of the Space Station. These lessons learned and design improvements are not only applicable to CMGs but can be applied to spacecraft mechanisms in general.

  13. Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Cort, Katherine A.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2013-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document early challenges and lessons learned in the solid-state lighting (SSL) market development as part of the DOE’s SSL Program efforts to continually evaluate market progress in this area. This report summarizes early actions taken by DOE and others to avoid potential problems anticipated based on lessons learned from the market introduction of compact fluorescent lamps and identifies issues, challenges, and new lessons that have been learned in the early stages of the SSL market introduction. This study identifies and characterizes12 key lessons that have been distilled from DOE SSL program results.

  14. Lessons Learned from Operation Market Garden

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-08

    Precribd by ASMI Std. L39-1S AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY LESSONS LEARNED FROM OPERA FTOW MARKET GARDEN by Jennifer B. Fox Lieutenant Colonel SA...j av; A/%or _tyeoi -- ABSTRACT TITLE Lessons Learned From Operation Market Garden AUTHORt Jennifer B. Fox, Lieutenant Colonel, USAF Operation Market ...On September 17, 1944. from airfields across southern England, the Allied forces launched a massive airborne operation, code named Market Garden

  15. E-learning for grass-roots emergency public health personnel: Preliminary lessons from a national program in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wangquan; Jiang, Qicheng; Qin, Xia; Fang, Guixia; Hu, Zhi

    2016-07-19

    In China, grass-roots emergency public health personnel have relatively limited emergency response capabilities and they are constantly required to update their professional knowledge and skills due to recurring and new public health emergencies. However, professional training, a principal solution to this problem, is inadequate because of limitations in manpower and financial resources at grass-roots public health agencies. In order to provide a cost-effective and easily expandable way for grass-roots personnel to acquire knowledge and skills, the National Health Planning Commission of China developed an emergency response information platform and provided trial access to this platform in Anhui and Heilongjiang provinces in China. E-learning was one of the modules of the platform and this paper has focused on an e-learning pilot program. Results indicated that e-learning had satisfactorily improved the knowledge and ability of grass-roots emergency public health personnel, and the program provided an opportunity to gain experience in e-course design and implementing e-learning. Issues such as the lack of personalized e-courses and the difficulty of evaluating the effectiveness of e-learning are topics for further study.

  16. Social support and child protection: Lessons learned and learning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ross A

    2015-03-01

    Social support has been a topic of research for nearly 50 years, and its applications to prevention and intervention have grown significantly, including programs advancing child protection. This article summarizes the central conclusions of the 1994 review of research on social support and the prevention of child maltreatment prepared for the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, and surveys advances in the field since its publication. Among the lessons learned twenty years ago are (a) the diversity of the social support needs of at-risk families and their association with child endangerment, (b) the need to supplement the emotionally affirmative aspects of social support with efforts to socialize parenting practices and monitor child well-being, (c) the desirability of integrating formal and informal sources of social support for recipients, and (d) the importance of considering the complex recipient reactions to receiving support from others. The lessons we are now learning derive from research exploring the potential of online communication to enhance social support, the neurobiology of stress and its buffering through social support, and the lessons of evaluation research that are identifying the effective ingredients of social support interventions.

  17. Workshop on Discovery Lessons-Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Discovery Program's continuous improvement effort, a Discovery Program Lessons-Learned workshop was designed to review how well the Discovery Program is moving toward its goal of providing low-cost research opportunities to the planetary science community while ensuring continued U.S. leadership in solar system exploration. The principal focus of the workshop was on the recently completed Announcement of Opportunity (AO) cycle, but the program direction and program management were also open to comment. The objective of the workshop was to identify both the strengths and weaknesses of the process up to this point, with the goal of improving the process for the next AO cycle. The process for initializing the workshop was to solicit comments from the communities involved in the program and to use the feedback as the basis for establishing the workshop agenda. The following four sessions were developed after reviewing and synthesizing both the formal feedback received and informal feedback obtained during discussions with various participants: (1) Science and Return on Investment; (2) Technology vs. Risk; Mission Success and Other Factors; (3) Cost; and (4) AO.AO Process Changes and Program Management.

  18. Implementing an early childhood developmental screening and surveillance program in primary care settings: lessons learned from a project in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Berry, Anita D; Garzon, Dawn Lee; Mack, Patricia; Kanwischer, Katelyn Z; Beck, Deborah Guzzo

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing Developmentally Oriented Primary Care (EDOPC) is a project with a goal to increase the financing and delivery of preventive developmental services for children birth to age 3 years in the state of Illinois. Primary care providers have more opportunities to screen and observe infants and toddlers than any other professional, because they see them up to 13 times in the first 3 years of life for well-child visits. The project focused on using a 1-hour, on-site training for primary care providers and their entire office staff as the method of increasing knowledge, focusing on intent to change practice and implementation of routine early childhood developmental screening. Although many primary care providers routinely use only developmental surveillance in their practices, clinical practice guidelines recommend routine use of standardized developmental screening, using validated developmental screening tools. This article includes lessons learned and recommendations based on clinical practice guidelines and experiences of the team members during implementation of the EDOPC project. Primary care providers are critical to this process because children with developmental disorders have the best long-term outcomes and opportunities for improved family functioning with early detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Copyright © 2014 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lessons Learned About Providing Laptops for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifaz, Alejandra; Zucker, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    As a way of helping states and districts interested in laptop initiatives, the Northeast and the Islands Regional Technology in Education Consortium (NEIRTEC) has reviewed lessons learned to date from many laptop initiatives around the country and has prepared this guide. Drawn from articles and reports about current and past programs (see…

  20. Approaches to Civic Education: Lessons Learned. Technical Publication Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agency for International Development (IDCA), Washington, DC. Office of Democracy and Governance.

    This report considers lessons learned from a multi-part research investigation into United States Agency for International Development's (USAID) civic education programming. To better understand how and under what conditions civic education contributes to the development of a more active and informed democratic citizenry, USAID initiated the study…

  1. A large-scale initiative to disseminate an evidence-based drug abuse prevention program in Italy: Lessons learned for practitioners and researchers.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Veronica; Griffin, Kenneth W; Antichi, Mariella; Celata, Corrado

    2015-10-01

    Across developed countries, experimentation with alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs often begins in the early adolescent years. Several evidence-based programs have been developed to prevent adolescent substance use. Many of the most rigorously tested and empirically supported prevention programs were initially developed and tested in the United States. Increasingly, these interventions are being adopted for use in Europe and throughout the world. This paper reports on a large-scale comprehensive initiative designed to select, adapt, implement, and sustain an evidence-based drug abuse prevention program in Italy. As part of a large-scale regionally funded collaboration in the Lombardy region of Italy, we report on processes through which a team of stakeholders selected, translated and culturally adapted, planned, implemented and evaluated the Life Skills Training (LST) school-based drug abuse prevention program, an evidence-based intervention developed in the United States. We discuss several challenges and lessons learned and implications for prevention practitioners and researchers attempting to undertake similar international dissemination projects. We review several published conceptual models designed to promote the replication and widespread dissemination of effective programs, and discuss their strengths and limitations in the context of planning and implementing a complex, large-scale real-world dissemination effort. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lessons learned in building a hospital-wide transition program from pediatric to adult-based health care for youth with special health care needs (YSHCN).

    PubMed

    Hergenroeder, Albert C; Wiemann, Constance M; Bowman, Valerie F

    2016-11-01

    Advancements in medicine have increased the likelihood that children with chronic illnesses will survive childhood. The success in treatment for their conditions has not been matched by methods to effectively facilitate their transition to adult care. This short report describes lessons learned in building a hospital-wide health care transition (HCT) planning infrastructure that could help patients transition from pediatric to adult-based care regardless of disease/disability. A solid foundation on which to build a hospital-based HCT planning program includes the following: focusing on structure and processes needed to facilitate medical transition; conducting a baseline assessment of current transition policy/practice; building an understanding of the complexity and necessity of transition planning; identifying advocates for transition planning and adult providers who will accept youth with chronic medical conditions; and establishing methods to evaluate transition program building activities. The implementation of any HCT program will depend on creating a culture that expects successful HCT to be the culmination of successful pediatric care. Hospital support (resources, staff training and an expanded infrastructure into which the program can fit) is necessary for a sustainable HCT planning program.

  3. Kosovo Two Years After. Joint Center for Lessons Learned. Quarterly Bulletin, Volume 3, Issue 3, June 2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Conference, one of the identified requirements was the need to create a Joint Lessons Learned Program (JLLP) Configuration Management Board (CMB...presentation was to provide a proposed JLLP framework for commonality and direction of our lessons learned program . The briefing looked at how we, the...Integrating Joint Operations Beyond The FSCL: Is Current Doctrine Adequate? (Section 2) ................... 22 Charter For Joint Lessons Learned Program Configuration

  4. SRS SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION AND PROCESSING; HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND LESSONS LEARNED

    SciTech Connect

    Cercy, M.; Peeler, D.; Stone, M.

    2013-09-25

    This report provides a historical overview and lessons learned associated with the SRS sludge batch (SB) qualification and processing programs. The report covers the framework of the requirements for waste form acceptance, the DWPF Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), waste feed acceptance, examples of how the program complies with the specifications, an overview of the Startup Program, and a summary of continuous improvements and lessons learned. The report includes a bibliography of previous reports and briefings on the topic.

  5. Enhancing emergency medicine initiatives with a quality improvement program: lessons learned in the emergency department of Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Azazh, Aklilu; Brown, Lori Di Prete; Ayele, Roman Aydiko; Teklu, Sisay; W/Tsadik, Assefu; Tefera, Muluwork; Bacha, Tigist; Geremew, Haymanot; Tefera, Girma; Busse, Heidi

    2014-07-01

    A Twinning Partnership between the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW) and Addis Ababa University (AAU) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia was formed to strengthen the development of emergency medical services at AAU's Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital (TASHI) through medical education and exchanges. The Twinning philosophy which emphasizes collaboration and joint learning was an ideal program in which QI program was incorporated to maximize success, promote sustainability, and reinforce basic principles for effective healthcare service delivery. This article describes the QI methodology, capacity building strategy, implementation approach, and lessons learned. QI initiative at TASH ED started during EM fellowship in 2010 when Priority problems in the department were identified, and root cause analysis and possible strategies for improvement were devised. Then Baseline and sensitization was undertaken which was followed by Quality Improvement Projects cycles. The Federal Ministry of health key performance indicators (KPI) were used as standard and measurement tool when it was relevant. The findings were analyzed and trends presented to the ED staff and other stakeholders. In the past four years Since QI initiatives started in TASH EM department different achievements have been registered. The main developments were capacity building with QI training of EM fellows, EM residents and EM and critical care nurses. QI Training was also conducted to Tikur Anbessa Hospital and college of health sciences leadership. In addition, various QI projects have been designed and started, while some are finalized and the rest are on implementation. The QI experience in the department suggests that a QI program can effectively support, complement, and enhance health system strengthening partnerships, and that establishment of a QI program at the department level is feasible and beneficial, enhancing the adoption and sustainability of health care improvements such as marked improvements in

  6. Lessons learned in using hospital discharge data for state and national public health surveillance: implications for Centers for Disease Control and prevention tracking program.

    PubMed

    Love, Denise; Rudolph, Barbara; Shah, Gulzar H

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Program is to build a nationwide network of integrated health and environmental data to measure impact of environmental factors on public health. This article describes how hospital discharge data can provide essential information for public health programs, including EPHT. The state inpatient hospital discharge data systems have properties that are highly desirable for surveillance and multistate initiatives, like EPHT, yet accessing and using the data can create challenges for the end user. This article highlights the strengths and limitations of hospital discharge data and references crash outcome data and evaluation system and Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project as models for accessing, linking, and aggregating hospital discharge data. These federal-state data partnerships have overcome many of these challenges and have the potential to serve as models for the EPHT Program. The lessons learned from these "early adopters" can shortcut the implementation period for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention EPHT Program.

  7. Social support in cyberspace: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Cudney, Shirley; Winters, Charlene; Weinert, Clarann; Anderson, Kerri

    2005-01-01

    The lessons learned from the implementation of phase one of Women to Women (WTW1), a research-based computer outreach program for rural women with chronic illness, and their influence on the development of phase two of Women to Women (WTW2) are discussed in this article. The changes implemented in WTW2 included moving from the FirstClass delivery platform to WebCT; increasing the intra- and interdisciplinary nature of the team by adding nurse experts in Web skills and women's health and non-nurse colleagues in family finance and nutrition; expanding the geographical area to be served from Montana to adjoining states; developing health teaching units that harness the internet as the major source of ever-current health information; including a control group in the study design; and selecting more pertinent, repeated measurement instruments to assess psychosocial variables.

  8. Rapid Spacecraft Development: Results and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, William A.

    2002-01-01

    The Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the management and direction of a dynamic and versatile program for the definition, competition, and acquisition of multiple indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contracts - resulting in a catalog of spacecraft buses. Five spacecraft delivery orders have been placed by the RSDO and one spacecraft has been launched. Numerous concept and design studies have been performed, most with the intent of leading to a future spacecraft acquisition. A collection of results and lessons learned is recorded to highlight management techniques, methods and processes employed in the conduct of spacecraft acquisition. Topics include working relationships under fixed price delivery orders, price and value, risk management, contingency reserves, and information restrictions.

  9. XML technology planning database : lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Some, Raphael R.; Neff, Jon M.

    2005-01-01

    A hierarchical Extensible Markup Language(XML) database called XCALIBR (XML Analysis LIBRary) has been developed by Millennium Program to assist in technology investment (ROI) analysis and technology Language Capability the New return on portfolio optimization. The database contains mission requirements and technology capabilities, which are related by use of an XML dictionary. The XML dictionary codifies a standardized taxonomy for space missions, systems, subsystems and technologies. In addition to being used for ROI analysis, the database is being examined for use in project planning, tracking and documentation. During the past year, the database has moved from development into alpha testing. This paper describes the lessons learned during construction and testing of the prototype database and the motivation for moving from an XML taxonomy to a standard XML-based ontology.

  10. XML technology planning database : lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Some, Raphael R.; Neff, Jon M.

    2005-01-01

    A hierarchical Extensible Markup Language(XML) database called XCALIBR (XML Analysis LIBRary) has been developed by Millennium Program to assist in technology investment (ROI) analysis and technology Language Capability the New return on portfolio optimization. The database contains mission requirements and technology capabilities, which are related by use of an XML dictionary. The XML dictionary codifies a standardized taxonomy for space missions, systems, subsystems and technologies. In addition to being used for ROI analysis, the database is being examined for use in project planning, tracking and documentation. During the past year, the database has moved from development into alpha testing. This paper describes the lessons learned during construction and testing of the prototype database and the motivation for moving from an XML taxonomy to a standard XML-based ontology.

  11. A Katrina experience: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Currier, Mary; King, Deborah S; Wofford, Marion R; Daniel, Bethany J; Deshazo, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Almost no data exist on how best to respond to the medical needs of civilians displaced by natural disasters. After Hurricane Katrina destroyed the Gulf Coast and seriously damaged the infrastructure of Jackson, Miss, the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) was challenged with serving a large group of evacuees at a major Red Cross evacuation shelter near our campus. We reviewed our experiences and share lessons learned. This is a retrospective review of administrative and clinical records for patients served by a medical clinic established emergently after Hurricane Katrina. Red Cross regulations precluded their volunteers from providing medical care other than first aid. Faced with numerous evacuees seeking medical assistance, UMMC established an ambulatory clinic at the shelter. The majority of patients had multiple medical problems, no medical insurance, and limited ability to purchase medications. The greatest need was for management of chronic illnesses. The clinic provided 2394 patient visits and filled more than 4902 prescriptions over 17 days. While medical facilities have emergency response plans for epidemics and mass trauma, little attention has focused on plans for care of evacuated populations. Shelter operators should consider advance coordination of medical care with existing health care systems. Medical facilities along evacuation routes should be aware that they may be asked to provide care for sheltered evacuees.

  12. Huygens Highlights and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton*, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Ten years ago, on 14 January 2005, the Huygens Probe parachuted down to the surface of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Huygens is part of the international Cassini/Huygens mission, a joint endeavor of NASA, the European Space Agency, and Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Cassini/Huygens, comprising the NASA-provided Saturn Orbiter and the ESA-provided Huygens probe, was launched in October 1997. It arrived at Saturn in early July 2004. Huygens was released on the 3rd orbit around Saturn. It made measurements during the hypersonic entry, the descent, and for more than one hour on the surface. Unique in situ characterization of the atmosphere along the entry and descent trajectory and of the surface at the landing site was provided, revealing that many Earth-like processes were at work on Titan, a very fascinating methane world. Huygens observations also allowed inferring the ice crust thickness, hence an estimation of the depth of the icy crust/liquid water ocean interface. Huygens measurements are also used as ground-truth of the measurements made by the orbiter during Titan flybys. In this presentation, after a brief review of the major mission milestones, Huygens achievements are discussed in the context of the progress made in our understanding of Titan during the Cassini/Huygens mission. Lessons learned for the future in situ exploration of Titan are addressed. * Most of this work was performed while at ESA/ESTEC, Noordwijk, The Netherlands

  13. Science and Sandy: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Following Hurricane Sandy's impact on the mid-Atlantic region, President Obama established a Task Force to '...ensure that the Federal Government continues to provide appropriate resources to support affected State, local, and tribal communities to improve the region's resilience, health, and prosperity by building for the future.' The author was detailed from NOAA to the Task Force between January and June 2013. As the Task Force and others began to take stock of the region's needs and develop plans to address them, many diverse approaches emerged from different areas of expertise including: infrastructure, management and construction, housing, public health, and others. Decision making in this environment was complex with many interests and variables to consider and balance. Although often relevant, science and technical expertise was not always at the forefront of this process. This talk describes the author's experience with the Sandy Task Force focusing on organizing scientific expertise to support the work of the Task Force. This includes a description of federal activity supporting Sandy recovery efforts, the role of the Task Force, and lessons learned from developing a science support function within the Task Force.

  14. Partnership Among Peers: Lessons Learned From the Development of a Community Organization–Academic Research Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Jewett-Tennant, Jeri; Collins, Cyleste; Matloub, Jacqueline; Patrick, Alison; Chupp, Mark; Werner, James J.; Borawski, Elaine A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Community engagement and rigorous science are necessary to address health issues. Increasingly, community health organizations are asked to partner in research. To strengthen such community organization–academic partnerships, increase research capacity in community organizations, and facilitate equitable partnered research, the Partners in Education Evaluation and Research (PEER) program was developed. The program implements an 18-month structured research curriculum for one mid-level employee of a health-focused community-based organization with an organizational mentor and a Case Western Reserve University faculty member as partners. Methods The PEER program was developed and guided by a community–academic advisory committee and was designed to impact the research capacity of organizations through didactic modules and partnered research in the experiential phase. Active participation of community organizations and faculty during all phases of the program provided for bidirectional learning and understanding of the challenges of community-engaged health research. The pilot program evaluation used qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques, including experiences of the participants assessed through surveys, formal group and individual interviews, phone calls, and discussions. Statistical analysis of the change in fellows’ pre-test and post-test survey scores were conducted using paired sample t tests. The small sample size is recognized by the authors as a limitation of the evaluation methods and would potentially be resolved by including more cohort data as the program progresses. Qualitative data were reviewed by two program staff using content and narrative analysis to identify themes, describe and assess group phenomena and determine program improvements. Objectives The objective of PEER is to create equitable partnerships between community organizations and academic partners to further research capacity in said organizations and

  15. Partnership Among Peers: Lessons Learned From the Development of a Community Organization-Academic Research Training Program.

    PubMed

    Jewett-Tennant, Jeri; Collins, Cyleste; Matloub, Jacqueline; Patrick, Alison; Chupp, Mark; Werner, James J; Borawski, Elaine A

    2016-01-01

    Community engagement and rigorous science are necessary to address health issues. Increasingly, community health organizations are asked to partner in research. To strengthen such community organization-academic partnerships, increase research capacity in community organizations, and facilitate equitable partnered research, the Partners in Education Evaluation and Research (PEER) program was developed. The program implements an 18-month structured research curriculum for one mid-level employee of a health-focused community-based organization with an organizational mentor and a Case Western Reserve University faculty member as partners. The PEER program was developed and guided by a community-academic advisory committee and was designed to impact the research capacity of organizations through didactic modules and partnered research in the experiential phase. Active participation of community organizations and faculty during all phases of the program provided for bidirectional learning and understanding of the challenges of community-engaged health research. The pilot program evaluation used qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques, including experiences of the participants assessed through surveys, formal group and individual interviews, phone calls, and discussions. Statistical analysis of the change in fellows' pre-test and post-test survey scores were conducted using paired sample t tests. The small sample size is recognized by the authors as a limitation of the evaluation methods and would potentially be resolved by including more cohort data as the program progresses. Qualitative data were reviewed by two program staff using content and narrative analysis to identify themes, describe and assess group phenomena and determine program improvements. The objective of PEER is to create equitable partnerships between community organizations and academic partners to further research capacity in said organizations and develop mutually beneficial research

  16. The National Center for Atmospheric Research Education and Outreach Program: Successes, Lessons Learned, and the Role of Research Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. M.; Foster, S.; Carbone, L.; Henderson, S.; Munoz, R.

    2003-12-01

    The growing consensus that improving science education and public science literacy requires the focused efforts of a wide spectrum of specialists, including scientists, provides the opportunity for national research centers to develop programs that seek to bring their unique science perspectives to educators and the public. At the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, we have developed a multifaceted program for science education and outreach designed to bring our science to these audiences in ways that build on our specialized expertise. Collaboration with scientists internal to NCAR, as well as in the broader University Corporation for Atmospheric Research community, has lead to numerous education and outreach projects that bring the results of funded research projects to the public. Education and outreach activities at NCAR include opportunities to engage with the public in informal as well as more formal settings. Our exhibit and tour program offers topically focused exhibits, interactive activities, and opportunities to learn about the science underway at the laboratory. We hold annual events, providing high-energy science demonstrations and lectures for the public. Our web sites disseminate extensive resources enabling students (K-12 and undergraduate), educators, and the public to learn on their own about our science, supplemented by interactives and hands-on activities. Our professional development programs engage middle and high school educators in standards-based activities and cutting-edge science content that highlights global and climate change topics and modeling in the geosciences. Central to all of these activities is the active participation of lab scientists and staff, whose personal enthusiasm and science expertise enriches the program for our audiences.

  17. Learning the Blues. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This lesson introduces students to the "blues," one of the most distinctive and influential elements of African-American musical tradition. With this lesson plan, students can take a virtual field trip to Memphis, Tennessee, one of the prominent centers of blues activities, and explore the history of the blues in the work of W. C. Handy…

  18. Lessons Learned for Improving Spacecraft Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Michael A.; Stambolian, Damon B.; Henderson, Gena M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has a unique history in processing the Space Shuttle fleet for launches. Some of this experience has been captured in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). This tool provides a convenient way for design engineers to review lessons from the past to prevent problems from reoccurring and incorporate positive lessons in new designs. At the Kennedy Space Center, the LLIS is being used to design ground support equipment for the next generation of launch and crewed vehicles. This paper describes the LLIS process and offers some examples.

  19. FBSEP (Functional Basic Skills Education Program) Radio Teletype Operator MOS 05C10. Learning Supervisor Guide for Self Paced 05C FBSEP Lessons.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-30

    NUJtIDL (.) Perspective Instructional Communications DABT 60-81--C-0027 PERFO~Mi:iG O GAN’ZArO,--N-A-,| X ~ AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM FLEMFNT. PROJECT. TASKA...once. If an item of infor- mation is NOT in a Lesson Study Guide, print an X next to p the number. DO NOT WRITE ON THIS TEST. .A-02 LT 1 05C FBSEP mu...print an X next to the number. DO NOT WRITE ON THIS TEST. A-02 RT 05C FBSEP *1 Part 1 (Cont’d) Parts of a Lesson Study Guide A. Lesson Understanding Quiz

  20. Critical Elements for Successful Implementation and Adoption of Authentic Scientific Research Programs: Lessons Learned from NASA's Mars Student Imaging Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug Boonstra, S.; Swann, J.; Boonstra, D.; Manfredi, L.; Christensen, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Recent research identifies the most effective learning as active, engaged learning in which students interact with phenomena, other students, and the teacher/leader to derive meaning and construct understanding of their surroundings. "Similarly, an engaging and effective science education goes well beyond the low-level factual recall that is emphasized in many science classes. It must develop the skills that students need to solve complex problems, work in teams, make and recognize evidence-based arguments, and interpret and communicate complex information" (emphasis added). Authentic science research projects provide active, engaged learning in which students interact with authentic science data in an authentic problem-solving context to derive meaning and construct understanding of the world. In formal (and many informal) settings, the teacher/leader is effectively the gatekeeper who determines the learning experiences in which the students will participate. From our experience of nearly a decade and a half of authentic science programming for 5thgrade through early college students working with NASA Mars data, supporting and enabling the teacher is perhaps the most critical and foundational element for designing a successful authentic research experience. Yet, a major barrier to this type of learning are teacher/leaders who are too often not equipped or who lack confidence to succeed in facilitating authentic research projects. The Mars Student Imaging Project has implemented an iterative process of design, testing, and redesign that has identified and implemented critical teacher/leader-enabling elements that have led to increasingly successful adoptions within formal and informal educational settings - allowing more students to gain the benefits of immersive research experience.

  1. Lessons Learned from FIPSE Projects II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Dora; And Others

    This monograph describes 30 college and university programs funded by the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education from 1989 to 1991. Each description includes information on program purpose, project activities, major insights and lessons, project continuation, and available information. The first group of 10 are programs focused on…

  2. Human Factors Lessons Learned on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Mount, Frances E.

    2006-01-01

    Experience on International Space Station (ISS) provides many important lessons for future space flight. NASA human factors engineers have been systematically collecting lessons learned from crew debriefs, as well as working with ground support teams to continuously improve crew operations. This paper describes the methods for collecting data from debriefs, lessons learned through that process, and an example of a technology development task funded through the Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) program element in response to an identified operational need. Each ISS increment crew spends many hours after the flight answering questions from the various subsystem leads. The Flight Crew Integration subsystem lead asks questions specific to human factors and habitability issues. In addition, crew comments on many other subsystems provide insight into interface designs, operability and maintainability. The debrief comments are unique to each crew, and must be categorized to provide operational lessons learned. Personal identifiers are removed and comments aggregated to separate consistent issues from personal preferences. Examples will be given, and the procedure for incorporating the lessons into requirements and guidelines for the next human space vehicle will be described. In flight, very few astronauts are medical doctors. Written medical procedures during flight need to be easy to follow and quick to understand. The problem was analyzed as part of a SHFE task. Organization was analyzed and reorganizations were created and tested. Results will be reported. The ISS is a very important analog for planning future long-term missions. Collection of data from debriefs, studying the lessons learned and focusing on requirements for future missions are examples of the accomplishments through the SHFE program.

  3. Human Factors Lessons Learned on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Mount, Frances E.

    2006-01-01

    Experience on International Space Station (ISS) provides many important lessons for future space flight. NASA human factors engineers have been systematically collecting lessons learned from crew debriefs, as well as working with ground support teams to continuously improve crew operations. This paper describes the methods for collecting data from debriefs, lessons learned through that process, and an example of a technology development task funded through the Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) program element in response to an identified operational need. Each ISS increment crew spends many hours after the flight answering questions from the various subsystem leads. The Flight Crew Integration subsystem lead asks questions specific to human factors and habitability issues. In addition, crew comments on many other subsystems provide insight into interface designs, operability and maintainability. The debrief comments are unique to each crew, and must be categorized to provide operational lessons learned. Personal identifiers are removed and comments aggregated to separate consistent issues from personal preferences. Examples will be given, and the procedure for incorporating the lessons into requirements and guidelines for the next human space vehicle will be described. In flight, very few astronauts are medical doctors. Written medical procedures during flight need to be easy to follow and quick to understand. The problem was analyzed as part of a SHFE task. Organization was analyzed and reorganizations were created and tested. Results will be reported. The ISS is a very important analog for planning future long-term missions. Collection of data from debriefs, studying the lessons learned and focusing on requirements for future missions are examples of the accomplishments through the SHFE program.

  4. MC-1 Engine Valves, Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laszar, John

    2003-01-01

    Many lessons were learned during the development of the valves for the MC-1 engine. The purpose of this report is to focus on a variety of issues related to the engine valves and convey the lessons learned. This paper will not delve into detailed technical analysis of the components. None of the lessons learned are new or surprising, but simply reinforce the importance of addressing the details of the design early, at the component level. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama developed the MC-1 engine, a LOX / FW-1, 60,000 pound thrust engine. This engine was developed under the Low Cost Boost Technology office at MSFC and proved to be a very successful project for the MSFC Propulsion team and the various subcontractors working the development of the engine and its components.

  5. An inquiry-based programming lesson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Rice, Emily; Derdzinski, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    We designed a 2-day inquiry activity where students learned about error analysis and coding practices in Python. Inquiry-based lessons provide students with opportunities to independently investigate scientific concepts and tools. A general structure is developed ahead of time and minimal, careful guidance provided during the activity, but students are given as much freedom as possible to explore the concepts at their own pace. We designed our activity to help students learn to write flexible, re-usable, and readable code. I will describe the lesson structure we initially designed, as well as what aspects worked for our students (or didn't) and our experience leading the activity.

  6. Lessons Learned In Developing The VACIS™ Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orphan, Victor J.

    2011-06-01

    SAIC's development of VACIS™ provides useful "lessons learned" in bridging the gap from an idea to a security or contraband detection product. From a gamma densitometer idea for solving a specific Customs Service (CS) requirement (detection of drugs in near-empty tanker trucks) in mid-1990's, SAIC developed a broad line of vehicle and cargo inspections systems (over 500 systems deployed to date) based on a gamma-ray radiographic imaging technique. This paper analyzes the reasons for the successful development of VACIS and attempts to identify "lessons learned" useful for future security and contraband detection product developments.

  7. The lift-fan aircraft: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, Wallace H.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the highlights and results of a workshop held at NASA Ames Research Center in October 1992. The objective of the workshop was a thorough review of the lessons learned from past research on lift fans, and lift-fan aircraft, models, designs, and components. The scope included conceptual design studies, wind tunnel investigations, propulsion systems components, piloted simulation, flight of aircraft such as the SV-5A and SV-5B and a recent lift-fan aircraft development project. The report includes a brief summary of five technical presentations that addressed the subject The Lift-Fan Aircraft: Lessons Learned.

  8. Lessons learned from early criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1996-06-01

    Four accidents involving the approach to criticality occurred during the period July, 1945, through May, 1996. These have been described in the format of the OPERATING EXPERIENCE WEEKLY SUMMARY which is distributed by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety. Although the lessons learned have been incorporated in standards, codes, and formal procedures during the last fifty years, this is their first presentation in this format. It is particularly appropriate that they be presented in the forum of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project Workshop closest to the fiftieth anniversary of the last of the four accidents, and that which was most instrumental in demonstrating the need to incorporate lessons learned.

  9. Very Large System Dynamics Models - Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Leonard Malczynski

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides lessons learned from developing several large system dynamics (SD) models. System dynamics modeling practice emphasize the need to keep models small so that they are manageable and understandable. This practice is generally reasonable and prudent; however, there are times that large SD models are necessary. This paper outlines two large SD projects that were done at two Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Idaho National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes the models and then discusses some of the valuable lessons learned during these two modeling efforts.

  10. Prevention of Diabetes Through the Lifestyle Intervention: Lessons Learned from the Diabetes Prevention Program and Outcomes Study and its Translation to Practice.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, Mary A; Bray, George A; Hattaway, Kathy; Khare-Ranade, Prajakta A; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Semler, Linda N; Weinzierl, Valarie A; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2014-12-01

    A number of strategies have been used to delay or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in high-risk adults. Among them were diet, exercise, medications and surgery. This report focuses on the nutritional lessons learned from implementation of the Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI) in the DPP and its follow-up DPPOS that looked at weight loss through modification of diet and exercise. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is a large clinical trial, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, designed to look at several strategies to prevent conversion to type 2 diabetes (T2D) by adults with prediabetes (IGT/IFG) including an Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI). The ∼3800 ethnically diverse participants (46% reported non-white race) were overweight, had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Treatments were assigned randomly. The Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS) is a follow up study evaluating the long-term outcomes of the clinical trial.

  11. Prevention of Diabetes Through the Lifestyle Intervention: Lessons Learned from the Diabetes Prevention Program and Outcomes Study and its Translation to Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hoskin, Mary A.; Bray, George A.; Hattaway, Kathy; Khare-Ranade, Prajakta A.; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Semler, Linda N.; Weinzierl, Valarie A.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2014-01-01

    A number of strategies have been used to delay or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) in high-risk adults. Among them were diet, exercise, medications and surgery. This report focuses on the nutritional lessons learned from implementation of the Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI) in the DPP and its follow-up DPPOS that looked at weight loss through modification of diet and exercise. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is a large clinical trial, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, designed to look at several strategies to prevent conversion to type 2 diabetes (T2D) by adults with prediabetes (IGT/IFG) including an Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI). The ∼3800 ethnically diverse participants (46% reported non-white race) were overweight, had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Treatments were assigned randomly. The Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS) is a follow up study evaluating the long-term outcomes of the clinical trial. PMID:25383256

  12. Lessons Learned from the Clementine Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    According to BMDO, the Clementine mission achieved many of its technology objectives during its flight to the Moon in early 1994 but, because of a software error, was unable to test the autonomous tracking of a cold target. The preliminary analyses of the returned lunar data suggest that valuable scientific measurements were made on several important topics but that COMPLEX's highest-priority objectives for lunar science were not achieved. This is not surprising given that the rationale for Clementine was technological rather than scientific. COMPLEX lists below a few of the lessons that may be learned from Clementine. Although the Clementine mission was not conceived as a NASA science mission exactly like those planned for the Discovery program, many operational aspects of the two are similar. It is therefore worthwhile to understand the strengths and faults of the Clementine approach. Some elements of the Clementine operation that led to the mission's success include the following: (1) The mission's achievements were the responsibility of a single organization and its manager, which made that organization and that individual accountable for the final outcome; (2) The sponsor adopted a hands-off approach and set a minimum number of reviews (three); (3) The sponsor accepted a reasonable amount of risk and allowed the project team to make the trade-offs necessary to minimize the mission's risks while still accomplishing all its primary objectives; and (4) The development schedule was brief and the agreed-on funding (and funding profile) was adhered to. Among the operational shortcomings of Clementine were the following: (1) An overly ambitious schedule and a slightly lean budget (meaning insufficient time for software development and testing, and leading ultimately to human exhaustion); and (2) No support for data calibration, reduction, and analysis. The principal lesson to be learned in this category is that any benefits from the constructive application of higher

  13. Lessons learned: DC-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmeyer, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The DC-X was conceived and developed specifically to lay the ground work for significantly lowering the cost of space operations. The system design was based on an initial set of program goals and a finite, limited set of resources. The goal in its simplest terms was to demonstrate vertical landing after rotation of the vehicle from a nose-first to an engines-first altitude. Finite resources actually drove the selection of a robust design to reduce fabrication and preflight testing costs. The result was a system with a large amount of flexibility which allowed expansion of the test goals as the system, and test program, evolved. The use of the vehicle flight computer interfacing with the ground control system for flight crew training was also not an initial concept. However, by defining an architecture for the system control modes which allowed additions and modifications as learning progressed, the 6 DOF codes used for flight controls software development were transported to the operating system to be used in a simulated flight mode. Flight data reduction was also greatly improved as the program progressed, and the data needs and presentation were refined. The software, avionics hardware, and the FOCC system development proceeded ahead of the vehicle, primarily because most of the hardware elements were existing at the outset of the program. The Built-in-Test (BIT) for avionics and propulsion systems were adequate. Particularly the flight readiness system which verified the vehicle health after engine start and before throttle-up for flight.

  14. Novel Humanitarian Aid Program: The Glivec International Patient Assistance Program-Lessons Learned From Providing Access to Breakthrough Targeted Oncology Treatment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Pat; Boultbee, Paula; Epstein, David

    2015-10-01

    Imatinib was the first targeted therapy approved for the treatment of cancer. With its approval, it was immediately clear to Novartis that this breakthrough therapy would require an innovative approach to worldwide access, with special consideration of low- and middle-income countries. Lack of government reimbursement, universal health care, or health insurance coverage, few trained specialty physicians or diagnostic services, and poor health care infrastructure were, and continue to be, contributing barriers to access to treatment in low- and middle-income countries. The Glivec International Patient Assistance Program (GIPAP) is an international drug donation program established by Novartis Pharma AG and implemented in partnership with The Max Foundation, a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization. GIPAP was established in 2001, essentially in parallel with the first approval of imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia. Since 2001, GIPAP has made imatinib accessible to all medically and financially eligible patients within 80 countries on an ongoing basis as long as their physicians prescribe it and no other means of access exists. To date, more than 49,000 patients have benefited from GIPAP, and 2.3 million monthly doses of imatinib have been approved through the program. GIPAP represents an innovative drug donation model that has set the standard for access programs for other targeted or innovative therapies. The purpose of this article is to describe the structure of GIPAP, as well as important lessons that have contributed to the success of the program. This article may assist other companies with the development of successful and far-reaching patient assistance programs in the future.

  15. A Brief History With Lessons Learned From The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program At Fenton Hill, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, S.; Woldegabriel, G. W.; Rehfeldt, K. R.

    2009-12-01

    Important lessons were learned that continue to be relevant today from the world’s first successful demonstration of a Hot Dry Rock (HDR) system for extracting underground geothermal energy conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. This experiment, conducted in hot, low-permeability, low-water context, crystalline basement rock was fundamentally different from the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) development currently underway at several sites in the U.S. and world. The HDR concept was developed in 1970’s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Two HDR reservoirs with two wells each were created and tested at the Fenton Hill site. In spite of its proximity to the Valles caldera and the Rio Grande rift, geological information and heat-flow data were used successfully to select the Fenton Hill experimental site within a block of intact crystalline basement rocks. Deep crystalline basement rocks marginal to active fault/recent volcanic centers were good candidates for HDR systems: these rocks had high heat content, and low matrix permeability leading to low water losses. Reconnaissance surveys indicated significant potential HDR geothermal resources through out the USA. Drilling and completion operations in hot crystalline rocks were challenging requiring further R&D. Hydraulic stimulation activities were carried out successfully in deep, hot crystalline rocks. Logging tools and instruments were developed that could operate successfully in the ~250oC environment. Development of techniques and tools for microseismic data monitoring, analysis, and interpretation was found to be enormously valuable. It was found that the systematic process that should be followed in developing HDR reservoirs is to drill and stimulate the first well, use the microseismic data to locate the target zone, and then complete the additional wells. The largest fraction of the flow impedance was found to be near the production well. Combined interpretation of the pressure testing, microseismic

  16. Prototyping with Application Generators: Lessons Learned from the Naval Aviation Logistics Command Management Information System Case

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    Prototyping with Application Generators: Lessons Learned from the Naval Aviation Logistics Command Management Information System Case. This study... management information system to automate manual Naval aviation maintenance tasks-NALCOMIS. With the use of a fourth-generation programming language

  17. Lessons Learned on Implementing Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) in a Ground Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferell, Bob; Lewis, Mark; Perotti, Jose; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Goerz, Jesse; Brown, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This paper's main purpose is to detail issues and lessons learned regarding designing, integrating, and implementing Fault Detection Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) for Constellation Exploration Program (CxP) Ground Operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  18. 77 FR 14446 - Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2 AMP XI.M41, “Buried and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Changes to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report Revision 2 AMP XI.M41, ``Buried and... program in NUREG-1801, Revision 2, ``Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report,'' and the NRC staff's... and lessons learned and to address emergent issues not covered in license renewal guidance...

  19. Joint Center for Lessons Learned Bulletin. Volume 1, Issue 1, September 1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    www.jwfc.js.mil iv Headquarters, Dept. of the Army, AR 11-33, Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application, Washington DC, 1989. v The Army’s... learned program . As we look to the future, we hope that one day everyone in ACC realizes the tremendous benefits of reducing redundant mistakes and...officer early in the planning process. This early contact and continual involvement in the planning process seems to be the key to a successful lessons

  20. The VELA Success Story and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Mario R.; Belian, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    The VELA program was one of the first successful space programs in the U.S. This project was managed for the Department of Defense by the predecessor of DARPA, with the participation of the U.S. Air Force. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) were in charge of providing nuclear surveillance sensors to verify compliance with the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty signed by President John F. Kennedy on October 7, 1963. The first two satellites were launched in tandem ten days later on October 17, 1963. A total of twelve satellites were launched from 1963 until 1970. Successful operations of some VELA on-board detectors continued until the early 1980s. We reviewed some of the many unique and valuable science achievements such as the discovery of gamma-ray bursts, galactic x-ray bursts, x-ray emission of solar flares, the plasma sheet and high Z ions in the solar wind, etc. Furthermore, a few lessons learned, both technical and managerial, are captured in this presentation.