Science.gov

Sample records for progressive thoracic myelopathy

  1. Idiopathic Ventral Spinal Cord Herniation: An Increasingly Recognized Cause of Thoracic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Berg-Johnsen, Jon; Ilstad, Eivind; Kolstad, Frode; Züchner, Mark; Sundseth, Jarle

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH), where a segment of the spinal cord has herniated through a ventral defect in the dura, is a rarely encountered cause of thoracic myelopathy. The purpose of our study was to increase the clinical awareness of this condition by presenting our experience with seven consecutive cases treated in our department since 2005. All the patients developed pronounced spastic paraparesis or Brown-Séquard syndrome for several years (mean, 4.7 years) prior to diagnosis. MRI was consistent with a transdural spinal cord herniation in the mid-thoracic region in all the cases. The patients underwent surgical reduction of the herniated spinal cord and closure of the dural defect using an artificial dural patch. At follow-up, three patients experienced considerable clinical improvement, one had slight improvement, one had transient improvement, and two were unchanged. Two of the four patients with sphincter dysfunction regained sphincter control. MRI showed realignment of the spinal cord in all the patients. ISCH is probably a more common cause of thoracic myelopathy than previously recognized. The patients usually develop progressive myelopathy for several years before the correct diagnosis is made. Early diagnosis is important in order to treat the patients before the myelopathy has become advanced. PMID:25336997

  2. Arachnoiditis Ossificans - A Rare Cause of Progressive Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Steel, Christopher J; Abrames, Erik L; O'Brien, William T

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoiditis ossificans is a rare cause of chronic, progressive myelopathy. In contrast to the more common benign causes of meningeal calcification, arachnoiditis ossificans results in replacement of portions of the spinal arachnoid by bone as an end-stage complication of adhesive arachnoiditis. It is usually the sequela of prior trauma or interventional procedures. Prognosis and treatment options depend upon the location and degree of spinal stenosis with thoracic involvement being more common and more severe than lumbar spine involvement. The imaging findings on magnetic resonance imaging may be confusing; however, the findings of intraspinal ossification on computed tomography are characteristics and diagnostic. We present a classic case of arachnoiditis ossificans in an elderly man who presented with progressive myelopathy and a recent fall, along with a review of the literature. The imaging in this case not only identified the characteristic findings of arachnoiditis ossificans but also identified secondary findings of the underlying causative etiology.

  3. Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Oyinkan Marquis, B; Capone, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Myelopathy is an inclusive term, referring to pathology leading to a neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. The clinical diagnosis of myelopathy requires a detailed history and physical examination to define the clinical syndrome. Neuroimaging is indicated in most instances of new-onset myelopathy. It is indicated also when the worsening of a myelopathy is unexplained. Advances in neuroimaging have proved to play a vital role in diagnosis. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment are dependent upon an adequate imaging evaluation to establish the presence of mechanical stability, extrinsic spinal cord compression, or an intramedullary lesion. The most frequent etiology of myelopathy is related to degenerative disease of the spine from osteophyte or extruded disc material causing compression of the spinal cord in the cervical or thoracic spine. The next common etiologies are spinal cord compression due to extradural masses caused by metastatic disease to bone or blunt trauma. In these cases, emergency imaging should be performed to assess the nature of the lesion causing the myelopathy and plan the most appropriate treatment. Also urgent imaging should be performed when an abscess in the spinal canal is suspected. Less urgent is imaging of primary neoplasms of the meninges, roots, or spinal cord, as well as noninfectious inflammatory processes, such as multiple sclerosis, and neurodegenerative, vascular, nutritional, or idiopathic disorders leading to myelopathy. Although a survey of the entire spinal cord can be performed with imaging, it is more appropriate to define from the clinical findings what levels of the spine and spinal cord should be imaged. This approach helps limit the likelihood of false-positive imaging findings that may encourage needless attempts to fix what is not broken. Similarly, the most appropriate imaging study and protocol should be selected in order to provide a timely and accurate diagnosis. To do so requires detailed knowledge

  4. Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Oyinkan Marquis, B; Capone, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Myelopathy is an inclusive term, referring to pathology leading to a neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. The clinical diagnosis of myelopathy requires a detailed history and physical examination to define the clinical syndrome. Neuroimaging is indicated in most instances of new-onset myelopathy. It is indicated also when the worsening of a myelopathy is unexplained. Advances in neuroimaging have proved to play a vital role in diagnosis. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment are dependent upon an adequate imaging evaluation to establish the presence of mechanical stability, extrinsic spinal cord compression, or an intramedullary lesion. The most frequent etiology of myelopathy is related to degenerative disease of the spine from osteophyte or extruded disc material causing compression of the spinal cord in the cervical or thoracic spine. The next common etiologies are spinal cord compression due to extradural masses caused by metastatic disease to bone or blunt trauma. In these cases, emergency imaging should be performed to assess the nature of the lesion causing the myelopathy and plan the most appropriate treatment. Also urgent imaging should be performed when an abscess in the spinal canal is suspected. Less urgent is imaging of primary neoplasms of the meninges, roots, or spinal cord, as well as noninfectious inflammatory processes, such as multiple sclerosis, and neurodegenerative, vascular, nutritional, or idiopathic disorders leading to myelopathy. Although a survey of the entire spinal cord can be performed with imaging, it is more appropriate to define from the clinical findings what levels of the spine and spinal cord should be imaged. This approach helps limit the likelihood of false-positive imaging findings that may encourage needless attempts to fix what is not broken. Similarly, the most appropriate imaging study and protocol should be selected in order to provide a timely and accurate diagnosis. To do so requires detailed knowledge

  5. Solitary osteochondroma of the thoracic spine causing myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Song, K-J; Lee, K-B

    2007-06-01

    We evaluate the clinical presentation and radiographic findings of a patient with solitary osteochondroma and compressive myelopathy and review the relevant English-language medical literature. The involvement of the spine with a solitary osteochondroma is rare. The addition of the current case to those already reported makes a total of 51 published cases of solitary vertebral osteochondromas with spinal cord compression. The clinical history, computed tomogram, magnetic resonance image, and plain radiograms were reviewed. A review of the literature was also done. The patient gradually improved and symptoms stopped progressing after surgical removal of the lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are useful for evaluating the size and extent of a spinal osteochondroma causing spinal cord compression. PMID:17638163

  6. Spinal Cord Kinking in Thoracic Myelopathy Caused by Ossification of the Ligamentum Flavum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Pan, Min; Yin, Chu-Qiang; Zheng, Xiu-Jun; Cong, Ya-Nan; Wang, De-Chun; Li, Shu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) is being increasingly recognized as a cause of thoracic myelopathy. This study was to describe a rare clinical entity of spinal cord kinking (SK) in thoracic myelopathy secondary to OLF. Methods: The data of 95 patients with thoracic myelopathy secondary to OLF were analyzed retrospectively. The incidence and location of SK were determined using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The clinical presentation and radiological characteristics in patients with SK were analyzed. Posterior en bloc laminectomy with OLF was performed, and the surgical results were evaluated. Results: SK was found in seven patients (7.4%) based on preoperative MRI. The patients included one male and six females with an average age of 55.6 years (range, 48–64 years). Five patients presented with radiculomyelopathy and two presented with typical thoracic myelopathy of spastic paraparesis. In all cases, the kinking was located just above the end of the spinal cord where the conus medullaris (CM) was compressed by the OLF. The degree of SK varied from mild to severe. The tip of the CM was located between the upper third of T11 to the lower third of L1, above the lower edge of L1. With an average follow-up of 30.4 months, the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association score significantly improved from 5.7 ± 1.8 preoperatively to 8.9 ± 1.4 postoperatively (t = 12.05; P < 0.0001) with an improvement rate of 63.1 ± 12.3%. Conclusions: SK is a rare radiological phenomenon. It is typically located at the thoracolumbar junction, where the CM is compressed by the OLF. Our findings indicate that these patients may benefit from a posterior decompressive procedure. PMID:26415796

  7. Thoracic radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Ryan C; Andary, Michael T; Russo, Randolph B; DeLano, Mark

    2002-08-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of spinal pain syndromes. Degenerative disc disease and diabetes mellitus may frequently cause radiculopathy at the thoracic level. Electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in the evaluation of radiculopathy and thoracic spinal pain syndromes. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a procedure that may be used in the treatment of thoracic spinal pain syndromes. Surgical intervention for thoracic radiculopathy usually is reserved for patients with progressive myelopathy and neurologic compromise.

  8. Clinical presentation of a patient with thoracic myelopathy at a chiropractic clinic

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Charles W.; Bishop, Mark D.; Beres, Jacqueline L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical presentation, examination findings, and management decisions of a patient with thoracic myelopathy who presented to a chiropractic clinic. Case Report/Methods After receiving a diagnosis of a diffuse arthritic condition and kidney stones based on lumbar radiograph interpretation at a local urgent care facility, a 45-year-old woman presented to an outpatient chiropractic clinic with primary complaints of generalized low back pain, bilateral lower extremity paresthesias, and difficulty walking. An abnormal neurological examination result led to an initial working diagnosis of myelopathy of unknown cause. The patient was referred for a neurological consult. Results Computed tomography revealed severe multilevel degenerative spondylosis with diffuse ligamentous calcification, facet joint hypertrophy, and disk protrusion at T9-10 resulting in midthoracic cord compression. The patient underwent multilevel spinal decompressive surgery. Following surgical intervention, the patient reported symptom improvement. Conclusion It is important to include a neurologic examination on all patients presenting with musculoskeletal complaints, regardless of prior medical attention. The ability to recognize myelopathy and localize the lesion to a specific spinal region by clinical examination may help prioritize diagnostic imaging decisions as well as facilitate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23204955

  9. Toxic and Metabolic Myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; da Rocha, Antonio José; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-10-01

    Myelopathy describes any neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. It is most commonly caused by its compression by neoplasms, degenerative disc disease, trauma, or infection. Less common causes of myelopathy include spinal cord tumors, infection, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, vascular, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Conditions affecting the spinal cord must be recognized as early as possible to prevent progression that may lead to permanent disability. Biopsy is rarely performed, thus the diagnosis and management rely on patient׳s history, physical examination, laboratory results, and imaging findings. Here we review the clinical presentations, pathophysiological mechanisms, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of myelopathies related to metabolic or toxic etiologies. PMID:27616316

  10. Degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kato, So; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Cervical myelopathy is the most common cause of acquired spinal cord compromise. The concept of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM), defined as symptomatic myelopathy associated with degenerative arthropathic changes in the spine axis, is being introduced. Given its progressive nature, treatment options have to be chosen in a timely manner. Surgical options include anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF), anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACCF), arthroplasty (in highly select cases), posterior laminectomy with/without fusion, and laminoplasty. Indications for each should be carefully considered in individual patients. Riluzole, a sodium-glutamate antagonist, is a promising option to optimize neurologic outcomes post-surgery and is being examined in the CSM-Protect Randomized Controlled Trial. Preoperative risk assessment is mandatory for prognostication. Sagittal alignment is known to play an important role to optimize surgical outcome. Guidelines for optimal management of DCM are in process. In principle, all but the mildest cases of DCM should be offered surgery for optimal outcome. PMID:27250040

  11. Degenerative myelopathy in a family of Siberian Husky dogs.

    PubMed

    Bichsel, P; Vandevelde, M; Lang, J; Kull-Hächler, S

    1983-11-01

    Three closely related, Siberian Husky dogs had chronic progressive paresis and ataxia with muscle atrophy in the hindlimbs. Radiologic and myelographic examination of the spine revealed no abnormalities. On histologic examination, disseminated degeneration of the white matter, particularly in the thoracic segments, was seen. The clinical and pathological findings were similar to those described in aging large dogs with so-called degenerative myelopathy. The cause of this disease is unknown but the fact that these 3 Huskies were closely related suggest that hereditary factors may play a role.

  12. Tropical myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    A large number of causal agents produce spinal cord lesions in the tropics. Most etiologies found in temperate regions also occur in the tropics including trauma, herniated discs, tumors, epidural abscess, and congenital malformations. However, infectious and nutritional disorders occur with higher prevalence in tropical regions. Among the most common infectious etiologies are tuberculous Pott's disease, brucellosis, and neuroborreliosis. Parasitic diseases such as schistosomiasis, neurocysticercosis, and eosinophilic meningitis are frequent causes of nontraumatic paraplegia. The retrovirus HTLV-1 is a cause of tropical spastic paraparesis. Nutritional causes of paraparesis include deficiencies of vitamin B12 and folate; endemic clusters of konzo and tropical ataxic myeloneuropathy are associated in Africa with malnutrition and excessive consumption of cyanide-containing bitter cassava. Other toxic etiologies of tropical paraplegia include lathyrism and fluorosis. Nutritional forms of myelopathy are associated often with optic and sensory neuropathy, hence the name tropical myeloneuropathies. Acute transverse myelopathy is seen in association with vaccination, infections, and fibrocartilaginous embolism of the nucleus pulposus. Multiple sclerosis and optic myelopathy occur in the tropics but with lesser prevalence than in temperate regions. The advent of modern imaging in the tropics, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, has allowed better diagnosis and treatment of these conditions that are a frequent cause of death and disability. PMID:24365434

  13. Tropical myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    A large number of causal agents produce spinal cord lesions in the tropics. Most etiologies found in temperate regions also occur in the tropics including trauma, herniated discs, tumors, epidural abscess, and congenital malformations. However, infectious and nutritional disorders occur with higher prevalence in tropical regions. Among the most common infectious etiologies are tuberculous Pott's disease, brucellosis, and neuroborreliosis. Parasitic diseases such as schistosomiasis, neurocysticercosis, and eosinophilic meningitis are frequent causes of nontraumatic paraplegia. The retrovirus HTLV-1 is a cause of tropical spastic paraparesis. Nutritional causes of paraparesis include deficiencies of vitamin B12 and folate; endemic clusters of konzo and tropical ataxic myeloneuropathy are associated in Africa with malnutrition and excessive consumption of cyanide-containing bitter cassava. Other toxic etiologies of tropical paraplegia include lathyrism and fluorosis. Nutritional forms of myelopathy are associated often with optic and sensory neuropathy, hence the name tropical myeloneuropathies. Acute transverse myelopathy is seen in association with vaccination, infections, and fibrocartilaginous embolism of the nucleus pulposus. Multiple sclerosis and optic myelopathy occur in the tropics but with lesser prevalence than in temperate regions. The advent of modern imaging in the tropics, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, has allowed better diagnosis and treatment of these conditions that are a frequent cause of death and disability.

  14. [A case of very slowly progressive, high-cervical spondylotic myelopathy presenting with symmetric deep sensory deficits in the palms].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Yamamoto, T

    1995-09-01

    We report a case of very slowly progressive, high-cervical spondylotic myelopathy with symmetrical deep sensory deficits in the palms. A 76-year-old man began to feel tingling sensation in the second fingers of the bilateral hands 30 years prior to admission. The abnormal sensation spread from the first to the third fingers, and subsequently all over the palms. He noticed intermittent sharp pain in the dermatomes of C4 and 5 bilaterally from his late sixties, and later he developed clumsiness of fine finger movements. In recent years he experienced stiffness in the thighs while walking. On neurological examination, there was a mild sensory deficits in light touch over the bilateral palms, while perception of temperature and pain was normal. Vibration sense was severely and position sense mildly impaired. Discriminative sensation, including graphesthesia, stereognosis, two-point discrimination and texture recognition, was severely impaired over the bilateral palms. On the other hand, all modalities of sensation were normal in the lower limbs. Gross motor dysfunction, such as weakness of limbs, amyotrophy or gait disturbance, was not present. He did not show limb ataxia, but the dexterity of his fingers was severely impaired. Deep tendon reflexes were mildly increased except for the Achilles tendons that were hyporeactive. Plantar responses were flexor bilaterally. Nerve conduction study revealed giant F waves and H reflexes by stimulations of the median and ulnar nerves bilaterally.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Nontraumatic Myelopathy Associated With Surfing

    PubMed Central

    Avilés-Hernández, Israel; García-Zozaya, Inigo; DeVillasante, Jorge M

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Ischemic nontraumatic spinal cord injury associated with surfing is a novel diagnosis believed to be related to prolonged spine hyperextension while lying prone on the surfboard. Only 9 cases have been documented. This report features possible risk factors, etiology, diagnostic imaging, and outcomes of surfer's myelopathy. Design: Case report. Results: A 37-year-old man developed T11 American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A paraplegia shortly after surfing. The clinical history and magnetic resonance imaging findings were compatible with an ischemic insult to the distal thoracic spinal cord. Our patient did not have any of the proposed risk factors associated with this condition, and, contrary to most reports, he sustained a complete spinal cord lesion without neurological recovery by 8 weeks post injury. Conclusions: Surfer's myelopathy, because of its proposed mechanism of injury, is amenable to medical intervention. Increased awareness of this condition may lead to early recognition and treatment, which should contribute to improved neurological outcomes. PMID:17684897

  16. Lethal Progressive Thoracic Insufficiency in a Neonate Due to Jarcho Levin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bhutia, Euden; Maria, Arti; Verma, Arushi; Sethi, Sidharth Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A rare case of Jarcho Levin syndrome (JLS) presenting as a lethal progressive respiratory insufficiency in early neonatal period is reported. The neonate had classical features of this syndrome including vertebral segmentation defects, typical costo-vertebral fusion defects and scoliosis resulting in small thoracic volume and limited chest expansion; all consistent with a clinical diagnosis of JLS with thoracic insufficiency. In addition, our case had a rare association of dextrocardia and acyanotic congenital heart disease. PMID:24741543

  17. Lethal progressive thoracic insufficiency in a neonate due to jarcho levin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Euden; Maria, Arti; Verma, Arushi; Sethi, Sidharth Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A rare case of Jarcho Levin syndrome (JLS) presenting as a lethal progressive respiratory insufficiency in early neonatal period is reported. The neonate had classical features of this syndrome including vertebral segmentation defects, typical costo-vertebral fusion defects and scoliosis resulting in small thoracic volume and limited chest expansion; all consistent with a clinical diagnosis of JLS with thoracic insufficiency. In addition, our case had a rare association of dextrocardia and acyanotic congenital heart disease.

  18. Hereditary and metabolic myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Hedera, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and metabolic myelopathies are a heterogeneous group of neurologic disorders characterized by clinical signs suggesting spinal cord dysfunction. Spastic weakness, limb ataxia without additional cerebellar signs, impaired vibration, and positional sensation are hallmark phenotypic features of these disorders. Hereditary, and to some extent, metabolic myelopathies are now recognized as more widespread systemic processes with axonal loss and demyelination. However, the concept of predominantly spinal cord disorders remains clinically helpful to differentiate these disorders from other neurodegenerative conditions. Furthermore, metabolic myelopathies are potentially treatable and an earlier diagnosis increases the likelihood of a good clinical recovery. This chapter reviews major types of degenerative myelopathies, hereditary spastic paraplegia, motor neuron disorders, spastic ataxias, and metabolic disorders, including leukodystrophies and nutritionally induced myelopathies, such as vitamin B12, E, and copper deficiencies. Neuroimaging studies usually detect a nonspecific spinal cord atrophy or demyelination of the corticospinal tracts and dorsal columns. Brain imaging can be also helpful in myelopathies caused by generalized neurodegeneration. Given the nonspecific nature of neuroimaging findings, we also review metabolic or genetic assays needed for the specific diagnosis of hereditary and metabolic myelopathies. PMID:27430441

  19. Progressive relapse of ligamentum flavum ossification following decompressive surgery.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kei; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ukai, Junichi; Muramoto, Akio; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (T-OLF) is a relatively rare spinal disorder that generally requires surgical intervention, due to its progressive nature and the poor response to conservative therapy. The prevalence of OLF has been reported at 3.8%-26%, which is similar to that of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). The progression of OPLL after cervical laminoplasty for the treatment of OPLL is often shown in long-term follow-up. However, there have been no reports on the progression of OLF following surgery. We report a case of thoracic myelopathy secondary to the progressive relapse of OLF following laminectomy. PMID:25558329

  20. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Secondary to Dropped Head Syndrome: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soufiani, Housain F.; Rahimizadeh, Saghayegh

    2016-01-01

    The dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a disabling condition caused by severe weakness of the neck extensor muscles causing progressive reducible kyphosis of the cervical spine and the inability to hold the head up. Weakness can occur in isolation or in association with a generalized neuromuscular disorder. Isolated cases are owed to the late onset of noninflammatory myopathy designated as INEM, where persistent chin to chest deformity may gradually cause or aggravate preexisting degenerative changes of the cervical spine and ultimately result in myelopathy. In review of the literature, we could find only 5 cases, with no unique guidelines to address the management of these two concomitant pathologies. Herein, a 69-year-old man who had developed cervical myelopathy 2 years after being affected by isolated dropped head syndrome is presented. Chin to chest deformity and cervical myelopathy were managed through three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) combined with decompressive cervical laminectomy and stabilization with C2 to C7 pedicle screw-rod construct. At 4-month follow-up, despite recovery in patient's neurological status, flexion deformity reappeared with recurrence of dropped head due to C7 pedicle screws pull-out. However, this was successfully managed with extension of the construct to the upper thoracic levels. PMID:27034870

  1. Increased expression of OX40 is associated with progressive disease in patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background OX40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family that is expressed primarily on activated CD4+ T cells and promotes the development of effector and memory T cells. Although OX40 has been reported to be a target gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) viral transactivator Tax and is overexpressed in vivo in adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells, an association between OX40 and HTLV-1-associated inflammatory disorders, such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), has not yet been established. Moreover, because abrogation of OX40 signals ameliorates chronic inflammation in animal models of autoimmune disease, novel monoclonal antibodies against OX40 may offer a potential treatment for HTLV-1-associated diseases such as ATL and HAM/TSP. Results In this study, we showed that OX40 was specifically expressed in CD4+ T cells naturally infected with HTLV-1 that have the potential to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines along with Tax expression. We also showed that OX40 was overexpressed in spinal cord infiltrating mononuclear cells in a clinically progressive HAM/TSP patient with a short duration of illness. The levels of the soluble form of OX40 (sOX40) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from chronic progressive HAM/TSP patients or from patients with other inflammatory neurological diseases (OINDs) were not different. In contrast, sOX40 levels in the CSF of rapidly progressing HAM/TSP patients were higher than those in the CSF from patients with OINDs, and these patients showed higher sOX40 levels in the CSF than in the plasma. When our newly produced monoclonal antibody against OX40 was added to peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture, HTLV-1-infected T cells were specifically removed by a mechanism that depends on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Conclusions Our study identified OX40 as a key molecule and biomarker for rapid progression of HAM/TSP. Furthermore, blocking OX40 may have potential in

  2. Canine degenerative myelopathy: a model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra C; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-02-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (CDM) represents a unique naturally occurring animal model for human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because of similar clinical signs, neuropathologic findings, and involvement of the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation. A definitive diagnosis can only be made postmortem through microscopic detection of axonal degeneration, demyelination and astroglial proliferation, which is more severe in the dorsal columns of the thoracic spinal cord and in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus. Interestingly, the muscle acetylcholine receptor complexes are intact in CDM prior to functional impairment, thus suggesting that muscle atrophy in CDM does not result from physical denervation. Moreover, since sensory involvement seems to play an important role in CDM progression, a more careful investigation of the sensory pathology in ALS is also warranted. The importance of SOD1 expression remains unclear, while oxidative stress and denatured ubiquinated proteins appear to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CDM. In this updated narrative review we performed a systematic search of the published studies on CDM that may shed light on the pathophysiological mechanisms of human ALS. A better understanding of the factors that determine the disease progression in CDM may be beneficial for the development of effective treatments for ALS.

  3. Myelopathy in Marfan's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Newman, P. K.; Tilley, P. J. B.

    1979-01-01

    A patient with Marfan's syndrome and a myelopathy is reported, and the association of multiple spinal arachnoid cysts noted. It is proposed that the basic connective tissue defect in Marfan's syndrome may predispose to the formation of arachnoid diverticuli and that in this case spinal cord damage was the sequel. Images PMID:422966

  4. Twins with progressive thoracic aortic aneurysm, recurrent dissection and ACTA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ware, Stephanie M; Shikany, Amy; Landis, Benjamin J; James, Jeanne F; Hinton, Robert B

    2014-10-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a genetically mediated disease with variable age of onset. In the pediatric age range, nonsyndromic TAA frequently has a milder course than syndromic forms of TAA, such as Marfan syndrome or Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Herein, we describe 17-year-old identical twin brothers with severe progressive TAA due to a novel de novo ACTA2 mutation. Interestingly, both boys were diagnosed at age 11 with congenital mydriasis, a recently recognized manifestation of some ACTA2 mutations due to smooth muscle dysfunction. One of the brothers presented with acute-onset lower back pain that was identified as dissection of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Imaging of the chest at this time showed severe fusiform TAA. Cardiac imaging in his twin showed similar TAA, but no abdominal aortic aneurysm. Both brothers underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement, but have had progressive aortic disease with recurrent dissection requiring multiple surgeries. This case emphasizes the importance of identifying physical stigmata of smooth muscle dysfunction, such as mydriasis, as potential markers for associated aortopathy and vascular diseases.

  5. Acute compressive myelopathy due to vertebral haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Kaloostian, Paul; Bydon, Ali

    2014-04-28

    A 47-year-old woman with a history of anaemia presented to the emergency room with an acute onset of leg weakness. Physical examination of the bilateral lower extremities was significant for 0/5 muscle strength in all muscle groups with decreased pinprick and temperature sensation. A sensory level at the umbilicus was appreciated. Fine touch and proprioception were preserved. Bowel and bladder function were intact. CT revealed several thoracic, vertebral haemangiomatas. An MRI was suggestive of an epidural clot at the T8-T10-weighted posterior epidural space. At the level of the lesion, the cerebrospinal fluid space was completely effaced, and the flattened spinal cord exhibited signs of oedema and compressive myelopathy. The patient immediately underwent surgical decompression of the spinal cord. An epidural clot and vessel conglomeration were identified. A postoperative spinal angiogram confirmed the diagnosis of vertebral haemangioma. At 1-month follow-up, the patient regained strength and sensation.

  6. Urodynamic profile in myelopathies: A follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anupam; Taly, Arun B.; Srivastava, Abhishek; Thyloth, Murali

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To study the significance of filling cystometry in assessment and management of neurogenic bladder in myelopathies and correlate neurological recovery and bladder management in the follow up. Study Design: Retrospective analysis of reports of filling cystometry in patients with traumatic and non-traumatic myelopathy. Setting: Neuro-rehabilitation unit of a tertiary care university hospital. Methods: The study was carried out between September 2005 and June 2006 and included all subjects with myelopathy who underwent filling cystometry. ASIA impairment scale was used to assess neurological status during admission as well as in the follow up. Bladder management was advised based on the cystometric findings. Neurological recovery and mode of bladder management were correlated during the follow up after a minimum of 6 months. Results: Fifty-two subjects (38 males, 14 females), mean age 33.26 ± 14.66 years (10–80) underwent filling cystometry. Twenty patients had cervical, 24 had thoracic and 8 had lumbar myelopathy. Cystometric findings were overactive detrusor observed in 43 patients, (21 had detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD), 22 without DSD) and areflexic/underactive detrusor in 9. Post-void residual (>15% of voided urine) was significant in 27 patients. Twenty-three patients (44%) reported for follow up (16 males, 7 females) after a mean duration of 9.04 ± 2.44 months (6–15 months). Neurological recovery was seen in 61% cases, while 1 patient showed deterioration. Only 26% patients reported change in bladder management during follow up. Correlation between neurological recovery and bladder management was found to be insignificant (P > 0.05) using spearman correlation co-efficient. Conclusions: Filling cystometry is valuable for assessment and management of neurogenic bladder after myelopathy. No significant relationship was observed between neurological recovery and neurogenic bladder management in the follow up in the present study. PMID:20151007

  7. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  8. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg; Park, Seung Won

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  9. Clinical outcomes of microendoscopic decompression surgery for cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Munehito; Yamada, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Yukihiro; Maio, Kazuhiro; Kawai, Masaki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Retrospective study on the results of microendoscopic decompression surgery for the treatment of cervical myelopathy. The purpose of this study was to describe the microendoscopic laminoplasty (MEL) technique as the surgical method in the treatment of cervical myelopathy, and to document the clinical outcomes for MEL surgery. Endoscopic surgery poses several challenges for the aspiring endoscopic surgeons, the most critical of which is mastering hand–eye coordination. With training in live animal and cadaver surgery, the technical progress has reduced the problem of morbidity following surgery. The authors have performed microendoscopic decompression surgery on more than 2,000 patients for lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Fifty-one patients underwent the posterior decompression surgery using microendoscopy for cervical myelopathy at authors’ institute. The average age was 62.9 years. The criteria for exclusion were cervical myelopathy with tumor, trauma, severe ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, rheumatoid arthritis, pyogenic spondylitises, destructive spondylo-arthropathies, and other combined spinal lesions. The items evaluated were neurological evaluation, recovery rates; these were calculated following examination using the Hirabayashi’s method with the criteria proposed by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scoring system (JOA score). The mean follow-up period was 20.3 months. The average of JOA score was 10.1 points at the initial examination and 13.6 points at the final follow-up. The average recovery rate was 52.5%. The recovery rate according to surgical levels was, respectively, 56.5% in one level, 46.3% in two levels and 54.1% in more than three levels. The complications were as follows: one patient sustained a pin-hole-like dura mater injury inflicted by a high-speed air-drill during surgery, one patient developed an epidural hematoma 3 days after surgery, and two patients had the C5 nerve root palsy after surgery. The epidural

  10. [Myelopathy secondary to an aneurysmal bone cyst of thoracic spine].

    PubMed

    Navas-García, Marta; Penanes, Juan Ramón; Fraga, Javier; Sola, Rafael G

    2016-02-01

    Introduccion. Los quistes oseos aneurismaticos espinales son lesiones osteoliticas benignas muy infrecuentes constituidas por cavidades hematicas limitadas por septos osteoconectivos y celulas gigantes tipo osteoclastos. Clinicamente se manifiestan con dolor local, sintomas neurologicos secundarios a compresion medular, asi como fracturas, deformidades e inestabilidad vertebral. Presentamos un caso de quiste oseo aneurismatico espinal dorsal con sintomatologia neurologica, tratado mediante una reseccion microquirurgica completa, sin secuelas neurologicas asociadas. Caso clinico. Mujer de 47 años, sin antecedentes traumaticos previos, valorada por presentar un cuadro de parestesias de los miembros inferiores de semanas de evolucion. El estudio radiologico de resonancia magnetica dorsal demostro la existencia de una lesion litica de bordes bien delimitados y esclerosis marginal en D4, con afectacion de los elementos posteriores vertebrales y compresion del cordon medular subyacente. La lesion fue extirpada en su totalidad, con desaparicion de la clinica sensitiva tras la intervencion. El diagnostico anatomopatologico definitivo fue quiste oseo aneurismatico espinal. Conclusion. A pesar de su baja incidencia, los quistes oseos aneurismaticos espinales deben considerarse, en el diagnostico diferencial de los tumores oseos espinales, como una posible causa de mielopatia compresiva subaguda o cronica. La reseccion tumoral completa se considera el tratamiento de eleccion, el cual con frecuencia es curativo y asocia un buen pronostico del paciente a largo plazo.

  11. Kyphotic Angle Progression of Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Tuberculous Spondylitis after Surgical Treatment: Comparison with Predicted Kyphosis Outcome after Conservative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon-Eok; Shin, Jae-Hyuk; Na, Ki-Ho; Kim, Yoon-Chung

    2009-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective comparative study. Purpose To compare the progression of the kyphotic angle (KA) in a surgically treated group with the predicted outcome of a conservatively treated group. Overview of Literature Late onset kyphosis is a complication of tuberculous spondylitis making its prevention a major goal of surgery. Methods Twenty six consecutive patients underwent an anterior reconstruction and posterior instrumented fusion in conjunction with antituberculous chemotherapy. The mean follow up was 56 months (range, 28 to 112 months). The patients were divided into subgroups based on the involved region of the thoracic and the thoracolumbar spine, initial KA, and the initial vertebral body loss (VBL(x)). The predicted KA (KAPd) was calculated using the formula, KAPd=5.5+30.5 VBL(x), to predict the final gibbus deformity. Kyphotic angle progression (ΔKA) based on the radiographic measurements after surgery (ΔKAR), and the predicted outcome of conservative treatment (ΔKAP) with chemotherapy were compared. Results Among the subgroups of the regions involved and initial KA, the ΔKA was radiographically superior with a reduced amount of kyphogenesis in the surgery group than the predicted outcome of the conservatively treated patients (p<0.05). The radiographic ΔKA was similar (p>0.05) with VBL(x)≤0.5 in the VBL(x) subgroup. Conclusions These results showed that in the VBL(x) subgroup, an initial VBL(x)≤0.5 is an indication of conservative antituberculous chemotherapy without surgery. PMID:20404952

  12. Median Nerve Somatosensory Evoked Potential in HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boostani, Reza; Poorzahed, Ali; Ahmadi, Zahra; Mellat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive Myelopathy that mainly involves the corticospinal tract. Despite pronounced involvement of the lower limbs, patients also have abnormalities in their upper limbs. So, we studied somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) of the median nerve in HAM/TSP patients to determine the extent of the involvement of the pathway of the central nervous system, especially the cervical spinal cord. Methods In this cross sectional study, 48 patients with HAM/TSP who were referred to Qaem Hospital in Mashhad from October 2010 to October 2011 were evaluated for various indices, including SSEPs of the median nerve for N9, N11, N13, and N20 waveforms and also N11–13 and N13–20 Inter Peak Latency (IPL), severity of disease (based on Osama criteria), disease duration (less or more than 2 years), age, and gender. SPSS software was used for data analysis. The t-test was used for quantitative data, and the chi-squared test was used for the qualitative variables. Results Thirty-four patients (70.2%) were females. The mean age was 45.6 ± 14.2 years. About SSEPs indices of the median nerve, N9 and N11 were normal in all patients, but N13 (50%), N20 (16.7%), IPL11–13 (58.3%), and IPL13–20 (22.9%) were abnormal. No significant relationships were found between age, gender, disease duration, and SSEPs indices (p > 0.05), but IPL11–13 and IPL13–20 had significant relationships with disease disability (p = 0.017 and p = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion Despite the lack of obvious complaints of upper limbs, SSEPs indices of the median nerve from the cervical spinal cord to the cortex were abnormal, which indicated extension of the lesion from the thoracic spinal cord up to the cervical spinal cord and thalamocortical pathways. Also, abnormalities in the cervical spinal cord had a direct correlation with the severity of disability in patients with HAM/TSP. PMID:27382445

  13. Mechanical and cellular processes driving cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Roisin T; Butler, Joseph S; O’Byrne, John M; Poynton, Ashley R

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a well-described clinical syndrome that may evolve from a combination of etiological mechanisms. It is traditionally classified by cervical spinal cord and/or nerve root compression which varies in severity and number of levels involved. The vast array of clinical manifestations of cervical myelopathy cannot fully be explained by the simple concept that a narrowed spinal canal causes compression of the cord, local tissue ischemia, injury and neurological impairment. Despite advances in surgical technology and treatment innovations, there are limited neuro-protective treatments for cervical myelopathy, which reflects an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological processes involved in this disease. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the key pathophysiological processes at play in the development of cervical myelopathy. PMID:26807352

  14. Compression Myelopathy due to Proliferative Changes around C2 Pars Defects without Instability.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Sakai, Toshinori; Tezuka, Fumitake; Abe, Mitsunobu; Yamashita, Kazuta; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    We report a case with compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects without instability. A 69-year-old man presented with progressive clumsy hands and spastic gait. Plain radiographs showed bilateral spondylolysis (pars defects) at C2 and fusion between C2 and C3 spinous processes. Dynamic views revealed mobility through the pars defects, but there was no apparent instability. Computed tomography showed proliferative changes at the pars defects, which protruded into spinal canal. On magnetic resonance imaging, the spinal cord was compressed and intramedullary high signal change was found. A diagnosis of compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects was made. We performed posterior decompression. Postoperatively, symptoms have been alleviated and images revealed sufficient decompression and no apparent instability. In patients with the cervical spondylolysis, myelopathy caused by instability or slippage have been periodically reported. The present case involving C2 spondylolysis is extremely rare. PMID:27340539

  15. Compression Myelopathy due to Proliferative Changes around C2 Pars Defects without Instability

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Tezuka, Fumitake; Abe, Mitsunobu; Yamashita, Kazuta; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case with compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects without instability. A 69-year-old man presented with progressive clumsy hands and spastic gait. Plain radiographs showed bilateral spondylolysis (pars defects) at C2 and fusion between C2 and C3 spinous processes. Dynamic views revealed mobility through the pars defects, but there was no apparent instability. Computed tomography showed proliferative changes at the pars defects, which protruded into spinal canal. On magnetic resonance imaging, the spinal cord was compressed and intramedullary high signal change was found. A diagnosis of compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects was made. We performed posterior decompression. Postoperatively, symptoms have been alleviated and images revealed sufficient decompression and no apparent instability. In patients with the cervical spondylolysis, myelopathy caused by instability or slippage have been periodically reported. The present case involving C2 spondylolysis is extremely rare. PMID:27340539

  16. Spontaneous resolution of idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniation: case report.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Nardin; Goldstein, Christina L; Santaguida, Carlo; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord herniation is a relatively rare but increasingly recognized clinical entity, with fewer than 200 cases reported in the literature to date. The etiology of this condition remains unknown, and surgery is used as the primary treatment to correct the herniation and consequent spinal cord compromise. Some patients without clinical progression have been treated with nonoperative measures, including careful follow-up and symptomatic physical therapy. To date, however, there has been no published report on the resolution of spinal cord herniation without surgical intervention. The patient in the featured case is a 58-year-old man who presented with mild thoracic myelopathy and imaging findings consistent with idiopathic spinal cord herniation. Surprisingly, updated MRI studies, obtained to better delineate the pathology, showed spontaneous resolution of the herniation. Subsequent MRI 6 months later revealed continued resolution of the previous spinal cord herniation. This is the first report of spontaneous resolution of a spinal cord herniation in the literature. At present, the treatment of this disorder is individualized, with microsurgical correction used in patients with progressive neurological impairment. The featured case highlights the potential variability in the natural history of this condition and supports considering an initial trial of nonoperative management for patients with mild, nonprogressive neurological deficits. PMID:26023901

  17. Spontaneous resolution of idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniation: case report.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Nardin; Goldstein, Christina L; Santaguida, Carlo; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord herniation is a relatively rare but increasingly recognized clinical entity, with fewer than 200 cases reported in the literature to date. The etiology of this condition remains unknown, and surgery is used as the primary treatment to correct the herniation and consequent spinal cord compromise. Some patients without clinical progression have been treated with nonoperative measures, including careful follow-up and symptomatic physical therapy. To date, however, there has been no published report on the resolution of spinal cord herniation without surgical intervention. The patient in the featured case is a 58-year-old man who presented with mild thoracic myelopathy and imaging findings consistent with idiopathic spinal cord herniation. Surprisingly, updated MRI studies, obtained to better delineate the pathology, showed spontaneous resolution of the herniation. Subsequent MRI 6 months later revealed continued resolution of the previous spinal cord herniation. This is the first report of spontaneous resolution of a spinal cord herniation in the literature. At present, the treatment of this disorder is individualized, with microsurgical correction used in patients with progressive neurological impairment. The featured case highlights the potential variability in the natural history of this condition and supports considering an initial trial of nonoperative management for patients with mild, nonprogressive neurological deficits.

  18. Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula Presenting as Cervical Myelopathy: A Rapid Recovery with Balloon Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, Manish; Bapuraj, J. Rajiv; Lal, Anupam; Prabhakar, S.; Khandelwal, N.

    2010-12-15

    A 24-year-old male presented with progressive cervical myelopathy of 2 months' duration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine and angiography revealed a large arteriovenous fistula arising from the left vertebral artery. The present case highlights the clinical features and dramatic recovery following endovascular balloon occlusion of a giant cervical arteriovenous fistula.

  19. Spontaneous Anterior Thoracic Spinal Cord Herniation through Dura Defect: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic spinal cord herniation is a rare disease cause of progressive myelopathy. Magnetic resonance image is a useful tool to diagnose preoperatively. Operation is a treatment of option. Sixty-six-year-old female visited Dong-A University Medical Center for progressive gait disturbance with falling tendency to right side. She had radiating pain and tingling sense on both leg. Sense of touch and temperature was decreased below T6 level. Both hip and knee motor power were grade IV. Magnetic resonance imaging scan showed anterior displacement of the spinal cord at T4-T5 vertebral level. Under the diagnosis of thoracic spinal cord herniation with dura defect, operation was performed for the patient with intraoperative neuromonitoring. Laminectomy at T4 and T5 level was done, and intradural exploration of the spinal cord revealed dura defect about 25mm×8mm in size. Spinal cord was released under microscope and dura defect was repaired with Lyoplant. The patient's symptom improved after the surgical procedure, but touch and temperature sense under T6 level had unchanged. PMID:27437019

  20. Delayed myelopathy secondary to stab wound with a retained blade tip within the laminae: case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Delayed neurologic deficit after a stab wound with a retained foreign body near the spinal canal is unusual, adequate radiological examination is fundamental in detecting retained foreign bodies, especially the CT scan, surgical extraction of the foreign body is the primary task and the surgical outcome is satisfactory. Here, we report a rare case of delayed myelopathy caused by spinal stenosis secondary to broken blade tip within thoracic laminae in an old man, who was injured in a knife attack 39 years ago. The incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis and prognosis are discussed.

  1. Delayed myelopathy secondary to stab wound with a retained blade tip within the laminae: case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Delayed neurologic deficit after a stab wound with a retained foreign body near the spinal canal is unusual, adequate radiological examination is fundamental in detecting retained foreign bodies, especially the CT scan, surgical extraction of the foreign body is the primary task and the surgical outcome is satisfactory. Here, we report a rare case of delayed myelopathy caused by spinal stenosis secondary to broken blade tip within thoracic laminae in an old man, who was injured in a knife attack 39 years ago. The incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis and prognosis are discussed. PMID:26629221

  2. Thoracic amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Shamsuzzaman, S M; Hashiguchi, Y

    2002-06-01

    cardiac failure or corpulmonale. Diagnosis by finding E histolytica in stool specimens is of limited value. In a limited number of cases amebae might be found in aspirated pus or expectorated sputum. "Anchovy sauce-like" pus or sputum may be found. Presence of bile in sputum indicates that the pus is of liver origin. Serological tests are of immense value in diagnosis. Liver enzymes are usually normal and neutrophilic leucocytosis may or may not be found. ESR is invariably elevated. Anti-amebic antibodies can be detected by ELISA, IFAT, and IHA. Amebic antigen can be detected from serum and pus by ELISA. Detection of Entamoeba DNA in pus or sputum may be a sensitive and specific method. Pleuropulmonary amebiasis is easily confused with other illnesses and is treated as pulmonary TB, bacterial lung abscesses, and carcinoma of the lung. A single drug regimen with metronidazole with supportive therapy usually cures patients without residual anomalies. Aspiration of pus from empyema thoracis may be needed for confirmation and therapeutic purposes. The pericardium is usually involved by direct extension from the amebic abscess of the left lobe of the liver, sometimes from the right lobe of the liver, and rarely from the lungs or pleura. An initial accumulation of serous fluid due to reactive pericarditis followed by intrapericardial rupture may develop either (1) acute onset of severe symptoms with chest pain, dyspnea, and cardiac tamponade, shock, and death, or (2) progressive effusion with thoracic cage pain, progressive dyspnea, and fever. Chest radiograph, ultrasound examination, and CT scan usually confirm the presence of a liver abscess in continuity with the pericardium and fluid within the pericardial sac with or without the fistulous tract. Echocardiography may demonstrate fluid in the pericardial cavity. Patients should be cared for in the ICU and ambecides should be started without delay. Pericardiocentesis usually confirms the diagnosis and improves the general

  3. Thoracic amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Shamsuzzaman, S M; Hashiguchi, Y

    2002-06-01

    cardiac failure or corpulmonale. Diagnosis by finding E histolytica in stool specimens is of limited value. In a limited number of cases amebae might be found in aspirated pus or expectorated sputum. "Anchovy sauce-like" pus or sputum may be found. Presence of bile in sputum indicates that the pus is of liver origin. Serological tests are of immense value in diagnosis. Liver enzymes are usually normal and neutrophilic leucocytosis may or may not be found. ESR is invariably elevated. Anti-amebic antibodies can be detected by ELISA, IFAT, and IHA. Amebic antigen can be detected from serum and pus by ELISA. Detection of Entamoeba DNA in pus or sputum may be a sensitive and specific method. Pleuropulmonary amebiasis is easily confused with other illnesses and is treated as pulmonary TB, bacterial lung abscesses, and carcinoma of the lung. A single drug regimen with metronidazole with supportive therapy usually cures patients without residual anomalies. Aspiration of pus from empyema thoracis may be needed for confirmation and therapeutic purposes. The pericardium is usually involved by direct extension from the amebic abscess of the left lobe of the liver, sometimes from the right lobe of the liver, and rarely from the lungs or pleura. An initial accumulation of serous fluid due to reactive pericarditis followed by intrapericardial rupture may develop either (1) acute onset of severe symptoms with chest pain, dyspnea, and cardiac tamponade, shock, and death, or (2) progressive effusion with thoracic cage pain, progressive dyspnea, and fever. Chest radiograph, ultrasound examination, and CT scan usually confirm the presence of a liver abscess in continuity with the pericardium and fluid within the pericardial sac with or without the fistulous tract. Echocardiography may demonstrate fluid in the pericardial cavity. Patients should be cared for in the ICU and ambecides should be started without delay. Pericardiocentesis usually confirms the diagnosis and improves the general

  4. Cervical myelopathy in athetoid and dystonic cerebral palsy: retrospective study and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rech, Celia; Garreau de Loubresse, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The early onset of degenerative cervical lesions has been well described in patients suffering from athetoid or dystonic cerebral palsy. Myelopathy can occur and aggravate of their unstable neurological status. Diagnosis and treatment are delayed and disrupted by the abnormal movements. This retrospective study was implemented to evaluate the symptoms, the anatomical findings, and the surgical management of seven patients from 20 to 56 years old suffering from cervical myelopathy and athetoid or dystonic cerebral palsy. The mean delay in diagnosis was 15 months and the mean follow-up was 33 months. The initial symptoms were spasticity, limbs weakness, paresthesias and vesico-sphinteric dysfunction. In addition to abnormal movements, imaging demonstrated disc herniation, spinal stenosis and instability. All patients were managed surgically by performing simultaneous spinal cord decompression and fusion. Two patients benefited from preoperative botulinum toxin injections, which facilitated postoperative care and immobilization. Strict postoperative immobilization was achieved for 3 months by a Philadelphia collar or a cervico-thoracic orthosis. All patients improved functionally with a mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association score gain of 1.5 points, in spite of the permanent disabilities of the myelopathy. Complications occurred with wound infection, metal failure and relapse of cervical myelopathy at an adjacent level in one case each. All the previous authors advised against isolated laminectomy but no consensus emerged from the literature analysis. Spinal fusion is usually recommended but can be complicated by degenerative adjacent deterioration. Surgical management provides good outcomes but requires a long-term follow-up. PMID:20066444

  5. Myelopathy due to intrathecal chemotherapy: report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Bay, Ali; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Etlik, Omer; Yilmaz, Cahide; Caksen, Huseyin

    2005-05-01

    Intrathecal chemotherapy and systemic chemotherapy are used for both prophylaxis and treatment of central nervous system disease in hematologic malignancies. However, intrathecal treatment has some adverse effects, such as arachnoiditis, progressive myelopathy, and leukoencephalopathy. The authors describe six children in whom myelopathy and adhesive arachnoiditis developed after administration of intrathecal chemotherapy including methotrexate, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisolone. Urinary retention and incontinence, the main presenting complaints in all patients, developed within 12 hours after intrathecal therapy and spontaneously resolved within 7 days. Two patients were unable to walk. In these two, weakness in the lower extremities gradually recovered by 1 month but urinary incontinence did not improve. None of the children had sensory loss. On follow-up periodic recurrent urinary tract infection was noted in four patients. MRI findings corresponded to arachnoiditis. No response was recorded on tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials in all patients. Intrathecal chemotherapy, especially methotrexate, can cause spinal cord dysfunction in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Arachnoiditis should be kept in mind as a causative factor in recurrent urinary tract infection in patients receiving intrathecal chemotherapy.

  6. Myelopathy in a previously asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Eyer-Silva, W A; Auto, I; Pinto, J F; Morais-de-Sá, C A

    2001-01-01

    A wide variety of disorders of diverse pathogenic mechanisms can trigger spinal cord dysfunction in HIV-1-infected patients. The most common such condition is HIV-1-associated myelopathy (HM) which characteristically complicates advanced HIV-1 disease in patients with low CD4 cell counts and previous AIDS-defining diagnoses. We describe an unusual presentation of HM in a previously asymptomatic patient with a relatively preserved CD4 cell count (458 cells/mm3) who was even unaware of his serological status. The patient presented with a clinically severe, slowly progressive myelopathy and could not walk unassisted. Significant neurological improvement could be obtained as rapidly as within 4 weeks after the institution of an antiretroviral combination of only two nucleoside analog HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors (zidovudine and didanosine). An HIV-1 protease inhibitor was also prescribed at that point but could only be added to intensify the regimen 3 months later, when significant neurological improvement had already been recorded. We also review the disorders reported to derange spinal cord function in previously asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patients.

  7. Surgical Management of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wesley; Dorsi, Michael J.; Witham, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a common degenerative condition that is a significant cause of morbidity. This review discusses the pathophysiology and natural history of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and focuses on the current literature evaluating the clinical management of these patients. PMID:20191085

  8. HTLV-1-associated infective dermatitis and probable HTLV-1- associated myelopathy in an adolescent female*

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Raquel Bisacotti; Tonoli, Renata Elise; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Pinto, Giselle Martins; Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated infective dermatitis (ID) is a chronic, severe and recurrent eczema occurring during childhood in patients vertically infected with HTLV-1. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesia (HAM/ TSP) is slow and progressive. We report the case of an adolescent female from a non-endemic area for HTLV-1 who presents ID and, most likely, associated HAM/TSP. PMID:26312674

  9. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  10. Thoracic actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Slade, P. R.; Slesser, B. V.; Southgate, J.

    1973-01-01

    Six cases of pulmonary infection with Actinomyces Israeli and one case of infection with Nocardia asteroides are described. The incidence of thoracic actinomycosis has declined recently and the classical presentation with chronic discharging sinuses is now uncommon. The cases described illustrate some of the forms which the disease may take. Actinomycotic infection has been noted, not infrequently, to co-exist with bronchial carcinoma and a case illustrating this association is described. Sputum cytology as practised for the diagnosis of bronchial carcinoma has helped to identify the fungi in the sputum. Treatment is discussed, particularly the possible use of oral antibiotics rather than penicillin by injection. Images PMID:4568119

  11. Treatment of symptomatic thoracic disc herniations with lateral interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Rhiannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic thoracic herniated discs have historically been treated using open exposures (i.e., thoracotomy), posing a clinical challenge given the approach related morbidity. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is one modern minimally disruptive alternative to thoracotomy. The direct lateral technique for lumbar pathologies has seen a sharp increase in procedural numbers; however application of this technique in thoracic pathologies has not been widely reported. Methods This study presents the results of three cases where LIF was used to treat symptomatic thoracic disc herniations. Indications for surgery included thoracic myelopathy, radiculopathy and discogenic pain. Patients were treated with LIF, without supplemental internal fixation, and followed for 24 months postoperatively. Results: Average length of hospital stay was 5 days. One patient experienced mild persistent neuropathic thoracic pain, which was managed medically. At 3 months postoperative all patients had returned to work and by 12 months all patients were fused. From preoperative to 24-month follow-up there were mean improvements of 83.3% in visual analogue scale (VAS), 75.3% in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 79.2% and 17.4% in SF-36 physical (PCS) and mental component scores (MCS), respectively. Conclusions LIF is a viable minimally invasive alternative to conventional approaches in treating symptomatic thoracic pathology without an access surgeon, rib resection, or lung deflation.

  12. Overshunting-associated myelopathy: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jason Man-Kit; Law, Hing-Yuen; Yuen, Shing-Chau; Yam, Kwong-Yui

    2016-09-01

    The authors present 2 cases of cervical myelopathy produced by engorged vertebral veins due to overshunting. Overshunting-associated myelopathy is a rare complication of CSF shunting. Coexisting cervical degenerative disc disease may further increase the difficulty of diagnosing the condition. Neurosurgeons and others who routinely evaluate patients with intracranial shunts should be familiar with this rare but possible diagnosis. PMID:27581312

  13. Recurrence of cervical myelopathy secondary to a strut graft fracture 20 years after anterior decompression and fusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kida, Kazunobu; Takaya, Shogo; Tadokoro, Nobuaki; Kumon, Masashi; Kiyasu, Katsuhito; Kato, Tomonari; Takemasa, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Tani, Toshikazu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on a 70-year-old man with recurrent cervical myelopathy 20 years after anterior decompression and fusion of C4-7 using a free vascularised strut graft. The recurrent myelopathy was secondary to a kyphotic deformity of a fractured graft and residual ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament with stenosis at C3/4. Intraoperative spinal cord-evoked potentials indicated that spinal cord traction secondary to progressive kyphosis of the cervical spine after the graft fracture was the cause. The patient underwent laminoplasty at C3 and laminectomy at C4 to decompress the stenosis at C3/4 as well as posterior cervical spinal fusion at C3-7 with pedicle screws and a lateral mass screw and a bone graft to prevent further progression of the kyphosis. At postoperative 18 months, the patient's Japanese Orthopaedic Association score had improved to 14 from 8, and he could walk without support. PMID:26321562

  14. Pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with cervical dystonia and severe cervical dyskinesias with cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, J; Loher, T; Pohle, T; Weber, S; Taub, E; Barlocher, C; Burgunder, J

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical treatment of complex cervical dystonia and of cervical dyskinesias associated with cervical myelopathy is challenging. In this prospective study, the long term effect of chronic pallidal stimulation in cervical dystonia and on combining the technique with spinal surgery in patients with severe cervical dyskinesias and secondary cervical myelopathy is described. Methods: Eight patients with a history of chronic dystonia who did not achieve adequate benefit from medical treatment or botulinum toxin injection participated in the study. Five patients had complex cervical dystonia with tonic postures and phasic movements. Three patients had rapidly progressive cervical myelopathy secondary to severe cervical dyskinesias and dystonia in the context of a generalised movement disorder. Quadripolar electrodes were implanted in the posteroventral lateral globus pallidus internus with stereotactic CT and microelectrode guidance. In the three patients with secondary cervical myelopathy, spinal surgery was performed within a few weeks and included multilevel laminectomies and a four level cervical corporectomy with spinal stabilisation. Results: Improvement of the movement disorder was noted early after pallidal surgery, but the full benefit could be appreciated only with a delay of several months during chronic stimulation. Three months after surgery, patients with cervical dystonia had improved by 38% in the severity score, by 54% in the disability score, and by 38% in the pain score of a modified version of the Toronto western spasmodic torticollis rating scale. At a mean follow up of 20 months, the severity score had improved by 63%, the disability score by 69%, and the pain score by 50% compared with preoperatively. There was also sustained amelioration of cervical dyskinesias in the three patients who underwent spinal surgery. Lead fractures occurred in two patients. The mean amplitude needed for chronic deep brain stimulation was 3.8 V at a mean

  15. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Its Intense Demands New Website from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Puts the Power of Information ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. All rights reserved. Expanded Proprietary ...

  16. Delayed myelopathy induced by chronic compression in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Kim, Phyo; Haisa, Toshihiko; Kawamoto, Toshiki; Kirino, Takaaki; Wakai, Susumu

    2004-04-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a common cause of neurological disability among the elderly; however, the exact mechanism for the insidious and progressive deterioration remains to be elucidated. To study the pathophysiology, we developed a simple experimental model reproducing the course. In rats, a thin sheet of expanding polymer was implanted microsurgically underneath the C5-C6 laminae. In the control group, the polymer sheet was removed immediately. Changes in motor functions were monitored for 25 weeks after the operation, with voluntary exercise activity measured by odometer attached to revolving cages, and forced running capability measured by duration of exercise on a rotating treadmill. Motor neurons were counted stereologically in continuous sections. In the compression group, the forced running capability deteriorated after a latent period of 17 weeks and progressively thereafter. In the control group, it stayed unchanged throughout 25 weeks. Course of the voluntary exercise was comparable between the groups. Motor neuron density in the compression group decreased significantly in 9 weeks (-20.3%) and 25 weeks (-35.5%), but not in 1 or 3 weeks. This practical model properly reproduces characteristic features of the clinical cervical myelopathy, with progressive motor disturbance after a latency and insidious neuronal loss preceding the symptoms.

  17. Antemortem diagnosis and successful management of noncompressive segmental myelopathy in a Siberian-Bengal mixed breed tiger.

    PubMed

    Flower, Jennifer E; Lynch, Kate; Clark-Price, Stuart C; Welle, Kenneth R; O'Brien, Robert; Whittington, Julia K

    2013-12-01

    A 10-yr-old female spayed mixed breed tiger presented for a 9-day history of acute and nonprogressive paralysis of the pelvic limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion suggestive of fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy with regional spinal cord edema, decreased disk signal intensity at L2-L3, and mild intervertebral disk protrusion at L1-L2 and L2-L3. Cerebral spinal fluid analysis showed no overt evidence of infection or neoplasia. Medical therapy was instituted, including corticosteroids and gastroprotectants as well as nursing care and physical therapy. The tiger began showing clinical improvement 2 wk after initiating treatment, progressing to the point where the animal was standing and intermittently walking. Three months after diagnosis, the tiger had regained muscle strength of its hind limbs and walked regularly with improving coordination. This case is the first report of antemortem diagnosis and successful medical management of suspected fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy in a large exotic felid.

  18. Antemortem diagnosis and successful management of noncompressive segmental myelopathy in a Siberian-Bengal mixed breed tiger.

    PubMed

    Flower, Jennifer E; Lynch, Kate; Clark-Price, Stuart C; Welle, Kenneth R; O'Brien, Robert; Whittington, Julia K

    2013-12-01

    A 10-yr-old female spayed mixed breed tiger presented for a 9-day history of acute and nonprogressive paralysis of the pelvic limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion suggestive of fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy with regional spinal cord edema, decreased disk signal intensity at L2-L3, and mild intervertebral disk protrusion at L1-L2 and L2-L3. Cerebral spinal fluid analysis showed no overt evidence of infection or neoplasia. Medical therapy was instituted, including corticosteroids and gastroprotectants as well as nursing care and physical therapy. The tiger began showing clinical improvement 2 wk after initiating treatment, progressing to the point where the animal was standing and intermittently walking. Three months after diagnosis, the tiger had regained muscle strength of its hind limbs and walked regularly with improving coordination. This case is the first report of antemortem diagnosis and successful medical management of suspected fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy in a large exotic felid. PMID:24450082

  19. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Spectrum of Related Disorders Affecting the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Goldstein, Christina L; Arnold, Paul; Harrop, James; Hilibrand, Alan; Nouri, Aria; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord dysfunction can result from either traumatic or nontraumatic causes, including tumors, infections, and degenerative changes. In this article, we review the range of degenerative spinal disorders resulting in progressive cervical spinal cord compression and propose the adoption of a new term, degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). DCM comprises both osteoarthritic changes to the spine, including spondylosis, disk herniation, and facet arthropathy (collectively referred to as cervical spondylotic myelopathy), and ligamentous aberrations such as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum. This review summarizes current knowledge of the pathophysiology of DCM and describes the cascade of events that occur after compression of the spinal cord, including ischemia, destruction of the blood-spinal cord barrier, demyelination, and neuronal apoptosis. Important features of the diagnosis of DCM are discussed in detail, and relevant clinical and imaging findings are highlighted. Furthermore, this review outlines valuable assessment tools for evaluating functional status and quality of life in these patients and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other topics of this review include epidemiology, the prevalence of degenerative changes in the asymptomatic population, the natural history and rates of progression, risk factors of diagnosis (clinical, imaging and genetic), and management strategies. PMID:26378358

  20. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Spectrum of Related Disorders Affecting the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Goldstein, Christina L; Arnold, Paul; Harrop, James; Hilibrand, Alan; Nouri, Aria; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord dysfunction can result from either traumatic or nontraumatic causes, including tumors, infections, and degenerative changes. In this article, we review the range of degenerative spinal disorders resulting in progressive cervical spinal cord compression and propose the adoption of a new term, degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). DCM comprises both osteoarthritic changes to the spine, including spondylosis, disk herniation, and facet arthropathy (collectively referred to as cervical spondylotic myelopathy), and ligamentous aberrations such as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum. This review summarizes current knowledge of the pathophysiology of DCM and describes the cascade of events that occur after compression of the spinal cord, including ischemia, destruction of the blood-spinal cord barrier, demyelination, and neuronal apoptosis. Important features of the diagnosis of DCM are discussed in detail, and relevant clinical and imaging findings are highlighted. Furthermore, this review outlines valuable assessment tools for evaluating functional status and quality of life in these patients and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other topics of this review include epidemiology, the prevalence of degenerative changes in the asymptomatic population, the natural history and rates of progression, risk factors of diagnosis (clinical, imaging and genetic), and management strategies.

  1. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-02-01

    Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported.From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores.Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36-112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease.Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  2. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported. From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36–112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease. Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  3. Changes in respiratory function in Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs with degenerative myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    OYAKE, Kanae; KOBATAKE, Yui; SHIBATA, Sanae; SAKAI, Hiroki; SAITO, Miyoko; YAMATO, Osamu; KUSHIDA, Kazuya; MAEDA, Sadatoshi; KAMISHINA, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is characterized by progressive degeneration of the spinal cord. Although atrophic changes in the intercostal muscles were previously reported in the late stage of DM in Pembroke Welsh Corgis (PWCs), changes in respiratory function have not yet been examined. In the present study, we performed an arterial blood gas analysis and measured respiratory movements over progressive disease stages to document changes in respiratory function in DM-affected PWCs. We found that respiratory dysfunction progressed during the later stages of DM and correlated with a change in respiratory movement to the abdominal breathing pattern. These results suggested that hypoventilation occurred due to dysfunctional changes in the intercostal muscles and resulted in hypoxemia in the later stages of DM. PMID:27109068

  4. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment. PMID:25808686

  5. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment.

  6. Two Cases of Klippel-Feil Syndrome with Cervical Myelopathy Successfully Treated by Simple Decompression without Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Bum; Lee, Young Seok; Nam, Taek Kyun; Park, Yong Sook; Kim, Young Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a congenital developmental disorder of cervical spine, showing short neck with restricted neck motion, low hairline, and high thoracic cage due to multilevel cervical fusion. Radiculopathy or myelopathy can be accompanied. There were 2 patients who were diagnosed as KFS with exhibited radiological and physical characteristics. Both patients had stenosis and cord compression at C1 level due to anterior displacement of C1 posterior arch secondary to kyphotic deformity of upper cervical spine, which has been usually indicative to craniocervical fixation. One patient was referred due to quadriparesis detected after surgery for aortic arch aneurysmal dilatation. The other patient was referred to us due to paraparesis and radiating pain in all extremities developed during gynecological examinations. Decompressive C1 laminectomy was done for one patient and additional suboccipital craniectomy for the other. No craniocervical fixation was done because there was no spinal instability. Motor power improved immediately after the operation in both patients. Motor functions and spinal stability were well preserved in both patients for 2 years. In KFS patients with myelopathy at the C1 level without C1-2 instability, a favorable outcome could be achieved by a simple decompression without spinal fixation. PMID:26512291

  7. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Injections into the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Jeffrey W.; Layzer, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Three cases of longitudinally extensive cervical myelopathies temporally associated with neck injections are presented. The spinal cord injury was similar radiographically, despite a number of different needle approaches and substances injected. In recent years, there have been reports of an acute cervical myelopathy immediately following an injection procedure in the neck. Various explanations have been offered for this unfortunate complication, including (1) direct injection into the cord leading to traumatic injury, (2) injection of particulate matter into the arterial supply of the cord causing microvascular embolism and spinal cord infarction, and (3) intraneural injection of the chemical with centripetal spread of the injectant from the nerve trunk to the substance of the cord. The merits of each of these 3 mechanisms in explaining these cases are discussed. Albeit rare, acute cervical myelopathy should be considered a potential complication from any deep injection of chemicals into the neck. PMID:26425248

  8. [Acute non-traumatic myelopathy in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hugo A

    2013-09-01

    The term 'acute myelopathies'--referred to a spinal cord dysfunction--represent a heterogeneous group of disorders with distinct etiologies, clinical and radiologic features, and prognoses. The objective of this review is to discuss the non-traumatic acute myelopathies. Acute myelopathy can be due to several causes as infective agents or inflammatory processes, such as in acute myelitis, compressive lesions, vascular lesions, etc. The clinical presentation is often dramatic with tetraparesis or paraparesis, sensory disturbances and bladder and/or bowel dysfunction. History and physical examination are used to localize the lesion to the root or specific level of the cord, which can guide imaging. Different syndromes are recognized: complete transverse lesion, central grey matter syndrome, anterior horn syndrome, anterior spinal artery syndrome, etc). The first priority is to rule out a compressive lesion. If a myelopathy is suspected, a gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the spinal cord should be obtained as soon as possible. If there is no structural lesion such as epidural blood or a spinal mass, then the presence or absence of spinal cord inflammation should be documented with a lumbar puncture. The absence of pleocytosis would lead to consideration of non inflammatory causes of myelopathy such as arteriovenous malformations, fibrocartilaginous embolism, or possibly early inflammatory myelopathy. In the presence of an inflammatory process (defined by gadolinium enhancement, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, or elevated cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin index), one should determine whether there is an inflammatory or an infectious cause. Different virus, bacterias, parasites and fungi have to be considered as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that involve the central nervous system.

  9. Restoration of Upper Limb Function in an Individual with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy using Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Milos R.; Zivanovic, Vera; Valiante, Taufik A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-traumatic spinal cord pathology is responsible for 25–52% of all spinal cord lesions. Studies have revealed that spinal stenosis accounts for 16–21% of spinal cord injury (SCI) admissions. Impaired grips as well as slow unskilled hand and finger movements are the most common complaints in patients with spinal cord disorders, such as myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. In the past, our team carried out couple of successful clinical trials, including two randomized control trials, showing that functional electrical stimulation therapy (FEST) can restore voluntary reaching and/or grasping function, in people with stroke and traumatic SCI. Motivated by this success, we decided to examine changes in the upper limb function following FEST in a patient who suffered loss of hand function due to myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. The participant was a 61-year-old male who had C3–C7 posterior laminectomy and instrumented fusion for cervical myelopathy. The participant presented with progressive right hand weakness that resulted in his inability to voluntarily open and close the hand and to manipulate objects unilaterally with his right hand. The participant was enrolled in the study ~22 months following initial surgical intervention. Participant was assessed using Toronto Rehabilitation Institute’s Hand Function Test (TRI-HFT), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). The pre–post differences in scores on all measures clearly demonstrated improvement in voluntary hand function following 15 1-h FEST sessions. The changes observed were meaningful and have resulted in substantial improvement in performance of activities of daily living. These results provide preliminary evidence that FEST has a potential to improve upper limb function in patients with non-traumatic SCI, such as myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. PMID:27375547

  10. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is surgery to treat sweating that is much heavier than normal. This condition ... hyperhidrosis . Usually the surgery is used to treat sweating in the palms or face. The sympathetic nerves ...

  11. Thoracic intrathymic thyroid.

    PubMed Central

    Spinner, R J; Moore, K L; Gottfried, M R; Lowe, J E; Sabiston, D C

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors introduce thoracic intrathymic thyroid as a clinical entity. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although accessory aberrant thyroid has not been found in other tissues in the mediastinum, a thoracic intrathymic location has not been described previously. It is believed that mediastinal thyroid tissue represents accessory ectopic tissue from the median thyroid anlage. Moreover, the close association of the thymus and thyroid supports the theory that mediastinal ectopic thyroid tissue develops from abnormal descent of these structures during embryogenesis. METHODS: Benign thoracic intrathymic thyroid lesions are described in patients with mediastinal masses. CONCLUSION: Thoracic intrathymic thyroid is a distinct entity. Its occurrence is supported both clinically and embryologically. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8024364

  12. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) causes pain in the shoulder, arm, and neck. It happens when the nerves or blood vessels just below your ... vein is compressed, your hand might be sensitive to cold, or turn pale or bluish. Your arm ...

  13. Treatment of Portosystemic Shunt Myelopathy with a Stent Graft Deployed through a Transjugular Intrahepatic Route

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Deepak Arora, Ankur; Deka, Pranjal; Mukund, Amar Bhatnagar, Shorav; Jindal, Deepti Kumar, Niteen Pamecha, Viniyendra

    2013-08-01

    A case of surgically created splenorenal shunt complicated with shunt myelopathy was successfully managed by placement of a stent graft within the splenic vein to close the portosystemic shunt and alleviate myelopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of shunt myelopathy in a patient with noncirrhotic portal fibrosis without cirrhosis treated by a novel technique wherein a transjugular intrahepatic route was adopted to deploy the stent graft.

  14. Thoracic manifestations of collagen vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Julia; Grimberg, Alexandre; Thompson, Bruna M; Antunes, Viviane B; Jasinowodolinski, Dany; Meirelles, Gustavo S P

    2012-01-01

    Collagen vascular diseases are a diverse group of immunologically mediated systemic disorders that often lead to thoracic changes. The collagen vascular diseases that most commonly involve the lung are rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis and dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, and Sjögren syndrome. Interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension are the main causes of mortality and morbidity among patients with collagen vascular diseases. Given the broad spectrum of possible thoracic manifestations and the varying frequency with which different interstitial lung diseases occur, the interpretation of thoracic images obtained in patients with collagen vascular diseases can be challenging. The task may be more difficult in the presence of treatment-related complications such as drug toxicity and infections, which are common in this group of patients. Although chest radiography is most often used for screening and monitoring of thoracic alterations, high-resolution computed tomography can provide additional information about lung involvement in collagen vascular diseases and may be especially helpful for differentiating specific disease patterns in the lung. General knowledge about the manifestations of thoracic involvement in collagen vascular diseases allows radiologists to provide better guidance for treatment and follow-up of these patients.

  15. [Factors of prognosis in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a review].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Jia, Zhi-wei; Wu, Jian-hong; Wang, De-li; Ruan, Di-ke

    2016-03-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction clinical disease. Surgery is the main therapeutic tool for CSM. However, there are obvious differences in clinical functional recovery after operation. For the past few years, the influence factors of prognosis in cervical spondylosis myelopathic has been widely concerned. Age, nerve function, course of desease, imaging findings,surgical method and related factors became the investigative point for prognosis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Present viewpoint showed that the older patient, preoperative worse nerve function, longer the course of disease would result in worse outcomes. Imaging examination maybe can indicate the prognosis, but the correlation is unclear. Selection of surgical method and approach should be based on the principles of sufficient decompression, stabilize the alignment of the cervical spine, keeping backward extension of cervical spine, maintain effective decompression, preventing complications. Therefore, the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy should be on the basis of pathogenic condition and imaging examination at early stage and a suitable usrgical procedure should be performed to obtain a better prognosis. PMID:27149790

  16. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques. PMID:23775735

  17. [Thoracic outlet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José Maria

    2005-01-01

    The thoracic outlet syndrome is a polymorphic clinical entity, whose nature is essentially anatomic, caused by the chronic compression of the neurovascular structures that are originated in the chest or neck and course to the upper extremity. According to the most affected structure, they can be classified as neurologic, arterial or venous syndromes, that may cause discomfort, pain and disability, sometimes definite and irreparable. Thoracic outlet syndrome are often difficult to recognize in clinical practice and it is important to emphasize some peculiar symptoms or signs that each syndrome may present, through specific maneuvers or adequate complementary studies. The great majority of patients may improve with physical therapy or postural correction, and a minority is indicated for surgical therapy. The main features of the diverse thoracic outlet syndromes, their clinical presentation, diagnosis, conventional and surgical management, surgical access, complications and prognosis are described and discussed in this paper dedicated to a complete review of the entity. PMID:16234911

  18. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  19. Thoracic Extraosseous Epidural Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Asil, Kiyasettin; Ceylan, Davut; Erdem, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas were first reported in 1929 by Globus and Doshay, and are defined as benign vascular structures developed between the neural tissues occurring in the central nervous system, consisting of a dilated vascular bed. Cavernous hemangiomas comprise nearly 5-12% of all spinal vascular malformations; however, existence in the epidural space without bone involvement is rare. Only 4% of all cavernous hemangiomas (0.22/1.000.000) are purely epidural cavernous hemangiomas. In this case report, we removed a hemorrhagic thoracic mass presenting with progressive neurological deficits in a 55-year-old male patient. We found this case to be appropriate for presentation due to the rare occurrence of this type of cavernous hemangioma. PMID:25674348

  20. Thoracic outlet syndrome: anatomy.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Erdoğan

    2004-02-01

    The thoracic outlet region contains three important structures: the brachial plexus, the subclavian artery, and the subclavian vein. As they travel from the upper mediastinum to the upper extremity, these structures run through three important spaces: the interscalene triangle, the costoclavicular space, and the subpectoral space. Compression can occur in any of these three spaces because of structural anomalies or trauma.

  1. Anti-venom-induced myelopathy in a semipoisonous snakebite.

    PubMed

    Biswas, R; Irodi, A; Paul, A; Ghimere, G; Joshi, K R; Alurkar, V M; Shetty, K J

    2004-06-01

    A 40-year-old woman developed myelopathy manifesting as Brown Sequard syndrome after administration of Anti-venom (polyvalent enzyme-refined equine globulin supposed to neutralise 0.6 mg of standard cobra venom, 0.45 mg of standard krait venom, 0.6 mg of standard Russel's viper venom and 0.45 mg of saw scaled viper venom, manufactured by Serum Institute of India, Pune, India). It was concluded to be an immunological inflammation of the spinal cord after ruling out hematomyelia on imaging. The necessity of antivenom in semipoisonous snake bites have been addressed further in the article. PMID:15311570

  2. Management of Giant Calcified Thoracic Disks and Description of the Trench Vertebrectomy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Mitchell, Paul S.; Wilby, Martin; Crooks, Daniel; Barrett, Chris; Pillay, Robin; Pigott, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Case series and review of the literature. Objective  To review the management of giant calcified disks in our large cohort and compare with the existing literature. We discuss our surgical technique. Methods  Twenty-nine cases of herniated thoracic disk between 2000 and 2013 were reviewed. Eighteen patients were identified as having giant calcified thoracic disks, defined as diffusely calcified disks occupying at least 40% of the spinal canal. Demographic data was collected in addition to presentation, imaging findings, operative details, and outcomes using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale. Results  Giant calcified thoracic disks (GCTDs) are unique clinical entities that require special neurosurgical consideration owing to significant (≥40%) involvement of the spinal canal and compression of the spinal cord, often leading to myelopathy. The median age at diagnosis was 51.2 years (range 37 to 70) with the mean duration of presenting symptoms being 9.9 months (range 2 weeks to 3 years). Seventeen (94.4%) patients presented with at least one sign of myelopathy (hyperreflexia, hypertonia, bladder or bowel dysfunction) with the remaining 1 (5.6%) patient presenting with symptoms in keeping with radiculopathy. Thoracotomy was performed on 17 (94.4%) patients, and 1 (5.6%) patient had a costotransverse approach. Mean follow-up was 19.8 months (range 7 months to 2 years). mJOA score improved in 15 (83.3%) patients. mJOA scores in the other patients remained stable. Conclusions  GCTDs are difficult neurosurgical challenges owing to their size, degree of spinal cord compression, and consistency. We recommend a trench vertebrectomy via a thoracotomy in their surgical management. This procedure safely allows the identification of normal dura on either side of the compressed segment prior to performing a diskectomy. Excellent fusion rates were achieved with insertion of rib head autograft in the trench. PMID:27556000

  3. Thoracic outlet syndrome following breast implant rupture.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Raakhi; Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus

    2015-03-01

    We present a patient with bilateral breast implant rupture who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant rupture and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942

  4. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Following Breast Implant Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present a patient with bilateral breast implant rupture who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant rupture and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942

  5. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  6. Mediastinal thoracic duct cyst.

    PubMed Central

    Gowar, F J

    1978-01-01

    A case of mediastinal thoracic duct cyst is described; it is believed to be the first to be reported in Britain. Five surgically treated cases have been reported but in none was the diagnosis made before operation. Symptoms are caused by pressure of the cyst on the trachea and oesophagus and my be aggravted by eating a fatty meal. Differential diagnosis from other mediastinal tumours, especially bronchogenic cyst and neurofibroma, could perhaps be established before operation by lymphangiography. Images PMID:746509

  7. Normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage development

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Development of the spine and thoracic cage consists of a complex series of events involving multiple metabolic processes, genes and signaling pathways. During growth, complex phenomena occur in rapid succession. This succession of events, this establishment of elements, is programmed according to a hierarchy. These events are well synchronized to maintain harmonious limb, spine and thoracic cage relationships, as growth in the various body segments does not occur simultaneously at the same magnitude or rate. In most severe cases of untreated progressive early-onset spinal deformities, respiratory insufficiency and pulmonary and cardiac hypertension (cor pulmonale), which characterize thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS), can develop, sometimes leading to death. TIS is the inability of the thorax to ensure normal breathing. This clinical condition can be linked to costo-vertebral malformations (e.g., fused ribs, hemivertebrae, congenital bars), neuromuscular diseases (e.g., expiratory congenital hypotonia), Jeune or Jarcho-Levin syndromes or to 50% to 75% fusion of the thoracic spine before seven years of age. Complex spinal deformities alter normal growth plate development, and vertebral bodies become progressively distorted, perpetuating the disorder. Therefore, many scoliotic deformities can become growth plate disorders over time. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of how spinal deformities can affect normal spine and thoracic cage growth. Previous conceptualizations are integrated with more recent scientific data to provide a better understanding of both normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage growth. PMID:24147251

  8. Reversible myelopathy with vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Senol, M G; Sonmez, G; Ozdag, F; Saracoglu, M

    2008-11-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes haematological, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and neurological diseases. Subacute combined degeneration (SCD) of the spinal cord, characterised by degeneration of the lateral and posterior columns, is often found due to vitamin B12 deficiency. We report SCD occurring in a 57-year-old man who presented with a 2.5-month history of gradually progressing tingling in the fingers and toes and neck ache. Laboratory data revealed vitamin B12 deficiency and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the cervical spinal cord demonstrated abnormal hyperintense signal changes on T2-weighted imaging of the posterior columns. In our case, follow-up MR imaging findings correlated well with clinical outcome after treatment with vitamin B12 supplements. Neurological symptoms in vitamin B12 deficiency are frequent. Early spinal MR imaging assists in the early diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  9. [Surgery for thoracic tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kilani, T; Boudaya, M S; Zribi, H; Ouerghi, S; Marghli, A; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is mainly a medical disease. Surgery has been the unique therapeutic tool for a long time before the advent of specific antituberculous drugs, and the role of surgery was then confined to the treatment of the sequelae of tuberculosis and their complications. The resurgence of tuberculosis and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB combined to immunosuppressed patients represent a new challenge for tuberculosis surgery. Surgery may be indicated for a diagnostic purpose in patients with pulmonary, pleural, mediastinal or thoracic wall involvement, or with a therapeutic purpose (drainage, resection, residual cavity obliteration). Modern imaging techniques and the advent of video-assisted thoracic surgery allowed a new approach of this pathology; the majority of diagnostic interventions and selected cases requiring lung resection can be performed through a mini-invasive approach. Patients proposed for aggressive surgery may be treated with the best results thanks to a good evaluation of the thoracic lesions, of the patients' nutritional, infectious and general status combined with a good coordination between the specialized medical team for an optimal preparation to surgery.

  10. [Thoracic actinomycosis: three cases].

    PubMed

    Herrak, L; Msougar, Y; Ouadnouni, Y; Bouchikh, M; Benosmane, A

    2007-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare condition which, in the thoracic localisation, can mimic cancer or tuberculosis. We report a series of three case of thoracic actinomycosis treated in the Ibn Sina University Thoracic Surgery Unit in Rabat, Morocco. CASE N degrees 1: This 45-year-old patient presented a tumefaction on the left anterior aspect of the chest. Physical examination identified a parietal mass with fistulisation to the skin. Radiography demonstrated a left pulmonary mass. Transparietal puncture led to the pathological diagnosis of actinomycosis. The patient was given medical treatment and improved clinically and radiographically. CASE N degrees 2: This 68-year-old patient presented repeated episodes of hemoptysis. The chest x-ray revealed atelectasia of the middle lobe and bronchial fibroscopy demonstrated the presence of a bud in the middle lobar bronchus. Biopsies were negative. The patient underwent surgery and the histology examination of the operative specimen revealed pulmonary actinomycosis. The patient recovered well clinically and radiographically with antibiotic therapy. CASE N degrees 3: This 56-year-old patient presented cough and hemoptysis. Physical examination revealed a left condensation and destruction of the left lung was noted on the chest x-ray. Left pleuropulmonectomy was performed. Histological analysis of the surgical specimen identified associated Aspergillus and Actinomyces. The outcome was favorable with medical treatment. The purpose of this work was to recall the radiological, clinical, histological, therapeutic, outcome aspects of this condition and to relate the problems of differential diagnosis when can suggest other diseases. PMID:17978739

  11. [Paravertebral analgesia in thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Arnal, D; Garutti, I; Olmedilla, L

    2004-10-01

    Managing postoperative pain from thoracotomy is one of the greatest challenges anesthesiologists face in daily practice. Proper management is assumed to improve the patient's prognosis. The thoracic paravertebral block, following its rediscovery, is being used with increasing frequency and success for both surgery and recovery from thoracotomy, challenging the supremacy of thoracic epidural analgesia, which to date has been considered the gold standard. We describe the history, anatomy, techniques and complications of the thoracic paravertebral block and review published randomized controlled trials comparing the thoracic paravertebral block to placebo and to epidural analgesia. In view of published evidence, it seems that the thoracic paravertebral block may replace the thoracic epidural technique as the gold standard for providing analgesia for patients undergoing thoracotomy.

  12. Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Ibrahim; Kische, Stephan; Rehders, Tim C.; Nienaber, Christoph A.; Rauchhaus, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    A thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition with structural weakness of the aortic wall, which can progress to arterial dilatation and rupture. Today, both an increasing awareness of vascular disease and the access to tomographic imaging facilitate the diagnosis of TAA even in an asymptomatic stage. The risk of rupture for untreated aneurysms beyond a diameter of 5.6 cm ranges from 46% to 74% and the two-year mortality rate is greater than 70%, with most deaths resulting from rupture. Treatment options include surgical and non-surgical repair to prevent aneurysm enlargement and rupture. While most cases of ascending aortic involvement are subject to surgical repair (partially with valve-preserving techniques), aneurysm of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta are amenable to emerging endovascular techniques as an alternative to classic open repair or to a hybrid approach (combining debranching surgery with stent grafting) in an attempt to improve outcomes. PMID:22419919

  13. Nonmalignant Adult Thoracic Lymphatic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Itkin, Maxim; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-09-01

    The thoracic lymphatic disorders are a heterogeneous group of uncommon conditions that are associated with thoracic masses, interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, and chylous complications. Accurate diagnosis of the thoracic lymphatic disorders has important implications for the newest approaches to management, including embolization and treatment with antilymphangiogenic drugs. New imaging techniques to characterize lymphatic flow, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiogram, are redefining approaches to disease classification and therapy. PMID:27514588

  14. Nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Nonintubated thoracic surgery has been used in procedures including pleura, lungs and mediastinum. Appropriate anesthesia techniques with or without sedation allow thoracic surgery patients to avoid the potential risks of intubated general anesthesia, particularly for the high-risk patients. However, nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery has some benefits as well as problems. In this review, the background, indication, perioperative anesthetic consideration and management, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed and summarized. PMID:25589994

  15. Myelopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hamming, L; van der Meulen, R; Vergouwen, A; Siegert, C

    2015-07-01

    Myelopathy, a severe condition characterised by paraparesis, sensory deficits and sphincter dysfunction, is one of the neuropsychiatric manifestations that have been described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE-associated myelopathy may confront clinicians with a challenging decision-making process due to the broad differential diagnosis, the lack of disease-specific findings, and the urgency to initiate immunosuppressive therapy early in the course of the disease to favourably affect outcome. PMID:26228194

  16. Surgical outcomes of elderly patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a meta-analysis of studies reporting on 2868 patients.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Foong, Hanyao; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-06-01

    group had lower Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores (MD -1.36, 95% CI -1.62 to -1.09; p < 0.00001) to begin with compared with the nonelderly group. The nonelderly group also had a higher postoperative JOA score (MD -1.11, 95% CI -1.44 to -0.79; p < 0.00001), therefore demonstrating a higher recovery rate from surgeries (MD -11.98, 95% CI -16.16 to -7.79; p < 0.00001). The length of stay (MD 4.14, 95% CI 3.54-4.73; p < 0.00001) was slightly longer in the elderly group. In terms of radiological outcomes, the elderly group had a smaller postoperative Cobb angle but a greater increase in spinal canal diameter compared with the nonelderly group. The complication rates were not significant. CONCLUSIONS Cervical myelopathy is a disease of the elderly, and age is an independent factor for recovery from surgery. Postoperative and long-term outcomes have been remarkable in terms of improvement in mobility and independence requiring reduced nursing care. There is definitely a higher potential risk while operating on the elderly population, but no significant difference in the incidence of postoperative complications was noted. Withholding surgery from the elderly population can lead to increased morbidity due to rapid progression of symptoms in addition to deconditioning from lack of mobility and independence. Reduction in operative time under anesthesia, lower blood loss, and perioperative fluid management have been shown to minimize the complication rate. The authors request that neurosurgeons weigh the potential benefit against the risks for every patient before withholding surgery from elderly patients. PMID:27246483

  17. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  18. The effect of age on the latency of radiation myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Geyer, J R; Taylor, E M; Milstein, J M; Shaw, C M; Hubbard, B A; Geraci, J P; Bleyer, W A

    1991-04-01

    The latent period to forelimb paresis following photon irradiation of the cervical spinal cord was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats ranging in age from 9 days to adulthood. The radiation was administered dorsally in single fractions, and in 15-day-old animals, to different lengths of the rostral cord and in doses ranging from 16 to 38 Gy. The duration of the latent period was found to be directly proportional to the age of the animal at the time of irradiation, and independent of radiation dose or the volume of the cervical cord which was irradiated. In the majority of paretic animals, the irradiated segment of the spinal cord demonstrated white matter necrosis. The results indicate that in the developing rat, the manifestations of radiation myelopathy are delayed by an interval determined in part by the age of the animal at the time of irradiation.

  19. Nitrous oxide myelopathy posing as spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Dalyai, Richard; Flanders, Adam E; Harrop, James

    2012-05-01

    The authors describe a patient who presented with acute tetraparesis and a proposed acute traumatic spinal cord injury that was the result of nitrous oxide myelopathy. This 19-year-old man sustained a traumatic fall off a 6-ft high wall. His examination was consistent with a central cord syndrome with the addition of dorsal column impairment. Cervical MRI demonstrated an isolated dorsal column signal that was suggestive of a nontraumatic etiology. The patient's symptoms resolved entirely over the course of 48 hours. Nitrous oxide abuse is increasing in prevalence. Its toxic side effects can mask vitamin B12 and folate deficiency and central cord syndrome. The patient's history and radiographic presentation are key to establishing a diagnosis.

  20. Advances in MR Imaging for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Salamon, Noriko; Holly, Langston T.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is the most common cause of nontraumatic spinal cord injury and is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in the elderly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an invaluable tool for the diagnosis and assessment of cervical spondylosis due to its sensitivity to soft tissues; however, standard MR techniques have some limitations in predicting neurological impairment and response to intervention. Therefore, there is great interest in novel MR techniques including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) as imaging biomarkers for neurological impairment and tools for understanding spinal cord physiology. This review outlines the pathogenesis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the correlative abnormalities observed on standard MRI, the biological implications and current status of DTI and MRS as clinical tools, and future directions of MR technology in the management of CSM patients. PMID:23917647

  1. [Myelopathies in impairment of extravertebral venous blood circulation].

    PubMed

    Tsuladze, I I; Dreval', O N; Kornienko, V N

    2009-01-01

    Development of myelopathies of venous genesis is based on venous hypertension inside vertebral canal which was initially described by J. Aboulker. According to anatomical and functional features of epidural venous system, two factors contribute in development of venous congestion: decreased outflow and increased inflow. Clinical manifestation is presented by spastic movement disorders. Morphological study performed in 18 cadavers allowed to discover so called 'narrow areas' which cause impaired circulation through large feeders of caval veins, which can be discovered by selective phlebography. Main phlebographic features include stenosis, compression, atresia, thrombosis and retrograde flow towards epidural venous plexus. We examined 58 patients with spastic para- and tetraparesis of unknown nature. Phlebographic signs of venous dyscirculation were revealed in 34 cases. 28 surgical operations were performed: 24 on feeders of vena cava superior and 4 on feeders of vena cava inferior. In 18 cases we obtained satisfactory results. This investigation should be continued.

  2. Mini Transsternal Approach to the Anterior High Thoracic Spine (T1–T4 Vertebrae)

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Bhaskar; Tsoti, Sandra Maria; Anichini, Giulio; Vergani, Francesco; Malik, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The anterior high thoracic spine is one of the most complex segments to be accessed surgically due to anatomical constraints and transitional characteristics. We describe in detail the mini transsternal approach to metastatic, infective, traumatic, and degenerative pathologies of T1 to T4 vertebral bodies. We analyse our surgical series, indications, and outcomes. Methods. Over a 5-year period 18 consecutive patients with thoracic myelopathy due to metastatic, infective, traumatic, and degenerative pathologies with T1 to T4 vertebral bodies involvement received a mini transsternal approach with intraoperative monitoring. Frankel scoring system was used to grade the neurological status. Results. Mean follow-up was 40 months. 78% patients improved in Frankel grade after surgery and 22% patients remained unchanged. Average operation time was 210 minutes. There were no intraoperative complications. One patient developed postoperative pneumonia successfully treated with antibiotics. Conclusion. The mini transsternal is a safe approach for infective, metastatic, traumatic, and degenerative lesions affecting the anterior high thoracic spine and the only one allowing an early and direct visualisation of the anterior theca. This approach overcomes the anatomical constraints of this region and provides adequate room for optimal reconstruction and preservation of spinal alignment in the cervicothoracic transition zone with good functional patient outcomes. PMID:27218104

  3. Extrapulmonary thoracic restriction (hidebound chest) complicating eosinophilic fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Chalker, R B; Dickey, B F; Rosenthal, N C; Simms, R W

    1991-11-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) is an unusual disorder characterized by diffuse skin thickening and induration due to inflammation within the deep fascia; visceral involvement is generally mild or absent. A patient with biopsy-proved EF developed progressive respiratory limitation. Physical examination revealed marked induration of the thoracic integument with a severely limited chest wall excursion. Total lung capacity was 62 percent of predicted with a normal corrected Dco and maximal inspiratory force; a chest computed tomogram with thin sections showed no evidence of parenchymal lung disease. Extrapulmonary thoracic restriction ("hidebound chest") has not been previously reported to complicate EF.

  4. Chondroblastoma of the thoracic vertebra.

    PubMed

    Attar, A; Ugur, H C; Caglar, Y S; Erdogan, A; Ozdemir, N

    2001-01-01

    A 48-year-old patient with interscapular pain was admitted to our clinic. MRI revealed a mass infiltrating the second thoracic vertebra and adjacent structures. No other clinical manifestations were observed in general examination. The patient underwent surgery and subtotal removal was achieved while anterior and posterior stabilisations were performed. Diagnosis was pathologically confirmed. As thoracic chondroblastoma cases are not frequent, we decided to present this case. PMID:11148083

  5. [Thoracic outlet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but its definition has been disputed. TOS is differentiated into five distinct disorders: arterial vascular, venous vascular, traumatic neurovascular, true neurologic (TN-TOS), and nonspecific TOS. TN-TOS is caused by compression of the lower plexus (T1>C8 roots and/or lower trunk) by a fibrous band. The most frequent presenting symptoms are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digital flexors. Numbness and sensory loss are usually present, mainly in the ulnar forearm, although severe pain or pain/paresthesia proximal to the elbow can occur; however, sensory symptoms or signs can be absent in some patients. Nerve conduction studies are pathognomonic and show the loss or severe attenuation of the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Additionally, they show a severely depressed median compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and, subsequently, a depressed ulnar CMAP and SNAP. TN-TOS is a rare disorder, although its incidence may be higher than previously believed. Hirayama disease is an important differential diagnosis. Nonspecific TOS, which is mainly diagnosed by provocative maneuvers, corresponds to the classical concept of TOS. However, this concept is now challenged and the existence of nonspecific TOS is doubted. PMID:25475030

  6. Myelopathy and vitamin E deficiency in six Mongolian wild horses.

    PubMed

    Liu, S K; Dolensek, E P; Adams, C R; Tappe, J P

    1983-12-01

    Degenerative myelopathy was diagnosed in six Mongolian wild horses. Three of the horses had a history of ataxia dating from birth to 3 months of age. The clinical signs were uncoordinated movement of the hindlimbs and an abnormally wide-based gait and stance. The other 3 horses had mild ataxia. There were no gross lesions in the brain, vertebrae, or spinal cord. Histologic examination revealed degeneration of the neural processes in the ventral and lateral funiculi of all 6 horses. Myelin sheaths were dilated and vacuolated, and there were swollen, fragmented, or lysed axons. Neuronal degeneration, phagocytosis, and accumulation of periodic acid-Schiff-positive, xylol-insoluble lipopigment were observed in the affected neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. The plasma alpha-tocopherol values of 5 of the affected horses ranged from less than 0.03 to 0.08 (mean, 0.04 +/- 0.01) mg/dl. Seven clinically normal horses from the same herd had a range of less than 0.03 to 0.3 (mean, 0.11 +/- 0.02) mg/dl, which was low enough to be considered deficient.

  7. Reported Outcome Measures in Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Maire; Elgheriani, Ali; Kolias, Angelos G.; Tetreault, Lindsay A.; Hutchinson, Peter J. A.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Kotter, Mark R. N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Degenerative cervical myelopathy [DCM] is a disabling and increasingly prevalent group of diseases. Heterogeneous reporting of trial outcomes limits effective inter-study comparison and optimisation of treatment. This is recognised in many fields of healthcare research. The present study aims to assess the heterogeneity of outcome reporting in DCM as the premise for the development of a standardised reporting set. Methods A systematic review of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases, registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015025497) was conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Full text articles in English, with >50 patients (prospective) or >200 patients (retrospective), reporting outcomes of DCM were eligible. Results 108 studies, assessing 23,876 patients, conducted world-wide, were identified. Reported outcome themes included function (reported by 97, 90% of studies), complications (reported by 56, 52% of studies), quality of life (reported by 31, 29% of studies), pain (reported by 29, 27% of studies) and imaging (reported by 59, 55% of studies). Only 7 (6%) studies considered all of domains in a single publication. All domains showed variability in reporting. Conclusions Significant heterogeneity exists in the reporting of outcomes in DCM. The development of a consensus minimum dataset will facilitate future research synthesis. PMID:27482710

  8. Lupus-related myelopathy: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Provenzale, J; Bouldin, T W

    1992-01-01

    Transverse myelopathy is an uncommon complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Three patients with SLE are reported who developed transverse myelopathy, including the neuropathological findings in one patient on whom necropsy was performed. Paraparesis was present in all three cases, but definite sensory changes were present in only one patient. In two patients, the CSF findings were remarkable for elevated protein and depressed glucose concentrations. Microscopic examination of the brain demonstrated small, scattered foci of recent necrosis consistent with microinfarctions. Striking abnormalities were found in the spinal cord at all levels, including multiple foci of vacuolar spongy degeneration in the peripheral white matter, as well as ballooning of myelin sheaths, swollen axons, myelin pallor, and loss of glial nuclei. The pathological findings in previously reported cases of SLE-related transverse myelopathy are reviewed, and the possible pathogenesis of the findings in our case are discussed. Images PMID:1402976

  9. Transverse myelopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus: an analysis of 14 cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, B.; Lafferty, T.; Brent, L.; DeHoratius, R.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To give a comprehensive review of transverse myelopathy (TM), a rare but serious condition reported in 1-2% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
METHODS—14 patients with SLE and TM were evaluated and 91 additional cases published in the English and German literature reviewed.
RESULTS—TM presented either as the initial manifestation or within five years of the diagnosis of SLE. Most patients presented with a detectable sensory deficit at the thoracic level. In our 14 patients, 22% of the patients showed complete neurological recovery, whereas in the total patient population of 105 (our cases plus those reviewed in the literature), complete recovery was observed in 50%, partial recovery in 29% and no improvement or deterioration in 21%. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone followed by cyclophosphamide seemed to be most effective. Seventy per cent of the total patient population had abnormal magnetic resonance imaging findings. In our group of 14 patients, those with higher disease activity (measured by the SLAM) at onset of TM were treated more aggressively (for example, with plasmapheresis and intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide). TM in our patients was associated with antiphospholipid antibodies in 43% of the cases as compared with 64% of the total patient population. Optic neuritis occurred in 48% of the total patient population with SLE and TM, suggesting an association.
CONCLUSIONS—TM in SLE is a poorly understood entity. Outcome might be more favourable than previously suggested. There is an association of TM with antiphospholipid antibodies in SLE patients. Treatment including intravenous cyclophosphamide may improve the final outcome. This report emphasises the need for multicentre trials to establish guidelines for optimal treatment.

 PMID:10666167

  10. 1H-NMR studies of cerebrospinal fluid: endogenous ethanol in patients with cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meshitsuka, S; Morio, Y; Nagashima, H; Teshima, R

    2001-10-01

    Endogenous ethanol was observed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the course of screening for cerebrospinal fluid of the patients with cervical myelopathy. Ethanol was detected in 10 out of 20 patients. It seems likely that the presence of endogenous ethanol is related to the severity of myelopathy. Also, the concentration of ethanol was correlated with that of lactate in the cerebrospinal fluid. This implies that ethanol may be formed as the end product of glycolysis or in an unknown pathway in the case of severely insulted myelonic tissues.

  11. Our technique of midsagittal splitting laminoplasty for compressive cervical myelopathy and its short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Niraj Kumar; Singh, Sunita; Chauhan, Shishu Pal Singh; Gopal, Nitya Nand

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to discuss the technique of midsagittal splitting laminoplasty and to compare its short-term follow-up results with laminectomy in cases of compressive cervical spinal cord myelopathy. Materials and Methods: Exclusion criteria were as follows: Intramedullary compressive lesions, kyphotic cervical spine, previous spinal surgeries, and defective anterior vertebral column. Twenty patients (10 each of laminoplasty and laminectomy groups) were prospectively studied from 2005 to 2008. After clinico-radiological assessment, laminoplasty or laminectomy was performed in patients aged <50 years and >50 years, respectively. The laminoplasty was performed by splitting the excised lamina in midline up to the tip of spinous process. Follow-up was done by neurosurgical cervical spine scoring, Nurick's grading, and the final outcome was determined by Odom's criteria. Results: The mean operative time and blood loss in laminoplasty and laminectomy was 100 ± 0.87 (range 90-140 min), 80 ± 0.67 (range 75-100 min) P = 0.04; and 65 ± 0.07 (range 60-90 ml) and 68 ± 0.61 (range 65-80 ml) P = 0.09, respectively. There were no intraoperative accidents, and no postoperative neurological deterioration/recurrence of symptoms. One patient who underwent laminectomy alone developed progressive kyphosis of the spine, whereas one having rheumatoid arthritis and long symptom duration didn’t improve. 85% (17/20 patients) had sustained excellent to fair outcome (improvement by at least one Nurick's grade). Conclusions: The technique used by us was simple, effective, and inexpensive. There was no minimal postoperative morbidity, although long-term results are awaited. PMID:27366246

  12. The thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T R; Dineen, R; White, B; Jaspan, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study included a series of middle-aged male and female patients who presented with chronic anterior hemicord dysfunction progressing to paraplegia. Imaging of anterior thoracic cord displacement by either a dural adhesion or a dural defect with associated cord herniation is presented. Methods This is a retrospective review of cases referred to a tertiary neuroscience centre over a 19-year period. Imaging series were classified by two experienced neuroradiologists against several criteria and correlated with clinical examination and/or findings at surgery. Results 16 cases were available for full review. Nine were considered to represent adhesions (four confirmed surgically) and four to represent true herniation (three confirmed surgically). In the three remaining cases the diagnosis was radiologically uncertain. Conclusion The authors propose “thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome” as a novel term to describe this patient cohort and suggest appropriate clinicoradiological features for diagnosis. Several possible aetiologies are also suggested, with disc rupture and inflammation followed by disc resorption and dural pocket formation being a possible mechanism predisposing to herniation at the extreme end of a clinicopathological spectrum. PMID:22665931

  13. Laminoplasty versus laminectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-Yu; Yang, Si-Dong; Huo, Li-Shuang; Wang, Tao; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This is a meta-analysis to compare the results between laminoplasty and laminectomy followed by fusion for the patients with multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. An extensive search of literature was performed in MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, and WANFANG. The following outcome measures were extracted: the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, cervical curvature index (CCI), visual analog scale (VAS), cervical lordosis (C2–7), complications, blood loss, and operation time. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 and STATA 12.0. A total of 23 studies comprising 774 and 743 patients treated with laminoplasty and laminectomy followed by fusion, respectively, were included in the final analysis. The pooled analysis showed that there was no significant difference in preoperative JOA scores [P = 0.89], postoperative JOA scores [P = 0.13], JOA scores improvement rate [P = 0.27], preoperative CCI [P = 0.15], postoperative CCI [P = 0.14], preoperative VAS [P = 0.41], postoperative VAS [P = 0.52], preoperative cervical lordosis (C2–7) [P = 0.46], postoperative cervical lordosis (C2–7) [P = 0.67], total complications [P = 0.07], axial pain [P = 0.94], and blood loss [P = 0.51]. However, there were significant difference in operation time (WMD = −19.57 [−32.11, −7.02], P = 0.002) and C5 palsy (OR = 0.26 [0.15, 0.44], P < 0.001). As compared with laminectomy followed by fusion, expansive laminoplasty showed no significant differences in JOA scores, CCI, ROM, VAS, cervical lordosis (C2–7), axial pain, total complications, and blood loss, but shorter operation time and fewer C5 palsy. PMID:27281067

  14. Thoracic Radiculopathy due to Rare Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of thoracic, or abdominal pain syndrome. The clinical representation of this uncommon disorder is often atypical. With many differential diagnoses to consider, it is not surprising that the cause of thoracic radiculopathy is often not discovered for months, or years, after the symptoms arise. We report two rare cases of thoracic radiculopathy; one case was caused by extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (EES) along the thoracic paraspinal area, and the other by foraminal stenosis, due to a bony spur of the thoracic vertebra. As such, thoracic radiculopathy should be considered in the diagnosis of patients with thoracic and abdominal pain, especially if initial diagnostic studies are inconclusive. PMID:27446792

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of degenerative cervical myelopathy: a review of structural changes and measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Aria; Martin, Allan R; Mikulis, David; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative cervical myelopathy encompasses a spectrum of age-related structural changes of the cervical spine that result in static and dynamic injury to the spinal cord and collectively represent the most common cause of myelopathy in adults. Although cervical myelopathy is determined clinically, the diagnosis requires confirmation via imaging, and MRI is the preferred modality. Because of the heterogeneity of the condition and evolution of MRI technology, multiple techniques have been developed over the years in an attempt to quantify the degree of baseline severity and potential for neurological recovery. In this review, these techniques are categorized anatomically into those that focus on bone, ligaments, discs, and the spinal cord. In addition, measurements for the cervical spine canal size and sagittal alignment are also described briefly. These tools have resulted collectively in the identification of numerous useful parameters. However, the development of multiple techniques for assessing the same feature, such as cord compression, has also resulted in a number of challenges, including introducing ambiguity in terms of which methods to use and hindering effective comparisons of analysis in the literature. In addition, newer techniques that use advanced MRI are emerging and providing exciting new tools for assessing the spinal cord in patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of degenerative cervical myelopathy: a review of structural changes and measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Aria; Martin, Allan R; Mikulis, David; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative cervical myelopathy encompasses a spectrum of age-related structural changes of the cervical spine that result in static and dynamic injury to the spinal cord and collectively represent the most common cause of myelopathy in adults. Although cervical myelopathy is determined clinically, the diagnosis requires confirmation via imaging, and MRI is the preferred modality. Because of the heterogeneity of the condition and evolution of MRI technology, multiple techniques have been developed over the years in an attempt to quantify the degree of baseline severity and potential for neurological recovery. In this review, these techniques are categorized anatomically into those that focus on bone, ligaments, discs, and the spinal cord. In addition, measurements for the cervical spine canal size and sagittal alignment are also described briefly. These tools have resulted collectively in the identification of numerous useful parameters. However, the development of multiple techniques for assessing the same feature, such as cord compression, has also resulted in a number of challenges, including introducing ambiguity in terms of which methods to use and hindering effective comparisons of analysis in the literature. In addition, newer techniques that use advanced MRI are emerging and providing exciting new tools for assessing the spinal cord in patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy. PMID:27246488

  17. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the motor cortex in cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Izabela; Duggal, Neil; Bartha, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Alterations in motor function in cervical myelopathy secondary to degenerative disease may be due to local effects of spinal compression or distal effects related to cortical reorganization. This prospective study characterizes differences in metabolite levels in the motor cortex, specifically N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline, myo-inositol and glutamate plus glutamine, due to alterations in cortical function in patients with reversible spinal cord compression compared with healthy controls. We hypothesized that N-acetylaspartate/creatine levels would be decreased in the motor cortex of patients with cervical myelopathy due to reduced neuronal integrity/function and myo-inositol/creatine levels would be increased due to reactive gliosis. Twenty-four patients with cervical myelopathy and 11 healthy controls underwent proton-magnetic resonance spectroscopy on a 3.0 Tesla Siemens Magnetom Tim Trio MRI. Areas of activation from functional magnetic resonance imaging scans of a finger-tapping paradigm were used to localize a voxel on the side of greater motor deficit in the myelopathy group (n = 10 on right side and n = 14 on left side of the brain) and on each side of the motor cortex in controls. Neurological function was measured with the Neck Disability Index, modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association and American Spinal Injury Association questionnaires. Metabolite levels were measured relative to total creatine within the voxel of interest. No metabolite differences were detected between the right side and left side of the motor cortex in controls. The myelopathy group had significantly decreased neurological function compared with the control group (Neck Disability Index: P < 0.001 and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association: P < 0.001). There was a significant decrease in the N-acetylaspartate/creatine metabolite ratio in the motor cortex of the myelopathy group (1.21 ± 0.07) compared with the right (1.37 ± 0.03; P = 0.01) and

  18. [A case of thoracic actinomycosis].

    PubMed

    Denisova, O A; Cherniavskaia, G M; Beloborodova, É I; Topol'nitskiĭ, E B; Iakimenko, Iu V; Chernogoriuk, G É; Beloborodova, E V; Strezh, Iu A; Vil'danova, L R

    2014-01-01

    A case of thoracic actinomycosis manifest as round shadow in the lung is described. Diagnosis was based on the presence of actinomycetes in a transthoracic lung biopsy sample. Treatment for 3 months resulted in recovery. No relapse was documented during 1 year follow-up period. PMID:25265662

  19. Compression Angle of Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament and Its Clinical Significance in Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keung Nyun; Shin, Hyun Chul; Shin, Dong Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The correction of clinical and radiologic abnormalities in patients with symptomatic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is the current mainstay of treatment. This study aimed to identify radiographic predictors of severity of myelopathy in patients with symptomatic OPLL. Methods Fifty patients with symptomatic cervical OPLL were enrolled. Based on Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, patients were divided into either the mild myelopathy (n=31) or severe myelopathy (n=19) group. All subjects underwent preoperative plain cervical roentgenogram, computed tomography (CT), and MR imaging (MRI). Radiological parameters (C2–7 sagittal vertical axis, SVA; C2–7 Cobb angle; C2–7 range of motion, ROM; OPLL occupying ratio; and compression angle) were compared. Compression angle of OPLL was defined as the angle between the cranial and caudal surfaces of OPLL at the maximum level of cord compression Results The occupying ratio of the spinal canal, C2–7 Cobb angle, C2–7 SVA, types of OPLL, and C2–7 ROM of the cervical spine were not statistically different between the two groups. However, the OPLL compression angle was significantly greater (p=0.003) in the severe myelopathy group than in the mild myelopathy group and was inversely correlated with JOA score (r=-0.533, p<0.01). Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the compression angle (B=-0.069, p<0.001) was significantly associated with JOA scores (R=0.647, p<0.005). Conclusion Higher compression angles of OPLL have deleterious effects on the spinal cord and decrease preoperative JOA scores.

  20. Compression Angle of Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament and Its Clinical Significance in Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keung Nyun; Shin, Hyun Chul; Shin, Dong Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The correction of clinical and radiologic abnormalities in patients with symptomatic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is the current mainstay of treatment. This study aimed to identify radiographic predictors of severity of myelopathy in patients with symptomatic OPLL. Methods Fifty patients with symptomatic cervical OPLL were enrolled. Based on Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, patients were divided into either the mild myelopathy (n=31) or severe myelopathy (n=19) group. All subjects underwent preoperative plain cervical roentgenogram, computed tomography (CT), and MR imaging (MRI). Radiological parameters (C2–7 sagittal vertical axis, SVA; C2–7 Cobb angle; C2–7 range of motion, ROM; OPLL occupying ratio; and compression angle) were compared. Compression angle of OPLL was defined as the angle between the cranial and caudal surfaces of OPLL at the maximum level of cord compression Results The occupying ratio of the spinal canal, C2–7 Cobb angle, C2–7 SVA, types of OPLL, and C2–7 ROM of the cervical spine were not statistically different between the two groups. However, the OPLL compression angle was significantly greater (p=0.003) in the severe myelopathy group than in the mild myelopathy group and was inversely correlated with JOA score (r=-0.533, p<0.01). Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the compression angle (B=-0.069, p<0.001) was significantly associated with JOA scores (R=0.647, p<0.005). Conclusion Higher compression angles of OPLL have deleterious effects on the spinal cord and decrease preoperative JOA scores. PMID:27651865

  1. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  2. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Qizhi, Sun; Peijia, Li; Lei, Sun; Junsheng, Chen; Jianmin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: Noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a special degenerative disease because of the intermediate normal level or levels between supra and infraabnormal levels. Some controversy exists over the optimal procedure for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. The study was to evaluate the outcomes of the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with zero-profile devices for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. Materials and Methods: 17 consecutive patients with two noncontiguous levels of CSM operated between December 2009 and August 2012 were included in the study. There were 12 men and 5 women with a mean age of 60.7 years (range 45–75 years). Involved disc levels were C3/4 and C5/6 in 11 patients and C4/5 and C6/7 in six patients. Preoperative plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT) with 3-D reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine were taken in all patients. All radiographs were independently evaluated by 2 spine surgeons and 1 radiologist. The outcomes were assessed by the average operative time, blood loss, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, improvement rate, neck dysfunction index (NDI), swallowing quality of life (SWAL-QOL) score, the cervical lordosis and complications. Results: The mean followup was 48.59 months (range 24-56 months). The average operative time and blood loss was 105.29 min and 136.47 ml, respectively. The preoperative JOA score was 8.35, which significantly increased to 13.7 at the final followup (P < 0.01). The NDI score was significantly decreased from preoperative 13.06 to postoperative 3.35 (P < 0.01). The operation also provided a significant increase in the cervical lordosis (P < 0.01) from preoperative 10.17° to postoperative 17.06°. The fusion rate was 94.1% at 6 months postoperatively, and 100% at 12 months after surgery. The mean SWAL-QOL score decreased from preoperative 68.06 to immediate postoperatively 65.65 and then increased to 67.65 at final followup

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Darrell; Shen, Ying H.; Russell, Ludivine; Coselli, Joseph S.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) is a highly lethal vascular disease. In many patients with TAD, the aorta progressively dilates and ultimately ruptures. Dissection formation, progression, and rupture cannot be reliably prevented pharmacologically because the molecular mechanisms of aortic wall degeneration are poorly understood. The key histopathologic feature of TAD is medial degeneration, a process characterized by smooth muscle cell depletion and extracellular matrix degradation. These structural changes have a profound impact on the functional properties of the aortic wall and can result from excessive protease-mediated destruction of the extracellular matrix, altered signaling pathways, and altered gene expression. Review of the literature reveals differences in the processes that lead to ascending versus descending and sporadic versus hereditary TAD. These differences add to the complexity of this disease. Although tremendous progress has been made in diagnosing and treating TAD, a better understanding of the molecular, cellular, and genetic mechanisms that cause this disease is necessary to developing more effective preventative and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:23856125

  4. Comparison of clinical signs and outcomes between dogs with presumptive ischemic myelopathy and dogs with acute noncompressive nucleus pulposus extrusion.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Joe; Drees, Randi; Volk, Holger A; De Decker, Steven

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare clinical signs and outcomes between dogs with presumptive ischemic myelopathy and dogs with presumptive acute noncompressive nucleus pulposus extrusion (ANNPE). DESIGN Retrospective study. ANIMALS 51 dogs with ischemic myelopathy and 42 dogs with ANNPE examined at 1 referral hospital. PROCEDURES Medical records and MRI sequences were reviewed for dogs with a presumptive antemortem diagnosis of ischemic myelopathy or ANNPE. Information regarding signalment, clinical signs at initial examination, and short-term outcome was retrospectively retrieved from patient records. Long-term outcome information was obtained by telephone communication with referring or primary-care veterinarians and owners. RESULTS Compared with the hospital population, English Staffordshire Bull Terriers and Border Collies were overrepresented in the ischemic myelopathy and ANNPE groups, respectively. Dogs with ANNPE were significantly older at disease onset and were more likely to have a history of vocalization at onset of clinical signs, have spinal hyperesthesia during initial examination, have a lesion at C1-C5 spinal cord segments, and be ambulatory at hospital discharge, compared with dogs with ischemic myelopathy. Dogs with ischemic myelopathy were more likely to have a lesion at L4-S3 spinal cord segments and have long-term fecal incontinence, compared with dogs with ANNPE. However, long-term quality of life and outcome did not differ between dogs with ischemic myelopathy and dogs with ANNPE. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results revealed differences in clinical signs at initial examination between dogs with ischemic myelopathy and dogs with ANNPE that may aid clinicians in differentiating the 2 conditions. PMID:27654163

  5. Robotic Surgery for Thoracic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgeries have developed in the general thoracic field over the past decade, and publications on robotic surgery outcomes have accumulated. However, controversy remains about the application of robotic surgery, with a lack of well-established evidence. Robotic surgery has several advantages such as natural movement of the surgeon’s hands when manipulating the robotic arms and instruments controlled by computer-assisted systems. Most studies have reported the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery based on acceptable morbidity and mortality compared to open or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Furthermore, there are accumulated data to indicate longer operation times and shorter hospital stay in robotic surgery. However, randomized controlled trials between robotic and open or VATS procedures are needed to clarify the advantage of robotic surgery. In this review, we focused the literature about robotic surgery used to treat lung cancer and mediastinal tumor. PMID:26822625

  6. Transarterial Onyx embolization of jugular foramen dural arteriovenous fistula with spinal venous drainage manifesting as myelopathy-a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hengwei; Lv, Xianli; Li, Youxiang

    2016-10-01

    We report a rare case of jugular foramen dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) with spinal venous drainage. A 48-year-old woman suffered from progressive weakness of lower extremities and incontinence of urine and feces for 14 days. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a tortuous posterior medullary vein at C2-T2 and ischemic signal at C2-C4 of the spinal cord. Brain MRI revealed an abnormal high signal near the left jugular foramen. Digital subtraction angiography of the spinal vascular was negative, while brain angiography showed a left jugular foramen DAVF with spinal perimedullary venous drainage. The patient recovered completely soon after endovascular embolization with Onyx-18. Diagnosis of a DAVF presenting with myelopathy is challenging. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for a favorable outcome.

  7. Genome-wide association analysis reveals a SOD1 mutation in canine degenerative myelopathy that resembles amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Awano, Tomoyuki; Johnson, Gary S.; Wade, Claire M.; Katz, Martin L.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Perloski, Michele; Biagi, Tara; Baranowska, Izabella; Long, Sam; March, Philip A.; Olby, Natasha J.; Shelton, G. Diane; Khan, Shahnawaz; O'Brien, Dennis P.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Coates, Joan R.

    2009-01-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease prevalent in several dog breeds. Typically, the initial progressive upper motor neuron spastic and general proprioceptive ataxia in the pelvic limbs occurs at 8 years of age or older. If euthanasia is delayed, the clinical signs will ascend, causing flaccid tetraparesis and other lower motor neuron signs. DNA samples from 38 DM-affected Pembroke Welsh corgi cases and 17 related clinically normal controls were used for genome-wide association mapping, which produced the strongest associations with markers on CFA31 in a region containing the canine SOD1 gene. SOD1 was considered a regional candidate gene because mutations in human SOD1 can cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an adult-onset fatal paralytic neurodegenerative disease with both upper and lower motor neuron involvement. The resequencing of SOD1 in normal and affected dogs revealed a G to A transition, resulting in an E40K missense mutation. Homozygosity for the A allele was associated with DM in 5 dog breeds: Pembroke Welsh corgi, Boxer, Rhodesian ridgeback, German Shepherd dog, and Chesapeake Bay retriever. Microscopic examination of spinal cords from affected dogs revealed myelin and axon loss affecting the lateral white matter and neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions that bind anti-superoxide dismutase 1 antibodies. These inclusions are similar to those seen in spinal cord sections from ALS patients with SOD1 mutations. Our findings identify canine DM to be the first recognized spontaneously occurring animal model for ALS. PMID:19188595

  8. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future. PMID:26843431

  9. Thoracic spine sports-related injuries.

    PubMed

    Menzer, Heather; Gill, G Keith; Paterson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Although sports-related injuries to the thoracic spine are relatively uncommon, they are among the most feared due to the potential for catastrophic neurologic injury. The increased biomechanical support of the thoracic spine makes injuries in this region particularly rare compared with the cervical and lumbar spine. As a result, thoracic spine injuries can be missed easily, difficult to diagnose, and problematic to treat. Recognition of mechanism and awareness of injury patterns help physicians determine a diagnosis and create an index of suspicion for unstable thoracic spine injuries. Aggressive full-contact sports receive the most attention for spinal injury; however several sports with repetitive loading of the spine can cause severe injuries, including rowing, gymnastics, and golf. The goal of this article was to provide an overview of the unique anatomic and biomechanical features of the thoracic spine and to discuss some of the more common thoracic injuries that can affect athletes. PMID:25574880

  10. [A Dumbbell-Type Thoracic Spinal Lipoma: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Takamiya, Soichiro; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Sasamori, Toru; Seki, Toshitaka; Saito, Hisatoshi

    2016-06-01

    Spinal lipomas are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all spinal tumors. Most are associated with spinal dysraphism. Spinal lipomas without spinal dysraphism are uncommon;they are typically subpial tumors. Some tumors are located both inside and outside the dura mater (so-called "dumbbell-type"). Herein, we report a patient with a dumbbell-type thoracic spinal lipoma. A man in his 50's complained of progressive gait disturbance, dysesthesia in his left leg, and hyperesthesia in his right leg. His symptoms were worsened by exercise. CT and MRI revealed a thoracic spinal lipoma extending from the spinal cord to the intervertebral foramen at the Th 6-8 level. He underwent partial tumor removal and untethering. Postoperatively he reported gradual symptom abatement. Dumbbell-type spinal lipomas are very rare. Besides partial removal of the tumor, untethering should be considered when symptoms are associated with tethering of the spinal cord. PMID:27270148

  11. TEVAR: Endovascular Repair of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Nation, David A.; Wang, Grace J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has allowed a minimally invasive approach for management of an array of thoracic aortic pathologies. Initially developed specifically for exclusion of thoracic aortic aneurysms, TEVAR is now used as an alternative to open surgery for a variety of disease pathologies due to the lower morbidity of this approach. Advances in endograft technology continue to broaden the applications of this technique. PMID:26327745

  12. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure causing myelopathy in a patient with bilateral jugular vein occlusion. Case report.

    PubMed

    Humphries, William E; Grossi, Peter M; Liethe, Linda G; George, Timothy M

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe the case of a 36-year-old woman with bilateral internal jugular vein occlusion, hydrocephalus, and Dandy-Walker variant who presented with myelopathy that was ultimately attributed to ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt failure. Computed tomography (CT) angiography of the head and neck revealed epidural venous engorgement within the cervical spine, greater that 50% narrowing of the C2-5 spinal canal, and compression of the cervical spinal cord. After successful shunt revision, postoperative CT angiography revealed decreased venous engorgement as well as decompression of the cervical spinal cord, and the patient's myelopathy improved. This case represents a fascinating clinical presentation of VP shunt failure, highlighting the physiological importance of the external jugular pathways involved in cerebral venous drainage.

  13. The spinal cord in rheumatoid arthritis with clinical myelopathy: a computed myelographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, J M; Kendall, B E; Crockard, H A

    1986-01-01

    Thirty one patients with suspected myelopathy due to rheumatoid arthritis were examined by plain radiography and 27 had computed myelography. Clinical features and radiological findings were compared. Deformity of the spinal cord could occur in the absence of combined anterior and posterior compression and correlated closely with clinical features only when considered in combination with skeletal and adjacent soft tissue abnormalities. The best surgical results were achieved by transoral odontoidectomy. Images PMID:3950633

  14. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy.

  15. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. PMID:27616315

  16. Fast track endoscopic thoracic sympathicotomy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João Bosco Vieira; Kux, Peter; Castro, Carlos H V; Cruvinel, Marcos G C; Costa, José R R

    2003-12-01

    The length of hospital stay is an important factor of cost and psychological discomfort in the treatment of hyperhidrosis by endoscopic thoracic sympathicotomy (ETS). Our experience enrolls 1587 patients operated on an outpatient basis in the last 10 years and seven months. This study aimed to confirm that ETS can be performed on an outpatient basis. Fifty-two consecutive patients (30 males and 22 females) were submitted to ETS under general anesthesia using a single lumen endotracheal tube, with lung collapse by intrapleural injection of CO(2). The sympathetic chain and the communicating rami were severed at different levels according to hyperhidrosis location. Patients were physical state American Society of Anesthesiologists 1 and 2. Age varied between 13 and 55 years (27.3 +/- 10.2 years). They were monitored with ECG, SPO2, NIBP, expired CO(2), sevoflurane analyzer, and airway pressure. Normal saline (40.0 +/- 2.7 ml/kg) was infused intravenously. The drugs used were propofol, alfentanil, rocuronium, ondansetron, dexamethasone, dipyrone, cetoprofene and sevoflurane. Anesthesia and post-operative data were analyzed. Post-operative thoracic X-rays were taken in 20 patients before discharge. Anesthesia lasted 67.2 +/- 20.8 minutes, and the surgical procedure took 46.3 +/- 20.9 minutes. The patients stayed 18.0 +/- 11.0 minutes in the post-anaesthetic care unit and were discharged from hospital after 150.3 +/- 43.1 minutes. The only abnormal post-operative event observed was insignificant residual carbothorax, found in 2 (10%) of the thoracic X-rays taken. In conclusion, this study confirmed that ETS can be performed safely on an outpatient basis. PMID:14673677

  17. Analgesia in thoracic surgery: review.

    PubMed

    De Cosmo, G; Aceto, P; Gualtieri, E; Congedo, E

    2009-06-01

    Post-thoracotomy pain is one of the most severe types of postoperative pain. It can last up to 2 months and can become chronic in 30% of patients. Pain relief after thoracic surgery is of particular significance, not only for ethical considerations but also for reduction of postoperative pulmonary and cardiac complications. Because of the difficulty in pain control, many approaches have been suggested, but a multimodal therapeutic strategy that provides a central or peripheral block associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) and adjuvant drugs is now the cornerstone of treatment, offering the possibility of reducing opioid requirements and side effects. Thoracic epidural analgesia with local anesthetics and opioids is regarded as the gold standard treatment for post-thoracotomy pain management because it results in early extubation, better ventilatory mechanisms and gas exchange, decreased incidence of atelectasis, pneumonia and chronic postoperative pain. When epidural analgesia is contraindicated or cannot be performed, other regional techniques of analgesia can be used. An alternative method of providing adequate pain relief is a thoracic paravertebral block: continuous paravertebral infusion of local anesthetic via a catheter placed percutaneously or under direct vision during thoracotomy. This is effective in controlling postoperative pain and in preserving pulmonary function. Other techniques, such as intercostal and interpleural blocks, are rarely utilized, whereas a single shot of intrathecal injection of a hydrophilic opioid, such as morphine, appears to be effective. Cryoanalgesia, which is successful in the immediate postoperative period, has been abandoned for its brief duration and increased incidence of chronic pain. PMID:18953284

  18. [A review on thoracic ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bussy, Sebastián; Labarca, Gonzalo; Lanza, Mario; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan

    2016-07-01

    The use of thoracic ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in the emergency department, intensive care unit or in patients with pulmonary diseases is increasing steadily. It is used to guide percutaneous tracheostomies, to assess pleural effusions, to rule out pneumothorax, and to guide the placement of endovascular and pleural catheters. It is also useful in the assessment of patients with dyspnea. The aim of this review is to provide the practical and technical basics for the use of this diagnostic tool among internists and specialists in pulmonary diseases. PMID:27661554

  19. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Jean; Griffith Pearson, F; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Canada’s contributions toward the 21st century’s practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. OBJECTIVE: To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. METHOD: Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. RESULTS: Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. CONCLUSIONS: Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  20. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the left internal mammary artery graft to the anterior descending coronary artery as a surgical strategy has been shown to improve the survival rate and decrease the risk of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery. These clinical benefits appear to be related to the superior short and long-term patency rates of the internal thoracic artery graft. Although the advantages of using of both internal thoracic arteries (ITA) for bypass grafting have taken longer to prove, recent results from multiple data sets now support these findings. The major advantage of bilateral ITA grafting appears to be improved survival rate, while the disadvantages of complex ITA grafting include the increased complexity of operation, and an increased risk of wound complications. While these short-term disadvantages have been mitigated in contemporary surgical practice, they have not eliminated. Bilateral ITA grafting should be considered the procedure of choice for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery that have a predicted survival rate of longer than ten years. PMID:23977627

  1. Solitary fibrous tumor of the thoracic spine. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vorster, S J; Prayson, R A; Lee, J H

    2000-04-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a neoplasm first described as a tumor of mesenchymal origin involving soft tissues. The authors provide a review of the literature with detailed pathological analysis and radiological description of SFTs involving the central nervous system. The authors report a rare case of a SFT of the thoracic spine in an adult man presenting with myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-circumscribed, intradural, extramedullary mass at the T2-3 level. Histological examination demonstrated a proliferation of predominantly spindle-shaped cells with a collagen-matrix background. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for vimentin and CD34 and negative for S-100 and epithelial membrane antigen with an MIB-1 labeling index of 2.6%. Review of the literature revealed 10 cases in which this tumor, frequently found in the pleura, was involved in the central nervous system. Although rare and their clinical significance as yet unknown, SFTs may be considered in the differential diagnosis of intradural spinal cord lesions. The natural history is also unknown, but these tumors appear to be biologically benign.

  2. [MR investigation of spinal cord herniation in the thoracic spine].

    PubMed

    Kenéz, József; Barsi, Péter; Várallyay, György; Bobest, Mátyás; Veres, Róbert

    2002-05-20

    Transdural herniation of the spinal cord is thought to be previously extremely rare and very often misdiagnosed. Possible reasons may be iatrogenic and traumatic or in about one third of cases it may be unknown, where the probable origin might be a congenital dural defect. The pathology may show characteristic and misleading MR patterns of the thoracic spine, emphasising the importance of these patterns. This anomaly can lead to progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. Surgical intervention, consisting the repair of the dural defect may result in improvement or even complete regression of the neurologic deficits.

  3. Primary Intimal Sarcoma of Thoracic Aorta Presenting as Hypertensive Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-I; Su, Min-I; Tsai, Cheng-Ting

    2015-01-01

    We report a 45-year-old woman who presented to our facility in a hypertensive crisis. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a thoracic aortic tumor, and tissues obtained via endovascular biopsy revealed undifferentiated sarcoma. A final diagnosis of intimal sarcoma was made by intra-operative pathological examination. Despite undergoing surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient died from progressive multiple metastasis and severe sepsis. Although aortic sarcoma is rarely diagnosed, it should be considered a possible etiology of hypertensive crisis. PMID:27122923

  4. Pregnancy and Thoracic Aortic Disease: Managing the Risks.

    PubMed

    Wanga, Shaynah; Silversides, Candice; Dore, Annie; de Waard, Vivian; Mulder, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The most common aortopathies in women of childbearing age are bicuspid aortic valve, coarctation of the aorta, Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, SMAD3 aortopathy, Turner syndrome, and familial thoracic aneurysm and dissection. The hemodynamic and hormonal changes of pregnancy increase the risk of progressive dilatation or dissection of the aorta in these women. The presence of hypertension increases the risk further. Therefore, appropriate preconception counselling is advised. For women who become pregnant, serial follow-up by a specialized multidisciplinary team throughout pregnancy and postpartum period is required. In this review we discuss risk assessment and management strategies for women with aortopathies. PMID:26604124

  5. Surfer’s myelopathy: a rare presentation in a non-surfing setting and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Hariswamy, Soumya; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Surfers myelopathy can be a rapidly devastating disease and little is known surrounding the pathophysiology of the condition. Although the classical pattern of illness has been well reported, it has never been observed in a non-surfing setting. Methods A 51-year-old demolition worker presented with acute non-traumatic myelopathy. Clinical examination revealed sensory loss to the level of L2. T2-MRI and MRI-DWI revealed a hyperintense signal suggestive of an ischaemic event. A diagnosis of surfer’s myelopathy was made and he was commenced on steroid therapy. Results Following steroid therapy and fluid management the patient was discharged after 6 days with minor anaethesia but significant overall neurological improvement. Conclusions Diagnosis of SM requires a thorough history, clinical examination and imaging (MRI, MRI-DWI). The patient should be admitted early and investigated. The use of rehabilitation services may be useful if available. PMID:27757436

  6. Ossification of thoracic ligamenta flava

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, S.; Minoru, O.; Russell, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    Although ligamentum flavum ossification (LFO) often occurs in normal persons, there are no reports of its detection on lateral chest radiographs made during screening examinations. Review of 1,744 consecutive lateral chest radiographs identified LFO in 6.2% of males and 4.8% of females. LFO occurred mainly at the intervertebral segments from T9-T10 through T12-L1. Most prevalent was the hook-shaped LFO, protruding inferoirly from the inferior facets into the projections of the intervertabral foramina. Though LFO can cause severe neurologic symptoms, none of the affected persons in this study reported such symptoms. LFO was first visualized radiographically when the subjects were 20-40 years old, and it may be a physiologic condition. The LFO in these cases existed independent of thoracic posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and degenerative osteoarthritis.

  7. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme.

  8. [Thoracic actinomycosis versus bronchial cancer].

    PubMed

    Brombacher-Frey, I; Wöckel, W; Kreusser, T

    1992-01-01

    We report on 4 thoracic actinomycoses; in three of these four cases a bronchial carcinoma was suspected, and in case No. 2 this carcinoma had been considered to be in a very advanced and inoperable stage. A man of 51 years of age was in a generally run-down condition. He also noticed that his sputum was tinged with blood. The x-ray film showed a large space-occupying growth at the right lung hilus. Repeated perbronchial biopsies of the focus did not yield any diagnosis. Actinomycosis was identified histologically only in the tissue samples obtained via thoracotomy. After a three-month penicillin course the hilar shadow receded. A 61-year old male patient was transferred to our Pneumological Hospital, being strongly suspected of suffering from an extensive bronchial carcinoma, and having multiple intrathoracic space-occupying growths as well as pleural effusions, a pericardial effusion, and an infiltration of the left thoracic wall with fistula formation; however, histological examination of skin biopsies revealed that he was suffering from actinomycosis. Antibiotic therapy cured him completely in a six-month course. In a man of 32 years of age who had been indulging for many years in a severe abuse of nicotin, we suspected a central bronchial carcinoma on the basis of his x-ray, but histology of the tissue taken from the space-occupying growth via diagnostic thoracotomy revealed that this patient, too, suffered from actinomycosis. Complete recession occurred after several months of antibiotic treatment. A woman of 82 years had been an inpatient for several months in another hospital because of relapsing pleuropneumonias on the right side. She was transferred to us as an outpatient after a renewed relapse. We conducted a transcutaneous fine-needle biopsy of the right indurating pleural effusion. A few actinomyces filaments were seen on histological examination of the purulent exudate. Hence, actinomycosis was confirmed. After antibiotic therapy the finding receded

  9. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  10. Thoracic ranula: an extremely rare case.

    PubMed

    Pang, Claudine Elizabeth; Lee, Tee Sin; Pang, Kenny Peter; Pang, Yoke Teen

    2005-03-01

    We present the first case of a thoracic ranula which originated from the left submandibular area extending into the subcutaneous tissue planes of the anterior chest wall. The patient had a history of surgery for a previous benign left salivary gland cyst, and presented with an enlarging mass in the anterior chest wall. This was a recurrence of a ranula, with an extension into the anterior thoracic wall. The thoracic ranula was excised, together with ipsilateral sublingual and submandibular glands, via a transcervical approach. No recurrence was detected over a 3-year post-operative follow up.

  11. [Cervical myelopathy in a patient with congenital cervico-cerebral vascular malformation].

    PubMed

    Naito, Kosuke; Oya, Fusaichi; Takei, Yo-ichi; Yamamoto, Kanji; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2004-09-01

    We report a 50 year-old woman with cervical myelopathy. The patient, who had cutaneous angiomas in the right orbital area, became aware of left upper limb weakness when she woke up, followed by painful abnormal sensation in both axilla and arms. MRI revealed an intramedullar lesion mainly located in cervical cord at the level of C3-C4. Angiography showed that serpentine left vertebral artery entered the canalis vertebralis at C3 and fed the blood flow of bilateral middle cerebral arteries. In this case, the upper cervical spinal cord ischemia might be induced by hemodynamic insufficiency of the anterior spinal artery ascribed to congenital cervico-cerebral vascular malformation.

  12. Thoracic Duct Embolization with Lipiodol for Chylothorax due to Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair with Debranching Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Hyoung; Jung, Jae Seung; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Ho Sung

    2015-01-01

    Chylothorax is a rare postoperative complication of a thoracic surgical procedure. Here, we report a case of chylothorax after thoracic endovascular aortic repair with debranching for the distal arch aneurysm of the aorta. First, the patient was treated by a medical method (nil per os, fat-free diet, and octreotide), but this method failed. The patient strongly refused surgical treatment. Therefore, we tried to occlude the thoracic duct by lymphangiography Lipiodol, and this line of treatment was successful. PMID:25705604

  13. Intramural Hematoma of the Thoracic Aorta as a Form of Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert Pukacki, Fryderyk; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Zarzecka, Anna; Majewski, Waclaw

    2007-09-15

    Intramural hematoma (IMH) of the thoracic aorta is a complication with unknown etiology and a poorly predictable prognosis. There is also considerable controversy about the management and prognosis of IMH as well as the treatment. We present two cases of endovascular treatment of IMH with stent-graft placement. On the basis of references, we discuss risks of progression of the given pathology and possible complications. Despite the lack of uniform opinion about the management of this disorder, we present our observations of and experiences with endovascular treatment of IMH of the thoracic aorta.

  14. Thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Toribio, R E; Kohn, C W; Lawrence, A E; Hardy, J; Hutt, J A

    1999-05-01

    A 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare was examined because of lethargy, fever, and weight loss of 1 month's duration. Thoracic auscultation revealed decreased lung sounds cranioventrally. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed bilateral anechoic areas with hyperechoic strands, consistent with pleural effusion and fibrin tags. A large amount of free fluid was evident during abdominal ultrasonography. Abnormalities included anemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Thoracic radiography revealed alveolar infiltrates in the cranial and caudoventral lung fields. A cavitary mass, consistent with an abscess, could be seen caudodorsal to the crura of the diaphragm. Ultrasonographic evaluation of this area revealed a hypoechoic mass with septations. Bilateral thoracocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture of the pleural fluid did not yield growth, but Blastomyces dermatitidis was isolated from pleural fluid, abdominal fluid, and an aspirate of the abscess. The mare was euthanatized, and a diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:10319179

  15. Cause of long thoracic nerve palsy: a possible dynamic fascial sling cause.

    PubMed

    Hester, P; Caborn, D N; Nyland, J

    2000-01-01

    Long thoracic nerve palsy can result from sudden or repetitive external biomechanical forces. This investigation describes a possible dynamic cause from internal forces. Six fresh cadaveric shoulders (3 female, 3 male, 4 left, 2 right) with full range of motion were systematically dissected to evaluate the anatomic course of the long thoracic nerve. In all specimens a tight fascial band of tissue arose from the inferior aspect of the brachial plexus, extended just superior to the middle scalene muscle insertion on the first rib, and presented a digitation that extended to the proximal aspect of the serratus anterior muscle. With progressive manual abduction and external rotation, the long thoracic nerve was found to "bow-string" across the fascial band. Medial and upward migration of the superior most aspect of the scapula was found to further compress the long thoracic nerve. Previous investigations have reported that nerves tolerate a 10% increase in their resting length before a stretch-induced neuropraxia develops. Previous studies postulated that long thoracic nerve palsy resulted from the tethering effect of the scalenus medius muscle as it actively or passively compressed the nerve; however, similar neuromuscular relationships occur in many other anatomic sites without ill effect. We propose that the cause of long thoracic nerve palsy may be this "bow-stringing" phenomenon of the nerve across this tight fascial band. This condition may be further exacerbated with medial and upward migration of the superior aspect of the scapula as is commonly seen with scapulothoracic dyskinesia and fatigue of the scapular stabilizers. Rehabilitation for long thoracic nerve palsy may therefore benefit from special attention to scapulothoracic muscle stabilization. PMID:10717860

  16. [Morpho-Functional Changes of Thoracic Aorta in Atherosclerosis: Multiplane Transesophageal Ultrasound Study

    PubMed

    Vrublevskiĭ, A. V.; Boshchenko, A. A.; Karpov, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate possibilities of multiplane transesophageal ultrasound for assessment of localization and structure of atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta as well as relationship between changes of elastic-tonic properties, processes of aortic wall remodeling, stage of aortic atheromatosis, and coronary atherosclerosis. MATERIAL: Patients with chronic ischemic heart disease and atherosclerosis of thoracic aorta (n=120), healthy volunteers (n=11, all men, mean age 51-/+8 years). METHODS: Multiplane transesophageal ultrasound with subsequent calculation of parameters of elasticity and stiffness. The classification of C. Pitsavos et al. (1997) was used for grading aortic atheromatosis. RESULTS. Atherosclerotic plaques were found in 109 patients (91%) and 69 patients (58%) had pronounced (stage 3-5) atheromatosis of thoracic aorta. The plaques were most frequently (87%) localized in descending aorta. Calcinated hyperdense plaques, soft plaques with low density, soft plaques with heterogeneous density prevailed in ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of thoracic atherosclerosis as predictor of atherosclerotic lesions in coronary vessels were 90 and 65%, respectively. Pronounced diffuse atherosclerosis of thoracic aorta decreased its elastic-tonic properties as evidenced by significant lowering of parameters of elasticity and increase of stiffness index. This process was associated with remodeling of thoracic aorta (progressive passive dilatation, thickening of its wall and lowering of amplitude of systolic excursion). Atheromatosis stage correlated inversely with systolic excursion and parameters of elasticity and directly with stiffness index, intima-media thickness, systolic and diastolic diameters of the aorta. There was also a direct correlation between stage of aortic atheromatosis and age and total score of coronary artery involvement. CONCLUSION: Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography is a

  17. The evolution of minimally invasive thoracic surgery: implications for the practice of uniportal thoracoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The history of Minimally Invasive Surgery in the thorax is one of evolution, not revolution. The concept of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to greatly reduce the trauma of chest operations was born over two decades ago. Since then, it has undergone a series of step-wise modifications and improvement. The original practice of three access ports in a ‘baseball diamond’ pattern was modified to suit operational needs, and gradually developed into ‘next generation’ approaches, including Needlescopic and 2-port VATS. The logical, incremental progression has culminated in the Uniportal VATS approach which has stirred considerable interest within the field of Thoracic Surgery in recent years. This measured, evolutionary process has significant implications on how the surgeon should approach, master and realize the full potential of the Uniportal technique. This article gives a précis of the evolutionary history of minimally invasive thoracic surgery, and highlights the lessons it provides about its future. PMID:25379198

  18. The evolution of minimally invasive thoracic surgery: implications for the practice of uniportal thoracoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sihoe, Alan D L

    2014-10-01

    The history of Minimally Invasive Surgery in the thorax is one of evolution, not revolution. The concept of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to greatly reduce the trauma of chest operations was born over two decades ago. Since then, it has undergone a series of step-wise modifications and improvement. The original practice of three access ports in a 'baseball diamond' pattern was modified to suit operational needs, and gradually developed into 'next generation' approaches, including Needlescopic and 2-port VATS. The logical, incremental progression has culminated in the Uniportal VATS approach which has stirred considerable interest within the field of Thoracic Surgery in recent years. This measured, evolutionary process has significant implications on how the surgeon should approach, master and realize the full potential of the Uniportal technique. This article gives a précis of the evolutionary history of minimally invasive thoracic surgery, and highlights the lessons it provides about its future.

  19. Late Occurrence of Cervicothoracic Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligaments in a Surgically Treated Thoracic OPLL Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Hong, Seung-Chyul

    2010-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the thoracic spine is rare, even in the Far East. A 45-year-old female presented with a 4-month history of progressive motor weakness in the lower extremities, numbness below the midthoracic area, and spastic gait disturbance. Neuroradiological examinations revealed massive OPLLs at the T4-T6 levels with severe anterior compression of the spinal cord. Anterior decompressive corpectomies with bone grafts were performed from T4 to T6 using a trans-thoracic approach. After surgery, the patient made an uneventful recovery. However, eleven years after surgery, the patient developed recurrent lower extremity weakness and spastic gait disturbance. De novo OPLLs at the C6-T2 levels were responsible for the severe spinal cord compression on this occasion. After second surgery, paralysis in both legs was resolved. We present a rare case of late cervicothoracic OPLL in a patient surgically treated for thoracic OPLL. PMID:20157380

  20. The evolution of minimally invasive thoracic surgery: implications for the practice of uniportal thoracoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sihoe, Alan D L

    2014-10-01

    The history of Minimally Invasive Surgery in the thorax is one of evolution, not revolution. The concept of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to greatly reduce the trauma of chest operations was born over two decades ago. Since then, it has undergone a series of step-wise modifications and improvement. The original practice of three access ports in a 'baseball diamond' pattern was modified to suit operational needs, and gradually developed into 'next generation' approaches, including Needlescopic and 2-port VATS. The logical, incremental progression has culminated in the Uniportal VATS approach which has stirred considerable interest within the field of Thoracic Surgery in recent years. This measured, evolutionary process has significant implications on how the surgeon should approach, master and realize the full potential of the Uniportal technique. This article gives a précis of the evolutionary history of minimally invasive thoracic surgery, and highlights the lessons it provides about its future. PMID:25379198

  1. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases—first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines.

  2. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Danguilan, Jose Luis J

    2016-08-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases-first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines. PMID:27651936

  3. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Danguilan, Jose Luis J

    2016-08-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases-first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines.

  4. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases—first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines. PMID:27651936

  5. Spinal dermoid sinus in a Dachshund with vertebral and thoracic limb malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dermoid sinus is an uncommon epithelial-lined fistula that may be associated with vertebral malformations. In humans, Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a rare condition characterized by congenital cervical vertebral fusion and may be associated with other developmental defects, including dermoid sinus. The present case report describes an adult Dachshund with cervical and cranial thoracic vertebral malformations as well as thoracic limb malformations resembling KFS with a concurrent type IV dermoid sinus. Case presentation A 1.5 year-old Dachshund with congenital thoracic limbs deformities and cervical-thoracic vertebral malformations presented with cervical hyperesthesia, rigidity of the cervical musculature and tetraparesis. Neurologic, radiographic, and computed tomography (CT) (2D, 3D, CT fistulography) examinations revealed skeletal anomalies, a dermoid sinus in the cranial thoracic region and epidural gas within the vertebral canal. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the sinus tract were performed and confirmed a type IV dermoid sinus. The clinical signs progressively recovered postoperatively, and no recurrent signs were observed after 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions Cervical vertebral malformations associated with limbs anomalies have not been reported in dogs and may represent a condition similar to KFS in humans. KFS can occur concurrently with other congenital conditions including dermoid sinus and should be included among the complex congenital anomalies described in dogs. PMID:24593884

  6. Effect of Pulsed Methylprednisolone on Pain, in Patients with HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Kevin G.; Puri, Aiysha; Demontis, Maria Antonietta; Short, Charlotte L.; Adonis, Adine; Haddow, Jana; Martin, Fabiola; Dhasmana, Divya

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is an immune mediated myelopathy caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The efficacy of treatments used for patients with HAM/TSP is uncertain. The aim of this study is to document the efficacy of pulsed methylprednisolone in patients with HAM/TSP. Data from an open cohort of 26 patients with HAM/TSP was retrospectively analysed. 1g IV methylprednisolone was infused on three consecutive days. The outcomes were pain, gait, urinary frequency and nocturia, a range of inflammatory markers and HTLV-1 proviral load. Treatment was well tolerated in all but one patient. Significant improvements in pain were: observed immediately, unrelated to duration of disease and maintained for three months. Improvement in gait was only seen on Day 3 of treatment. Baseline cytokine concentrations did not correlate to baseline pain or gait impairment but a decrease in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) concentration after pulsed methylprednisolone was associated with improvements in both. Until compared with placebo, treatment with pulsed methylprednisolone should be offered to patients with HAM/TSP for the treatment of pain present despite regular analgesia. PMID:27077747

  7. Surgical Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Associated Hypertension—A Retrospective Study of 309 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wen-yu; Wang, Xia; Chen, Bin; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Nie, Lin; Cheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease, and various risk factors are known to be involved in it. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most common non-traumatic cause of myelopathy, which displays neurological symptoms and may induce systemic symptoms. To date, it is still unknown whether CSM is associated with hypertension, and if so, whether the decompression operations can attenuate CSM associated hypertension. Here, a total of 309 patients with CSM who received anterior or posterior decompression surgery were enrolled as subjects. Blood pressure measurements were performed before and within one week after the surgery. Among the 309 subjects, 144 (46.6%) of them exhibited hypertension before surgery, a significantly higher ratio than that of the whole population. One week after surgery, blood pressure of 106 (73.6%) patients turned back to normal. Blood pressure of another 37(25.7%) patients decreased with different degrees, although still higher than normal. Moreover, it appears that both approaches were effective in improving blood pressure, while the posterior approach was more effective in decreasing systolic blood pressure. We speculate this type of hypertension might result from hyperactivity of sympathetic nervous system as the heart rate of these patients decreased after surgery as well. Collectively, compression of spinal cord in CSM patients might be associated with hypertension, and decompression surgery largely attenuated this type of hypertension. These findings prove CSM to be a potential associated factor of high blood pressure and may shed light on therapies of hypertension in clinics. PMID:26193469

  8. Intramedullary Sarcoidosis Presenting with Delayed Spinal Cord Swelling after Cervical Laminoplasty for Compressive Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Du Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown etiology that may affect any organ in the body. The nervous system is involved in 5-16% of cases of sarcoidosis. Here, we report a case of intramedullary sarcoidosis presenting with delayed spinal cord swelling after laminoplasty for the treatment of compressive cervical myelopathy. A 56-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of upper extremity pain and gait disturbance. The patient had undergone laminoplasty for compressive cervical myelopathy 3 months previously. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large solitary intramedullary lesion with associated extensive cord swelling, signal changes, and heterogeneous enhancement of spinal cord from C2 to C7. Spinal cord biopsy revealed non-necrotizing granulomas with signs of chronic inflammation. The final diagnosis of sarcoidosis was based upon laboratory data, imaging findings, histological findings, and the exclusion of other diagnoses. Awareness of such presentations and a high degree of suspicion of sarcoidosis may help arrive at the correct diagnosis. PMID:25535524

  9. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R−). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  10. [Video-assisted thoracic surgery, lung transplantation and mediastinitis: major issues in thoracic surgery in 2010].

    PubMed

    Borro, José M; Moreno, Ramón; Gómez, Ana; Duque, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the major issues in thoracic surgery relating to the advances made in our specialty in 2010. To do this, the 43(rd) Congress of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery held in La Coruña and the articles published in the Society's journal, Archivos de Bronconeumología, were reviewed. The main areas of interest were related to the development of video-assisted thoracic surgery, lung transplantation and descending mediastinitis. The new tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification (7(th) edition), presented last year, was still a topical issue this year. The First Forum of Thoracic Surgeons and the Update in Thoracic Surgery together with the Nurses' Area have constituted an excellent teaching program. PMID:21300211

  11. Asian perspective in surgery: thoracic surgery in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Turkey with a population of 78 million is located between Asia and Europe geographically and culturally. There are 577 active pure thoracic surgeon and 37 thoracic surgery teaching units. Thoracic surgeons usually deal with lung cancer patients due to relatively higher rate of tobacco usage as well as inflammatory diseases such as pulmonary hydatid disease, bronchiectasis and empyema. Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has been a new approach which is being adapted by increasingly more surgeons. There are a number of reasons to predict that the number of thoracic surgical cases will be increased and new generation of thoracic surgeons will be operating more minimally invasive resectional surgeries for most lung cancer in future.

  12. Asian perspective in surgery: thoracic surgery in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turna, Akif

    2016-08-01

    Turkey with a population of 78 million is located between Asia and Europe geographically and culturally. There are 577 active pure thoracic surgeon and 37 thoracic surgery teaching units. Thoracic surgeons usually deal with lung cancer patients due to relatively higher rate of tobacco usage as well as inflammatory diseases such as pulmonary hydatid disease, bronchiectasis and empyema. Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has been a new approach which is being adapted by increasingly more surgeons. There are a number of reasons to predict that the number of thoracic surgical cases will be increased and new generation of thoracic surgeons will be operating more minimally invasive resectional surgeries for most lung cancer in future.

  13. Functional reorganization of the forepaw cortical representation immediately after thoracic spinal cord hemisection in rats.

    PubMed

    Yagüe, J G; Humanes-Valera, D; Aguilar, J; Foffani, G

    2014-07-01

    Spinal cord injury may produce long-term reorganization of cortical circuits. Little is known, however, about the early neurophysiological changes occurring immediately after injury. On the one hand, complete thoracic spinal cord transection of the spinal cord immediately decreases the level of cortical spontaneous activity and increases the cortical responses to stimuli delivered to the forepaw, above the level of the lesion. On the other hand, a thoracic spinal cord hemisection produces an immediate cortical hyperexcitability in response to preserved spinothalamic inputs from stimuli delivered to the hindpaw, below the level of the lesion. Here we show that a thoracic spinal cord hemisection also produces a bilateral increase of the responses evoked in the forepaw cortex by forepaw stimuli, associated with a bilateral decrease of cortical spontaneous activity. Importantly, the increased cortical forepaw responses are immediate in the cortex contralateral to the hemisection (significant within 30min after injury), but they are progressive in the cortex ipsilateral to the hemisection (reaching significance only 2.5h after injury). Conversely, the decreased cortical spontaneous activity is progressive both ipsilaterally and contralaterally to the hemisection (again reaching significance only 2.5h after injury). In synthesis, the present work reports a functional reorganization of the forepaw cortical representation immediately after thoracic spinal cord hemisection, which is likely important to fully understand the mechanisms underlying long-term cortical reorganization after incomplete spinal cord injuries.

  14. Interventional bronchoscopy in the management of thoracic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hardavella, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Educational Aims To highlight the various methods of interventional bronchoscopy. To inform about the indications for palliation and curative bronchoscopy in lung cancer. Interventional bronchoscopy is a rapidly expanding field in respiratory medicine offering minimally invasive therapeutic and palliative procedures for all types of lung neoplasms. This field has progressed over the last couple of decades with the application of new technology. The HERMES European curriculum recommendations include interventional bronchoscopy skills in the modules of thoracic tumours and bronchoscopy [1]. However, interventional bronchoscopy is not available in all training centres and consequently, not all trainees will obtain experience unless they rotate to centres specifically offering such training. In this review, we give an overview of interventional bronchoscopic procedures used for the treatment and palliation of thoracic malignancy. These can be applied either with flexible or rigid bronchoscopy or a combination of both depending on the anatomical location of the tumour, the complexity of the case, bleeding risk, the operator’s expertise and preference as well as local availability. Specialised anaesthetic support and appropriately trained endoscopy staff are essential, allowing a multimodality approach to meet the high complexity of these cases. PMID:26632425

  15. Uncertainty Quantification applied to flow simulations in thoracic aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccadifuoco, Alessandro; Mariotti, Alessandro; Celi, Simona; Martini, Nicola; Salvetti, Maria Vittoria

    2015-11-01

    The thoracic aortic aneurysm is a progressive dilatation of the thoracic aorta causing a weakness in the aortic wall, which may eventually cause life-threatening events. Clinical decisions on treatment strategies are currently based on empiric criteria, like the aortic diameter value or its growth rate. Numerical simulations can give the quantification of important indexes which are impossible to be obtained through in-vivo measurements and can provide supplementary information. Hemodynamic simulations are carried out by using the open-source tool SimVascular and considering patient-specific geometries. One of the main issues in these simulations is the choice of suitable boundary conditions, modeling the organs and vessels not included in the computational domain. The current practice is to use outflow conditions based on resistance and capacitance, whose values are tuned to obtain a physiological behavior of the patient pressure. However it is not known a priori how this choice affects the results of the simulation. The impact of the uncertainties in these outflow parameters is investigated here by using the generalized Polynomial Chaos approach. This analysis also permits to calibrate the outflow-boundary parameters when patient-specific in-vivo data are available.

  16. Early structural changes in sheep lung following thoracic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guerry-Force, M.L.; Perkett, E.A.; Brigham, K.L.; Meyrick, B.

    1988-04-01

    Using a large animal model of radiation lung injury--the sheep exposed to bilateral thoracic irradiation--we have recently shown the development of sustained pulmonary hypertension during the first 4 weeks following radiation. This is the period prior to the onset of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. In the present study, we have examined biopsy and autopsy lung tissue from these same sheep and assessed the sequential changes in lung morphology. Six unanesthetized sheep received bilateral thoracic irradiation (a total of 15 Gy); control sheep were sham irradiated. Lung biopsy tissue was taken prior to and at weekly or biweekly intervals during the 4 weeks immediately following radiation. The lungs were also removed at autopsy for light and electron microscopic examination. Our results show early (Week 1) interstitial and progressive intraalveolar edema accompanied by endothelial and epithelial injury. A gradual increase in number of interstitial mononuclear cells was evident from Week 1, both in the lung tissue and in perivascular cuffs. The number of peripheral lung interstitial mononuclear cells was twice baseline from Week 3 and included accumulation of lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and intravascular macrophages. The increased numbers of mononuclear cells paralleled the development of chronic pulmonary hypertension, perhaps suggesting their involvement in the pathogenesis of this disease. Alternatively, it may be that increased mononuclear cell number represents a stage of lung repair.

  17. Acute Shingles after Resection of Thoracic Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Muesse, Jason L.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Harris, Richard L.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes zoster is relatively uncommon after surgery in immunocompetent patients. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of herpes zoster after the resection of a thoracic schwannoma. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman in whom acute shingles developed after the video-assisted thoracic surgical resection of a posterior mediastinal schwannoma adjacent to the 4th thoracic vertebral body. The patient recovered after receiving timely antiviral therapy. Rash and pain are common in patients who have wound infections and contact dermatitis after surgery, so the possible reactivation of varicella virus might not be prominent in the surgeon's mind. This case serves as a reminder that viral infections such as shingles should be considered in the differential diagnosis of postoperative erythema and pain. PMID:22740749

  18. Estimating Hemodynamic Responses to the Wingate Test Using Thoracic Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Astorino, Todd A.; Bovee, Curtis; DeBoe, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Techniques including direct Fick and Doppler echocardiography are frequently used to assess hemodynamic responses to exercise. Thoracic impedance has been shown to be a noninvasive alternative to these methods for assessing these responses during graded exercise to exhaustion, yet its feasibility during supramaximal bouts of exercise is relatively unknown. We used thoracic impedance to estimate stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) during the Wingate test (WAnT) and compared these values to those from graded exercise testing (GXT). Active men (n = 9) and women (n = 7) (mean age = 24.8 ± 5.9 yr) completed two Wingate tests and two graded exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. During exercise, heart rate (HR), SV, and CO were continuously estimated using thoracic impedance. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to identify potential differences in hemodynamic responses across protocols. Results: Maximal SV (138.6 ± 37.4 mL vs. 135.6 ± 26.9 mL) and CO (24.5 ± 6.1 L·min-1 vs. 23.7 ± 5.1 L·min-1) were similar (p > 0.05) between repeated Wingate tests. Mean maximal HR was higher (p < 0.01) for GXT (185 ± 7 b·min-1) versus WAnT (177 ± 11 b·min-1), and mean SV was higher in response to WAnT (137.1 ± 32.1 mL) versus GXT (123.0 ± 32.0 mL), leading to similar maximal cardiac output between WAnT and GXT (23.9 ± 5.6 L·min-1 vs. 22.5 ± 6.0 L·min-1). Our data show no difference in hemodynamic responses in response to repeated administrations of the Wingate test. In addition, the Wingate test elicits similar cardiac output compared to progressive cycling to VO2max. Key points Measurement of cardiac output (CO), the rate of oxygen transport delivered by the heart to skeletal muscle, is not widely-employed in Exercise Physiology due to the level of difficulty and invasiveness characteristic of most techniques used to measure this variable. Nevertheless, thoracic impedance has been shown to provide a noninvasive and simpler approach to continuously

  19. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  20. Long thoracic neuropathy from athletic activity.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J S; Leonard, J A

    1992-01-01

    Four cases of long thoracic mononeuropathy associated with sports participation are presented. Each patient developed shoulder pain or dysfunction after an acute event or vigorous activity, and demonstrated scapular winging consistent with serratus anterior weakness. The diagnosis was confirmed with electromyography in each case. It is suggested that the athletic activity caused a stretch injury to the long thoracic nerve. Conservative management, consisting of range of motion exercises for the shoulder and strengthening of the serratus anterior muscle, resulted in a favorable outcome in all patients.

  1. Comparison of two reconstructive techniques in the surgical management of four-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, FengNing; Li, ZhongHai; Huang, Xuan; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Fan; Shen, HongXing; Kang, YiFan; Zhang, YinQuan; Cai, Bin; Hou, TieSheng

    2015-01-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy and radiological outcome of treating 4-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) with either anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or "skip" corpectomy and fusion, 48 patients with 4-level CSM who had undergone ACDF or SCF at our hospital were analyzed retrospectively between January 2008 and June 2011. Twenty-seven patients received ACDF (Group A) and 21 patients received SCF. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, and Cobb's angles of the fused segments and C2-7 segments were compared in the two groups. The minimum patient follow-up was 2 years. No significant differences between the groups were found in demographic and baseline disease characteristics, duration of surgery, or follow-up time. Our study demonstrates that there was no significant difference in the clinical efficacy of ACDF and SCF, but ACDF involves less intraoperative blood loss, better cervical spine alignment, and fewer postoperative complications than SCF. PMID:25692140

  2. Solitary spinal epidural cavernous haemangiomas as a rare cause of myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shamji, Mohammed F

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas rarely occur in the spinal epidural space. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with myelopathy secondary to spinal cord compression from a purely epidural lesion. The imaging characteristics of cavernous haemangiomas are unique, reflecting a highly vascular lesion. Key differentiating features from intracranial or intramedullary lesions include the lack of a surrounding hemosiderin ring and popcorn appearance. An urgent referral to a neurosurgeon is recommended given the possibility of acute neurological deterioration from intralesional haemorrhage, and good recovery from early surgical resection. Preoperative planning with thorough patient counselling and availability of matched blood is important, and an en bloc resection approach should be taken to minimise blood loss. In this case, the patient experienced complete recovery after surgical resection. No recurrence after complete resection has been reported in the literature. This suggests a good long-term outcome for the patient and that no early adjuvant therapy is necessary. PMID:26409007

  3. Mayo Clinic: An Institutional History of General Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gillaspie, Erin A; Nichols, Francis C; Allen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic was started in Rochester, MN after a 1883 tornado disaster. The Mayo brothers, William and Charles began thoracic surgical procedures early in their career. Dr. Samuel Robinson is recognized as the first thoracic surgeon at Mayo. He was followed by Drs. Harrington and Claret who became famous surgeons. Many other notable surgeons have help to build the thoracic surgical practice into what is today a world renown center of excellence in thoracic surgery. PMID:26811041

  4. Mayo Clinic: An Institutional History of General Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gillaspie, Erin A; Nichols, Francis C; Allen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic was started in Rochester, MN after a 1883 tornado disaster. The Mayo brothers, William and Charles began thoracic surgical procedures early in their career. Dr. Samuel Robinson is recognized as the first thoracic surgeon at Mayo. He was followed by Drs. Harrington and Claret who became famous surgeons. Many other notable surgeons have help to build the thoracic surgical practice into what is today a world renown center of excellence in thoracic surgery.

  5. Clinical Presentation of Cervical Myelopathy at C1–2 Level

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Tsuneo; Terashima, Yoshinori; Tsuda, Hajime; Yoshimoto, Mitsunori; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Single-center retrospective study. Purpose To clarify the clinical features of cervical myelopathy at the C1–2 level. Overview of Literature Methods for distinguishing the affected level based on myelomere symptoms or dysfunction of the conducting pathway were established. However, no symptoms have been identified as being specific to the C1–2 level segment. Methods We evaluated 24 patients with cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord compression at the C1–2 level. Preoperative neurological assessment were investigated and compared with the rate and site of compression of the spinal cord using computed tomography-myelography. Results Impaired temperature and pain sensation were confirmed in 18 of the 24 patients with that localized to the upper arms (n=3), forearm (n=9), both (n=2), and whole body (n=4). Muscle weakness was observed in 18 patients, muscle weakness extended from the biceps brachii to the abductor digiti minimi in 10 patients, and in the whole body in 8 patients. Deep tendon reflexes were normal in 10 patients, whereas hyperactive deep tendon reflexes were noted in 14 patients. The rate of spinal cord compression was significantly higher in patients with perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness compared with those with no dysfunction. However, no significant difference in the rate and site of compression was identified in those with dysfunction. Conclusions Perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness localized to the upper limbs was observed in 58% and 42% of patients, respectively. Neurological abnormalities, such as perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness, were visualized in patients with marked compression. PMID:27559458

  6. Etiological, clinical, and radiological features of longitudinally extensive myelopathy in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihe; Jiao, Yujuan; Cui, Lei; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Linwei; Jiao, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Longitudinally extensive myelopathy (LEM) is a rare spinal syndrome, and was mostly assessed in western populations. In order to investigate the etiological, clinical, and radiological features of LEM in Chinese patients, we retrospectively analyzed eighty-nine (40 men and 49 women, median age 45.9±15.7years) patients with LEM hospitalized in China-Japan Friendship Hospital. LEM comprised autoimmune inflammatory myelitis (n=53), metabolic and compressive disorders (n=13), vascular diseases (n=10), neoplastic diseases (n=7), infectious diseases (n=4), and syringomyelia (n=2). Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) was the most common cause of transverse myelopathy identified in LEM (38/89 [42.7%]) characterized by intractable vomiting and hiccups and painful tonic spasms. Subacute combined degeneration and anterior spinal artery syndrome accounted for the largest non-transverse LEM, which selectively affected the spinal dorsal and/or lateral columns and the spinal anterior region, respectively. Radicular pain was common in anterior spinal artery syndrome. Postrema (n=15, 39.5%) and cervical (n=31, 81.6%) lesions were significantly increased in NMOSD versus non-NMOSD (n=7, 13.7% and n=34, 66.7%, respectively, p<0.05]. Axial T2-weighted MRI indicated that 46 (51.7%) patients exhibited complete lesions; 43 (48.3%) patients exhibited non-transverse lesions, mainly unilateral or symmetrical tract lesions. Twenty-four (51.1%) LEM patients exhibited distinct gadolinium contrast enhancement. In this Chinese cohort, LEM was primarily attributed to NMOSD. While the etiological distribution in the non-NMOSD group was different from western populations, clinical and imaging features may facilitate a differential diagnosis. PMID:27526974

  7. Inadequate Surgical Decompression in Patients with Cervical Myelopathy: A Retrospective Review

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Amandeep; Rolfe, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Retrospective study. Objective  We reviewed cases of surgically treated cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) or chronic, degenerative myelopathy of the subaxial cervical spine to study the incidence of inadequate surgical decompression. Methods  We included all persons treated at our institution after a first surgical decompression for CSM over a 3-year period. Inadequate original surgical decompression was defined as neurologic decline within 12 months postoperatively and ongoing impingement of the spinal cord with <1-mm change in anteroposterior canal dimension from pre- to postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) leading to revision decompressive surgery. Revisions for other reasons were not counted as inadequate. Results  Of 50 patients, 5 (10%) required revision decompression for neurologic decline and inadequate change in space available for the cord on postoperative imaging; 4 patients declined within the first 6 months and 1 patient at 8 months postoperatively. None of the 5 declined further after posterior revision, but none recovered from the interval loss. All 5 had undergone anterior approaches, for an anterior inadequacy rate of 23% (5 of 22). None of the 28 patients having posterior or combined approach declined at 2 years or had <1-mm change on postoperative MRI. The difference between anterior and posterior approaches was statistically significant (p = 0.018). Conclusions  The rate of inadequate surgical decompression for CSM was greater than expected in this series and directly associated with an anterior approach. No cases of inadequacy occurred for posterior or combined approaches. Postoperative neuroradiographic imaging such as MRI should be entertained routinely for this entity or at least for anterior-only approaches. PMID:27555995

  8. Percutaneous approach to the upper thoracic spine: optimal patient positioning.

    PubMed

    Bayley, Edward; Clamp, Jonathan; Boszczyk, Bronek M

    2009-12-01

    Percutaneous access to the upper thoracic vertebrae under fluoroscopic guidance is challenging. We describe our positioning technique facilitating optimal visualisation of the high thoracic vertebrae in the prone position. This allows safe practice of kyphoplasty, vertebroplasty and biopsy throughout the upper thoracic spine.

  9. Coil embolization of traumatic pseudoaneurysm of right internal thoracic artery.

    PubMed

    Tourmousoglou, Christos; Zambakis, Peter; Koletsis, Efstratios; Prokakis, Christos; Charoulis, Nikolaos; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic injury to the chest and internal thoracic artery is a perplexing problem that is difficult to diagnose and open to different treatment options. Internal thoracic artery pseudoaneurysms are an extremely rare vascular abnormality. We report the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the musculophrenic artery, a branch of right internal thoracic artery, caused by a penetrating injury of the chest.

  10. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension resulting from a thoracic osteophyte.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ling-Chien; Hsu, Yung-Chu

    2015-06-01

    We report a 34-year-old woman who presented with progressive postural headache and neck tightness over 1week. We confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and spinal images showed a thoracic osteophyte caused the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. SIH caused by spinal CSF leak is generally thought to be a consequence of deficiency of the spinal meninges in conjunction with trivial trauma. Less commonly, spinal bony pathology can lead to SIH. We reviewed 13 reported patients with bony structural pathology related SIH. After two to three epidural blood patches, eight patients underwent surgery. They generally had good outcomes. In conclusion, even though surgical repair confers specific risks, it should be considered after repetitive failures of epidural blood patches. The long-term prognoses of surgical versus non-surgical patients warrants further investigation. PMID:25778385

  11. Syphilitic myelopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... themselves may need help. Rehabilitation, physical therapy, and occupational therapy may help people who have muscle weakness. You may need analgesics to control pain. These may include over-the-counter medications ...

  12. Functional chiral asymmetry in descending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Frazin, L J; Lanza, G; Vonesh, M; Khasho, F; Spitzzeri, C; McGee, S; Mehlman, D; Chandran, K B; Talano, J; McPherson, D

    1990-12-01

    To determine whether rotational blood flow or chiral asymmetry exists in the human descending thoracic aorta, we established the ability of color Doppler ultrasound to detect rotational flow in a tornado tube model of a vortex descending fluid column. In a model of the human aortic arch with a pulse duplicator, color Doppler was then used to demonstrate that rotational flow occurs first in the transverse arch and then in the proximal descending thoracic aorta. With the use of color Doppler esophageal echocardiography, 53 patients (age range, 25-78 years; mean age, 56.4 years) were prospectively examined for rotational flow in the descending thoracic aorta. At 10 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 22 of 38 patients (58%) revealed rotational flow with obvious diastolic counterclockwise rotation but less obvious systolic clockwise rotation. At 5 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 29 of 46 patients (63%) revealed rotational flow with a tendency toward systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise rotation. At the retro-left ventricular position, 47 of 53 patients (89%) revealed rotational flow, usually of a clockwise direction, occurring in systole. Our data suggest that aortic flow is not purely pulsatile and axial but has a rotational component. Rotational flow begins in the aortic arch and is carried through to the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is chirally asymmetric with systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise components. These data demonstrate an aortic rotational flow component that may have physiological implications for organ perfusion. PMID:2242523

  13. Retrograde replacement of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, D A

    1995-01-01

    A technique is described for replacement of the entire thoracic aorta. In this "pull-through" technique, which utilizes hypothermic circulatory arrest, the graft is implanted in a retrograde fashion, thus providing protection for the spinal cord and brain and avoiding injury to the vagus and phrenic nerves. PMID:7647599

  14. Thoracic BB injuries in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, L G; Radhakrishnan, J; Gordon, R T; Shah, M R; Lain, K Y; Messersmith, R N; Roettger, R H; Norwood, S H

    1995-03-01

    Penetrating thoracic injury from BB shot remains an innocuous event in most patients, but factors including location, proximity, gun type, and patient weight may identify groups at risk. The following cases demonstrate morbidity and mortality in two patients, and this experience may suggest the need for reassessment of this injury.

  15. INTERFERON BETA-1A TREATMENT IN HTLV-1-ASSOCIATED MYELOPATHY/TROPICAL SPASTIC PARAPARESIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; da Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; da Silva, Diego Luz Felipe; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  16. Interferon beta-1a treatment in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto da; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; Silva, Diego Luz Felipe da; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  17. Nitrous oxide-induced B₁₂ deficiency myelopathy: Perspectives on the clinical biochemistry of vitamin B₁₂.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Leith; El-Saden, Suzie

    2011-02-15

    Beginning with a case report of nitrous oxide (N₂O)-induced B₁₂ deficiency myelopathy, this article reviews the clinical biochemistry of vitamin B₁₂, and examines the pathogenetic mechanisms by which B₁₂ deficiency leads to neurologic damage, and how this damage is potentiated by N₂O exposure. The article systematically examines the available experimental data relating to the two main coenzyme mechanisms that are usually suggested in clinical articles, particularly the deficient methylation hypothesis. The article demonstrates that neither of these mechanisms is fully consistent with the available data. The article then presents a novel mechanism based on new data from the neuroimmunology basic science literature which suggests that the pathogenesis of B₁₂ deficiency myelopathy may not be related to its role as a coenzyme, but rather to newly discovered functions of B₁₂ in regulating cytokines and growth factors.

  18. Laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Liu, Zhong-Jun; Wang, Shao-Bo; Pan, Sheng-Fa; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Feng-Shan; Sun, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Although several studies report various treatment solutions for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy, long-term follow-up studies are very rare. None of the reported treatment solutions represent a gold standard for this disease owing to the small number of cases and lack of long-term follow-up. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation to treat cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy from a single center.This retrospective study included 15 patients (9 male patients and 6 female patients) with athetoid cerebral palsy who underwent laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for cervical spondylotic myelopathy at our hospital between March 2006 and June 2010. Demographic variables, radiographic parameters, and pre- and postoperative clinical outcomes determined by the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were assessed.The mean follow-up time was 80.5 months. Developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis (P = 0.02) and cervical lordosis (P = 0.04) were significantly correlated with lower preoperative modified JOA scores. The mean modified JOA scores increased from 7.97 preoperatively to 12.1 postoperatively (P < 0.01). The mean VAS score decreased from 5.30 to 3.13 (P < 0.01), and the mean NDI score decreased from 31.73 to 19.93 (P < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis and recovery rate of the modified JOA score (P = 0.01).Developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis is significantly related to neurological function in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy. Laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation is an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. PMID:27684879

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Thoracic Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan-Pan; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Yu, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to review cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) after thoracic decompression and describe its regular and special features. Data Sources: Literature cited in this review was retrieved from PubMed and Medline and was primarily published during the last 10 years. “Cerebrospinal fluid”, “leakage”, “dural tears”, and “thoracic decompression” were the indexed terms. Relevant citations in the retrieved articles were also screened to include more data. Study Selection: All retrieved literature was scrutinized, and four categories were recorded: incidence and risk factors, complications, treatment modalities, and prognosis. Results: CSFL is much more frequent after thoracic decompression than after cervical and lumbar spinal surgeries. Its occurrence is related to many clinical factors, especially the presence of ossified ligaments and the adhesion of the dural sac. While its impact on the late neurological recovery is currently controversial, CSFL increases the risk of other perioperative complications, such as low intracranial pressure symptoms, infection, and vascular events. The combined use of primary repairs during the operation and conservative treatment postoperatively is generally effective for most CSFL cases, whereas lumbar drains and reoperations should be implemented as rescue options for refractory cases only. Conclusions: CSFL after thoracic decompression has not been specifically investigated, so the present study provides a systematic and comprehensive review of the issue. CSFL is a multi-factor-related complication, and pathological factors play a decisive role. The importance of CSFL is in its impact on the increased risk of other complications during the postoperative period. Methods to prevent these complications are in need. In addition, though the required treatment resources are not special for CSFL after thoracic decompression, most CSFL cases are conservatively curable, and surgeons should be

  20. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2–4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7–10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7–10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed – hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in

  1. Non-intubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery—technical issues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Performing awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is technically more challenging than thoracic surgery under general anesthesia (GA), but it can result in a greater benefit for the patient. Local wound infiltration and lidocaine administration in the pleural space can be considered for ATS. More invasive techniques are local wound infiltration with wound catheter insertion, thoracic wall blocks, selective intercostal nerve blockade, thoracic paravertebral blockade and thoracic epidural analgesia, offering the advantage of a catheter placement which can also be continued for postoperative analgesia. PMID:26046050

  2. The Benefits of Internal Thoracic Artery Catheterization in Patients With Chronic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ilic, Nikola Davidovic, Lazar; Koncar, Igor; Dragas, Marko; Markovic, Miroslav; Colic, Momcilo; Cinara, Ilijas

    2011-04-15

    Occlusion of the abdominal aorta may be caused by an embolic lesion, but more commonly by thrombotic disease at the aortoiliac area, progressing retrograde. However, the visualization of the distal run-off via internal thoracic-epigastric inferior artery collateral channel may be a very important diagnostic tool, especially in countries with poor technical equipment. This study was designed to show the benefit of the selective internal thoracic angiography in cases with complete aortic occlusion. We present 30 patients with chronic aortic abdominal occlusion who were submitted to the transaxillary aortography and selective ITA angiography with purpose of distal run off evaluation. Angiographic evaluation was performed by two independent radiologists according to previously defined classification. Good angiographic score via internal thoracic angiography by first observer was achieved in 19 (63.3%) patients and in 18 (60%) by a second observer. Transaxillary aortography showed inferior results: good angiographic score by the first observer in six (20%) patients and by the second observer in three (3%) patients. Low extremity run-off is better visualized during internal thoracic angiography than during transaxillary aortography.

  3. Incremental value of thoracic ultrasound in intensive care units: Indications, uses, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Liccardo, Biagio; Martone, Francesca; Trambaiolo, Paolo; Severino, Sergio; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; D’Andrea, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Emergency physicians are required to care for unstable patients with life-threatening conditions, and thus must make decisions that are both quick and precise about unclear clinical situations. There is increasing consensus in favor of using ultrasound as a real-time bedside clinical tool for clinicians in emergency settings alongside the irreplaceable use of historical and physical examinations. B-mode sonography is an old technology that was first proposed for medical applications more than 50 years ago. Its application in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases has always been considered limited, due to the presence of air in the lung and the presence of the bones of the thoracic cage, which prevent the progression of the ultrasound beam. However, the close relationship between air and water in the lungs causes a variety of artifacts on ultrasounds. At the bedside, thoracic ultrasound is based primarily on the analysis of these artifacts, with the aim of improving accuracy and safety in the diagnosis and therapy of the various varieties of pulmonary pathologic diseases which are predominantly “water-rich” or “air-rich”. The indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages, and techniques of thoracic ultrasound and its related procedures are analyzed in the present review. PMID:27247712

  4. Use of thoracic spine manipulation in the treatment of adhesive capsulitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Joshua R

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis (AC) is a common and disabling shoulder condition seen in physical therapy, and there is no clear consensus as to the best treatment approach. Recently there has been emerging evidence that manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine may be beneficial for patients with shoulder pain; however, this has not been examined specifically in patients with AC. The purpose of this paper is to present the case of 59-year-old female referred to physical therapy with a diagnosis of AC. The patient presented with complaints of left shoulder pain and significant limitations in range of motion (ROM) and upper extremity function. The initial treatment included exercises and manual therapy directed at the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic joints, and after 10 visits only minimal progress had been made. Further examination revealed mobility and ROM deficits in the thoracic spine, and manual therapy directed at this region was incorporated into her treatment. After the first session of thoracic spine manual therapy (TSMT) a 25 degree improvement was noted in active shoulder flexion. After four total visits of TSMT substantial improvements in pain, ROM, and function were noted compared to those made during the first 10 visits. This case adds to the emerging evidence that manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine should be considered for patients with shoulder pain. PMID:23372391

  5. Role of Mechanotransduction in Vascular Biology: Focus on Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J.D.; Schwartz, M.A.; Tellides, G.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic aortic diseases that involve progressive enlargement, acute dissection, or rupture are influenced by the hemodynamic loads and mechanical properties of the wall. We have only limited understanding, however, of the mechanobiological processes that lead to these potentially lethal conditions. Homeostasis requires that intramural cells sense their local chemo-mechanical environment and establish, maintain, remodel, or repair the extracellular matrix to provide suitable compliance and yet sufficient strength. Proper sensing, in turn, necessitates both receptors that connect the extracellular matrix to intracellular actomyosin filaments and signaling molecules that transmit the related information to the nucleus. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections are associated with poorly controlled hypertension and mutations in genes for extracellular matrix constituents, membrane receptors, contractile proteins, and associated signaling molecules. This grouping of factors suggests that these thoracic diseases result, in part, from dysfunctional mechanosensing and mechanoregulation of the extracellular matrix by the intramural cells, which leads to a compromised structural integrity of the wall. Thus, improved understanding of the mechanobiology of aortic cells could lead to new therapeutic strategies for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. PMID:25858068

  6. Incremental value of thoracic ultrasound in intensive care units: Indications, uses, and applications.

    PubMed

    Liccardo, Biagio; Martone, Francesca; Trambaiolo, Paolo; Severino, Sergio; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; D'Andrea, Antonello

    2016-05-28

    Emergency physicians are required to care for unstable patients with life-threatening conditions, and thus must make decisions that are both quick and precise about unclear clinical situations. There is increasing consensus in favor of using ultrasound as a real-time bedside clinical tool for clinicians in emergency settings alongside the irreplaceable use of historical and physical examinations. B-mode sonography is an old technology that was first proposed for medical applications more than 50 years ago. Its application in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases has always been considered limited, due to the presence of air in the lung and the presence of the bones of the thoracic cage, which prevent the progression of the ultrasound beam. However, the close relationship between air and water in the lungs causes a variety of artifacts on ultrasounds. At the bedside, thoracic ultrasound is based primarily on the analysis of these artifacts, with the aim of improving accuracy and safety in the diagnosis and therapy of the various varieties of pulmonary pathologic diseases which are predominantly "water-rich" or "air-rich". The indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages, and techniques of thoracic ultrasound and its related procedures are analyzed in the present review.

  7. Thoracic surgery and the war against smoking: Richard H. Overholt, MD.

    PubMed

    Berger, R L; Dunton, R F; Ashraf, M M; Leonardi, H K; Karlson, K J; Neptune, W B

    1992-04-01

    Richard H. Overholt was born at the beginning of the twentieth century when thoracic surgery hardly existed. During the first 20 years of his life progress in the field was slow. The next 20 years, which coincided with Overholt's surgical training and his early years as a thoracic surgeon, saw a rapid and almost explosive growth. Overholt's contributions were legion. They included the world's first successful right pneumonectomy, advancements in surgical treatment of tuberculosis, development of segmental resection, and introduction of the prone operative position. He was a bold and creative pioneer thoracic surgeon with consumate technical skills. Sixty years ago, when Overholt started his career as a thoracic surgeon, the hazards of smoking were not appreciated, the habit was fashionable, and consumption of tobacco was rapidly rising. In the early 1930s Overholt was among the very few physicians who recognized the perils of smoking and initiated a long but initially unrewarding antismoking crusade. By the early 1950s evidence about the ill effects of tobacco use began to accumulate. Organized medicine, voluntary health groups, and governmental agencies joined in a concerted effort to educate and to contain smoking. During the ensuing 30 years the antismoking movement achieved ever-increasing success. Today, it is widely recognized that smoking is a major health hazard and tobacco consumption is on the decline. Richard Overholt issued the first warning signals about the perils of tobacco and served as an indefatigable leader of the antismoking crusade throughout his professional career. PMID:1554293

  8. [Vacuolar myelopathy with symmetrical involvement of the fasciculus cuneatus, in a case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with multisystemic degeneration].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Mariko; Yamamoto, Toru

    2002-08-01

    We report on vacuolar myelopathy in a case of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with multisystemic degeneration. The patient was a 75-year-old woman at death, who had been characterized by severe upper and lower motor neuron disturbance and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. She became dependent on a respirator 14 months and survived 34 months after the onset of her illness. Neuropathologically, severe degeneration of the basal ganglia, substantia nigra, Clark's dorsal nucleus and spinocerebellar tract were noted together with the prominent alteration of the motor neuron system. The unexpected feature in this patient was the prominent vacuolar change in the white matter of the spinal cord. Especially, the fasciculus cuneatus was entirely occupied by various sizes of vacuoles. These vacuoles tended to be rimmed by thin myelin, which was continuous to disintegrated myelin sheaths. Axons were occasionally noted in the vacuoles. Vacuoles were only rarely present in the corticospinal and spinocerebellar tracts where myelin was severely lost due to the primary disease. In the vacuolar lesions lipid-laden macrophages were occasionally found, suggesting that a postmortem artifact was unlikely. Although the etiology of vacuolar myelopathy is unknown, the selective distribution of vacuolar change as seen in our patient has never been described in the past literature of vacuolar myelopathy associated with various diseases.

  9. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  10. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  11. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars.

  12. Endovascular Repair of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an assessment on endovascular repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA). Clinical Need Aneurysm is the most common condition of the thoracic aorta requiring surgery. Aortic aneurysm is defined as a localized dilatation of the aorta. Most aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are asymptomatic and incidentally discovered. However, TAA tends to enlarge progressively and compress surrounding structures causing symptoms such as chest or back pain, dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), dyspnea (shortness of breath), cough, stridor (a harsh, high-pitched breath sound), and hoarseness. Significant aortic regurgitation causes symptoms of congestive heart failure. Embolization of the thrombus to the distal arterial circulation may occur and cause related symptoms. The aneurysm may eventually rupture and create a life-threatening condition. The overall incidence rate of TAA is about 10 per 100,000 person-years. The descending aorta is involved in about 30% to 40% of these cases. The prognosis of large untreated TAAs is poor, with a 3-year survival rate as low as 25%. Intervention is strongly recommended for any symptomatic TAA or any TAA that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal aorta or is 6 cm or larger. Open surgical treatment of TAA involves left thoracotomy and aortic graft replacement. Surgical treatment has been found to improve survival when compared with medical therapy. However, despite dramatic advances in surgical techniques for performing such complex operations, operative mortality from centres of excellence are between 8% and 20% for elective cases, and up to 50% in patients requiring emergency operations. In addition, survivors of open surgical repair of TAAs may suffer from severe complications. Postoperative or postprocedural complications of descending TAA repair include paraplegia, myocardial infarction, stroke, respiratory failure, renal failure, and intestinal ischemia. The Technology Endovascular aortic aneurysm

  13. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Massard, Gilbert; Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-05-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows' leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks and

  14. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  15. Thoracic Endometriosis Syndrome: A Veritable Pandora's Box.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sobha S; Nayar, Jayashree

    2016-04-01

    Thoracic endometriosis syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in pleura, lung parenchyma, airways, and/or encompasses mainly four clinical entities-catamenial pneumothorax, catamenial haemothorax, catamenial haemoptysis and lung nodules. The cases were studied retrospectively by reviewing the records at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, for duration of five years i.e., form March 2010-2014 and analysed for the clinical presentation and management of thoracic endometriosis syndrome. Catamenial breathlessness was the main symptom. Pneumothorax and pleural effusion were the findings on investigations. Histopathology report of endometriosis was present in three cases (50%). Conditions with excess oestrogen like endometriosis, fibroid, adenomyosis were diagnosed in these patients by pelvic scan. After the initial supportive treatment with hormones, pleurodesis, hysterectomy and lung decortication were the treatment modalities. Two cases that had multiple recurrences were diagnosed as disseminated TES. They underwent combined treatment of surgery and hormones.

  16. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing. PMID:11567193

  17. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  18. Thoracic surgery in India: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    India has the dubitable honor of being ranked first in the world with regards to lung disease burden. A good proportion of this disease burden is amenable to surgical treatment. However, patients have limited access to quality thoracic surgical care due to a number of obstacles. This review article summarizes these obstacles and the implied opportunities that exist in this nascent surgical discipline in the world’s second most populous country.

  19. Chondromyxoid fibroma of two thoracic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Bruder, E; Zanetti, M; Boos, N; von Hochstetter, A R

    1999-05-01

    We report on a case of chondromyxoid fibroma involving two adjacent thoracic vertebrae with features of aggressive behaviour on radiographs, CT and MRI. Histology revealed typical chondromyxoid fibroma with unusually coarse calcifications. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the spine is rare, and only 30 of these tumours have been reported so far. Involvement of two contiguous vertebral bodies by chondromyxoid fibroma, as reported here, appears exceptional. PMID:10424337

  20. [Septic arthritis of thoracic facet joint].

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelghani, K; Gérard-Dran, D; Combe, B

    2009-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the facet joint is a rare condition. We report a case of septic arthritis of both a thoracic facet joint and a wrist. Clinical manifestations were consistent with a spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated infection of facet joints of T1 and T2. A surgical biopsy of the wrist isolated a type B streptococcus. The same organism was found in urine culture. The patient had an uneventful recovery on antibiotics.

  1. Endovascular intervention in thoracic arterial trauma.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Eric K

    2008-11-01

    The management of thoracic vascular injury has improved dramatically over the past two decades. The availability of multi-row detector CT has facilitated early diagnosis and incorporation of minimally invasive endograft repair for traumatic aortic injury has improved mortality and paraplegia rates. This review evaluates the available data on stent-graft repair of acute blunt traumatic aortic injury and traumatic great vessel injury with regard to safety and efficacy in comparison with conventional open surgical repair. PMID:18842261

  2. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    2012-05-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002, registered in 89 population-based cancer registries (CRs) and followed-up to 31st December 2003. Over 17,688 cases of rare thoracic cancers were selected based on the list of the RACECARE project. Mesothelioma was the most common tumour (19 per million per year) followed by epithelial tumours of the trachea and thymus (1.3 and 1.7, respectively). The age standardised incidence rates of epithelial tumours of the trachea was double in Eastern and Southern Europe versus the other European regions: 2 per million per year. Epithelial tumours of the thymus had the lowest incidence in Northern and Eastern Europe and UK and Ireland(1) and somewhat higher incidence in Central and Southern Europe.(2) Highest incidence in mesothelioma was seen in UK and Ireland(23) and lowest in Eastern Europe.(4) Patients with tumours of the thymus had the best prognosis (1-year survival 85%, 66% at 5 years). Five year survival was lowest for the mesothelioma 5% compared to 14% of patients with tumours of the trachea. Mesothelioma was the most prevalent rare cancer (12,000 cases), followed by thymus (7000) and trachea (1400). Cancer Registry (CR) data play an important role in revealing the burden of rare thoracic cancers and monitoring the effect of regulations on asbestos use and smoking related policies.

  3. Thoracic surgery in India: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    India has the dubitable honor of being ranked first in the world with regards to lung disease burden. A good proportion of this disease burden is amenable to surgical treatment. However, patients have limited access to quality thoracic surgical care due to a number of obstacles. This review article summarizes these obstacles and the implied opportunities that exist in this nascent surgical discipline in the world’s second most populous country. PMID:27651933

  4. Thoracic surgery in India: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yendamuri, Sai

    2016-08-01

    India has the dubitable honor of being ranked first in the world with regards to lung disease burden. A good proportion of this disease burden is amenable to surgical treatment. However, patients have limited access to quality thoracic surgical care due to a number of obstacles. This review article summarizes these obstacles and the implied opportunities that exist in this nascent surgical discipline in the world's second most populous country.

  5. Thoracic surgery in India: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yendamuri, Sai

    2016-08-01

    India has the dubitable honor of being ranked first in the world with regards to lung disease burden. A good proportion of this disease burden is amenable to surgical treatment. However, patients have limited access to quality thoracic surgical care due to a number of obstacles. This review article summarizes these obstacles and the implied opportunities that exist in this nascent surgical discipline in the world's second most populous country. PMID:27651933

  6. The European general thoracic surgery database project.

    PubMed

    Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database is a free registry created by ESTS in 2001. The current online version was launched in 2007. It runs currently on a Dendrite platform with extensive data security and frequent backups. The main features are a specialty-specific, procedure-specific, prospectively maintained, periodically audited and web-based electronic database, designed for quality control and performance monitoring, which allows for the collection of all general thoracic procedures. Data collection is the "backbone" of the ESTS database. It includes many risk factors, processes of care and outcomes, which are specially designed for quality control and performance audit. The user can download and export their own data and use them for internal analyses and quality control audits. The ESTS database represents the gold standard of clinical data collection for European General Thoracic Surgery. Over the past years, the ESTS database has achieved many accomplishments. In particular, the database hit two major milestones: it now includes more than 235 participating centers and 70,000 surgical procedures. The ESTS database is a snapshot of surgical practice that aims at improving patient care. In other words, data capture should become integral to routine patient care, with the final objective of improving quality of care within Europe.

  7. [Thoracic surgery for patients with bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Iyoda, A; Satoh, Y

    2012-07-01

    Thoracic surgery poses a risk for complications in the respiratory system. In particular, for patients with bronchial asthma, we need to care for perioperative complications because it is well known that these patients frequently have respiratory complications after surgery, and they may have bronchial spasms during surgery. If we can get good control of their bronchial asthma, we can usually perform surgery for these patients without limitations. For safe postoperative care, it is desirable that these patients have stable asthma conditions that are well-controlled before surgery, as thoracic surgery requires intrabronchial intubation for anesthesia and sometimes bronchial resection. These stimulations to the bronchus do not provide for good conditions because of the risk of bronchial spasm. Therefore, we should use the same agents that are used to control bronchial asthma if it is already well controlled. If it is not, we have to administer a β₂ stimulator, aminophylline, or steroidal agents for good control. Isoflurane or sevoflurane are effective for the safe control of anesthesia during surgery, and we should use a β₂ stimulator, with or without inhalation, or steroidal agents after surgery. It is important to understand that we can perform thoracic surgery for asthma patients if we can provide perioperative control of bronchial asthma, although these patients still have severe risks. PMID:22868432

  8. Open aortic surgery after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Coselli, Joseph S; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Preventza, Ourania; de la Cruz, Kim I; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Green, Susan Y

    2016-08-01

    In the last decade, thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has emerged as an appealing alternative to the traditional open aortic aneurysm repair. This is largely due to generally improved early outcomes associated with TEVAR, including lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. However, it is relatively common for patients who undergo TEVAR to need a secondary intervention. In select circumstances, these secondary interventions are performed as an open procedure. Although it is difficult to assess the rate of open repairs after TEVAR, the rates in large series of TEVAR cases (>300) have ranged from 0.4 to 7.9 %. Major complications of TEVAR that typically necessitates open distal aortic repair (i.e., repair of the descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aorta) include endoleak (especially type I), aortic fistula, endograft infection, device collapse or migration, and continued expansion of the aneurysm sac. Conversion to open repair of the distal aorta may be either elective (as for many endoleaks) or emergent (as for rupture, retrograde complicated dissection, malperfusion, and endograft infection). In addition, in select patients (e.g., those with a chronic aortic dissection), unrepaired sections of the aorta may progressively dilate, resulting in the need for multiple distal aortic repairs. Open repairs after TEVAR can be broadly classified as full extraction, partial extraction, or full salvage of the stent-graft. Although full and partial stent-graft extraction imply failure of TEVAR, such failure is generally absent in cases where the stent-graft can be fully salvaged. We review the literature regarding open repair after TEVAR and highlight operative strategies.

  9. [MRSA-related empyema as thoracic surgical site infection].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Hisao

    2009-09-01

    The incidence of empyema as a thoracic surgical site infection (SSI) is relating low, but empyema related to MRSA poses an unenviable therapeutic challenge. We review 3 cases of MRSA-related empyema as SSI seem in the last 10 years, and evaluate therapeutic measures. All 3 subjects began being administered vancomycin (VCM) systemically once the diagnosis was established. Subject 1 developed MRSA-related empyema following pulmonary segmentectomy for small-cell lung cancer. The subject was treated following a diagnosis of incisional SSI, with delayed adequate pleural drainage, resulting in treatment difficulties, but was cured without becoming MRSA-negative. Subject 2 developed MRSA-related empyema following pulmonary lobectomy for advanced lung cancer associated with pneumoconiosis. Following bronchoplasty, a chest tube was placed for long-term drainage. The subject did not become MRSA-negative after VCM administration, but became so after linezolid treatment, facilitating a cure. Subject 3, who had secondary pneumothorax, underwent thoracoscopic partial hepatic resection. Intraoperative findings suggested pleural cavity infection, necessitating a prophylactic drain, but MRSA-related pyothorax developed. Fibrinolysis with urokinase effectively cleared up the poor drainage and the subject was cured without becoming MRSA-negative. In conclusion, in controlling MRSA-related empyema as SSI noted that: (1) long-term postperative thoracic drain retention may lead to retrograde infection; (2) surgical procedures reducing the extent of pulmonary resection may effectively prevent pyothorax progression; (3) for poor drainage in advanced pyothorax, fibrinolytic therapy is worth attempting before thoracoscopic surgery; and (4) the timing for discontinuing anti-MRSA drugs should be determined based on the clinical course rather than negative conversion of bacteria. PMID:19860251

  10. Comparative Analysis of VOCs in Exhaled Breath of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changsong; Li, Mingjuan; Jiang, Hongquan; Tong, Hongshuang; Feng, Yue; Wang, Yue; Pi, Xin; Guo, Lei; Nie, Maomao; Feng, Honglin; Li, Enyou

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable neurological degenerative disease. It can cause irreversible neurological damage to motor neurons; typical symptoms include muscle weakness and atrophy, bulbar paralysis and pyramidal tract signs. The ALS-mimicking disease cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) presents similar symptoms, but analysis of breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can potentially be used to distinguish ALS from CSM. In this study, breath samples were collected from 28 ALS and 13 CSM patients. Subsequently, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) was used to analyze breath VOCs. Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLSDA) were the statistical methods used to process the final data. We identified 4 compounds with significantly decreased levels in ALS patients compared with CSM controls: (1) carbamic acid, monoammonium salt; (2) 1-alanine ethylamide, (S)-; (3) guanidine, N,N-dimethyl-; and (4) phosphonic acid, (p-hydroxyphenyl)-. Currently, the metabolic origin of the VOCs remains unclear; however, several pathways might explain the decreasing trends observed. The results of this study demonstrate that there are specific VOC profiles associated with ALS and CSM patients that can be used to differentiate between the two. In addition, these metabolites could contribute to a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of ALS. PMID:27212435

  11. Hypometabolism of watershed areas of the brain in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Akitoshi; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Ebihara, Yuka; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-11-01

    In previous studies of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), areas of slow blood flow in the spinal cord were related to pathological changes. While the pathological changes in the brain are milder than those in the spinal cord, they are also more significant in sites with slow blood flow. In this study, we investigated brain glucose metabolism in slow blood flow areas using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET). Clinical features and brain (18)F-FDG-PET parameters were analyzed in six patients with HAM/TSP. For comparison of PET data, eight healthy volunteers were enrolled as normal controls (NLs). Glucose metabolism in the watershed areas of the middle and posterior cerebral arteries, as compared with that in the occipital lobes as a control, was significantly lower in HAM/TSP patients than in NLs. This result confirmed the relationship between slow blood flow areas and hypometabolism in HAM/TSP, and is consistent with previous findings that pathological changes are accentuated in sites with slow blood flow.

  12. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy due to the Ochronotic Arthropathy of the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yuan, Qiang; He, Da

    2016-01-01

    Ochronosis is a musculoskeletal manifestation of alkaptonuria, a rare hereditary metabolic disorder occurs due to the absence of homogentisic acid oxidase and leading to various systemic abnormalities related to deposition of homogentisic acid pigmentation (ochronotic pigmentation). The present case reports the clinical features, radiographic findings, treatments and results of a cervical spondylotic myelopathy woman patient due to the ochronotic arthropathy of the cervical spine. The patient aged 62 years was presented with gait disturbance and hand clumsiness. Physical examination, X-rays, computed tomography and lab results of the urine sample confirmed the presence of ochronosis with the involvement of the cervical spine. The patient underwent a modified cervical laminoplasty due to multi-segment spinal cord compression. The postoperative follow-up showed a good functional outcome with patient satisfaction. The present study concludes the conditions and important diagnostic and surgical aspects of a patient. It is necessary to identify the condition clinically and if cord compression is observed, appropriate surgical interventions needs to be instituted. PMID:26885289

  13. Etanercept-Induced Myelopathy in a Pediatric Case of Blau Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Caracseghi, Fabiola; Izquierdo-Blasco, Jaume; Sanchez-Montanez, Angel; Melendo-Perez, Susana; Roig-Quilis, Manuel; Modesto, Consuelo

    2011-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare autoinflammatory disorder within the group of pediatric granulomatous diseases. Mutations in nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15) are responsible for this condition, which has an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and variable expressivity. The clinical picture includes arthritis, uveitis, skin rash, and granulomatous inflammation. Central nervous system involvement is seldom reported, although some isolated cases of seizures, neurosensorial hearing loss, and transient cranial nerve palsy have been described. Treatment consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and immunosuppressive agents, among which anti-tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha (TNF-α) biologic agents, such as etanercept, play an important role. Among the major adverse effects of TNF-α inhibitors, demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis, and acute transverse myelitis have been reported in adults. We describe a case of pediatric Blau syndrome affected by etanercept-induced myelopathy, manifesting as a clinical syndrome of transverse myelitis. The patient experienced rapid recovery after etanercept was discontinued. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature and, possibly, the one with the latest onset, following 8 years of treatment. We discuss the etiopathogenic mechanisms of this reaction and possible explanations for the imaging findings. PMID:22937436

  14. Variants within the SP110 nuclear body protein modify risk of canine degenerative myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ivansson, Emma L.; Kozyrev, Sergey V.; Murén, Eva; Körberg, Izabella Baranowska; Swofford, Ross; Koltookian, Michele; Tonomura, Noriko; Zeng, Rong; Kolicheski, Ana L.; Hansen, Liz; Katz, Martin L.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Johnson, Gary S.; Coates, Joan R.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a naturally occurring neurodegenerative disease with similarities to some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Most dogs that develop DM are homozygous for a common superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1) mutation. However, not all dogs homozygous for this mutation develop disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) breed comparing DM-affected and -unaffected dogs homozygous for the SOD1 mutation. The analysis revealed a modifier locus on canine chromosome 25. A haplotype within the SP110 nuclear body protein (SP110) was present in 40% of affected compared with 4% of unaffected dogs (P = 1.5 × 10−5), and was associated with increased probability of developing DM (P = 4.8 × 10−6) and earlier onset of disease (P = 1.7 × 10−5). SP110 is a nuclear body protein involved in the regulation of gene transcription. Our findings suggest that variations in SP110-mediated gene transcription may underlie, at least in part, the variability in risk for developing DM among PWCs that are homozygous for the disease-related SOD1 mutation. Further studies are warranted to clarify the effect of this modifier across dog breeds. PMID:27185954

  15. Asian perspective in surgery: thoracic surgery in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turna, Akif

    2016-08-01

    Turkey with a population of 78 million is located between Asia and Europe geographically and culturally. There are 577 active pure thoracic surgeon and 37 thoracic surgery teaching units. Thoracic surgeons usually deal with lung cancer patients due to relatively higher rate of tobacco usage as well as inflammatory diseases such as pulmonary hydatid disease, bronchiectasis and empyema. Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has been a new approach which is being adapted by increasingly more surgeons. There are a number of reasons to predict that the number of thoracic surgical cases will be increased and new generation of thoracic surgeons will be operating more minimally invasive resectional surgeries for most lung cancer in future. PMID:27651934

  16. Asian perspective in surgery: thoracic surgery in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Turkey with a population of 78 million is located between Asia and Europe geographically and culturally. There are 577 active pure thoracic surgeon and 37 thoracic surgery teaching units. Thoracic surgeons usually deal with lung cancer patients due to relatively higher rate of tobacco usage as well as inflammatory diseases such as pulmonary hydatid disease, bronchiectasis and empyema. Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has been a new approach which is being adapted by increasingly more surgeons. There are a number of reasons to predict that the number of thoracic surgical cases will be increased and new generation of thoracic surgeons will be operating more minimally invasive resectional surgeries for most lung cancer in future. PMID:27651934

  17. Thoracic Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Middle Aortic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Taek; Lee, Mina; Kim, Young Sam; Yoon, Yong Han; Baek, Wan Ki

    2016-09-01

    Middle aortic syndrome is a rare disease defined as a segmental narrowing of the distal descending thoracic or abdominal aorta. A thoracoabdominal bypass or endovascular treatment is the choice of treatment. Endovascular therapy consists of a balloon dilatation and stent implantation. Recently, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has been widely used in a variety of aortic diseases. We report a case of middle aortic syndrome treated with a thoracic endovascular stent graft. PMID:27549552

  18. Thoracic Kidney: Extremely Rare State of Aberrant Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Khoshchehreh, Mahdi; Paknejad, Omalbanin; Bakhshayesh-Karam, Mehrdad; Pazoki, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    The thorax is the rarest place among all forms of renal ectopia. We report a rare case of an unacquired thoracic kidney. Only about 200 cases of the thoracic kidney have ever been reported in medical literature worldwide. In this paper we present the rarest form of nontraumatic nonhernia associated, truly ectopic thoracic kidney. The differential diagnosis and management options and classification of this rare form of aberrant kidney are discussed. PMID:26301113

  19. Mini-open lateral retro-pleural thoracic corpectomy for osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Amir; Uribe, Juan S

    2013-07-01

    Thoracic vertebral body corpectomy with associated deformity and neural element compression can be challenging. Multiple approaches have been proposed including trans-pedicular, costotransversectomy and trans-thoracic. Approach related pitfalls, nuances, morbidity and complication profile differ with each technique. A mini-open retro-pleural approach provides great access to bony pathology and neural elements without the need to violate the thoracic cavity or chest-tube placement postoperatively. Here we present a 56-year-old male with progressive back pain and suspected osteomyelitis/discitis at T-9 & T-10 who presented with progressive deformity and failure of empiric antibiotic treatment. He underwent a two-level lateral corpectomy. The technique and operative nuances to a lateral retro-pleural approach to thoracic corpectomy are presented. Important surgical concepts such as patient positioning, appropriate use of intraoperative fluoroscopy, regional anatomy, postoperative care and pitfalls are outlined. Emphasis is made on a true lateral approach, posterior rib resection, wide retro-pleural dissection and preservation of the parietal pleura as you descent on to the vertebral body. Identifying the correct plane of dissection, timely corpectomy, placement of expandable cage and correction of deformity are discussed. Water-tight closure with removal of retro-pleural air utilizing an intra-operative water-seal technique using a red-rubber catheter is shown. Nuvasive owns the copyright for figures included within the video and has given JNSPG permission to use them. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/17Xo_u3WHNg. PMID:23829847

  20. A Review of Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy and Different Types of Peracute Non-Compressive Intervertebral Disk Extrusions in Dogs and Cats.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses terminology, pathological, clinical, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, treatment, outcome, and prognostic factors of fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy (FCEM), acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion (ANNPE), and intradural/intramedullary intervertebral disk extrusion (IIVDE). FCEM, ANNPE, and IIVDE have a similar clinical presentation characterized by peracute onset of neurological dysfunction that is generally non-progressive after the initial 24-48 h. Differentiating between these conditions can be challenging, however, certain clinical and imaging findings can help. FCEM can occur in both adult and immature animals, whereas ANNPE or IIVDE have been reported only in animals older than 1 year. In dogs, ANNPE and IIVDE most commonly occur in the intervertebral disk spaces between T12 and L2, whereas FCEM has not such site predilection. In cats, FCEM occurs more frequently in the cervical spinal cord than in other locations. Data on cats with ANNPE and IIVDE are limited. Optimal MRI definition and experience in neuroimaging can help identify the findings that allow differentiation between FCEM, ANNPE, and IIVDE. In animals with ANNPE and IIVDE, the affected intervertebral disk space is often narrowed and the focal area of intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted images is located above the affected intervertebral disk space. In dogs with ANNPE signal changes associated with the extruded nucleus pulposus and epidural fat disruption can be identified in the epidural space dorsal to the affected intervertebral disk. Identification of a linear tract (predominantly hyperintense on T2-weighted images, iso to hypointense on T1-weighted images and hypointense on T2*-weighted gradient recall echo images) extending from the intervertebral disk into the spinal cord parenchyma is highly suggestive of IIVDE. Treatment of FCEM and ANNPE is conservative. Dogs reported with IIVDE have been managed either conservatively or

  1. A Review of Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy and Different Types of Peracute Non-Compressive Intervertebral Disk Extrusions in Dogs and Cats.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses terminology, pathological, clinical, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, treatment, outcome, and prognostic factors of fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy (FCEM), acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion (ANNPE), and intradural/intramedullary intervertebral disk extrusion (IIVDE). FCEM, ANNPE, and IIVDE have a similar clinical presentation characterized by peracute onset of neurological dysfunction that is generally non-progressive after the initial 24-48 h. Differentiating between these conditions can be challenging, however, certain clinical and imaging findings can help. FCEM can occur in both adult and immature animals, whereas ANNPE or IIVDE have been reported only in animals older than 1 year. In dogs, ANNPE and IIVDE most commonly occur in the intervertebral disk spaces between T12 and L2, whereas FCEM has not such site predilection. In cats, FCEM occurs more frequently in the cervical spinal cord than in other locations. Data on cats with ANNPE and IIVDE are limited. Optimal MRI definition and experience in neuroimaging can help identify the findings that allow differentiation between FCEM, ANNPE, and IIVDE. In animals with ANNPE and IIVDE, the affected intervertebral disk space is often narrowed and the focal area of intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted images is located above the affected intervertebral disk space. In dogs with ANNPE signal changes associated with the extruded nucleus pulposus and epidural fat disruption can be identified in the epidural space dorsal to the affected intervertebral disk. Identification of a linear tract (predominantly hyperintense on T2-weighted images, iso to hypointense on T1-weighted images and hypointense on T2*-weighted gradient recall echo images) extending from the intervertebral disk into the spinal cord parenchyma is highly suggestive of IIVDE. Treatment of FCEM and ANNPE is conservative. Dogs reported with IIVDE have been managed either conservatively or

  2. Prognostic Value of Preoperative Coping Strategies for Pain in Patients with Residual Neuropathic Pain after Laminoplasty for Compressive Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single-center retrospective cohort study. Purpose To clarify the prognostic value of preoperative coping strategies for pain due to compressive cervical myelopathy. Overview of Literature Preoperative physical function, imaging and electrophysiological findings are known predictors of surgical outcomes. However, coping strategies for pain have not been considered. Methods Postoperative questionnaires, concerning health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and daily living activities, were sent to 78 patients with compressive cervical myelopathy who had suffered from neuropathic pain before laminoplasty, and been preoperatively assessed with respect to their physical and mental status and coping strategies for pain. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to clarify the extent to which the patient's preoperative coping strategies could explain the variance in postoperative HRQOL and activity levels. Results Forty-two patients with residual neuropathic pain after laminoplasty were analyzed by questionnaires (28 men, 14 women; mean age, 62.7±10.2 years; symptom duration, 48.0±66.0 months). The valid response rate was 53.8%. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that preoperative coping strategies, which involved coping self-statements, diverting attention, and catastrophizing, were independently associated with postoperative HRQOL and activity level, and could explain 7% to 11% of their variance. Combinations of the coping strategies for pain and upper/lower motor functions could explain 26% to 36% of the variance in postoperative HRQOL and activity level. Conclusions Preoperative coping strategies for pain are good predictors of postoperative HRQOL and activities of daily living in patients with postoperative residual neuropathic pain due to compressive cervical myelopathy. PMID:26435783

  3. Value of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring to reduce neurological complications in patients undergoing anterior cervical spine procedures for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Muralidharan, Aditya; Loke, Yoon K; Habeych, Miguel; Crammond, Donald; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of reports of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and to assess the value of intraoperative monitoring (IOM), including somatosensory evoked potentials, transcranial motor evoked potentials and electromyography, in anterior cervical procedures. A search was conducted to collect a small database of relevant papers using key words describing disorders and procedures of interest. The database was then shortlisted using selection criteria and data was extracted to identify complications as a result of anterior cervical procedures for cervical spondylotic myelopathy and outcome analysis on a continuous scale. In the 22 studies that matched the screening criteria, only two involved the use of IOM. The average sample size was 173 patients. In procedures done without IOM a mean change in Japanese Orthopaedic Association score of 3.94 points and Nurick score by 1.20 points (both less severe post-operatively) was observed. Within our sub-group analysis, worsening myelopathy and/or quadriplegia was seen in 2.71% of patients for studies without IOM and 0.91% of patients for studies with IOM. Variations persist in the existing literature in the evaluation of complications associated with anterior cervical spinal procedures. Based on the review of published studies, sufficient evidence does not exist to make recommendations regarding the use of different IOM modalities to reduce neurological complications during anterior cervical procedures. However, future studies with objective measures of neurological deficits using a specific IOM modality may establish it as an effective and reliable indicator of injury during such surgeries. PMID:26677786

  4. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF FEMORAL FRACTURE REPAIR IN A PATIENT WITH CERVICAL MYELOPATHY, AUTONOMIC DYSFUNCTION, AND DIFFICULT AIRWAY.

    PubMed

    Vellore, Ajay R; Robards, Christopher B; Clendenen, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    Spinal stenosis is a potentially serious condition that can lead to myelopathies and autonomic instability, both of which, as a result, may complicate anesthetic management. Additionally, neuraxial anesthesia appears to increase the risk of worsened neurological outcomes in this population. A 56-year-old female with spinal stenosis, autonomic dysfunction, and known difficult airway who required anesthesia for repair of a femur fracture is presented. After pre-operative arterial line and femoral block placement, an ultrasound guided subarachnoid block was safely placed. This supports the notion that in the appropriate setting, a safe, successful neuraxial blockade can be performed when a general anesthetic may be fraught with more risk. PMID:27382821

  5. Video-Assisted Thoracic Sympathectomy for Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Milanez de Campos, Jose Ribas; Kauffman, Paulo; Gomes, Oswaldo; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    By the 1980s, endoscopy was in use by some groups in sympathetic denervation of the upper limbs with vascular indications. Low morbidity, cosmetic results, reduction in the incidence of Horner syndrome, and the shortened time in hospital made video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy (VATS) better accepted by those undergoing treatment for hyperhidrosis. Over the last 25 years, this surgical procedure has become routine in the treatment of hyperhidrosis, leading to a significant increase in the number of papers on the subject in the literature. PMID:27427529

  6. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  7. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  8. Voxel-based analysis of grey and white matter degeneration in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grabher, Patrick; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Trachsler, Aaron; Friedl, Susanne; David, Gergely; Sutter, Reto; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Thompson, Alan J.; Curt, Armin; Freund, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective study, we made an unbiased voxel-based analysis to investigate above-stenosis spinal degeneration and its relation to impairment in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Twenty patients and 18 controls were assessed with high-resolution MRI protocols above the level of stenosis. Cross-sectional areas of grey matter (GM), white matter (WM), and posterior columns (PC) were measured to determine atrophy. Diffusion indices assessed tract-specific integrity of PC and lateral corticospinal tracts (CST). Regression analysis was used to reveal relationships between MRI measures and clinical impairment. Patients showed mainly sensory impairment. Atrophy was prominent within the cervical WM (13.9%, p = 0.004), GM (7.2%, p = 0.043), and PC (16.1%, p = 0.005). Fractional anisotropy (FA) was reduced in the PC (−11.98%, p = 0.006) and lateral CST (−12.96%, p = 0.014). In addition, radial (+28.47%, p = 0.014), axial (+14.72%, p = 0.005), and mean (+16.50%, p = 0.001) diffusivities were increased in the PC. Light-touch score was associated with atrophy (R2 = 0.3559, p = 0.020) and FA (z score 3.74, p = 0.003) in the PC, as was functional independence and FA in the lateral CST (z score 3.68, p = 0.020). This study demonstrates voxel-based degeneration far above the stenosis at a level not directly affected by the compression and provides unbiased readouts of tract-specific changes that relate to impairment. PMID:27095134

  9. Voxel-based analysis of grey and white matter degeneration in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Grabher, Patrick; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Trachsler, Aaron; Friedl, Susanne; David, Gergely; Sutter, Reto; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Thompson, Alan J; Curt, Armin; Freund, Patrick

    2016-04-20

    In this prospective study, we made an unbiased voxel-based analysis to investigate above-stenosis spinal degeneration and its relation to impairment in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Twenty patients and 18 controls were assessed with high-resolution MRI protocols above the level of stenosis. Cross-sectional areas of grey matter (GM), white matter (WM), and posterior columns (PC) were measured to determine atrophy. Diffusion indices assessed tract-specific integrity of PC and lateral corticospinal tracts (CST). Regression analysis was used to reveal relationships between MRI measures and clinical impairment. Patients showed mainly sensory impairment. Atrophy was prominent within the cervical WM (13.9%, p = 0.004), GM (7.2%, p = 0.043), and PC (16.1%, p = 0.005). Fractional anisotropy (FA) was reduced in the PC (-11.98%, p = 0.006) and lateral CST (-12.96%, p = 0.014). In addition, radial (+28.47%, p = 0.014), axial (+14.72%, p = 0.005), and mean (+16.50%, p = 0.001) diffusivities were increased in the PC. Light-touch score was associated with atrophy (R(2) = 0.3559, p = 0.020) and FA (z score 3.74, p = 0.003) in the PC, as was functional independence and FA in the lateral CST (z score 3.68, p = 0.020). This study demonstrates voxel-based degeneration far above the stenosis at a level not directly affected by the compression and provides unbiased readouts of tract-specific changes that relate to impairment.

  10. Effects of brain derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Stoner, Kirsten E; Grossbach, Andrew J; Viljoen, Stephanus V; McHenry, Colleen L; Petrie, Michael A; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Grosland, Nicole M; Shields, Richard K; Howard, Matthew A

    2016-02-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the leading cause of spinal cord related disability in the elderly. It results from degenerative narrowing of the spinal canal, which causes spinal cord compression. This leads to gait instability, loss of dexterity, weakness, numbness and urinary dysfunction. There has been indirect data that implicates a genetic component to CSM. Such a finding may contribute to the variety in presentation and outcome in this patient population. The Val66Met polymorphism, a mutation in the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, has been implicated in a number of brain and psychological conditions, and here we investigate its role in CSM. Ten subjects diagnosed with CSM were enrolled in this prospective study. Baseline clinical evaluation using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale, Nurick and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were collected. Each subject underwent objective testing with gait kinematics, as well as hand functioning using the Purdue Peg Board. Blood samples were analyzed for the BDNF Val66Met mutation. The prevalence of the Val66Met mutation in this study was 60% amongst CSM patients compared to 32% in the general population. Individuals with abnormal Met allele had worse baseline mJOA and Nurick scores. Moreover, baseline gait kinematics and hand functioning testing were worse compared to their wild type counterpart. BDNF Val66Met mutation has a higher prevalence in CSM compared to the general population. Those with BDNF mutation have a worse clinical presentation compared to the wild type counterpart. These findings suggest implication of the BDNF mutation in the development and severity of CSM. PMID:26461908

  11. Probabilities of Radiation Myelopathy Specific to Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to Guide Safe Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Weinberg, Vivian; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Eric; Chao, Sam; Muacevic, Alexander; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Soltys, Scott; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Angelov, Lilyana; Gibbs, Iris; Wong, C. Shun; Larson, David A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. Methods and Materials: DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy (units = Gy{sub 2/2}). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Results: Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusion: We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT.

  12. Laminoplasty versus laminectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-Yu; Yang, Si-Dong; Huo, Li-Shuang; Wang, Tao; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    This is a meta-analysis to compare the results between laminoplasty and laminectomy followed by fusion for the patients with multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. An extensive search of literature was performed in MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, and WANFANG. The following outcome measures were extracted: the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, cervical curvature index (CCI), visual analog scale (VAS), cervical lordosis (C2-7), complications, blood loss, and operation time. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 and STATA 12.0. A total of 23 studies comprising 774 and 743 patients treated with laminoplasty and laminectomy followed by fusion, respectively, were included in the final analysis. The pooled analysis showed that there was no significant difference in preoperative JOA scores [P = 0.89], postoperative JOA scores [P = 0.13], JOA scores improvement rate [P = 0.27], preoperative CCI [P = 0.15], postoperative CCI [P = 0.14], preoperative VAS [P = 0.41], postoperative VAS [P = 0.52], preoperative cervical lordosis (C2-7) [P = 0.46], postoperative cervical lordosis (C2-7) [P = 0.67], total complications [P = 0.07], axial pain [P = 0.94], and blood loss [P = 0.51]. However, there were significant difference in operation time (WMD = -19.57 [-32.11, -7.02], P = 0.002) and C5 palsy (OR = 0.26 [0.15, 0.44], P < 0.001). As compared with laminectomy followed by fusion, expansive laminoplasty showed no significant differences in JOA scores, CCI, ROM, VAS, cervical lordosis (C2-7), axial pain, total complications, and blood loss, but shorter operation time and fewer C5 palsy. PMID:27281067

  13. Risk Factor Analysis for C5 Palsy after Double-Door Laminoplasty for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Ko; Ikeuchi, Hiroko; Shiraki, Makoto; Komiya, Norihiro; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective comparative study. Purpose To clarify the risk factors related to the development of postoperative C5 palsy through radiological studies after cervical double-door laminoplasty (DDL). Overview of Literature Although postoperative C5 palsy is generally considered to be the result of damage to the nerve root or segmental spinal cord, the associated pathology remains controversial. Methods A consecutive case series of 47 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy treated by DDL at our institution between April 2008 and April 2015 were reviewed. Postoperative C5 palsy occurred in 5 of 47 cases after DDL. We investigated 9 radiologic factors that have been reported to be risk factors for C5 palsy in various studies, and statistically examined these between the two groups of palsy and the non-palsy patients. Results We found a significant difference between patients with and without postoperative C5 palsy with regards to the posterior shift of spinal cord at C4/5 (p=0.008). The logistic regression analyses revealed posterior shift of the spinal cord at C4/5 (odds ratio, 12.066; p=0.029; 95% confidence interval, 1.295–112.378). For the other radiologic factors, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Conclusions In the present study, we showed a significant difference in the posterior shift of the spinal cord at C4/5 between the palsy and the non-palsy groups, indicating that the "tethering phenomenon" was likely a greater risk factor for postoperative C5 palsy. PMID:27114771

  14. [Extra-thoracic solitary fibrous tumor. Report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Amel; Mestiri, Sarra; Mokni, Moncef; Stita, Wided; Ikram, Bellara; Sriha, Badreddine; Korbi, Sadok

    2006-09-01

    The solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), is an unusual entity, first described in the pleura, but can involve other serosal surfaces and viscera. We report two cases of extra-thoracic SFT involving the retro-peritoneum and the upper arm. Extra-thoracic TFS is a rarily wide morphologic and evolutive spectrum.

  15. Thoracic-pelvic dysostosis: a 'new' autosomal dominant form.

    PubMed Central

    Bankier, A; Danks, D M

    1983-01-01

    A form of thoracic and pelvic dysostosis is reported in a mother and her son. The short ribs caused respiratory distress in the baby and raised the possibility of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD). The radiological features, however, distinguish this benign condition from ATD and other described skeletal dysplasias. Images PMID:6620328

  16. Thoracic aortopathies in the military patient.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, David; White, S; Wilson, D; Haworth, K; Williams, A

    2015-09-01

    Thoracic aortic disease is an important contributor to arterial disease and therefore, mortality in the UK. It has close associations with hypertension, atherosclerosis and genetic conditions such as Marfan syndrome. The cardiovascular consequences of acute aortic dissection or the rupture of a thoracic aneurysm are life threatening with a 1% increase in mortality per hour with a type A aortic dissection and a high 30-day mortality rate. The clinical diagnosis can be difficult for the general physician as the symptoms can mimic more common conditions such as acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism or acute abdomen. The investigations that carry the highest sensitivity and specificity, CT, transoesophageal echocardiography and MRI are not usually first-line investigations in most patients so a high index of clinical suspicion is key. The management of acute aortic syndromes involves good initial resuscitation and early discussion with the cardiothoracic surgeons. Given the serious consequences of acute aortic syndromes, it is important for all military doctors to be aware of these presentations and to appreciate the difficulties that can be encountered when trying to accurately diagnose them. Routine medicals, particularly entrance medicals, present a unique clinical opportunity to recognise the clinical features that would warrant further investigation and specialist advice. PMID:26243806

  17. Thoracic aortopathies in the military patient.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, David; White, S; Wilson, D; Haworth, K; Williams, A

    2015-09-01

    Thoracic aortic disease is an important contributor to arterial disease and therefore, mortality in the UK. It has close associations with hypertension, atherosclerosis and genetic conditions such as Marfan syndrome. The cardiovascular consequences of acute aortic dissection or the rupture of a thoracic aneurysm are life threatening with a 1% increase in mortality per hour with a type A aortic dissection and a high 30-day mortality rate. The clinical diagnosis can be difficult for the general physician as the symptoms can mimic more common conditions such as acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism or acute abdomen. The investigations that carry the highest sensitivity and specificity, CT, transoesophageal echocardiography and MRI are not usually first-line investigations in most patients so a high index of clinical suspicion is key. The management of acute aortic syndromes involves good initial resuscitation and early discussion with the cardiothoracic surgeons. Given the serious consequences of acute aortic syndromes, it is important for all military doctors to be aware of these presentations and to appreciate the difficulties that can be encountered when trying to accurately diagnose them. Routine medicals, particularly entrance medicals, present a unique clinical opportunity to recognise the clinical features that would warrant further investigation and specialist advice.

  18. Basic thoracic ultrasound for the respiratory physician.

    PubMed

    Jimborean, Gabriela; Ianoşi, Edith Simona; Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Toma, Tudor P

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic ultrasound (TUS) evolved in the last ten years as the method of choice for evaluating pleural abnormalities and for guiding lung procedures. TUS can "see" almost all structures in the chest, including thoracic wall, pleura, pleural space, the heart, the great vessels and the peripheral layers of the lungs. However, there is still a great need to develop TUS services in respiratory departments in Romania. To facilitate this development we reviewed the literature and selected what we considered to be essential practical information for the beginner in TUS, including technique, normal findings, and common abnormalities. Moreover, we describe here a step-by-step scanning technique for chest physicians. Our aim is to raise awareness of TUS. Because TUS is rapid, accurate, noninvasive and can be applied in any ward, we recommend facilitating the training of all junior respiratory doctors in this technique, as it is likely to improve patient experience, clinical effectiveness and to reduce costs with chest radiographs or CT scans in the future. PMID:26738366

  19. Experimental Study of a Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Prior to and After Surgical Repair Hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerlo, Anna-Elodie; Frankel, Steven; Chen, Jun; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2014-11-01

    Once a Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm (TAA) is detected, the risk of rupture is estimated based on the TAA diameter compared to the normal aortic diameter and its expansion rate. However, there are no reliable predictors that can provide accurate prognosis, and each aneurysm may progress differently. This work aims to assess the hemodynamic characteristics and flow structures associated with TAAs. The flow in a patient specific thoracic aortic aneurysm is compared to the same patient after treatment, in order to quantify the differences in the hydrodynamic forces acting on the aneurysm. Flow visualization with dye and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are used to study flow features within both geometries. Local flow patterns are visualized to predict potential areas of recirculation and low shear stresses as they are associated with thrombogenicity. Understanding the differences in flow features between a thoracic aortic aneurysm and a normal aorta (or a TAA after surgical repair) may lead to a better understanding of disease mechanisms that will enable clinicians to better estimate the risk of rupture.

  20. NRF2 deficiency reduces life span of mice administered thoracic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Travis, Elizabeth L; Rachakonda, Girish; Zhou, Xinhui; Korhonen, Katrina; Sekhar, Konjeti R; Biswas, Swati; Freeman, Michael L

    2011-09-15

    Subsets of cancer survivors who have been subjected to thoracic irradiation face the prospect of developing pulmonary injury. Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis is an insidious injury that presents 6 to 24 months after irradiation and continues to progress over a period of years. TGF-β and reactive oxygen species contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of this injury. The transcription factor NRF2 controls antioxidant gene expression and therefore regulates the cellular oxidant burden. This work demonstrates an additional paradigm for NRF2: suppression of TGF-β-mediated signaling, assessed by measuring expression of a surrogate TGF-β1 target gene (PAI-1) in lung fibroblasts. Thoracic irradiation of Nfe2l2(-/-) mice resulted in rapid expression of PAI-1 and FSP-1 compared to irradiated wild-type mice. Examination of lung tissue 16 weeks after thoracic irradiation of Nfe2l2(-/-) mice revealed the presence of distended alveoli and decreased numbers of alveoli compared to wild-type mice. Suppression of NRF2 expression shortened life span in mice administered 16 Gy to the thorax. Nfe2l2(+/-) and Nfe2l2(-/-) mice exhibited a mean life span of 176 days compared to wild-type mice, which lived an average of 212 days. These novel results identify NRF2 as a susceptibility factor for the development of late tissue injury.

  1. Women in Thoracic Surgery: 30 Years of History.

    PubMed

    Antonoff, Mara B; David, Elizabeth A; Donington, Jessica S; Colson, Yolonda L; Litle, Virginia R; Lawton, Jennifer S; Burgess, Nora L

    2016-01-01

    Women in Thoracic Surgery was founded in 1986, with 2016 marking its 30th anniversary. Reflecting back on the last 3 decades of history, accomplishments, and enormous strides in our field, we review the past, present, and future of this organization. Although women still constitute a small minority of practicing surgeons in our field today, opportunities currently abound for women in thoracic surgery. Owing much to the early female pioneers in the field and to the support of male sponsors and our national societies, Women in Thoracic Surgery has grown and prospered, as have its members and the global community of female thoracic surgeons as a whole. In celebration of our 30th anniversary, we share with the readership the rich history of Women in Thoracic Surgery and its goals for the future.

  2. Mechanical strength of aneurysmatic and dissected human thoracic aortas at different shear loading modes.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Gerhard; Sherifova, Selda; Oberwalder, Peter J; Dapunt, Otto E; Ursomanno, Patricia A; DeAnda, Abe; Griffith, Boyce E; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2016-08-16

    Rupture of aneurysms and acute dissection of the thoracic aorta are life-threatening events which affect tens of thousands of people per year. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear and the aortic wall is known to lose its structural integrity, which in turn affects its mechanical response to the loading conditions. Hence, research on such aortic diseases is an important area in biomechanics. The present study investigates the mechanical properties of aneurysmatic and dissected human thoracic aortas via triaxial shear and uniaxial tensile testing with a focus on the former. In particular, ultimate stress values from triaxial shear tests in different orientations regarding the aorta׳s orthotropic microstructure, and from uniaxial tensile tests in radial, circumferential and longitudinal directions were determined. In total, 16 human thoracic aortas were investigated from which it is evident that the aortic media has much stronger resistance to rupture under 'out-of-plane' than under 'in-plane' shear loadings. Under different shear loadings the aortic tissues revealed anisotropic failure properties with higher ultimate shear stresses and amounts of shear in the longitudinal than in the circumferential direction. Furthermore, the aortic media decreased its tensile strength as follows: circumferential direction >longitudinaldirection> radial direction. Anisotropic and nonlinear tissue properties are apparent from the experimental data. The results clearly showed interspecimen differences influenced by the anamnesis of the donors such as aortic diseases or connective tissue disorders, e.g., dissected specimens exhibited on average a markedly lower mechanical strength than aneurysmatic specimens. The rupture data based on the combination of triaxial shear and uniaxial extension testing are unique and build a good basis for developing a 3D failure criterion of diseased human thoracic aortic media. This is a step forward to more realistic modeling of mechanically

  3. Chance Fracture of the Upper Thoracic Spine in a Child.

    PubMed

    Sander, Anna L; Laurer, Helmut; El Saman, André; Ploss, Carola; Mack, Martin G; Maier, Bernd; Marzi, Ingo

    2009-06-01

    We report on a three-year-old girl who fell accidentally from the fourth floor. She suffered multiple trauma, including severe head injury, unstable T2-T3 Chance fracture, pneumothorax with lung contusion and serial rib fractures on the left side, liver laceration, splenic injury and fracture of the sacral bone on the right side. The progressive intracranial pressure was released by trepanation and bifrontal craniectomy. The abdominal injuries were treated conservatively. After stabilization of the intracranial situation, dorsal spondylodesis from T2 to T4 was performed employing the cannulated NEON system (Ulrich(®)) with CT-controlled positioning of guide wires. One year on, the implants have been removed and the patient has good function, with only a small atactic dysfunction as residuum. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a pediatric Chance fracture located in the upper thoracic spine following a fall from great height that describes how this treatment approach led to a very favorable outcome. PMID:26814912

  4. Lhermitte Sign as a Presenting Symptom of Thoracic Spinal Pathology: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Hills, Adam; Al-Hakim, Mazen

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old male with ankylosing spondylitis presented with complaints of progressively worsening bilateral leg weakness and difficulty ambulating of 2-week duration. He also felt a sharp, electric, shock-like sensation radiating from his lower back into his legs upon flexing the trunk. There was no history of trauma or other inciting events within the 2 weeks prior to presentation. Thoracic MRI at this visit showed a three-column fracture at T11-T12. He underwent spinal fusion surgery and within 2 days after surgery the radiating electrical sensation with spinal flexion had completely resolved. PMID:26339515

  5. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies.

  6. Non-intubated thoracic surgery—A survey from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Roberto; Akopov, Andrej; Congregado, Miguel; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background A survey amongst the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) members has been performed to investigate the currents trends, rates of adoption as well as potential for future expansion of non-intubated thoracic surgery (NITS) performed under spontaneous ventilation. Methods A 14-question-based questionnaire has been e-mailed to ESTS members. To facilitate the completion of the questionnaire, questions entailed either quantitative or multiple-choice answers. Investigated issues included previous experience with NITS and number of procedures performed, preferred types of anesthesia protocols (i.e., thoracic epidural anesthesia, intercostal or paravertebral blocks, laryngeal mask, use of additional sedation), type of procedures, ideal candidates for NITS, main advantages and technical disadvantages. Non-univocal answer to multiple-choice questions was permitted. Results Out of 105 responders, 62 reported an experience with NITS. The preferred types of anesthesia were intercostal blocks with (59%) or without (50%) sedation, followed by laryngeal mask with sedation (43%) and thoracic epidural anesthesia with sedation (20%). The most frequently performed procedures included thoracoscopic management of recurrent pleural effusion (98%), pleural decortication for empyema thoracis and lung biopsy for interstitial lung disease (26% each); pericardial window and mediastinal biopsy (20% each). More complex procedures such as lobectomy, lung volume reduction surgery and thymectomy have been performed by a minority of responders (2% each). Poor-risk patients due to co-morbidities (70%) and patients with poor pulmonary function (43%) were considered the ideal candidates. Main advantages included faster, recovery (67%), reduced morbidity (59%) and shorter hospital stay with decreased costs (43% each). Reported technical disadvantages included coughing (59%) and poor maneuverability due to diaphragmatic and lung movements (56%). Overall, 69% of responders indicated

  7. Respiratory Displacement of the Thoracic Aorta: Physiological Phenomenon With Potential Implications for Thoracic Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Tim Frederik; Tetzlaff, Ralf; Rengier, Fabian; Geisbuesch, Philipp; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Boeckler, Dittmar; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude and direction of respiratory displacement of the ascending and descending thoracic aorta during breathing maneuvers. In 11 healthy nonsmokers, dynamic magnetic resonance imaging was performed in transverse orientation at the tracheal bifurcation during maximum expiration and inspiration as well as tidal breathing. The magnitude and direction of aortic displacement was determined relatively to resting respiratory position for the ascending (AA) and descending (DA) aorta. To estimate a respiratory threshold for occurrence of distinct respiratory aortic motion, the latter was related to the underlying change in anterior-posterior thorax diameter. Compound displacement between maximum expiration and inspiration was 24.3 {+-} 6.0 mm for the AA in the left anterior direction and 18.2 {+-} 5.5 mm for the DA in the right anterior direction. The mean respiratory thorax excursion during tidal breathing was 8.9 {+-} 2.8 mm. The respiratory threshold, i.e., the increase in thorax diameter necessary to result in respiratory aortic displacement, was estimated to be 15.7 mm. The data suggest that after a threshold of respiratory thorax excursion is exceeded, respiration is accompanied by significant displacement of the thoracic aorta. Although this threshold may not be reached during tidal breathing in the majority of individuals, segmental differences during forced respiration impact on aortic geometry, may result in additional extrinsic forces on the aortic wall, and may be of significance for aortic prostheses designed for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

  8. Multifocal thoracic chordoma mimicking a paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Conzo, Giovanni; Gambardella, Claudio; Pasquali, Daniela; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Avenia, Nicola; Pietra, Cristina Della; Napolitano, Salvatore; Palazzo, Antonietta; Mauriello, Claudio; Parmeggiani, Domenico; Pettinato, Guido; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Santini, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Chordoma of thoracic vertebras is a very rare locally invasive neoplasm with low grade malignancy arising from embryonic notochordal remnants. Radical surgery remains the cornerstone of the treatment. We describe a case of multifocal T1-T2 chordoma, without bone and disc involvement, incidentally misdiagnosed as a paraganglioma, occurring in a 47-year-old male asymptomatic patient. Neoplasm was radically removed by an endocrine surgeon through a right extended cervicotomy. A preoperative reliable diagnosis of chordoma, as in the reported case, is often difficult. Radical surgery can provide a favorable outcome but, given the high rates of local recurrence of this neoplasm, a strict and careful follow-up is recommended. Although very rare, chordoma should be suggested in the differential diagnosis of the paravertebral cervical masses of unknown origin. Spine surgeon consultation and a FNB should be routinely included in the multidisciplinary preoperative work-up of these neoplasms. PMID:24125991

  9. Thoracic spinal cord compression by a tophus.

    PubMed

    Ntsiba, Honoré; Makosso, Edouard; Moyikoua, Armand

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic (T10) spinal cord compression by a tophus in a patient with known chronic gout. Spastic paraplegia developed gradually over 6 months in this 43-year-old man with hypertension, alcohol abuse, and chronic gouty arthritis with tophi. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography visualized an intradural nodule measuring 1.5cm in diameter at the level of T10, as well as geodes in the left T10 lamina and left T9-T10 articular processes. The nodule was removed surgically and shown by histological examination to be a tophus. The neurological impairments resolved rapidly and completely. We found about 60 similar cases in the literature. Spinal cord compression in a patient with chronic gout can be caused by a tophus.

  10. Tophaceous pseudogout of the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vasisht; Kesler, Henry; Johnson, Mahlon; Dorfman, Howard; Walter, Kevin

    2012-04-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPDD, tophaceous pseudogout) is a rare crystal arthropathy characterized by pyrophosphate crystal deposition in joints, synovitis and chondrocalcinosis on imaging. We present the case of a 72-year-old man with 6 months of left chest pain; magnetic resonance imaging revealed a T9/T10 herniated disc. Intraoperatively, the material was sent for pathological analysis revealing pseudogout. Axial calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition is rare but reported in the literature and found at the craniocervical junction and skull. Spinal calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition is rare in the thoracic spine. It is often asymptompatic and can involve the disc or ligaments. This case demonstrates a unique presentation of CPDD.

  11. Aquaporin-4 Antibodies Are Not Related to HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    von Glehn, Felipe; Jarius, Sven; Penalva de Oliveira, Augusto C.; Brandão, Carlos Otávio; Farias, Alessandro S.; Damasceno, Alfredo; Casseb, Jorge; Moraes, Adriel S.; Longhini, Ana Leda F.; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Damasceno, Benito P.; Wildemann, Brigitte; Santos, Leonilda M. B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The seroprevalence of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is very high among Brazilians (∼1∶200). HTLV-1 associated myelopathy or tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is the most common neurological complication of HTLV-1 infection. HAM/TSP can present with an acute/subacute form of longitudinally extensive myelitis, which can be confused with lesions seen in aquaporin-4 antibody (AQP4-Ab) positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) on MRI. Moreover, clinical attacks in patients with NMOSD have been shown to be preceded by viral infections in around 30% of cases. Objective To evaluate the frequency of AQP4-Ab in patients with HAM/TSP. To evaluate the frequency of HTLV-1 infection in patients with NMOSD. Patients and Methods 23 Brazilian patients with HAM/TSP, 20 asymptomatic HTLV-1+ serostatus patients, and 34 with NMOSD were tested for AQP4-Ab using a standardized recombinant cell based assay. In addition, all patients were tested for HTLV-1 by ELISA and Western blotting. Results 20/34 NMOSD patients were positive for AQP4-Ab but none of the HAM/TSP patients and none of the asymptomatic HTLV-1 infected individuals. Conversely, all AQP4-Ab-positive NMOSD patients were negative for HTLV-1 antibodies. One patient with HAM/TSP developed optic neuritis in addition to subacute LETM; this patient was AQP4-Ab negative as well. Patients were found to be predominantly female and of African descent both in the NMOSD and in the HAM/TSP group; Osame scale and expanded disability status scale scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions Our results argue both against a role of antibodies to AQP4 in the pathogenesis of HAM/TSP and against an association between HTLV-1 infection and the development of AQP4-Ab. Moreover, the absence of HTLV-1 in all patients with NMOSD suggests that HTLV-1 is not a common trigger of acute attacks in patients with AQP4-Ab positive NMOSD in populations with high HTLV-1 seroprevalence

  12. Functional cortical reorganization in cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and changes associated with surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhagavatula, Indira Devi; Shukla, Dhaval; Sadashiva, Nishanth; Saligoudar, Praveen; Prasad, Chandrajit; Bhat, Dhananjaya I

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The physiological mechanisms underlying the recovery of motor function after cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) surgery are poorly understood. Neuronal plasticity allows neurons to compensate for injury and disease and to adjust their activities in response to new situations or changes in their environment. Cortical reorganization as well as improvement in corticospinal conduction happens during motor recovery after stroke and spinal cord injury. In this study the authors aimed to understand the cortical changes that occur due to CSM and following CSM surgery and to correlate these changes with functional recovery by using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI). METHODS Twenty-two patients having symptoms related to cervical cord compression due to spondylotic changes along with 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Patients underwent cervical spine MRI and BOLD fMRI at 1 month before surgery (baseline) and 6 months after surgery. RESULTS Five patients were excluded from analysis because of technical problems; thus, 17 patients made up the study cohort. The mean overall modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score improved in patients following surgery. Mean upper-extremity, lower-extremity, and sensory scores improved significantly. In the preoperative patient group the volume of activation (VOA) was significantly higher than that in controls. The VOA after surgery was reduced as compared with that before surgery, although it remained higher than that in the control group. In the preoperative patient group, activations were noted only in the left precentral gyrus (PrCG). In the postoperative group, activations were seen in the left postcentral gyrus (PoCG), as well as the PrCG and premotor and supplementary motor cortices. In postoperative group, the VOA was higher in both the PrCG and PoCG as compared with those in the control group. CONCLUSIONS There is over-recruitment of sensorimotor cortices

  13. Current status of thoracic dorsal sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Welch, E; Geary, J

    1984-01-01

    This article summarizes over 20 years of experience (1962 to 1982) with cervical sympathectomy (thoracic dorsal sympathectomy) in 46 patients undergoing 68 sympathectomies. All operations were performed through an anterior supraclavicular approach. Indications for surgery were intractable Raynaud's disease (26 patients), atherosclerotic obliterative arterial disease (five), causalgia (five), posttraumatic sympathetic dystrophy (seven), collagen vascular disorders (eight), hyperhidrosis (12), occupational-related digital thrombosis (four), and thrombosis secondary to intra-arterial injection (one). The incidence of complications and side effects, both temporary and permanent, including Horner's syndrome, is reviewed in detail. Particular reference is made to the various surgical techniques of managing the stellate ganglion; four patients had two-third to three-fourth resection of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-3 thoracic ganglion, two had preservation of the stellate ganglion and resection of the T-2 through T-4 ganglia, seven had excision of the entire stellate ganglion down to and including the T-4 ganglion, seven had resection of the lower third of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-4 ganglion, and 48 had removal of the lower half of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-3 ganglion. The study reviews the literature germane to anatomic considerations and suggests revisions in current texts and atlases. By retrospective analysis of the records and a follow-up questionnaire, which provided an 86% follow-up (average 8.4 years), the paper points to the distinctive clinical characteristics of the different groups within the population undergoing the operation and provides guidelines for patient selection and conclusions on the place for this operation in the management of vascular diseases involving the upper extremity. PMID:6481864

  14. Nearly Asymptomatic Eight-Month Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arjun; Kumar, Krishan; Zeltser, Roman; Makaryus, Amgad N.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is a rare, but lethal, medical condition that is either misdiagnosed as a myocardial infarction or overlooked completely. Though thoracic aortic dissections are commonly diagnosed in patients exhibiting sharp chest pain, there are some notable cases where patients do not report the expected severity of pain. We report a unique case of a patient with a thoracic aortic dissection who was initially nearly asymptomatic for eight months, in order to heighten awareness, highlight diagnosis protocol, and improve prognosis for this commonly misdiagnosed, but fatal, condition. PMID:27257400

  15. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs.

    PubMed

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Freeman, Richard K; Krasna, Mark J

    2015-08-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed. PMID:26380186

  16. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  17. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Richard K.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed. PMID:26380186

  18. Thoracic and lumbar extradural structure examined by extraduroscope.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, T; Hirabayashi, Y; Shimizu, R; Saitoh, K; Fukuda, H

    1998-08-01

    We examined the extradural space using a flexible extraduroscope in 113 patients undergoing extradural anaesthesia. Patients were classified into two groups to receive either thoracic or lumbar extradural anaesthesia as needed for perioperative analgesia. The extraduroscopy showed that the thoracic extradural space becomes widely patent after injecting a given amount of air and that the amount of fatty and fibrous connective tissue is less in the thoracic extradural space compared with the lumbar extradural space. We suggest that differences between the structure of these two vertebral regions may affect the spread of local anaesthetics in the extradural space. PMID:9813508

  19. Initial experience in the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysmal disease with a thoracic aortic endograft at Baylor University Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Apple, Jeffrey; McQuade, Karen L.; Hamman, Baron L.; Hebeler, Robert F.; Shutze, William P.

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent endovascular repair of thoracic aneurysms and of other thoracic aortic pathology with the thoracic aortic endograft (Gore Medical, Flagstaff, AZ) from June 2005 to July 2007 was performed. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 months (range, 2–25 months). Indications for thoracic endografting included descending thoracic aneurysms (n = 18), thoracoabdominal aneurysms (n = 3), traumatic aortic injuries (n = 3), penetrating aortic ulcers (n = 2), and contained rupture of a type B dissection (n = 1). One patient died during the procedure, for an overall mortality rate of 3.7%. The average length of stay was 8.1 days, with an average stay in the intensive care unit of 4.2 days. If patients with traumatic aortic injuries were excluded, the average overall and intensive care unit length of stay were 5.6 and 1.8 days, respectively. There was one incident of spinal cord ischemia (3.7%). There were five type I or type III endoleaks, three of which required revision (11.1%). In conclusion, thoracic endografting is a safe and viable option for the repair of descending thoracic aneurysms and other aortic pathologies. We have found it to be less invasive, even in conjunction with preoperative debranching procedures, with a shorter recovery time, decreased perioperative morbidity and blood loss, and decreased peri-operative mortality compared with standard open repair. PMID:18382748

  20. Comparison of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Score and the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire Scores: Time-Dependent Changes in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy and Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Motoki; Sakaura, Hironobu; Fujimori, Takahito; Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To identify differences in time-dependent perioperative changes between the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and the JOA Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire (JOACMEQ) score in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) who underwent cervical laminoplasty. Overview of Literature The JOA score does not take into consideration patient satisfaction or quality of life. Accordingly, the JOACMEQ was designed in 2007 as a patient-centered assessment tool. Methods We studied 21 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty. We objectively evaluated the time-dependent changes in JOACMEQ scores and JOA scores for all patients before surgery and at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Results The average total JOA score and the recovery rate improved significantly after surgery in both groups, with a slightly better recovery rate in the OPLL group. Cervical spine function improved significantly in the CSM group but not in the OPLL group. Upper- and lower-extremity functions were more stable in the CSM group than in the OPLL group. The effectiveness rate of the JOACMEQ for measuring quality of life was quite low in both groups. In both groups, the Spearman contingency coefficients were dispersed widely except for upper- and lower-extremity function. Conclusions Scores for upper- and lower-extremity function on the JOACMEQ correlated well with JOA scores. Because the JOACMEQ can also assess cervical spine function and quality of life, factors that cannot be assessed by the JOA score alone, the JOACMEQ is a more comprehensive evaluation tool. PMID:25705334

  1. Endovascular stent graft repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms: the history and the present in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Shimazaki, Taro; Iwahashi, Toru; Ogino, Hitoshi; Ishimaru, Shin; Shigematsu, Hiroshi; Yozu, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    Stent-grafts for endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms have been commercially available for more than ten years in the West, whereas, in Japan, a manufactured stent-graft was not approved for the use until March 2008. Nevertheless, endovascular thoracic intervention began to be performed in Japan in the early 1990s, with homemade devices used in most cases. Many researchers have continued to develop their homemade devices. We have participated in joint design and assessment efforts with a stent-graft manufacturer, focusing primarily on fenestrated stent-grafts used in repairs at the distal arch, a site especially prone to aneurysm. In March 2008, TAG (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) was approved as a stent graft for the thoracic area first in Japan, which was major turning point in treatment for thoracic aortic aneurysms. Subsequently, TALENT (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) was approved in May 2009, and TX2 (COOK MEDICAL Inc., Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in March 2011. Valiant as an improved version of TALENT was approved in November 2011, and TX2 Proform as an improved version of TX2 began to be supplied in October 2012. These stent grafts are excellent devices that showed good results in Western countries, and marked effectiveness can be expected by making the most of the characteristics of each device. A clinical trial in Japan on Najuta (tentative name) (Kawasumi Labo., Inc., Tokyo, Japan) as a line-up of fenestrated stent grafts that can be applied to distal arch aneurysms showing a high incidence, and allow maintenance of blood flow to the arch vessel was initiated. This trial was completed, and Najuta has just been approved in January of 2013 in Japan, and further development is expected. In the U.S., great efforts have recently been made to develop and manufacture excellent stent grafts for thoracic aneurysms, and rapid progress has been achieved. In particular, in the area of the aortic arch, in which we

  2. The immediate effects of spinal thoracic manipulation on respiratory functions

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Doo Chul; Lee, Yong Woo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thoracic spinal manipulation therapy on respiratory function including forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second in young healthy individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty young healthy subjects recruited from a local university participated in this study. Subjects were randomly allocated into an experimental group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The experimental group received thoracic spinal manipulation and the control group received placebo thoracic spinal manipulation. Respiratory function tests, including forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second, were measured before and after intervention. [Results] The values for both tests were significantly higher in the experimental group. The control group showed no changes after the intervention. Differences in pre- and post-intervention values for both tests were significantly different between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Spinal manipulation therapy applied to the thoracic region improved respiratory function test results of participants in this study. PMID:27799691

  3. An improved retractor for cardiac and thoracic operations.

    PubMed

    McEnany, M T

    1980-10-01

    Several standard abdominal wall retractors have been modified to improve exposure at the extremes of thoracic and groin incisions and to enhance the efficiency and comfort of the assistant in supplying adequate visibility in these areas.

  4. Thoracic and respirable particle definitions for human health risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides estimates of the thoracic and respirable fractions, for adults and children during typical activities during both nasal and oral inhalation, that may be used in the design of experimental studies and interpretation of evidence of health effects.

  5. Night blindness due to vitamin A deficiency associated with copper deficiency myelopathy secondary to bowel bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    AlHassany, Ali Abdul Jabbar

    2014-01-01

    We present an interesting case of combined vitamin A and copper deficiency after a history of gastric bypass surgery where symptoms improved after parenteral copper and vitamin A treatment. Gastric bypass surgery as a cause of fat soluble vitamin deficiency is generally under-reported. Copper deficiency has been reported after gastric bypass surgery. Vitamin A deficiency after gastric bypass surgery has also been reported in the literature, but the reported cases again fall below the actual figures. B12 and folate deficiencies can produce a type of myelopathy similar to that produced by copper deficiency, and differentiation on the basis of laboratory tests, neurophysiology and improvement of symptoms after replacement therapy might be the hallmark of diagnosis. Combinations of vitamin deficiencies were previously reported, but no cases of combined vitamin A and copper deficiency could be found in the literature.

  6. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with welldemarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspinal pathological signal intensity, lateral dural compression might influence the circulation to the sudomotor pathway, and paramedian compression might influence the ipsilateral sulcal artery, which perfuses the sympathetic descending pathway and the intermediolateral nucleus. Sweat function testing and thermography should be performed to determine the focus of the hemifacial hyperhidrosis, and the myelopathy should be investigated on both sides.

  7. Clinical pathway for thoracic surgery in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm for postoperative care for thoracic surgical patients in the United States has shifted with efforts to reduce hospital length of stay and improve quality of life. The increasing usage of minimally invasive techniques in thoracic surgery has been an important part of this. In this review we will examine our standard practices as well as the evidence behind both general contemporary postoperative care principles and those specific to certain operations. PMID:26941967

  8. Unilateral anhidrosis: A rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Alkan, Güzide; Baysalman, Hatice Baran; Kaplan, Tevfik

    2016-02-01

    Management of pain following thoracotomy is an important issue for the control of early morbidity. We herein present the case of a patient who was referred to our hospital after a fall from a height. Right-sided multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax, and diaphragmatic rupture were detected. Thoracic epidural catheterization was performed for pain management just before thoracotomy. The patient developed unilateral anhidrosis postoperatively. We discuss this rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia with a review of relevant literature.

  9. Critical decisions in trauma of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Degiannis, E; Boffard, K

    2002-05-01

    Trauma to the thoracic aorta is a significant injury with a high mortality. This mortality is partly due to the delayed recognition of the condition. The increase of motor vehicle accidents and the use of firearms worldwide has resulted in an increase of the incidence of trauma to the thoracic aorta. Certain new developments in diagnosis and management have resulted in traditional methods being questioned. This review analyses current literature and data which we attempt to evaluate.

  10. Comparison between Thoracic Epidural Block and Thoracic Paravertebral Block for Post Thoracotomy Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soniya; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Chaudhary, Ajay Kumar; Chandra, Girish; Prakash, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative pain after thoracotomy is being considered one of the most severe pain and if not treated well, can result in various respiratory and other complications. Aim Present study was conducted with the aim to compare continuous thoracic epidural infusion with continuous paravertebral infusion for postoperative pain using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and four point observer ranking. The secondary outcomes measured were pulmonary functions and any complication like hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, vomiting, urinary retention and neurological complications if any. Materials and Methods Sixty patients of age group 18-60 years posted for anterolateral thoracotomy surgery for lung resection were randomised either to epidural or paravertebral group in this randomised prospective double blind study. In Epidural group 7.5ml bolus of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 50μg Fentanyl and in Paravertebral group 15ml bolus of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 50μg Fentanyl was given 30 minutes before the anticipated end of surgery. Bolus dose was followed by infusion of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 2μg/ml Fentanyl at the rate of 5 ml/hr in both groups. Parameters noted were Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), Heart Rate (HR), Oxygen Saturation (SpO2), Arterial Blood Gas (PaCO2, P/F ratio), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Four Point Observer Ranking Scale (FPORS) for pain, number of sensory segments blocked (by checking for pinprick sensation), requirement of infusion top ups and rescue analgesia (Tramadol), pre and postoperative pulmonary function test {(Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV)1, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC, Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR)} and complications from start of infusion till 24 hours in the postoperative period. Results Both the techniques were effective in relieving pain but pain relief was significantly better with epidural. Postoperatively, HR, SpO2, P/F ratio and PaCO2 were comparable between group E and P. There was significant decline in FeV1

  11. Acute lung injury after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Kenneth D; Neustein, Steven M

    2010-08-01

    In this review, the authors discussed criteria for diagnosing ALI; incidence, etiology, preoperative risk factors, intraoperative management, risk-reduction strategies, treatment, and prognosis. The anesthesiologist needs to maintain an index of suspicion for ALI in the perioperative period of thoracic surgery, particularly after lung resection on the right side. Acute hypoxemia, imaging analysis for diffuse infiltrates, and detecting a noncardiogenic origin for pulmonary edema are important hallmarks of acute lung injury. Conservative intraoperative fluid administration of neutral to slightly negative fluid balance over the postoperative first week can reduce the number of ventilator days. Fluid management may be optimized with the assistance of new imaging techniques, and the anesthesiologist should monitor for transfusion-related lung injuries. Small tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg and low plateau pressures of < or =30 cmH2O may reduce organ and systemic failure. PEEP may improve oxygenation and increases organ failure-free days but has not shown a mortality benefit. The optimal mode of ventilation has not been shown in perioperative studies. Permissive hypercapnia may be needed in order to reduce lung injury from positive-pressure ventilation. NO is not recommended as a treatment. Strategies such as bronchodilation, smoking cessation, steroids, and recruitment maneuvers are unproven to benefit mortality although symptomatically they often have been shown to help ALI patients. Further studies to isolate biomarkers active in the acute setting of lung injury and pharmacologic agents to inhibit inflammatory intermediates may help improve management of this complex disease.

  12. Conduits for Coronary Bypass: Internal Thoracic Artery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This second report in the series on coronary artery bypass presents the authors experience and personal views on the internal thoracic artery (ITA) which date to 1966. There has been a very gradual evolution in the acceptance of this conduit which was initially compared with the saphenous vein and viewed as an improbable alternative to it. As is common with concepts and techniques which are 'outside the box' there was skepticism and criticism of this new conduit which was more difficult and time consuming to harvest for the surgeon who had to do it all. It was viewed as small, fragile, spastic and its flow capacity was questioned. Only a few surgeons employed it because of these issues and some of them would frequently graft it to the diagonal artery as it was thought not to supply adequate flow for the left anterior descending unless it was small. After a decade, angiographic data revealed superior patency to vein grafts. Even this evidence and survival benefit reported a few years later did not convince many surgeons that their concerns about limitations justified its use. Thus widespread adaption of the ITA as the conduit of choice for the anterior descending required another decade and bilateral use is only now expanding to more than 5% of patients in the US and somewhat faster in other countries. PMID:23275918

  13. Computer modeling of thoracic response to blast.

    PubMed

    Stuhmiller, J H; Chuong, C J; Phillips, Y Y; Dodd, K T

    1988-01-01

    Primary blast injury affects the gas-containing structures of the body. Damage to the lungs with resultant respiratory insufficiency and arterial embolization of air from alveolar pulmonary venous fistulae is the predominant cause of morbidity and mortality following high-level blast exposure. In an effort to generate a widely applicable damage-risk criterion for thoracic injury from blast we are developing a complex computer finite element model (FEM) of the thorax. Taking an engineering approach, a horizontal cross-section of the thorax is divided into small discrete units (finite elements) of homogeneous structure. The necessary physical properties (density, bulk modulus, etc.) are then determined for each element. Specifying the material constants and geometry of the elements, the computer can load the surface of the structure with some force-time function (blast pressure-time history) and calculate the resultant physical events such as displacement, compression, stress, strain, etc. Computer predictions of pressure wave phenomena in the lung parenchyma are compared with trans-bronchially measured pressures in blast-exposed animals. The model should prove useful in assessing the risk of blast injury in diverse overpressure environments and may give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms and strategies for protection.

  14. Endovascular Management of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fattori, Rossella Russo, Vincenzo; Lovato, Luigi; Buttazzi, Katia; Rinaldi, Giovanni

    2011-12-15

    The overall survival of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) has improved significantly in the past few years. Endovascular treatment, proposed as an alternative to surgery, has been considered a therapeutic innovation because of its low degree of invasiveness, which allows the treatment of even high-surgical risk patients with limited complications and mortality. A major limitation is the lack of adequate evidence regarding long-term benefit and durability because follow-up has been limited to just a few years even in the largest series. The combination of endovascular exclusion with visceral branch revascularization for the treatment of thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms involving the visceral aorta has also been attempted. As an alternative, endografts with branches represent a technological evolution that allows treatment of complex anatomy. Even if only small numbers of patients and short follow-up are available, this technical approach, which has with limited mortality (<10%) and paraplegia rates, to expand endovascular treatment to TAA seems feasible. With improved capability to recognize proper anatomy and select clinical candidates, the choice of endovascular stent-graft placement may offer a strategy to optimize management and improve prognosis.

  15. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R-). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation.

  16. Selective lung intubation during paediatric thoracic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mixa, V; Nedomova, B; Rygl, M

    2016-01-01

    Selective lung intubation is a necessary prerequisite for the completion of most interventions comprising thoracotomy and thoracoscopy. In paediatric care, our site uses Univent tubes for children up to the age of three years and double-lumen tubes (DLT) for children from 6-8 years of age. In younger children, we usually use regular endotracheal intubation, with the lung being held in the hemithorax position being operated on using a surgical retractor. The article presents the analysis of 860 thoracic surgeries, of which 491 comprised selective intubation (Univent 57 cases, DLT 434 cases). The use of the aforementioned devices is connected with certain complications. Univent tube can be connected with intraoperative dislocation of the obturating balloon (29.8%) and balloon perforation (5.2%). DLT insertion may be connected with failure of tube fitting. In 84 cases we had to repeat DLT insertion (20.6%). In 8 cases we were not able to insert DLT at all (1.8%). Standard use of selective intubation methods in paediatric patients from two years of age improved the conditions for surgical interventions (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 19). PMID:27546541

  17. Effects of voluntary constraining of thoracic displacement during hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Chonan, T; Mulholland, M B; Cherniack, N S; Altose, M D

    1987-11-01

    The study evaluated the interrelationships between the extent of thoracic movements and respiratory chemical drive in shaping the intensity of the sensation of dyspnea. Normal subjects rated their sensations of dyspnea as PCO2 increased during free rebreathing and during rebreathing while ventilation was voluntarily maintained at a constant base-line level. Another trial evaluated the effects on the intensity of dyspnea, of voluntary reduction in the level of ventilation while PCO2 was held constant. During rebreathing, there was a power function relationship between changes in PCO2 and the intensity of dyspnea. At a given PCO2, constraining tidal volume and breathing frequency to the prerebreathing base-line level resulted in an increase in dyspnea. The fractional differences in the intensity of dyspnea between free and constrained rebreathing were independent of PCO2. However, the absolute difference in the intensity of dyspnea between free and constrained rebreathing enlarged with increasing hypercapnia. At PCO2 of 50 Torr, this difference correlated significantly with the increase in both minute ventilation (r = 0.675) and tidal volume (r = 0.757) above the base line during free rebreathing. Similarly, during steady-state hypercapnia at 50 Torr PCO2, the intensity of dyspnea increased progressively as ventilation was voluntarily reduced from the spontaneously adopted free-breathing level. These results indicate that dyspnea increases with the level of respiratory chemical drive but that the intensity of the sensation is further accentuated when ventilation is constrained below that demanded by the level of chemical drive. This may be explained by a loss of inhibitory feedback from lung or chest wall mechanoreceptors acting on brain stem and/or cortical centers.

  18. Determinants of mechanical properties in the developing ovine thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Wells, S M; Langille, B L; Lee, J M; Adamson, S L

    1999-10-01

    We previously reported changes in mechanical properties and collagen cross-linking of the ovine thoracic aorta during perinatal development and postnatal maturation, and we now report changes in biochemical composition (elastin, collagen, and DNA contents per mg wet wt) over the same developmental intervals. A comparison of results from the present and previous studies has yielded novel and important observations concerning the relationship between aortic mechanics and composition during maturation. Developmental changes in aortic incremental elastic modulus at low tensile stress (E(low)) closely followed changes in relative elastin content (i.e., per mg wet wt). An 89% increase in E(low) during the perinatal period was associated with a 69% increase in relative elastin content, whereas neither variable changed during postnatal life. Incremental elastic modulus at high tensile stress (E(high)) did not change during the perinatal period but increased 88% during postnatal life. This pattern closely paralleled changes in collagen cross-linking index, which did not change perinatally but almost doubled postnatally. In contrast, relative collagen content (per mg wet wt) increased only slightly from fetal to adult life, a trend that was unrelated to aortic mechanics. Substantial, progressive decreases in measures of wall viscosity (pressure wave attenuation coefficient and viscoelastic phase angle) from fetal to adult life followed the pattern observed for relative DNA (smooth muscle cell) content (per mg wet wt). Our findings suggest that accumulation of elastin per milligram wet weight contributes most to developmental changes in E(low), change in collagen cross-linking is the primary determinant of developmental changes in E(high), and cell accumulation contributes most to developmental changes in wall viscosity.

  19. Analysis of the outcome in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, undergone canal expansive laminoplasty supported with instrumentation in a group of Indian population – a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Subhadip; Banerjee, U.; Mukherjee, A.S.; Kundu, Srikanta

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic compression of the cervical spinal cord leads to a clinical syndrome of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Clinical symptoms of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) or cervical myeloradiculopathies result in spinal cord and root dysfunction. The primary aims of surgical intervention for multilevel myelopathy are to decompress the spinal cord and maintain stability of the cervical spine. Secondary aims are to minimize complications which include long-term pain and motion loss. Laminoplasty as either single-door or double-door technique and with/without instrumentation is an established mode of surgical treatment. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the result of single-door laminoplasty technique, supported with instrumented fixation in patients with multilevel degenerative cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy. Methods A prospective and without control study has been conducted in the institution in 17 patients with CSM, operated by canal expansive single-door laminoplasty (Hirabayashi technique) between April 2010 to April 2015. These patients were followed up for at least 3 years with both clinical and radiographic evaluations. Results On clinical evaluation, 15 of the 17 patients (87%) experienced relief of their symptoms. According to the Nurick classification, 11 patients’ demonstrated improvement by one grade, two patients improved by two grades, two patients were unchanged and two had worsening of the Nurick grade. Conclusions The results of this study regarding the use of open-door laminoplasty with instrumented fixation suggest that this technique is a satisfactory alternative for cases of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy without deformation. Level of Evidence Level III therapeutic study. PMID:27441175

  20. Investigation of pulsatile flowfield in healthy thoracic aorta models.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Yang, An-Shik; Tseng, Li-Yu; Chai, Jyh-Wen

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Complex hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of aortic dissection and atherosclerosis, as well as many other diseases. Since fundamental fluid mechanics are important for the understanding of the blood flow in the cardiovascular circulatory system of the human body aspects, a joint experimental and numerical study was conducted in this study to determine the distributions of wall shear stress and pressure and oscillatory WSS index, and to examine their correlation with the aortic disorders, especially dissection. Experimentally, the Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) method was used to acquire the true geometry of a normal human thoracic aorta, which was readily converted into a transparent thoracic aorta model by the rapid prototyping (RP) technique. The thoracic aorta model was then used in the in vitro experiments and computations. Simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code ACE+((R)) to determine flow characteristics of the three-dimensional, pulsatile, incompressible, and Newtonian fluid in the thoracic aorta model. The unsteady boundary conditions at the inlet and the outlet of the aortic flow were specified from the measured flowrate and pressure results during in vitro experiments. For the code validation, the predicted axial velocity reasonably agrees with the PC-MRI experimental data in the oblique sagittal plane of the thoracic aorta model. The thorough analyses of the thoracic aorta flow, WSSs, WSS index (OSI), and wall pressures are presented. The predicted locations of the maxima of WSS and the wall pressure can be then correlated with that of the thoracic aorta dissection, and thereby may lead to a useful biological significance. The numerical results also suggest that the effects of low WSS and high OSI tend to cause wall thickening occurred along the inferior wall of the aortic arch and the

  1. Cox Decompression Manipulation and Guided Rehabilitation of a Patient With a Post Surgical C6-C7 Fusion With Spondylotic Myelopathy and Concurrent L5-S1 Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe combined treatment utilizing Cox distraction manipulation and guided rehabilitation for a patient with spine pain and post-surgical C6-7 fusion with spondylotic myelopathy and L5-S1 radiculopathy. Clinical features A 38-year-old man presented to a chiropractic clinic with neck pain and a history of an anterior cervical spine plate fusion at C6-7 after a work related accident 4 years earlier. He had signs and symptoms of spondolytic myelopathy and right lower back, right posterior thigh pain and numbness. Intervention and outcome The patient was treated with Cox technique and rehabilitation. The patient experienced a reduction of pain on a numeric pain scale from 8/10 to 3/10. The patient was seen a total of 12 visits over 3 months. No adverse effects were reported. Conclusions A patient with a prior C6-7 fusion with spondylotic myelopathy and concurrent L5-S1 radiculopathy improved after a course of rehabilitation and Cox distraction manipulation. Further research is needed to establish its efficiency. PMID:25685119

  2. Mechanism of the formation for thoracic impedance change.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming-Xing; Xiao, Qiu-Jin; Cui, Chao-Ying; Kuang, Nan-Zhen; Hong, Wen-Qin; Hu, Ai-Rong

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism of the formation for thoracic impedance change. On the basis of Ohm's law and the electrical field distribution in the cylindrical volume conductor, the formula about the thoracic impedance change are deduced, and they are demonstrated with the model experiment. The results indicate that the thoracic impedance change caused by single blood vessel is directly proportional to the ratio of the impedance change to the basal impedance of the blood vessel itself, to the length of the blood vessel appearing between the current electrodes, and to the basal impedance between two detective electrodes on the chest surface, while it is inversely proportional to the distance between the blood vessel and the line joining two detective electrodes. The thoracic impedance change caused by multiple blood vessels together is equal to the algebraic addition of all thoracic impedance changes resulting from the individual blood vessels. That is, the impedance changes obey the principle of adding scalars in the measurement of the electrical impedance graph. The present study can offer the theoretical basis for the waveform reconstruction of Impedance cardiography (ICG).

  3. Regional interdependence and manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Amy; Young, Jodi; Mintken, Paul; Cleland, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine manipulation is commonly used by physical therapists for the management of patients with upper quarter pain syndromes. The theoretical construct for using thoracic manipulation for upper quarter conditions is a mainstay of a regional interdependence (RI) approach. The RI concept is likely much more complex and is perhaps driven by a neurophysiological response including those related to peripheral, spinal cord and supraspinal mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that thoracic spine manipulation results in neurophysiological changes, which may lead to improved pain and outcomes in individuals with musculoskeletal disorders. The intent of this narrative review is to describe the research supporting the RI concept and its application to the treatment of individuals with neck and/or shoulder pain. Treatment utilizing both thrust and non-thrust thoracic manipulation has been shown to result in improvements in pain, range of motion and disability in patients with upper quarter conditions. Research has yet to determine optimal dosage, techniques or patient populations to which the RI approach should be applied; however, emerging evidence supporting a neurophysiological effect for thoracic spine manipulation may negate the need to fully answer this question. Certainly, there is a need for further research examining both the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of manual therapy interventions utilized in the RI model as well as the neurophysiological effects resulting from this intervention. PMID:26309384

  4. Regional interdependence and manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Amy; Young, Jodi; Mintken, Paul; Cleland, Josh

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic spine manipulation is commonly used by physical therapists for the management of patients with upper quarter pain syndromes. The theoretical construct for using thoracic manipulation for upper quarter conditions is a mainstay of a regional interdependence (RI) approach. The RI concept is likely much more complex and is perhaps driven by a neurophysiological response including those related to peripheral, spinal cord and supraspinal mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that thoracic spine manipulation results in neurophysiological changes, which may lead to improved pain and outcomes in individuals with musculoskeletal disorders. The intent of this narrative review is to describe the research supporting the RI concept and its application to the treatment of individuals with neck and/or shoulder pain. Treatment utilizing both thrust and non-thrust thoracic manipulation has been shown to result in improvements in pain, range of motion and disability in patients with upper quarter conditions. Research has yet to determine optimal dosage, techniques or patient populations to which the RI approach should be applied; however, emerging evidence supporting a neurophysiological effect for thoracic spine manipulation may negate the need to fully answer this question. Certainly, there is a need for further research examining both the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of manual therapy interventions utilized in the RI model as well as the neurophysiological effects resulting from this intervention. PMID:26309384

  5. Imaging features of thoracic metastases from gynecologic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jiménez, Santiago; Rosado-de-Christenson, Melissa L; Walker, Christopher M; Kunin, Jeffery R; Betancourt, Sonia L; Shoup, Brenda L; Pettavel, Paul P

    2014-10-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are a heterogeneous group of common neoplasms and represent the fourth most common malignancy in women. Thoracic metastases exhibit various imaging patterns and are usually associated with locally invasive primary neoplasms with intra-abdominal spread. However, thoracic involvement may also occur many months to years after initial diagnosis or as an isolated finding in patients without evidence of intra-abdominal neoplastic involvement. Thoracic metastases from endometrial carcinoma typically manifest as pulmonary nodules and lymphadenopathy. Thoracic metastases from ovarian cancer often manifest with small pleural effusions and subtle pleural nodules. Thoracic metastases to the lungs, lymph nodes, and pleura may also exhibit calcification and mimic granulomatous disease. Metastases from fallopian tube carcinomas exhibit imaging features identical to those of ovarian cancers. Most cervical cancers are of squamous histology, and while solid pulmonary metastases are more common, cavitary metastases occur with some frequency. Metastatic choriocarcinoma to the lung characteristically manifests with solid pulmonary nodules. Some pulmonary metastases from gynecologic malignancies exhibit characteristic features such as cavitation (in squamous cell cervical cancer) and the "halo" sign (in hemorrhagic metastatic choriocarcinoma) at computed tomography (CT). However, metastases from common gynecologic malignancies may be subtle and indolent and may mimic benign conditions such as intrapulmonary lymph nodes and remote granulomatous disease. Therefore, radiologists should consider the presence of locoregional disease as well as elevated tumor marker levels when interpreting imaging studies because subtle imaging findings may represent metastatic disease. Positron emission tomography/CT may be helpful in identifying early locoregional and distant tumor spread. PMID:25310428

  6. Endovascular aortic injury repair after thoracic pedicle screw placement.

    PubMed

    Pesenti, S; Bartoli, M A; Blondel, B; Peltier, E; Adetchessi, T; Fuentes, S

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to describe the management and prevention of thoracic aortic injuries caused by a malposition of pedicle screws in corrective surgery of major spine deformities. Positioning pedicle screws in thoracic vertebras by posterior approach exposes to the risk of injury of the elements placed ahead of the thoracic spine, as the descending thoracic aorta. This complication can result in a cataclysmic bleeding, needing urgent vascular care, but it can also be totally asymptomatic, resulting in the long run in a pseudoaneurysm, justifying the systematic removal of the hardware. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who underwent spinal correction surgery for thoraco-lumbar degenerative kypho-scoliosis. Immediately after the surgery, a thoracic aortic injury caused by the left T7 pedicle screw was diagnosed. The patient underwent a two-step surgery. The first step was realized by vascular surgeons and aimed to secure the aortic wall by short endovascular aortic grafting. During the second step, spine surgeons removed the responsible screw by posterior approach. The patient was discharged in a rehabilitation center 7 days after the second surgery. When such a complication occurs, a co-management by vascular and spine surgeons is necessary to avoid major complications. Endovascular management of this kind of vascular injuries permits to avoid an open surgery that have a great rate of morbi-mortality in frail patients. Nowadays, technologies exist to prevent this kind of event and may improve the security when positioning pedicle screws. PMID:25023930

  7. Case Report: The Effects of Massage Therapy on a Woman with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Mary Lillias

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to a group of conditions resulting from compression of the neurovascular structures of the thoracic outlet. The parameters for physical therapy include myofascial release (MFR), neuromuscular therapy (NMT), muscle strengthening, and stretching. This case study examined the effects of neuromuscular therapy, massage, and other manual therapies on a 56-year-old female presenting with bilateral numbness over the forearms and hands on waking. Numbness occurred most days, progressing to “dead rubbery” forearms and hands once or twice a month. Methods The treatment plan was implemented over eight weeks and consisted of six, 50-minute bodywork sessions. Several nonbodywork strategies were also employed to address potential contributing factors to the TOS symptomology experienced by the client. Objective measurements included posture analysis (PA), range of movement (ROM), and Roos and Adson’s tests. The Measure Your Own Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP2), a client-generated measure of clinical outcome, was used to measure clinical change. Results MYMOP2 overall profile score results demonstrated an improvement of 2.25 from pretreatment to post-treatment measurement. Clinically meaningful change was measured by the individual and was indicative of substantial symptom improvement where a score change of over one was considered as meaningful. Conclusions A course of massage was effective for numbness symptoms in an individual with TOS, and results lasted over a year without additional treatments. Further research is needed to fully understand the effects of massage for TOS symptoms. PMID:25452819

  8. Diagnosis of traumatic thoracic aortic rupture: a 10-year retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Kram, H B; Appel, P L; Wohlmuth, D A; Shoemaker, W C

    1989-02-01

    A 10-year retrospective analysis of 82 patients with suspected thoracic aortic rupture (TAR) due to blunt chest trauma was performed to define which symptoms and signs were helpful in making an early diagnosis. Symptoms and signs associated with TAR included midscapular back pain (in the absence of thoracic spine fracture), unexplained hypotension, upper extremity hypertension, bilateral femoral pulse deficits, and initial chest tube output in excess of 750 mL. Chest roentgenographic signs seen with significantly greater frequency in the 12 patients with TAR than in 70 patients without such rupture included a widened paratracheal stripe (7 patients), deviation of the nasogastric tube or central venous pressure line (5 patients), blurring of the aortic knob (9 patients), abnormal paraspinous stripe (6 patients), and rightward tracheal deviation (5 patients). Mediastinal widening of greater than 8 cm occurred in 11 of the 12 patients with TAR (sensitivity, 92%); its specificity, however, was only 10% (11 true-positive and 63 false-positive results). In patients in hemodynamically stable condition who display these findings, immediate aortography should be considered. The presence of myocardial contusions, intraabdominal injuries, and pelvic fractures also occurred more frequently in patients with TAR. We conclude that a detailed history, physical examination, and chest roentgenography, with rapid progression to aortography in suspicious cases, represent the safest and most reliable approach to patients with TAR.

  9. The experimental validation of free fat grafts in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Junichi; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Masataro; Kondo, Tomoko; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the viability of free fat grafts in the thoracic cavity using 3-month old male swine (n = 2). After left caudal lobectomy, 1-3 g of subcutaneous fat tissue harvested via the thoracotomy site was implanted in the chest cavity. At re-thoracotomy 6 weeks after implantation, all of the implanted fat grafts (n = 15) were found to have closely adhered to the parietal pleura and visceral pleura. There was a significant decrease by ∼30% in the weight of the fat grafts after implantation. Regardless of the weight loss, the implanted fat graft showed normal structuring without scar formation in the central area. Our results may suggest that free fat pads, which weighed up to 3 g, were successfully cultured in the thoracic cavity until the implanted tissues integrated into the surrounding tissues. Therefore, the free fat pad can be used as a biomaterial for some purposes in thoracic surgery.

  10. A comparison of thoracic or lumbar patient-controlled epidural analgesia methods after thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to compare patient-controlled thoracic or lumbar epidural analgesia methods after thoracotomy operations. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were prospectively randomized to receive either thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA group) or lumbar epidural analgesia (LEA group). In both groups, epidural catheters were administered. Hemodynamic measurements, visual analog scale scores at rest (VAS-R) and after coughing (VAS-C), analgesic consumption, and side effects were compared at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours postoperatively. Results The VAS-R and VAS-C values were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group at 2, 4, 8, and 16 hours after surgery (for VAS-R, P = 0.001, P = 0.01, P = 0.008, and P = 0.029, respectively; and for VAS-C, P = 0.035, P = 0.023, P = 0.002, and P = 0.037, respectively). Total 24-hour analgesic consumption was different between groups (175 +/- 20 mL versus 185 +/- 31 mL; P = 0.034). The comparison of postoperative complications revealed that the incidence of hypotension (21/57, 36.8% versus 8/63, 12.7%; P = 0.002), bradycardia (9/57, 15.8% versus 2/63, 3.2%; P = 0.017), atelectasis (1/57, 1.8% versus 7/63, 11.1%; P = 0.04), and the need for intensive care unit (ICU) treatment (0/57, 0% versus 5/63, 7.9%; P = 0.03) were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group. Conclusions TEA has beneficial hemostatic effects in comparison to LEA after thoracotomies along with more satisfactory pain relief profile. PMID:24885545

  11. Dorsal resection of a thoracic hemivertebra in a 4-year-old boy with endochondral gigantism. A case report.

    PubMed

    Zarghooni, Kourosh; Sobotrke, Rolf; Schmidt, Heinrich; Rollinghoff, Marc; Siewe, Jan; Eysel, Peer

    2010-10-01

    The authors present what appears to be the first case of congenital kyphosis due to a T12 hemivertebra in a four-year-old boy with endochondral gigantism syndrome of unknown origin. Because of his overgrowth, the patient had severe medical and orthopaedic problems and was almost immobile. Prior to surgery, he experienced a rapidly progressive thoracolumbar kyphosis to 600 (T10-L2). MRI of the brain and spine showed critical protraction of the spinal cord and myelopathy from compression at T12. Single-stage posterior resection of the hemivertebra with spinal shortening and dorsal transpedicular instrumentation of T10-L2 was performed. Although the bone tissue was cartilaginous and dysplastic, 420 (30%) correction was achieved along with decompression of the spinal canal. The patient experienced no neurological impairment post-operatively. At follow-up examination 1.5 year after surgery, the patient's movement disorder had improved markedly and he was able to stand and walk. This very rare case demonstrates that single-stage posterior hemivertebra resection and transpedicular instrumentation for correction of congenital kyphosis can be a safe and effective procedure even in a very challenging case.

  12. Signal intensity ratio on magnetic resonance imaging as a prognostic factor in patients with cervical compressive myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Ha, Yoon; Shin, Jun Jae; Cho, Yong Eun; Lee, Ji Hae; Cho, Woo Ho

    2016-09-01

    Patients with intramedullary signal intensity (SI) changes have a poor prognosis after surgical decompression in cervical compressive myelopathy (CCM); however, some patients show no clear relationship between the SI and postsurgical prognosis. This discrepancy may be because no comprehensive and proper quantitative evaluation exists to assess SI on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was prospectively to evaluate the correlation between the clinical features, neurological outcome of patients with CCM, and the quantitative assessment of SI changes preoperatively and postoperatively, and the correlation with SI severity.A total of 112 patients with CCM at 1 or 2 levels underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. We quantitatively analyzed MR signal changes on T1-weighted MR images (T1WI), gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) contrast-enhanced T1WI, and T2-weighted MR images (T2WI) using the signal intensity ratio (SIR). We evaluated the correlations between various variables and neurological outcome using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scale, and the severity of SI change by grade (i.e., grade 0 ["none"], grade 1 ["light"], and grade 2 ["bright on T2WI"]).Significant differences between the 3 grades existed in symptom duration, preoperative JOA score, SIR on T2WI, and JOA recovery ratio. The JOA recovery ratio was negatively correlated with symptom duration and the SIR on T2WI, and positively correlated with the preoperative JOA score and cord compression ratio, but not with the SIR on T1WI and contrast-enhanced T1WI. On the postoperative 12-month follow-up MRI, the JOA recovery ratio and SIR on T2WI of the SI reversal patients were better than those of the nonreversal patients. On multiple regression analysis, the SIR on T2WI was the main significant prognostic factor of surgical outcome.The grading system on T2WI provided reliable predictive information for neurological outcome. Quantitative alterations

  13. Prospective Evaluation of Thoracic Ultrasound in the Detection of Pneumothorax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. W.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Billica, R. D.; Williams, D. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Sargysan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax (PTX) occurs commonly in trauma patients and is confirmed by examination and radiography. Thoracic ultrasound (VIS) has been suggested as an alternative method for rapidly diagnosing PTX when X-ray is unavailable as in rural, military, or space flight settings; however, its accuracy and specificity are not known. Methods: We evaluated the accuracy of thoracic U/S detection of PTX compared to radiography in stable, emergency patients with a high suspicion of PTX at a Level-l trauma center over a 6-month period. Following University and NASA Institutional Review Board approval, informed consent was obtained from patients with penetrating or blunt chest trauma, or with a history consistent with PTX. Whenever possible, the presence or absence of the " lung sliding" sign or the "comet tail" artifact were determined by U/S in both hemithoraces by residents instructed in thoracic U/S before standard radiologic verification of PTX. Results were recorded on data sheets for comparison to standard radiography. Results: Thoracic VIS had a 94% sensitivity; two PTX could not be reliably diagnosed due to subcutaneous air; the true negative rate was 100%. In one patient, the VIS exam was positive while X ray did not confirm PTX; a follow-up film 1 hour later demonstrated a small PTX. The average time for bilateral thoracic VIS examination was 2 to 3 minutes. Conclusions: Thoracic ultrasound reliably diagnoses pneumothorax. Presence of the "lung sliding" sign conclusively excludes pneumothorax. Expansion of the FAST examination to include the thorax should be investigated.

  14. Medical students' views on thoracic surgery residency programs in a Japanese medical school.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Kiyofumi; Naraoka, Shu-ichi; Miyajima, Masahiro; Uzuka, Takeshi; Saito, Tatsuya; Abe, Tomio

    2003-09-01

    There has been a decline in the number of medical students applying for thoracic surgery training programs. We obtained knowledge of medical students' views on thoracic surgery residency programs. After completion of thoracic surgery clerkship, 17 students were asked to fill out questionnaires on first-year thoracic surgery residency programs. The majority of students considered thoracic surgery to be held in high regard by the general public, and felt that the salary was sufficient. However, only one student chose a thoracic surgery training program. The main reason for not applying for thoracic surgery residency was lifestyle issues. The factors in determining career choice included quality of education and work hours. Medical students are likely to select specialties other than thoracic surgery. Since the main factor influencing medical students' career is the quality of education in a residency program, efforts should be made to improve the quality of education.

  15. Prevention and Management of Nerve Injuries in Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Auchincloss, Hugh G; Donahue, Dean M

    2015-11-01

    Nerve injuries can cause substantial morbidity after thoracic surgical procedures. These injuries are preventable, provided that the surgeon has a thorough understanding of the anatomy and follows important surgical principles. When nerve injuries occur, it is important to recognize the options available in the immediate and postoperative settings, including expectant management, immediate nerve reconstruction, or auxiliary procedures. This article covers the basic anatomy and physiology of nerves and nerve injuries, an overview of techniques in nerve reconstruction, and a guide to the nerves most commonly involved in thoracic operative procedures.

  16. Modified uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery in children

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Seims, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has been traditionally performed by a multi-port approach, but uniportal VATS is gaining popularity among thoracic surgeons. The use of only one intercostal space may result in less pain, but competition among camera and operating instruments may be a disadvantage. In children, the limited space in the thorax makes the uniportal VATS difficult to accomplish. We present a modification of the uniportal VATS, using a single skin incision but placing the thoracoscope in the superior or inferior intercostal space relative to the working instruments to increase instrument range of motion within a single intercostal space. PMID:27251823

  17. Dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with tuberculous pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Im, Kyong Shil; Choi, Min Kyung; Jeon, Yong Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with the tuberculous pleural effusion. An 82-year-old woman underwent emergency stent graft under a diagnosis of dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm. Preoperative computed tomography revealed right pleural effusion supposed to the hemothorax caused by the dissecting aneurysm. But, the effusion was sanguineous color fluid and it was determined to result from pulmonary tuberculosis. The medical team was exposed to the pulmonary tuberculosis; fortunately no one became infected. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of an infected aortic aneurysm and prepare for pathogen transmission. PMID:27499987

  18. Surgical Strategy for Thoracic Aortic Pseudoaneurysm with Sternal Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Sachiko; Iida, Yasunori; Misumi, Takahiko; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    A thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm is a life-threatening complication following thoracic aortic surgery. We describe a surgical strategy for this pseudoaneurysm with a high risk for rupture during median sternotomy. The pseudoaneurysm was distended and widely adherent to the posterior sternum. Elective cardiopulmonary bypass and moderate hypothermia were established, and sternotomy was performed without left ventricle distention or brain ischemia. Total arch replacement was successful and the patient was discharged on post operative day (POD) 18. A key surgical strategy was to avoid ventricular fibrillation before sternotomy. Appropriate sternotomy timing and perfusion strategy are crucial for successful treatment.

  19. Skeletal Dysplasias That Cause Thoracic Insufficiency in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    İpek, Mehmet Sah; Akgul Ozmen, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Skeletal dysplasias are a heterogeneous group of conditions associated with various abnormalities of the skeleton. Some of them are perinatally lethal and can be diagnosed at birth. Lethality is usually due to thoracic underdevelopment and lung hypoplasia. A correct diagnosis and typing of the skeletal disorder is essential for the prognosis as is genetic counseling of the family. A retrospective review of 12 cases of clinico-radiologic diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia, leading to thoracic insufficiency, was conducted. We aimed to make differential diagnosis with special emphasis on radiological findings, and to emphasize the importance of parental counseling. PMID:27057899

  20. Pericardial fat flap for mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Kawatani, Yohei; Ito, Yujiro; Hori, Takaki

    2016-07-01

    Standard treatment for mycotic aneurysm of thoracic aorta is complete debridement with replacement of the aneurysm with a homograft or Dacron graft. However, contamination from surrounding tissues may occur after the graft replacement. Transposition of the viable, well-vascularized tissues should be used to fill surrounding dead space and isolate the graft to prevent reinfection. Although the omentum is regarded as the best tissue, it is not always available for use. We describe here a new alternative technique for such situations, that is, the use of a pericardial fat flap for patients with a mycotic descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. PMID:27059067

  1. Reasons to participate in European Society of Thoracic Surgeons database

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The process of data collection inevitably involves costs at various levels. Nevertheless, this effort is essential to base our knowledge and the consequent decision making on solid foundations. The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) database collects a large amount of data on general thoracic surgery derived from about 60 units representative of 11 nations. Since its beginning in 2001, the ESTS database has contributed to increase the knowledge and the quality of care in our specialty. The present paper illustrates the ultimate finalities and the obtained results of this data collection, providing a broad overview of the motivations to participate to the ESTS database. PMID:25984355

  2. Modified uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery in children.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Seims, Aaron D

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has been traditionally performed by a multi-port approach, but uniportal VATS is gaining popularity among thoracic surgeons. The use of only one intercostal space may result in less pain, but competition among camera and operating instruments may be a disadvantage. In children, the limited space in the thorax makes the uniportal VATS difficult to accomplish. We present a modification of the uniportal VATS, using a single skin incision but placing the thoracoscope in the superior or inferior intercostal space relative to the working instruments to increase instrument range of motion within a single intercostal space.

  3. [Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) in clinical practice: effects, technique, complications and suggestions during anticoagulant treatment].

    PubMed

    Passarani, S; Pedrazzini, G; Paino, R; Paleari, G

    2001-03-01

    The effects of thoracic peridural analgesia (TEA) on the neuroendocrine response to surgery are well known, but, at the present this technique is not widely used especially in Italy. The aim of this paper is to give information and suggestions on thoracic epidural analgesia in thoracic and cardiac surgery, and to discuss how anticoagulant therapy may interfere on this technique.

  4. American Thoracic Society and Marron Institute Report. Estimated Excess Morbidity and Mortality Caused by Air Pollution above American Thoracic Society-Recommended Standards, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Cromar, Kevin R; Gladson, Laura A; Perlmutt, Lars D; Ghazipura, Marya; Ewart, Gary W

    2016-08-01

    Estimates of the health impacts of air pollution are needed to make informed air quality management decisions at both the national and local levels. Using design values of ambient pollution concentrations from 2011-2013 as a baseline, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the Marron Institute of Urban Management estimated excess morbidity and mortality in the United States attributable to exposure to ambient ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) at levels above the American Thoracic Society-recommended standards. Within the subset of counties with valid design values for each pollutant, 14% had PM2.5 concentrations greater than the ATS recommendation, whereas 91% had O3 concentrations greater than the ATS recommendation. Approximately 9,320 excess deaths (69% from O3; 31% from PM2.5), 21,400 excess morbidities (74% from O3; 26% from PM2.5), and 19,300,000 adversely impacted days (88% from O3; 12% from PM2.5) in the United States each year are attributable to pollution exceeding the ATS-recommended standards. California alone is responsible for 37% of the total estimated health impacts, and the next three states (Pennsylvania, Texas, and Ohio) together contributed to 20% of the total estimates. City-specific health estimates are provided in this report and through an accompanying online tool to help inform air quality management decisions made at the local level. Riverside and Los Angeles, California have the most to gain by attaining the ATS recommendations for O3 and PM2.5. This report will be revised and updated regularly to help cities track their progress. PMID:27509145

  5. American Thoracic Society and Marron Institute Report. Estimated Excess Morbidity and Mortality Caused by Air Pollution above American Thoracic Society-Recommended Standards, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Cromar, Kevin R; Gladson, Laura A; Perlmutt, Lars D; Ghazipura, Marya; Ewart, Gary W

    2016-08-01

    Estimates of the health impacts of air pollution are needed to make informed air quality management decisions at both the national and local levels. Using design values of ambient pollution concentrations from 2011-2013 as a baseline, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the Marron Institute of Urban Management estimated excess morbidity and mortality in the United States attributable to exposure to ambient ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) at levels above the American Thoracic Society-recommended standards. Within the subset of counties with valid design values for each pollutant, 14% had PM2.5 concentrations greater than the ATS recommendation, whereas 91% had O3 concentrations greater than the ATS recommendation. Approximately 9,320 excess deaths (69% from O3; 31% from PM2.5), 21,400 excess morbidities (74% from O3; 26% from PM2.5), and 19,300,000 adversely impacted days (88% from O3; 12% from PM2.5) in the United States each year are attributable to pollution exceeding the ATS-recommended standards. California alone is responsible for 37% of the total estimated health impacts, and the next three states (Pennsylvania, Texas, and Ohio) together contributed to 20% of the total estimates. City-specific health estimates are provided in this report and through an accompanying online tool to help inform air quality management decisions made at the local level. Riverside and Los Angeles, California have the most to gain by attaining the ATS recommendations for O3 and PM2.5. This report will be revised and updated regularly to help cities track their progress.

  6. Anterior Cervical Corpectomy with free vascularized fibular graft versus multilevel discectomy and grafting for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Addosooki, Ahmad I; El-deen, Mohamed Alam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A retrospective study to compare the radiologic and clinical outcomes of 2 different anterior approaches, multilevel anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) using autologus ticortical bone graft versus anterior cervical corpectomy with fusion (ACCF) using free vascularized fibular graft (FVFG) for the management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy(CSM). Methods A total of 15 patients who underwent ACDF or ACCF using FVFG for multilevel CSM were divided into two groups. Group A (n = 7) underwent ACDF and group B (n = 8) ACCF. Clinical outcomes using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, perioperative parameters including operation time and hospital stay, radiological parameters including fusion rate and cervical lordosis, and complications were compared. Results Both group A and group B demonstrated significant increases in JOA scores. Patients who underwent ACDF experienced significantly shorter operation times and hospital stay. Both groups showed significant increases in postoperative cervical lordosis and achieved the same fusion rate (100 %). No major complications were encountered in both groups. Conclusion Both ACDF and ACCF using FVFG provide satisfactory clinical outcomes and fusion rates for multilevel CSM. However, multilevel ACDF is associated with better radiologic parameters, shorter hospital stay and shorter operative times. PMID:26767152

  7. Psychiatric comorbidities in a young man with subacute myelopathy induced by abusive nitrous oxide consumption: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mancke, Falk; Kaklauskaitė, Gintarė; Kollmer, Jennifer; Weiler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), a long-standing anesthetic, is known for its recreational use, and its consumption is on the rise. Several case studies have reported neurological and psychiatric complications of N2O use. To date, however, there has not been a study using standardized diagnostic procedures to assess psychiatric comorbidities in a patient consuming N2O. Here, we report about a 35-year-old male with magnetic resonance imaging confirmed subacute myelopathy induced by N2O consumption, who suffered from comorbid cannabinoid and nicotine dependence as well as abuse of amphetamines, cocaine, lysergic acid diethylamide, and ketamine. Additionally, there was evidence of a preceding transient psychotic and depressive episode induced by synthetic cannabinoid abuse. In summary, this case raises awareness of an important mechanism of neural toxicity, with which physicians working in the field of substance-related disorders should be familiar. In fact, excluding N2O toxicity in patients with recognized substance-related disorders and new neurological deficits is compulsory, as untreated for months the damage to the nervous system is at risk of becoming irreversible. PMID:27729826

  8. Physiotherapy for human T-lymphotropic virus 1-associated myelopathy: review of the literature and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Katia N; Macêdo, Maíra C; Andrade, Rosana P; Mendes, Selena D; Martins, José V; Baptista, Abrahão F

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) infection may be associated with damage to the spinal cord – HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis – and other neurological symptoms that compromise everyday life activities. There is no cure for this disease, but recent evidence suggests that physiotherapy may help individuals with the infection, although, as far as we are aware, no systematic review has approached this topic. Therefore, the objective of this review is to address the core problems associated with HTLV-1 infection that can be detected and treated by physiotherapy, present the results of clinical trials, and discuss perspectives on the development of knowledge in this area. Major problems for individuals with HTLV-1 are pain, sensory-motor dysfunction, and urinary symptoms. All of these have high impact on quality of life, and recent clinical trials involving exercises, electrotherapeutic modalities, and massage have shown promising effects. Although not influencing the basic pathologic disturbances, a physiotherapeutic approach seems to be useful to detect specific problems related to body structures, activity, and participation related to movement in HTLV-1 infection, as well as to treat these conditions. PMID:25759588

  9. Cervical myelopathy due to single level disc herniation presenting as intramedullary mass lesion: What to do first?

    PubMed

    Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Özcan Ekşi, Emel Ece; Yılmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Konya, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy (CM) is mostly a degenerative process ending in myelopathic and/or radiculopathic syndromes. On T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CM appears as a hyperintense area near the spondylotic spine. This high intensity signal depends on the impact of outer forces and their duration. It also determines the prognosis of the surgical candidate. A 40-year-old male patient admitted to our clinic with right upper extremity weakness and hypoesthesia that had started 2 months earlier. On neurological examination there was 2/5 motor weakness of right biceps brachii, and hypoesthesia over right C6 dermatome. Right upper extremity deep tendon reflexes were hypoactive, but lower ones were hyperactive. After clinical and radiological work-up, preliminary diagnosis was directed to a spinal intramedullary tumor. Total resection of the herniated cervical disc fragment and the mass lesion was managed. Pathology of the mass lesion was compatible with subacute infarct tissue and inflammatory response. Final diagnosis was CM under effect of cervical disc herniation. Contrast-enhanced spinal cord myelopathic lesions are very rare and resemble much more tumors and inflammatory processes. However, the principal treatment approach totally differs depending on pathology. When there are both a disc herniation and a high clinical suspicion; biopsy should be delayed. The most probable solution will be surgery for the disc disease with thorough preoperative scanning of vascular malformations; clinical and radiological close follow-up after surgery. Biopsy or surgical resection can be performed if patient deteriorates despite the primary surgery. PMID:25972718

  10. Axonal plasticity underpins the functional recovery following surgical decompression in a rat model of cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Rana S; Parker, John; Syed, Yasir A; Edgley, Steve; Young, Adam; Fawcett, James W; Jeffery, Nick D; Franklin, Robin J M; Kotter, Mark R N

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most common spinal cord disorder and a major cause of disability in adults. Improvements following surgical decompression are limited and patients often remain severely disabled. Post mortem studies indicate that CSM is associated with profound axonal loss. However, our understanding of the pathophysiology of CSM remains limited.To investigate the hypothesis that axonal plasticity plays a role in the recovery following surgical decompression, we adopted a novel preclinical model of mild to moderate CSM. Spinal cord compression resulted in significant locomotor deterioration, increased expression of the axonal injury marker APP, and loss of serotonergic fibres. Surgical decompression partially reversed the deficits and attenuated APP expression. Decompression was also associated with axonal sprouting, reflected in the restoration of serotonergic fibres and an increase of GAP43 expression. The re-expression of synaptophysin indicated the restoration of functional synapses following decompression. Promoting axonal plasticity may therefore be a therapeutic strategy for promoting neurological recovery in CSM. PMID:27552807

  11. Recurrent solitary fibrous tumour of the thoracic spine. A case-report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, B; Guedj, N; Lonjon, G; Guigui, P

    2012-11-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare tumours originating in the soft tissues. SFT development in the spine is an exceedingly rare event about which little is known. We describe a case of SFT of the thoracic spine in a 56-year-old woman. She presented with neurological deficits that required emergency resection, which was incomplete. Two subsequent local recurrences prompted further surgical procedures. At last follow-up, 12 months after the last procedure, function was satisfactory and there was no evidence of tumour recurrence. The management of SFTs is not well standardised, and no proven adjuvant treatments are available to date. Complete excision is effective in controlling disease progression. Prolonged follow-up is mandatory.

  12. Mechanical properties of rat thoracic and abdominal aortas.

    PubMed

    Assoul, N; Flaud, P; Chaouat, M; Letourneur, D; Bataille, I

    2008-07-19

    Mechanical properties of abdominal and thoracic arteries of 2mm in diameter were determined from adults Wistar rats. A tensile testing instrument was used to obtain stress/strain curves with arteries immersed in physiological buffer at 37 degrees C. A displacement was applied on all arteries with various frequencies (1-7.5Hz) and strains (5-60%). From each curve a Young modulus was obtained using a mathematical model based on a nonlinear soft tissue model. No influence of frequency on modulus was evidenced in the tested range. Abdominal aortas, which were found slightly thicker than thoracic aortas, were characterized by a higher modulus. Due to the interest of decellularized biological materials, we also used SDS/Triton treated arteries, and found that the chemical treatment increased modulus of thoracic arteries. Tensile tests were also performed on thoracic aortas in the longitudinal and transversal directions. Longitudinal moduli were found higher than transversal moduli and the difference could be related to the longitudinal orientation of collagen fibers. These data and mathematical model seem useful in the design of new vascular synthetic or biological prostheses for the field of tissue engineering.

  13. Normal Range of Thoracic Kyphosis in Male School Children

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, MohammadBagher; Veisi, Korosh; Karimi, Loghman; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Najafi, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although there are frequent studies about normal range of thoracic kyphosis, there is still a controversy about the exact values of this curve. In nine reported studies on 10 to 20 years of age boys, the value ranged from 25.1° to 53.3°. Objective for the Study. The aim of the present research was investigation of normal ranges of thoracic kyphosis in school children in Kermanshah, western Iran. Methods. 582 male students aged 13 to 18 years old using cluster random sampling were recruited from schools in Kermanshah city, 97 students for each age. Thoracic curves were measured using the flexicurve method. Results. Mean thoracic kyphosis for whole population was 35.49° SD 7.83 and plus or minus two standard deviations ranged from 19.83° to 51.15°. It increased gradually from 13 to 16 and then there was a little decrease to 18 years. Mean values for each age (13–16) were 13 (34.41 SD 7.47°), 14 (34.86 SD 8.29°), 15 (35.79 SD 7.93°), 16 (36.49 SD 7.85°), 17 (35.84 SD 8.33°), and 18 (35.55 SD 7.07°). Conclusions. Our results are in agreement with previous reports and can be used as normal values for local and regional purposes. PMID:24967122

  14. Thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis: an unusual complication of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Olushola; Mayooran, Nithiananthan; Iqbal, Nasir

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis complicating Crohn's disease is a rare occurrence and mostly occurred in patients with Crohn's disease complicated by an abscess or fistulising disease. We report a case of thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis, occurring in a refractory Crohn's disease without contiguous abscess or fistula with the bowel. PMID:24916975

  15. Hereditary Influence in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection.

    PubMed

    Isselbacher, Eric M; Lino Cardenas, Christian Lacks; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-06-14

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition in that it places patients at risk for aortic dissection or rupture. However, our modern understanding of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic aneurysm is quite limited. A genetic predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysm has been established, and gene discovery in affected families has identified several major categories of gene alterations. The first involves mutations in genes encoding various components of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling cascade (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3 and SKI), and these conditions are known collectively as the TGF-β vasculopathies. The second set of genes encode components of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus (ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK, and PRKG1), a group called the smooth muscle contraction vasculopathies. Mechanistic hypotheses based on these discoveries have shaped rational therapies, some of which are under clinical evaluation. This review discusses published data on genes involved in thoracic aortic aneurysm and attempts to explain divergent hypotheses of aneurysm origin. PMID:27297344

  16. Spinal cord injury following an attempted thoracic epidural.

    PubMed

    Mayall, M F; Calder, I

    1999-10-01

    Unsuccessful attempts were made to insert a thoracic epidural in an anaesthetised patient. Signs of spinal cord damage were observed the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a haematoma anterior to the spinal cord. Surgical exploration revealed an intradural haematoma and a needle puncture of the cord. The patient suffered a permanent paraparesis.

  17. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Lewis, Jaime; Guitron, Julian; Reed, Michael; Pritts, Timothy; Starnes, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13%) following blunt injury and 20 (87%) after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury. PMID:23723618

  18. Hereditary Influence in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection.

    PubMed

    Isselbacher, Eric M; Lino Cardenas, Christian Lacks; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-06-14

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition in that it places patients at risk for aortic dissection or rupture. However, our modern understanding of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic aneurysm is quite limited. A genetic predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysm has been established, and gene discovery in affected families has identified several major categories of gene alterations. The first involves mutations in genes encoding various components of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling cascade (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3 and SKI), and these conditions are known collectively as the TGF-β vasculopathies. The second set of genes encode components of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus (ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK, and PRKG1), a group called the smooth muscle contraction vasculopathies. Mechanistic hypotheses based on these discoveries have shaped rational therapies, some of which are under clinical evaluation. This review discusses published data on genes involved in thoracic aortic aneurysm and attempts to explain divergent hypotheses of aneurysm origin.

  19. Thoracic aortic dissection in a 38-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Tilney, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A few days before Christmas, a flight team was activated for an interfacility transfer of a 38-year-old man with a history of hypertension and spinal stenosis diagnosed with a thoracic aortic dissection. The patient was presented to a local community hospital complaining of nearly 5 days of left-sided rib pain. This afternoon when he stood up from a chair, he experienced a near-syncopal episode. Concurrently, he had an abrupt onset of a tearing sensation in his chest that radiated to thoracic spine in the region between his shoulder blades. Ground emergency medical services (EMS) was called, and the patient was transported to the community hospital. During the initial transport and evaluation by the emergency department (ED) staff, the patient was noted to be hypertensive, with a systolic blood pressure greater than 180 mmHg. In the ED, the patient received aspirin, morphine, and Lopressor. He underwent a chest x-ray (Figure 1) and computed tomography (CT) scan and was diagnosed with a type B thoracic aorta dissection, which was noted to start on the descending thoracic aorta distal to the left subclavian artery and extend to the level of the celiac trunk (Figure 2). Despite the initial beta blockade, the patient was noted to be profoundly hypertensive, with initial blood pressure greater than 190 mmHg systolic. The flight team was activated for hemodynamic management and rapid transport to a facility capable of vascular and cardiothoracic surgery.

  20. Anode heel affect in thoracic radiology: a visual grading analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mearon, T.; Brennan, P. C.

    2006-03-01

    For decades, the antero-posterior (AP) projection of the thoracic spine has represented a substantial challenge. Patient thickness varies substantially along the cranio-caudal axis resulting in images that are too dark for the upper vertebrae and too light, or with excessive quantum mottle, towards the 9th to 12th thoracic vertebra. The anode heel affect is a well known phenomenon, however there is a paucity of reports demonstrating its exploitation in clinical departments for optimising images. The current work, using an adult, tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom, explores if appropriate positioning ofthe anode can improve image quality for thoracic spine radiology. At each of 5 kVps (70, 81, 90, 102, 109) thirty AP thoracic spine images were produced, 15 with the anode end of the tube towards the cranial part of the phantom and 15 with the anode end of the tube facing caudally. Visual grading analysis of the resultant images demonstrated significant improvements in overall image quality and visualisation of specific anatomical features for the cranially facing anode compared with the alternative position, which were most pronounced for the 1st to 4th and 9th to 12th vertebrae. These improvements were evident at 70, 81 and 90 kVp, but not for the higher beam energies. The results demonstrate that correct positioning of the X-ray tube can improve image quality for thoracic radiology at specific tube potentials. Further work is ongoing to investigate whether this easy to implement and cost-free technique can be employed for other examinations.

  1. Stent-graft repair for acute traumatic thoracic aortic rupture.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser, B; Czermak, B; Jaschke, W; Waldenberger, P; Fraedrich, G; Perkmann, R

    2004-12-01

    Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta is potentially life-threatening and leads to death in 75 to 90 per cent of cases at the time of injury. In high-risk patients, as traumatic injuries of the aorta combine with multiple associated injuries, endoluminal repair is now reported as a promising therapeutic strategy with encouraging results. This study determined the outcome of patients with traumatic thoracic aortic injury treated endovascularly during the past 7 years at our institution. Thirteen patients, 11 males and 2 females (mean age, 39 years; range, 19-82), with traumatic rupture of the otherwise unremarkable descending aorta (10 acute, 3 chronic), out of a series of 64 endovascular thoracic stent-graft procedures, were treated by implantation of Talent (n = 8), Vanguard (n = 5), and Excluder (n = 2) self-expanding devices between January 1996 and August 2003. The immediate technical success rate was 92 per cent (12/13). One patient showed a proximal endoleak type I, which was treated successfully by an additional stent-graft procedure. Secondary success rate was 100 per cent. The mortality rate was 0 per cent. Two additional stent-graft procedures were performed due to type I endoleaks after 18 and 28 months. There was no other intervention-related morbidity or mortality during the mean follow-up time of 26.4 months' (range, 6-86). Endovascular stent-graft repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries is a safe, effective, and low-morbidity alternative to open thoracic surgery and has promising midterm results.

  2. Uniextrapedicular kyphoplasty for the treatment of thoracic osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhaohui; Ma, Rong; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Huiyong; Ding, Huiqiang; Liang, Siming; Suo, Zhigang

    2013-08-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures are common and cause pain and disability. Most osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures occur in the lower thoracic and thoracolumbar spine. Percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty through a transpedicular approach is a classic procedure performed to treat osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. However, due to the slender morphology of the pedicles, small pedicle size, and the angular severity of thoracic kyphosis, performing kyphoplasty in middle and high thoracic levels is technically challenging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of single-balloon kyphoplasty for the treatment of thoracic osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures via an extrapedicular approach. Between July 2004 and May 2008, thirty-eight patients with thoracic osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures underwent percutaneous kyphoplasty via a unilateral extrapedicular approach. Average patient age was 60.3 years. Symptomatic levels ranged from T4 to T12. All affected vertebrae were identified via physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and radiographs. Pain relief, vertebral height restoration, and kyphosis correction were compared pre- and postoperatively using the visual analog scale and radiographs. The operation was successful in all patients. Average injected bone cement volume was 3.2±1.4 mL. Mean follow-up was 9.5 months. Visual analog scale pain score improved in 36 of 38 patients postoperatively. Mean visual analog scale pain score was 8.92±0.682 preoperatively and 2.40±0.31 postoperatively and remained at 2.80±0.34 until last follow-up. Mean middle body height correction ratio was 50.9%±34.6%. No lateral wedging was found in the coronal alignment of the treated vertebrae. Three (7.9%) patients sustained cement extravasation with no adverse events. Kyphoplasty through a unilateral extrapedicular approach can achieve convergent and proper cement filling in the affected

  3. Penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign body: can video-assisted thoracic surgery take up the leading role in acute management?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peter S. Y.; Chan, Herman H. M.; Lau, Rainbow W. H.; Capili, Freddie G.; Underwood, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is widely adopted in acute management of patient with thoracic trauma, but its use in penetrating thoracic injuries with retained foreign bodies were rarely reported. We described three of such cases using VATS as the first line approach. Identification of injuries, control of bleeders, clot evacuation, resection of damaged lung parenchyma and safe retrieval of foreign bodies were all performed via complete VATS within short operative time. Patient were uneventfully discharged during early post-operative period. We suggest that, for haemodynamically stable patients, VATS offers a safe and minimally-invasive alternative to conventional thoracotomy for penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign bodies. PMID:27621884

  4. Penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign body: can video-assisted thoracic surgery take up the leading role in acute management?

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter S Y; Chan, Herman H M; Lau, Rainbow W H; Capili, Freddie G; Underwood, Malcolm J; Wan, Innes Y P

    2016-08-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is widely adopted in acute management of patient with thoracic trauma, but its use in penetrating thoracic injuries with retained foreign bodies were rarely reported. We described three of such cases using VATS as the first line approach. Identification of injuries, control of bleeders, clot evacuation, resection of damaged lung parenchyma and safe retrieval of foreign bodies were all performed via complete VATS within short operative time. Patient were uneventfully discharged during early post-operative period. We suggest that, for haemodynamically stable patients, VATS offers a safe and minimally-invasive alternative to conventional thoracotomy for penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign bodies. PMID:27621884

  5. Penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign body: can video-assisted thoracic surgery take up the leading role in acute management?

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter S Y; Chan, Herman H M; Lau, Rainbow W H; Capili, Freddie G; Underwood, Malcolm J; Wan, Innes Y P

    2016-08-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is widely adopted in acute management of patient with thoracic trauma, but its use in penetrating thoracic injuries with retained foreign bodies were rarely reported. We described three of such cases using VATS as the first line approach. Identification of injuries, control of bleeders, clot evacuation, resection of damaged lung parenchyma and safe retrieval of foreign bodies were all performed via complete VATS within short operative time. Patient were uneventfully discharged during early post-operative period. We suggest that, for haemodynamically stable patients, VATS offers a safe and minimally-invasive alternative to conventional thoracotomy for penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign bodies.

  6. Penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign body: can video-assisted thoracic surgery take up the leading role in acute management?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peter S. Y.; Chan, Herman H. M.; Lau, Rainbow W. H.; Capili, Freddie G.; Underwood, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is widely adopted in acute management of patient with thoracic trauma, but its use in penetrating thoracic injuries with retained foreign bodies were rarely reported. We described three of such cases using VATS as the first line approach. Identification of injuries, control of bleeders, clot evacuation, resection of damaged lung parenchyma and safe retrieval of foreign bodies were all performed via complete VATS within short operative time. Patient were uneventfully discharged during early post-operative period. We suggest that, for haemodynamically stable patients, VATS offers a safe and minimally-invasive alternative to conventional thoracotomy for penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign bodies.

  7. Neurological Manifestations in Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1)–Infected Individuals Without HTLV-1–Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanajura, Davi; Castro, Néviton; Oliveira, Paulo; Neto, Abraão; Muniz, André; Carvalho, Natália B.; Orge, Glória; Santos, Silvane; Glesby, Marshall J.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the agent of HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), observed in up to 5% of infected individuals. Despite low prevalence, many HTLV-1–infected patients who do not fulfill criteria for HAM/TSP present with neurological complaints related to sensory, motor, urinary, or autonomic manifestations. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neurologic manifestations and risk factors associated with these outcomes. Methods. The incidence of HAM/TSP and new signs and neurologic symptoms were computed in a group of patients enrolled in a cohort study. Results. Of 414 subjects, 76 had definite HAM/TSP, 87 had possible or probable HAM/TSP, and 251 subjects had no neurologic manifestation and were selected for analysis. Definite HAM/TSP developed in 5 (1.47%) patients. Follow-up of at least 3 years was achieved in 51% of patients. The incidence rate was computed in 1000 person-years (206 for hand numbness, 187 for feet numbness, 130 for nocturia, and 127 for urgency). Average incidence rate in neurological exam was 76 for leg hyperreflexia, 53 for leg weakness, and 37 for Babinski sign. In the applied Expanded Disability Status Scale, the incidence rate of worsening 1 point was 134 per 1000 person-years. Kaplan–Meier curves stratified by sex and proviral load showed that females and patients with proviral load >50 000 copies/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells had a higher risk of progression. Conclusions. Development of neurological symptoms or signs occurred in up to 30% of asymptomatic subjects during 8 years of follow-up. PMID:25820277

  8. Effect of thoracic and cervical joint mobilization on pulmonary function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sang-Hun; Bang, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to conduct thoracic and cervical mobilization in stroke patients and determine its effects on respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one stroke patients were studied. Subjects were divided into a control group (control group, n=11) who did not undergo thoracic and cervical joint mobilization, and an experimental group (thoracic and cervical mobilization group, n=10) who underwent thoracic and cervical joint mobilization. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, well-known indicators of respiratory capabilities, were measured. Peak cough flow was measured as an indicator of cough capability. [Results] After the exercise, respiratory function in the thoracic and cervical mobilization group showed statistically significant improvements demonstrated by increases in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and peak cough flow. [Conclusion] The findings indicate that thoracic and cervical mobilization can improve the thoracic movements of stroke patients resulting in improved pulmonary function. PMID:26957769

  9. Radiographic detection of thoracic lesions in adult cows: A retrospective study of 42 cases (1995–2002)

    PubMed Central

    Masseau, Isabelle; Fecteau, Gilles; Breton, Luc; Hélie, Pierre; Beauregard, Guy; Blond, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Medical records of 42 cows that underwent both thoracic radiographic and postmortem examinations within a period of 7 days were reviewed to develop an evaluation grid to interpret bovine thoracic radiographs and to determine the sensitivity and the specificity of thoracic radiographs for detection of thoracic lesions, based on postmortem examination. Most cows (64%) had clinical signs of respiratory disease, whereas 19% showed signs of cardiac problems. The sensitivity and specificity of radiographs for identifying cows with thoracic lesions were 94% and 50%, respectively. In this study, with a prevalence of thoracic lesions of 86%, the positive- and negative-predictive values were 92% and 57%, respectively. This study provides an evaluation grid that allows standardization of the reading of bovine thoracic radiographs and the identification of most thoracic lesions. Bovine thoracic radiographs are useful in detecting thoracic lesions in cows. PMID:18390098

  10. Computed tomography in cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy: visualisation of structures, myelographic comparison, cord measurements and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; du Boulay, G H; Stevens, J M; Kendall, B E

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-nine patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), radiculopathy (CSR), or both (CSMR) were studied with computed tomography (CT). Computer-assisted myelography (CAM) accurately determines the site and nature of spondylotic protrusions and provides good visualisation of the subarachnoid space and cord deformities even in areas with dilute metrizamide. However, excessive vertebral movement and bulging ligamenta flava with their effects on cord deformity, so easily visualised in myelograms, are completely or partially missed. In the assessment of CSM, metrizamide myelography (MM) followed by CAM should be performed, particularly when the myelographic images are unsatisfactory due to contrast dilution or blockage, when cord compression cannot be ascertained with MM and when cord atrophy is suspected. In CSR, the diagnostic information from MM and CAM is comparable. The diagnostic criteria in CAM are, however, less direct and since MM is adequate in uncomplicated cases, CAM is generally not necessary. The APD, APD/TD ratio, area and circularity are sensitive indices of cord deformity and the first two should be used more often to assist visual assessment of cord deformity. The relation between cord parameters and treatment response is better reflected in CSM cases managed conservatively and the results suggest that the degree of cord deformity is helpful in determining the outcome and hence the choice between surgical and conservative treatment. In plain CT, the osteophytes and calcified discs are adequately visualised and canal dimensions measured with accuracy, but the cervical cord and roots cannot be properly assessed and the diagnosis of CSM or CSR cannot be ascertained. At present, its role in cervical spondylosis is therefore limited.

  11. Use of multivariate linear regression and support vector regression to predict functional outcome after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Haydn; Lee, Sunghoon I; Garst, Jordan H; Lu, Derek S; Li, Charles H; Nagasawa, Daniel T; Ghalehsari, Nima; Jahanforouz, Nima; Razaghy, Mehrdad; Espinal, Marie; Ghavamrezaii, Amir; Paak, Brian H; Wu, Irene; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Lu, Daniel C

    2015-09-01

    This study introduces the use of multivariate linear regression (MLR) and support vector regression (SVR) models to predict postoperative outcomes in a cohort of patients who underwent surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Currently, predicting outcomes after surgery for CSM remains a challenge. We recruited patients who had a diagnosis of CSM and required decompressive surgery with or without fusion. Fine motor function was tested preoperatively and postoperatively with a handgrip-based tracking device that has been previously validated, yielding mean absolute accuracy (MAA) results for two tracking tasks (sinusoidal and step). All patients completed Oswestry disability index (ODI) and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association questionnaires preoperatively and postoperatively. Preoperative data was utilized in MLR and SVR models to predict postoperative ODI. Predictions were compared to the actual ODI scores with the coefficient of determination (R(2)) and mean absolute difference (MAD). From this, 20 patients met the inclusion criteria and completed follow-up at least 3 months after surgery. With the MLR model, a combination of the preoperative ODI score, preoperative MAA (step function), and symptom duration yielded the best prediction of postoperative ODI (R(2)=0.452; MAD=0.0887; p=1.17 × 10(-3)). With the SVR model, a combination of preoperative ODI score, preoperative MAA (sinusoidal function), and symptom duration yielded the best prediction of postoperative ODI (R(2)=0.932; MAD=0.0283; p=5.73 × 10(-12)). The SVR model was more accurate than the MLR model. The SVR can be used preoperatively in risk/benefit analysis and the decision to operate. PMID:26115898

  12. Use of multivariate linear regression and support vector regression to predict functional outcome after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Haydn; Lee, Sunghoon Ivan; Garst, Jordan H.; Lu, Derek S.; Li, Charles H.; Nagasawa, Daniel T.; Ghalehsari, Nima; Jahanforouz, Nima; Razaghy, Mehrdad; Espinal, Marie; Ghavamrezaii, Amir; Paak, Brian H.; Wu, Irene; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Lu, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    This study introduces the use of multivariate linear regression (MLR) and support vector regression (SVR) models to predict postoperative outcomes in a cohort of patients who underwent surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Currently, predicting outcomes after surgery for CSM remains a challenge. We recruited patients who had a diagnosis of CSM and required decompressive surgery with or without fusion. Fine motor function was tested preoperatively and postoperatively with a handgrip-based tracking device that has been previously validated, yielding mean absolute accuracy (MAA) results for two tracking tasks (sinusoidal and step). All patients completed Oswestry disability index (ODI) and modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association questionnaires preoperatively and postoperatively. Preoperative data was utilized in MLR and SVR models to predict postoperative ODI. Predictions were compared to the actual ODI scores with the coefficient of determination (R2) and mean absolute difference (MAD). From this, 20 patients met the inclusion criteria and completed follow-up at least 3 months after surgery. With the MLR model, a combination of the preoperative ODI score, preoperative MAA (step function), and symptom duration yielded the best prediction of postoperative ODI (R2 = 0.452; MAD = 0.0887; p = 1.17 × 10−3). With the SVR model, a combination of preoperative ODI score, preoperative MAA (sinusoidal function), and symptom duration yielded the best prediction of postoperative ODI (R2 = 0.932; MAD = 0.0283; p = 5.73 × 10−12). The SVR model was more accurate than the MLR model. The SVR can be used preoperatively in risk/benefit analysis and the decision to operate. PMID:26115898

  13. Laminoplasty versus laminectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical myelopathy: a meta-analysis of clinical and radiological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Jaebong; Kang, James D; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Posterior cervical surgery, expansive laminoplasty (EL) or laminectomy followed by fusion (LF), is usually performed in patients with multilevel (≥ 3) cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). However, the superiority of either of these techniques is still open to debate. The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and postoperative kyphosis in patients undergoing EL versus LF by performing a meta-analysis. METHODS Included in the meta-analysis were all studies of EL versus LF in adults with multilevel CSM in MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane library. A random-effects model was applied to pool data using the mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes, such as the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) grade, the cervical curvature index (CCI), and the visual analog scale (VAS) score for neck pain. RESULTS Seven studies comprising 302 and 290 patients treated with EL and LF, respectively, were included in the final analyses. Both treatment groups showed slight cervical lordosis and moderate neck pain in the baseline state. Both groups were similarly improved in JOA grade (MD 0.09, 95% CI -0.37 to 0.54, p = 0.07) and neck pain VAS score (MD -0.33, 95% CI -1.50 to 0.84, p = 0.58). Both groups evenly lost cervical lordosis. In the LF group lordosis seemed to be preserved in long-term follow-up studies, although the difference between the 2 treatment groups was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS Both EL and LF lead to clinical improvement and loss of lordosis evenly. There is no evidence to support EL over LF in the treatment of multilevel CSM. Any superiority between EL and LF remains in question, although the LF group shows favorable long-term results.

  14. Patient safety in thoracic surgery and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons checklist

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Improving patient safety seems to be a new interesting clinical subject but, in fact, it is no new. It has to do with one of the oldest ethical principles of our profession: curing and not harming. The important research that has been done in a short period of time has brought in new insight to this complex area that is fast developing. The creation of safety managing systems will allow coordinating efforts from very different, although complementary, areas to create real safety culture and safety climate in every organization. In the surgical settings, teamwork is basic to provide good quality of care. Safety leaders in every team have an important role in establishing priorities, summarizing proposals, coordinating efforts, launching new initiatives and transmitting that safety efforts are worth taken. Preparedness and anticipation are key points for avoiding most of the diverse types of patient harm that can occur. As has been published, a great number of errors can be avoided simply using crosscheck based on specialized checklist that reviews every important detail of the procedure. This strategy has been demonstrated very useful at other high risk industries such as aviation, nuclear or food management. The Safe Surgery Saves Lives program launched in 2002 by the WHO has taught us that improvement is possible using a simple checklist. More complex and detail checklist can be more adequate for more complex procedures and settings. The proposed ESTS checklist reviews different areas of possible error in deeper detail allowing the finest adjustment of the patient before the skin incision. It has been recently released to the general thoracic community and monitors its use and usefulness has to be warrantied. PMID:25984360

  15. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb's angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=-0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer.

  16. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb’s angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=−0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer. PMID:26834376

  17. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb's angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=-0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer. PMID:26834376

  18. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report 2015. Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darcy E; Cardoso, Wellington V; Gilpin, Sarah E; Majka, Susan; Ott, Harald; Randell, Scott H; Thébaud, Bernard; Waddell, Thomas; Weiss, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine, in collaboration with the NHLBI, Alpha-1 Foundation, American Thoracic Society, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, European Respiratory Society, International Society for Cellular Therapy, and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," held July 27 to 30, 2015, at the University of Vermont. The conference objectives were to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are all rapidly expanding areas of study that both provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. This 10th anniversary conference was a follow up to five previous biennial conferences held at the University of Vermont in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Each of those conferences, also sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, and respiratory disease foundations, has been important in helping guide research and funding priorities. The major conference recommendations are summarized at the end of the report and highlight both the significant progress and major challenges in these rapidly progressing fields. PMID:27509163

  19. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel J; Chambers, Daniel; Giangreco, Adam; Keating, Armand; Kotton, Darrell; Lelkes, Peter I; Wagner, Darcy E; Prockop, Darwin J

    2015-04-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine and the Vermont Lung Center, in collaboration with the NHLBI, Alpha-1 Foundation, American Thoracic Society, European Respiratory Society, International Society for Cell Therapy, and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," held July 29 to August 1, 2013 at the University of Vermont. The conference objectives were to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are all rapidly expanding areas of study that both provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. This conference was a follow-up to four previous biennial conferences held at the University of Vermont in 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011. Each of those conferences, also sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, and Respiratory Disease Foundations, has been important in helping guide research and funding priorities. The major conference recommendations are summarized at the end of the report and highlight both the significant progress and major challenges in these rapidly progressing fields.

  20. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report 2015. Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darcy E; Cardoso, Wellington V; Gilpin, Sarah E; Majka, Susan; Ott, Harald; Randell, Scott H; Thébaud, Bernard; Waddell, Thomas; Weiss, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine, in collaboration with the NHLBI, Alpha-1 Foundation, American Thoracic Society, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, European Respiratory Society, International Society for Cellular Therapy, and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," held July 27 to 30, 2015, at the University of Vermont. The conference objectives were to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are all rapidly expanding areas of study that both provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. This 10th anniversary conference was a follow up to five previous biennial conferences held at the University of Vermont in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Each of those conferences, also sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, and respiratory disease foundations, has been important in helping guide research and funding priorities. The major conference recommendations are summarized at the end of the report and highlight both the significant progress and major challenges in these rapidly progressing fields.

  1. Thoracic outlet syndrome caused by synostosis of the first and second thoracic ribs: 2 case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reidler, Jay S; Das De, Soumen; Schreiber, Joseph J; Schneider, Darren B; Wolfe, Scott W

    2014-12-01

    We present 2 cases of combined arterial and neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome triggered by trauma in patients with congenital synostoses of the first and second ribs. These patients were successfully treated with supraclavicular resection of the first and second ribs and scalenectomy. We review these cases and the associated literature on thoracic outlet syndrome and rib synostosis.

  2. Image segmentation and registration algorithm to collect thoracic skeleton semilandmarks for characterization of age and sex-based thoracic morphology variation.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Ashley A; Nguyen, Callistus M; Schoell, Samantha L; Maldjian, Joseph A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-12-01

    Thoracic anthropometry variations with age and sex have been reported and likely relate to thoracic injury risk and outcome. The objective of this study was to collect a large volume of homologous semilandmark data from the thoracic skeleton for the purpose of quantifying thoracic morphology variations for males and females of ages 0-100 years. A semi-automated image segmentation and registration algorithm was applied to collect homologous thoracic skeleton semilandmarks from 343 normal computed tomography (CT) scans. Rigid, affine, and symmetric diffeomorphic transformations were used to register semilandmarks from an atlas to homologous locations in the subject-specific coordinate system. Homologous semilandmarks were successfully collected from 92% (7077) of the ribs and 100% (187) of the sternums included in the study. Between 2700 and 11,000 semilandmarks were collected from each rib and sternum and over 55 million total semilandmarks were collected from all subjects. The extensive landmark data collected more fully characterizes thoracic skeleton morphology across ages and sexes. Characterization of thoracic morphology with age and sex may help explain variations in thoracic injury risk and has important implications for vulnerable populations such as pediatrics and the elderly.

  3. Bilateral Thoracic Ganglion Cyst : A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kazanci, Burak; Tehli, Ozkan; Guclu, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts usually arise from the tissues around the facet joints. It is usually associated with degenerative cahanges in facet joints. Bilateral thoracic ganglion cysts are very rare and there is no previous case that located in bilateral intervertebral foramen compressing the L1 nerve root associated with severe radiculopathy. We report a 53 years old woman who presented with bilateral groin pain and severe numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cystic mass in the intervertebral foramen between 12th thoracal and 1st lumbar vertebrae. The cystic lesions were removed after bilateral exposure of Th12-L1 foramens. The result of hystopathology confirmed the diagnosis as ganglion cyst. The ganglion cyst may compromise lumbar dorsal ganglion when it located in the intervertebral foramen. The surgeon should keep this rare entity in their mind for differential diagnosis. PMID:23908708

  4. Photodynamic Therapy in Non-Gastrointestinal Thoracic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Biniam; Hirpara, Dhruvin; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-21

    Photodynamic therapy has a role in the management of early and late thoracic malignancies. It can be used to facilitate minimally-invasive treatment of early endobronchial tumours and also to palliate obstructive and bleeding effects of advanced endobronchial tumours. Photodynamic therapy has been used as a means of downsizing tumours to allow for resection, as well as reducing the extent of resection necessary. It has also been used successfully for minimally-invasive management of local recurrences, which is especially valuable for patients who are not eligible for radiation therapy. Photodynamic therapy has also shown promising results in mesothelioma and pleural-based metastatic disease. As new generation photosensitizers are being developed and tested and methodological issues continue to be addressed, the role of photodynamic therapy in thoracic malignancies continues to evolve.

  5. Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aneurysm with an Intraaortic Occluder

    PubMed Central

    Liotta, Domingo; Frank, L.; Del Rio, M.; Gallo, A.; Navia, J.; Bertolozzi, E.; Bracco, D.; Cesareo, V.

    1987-01-01

    Elective treatment of descending thoracic aneurysms involves direct surgery, with Dacron graft replacement of the diseased aortic segment. When the patient's condition contraindicates major surgery, however, the surgeon should consider using an extraanatomic approach—implanting an ascending aorta-to-abdominal aorta Dacron bypass graft in a ventral position and leaving the diseased segment undisturbed. After such a procedure, the descending thoracic aorta must be excluded from the normal circulation. For this purpose, we have designed an intraaortic occluding technique in which an umbrella-like device is implanted immediately distal to the left subclavian artery. This technique has proved safe and uncomplicated in canine experiments and is ready for clinical trials. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1987; 14:196-205) Images PMID:15229741

  6. Endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter H; Huynh, Tam T; Kougias, Panagiotis; Wall, Mathew J; Coselli, Joseph S; Mattox, Kenneth L

    2008-08-01

    Blunt trauma to the thoracic aorta is life-threatening, with instant fatality in at least 75% of victims. If left untreated, nearly half of those who survive the initial injury will die within the first 24 hours. Surgical repair has been the standard treatment of blunt aortic injury, but immediate operative intervention is frequently difficult due to concomitant injuries. Although endovascular treatment of traumatic aortic disruption is less invasive than conventional repair via thoracotomy, this strategy remains controversial in young patients due to anatomical considerations and device limitations. This article reviews the likely advantages of endovascular interventions for blunt thoracic aortic injuries. Potential limitations and clinical outcomes of this minimally invasive technique are also discussed.

  7. Palmar hyperhidrosis CT guided chemical percutaneous thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Adler, O B; Engel, A; Rosenberger, A; Dondelinger, R

    1990-10-01

    Palmar hyperhidrosis or excessive sweating of the hands causes, to those affected, emotional and physical disturbance and impediment in professional and social life. The cause is unknown. Sweat glands are innervated by the sympathetic chain of the autonomous nervous system. The center of sympathetic regulation of the upper extremities is located between the segments of D.2-D.9 of the spinal cord. Accepted treatment consists of surgery aimed to excise the third thoracic sympathetic ganglion. Besides the surgical procedure as such, and its complications, there are complications inherent to the excision of the ganglion. These are Horner's syndrome, compensatory sweating in other parts of the body, and recurrence of sweating. CT guided chemical percutaneous thoracic sympathectomy presents an alternative, which in the event of failure does not prevent ensuing surgery. The preliminary experience with this procedure in 50 patients is presented and discussed.

  8. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-11-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  9. Thoracic Endometriosis Syndrome: A Veritable Pandora’s Box

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Jayashree

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endometriosis syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in pleura, lung parenchyma, airways, and/or encompasses mainly four clinical entities–catamenial pneumothorax, catamenial haemothorax, catamenial haemoptysis and lung nodules. The cases were studied retrospectively by reviewing the records at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, for duration of five years i.e., form March 2010-2014 and analysed for the clinical presentation and management of thoracic endometriosis syndrome. Catamenial breathlessness was the main symptom. Pneumothorax and pleural effusion were the findings on investigations. Histopathology report of endometriosis was present in three cases (50%). Conditions with excess oestrogen like endometriosis, fibroid, adenomyosis were diagnosed in these patients by pelvic scan. After the initial supportive treatment with hormones, pleurodesis, hysterectomy and lung decortication were the treatment modalities. Two cases that had multiple recurrences were diagnosed as disseminated TES. They underwent combined treatment of surgery and hormones. PMID:27190904

  10. [Prevention and treatment of intraoperative complications of thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Lampl, L

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve a minimal complication rate there is a need for a comprehensive strategy. This means in the first line preventive steps which include patient positioning, suitable approaches and access, an appropriately qualified surgical team as well as a carefully planned dissection and preparation. Furthermore, a supply of additional instrumentation, such as thrombectomy catheters, special vascular clamps and even extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and a heart-lung machine (HLM) in cases of centrally located lesions should be on stand-by. Control instruments, such as a bronchoscope and esophagoscope should not be forgotten. In selected cases a preoperative embolization (vascular malformation) or cream swallow (thoracic duct injury) can be helpful. Special interventions to overcome complications arising are described for the chest wall, lung parenchyma, pulmonary vessels, great vessels, bronchial arteries, trachea and bronchi, esophagus, thoracic duct, heart, vertebral column and sternum corresponding to the topography.

  11. Photodynamic Therapy in Non-Gastrointestinal Thoracic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Biniam; Hirpara, Dhruvin; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy has a role in the management of early and late thoracic malignancies. It can be used to facilitate minimally-invasive treatment of early endobronchial tumours and also to palliate obstructive and bleeding effects of advanced endobronchial tumours. Photodynamic therapy has been used as a means of downsizing tumours to allow for resection, as well as reducing the extent of resection necessary. It has also been used successfully for minimally-invasive management of local recurrences, which is especially valuable for patients who are not eligible for radiation therapy. Photodynamic therapy has also shown promising results in mesothelioma and pleural-based metastatic disease. As new generation photosensitizers are being developed and tested and methodological issues continue to be addressed, the role of photodynamic therapy in thoracic malignancies continues to evolve. PMID:26805818

  12. Single-Port Thoracic Surgery: A New Direction

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Calvin S. H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has slowly established itself as an alternate surgical approach for the treatment of an increasingly wide range of thoracic conditions. The potential benefits of fewer surgical incisions, better cosmesis, and less postoperative pain and paraesthesia have led to the technique’s popularity worldwide. The limited single small incision through which the surgeon has to operate poses challenges that are slowly being addressed by improvements in instrument design. Of note, instruments and video-camera systems that are narrower and angulated have made single-port VATS major lung resection easier to perform and learn. In the future, we may see the development of subcostal or embryonic natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery access, evolution in anaesthesia strategies, and cross-discipline imaging-assisted lesion localization for single-port VATS procedures. PMID:25207240

  13. Primary Intradural Extramedullary Spinal Melanoma in the Lower Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Kathrin; Bresch, Anke; Lobsien, Donald; Mueller, Wolf; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Seidel, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Background Context. Up to date, only four cases of primary intradural extramedullary spinal cord melanoma (PIEM) have been reported. No previous reports have described a case of PIEM located in the lower thoracic spine with long-term follow-up. Purpose. Demonstrating an unusual, extremely rare case of melanoma manifestation. Study Design. Case report. Methods. We report a case of a 57-year-old female suffering from increasing lower extremity pain, left-sided paresis, and paraesthesia due to spinal cord compression caused by PIEM in the lower thoracic spine. Results. Extensive investigation excluded other possible primary melanoma sites and metastases. For spinal cord decompression, the tumor at level T12 was resected, yet incompletely. Adjuvant radiotherapy was administered two weeks after surgery. The patient was recurrence-free at 104 weeks after radiotherapy but presents with unchanged neurological symptoms. Conclusion. Primary intradural extramedullary melanoma (PIEM) is extremely rare and its clinical course is unpredictable. PMID:27127667

  14. The history of surgery of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Cooley, D A

    1999-11-01

    Until the late 19th century, treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms relied on ligation of the parent vessel or introduction of foreign materials to promote coagulation or fibrosis. A major breakthrough occurred in 1888, when Rudolph Matas reported an internal repair technique known as endoaneurysmorrhaphy. In this approach, the clot was excised from the aneurysmal sac, and the orifices of the arteries that entered the sac were sutured from within, reestablishing continuous blood flow. At the beginning of the 20th century, Alexis Carrel and Charles Guthrie began to lay the foundation for modern vascular anastomotic techniques. Although isolated successes were reported, optimal treatment of thoracic aortic disease awaited the development of reliable synthetic grafts in the 1950s and 1960s. During the past 15 years, the treatment goal has reverted to endoaneurysmorrhaphy, involving the use of a suitable graft to restore aortic continuity. PMID:10589335

  15. Clinical outcome and prognosis of carbon ion radiotherapy on thoracic malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha

    Objective To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and side-response of high-LET carbon ion radiotherapy on thoracic malignant tumors. Methods Ten patients with pathological confirmed thoracic malignant tumors received treatment using heavy ion accelerator, which included 6 cases with non-small lung cancer, one case with small lung cancer, 2 cases with metastatic sarcomas and one case with invasive thymoma. The applied regimen included fractioned dose (5.5-6.8GyE/Fraction), one faction/day, and 7 fractions/week. The total dose ranged from 55 to 70 GyE. Results The short-term results showed that the response rate (the complete response (CR) rate +the partial response (PR) rate) was 10% at the first month, 40% at the third month and 90% at the sixth month. The overall response rate was 90% and the rate of stable disease was 10%. There was no relation between the response rate and tumor pathology (P>0.05) while significance between the response rate and the tumor volume.At median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6 to 36 months), the local control rate and free-disease rate were respectively 100% an 90% at the first year, 90% and 80% at the secondary year, 80% and 70% at the third year. The death rate due to disease progression was 20% and the non-specific death rate was 10%. Side and toxicity effects: Grade I skin effect occurred in three cases and Grade I lung effect occurred in two cases. The blood counts didn’t reach significance among pre-radiation course, peri-radiation course and post-radiation course (P>0.05). The subgoups of T cells detected in humoral immunity and cytoimmunity didn’t change between pre-radiation and post radiation(P>0.05). Conclusions Carbon ion radiotherapy is effective and safe in the management of patients with thoracic malignant tumors. There were no obvious side effects. The long term of clinical outcome and the late effect need to be further observed.

  16. Long-term sequelae following blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Yeo, T P

    2001-01-01

    People experiencing blunt thoracic trauma may sustain multiple rib fractures, flail chest, cardiac or pulmonary contusions, injury to the great vessels, sternal fractures, clavicular fractures, neck injuries, and lacerations of the liver and/or spleen. Long-term sequelae from blunt chest trauma include chest wall deformities, persistent dyspnea, and cardiac, neurologic, or esophageal complications. Chronic pain, depression, and loss of functional status are also frequent components of recovery from trauma. PMID:12025303

  17. Immediate effects of upper thoracic spine manipulation on hypertensive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John; Tyer, Ken; Coats, Jesse; Williams, Gabbrielle; Kulcak, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine if there were any statistically significant immediate effects of upper thoracic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) on cardiovascular physiology in hypertensive individuals. Introduction: Preliminary research suggests that SMT to various regions of the spine may be capable of lowering systolic and diastolic blood pressure in hypertensive individuals. Further studies are warranted to corroborate or refute these findings as well as measure how other attributes of cardiovascular physiology are impacted by SMT. Methods: Fifty hypertensive participants (age = 45.5±13.9 years, height = 1.69±0.10 m, body mass = 93.9±21.5 kg: mean±standard deviation (SD)) were equally randomized into a single-blind, controlled trial involving two study groups: supine diversified anterior upper thoracic SMT of T1–4, or a ‘no T-spine contact’ control. Outcome measures were electrocardiogram, bilateral pulse oximetry, and bilateral blood pressure measurement performed at baseline, post 1-minute intervention, and post 10-minute intervention. An independent samples t-test was used to compare between-group differences at baseline. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare within-group changes over time. Results: Within-group changes in PR interval and QRS duration demonstrated that the atria were transiently less active post-SMT and the ventricles were more active post-SMT, however the changes were clinically minimal. Conclusion: The results of this study, and the limited existing normotensive, thoracic-specific SMT research in this field, suggest that cardiovascular physiology, short-term, is not affected by upper thoracic spine SMT in hypertensive individuals to a clinically relevant level. PMID:26309381

  18. Calibration of high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taekhee; Thorpe, Andrew; Cauda, Emanuele; Harper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    High flow rate respirable size selective samplers, GK4.126 and FSP10 cyclones, were calibrated for thoracic-size selective sampling in two different laboratories. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) utilized monodisperse ammonium fluorescein particles and scanning electron microscopy to determine the aerodynamic particle size of the monodisperse aerosol. Fluorescein intensity was measured to determine sampling efficiencies of the cyclones. The Health Safety and Laboratory (HSL) utilized a real time particle sizing instrument (Aerodynamic Particle Sizer) and poly-disperse glass sphere particles and particle size distributions between the cyclone and reference sampler were compared. Sampling efficiency of the cyclones were compared to the thoracic convention defined by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)/Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN)/International Standards Organization (ISO). The GK4.126 cyclone showed minimum bias compared to the thoracic convention at flow rates of 3.5 l min−1 (NIOSH) and 2.7–3.3 l min−1 (HSL) and the difference may be from the use of different test systems. In order to collect the most dust and reduce the limit of detection, HSL suggested using the upper end in range (3.3 l min−1). A flow rate of 3.4 l min−1 would be a reasonable compromise, pending confirmation in other laboratories. The FSP10 cyclone showed minimum bias at the flow rate of 4.0 l min−1 in the NIOSH laboratory test. The high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers might be used for higher sample mass collection in order to meet analytical limits of quantification. PMID:26891196

  19. Calibration of high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taekhee; Thorpe, Andrew; Cauda, Emanuele; Harper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    High flow rate respirable size selective samplers, GK4.126 and FSP10 cyclones, were calibrated for thoracic-size selective sampling in two different laboratories. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) utilized monodisperse ammonium fluorescein particles and scanning electron microscopy to determine the aerodynamic particle size of the monodisperse aerosol. Fluorescein intensity was measured to determine sampling efficiencies of the cyclones. The Health Safety and Laboratory (HSL) utilized a real time particle sizing instrument (Aerodynamic Particle Sizer) and polydisperse glass sphere particles and particle size distributions between the cyclone and reference sampler were compared. Sampling efficiency of the cyclones were compared to the thoracic convention defined by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)/Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN)/International Standards Organization (ISO). The GK4.126 cyclone showed minimum bias compared to the thoracic convention at flow rates of 3.5 l min(-1) (NIOSH) and 2.7-3.3 l min(-1) (HSL) and the difference may be from the use of different test systems. In order to collect the most dust and reduce the limit of detection, HSL suggested using the upper end in range (3.3 l min(-1)). A flow rate of 3.4 l min(-1) would be a reasonable compromise, pending confirmation in other laboratories. The FSP10 cyclone showed minimum bias at the flow rate of 4.0 l min(-1) in the NIOSH laboratory test. The high flow rate thoracic-size selective samplers might be used for higher sample mass collection in order to meet analytical limits of quantification. PMID:26891196

  20. The wide spectrum of the asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cortina, H; Beltran, J; Olague, R; Ceres, L; Alonso, A; Lanuza, A

    1979-04-19

    Seven cases of A. T. D. are presented. Radiological findings were extraordinarily diverse. The prognosis of the disease is difficult for each individual case, because of the frequent pulmonary complications and cystic renal lesions are not always directly related to the severity of the bone changes. The authors believe that the term "thoracic-pelvic-phalangeal dysplasia" proposed by Langer, is the most adequate, since it points to the key factors in the diagnosis of the disease. PMID:450492

  1. Acute postoperative shingles after thoracic sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Massad, Malek G; Navarro, Rafael A; Rubeiz, Helene; Kpodonu, Jacques; Karol, Janet; Blacha, Mathew; Evans, Alexander

    2004-12-01

    Shingles secondary to reactivation of a previous varicella-zoster virus infection has been reported to develop within surgical wounds and after trauma. We report the case of a 17-year-old girl with history of chicken pox in childhood who had acute postoperative shingles develop along the T3-T4 dermatomes after thoracic sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis. The possible causes and precipitating factors are discussed. PMID:15561060

  2. Thoracic surgical training in Europe: what has changed recently?

    PubMed Central

    Lerut, Antoon E. M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Training in thoracic surgery (TS) traditionally varies amongst countries in Europe. The theoretical content of the training, the length of training, the amount of self-performed procedures to be done and the definition of training units all differ in European countries. However, in the past two decades, several initiatives were taken to harmonize TS training in Europe. The purpose of this paper is to highlight these initiatives and their impact on today’s TS training in Europe. PMID:27047948

  3. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-09-15

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  4. Acute postoperative shingles after thoracic sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Massad, Malek G; Navarro, Rafael A; Rubeiz, Helene; Kpodonu, Jacques; Karol, Janet; Blacha, Mathew; Evans, Alexander

    2004-12-01

    Shingles secondary to reactivation of a previous varicella-zoster virus infection has been reported to develop within surgical wounds and after trauma. We report the case of a 17-year-old girl with history of chicken pox in childhood who had acute postoperative shingles develop along the T3-T4 dermatomes after thoracic sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis. The possible causes and precipitating factors are discussed.

  5. Effect of Massage on Pain Management for Thoracic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza; Rodgers, Nancy; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Cordes, Mary Ellen; Bauer, Brent; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cha, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Integrative therapies such as massage have gained support as interventions that improve the overall patient experience during hospitalization. Thoracic surgery patients undergo long procedures and commonly have postoperative back, neck, and shoulder pain. Purpose: Given the promising effects of massage therapy for alleviation of pain, we studied the effectiveness and feasibility of massage therapy delivered in the postoperative thoracic surgery setting. Methods: Patients who received massage in the postoperative setting had pain scores evaluated pre and post massage on a rating scale of 0 to 10 (0 = no pain, 10 = worst possible pain). Results: In total, 160 patients completed the pilot study and received massage therapy that was individualized. Patients receiving massage therapy had significantly decreased pain scores after massage (p ≤ .001), and patients’ comments were very favorable. Patients and staff were highly satisfied with having massage therapy available, and no major barriers to implementing massage therapy were identified. Conclusions: Massage therapy may be an important additional pain management component of the healing experience for patients after thoracic surgery. PMID:21847428

  6. Endovascular Repair of Contained Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Robert; Loosemore, Tom; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of stent-grafts for the treatment of acute rupture of the thoracic aorta. Methods: Four patients with acute contained ruptures of the thoracic aorta were treated by insertion of stent-grafts. The underlying aortic lesions were aneurysm, acute aortic ulcer, acute type B dissection and giant cell aortitis. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia in three patients and local anesthesia in one patient. Results: All stent-grafts were successfully deployed. All patients survived the procedure and are now alive and well at follow-up (mean 6.3 months, range 44 days-16 months). One patient underwent a second stent procedure 10 days after the first procedure because of a proximal endoleak. All hemothoraces have resolved. There were no complications. Conclusion:Treatment of acute contained ruptures of the thoracic aorta by the insertion of stent-grafts is feasible. The technical success rates,complication rates and patient survival compare favorably with emergency surgery.

  7. Current readings: Window-of-opportunity trials for thoracic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Anne S

    2014-01-01

    Recent major advances in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer have occurred with the identification of molecular biomarker targets and administration of novel agents with resulting improvement in clinical outcomes. In the early-stage setting, personalized therapy with novel agents and molecular profiling are being incorporated into neoadjuvant "window-of-opportunity" trials. These important studies enable biomarker research and an expedited analysis of the efficacy of the targeted agent. However, there are significant limitations to window-of-opportunity trials. The aim of this article is to review the current window-of-opportunity trials of neoadjuvant targeted agents for thoracic malignancies, discuss the benefits and limitations of these trials, and propose more optimal alternative trial end points. Neoadjuvant trials of resectable non-small cell lung cancer and mesothelioma that are ongoing or under development and relevant to thoracic surgeons are also discussed. The success of these trials will depend on a collaborative multidisciplinary effort, especially from the field of thoracic surgery.

  8. A review of enhanced recovery for thoracic anaesthesia and surgery.

    PubMed

    Jones, N L; Edmonds, L; Ghosh, S; Klein, A A

    2013-02-01

    During the past decade, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of thoracic surgical procedures carried out in the UK. The current financial climate dictates that more efficient use of resources is necessary to meet escalating demands on healthcare. One potential means to achieve this is through the introduction of enhanced recovery protocols, designed to produce productivity savings by driving reduction in length of stay. These have been promoted by government bodies in a number of surgical specialties, including colorectal, gynaecological and orthopaedic surgery. This review focuses on aspects of peri-operative care that might be incorporated into such a programme for thoracic anaesthesia, for which an enhanced recovery programme has not yet been introduced in the UK, and a review of the literature specific to this area of practice has not been published before. We performed a comprehensive search for published work relating to the peri-operative management and optimisation of patients undergoing thoracic surgery, and divided these into appropriate areas of practice. We have reviewed the specific interventions that may be included in an enhanced recovery programme, including: pre-optimisation; minimising fasting time; thrombo-embolic prophylaxis; choice of anaesthetic and analgesic technique and surgical approach; postoperative rehabilitation; and chest drain management. Using the currently available evidence, the design and implementation of an enhanced recovery programme based on this review in selected patients as a package of care may reduce morbidity and length of hospital stay, thus maximising utilisation of available resources. PMID:23121400

  9. Depth of the thoracic epidural space in children.

    PubMed

    Masir, F; Driessen, J J; Thies, K C; Wijnen, M H; van Egmond, J

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia in anaesthetized children requires a meticulous technique and may have an increased success rate when the distance between skin and epidural space is known. The objective of this observational study was to measure the skin to epidural distance (SED) during thoracic epidural puncture in 61 children. The epidural puncture was performed using the loss of resistance technique with saline 0.9%. The distance from the needle tip to the point where the needle emerged from the skin was measured. The post-operative analgesia parameters were also measured. Skin to epidural distance correlated significantly with the age and weight of the children. The equation for the relation between SED (cm) and age was 2.15 + (0.01 x months) and for SED vs weight was 1.95 + (0.045 x kg). Despite considerable variability among individuals, the observed correlation of SED with both age and weight shows that this parameter may be helpful to guide thoracic epidural puncture in anaesthetized children. PMID:17067139

  10. Immediate reduction in temporal sensory summation after thoracic spinal manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D; Beneciuk, Jason M; George, Steven Z

    2011-01-01

    Background Context Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) has shown clinical effectiveness in some patients with musculoskeletal pain. Purpose We performed the current experiment to test whether regional pain modulation is to be expected from thoracic SMT. Study Design/Setting Randomized experimental design performed in a university pain laboratory. Outcome Measures The primary outcome was experimental pain sensitivity in cervical and lumbar innervated area. Methods Ninety healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to receive one of three interventions (SMT, exercise or rest) to the upper thoracic spine. Participants completed questionnaires about pain-related affect and expectations regarding each of the interventions. We collected experimental pain sensitivity measures of cervical and lumbar innervated areas before and immediately after randomly assigned intervention. Mixed-model analysis of co-variance was used to test changes in measures of experimental pain sensitivity. Results No interactions or intervention (group) effects were noted for pressure or A-delta mediated thermal pain responses. Participants receiving SMT had greater reductions in temporal sensory summation (TSS). Conclusions This current study indicates thoracic SMT reduces TSS in healthy subjects. These findings extend our previous work in healthy and clinical subjects by indicating change in the nocioceptive afferent system occurred caudal to the region of SMT application. However, the duration of reduction in TSS is an unknown, and more work needs to be completed in clinical populations for confirm the relevance of these findings. PMID:21463970

  11. Instantaneous Respiratory Estimation from Thoracic Impedance by Empirical Mode Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Tai; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Wang, Chun-Li; Jian, Hung-Ming; Lin, Sheng-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Impedance plethysmography provides a way to measure respiratory activity by sensing the change of thoracic impedance caused by inspiration and expiration. This measurement imposes little pressure on the body and uses the human body as the sensor, thereby reducing the need for adjustments as body position changes and making it suitable for long-term or ambulatory monitoring. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) can decompose a signal into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) that disclose nonstationary components as well as stationary components and, similarly, capture respiratory episodes from thoracic impedance. However, upper-body movements usually produce motion artifacts that are not easily removed by digital filtering. Moreover, large motion artifacts disable the EMD to decompose respiratory components. In this paper, motion artifacts are detected and replaced by the data mirrored from the prior and the posterior before EMD processing. A novel intrinsic respiratory reconstruction index that considers both global and local properties of IMFs is proposed to define respiration-related IMFs for respiration reconstruction and instantaneous respiratory estimation. Based on the experiments performing a series of static and dynamic physical activates, our results showed the proposed method had higher cross correlations between respiratory frequencies estimated from thoracic impedance and those from oronasal airflow based on small window size compared to the Fourier transform-based method. PMID:26198231

  12. [Hemodynamic repercussion of epidural bupivacaine in thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Pérez Gallardo, A; Lajara Montell, A M; Manzanos Luna, A M

    1991-01-01

    Systemic and pulmonary hemodynamic effects of 8 to 10 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine containing 1:200,000 adrenaline administered at the midthoracic level were prospectively assessed in 20 patients (aged 45 +/- 16 years) with thoracic trauma presenting 6 +/- 2 rib fractures and pulmonary contusion of different extent and radiologic density. The study was carried out at comparable evolving times, 24 h after trauma, during the second or third day of treatment, and when the hemodynamic stability of the patient was achieved. Hemodynamic measurements were performed before and 30 min after administration of the analgesic agent using a Swan-Ganz catheter. The results indicate that administration of moderate doses of epidural bupivacaine at the middle thoracic level in patients with normovolemic thoracic traumatism were not followed by alterations in the hemodynamic function except for a slight decrease in systemic arterial and pulmonary pressure. The mean arterial pressure decreased by 8% (p less than 0.05), the cardiac index showed a 4% reduction (p = 0.05), and the mean pulmonary pressure experienced a 14% decrease (p less than 0.05).

  13. Pulmonary Complications following Thoracic Spinal Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Brandon C.; Schnell, Eric C.; Dettori, Joseph R.; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Oskouian, Rod

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objective To determine the frequency of pulmonary effusion, pneumothorax, and hemothorax in adult patients undergoing thoracic corpectomy or osteotomy for any condition and to determine if these frequencies vary by surgical approach (i.e., anterior, posterior, or lateral). Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched through September 21, 2015, to identify studies specifically evaluating the frequency of pulmonary effusion, pneumothorax, and hemothorax in patients undergoing thoracic spine surgery. Results Fourteen studies, 13 retrospective and 1 prospective, met inclusion criteria. The frequency across studies of pulmonary effusion ranged from 0 to 77%; for hemothorax, 0 to 77%; and for pneumothorax, 0 to 50%. There was no clear pattern of pulmonary complications with respect to surgical approach. Conclusions There is insufficient data to determine the risk of pulmonary complications following anterior, posterior, or lateral approaches to the thoracic spine. Methods for assessing pulmonary complications were not well reported, and data is sparse. PMID:27099821

  14. Thoracic epaxial muscles in living archosaurs and ornithopod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Organ, Christopher Lee

    2006-07-01

    Crocodylians possess the same thoracic epaxial muscles as most other saurians, but M. transversospinalis is modified by overlying osteoderms. Compared with crocodylians, the thoracic epaxial muscles of birds are reduced in size, disrupted by the synsacrum, and often modified by intratendinous ossification and the notarium. A phylogenetic perspective is used to determine muscle homologies in living archosaurs (birds and crocodylians), evaluate how the apparent disparity evolved, and reconstruct the thoracic epaxial muscles in ornithopod dinosaurs. The avian modifications of the epaxial musculoskeletal system appear to have coevolved with the synsacrum and notarium. The lattice of ossified tendons in iguanodontoidean dinosaurs (Hadrosauridae and Iguanodontidae) is homologized to M. transversospinalis in crocodylians and M. longus colli dorsalis, pars thoracica in birds. Birds have an arrangement of tendons within M. longus colli dorsalis, pars thoracica identical to that observed in the epaxial ossified tendons of iguanodontoid dinosaurs. Moreover, many birds (such as grebes and turkeys) ossify these tendons, resulting in a two- or three-layered lattice of ossified tendons, a morphology also seen in iguanodontoid dinosaurs. Although the structure of M. transversospinalis appears indistinguishable between birds and iguanodontoid dinosaurs, intratendinous ossification within this epaxial muscle evolved convergently. PMID:16779820

  15. Outcome Measures of Functionality, Social Interaction, and Pain in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Validation Study for the Iranian Version of the Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale

    PubMed Central

    Nayeb Aghaei, Hossein; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad; Mohammadi, Hassan Reza; Alizadeh, Pooyan; Montazeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional. Purpose To translate and validate the Iranian version of the Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale (CNFDS). Overview of Literature Instruments measuring patient-reported outcomes should satisfy certain psychometric properties. Methods Ninety-three cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy were entered into the study and completed the CNFDS pre and postoperatively at the 6 month follow-up. The modified Japanese Orthopedic Association Score was also completed. The internal consistency, test-retest, convergent validity, construct validity (item scale correlation), and responsiveness to change were assessed. Results Mean age of the patients was 54.3 years (standard deviation, 8.9). The Cronbach α coefficient was satisfactory (α=0.84). Test-retest reliability as assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient analysis was 0.95 (95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.98). The modified Japanese Orthopedic Association score correlated strongly with the CNFDS score, lending support to its good convergent validity (r=-0.80; p<0.001). Additionally, the correlation of each item with its hypothesized domain on the CNFDS was acceptable, suggesting that the items had a substantial relationship with their own domains. These results also indicate that the instrument was responsive to change (p<0.0001). Conclusions The findings suggest that the Iranian version of the CNFDS is a valid measure to assess functionality, social interaction, and pain among patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. PMID:26713123

  16. Clinically relevant variants identified in thoracic aortic aneurysm patients by research exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Jeffrey A; Landis, Benjamin J; Shikany, Amy R; Hinton, Robert B; Ware, Stephanie M

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a genetically heterogeneous disease involving subclinical and progressive dilation of the thoracic aorta, which can lead to life-threatening complications such as dissection or rupture. Genetic testing is important for risk stratification and identification of at risk family members, and clinically available genetic testing panels have been expanding rapidly. However, when past testing results are normal, there is little evidence to guide decision-making about the indications and timing to pursue additional clinical genetic testing. Results from research based genetic testing can help inform this process. Here we present 10 TAA patients who have a family history of disease and who enrolled in research-based exome testing. Nine of these ten patients had previous clinical genetic testing that did not identify the cause of disease. We sought to determine the number of rare variants in 23 known TAA associated genes identified by research-based exome testing. In total, we found 10 rare variants in six patients. Likely pathogenic variants included a TGFB2 variant in one patient and a SMAD3 variant in another. These variants have been reported previously in individuals with similar phenotypes. Variants of uncertain significance of particular interest included novel variants in MYLK and MFAP5, which were identified in a third patient. In total, clinically reportable rare variants were found in 6/10 (60%) patients, with at least 2/10 (20%) patients having likely pathogenic variants identified. These data indicate that consideration of re-testing is important in TAA patients with previous negative or inconclusive results. PMID:26854089

  17. Awake video-assisted thoracic surgery in acute infectious pulmonary destruction

    PubMed Central

    Egorov, Vladimir; Deynega, Igor; Ionov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Background Many of thoracic minimally invasive interventions have been proven to be possible without general anesthesia. This article presents results of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) application under local anesthesia in patients with lung abscesses and discusses its indications in detail. Methods The study involved prospective analysis of treatment outcomes for all acute infectious pulmonary destruction (AIPD) patients undergoing VATS under local anesthesia and sedation since January 1, 2010, till December 31, 2013. Patients with pulmonary destruction cavity at periphery of large size (>5 cm) underwent non-intubated video abscessoscopy (NIVAS). Patients with pyopneumothorax (lung abscess penetration into pleural cavity) underwent non-intubated video thoracoscopy (NIVTS). Indications for NIVAS and NIVTS were as follows: cavity debridement and washing, necrotic sequestra removal, adhesion split, biopsy. All interventions were done under local anesthesia and sedation without trachea intubation and epidural anesthesia. Results Sixty-five enrolled patients had 42 NIVAS and 32 NIVTS interventions, nine patients underwent two surgeries. None of the patients required trachea intubation or epidural anesthesia. In none of our cases with conversion to thoracotomy was required. Post-surgical complications developed after 11 interventions (13%): subcutaneous emphysema (five cases), chest wall phlegmon (three cases), pulmonary bleeding (two cases), and pneumothorax (one case). One patient died due to the main disease progression. In 50 patients NIVAS and NIVTS were done within 5 to 8 days after abscess/pleural cavity draining, while in other 15 patients—immediately prior to draining; both pulmonary bleeding episodes and all cases of chest wall phlegmon took place in the latter group. Conclusions NIVAS and NIVTS under local anesthesia and sedation are well tolerated by patients, safe and should be used more often in AIPD cases. Timing of NIVAS and NIVTS procedures

  18. Lymph flow pattern in the intact thoracic duct in sheep.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, M; Flatebø, T; Nicolaysen, G

    1997-08-15

    1. To study the lymph flow dynamics in the intact thoracic duct, we applied an ultrasound transit-time flow probe in seven anaesthetized and four unanaesthetized adult sheep (approximately 60 kg). In unanaesthetized non-fasting animals we found that lymph flow in the thoracic duct was always regular pulsatile (pulsation frequency, 5.2 +/- 0.8 min-1) with no relation to heart or respiratory activity. At baseline the peak level of the thoracic duct pulse flow was 11.6-20.7 ml min-1 with a nadir of 0-3.6 ml min-1. Mean lymph flow was 5.4 +/- 3.1 ml min-1. The flow pattern of lymph in the thoracic duct was essentially the same in the anaesthetized animals. 2. In both the anaesthetized and unanaesthetized animals, the lymph flow response to a stepwise increase in the outflow venous pressure showed interindividual variation. Some were sensitive to any increase in outflow venous pressure, but others were resistant in that lymph flow did not decrease until outflow venous pressure was increased to higher levels. This resistance was also observed in the high lymph flow condition produced by fluid infusion in the anaesthetized animal and mechanical constriction of the caudal vena cava in the unaesthetized animals. Pulsation frequency of the thoracic duct flow initially increased and then decreased with a stepwise increase in the outflow venous pressure. This initial increase might be a compensatory response to maintain lymph flow against elevated outflow venous pressure. 3. To test the effect of long-term outflow venous pressure elevation in unanaesthetized sheep, outflow venous pressure was increased by inflation of a cuff around the cranial vena cava for 1, 5 or 25 h. The cuff was inflated to a level where lymph flow was reduced. Lymph flow remained low or decreased further during the entire cuff-inflation period. We calculated the lymph debt caused by the outflow venous pressure elevation and the amount 'repaid' when venous pressure returned to normal. Lymph debt for 25 h

  19. Lymph flow pattern in the intact thoracic duct in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Onizuka, M; Flatebø, T; Nicolaysen, G

    1997-01-01

    1. To study the lymph flow dynamics in the intact thoracic duct, we applied an ultrasound transit-time flow probe in seven anaesthetized and four unanaesthetized adult sheep (approximately 60 kg). In unanaesthetized non-fasting animals we found that lymph flow in the thoracic duct was always regular pulsatile (pulsation frequency, 5.2 +/- 0.8 min-1) with no relation to heart or respiratory activity. At baseline the peak level of the thoracic duct pulse flow was 11.6-20.7 ml min-1 with a nadir of 0-3.6 ml min-1. Mean lymph flow was 5.4 +/- 3.1 ml min-1. The flow pattern of lymph in the thoracic duct was essentially the same in the anaesthetized animals. 2. In both the anaesthetized and unanaesthetized animals, the lymph flow response to a stepwise increase in the outflow venous pressure showed interindividual variation. Some were sensitive to any increase in outflow venous pressure, but others were resistant in that lymph flow did not decrease until outflow venous pressure was increased to higher levels. This resistance was also observed in the high lymph flow condition produced by fluid infusion in the anaesthetized animal and mechanical constriction of the caudal vena cava in the unaesthetized animals. Pulsation frequency of the thoracic duct flow initially increased and then decreased with a stepwise increase in the outflow venous pressure. This initial increase might be a compensatory response to maintain lymph flow against elevated outflow venous pressure. 3. To test the effect of long-term outflow venous pressure elevation in unanaesthetized sheep, outflow venous pressure was increased by inflation of a cuff around the cranial vena cava for 1, 5 or 25 h. The cuff was inflated to a level where lymph flow was reduced. Lymph flow remained low or decreased further during the entire cuff-inflation period. We calculated the lymph debt caused by the outflow venous pressure elevation and the amount 'repaid' when venous pressure returned to normal. Lymph debt for 25 h

  20. Thoracic and respirable particle definitions for human health risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Particle size-selective sampling refers to the collection of particles of varying sizes that potentially reach and adversely affect specific regions of the respiratory tract. Thoracic and respirable fractions are defined as the fraction of inhaled particles capable of passing beyond the larynx and ciliated airways, respectively, during inhalation. In an attempt to afford greater protection to exposed individuals, current size-selective sampling criteria overestimate the population means of particle penetration into regions of the lower respiratory tract. The purpose of our analyses was to provide estimates of the thoracic and respirable fractions for adults and children during typical activities with both nasal and oral inhalation, that may be used in the design of experimental studies and interpretation of health effects evidence. Methods We estimated the fraction of inhaled particles (0.5-20 μm aerodynamic diameter) penetrating beyond the larynx (based on experimental data) and ciliated airways (based on a mathematical model) for an adult male, adult female, and a 10 yr old child during typical daily activities and breathing patterns. Results Our estimates show less penetration of coarse particulate matter into the thoracic and gas exchange regions of the respiratory tract than current size-selective criteria. Of the parameters we evaluated, particle penetration into the lower respiratory tract was most dependent on route of breathing. For typical activity levels and breathing habits, we estimated a 50% cut-size for the thoracic fraction at an aerodynamic diameter of around 3 μm in adults and 5 μm in children, whereas current ambient and occupational criteria suggest a 50% cut-size of 10 μm. Conclusions By design, current size-selective sample criteria overestimate the mass of particles generally expected to penetrate into the lower respiratory tract to provide protection for individuals who may breathe orally. We provide estimates of thoracic and

  1. Three dimensional model for surgical planning in resection of thoracic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min P.; Ta, Anderson H.; Ellsworth, Warren A.; Marco, Rex A.; Gaur, Puja; Miller​, Jordan S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The computed tomography scan provides vital information about the relationship of thoracic malignancies to the surrounding structures and aids in surgical planning. However, it can be difficult to visualize the images in a two-dimensional screen to interpret the full extent of the relationship between important structures in the surgical field. Presentation of case We report two cases where we used a three-dimensional printed model to aid in the surgical resection of thoracic malignancies. Discussion Careful planning is necessary to resect thoracic malignancies. Although two-dimensional images of the thoracic malignancies provide vital information about the tumor and its surrounding structures, the three-dimensional printed model can provide more accurate information about the tumor and assist in surgical planning. Conclusion Three-dimensional printed model provide better visualization of complex thoracic tumors, aid in counseling the patient about the surgical procedure and assisted in surgical resection of thoracic malignancy. PMID:26453940

  2. Thoracic ROM measurement system with visual bio-feedback: system design and biofeedback evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takeshi; Kawamura, Kazuya; Fujitani, Junko; Koike, Tomokazu; Fujimoto, Masashi; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2011-01-01

    Patients with diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) need to improve their thorax mobility. Thoracic ROM is one of the simplest and most useful indexes to evaluate the respiratory function. In this paper, we have proposed the prototype of a simple thoracic ROM measurement system with real-time visual bio-feedback in the chest expansion test. In this system, the thoracic ROM is measured using a wire-type linear encoder whose wire is wrapped around the thorax. In this paper, firstly, the repeatability and reliability of measured thoracic ROM was confirmed as a first report of the developed prototype. Secondly, we analyzed the effect of the bio-feedback system on the respiratory function. The result of the experiment showed that it was easier to maintain a large and stable thoracic ROM during deep breathing by using the real-time visual biofeedback system of the thoracic ROM. PMID:22254548

  3. Post-operative care to promote recovery for thoracic surgical patients: a nursing perspective

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The change in patient population leads to an inevitable transformation among the healthcare system. Over the past decades, thoracic surgical technique has been evolving from conventional open thoracotomy to minimally invasive video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Thoracic nursing team of Prince of Wales Hospital (PWH) grows together with the evolution and aims at providing holistic and quality care to patients require thoracic operation. In order to enhance patient post-operative recovery, few strategies have been implemented including early mobilization, staff training and clinical audit. On the other hand, nursing case management approach was proved to be a cost-effective method in managing patients. It is also suitable for thoracic patients, especially for those who are suffering from thoracic neoplasm. It is believed that, the introduction of nursing case management approach would provide a better holistic care to the thoracic patients. PMID:26941973

  4. Thoracic Aortic Stent-Graft Placement for Safe Removal of a Malpositioned Pedicle Screw

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hongtao; Shin, Ji Hoon Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Young Jun; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki

    2010-10-15

    We describe a case of percutaneous placement of a thoracic aortic stent-graft for safe removal of a malpositioned pedicle screw in a 52-year-old man. The patient had undergone posterior thoracic spinal instrumentation for pyogenic spondylitis and spinal deformity 8 months previously. Follow-up CT images showed a malpositioned pedicle screw which was abutting the thoracic aorta at the T5 level. After percutaneous stent-graft placement, the malpositioned pedicle screw was safely and successfully removed.

  5. Inadvertent Puncture of the Thoracic Duct During Attempted Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraber, Ulf K.M. Nibbe, Lutz; Gebauer, Bernhard; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2003-11-15

    We report a case of puncture of the thoracic duct during left subclavian vein catheterization on the intensive care unit. Computed tomography and measurement of the triglyceride levels in the aspirated fluid proved the inadvertent penetration of the guidewire into the thoracic duct. Early recognition of central line misplacement avoided serious complications. Inadvertent central venous catheter placement into the thoracic duct may have the potential complications of infusion mediastinum and chylothorax.

  6. Dorsal thoracic arachnoid web presenting as neuropathic pain: 'Scalpel' sign found on MRI.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; El-Sherif, Yasir; Voutsinas, Lynne

    2016-10-01

    Dorsal thoracic arachnoid webs are due to a deformity in the formation of arachnoid membrane in the spinal arachnoid space. These webs usually occur in the upper thoracic spine and are viewed on imaging as a pathogonomic 'scalpel' sign because of the resemblance on sagittal MRI to a surgical scalpel. We describe a case of a patient with a neuropathic pain presentation. After MR imaging, a focal dorsal indentation of the upper thoracic spinal cord at the T3-T4 level with the scalpel sign was found. This sign indicates that the patient's neuropathic pain was caused by the dorsal thoracic arachnoid web.

  7. TEVAR for Flash Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm to Pulmonary Artery Fistula.

    PubMed

    Bornak, Arash; Baqai, Atif; Li, Xiaoyi; Rey, Jorge; Tashiro, Jun; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2016-01-01

    Enlarging aneurysms in the thoracic aorta frequently remain asymptomatic. Fistulization of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) to adjacent structures or the presence of a patent ductus arteriosus and TAA may lead to irreversible cardiopulmonary sequelae. This article reports on a large aneurysm of the thoracic aorta with communication to the pulmonary artery causing pulmonary edema and cardiorespiratory failure. The communication was ultimately closed after thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair allowing rapid symptom resolution. Early diagnosis and closure of such communication in the presence of TAA are critical for prevention of permanent cardiopulmonary damage.

  8. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-02-15

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  9. Thoracic duct cyst of posterior mediastinum: a “challenging” differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Electra, Michalopoulou-Manoloutsiou; Evangelia, Athanasiou; Mattheos, Bobos; Dimitris, Hatzibougias I.; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Charalampidis, Chralampos; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Mparmpetakis, Nikolaos; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Andreas, Mpakas; Stamatis, Arikas; Alexandros, Kolettas; Kosmas, Tsakiridis

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic duct cysts of the mediastinum are extremely rare entities and their pathogenesis still remains unknown. Imaging methods are not specific and show a cystic mass, however the real nature of the lesion is confirmed only with the help of histopathological examination after surgical excision. Here, we present a case of thoracic cyst in a 28-year-old female, lining in posterior lower mediastinum. The cyst was removed by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) and the histopathological findings were that of thoracic duct cyst. Through this case, we propose an ideal surgical approach and diagnostic procedure. PMID:27275479

  10. Dorsal thoracic arachnoid web presenting as neuropathic pain: 'Scalpel' sign found on MRI.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; El-Sherif, Yasir; Voutsinas, Lynne

    2016-10-01

    Dorsal thoracic arachnoid webs are due to a deformity in the formation of arachnoid membrane in the spinal arachnoid space. These webs usually occur in the upper thoracic spine and are viewed on imaging as a pathogonomic 'scalpel' sign because of the resemblance on sagittal MRI to a surgical scalpel. We describe a case of a patient with a neuropathic pain presentation. After MR imaging, a focal dorsal indentation of the upper thoracic spinal cord at the T3-T4 level with the scalpel sign was found. This sign indicates that the patient's neuropathic pain was caused by the dorsal thoracic arachnoid web. PMID:27316566

  11. Predicting the minimum clinically important difference in patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Wilson, Jefferson R; Kotter, Mark R N; Nouri, Aria; Côté, Pierre; Kopjar, Branko; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is defined as the minimum change in a measurement that a patient would identify as beneficial. Before undergoing surgery, patients are likely to inquire about the ultimate goals of the operation and of their chances of experiencing meaningful improvements. The objective of this study was to define significant predictors of achieving an MCID on the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale at 2 years following surgery for the treatment of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). METHODS Seven hundred fifty-seven patients were prospectively enrolled in either the AOSpine North America or International study at 26 global sites. Fourteen patients had a perfect preoperative mJOA score of 18 and were excluded from this analysis (n = 743). Data were collected for each participating subject, including demographic information, symptomatology, medical history, causative pathology, and functional impairment. Univariate log-binominal regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the association between preoperative clinical factors and achieving an MCID on the mJOA scale. Modified Poisson regression using robust error variances was used to create the final multivariate model and compute the relative risk for each predictor. RESULTS The sample consisted of 463 men (62.31%) and 280 women (37.69%), with an average age of 56.48 ± 11.85 years. At 2 years following surgery, patients exhibited a mean change in functional status of 2.71 ± 2.89 points on the mJOA scale. Of the 687 patients with available follow-up data, 481 (70.01%) exhibited meaningful gains on the mJOA scale, whereas 206 (29.98%) failed to achieve an MCID. Based on univariate analysis, significant predictors of achieving the MCID on the mJOA scale were younger age; female sex; shorter duration of symptoms; nonsmoking status; a lower comorbidity score and absence of cardiovascular disease; and absence of upgoing plantar responses, lower

  12. Retrospective cost analysis of cervical laminectomy and fusion versus cervical laminoplasty in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Daniel T.; Ricart-Hoffiz, Pedro A.; Andres, Tate M.; Hoelscher, Christian M.; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S.; Goldstein, Jeffrey A.; Bendo, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical laminoplasty (CLP) and posterior cervical laminectomy and fusion (CLF) are well-established surgical procedures used in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). In situations of clinical equipoise, an influential factor in procedural decision making could be the economic effect of the chosen procedure. The object of this study is to compare and analyze the total hospital costs and charges pertaining to patients undergoing CLP or CLF for the treatment of CSM. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 81 consecutive patients from a single institution; 55 patients were treated with CLP and 26 with CLF. CLP was performed via the double-door allograft technique that does not require implants, whereas laminectomy fusion procedures included metallic instrumentation. We analyzed 10,682 individual costs (HC) and charges (HCh) for all patients, as obtained from hospital accounting data. The Current Procedural Terminology codes were used to estimate the physicians’ fees as such fees are not accounted for via hospital billing records. Total cost (TC) therefore equaled the sum of the hospital cost and the estimated physicians’ fees. Results The mean length of stay was 3.7 days for CLP and 5.9 days for CLF (P < .01). There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to age, gender, previous surgical history, and medical insurance. The TC mean was $17,734 for CLP and $37,413 for CLF (P < .01). Mean HCh for CLP was 42% of that for CLF, and therefore the mean charge for CLF was 238% of that for CLP (P < .01). Mean HC was $15,426 for CLP and $32,125 for CLF (P < .01); the main contributor was implant cost (mean $2582). Conclusions Our study demonstrates that, in clinically similar populations, CLP results in reduced length of stay, TC, and hospital charges. In CSM cases requiring posterior decompression, we demonstrate CLP to be a less costly procedure. However, in the presence of neck pain, kyphotic deformity, or gross

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of effort-induced thrombosis of the axillary subclavian vein due to venous thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vemuri, Chandu; Salehi, Payam; Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; McLaughlin, Lauren N; Thompson, Robert W

    2016-10-01

    Venous thoracic outlet syndrome (VTOS) is uncommon but most frequently occurs in young, active, healthy patients. This condition typically presents as subclavian vein (SCV) effort thrombosis, also known as Paget-Schroetter syndrome. The pathophysiology underlying VTOS is chronic repetitive compression injury of the SCV in the costoclavicular space, resulting in progressive venous scarring, focal stenosis, and eventual thrombosis. Clinical evaluation includes a history and physical examination followed by catheter-based venography, for definitive confirmation of the diagnosis and initial treatment with pharmacomechanical thrombolysis. After restoration of SCV patency, patients are maintained with anticoagulation and surgical therapy is usually planned within 4 to 6 weeks. Surgical management of VTOS can be accomplished via different protocols involving either the transaxillary, infraclavicular or paraclavicular approaches to thoracic outlet decompression. The paraclavicular approach is emphasized in this review, because it affords the surgeon the ability to safely perform complete thoracic outlet decompression (complete anterior and middle scalenectomy, removal of the entire first rib, and resection of the subclavius muscle and costoclavicular ligament), along with definitive management of the damaged SCV (external venolysis, intraoperative venography, and direct vein reconstruction, if needed, using patch angioplasty or bypass grafting), in one operative setting. After surgical therapy, interval anticoagulation and a comprehensive physical therapy and rehabilitation program are important in achieving a return to full function. Current protocols on the basis of the paraclavicular surgical approach have thereby routinely provided patients with lasting symptomatic relief, freedom from indefinite anticoagulation, and the ability to return to unrestricted upper extremity activity. PMID:27639006

  14. Physiological Interaction of Heart and Lung in Thoracic Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Veen, Sonja van der; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Boer, Rudolf A. de; Dickinson, Michael G.; Jong, Johan R. de; Faber, Hette; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Brandenburg, Sytze; Berger, Rolf M.F.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Luijk, Peter van

    2012-12-01

    Introduction: The risk of early radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) limits the dose and efficacy of radiation therapy of thoracic tumors. In addition to lung dose, coirradiation of the heart is a known risk factor in the development RILT. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying physiology of the interaction between lung and heart in thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Rat hearts, lungs, or both were irradiated to 20 Gy using high-precision proton beams. Cardiopulmonary performance was assessed using breathing rate measurements and F{sup 18}-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET) scans biweekly and left- and right-sided cardiac hemodynamic measurements and histopathology analysis at 8 weeks postirradiation. Results: Two to 12 weeks after heart irradiation, a pronounced defect in the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the left ventricle (LV) was observed. At 8 weeks postirradiation, this coincided with LV perivascular fibrosis, an increase in LV end-diastolic pressure, and pulmonary edema in the shielded lungs. Lung irradiation alone not only increased pulmonary artery pressure and perivascular edema but also induced an increased LV relaxation time. Combined irradiation of lung and heart induced pronounced increases in LV end-diastolic pressure and relaxation time, in addition to an increase in right ventricle end-diastolic pressure, indicative of biventricular diastolic dysfunction. Moreover, enhanced pulmonary edema, inflammation and fibrosis were also observed. Conclusions: Both lung and heart irradiation cause cardiac and pulmonary toxicity via different mechanisms. Thus, when combined, the loss of cardiopulmonary performance is intensified further, explaining the deleterious effects of heart and lung coirradiation. Our findings show for the first time the physiological mechanism underlying the development of a multiorgan complication, RILT. Reduction of dose to either of these organs offers new opportunities to

  15. Lower thoracic rib stress fractures in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Gerrie, Brayden J; Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    Stress fractures of the first rib on the dominant throwing side are well-described in baseball pitchers; however, lower thoracic rib fractures are not commonly recognized. While common in other sports such as rowing, there is scant literature on these injuries in baseball. Intercostal muscle strains are commonly diagnosed in baseball pitchers and have a nearly identical presentation but also a highly variable healing time. The diagnosis of a rib stress fracture can predict a more protracted recovery. This case series presents two collegiate baseball pitchers on one team during the same season who were originally diagnosed with intercostal muscle strains, which following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were found to have actually sustained lower thoracic rib stress fractures. The first sustained a stress fracture of the posterior aspect of the right 8th rib on the dominant arm side, while the second presented with a left-sided 10th rib stress fracture on the nondominant arm side. In both cases, MRI was used to visualize the fractures as plain radiographs are insensitive and commonly negative early in patient presentation. Patients were treated with activity modification, and symptomatic management for 4-6 weeks with a graduated return to throwing and competition by 8-10 weeks. The repetitive high stresses incurred by pitching may cause either dominant or nondominant rib stress fractures and this should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic injuries in throwers. It is especially important that athletic trainers and team physicians consider this diagnosis, as rib fractures may have a protracted course and delayed return to play. Additionally, using the appropriate imaging techniques to establish an accurate diagnosis can help inform return-to-play decisions, which have important practical applications in baseball, such as roster management and eligibility.

  16. Evaluation of various deformable image registration algorithms for thoracic images.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Fujita, Yukio; Katsuta, Yoshiyuki; Dobashi, Suguru; Takeda, Ken; Kishi, Kazuma; Kubozono, Masaki; Umezawa, Rei; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Matsushita, Haruo; Jingu, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of one commercially available and three publicly available deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for thoracic four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) images. Five patients with esophagus cancer were studied. Datasets of the five patients were provided by DIR-lab (dir-lab.com) and consisted of thoracic 4D CT images and a coordinate list of anatomical landmarks that had been manually identified. Expert landmark correspondence was used for evaluating DIR spatial accuracy. First, the manually measured displacement vector field (mDVF) was obtained from the coordinate list of anatomical landmarks. Then the automatically calculated displacement vector field (aDVF) was calculated by using the following four DIR algorithms: B-spine implemented in Velocity AI (Velocity Medical, Atlanta, GA, USA), free-form deformation (FFD), Horn-Schunk optical flow (OF) and Demons in DIRART of MATLAB software. Registration error is defined as the difference between mDVF and aDVF. The mean 3D registration errors were 2.7 ± 0.8 mm for B-spline, 3.6 ± 1.0 mm for FFD, 2.4 ± 0.9 mm for OF and 2.4 ± 1.2 mm for Demons. The results showed that reasonable accuracy was achieved in B-spline, OF and Demons, and that these algorithms have the potential to be used for 4D dose calculation, automatic image segmentation and 4D CT ventilation imaging in patients with thoracic cancer. However, for all algorithms, the accuracy might be improved by using the optimized parameter setting. Furthermore, for B-spline in Velocity AI, the 3D registration error was small with displacements of less than ∼10 mm, indicating that this software may be useful in this range of displacements. PMID:23869025

  17. Lower thoracic rib stress fractures in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Gerrie, Brayden J; Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    Stress fractures of the first rib on the dominant throwing side are well-described in baseball pitchers; however, lower thoracic rib fractures are not commonly recognized. While common in other sports such as rowing, there is scant literature on these injuries in baseball. Intercostal muscle strains are commonly diagnosed in baseball pitchers and have a nearly identical presentation but also a highly variable healing time. The diagnosis of a rib stress fracture can predict a more protracted recovery. This case series presents two collegiate baseball pitchers on one team during the same season who were originally diagnosed with intercostal muscle strains, which following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were found to have actually sustained lower thoracic rib stress fractures. The first sustained a stress fracture of the posterior aspect of the right 8th rib on the dominant arm side, while the second presented with a left-sided 10th rib stress fracture on the nondominant arm side. In both cases, MRI was used to visualize the fractures as plain radiographs are insensitive and commonly negative early in patient presentation. Patients were treated with activity modification, and symptomatic management for 4-6 weeks with a graduated return to throwing and competition by 8-10 weeks. The repetitive high stresses incurred by pitching may cause either dominant or nondominant rib stress fractures and this should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic injuries in throwers. It is especially important that athletic trainers and team physicians consider this diagnosis, as rib fractures may have a protracted course and delayed return to play. Additionally, using the appropriate imaging techniques to establish an accurate diagnosis can help inform return-to-play decisions, which have important practical applications in baseball, such as roster management and eligibility. PMID:26559562

  18. Thoracic radiographic features of silicosis in 19 horses.

    PubMed

    Berry, C R; O'Brien, T R; Madigan, J E; Hager, D A

    1991-01-01

    Clinical records and thoracic radiographs of 19 horses with a confirmed pathologic diagnosis of silicosis were reviewed. These horses had histories of varying degrees of chronic weight loss, exercise intolerance, and respiratory distress. At the time of presentation, two horses were asymptomatic. Ten horses were geldings and nine were female. The mean age of the 19 horses was 10.7 +/- 5.5 years. Fourteen horses were identified as being from the Monterey-Carmel Peninsula of midcoastal California. An abnormal, structured interstitial pulmonary pattern was identified on thoracic radiographs in each horse. The interstitial pulmonary changes were classified as miliary (13 horses), reticulonodular (4), or linear interstitial (2), and were best visualized dorsally and caudodorsally. In addition to the abnormal interstitial pulmonary pattern, areas of pulmonary consolidation were evident caudodorsally in seven horses. Other thoracic radiographic features included: hilar lymphadenopathy (4 horses), pleural effusion/thickening (4), cranial mediastinal lymphadenopathy (2), hyperinflation (1), and a discrete pulmonary mass (1). Necropsy findings in eight horses and results of lung biopsies in an additional five horses showed a diffuse, multifocal, granulomatous pneumonia with areas of pulmonary fibrosis. Cellular infiltrates included predominantly macrophages with intracellular and/or extracellular crystalline material, occasional lymphocytes, and giant cells. Similar cellular changes were also identified, during necropsy, in the hilar and tracheobronchial lymph nodes in each of the eight horses, although gross enlargement of the lymph nodes was present in only six horses. The radiographic and pathologic findings of these 19 horses are consistent with chronic or the accelerated forms of silicosis that are recognized in humans. PMID:1941758

  19. Major morbidity after video-assisted thoracic surgery lung resections: a comparison between the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons definition and the Thoracic Morbidity and Mortality system

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Milton, Richard; Kefaloyannis, Emmanuel; Chaudhuri, Nilanjan; Poyser, Emily; Spencer, Nicholas; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background The thoracic morbidity and mortality (TM&M) classification system univocally encodes the postoperative adverse events by their management complexity. This study aims to compare the distribution of the severity of complications according to the TM&M system versus the distribution according to the classification proposed by European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database in a population of patients submitted to video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lung resection. Methods A total of 227 consecutive patients submitted to VATS lobectomy for lung cancer were analyzed. Any complication developed postoperatively was graded from I to V according to the TM&M system, reflecting the increasing severity of its management. We verified the distribution of the different grades of complications and analyzed their frequency among those defined as “major cardiopulmonary complications” by the ESTS Database. Results Following the ESTS definitions, 20 were the major cardiopulmonary complications [atrial fibrillation (AF): 10, 50%; adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): 1, 5%; pulmonary embolism: 2, 10%; mechanical ventilation >24 h: 1, 5%; pneumonia: 3, 15%; myocardial infarct: 1, 5%; atelectasis requiring bronchoscopy: 2, 10%] of which 9 (45%) were reclassified as minor complications (grade II) by the TM&M classification system. According to the TM&M system, 10/34 (29.4%) of all complications were considered minor (grade I or II) while 21/34 (71.4%) as major (IIIa: 8, 23.5%; IIIb: 4, 11.7%; IVa: 8, 23.5%; IVb: 1, 2.9%; V: 3, 8.8%). Other 14 surgical complications occurred and were classified as major complications according to the TM&M system. Conclusions The distribution of postoperative complications differs between the two classification systems. The TM&M grading system questions the traditional classification of major complications following VATS lung resection and may be used as an additional endpoint for outcome analyses. PMID:26380733

  20. Prenatal development of the fetal thoracic sympathetic trunk in sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Nourinezhad, Jamal; Gilanpour, Hassan; Radmehr, Bijan

    2013-10-01

    This study aims at clarifying the detailed morphological and topographical changes of the thoracic part of the sympathetic trunk of sheep during fetal development. Bilateral micro-dissection of the thoracic sympathetic trunk was performed on 40 sheep fetuses aged 6-20 weeks (18 males and 22 females) under a stereomicroscope. The cervicothoracic ganglion (CTG) was observed on 75/80 sides (93.7%) and was composed of the caudal cervical and the first thoracic ganglia on 45/80 sides (56.2%), and of the caudal cervical and the first two thoracic ganglia on 30/80 sides (37.5%). The presence of the two last (12th-13th) thoracic ganglia was not constant. The influence of the sex, the side of the body, and the ages of the fetus on the morphology and topography of the thoracic sympathetic trunk in sheep were identified. In spite of the differences in the morphology and topography of the thoracic sympathetic trunk between early and late fetal developments, the morphology and topography of the older fetal thoracic sympathetic trunk tended to be similar to that of the adult sheep. To comprehend the comparative morphology of the fetal thoracic sympathetic trunk more completely, our results were compared with previous studies. Consequently, differences and similarities in the composition and position of the CTG, presence of single caudal cervical ganglion without fusion to the thoracic ganglia, and absence of the thoracic ganglia, and presence of splitting of the interganglionic branch were found among sheep, pig, and human fetuses. Therefore, sheep might be the appropriate animal model to be applied in human sympathetic nervous system. PMID:23639816

  1. [Transient delayed paraplegia after repair of thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Martín Torrijos, M; Aguilar Lloret, C; Ariño Irujo, J J; Serrano Hernando, F J; López Timoneda, F

    2013-11-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysm requires multidisciplinary management due to its complexity both in surgical technique and anesthetic considerations. One of the most feared postoperative complication is spinal cord ischemia. It can be presented as different clinical patterns, and its recovery may be partial or complete. The postoperative management of spinal cord ischemia is mainly based on techniques to increase spinal cord perfusion, above all, hemodynamic stability and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. We present two cases of delayed paraplegia after an open repair of a thoracoabdominal aneurysm and a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm repair using an endovascular stent graft. They both had a complete neurological recovery after cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

  2. Needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery pleurodesis for primary pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Sihoe, Alan D L; Hsin, Michael K Y; Yu, Peter S Y

    2014-01-01

    Conventional video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is already well established as the approach of choice for definitive surgical management for primary pneumothorax. However, VATS itself is a constantly evolving technique. The needlescopic VATS (nVATS) approach uses the existing chest drain wound as a working port and adds only two 3-mm ports to provide equally effective pleurodesis as conventional VATS. Staple resection of bullae or blebs plus complete mechanical parietal pleural abrasion is achievable using nVATS. By potentially reducing morbidity for the individual patient, the nVATS approach may lower thresholds for surgical candidacy-even for first episodes of primary pneumothorax.

  3. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease.

    PubMed

    George, Robert S; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas

    2016-02-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  4. Thoracic intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement: a rare clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Faheem, Mohd; Zeeshan, Qazi; Ojha, Balkrishna; Agrawal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy presented with a 1-year history of low backache, followed by paraparesis and urinary incontinence. MRI of the thoracic spine revealed an intramedullary, intensely contrast-enhancing lesion extending from T11 to L1 vertebral level, consistent with astrocytoma, ependymoma or haemangioblastoma. A diagnosis of intramedullary chordoma was made on tissue biopsy and immunohistochemical study. This is the second report of an intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement in English literature. After 6 months of follow-up, patient showed good clinical outcome in terms of improvement in power in lower limbs and backache.

  5. Salmonella spondylodiscitis of the thoracic vertebrae mimicking spine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Muhamad Effendi, Ferdhany; Ibrahim, Mohd Ikraam; Mohd Miswan, Mohd Fairudz

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Salmonella infection involving the thoracic spine is very rare. It commonly presents with non-specific chronic back pain and can occur with no gastrointestinal manifestation. Blood test results and imaging findings are often indistinguishable from more common chronic spine infections such as spine tuberculosis. Culture studies remain the key to establishing a definitive diagnosis and subsequently successful treatment. We report a case in which a patient presented with symptoms and signs suggestive of spine tuberculosis, yet the culture examination revealed otherwise. PMID:27381996

  6. Thoracic outlet syndrome: a neurological and vascular disorder.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Zachary; Sorenson, Edward; Tubbs, R Shane; Arya, Rahul; Meloy, Patrick; Shah, Rajnil; Shirk, Samuel; Loukas, Marios

    2014-07-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a condition arising from compression of the subclavian vessels and/or brachial plexus as the structures travel from the thoracic outlet to the axilla. Despite the significant pathology associated with TOS, there remains some general disagreement among experts on the specific anatomy, etiology, and pathophysiology of the condition, presumably because of the wide variation in symptoms that manifest in presenting patients, and because of lack of a definitive gold standard for diagnosis. Symptoms associated with TOS have traditionally been divided into vascular and neurogenic categories, a distinction based on the underlying structure(s) implicated. Of the two, neurogenic TOS (nTOS) is more common, and typically presents as compression of the brachial plexus; primarily, but not exclusively, involving its lower trunk. Vascular TOS (vTOS) usually involves compression of the vessel, most commonly the subclavian artery or vein, or is secondary to thrombus formation in the venous vasculature. Any anatomical anomaly in the thoracic outlet has the potential to predispose a patient to TOS. Common anomalies include variations in the insertion of the anterior scalene muscle (ASM) or scalenus minimus muscle, the presence of a cervical rib or of fibrous and muscular bands, variations in insertion of pectoralis minor, and the presence of neurovascular structures, which follow an atypical course. A common diagnostic technique for vTOS is duplex imaging, which has generally replaced more invasive angiographic techniques. In cases of suspected nTOS, electrophysiological nerve studies and ASM blocks provide guidance when screening for patients likely to benefit from surgical decompression of TOS. Surgeons generally agree that the transaxillary approach allows the greatest field of view for first rib excision to relieve compressed vessels. Alternatively, a supraclavicular approach is favored for scalenotomies when the ASM impinges on surrounding

  7. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease.

    PubMed

    George, Robert S; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas

    2016-02-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use.

  8. Thoracic intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement: a rare clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Faheem, Mohd; Zeeshan, Qazi; Ojha, Balkrishna; Agrawal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy presented with a 1-year history of low backache, followed by paraparesis and urinary incontinence. MRI of the thoracic spine revealed an intramedullary, intensely contrast-enhancing lesion extending from T11 to L1 vertebral level, consistent with astrocytoma, ependymoma or haemangioblastoma. A diagnosis of intramedullary chordoma was made on tissue biopsy and immunohistochemical study. This is the second report of an intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement in English literature. After 6 months of follow-up, patient showed good clinical outcome in terms of improvement in power in lower limbs and backache. PMID:27469385

  9. Thoracic intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement: a rare clinical entity

    PubMed Central

    Faheem, Mohd; Zeeshan, Qazi; Ojha, Balkrishna; Agrawal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy presented with a 1-year history of low backache, followed by paraparesis and urinary incontinence. MRI of the thoracic spine revealed an intramedullary, intensely contrast-enhancing lesion extending from T11 to L1 vertebral level, consistent with astrocytoma, ependymoma or haemangioblastoma. A diagnosis of intramedullary chordoma was made on tissue biopsy and immunohistochemical study. This is the second report of an intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement in English literature. After 6 months of follow-up, patient showed good clinical outcome in terms of improvement in power in lower limbs and backache. PMID:27469385

  10. Thoracic outlet syndrome: another cause for unilateral palmar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Oya; Ozçakar, Levent

    2007-08-01

    One of the most important therapeutic goal in hyperhidrosis treatment is to seek for the underlying cause and to tailor the treatment accordingly. A detailed history and prompt physical examination are needed to clarify the etiological factor. In this study, we report a 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome presenting with complaints of pain, numbness, and fatigue in her left arm and ipsilateral palmar hyperhidrosis. Thus, we want to highlight a specific potential cause of secondary hyperhidrosis, which can otherwise be easily overlooked, and furthermore, which has a completely different treatment strategy. PMID:16941200

  11. Cough headache and thoracic inlet valvular competence in uremia.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yu-Ming; Hu, Han-Haw

    2005-01-01

    Cough headache is a transient headache upon coughing, bending, stooping, or lifting in the absence of intracranial lesions. Reports show that incompetent jugular venous valve and cerebrospinal fluid hypervolemia are contributing factors. Headache is a common complaint of uremia patients. We conducted a clinical-radiological correlation study on 15 uremia patients with headache and central venous thrombosis. Thirteen patients were diagnosed to have benign cough headache (BCH); the others were diagnosed with chronic tension type headache. Venogram disclosed either internal jugular or vertebral venous regurgitation in the BCH group. Acquired thoracic inlet valvular incompetence might contribute to BCH. PMID:15785073

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yik; Fan, Yi; Cheng, Stephen; Chow, Kwok

    2011-11-01

    Thoracic Aortic Dissection (TAD) is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality. An aortic dissection is formed when blood infiltrates the layers of the vascular wall, and a new artificial channel, the false lumen, is created. The expansion of the blood vessel due to the weakened wall enhances the risk of rupture. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is performed to study the hemodynamics of this pathological condition. Both idealized geometry and realistic patient configurations from computed tomography (CT) images are investigated. Physiological boundary conditions from in vivo measurements are employed. Flow configuration and biomechanical forces are studied. Quantitative analysis allows clinicians to assess the risk of rupture in making decision regarding surgical intervention.

  13. Cadaveric nerve allotransplantation in the treatment of persistent thoracic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Barbour, John R; Yee, Andrew; Moore, Amy M; Trulock, Elbert P; Buchowski, Jacob M; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-04-01

    When relief from neuralgia cannot be achieved with traditional methods, neurectomy may be considered to abate the stimulus, and primary opposition of the terminal nerve ending is recommended to prevent neuroma. Nerve repair with autograft is limited by autologous nerves available for large nerve defects. Cadaveric allografts provide an unlimited graft source without donor-site morbidities, but are rapidly rejected unless appropriate immunosuppression is achieved. An optimal treatment method for nerve allograft transplantation would minimize rejection while simultaneously permitting nerve regeneration. This report details a novel experience of nerve allograft transplantation using cadaveric nerve grafts to desensitize persistent postoperative thoracic neuralgia.

  14. Billing, coding, and credentialing in the thoracic surgery practice.

    PubMed

    Cooke, David T; Gelfand, Gary A J; Broghammer, Joshua A

    2011-08-01

    New graduates entering thoracic surgery often face bureaucratic barriers to beginning practice. It is important to understand the credentialing and privileging process to navigate these obstacles successfully. In addition, the implementation of cutting-edge technology by recent trainees can pose problems in institutions not familiar with newer surgical techniques. Efficient coding and billing are a requirement for maintaining profitability and delivering the best care possible. This article explores theses nuances in both the American and the Canadian medical systems in building a successful practice. PMID:21762858

  15. Giant Thoracic Aneurysm Following Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Tran, Cao; Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Nguyen, Ngoc; Omar, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is a common congenital anomaly associated with aortopathy, which can cause aortic root dilatation, necessitating regular screening if the aortic root is > 4.0 cm. Despite the low absolute incidence of aortic complications associated with bicuspid aortic valve in the general population, the consequences of such complications for an individual patient can be devastating. Herein we propose a balanced algorithm that incorporates recommendations from the three major guidelines for follow-up imaging of the aortic root and ascending thoracic aorta in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve, maintaining the current recommendations with regard to surgical thresholds. PMID:26827748

  16. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  17. Chylous Ascites: A Rare Complication of Thoracic Duct Embolization for Chylothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Gaba, Ron C. Owens, Charles A.; Bui, James T.; Carrillo, Tami C.; Knuttinen, M. Grace

    2011-02-15

    Thoracic duct embolization represents a safe and effective method to treat postsurgical chylothorax. Complications of this procedure are rare despite transabdominal puncture of lymphatic channels for thoracic duct access, and chylous ascites is unreported. Herein, we describe a case of chylous ascites formation after lymphatic puncture and attempted cannulation. Our management approach is also discussed.

  18. Modified cuffed anastomosis technique to treat pseudoaneurysms following thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Satoshi; Oda, Katsuhiko; Motoyoshi, Naotaka; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is very rare. We report a case of thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysms due to flares at the proximal end of a stent graft after TEVAR for ductal aneurysm. We describe a total aortic arch replacement in this case using a modified cuffed anastomosis technique with an elephant trunk procedure leaving the partial stent graft in situ. PMID:22314008

  19. Pneumocephalus and Pneumorrhachis due to a Subarachnoid Pleural Fistula That Developed after Thoracic Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung-Ki; Kim, Woo-Jae; Kim, Ho-Sang; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Yun-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Development of a communication between the spinal subarachnoid space and the pleural space after thoracic spine surgery is uncommon. Subarachnoid pleural fistula (SAPF), a distressing condition, involves cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Here we report an unusual case of SAPF, occurring after thoracic spine surgery, that was further complicated by pneumocephalus and pneumorrhachis postthoracentesis, which was performed for unilateral pleural effusion. PMID:27799999

  20. Thoracic manipulation versus mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jodi L; Walker, Doug; Snyder, Shane; Daly, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Thoracic manipulation is widely used in physical therapy and has been shown to be effective at addressing mechanical neck pain. However, thoracic mobilization may produce similar effects. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the current literature regarding the effectiveness of thoracic manipulation versus mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain. Methods: ProQuest, NCBI-PubMed, APTA's Hooked on Evidence, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus were searched to identify relevant studies. Fourteen studies meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and the GRADE approach. Results: The literature as assessed by the PEDro scale was fair and the GRADE method showed overall quality ranging from very low to moderate quality. The 14 included studies showed positive outcomes on cervical pain levels, range of motion, and/or disability with the use of thoracic manipulation or mobilization. There was a paucity of literature directly comparing thoracic manipulation and mobilization. Discussion: Current limitations in the body of research, specifically regarding the use of thoracic mobilization, limit the recommendation of its use compared to thoracic manipulation for patients with mechanical neck pain. There is, however, a significant amount of evidence, although of varied quality, for the short-term benefits of thoracic manipulation in treating patients with this condition. Further high quality research is necessary to determine which technique is more effective in treating patients with mechanical neck pain. PMID:25125936

  1. Surgical management of a ballistic trauma of the right ventricle and descending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Carrières, Caroline; Georg, Yannick; Khelifa, Ismail; Koskas, Fabien

    2014-07-01

    Ballistic injuries of the descending aorta are uncommon and of extremely severe prognosis. We report the case of a 55-year-old man treated for such a thoracic trauma that combined wounds of the heart and descending thoracic aorta. A combination of conventional surgical and endovascular approaches enabled successful treatment.

  2. [Thoracic wall defect reconstruction and dead space obliteration with an intra-/extrathoracic free flap].

    PubMed

    Harenberg, P S; Viol, A W; D'Amico, T A; Levin, L S; Erdmann, D

    2009-07-01

    Presented is the case of a 61-year-old male patient with a chronic thoracic wall defect, including a bronchopleural fistula, after multiple resections of a desmoid tumor. After partial lung resection to remove the bronchopleural fistula, dead space was partially obliterated and the thoracic wall reconstructed with a free combined intra- and extrathoracic rectus abdominis muscle flap. PMID:19280081

  3. Bilateral Internal Thoracic Artery Grafting: Is It Reasonable in Octogenarians?

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Toshihiro; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of using bilateral internal thoracic artery (BITA) grafts for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in octogenarians is not clear. This study aimed to compare outcomes between use of BITA and single internal thoracic artery (SITA) grafts in octogenarians undergoing isolated CABG. Methods: Isolated CABG was performed in 1,566 patients at the Sakakibara Heart Institute between September 2004 and December 2012. Of these, 125 consecutive octogenarians were included and divided into two groups, according to the use of BITA grafts (101 subjects) or SITA grafts (24 subjects). Early and late outcomes were compared between groups. Results: The preoperative patient characteristics were similar between the two groups. Early outcomes were similar, including hospital death or deep sternal infection. The estimated 5-year survival rate was similar in the BITA and SITA groups (78% vs 62%, p = 0.269). Freedom from major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events was significantly higher in the BITA group than in the SITA group after 5 years (90% vs 75%, p = 0.032). Conclusions: Our results suggest that use of BITA grafts for CABG is feasible and beneficial in octogenarians, resulting in improved late outcomes without increased operative risk. PMID:26004110

  4. A Primer on Health Economic Evaluations in Thoracic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Melanie D; Atherly, Adam J; Bocsi, Gregary T; Camidge, D Ross

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest for economic evaluation in oncology to illustrate the value of multiple new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. As these analyses have started to move from specialist publications into mainstream medical literature, the wider medical audience consuming this information may need additional education to evaluate it appropriately. Here we review standard practices in economic evaluation, illustrating the different methods with thoracic oncology examples where possible. When interpreting and conducting health economic studies, it is important to appraise the method, perspective, time horizon, modeling technique, discount rate, and sensitivity analysis. Guidance on how to do this is provided. To provide a method to evaluate this literature, a literature search was conducted in spring 2015 to identify economic evaluations published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. Articles were reviewed for their study design, and areas for improvement were noted. Suggested improvements include using more rigorous sensitivity analyses, adopting a standard approach to reporting results, and conducting complete economic evaluations. Researchers should design high-quality studies to ensure the validity of the results, and consumers of this research should interpret these studies critically on the basis of a full understanding of the methodologies used before considering any of the conclusions. As advancements occur on both the research and consumer sides, this literature can be further developed to promote the best use of resources for this field.

  5. A Primer on Health Economic Evaluations in Thoracic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Melanie D; Atherly, Adam J; Bocsi, Gregary T; Camidge, D Ross

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest for economic evaluation in oncology to illustrate the value of multiple new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. As these analyses have started to move from specialist publications into mainstream medical literature, the wider medical audience consuming this information may need additional education to evaluate it appropriately. Here we review standard practices in economic evaluation, illustrating the different methods with thoracic oncology examples where possible. When interpreting and conducting health economic studies, it is important to appraise the method, perspective, time horizon, modeling technique, discount rate, and sensitivity analysis. Guidance on how to do this is provided. To provide a method to evaluate this literature, a literature search was conducted in spring 2015 to identify economic evaluations published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. Articles were reviewed for their study design, and areas for improvement were noted. Suggested improvements include using more rigorous sensitivity analyses, adopting a standard approach to reporting results, and conducting complete economic evaluations. Researchers should design high-quality studies to ensure the validity of the results, and consumers of this research should interpret these studies critically on the basis of a full understanding of the methodologies used before considering any of the conclusions. As advancements occur on both the research and consumer sides, this literature can be further developed to promote the best use of resources for this field. PMID:27079184

  6. Guidelines on surgery of the thoracic sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Moreno Balsalobre, Ramón; Moreno Mata, Nicolás; Ramos Izquierdo, Ricard; Aragón Valverde, Francisco Javier; Molins López-Rodo, Laureano; Rivas de Andrés, Juan José; García Fernández, José Luis; Cañizares Carretero, Miguel Ángel; Congregado Loscertales, Miguel; Carbajo Carbajo, Miguel

    2011-02-01

    Thoracic sympathetic nervous system (TSNS) surgery has increased in importance in the last few years, generating great expectations among the general population and the scientific community. This has been due to the excellent results obtained by videothoracoscopy-assisted thoracic sympathectomy in the treatment of essential hyperhidrosis and other TSNS disorders. This minimally invasive surgical technique has been shown to be effective, and with a low morbidity it is accepted as one of the best therapeutic options for the treatment of palmar and bilateral axillary hyperhidrosis and the number of patients consulting with the intention of having the operation has increased considerably. Although compensatory sweating, which is occasionally intense, often occurs after the surgery, this and other secondary effects of the technique are well tolerated by patients. The current evidence on TSNS and the treatment of essential hyperhidrosis is based on observational studies, making it difficult to compare series and draw conclusions. There has been much discussion on standardising the technique, defining the most favourable levels for clipping, and choosing the type of denervation with least secondary effects. This has led to the need to draw up these guidelines which should clarify and standardise the criteria for managing patients with disorders of TSNS. PMID:21342743

  7. Thoracic sympathetic nerve reconstruction for compensatory hyperhidrosis: the Melbourne technique

    PubMed Central

    Hensman, Chris; Leong, James

    2014-01-01

    Background Compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) is a potential complication following endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) in the management of primary hyperhidrosis. CH is considered a permanent condition with significant psychosocial impacts but with few treatment options. Various reversal surgical techniques, aimed at reconstituting sympathetic pathways, have been developed but results have been inconsistent. Objective We present two case reports of a novel technique of reversal surgery, the Melbourne technique, which was employed to treat severe CH that developed within 3-5 months following ETS. Both patients were followed-up to 8 years. Methods The Melbourne technique employs an endoscopic approach to expose previously sympathectomized or sympathotomized thoracic sympathetic chains. In these two cases it was performed on the right side only. Instead of an interpositional nerve graft, an autogenous vein graft was simultaneously harvested and used as a nerve conduit to bridge the secondary nerve defect after neuroma excision. Long-term outcomes were assessed using the dermatology life quality index (DLQI) and the quality of life (QoL) questionnaires, which are validated for hyperhidrosis. Results In both cases, patients reported postoperative improvements in QoL scores. However, the improvement was more marked in one case compared with the other. There were no significant immediate and long-term postoperative complications. Conclusions The Melbourne technique shows promise as an alternative to interpositional nerve grafts or nerve transfers employed in other endoscopic reversal surgeries for CH. PMID:25333020

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Acute and Chronic Thoracic Aortic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Jan Ferko, Alexander; Lojik, Miroslav; Krajina, Antonin; Harrer, Jan; Dominik, Jan

    2007-11-15

    Our aim is to present midterm results after endovascular repair of acute and chronic blunt aortic injury. Between December 1999 and December 2005, 13 patients were endovascularly treated for blunt aortic injury. Ten patients, 8 men and 2 women, mean age 38.7 years, were treated for acute traumatic injury in the isthmus region of thoracic aorta. Stent-graftings were performed between the fifth hour and the sixth day after injury. Three patients (all males; mean age, 66 years; range, 59-71 years) were treated due to the presence of symptoms of chronic posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta (mean time after injury, 29.4 years, range, 28-32). Fifteen stent-grafts were implanted in 13 patients. In the group with acute aortic injury one patient died due to failure of endovascular technique. Lower leg paraparesis appeared in one patient; the other eight patients were regularly followed up (1-72 months; mean, 35.6 months), without complications. In the group with posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms all three patients are alive. One patient suffered postoperatively from upper arm claudication, which was treated by carotidosubclavian bypass. We conclude that the endoluminal technique can be used successfully in the acute repair of aortic trauma and its consequences. Midterm results are satisfactory, with a low incidence of neurologic complications.

  9. Interactive annotation of textures in thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P.; de Jong, Pim A.; Gietema, Hester A.; Grutters, Jan C.; Prokop, Mathias; van Ginneken, Bram

    2010-03-01

    This study describes a system for interactive annotation of thoracic CT scans. Lung volumes in these scans are segmented and subdivided into roughly spherical volumes of interest (VOIs) with homogeneous texture using a clustering procedure. For each 3D VOI, 72 features are calculated. The observer inspects the scan to determine which textures are present and annotates, with mouse clicks, several VOIs of each texture. Based on these annotations, a k-nearest-neighbor classifier is trained, which classifies all remaining VOIs in the scan. The algorithm then presents a slice with suggested annotations to the user, in which the user can correct mistakes. The classifier is retrained, taking into account these new annotations, and the user is presented another slice for correction. This process continues until at least 50% of all lung voxels in the scan have been classified. The remaining VOIs are classified automatically. In this way, the entire lung volume is annotated. The system has been applied to scans of patients with usual and non-specific interstitial pneumonia. The results of interactive annotation are compared to a setup in which the user annotates all predefined VOIs manually. The interactive system is 3.7 times as fast as complete manual annotation of VOIs and differences between the methods are similar to interobserver variability. This is a first step towards precise volumetric quantitation of texture patterns in thoracic CT in clinical research and in clinical practice.

  10. Thoracic skeletal defects and cardiac malformations: a common epigenetic link?

    PubMed

    Weston, Andrea D; Ozolins, Terence R S; Brown, Nigel A

    2006-12-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defects in humans. In addition, cardiac malformations represent the most frequently identified anomaly in teratogenicity experiments with laboratory animals. To explore the mechanisms of these drug-induced defects, we developed a model in which pregnant rats are treated with dimethadione, resulting in a high incidence of heart malformations. Interestingly, these heart defects were accompanied by thoracic skeletal malformations (cleft sternum, fused ribs, extra or missing ribs, and/or wavy ribs), which are characteristic of anterior-posterior (A/P) homeotic transformations and/or disruptions at one or more stages in somite development. A review of other teratogenicity studies suggests that the co-occurrence of these two disparate malformations is not unique to dimethadione, rather it may be a more general phenomenon caused by various structurally unrelated agents. The coexistence of cardiac and thoracic skeletal malformations has also presented clinically, suggesting a mechanistic link between cardiogenesis and skeletal development. Evidence from genetically modified mice reveals that several genes are common to heart development and to formation of the axial skeleton. Some of these genes are important in regulating chromatin architecture, while others are tightly controlled by chromatin-modifying proteins. This review focuses on the role of these epigenetic factors in development of the heart and axial skeleton, and examines the hypothesis that posttranslational modifications of core histones may be altered by some developmental toxicants.

  11. Anatomic Variations of Cervical and High Thoracic Ligamentum Flavum

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Pil; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural blocks are widely used for the management of acute and chronic pain. The technique of loss of resistance is frequently adopted to determine the epidural space. A discontinuity of the ligamentum flavum may increase the risk of failure to identify the epidural space. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anatomic variations of the cervical and high thoracic ligamentum flavum in embalmed cadavers. Methods Vertebral column specimens of 15 human cadavers were obtained. After vertebral arches were detached from pedicles, the dural sac and epidural connective tissue were removed. The ligamentum flavum from C3 to T6 was directly examined anteriorly. Results The incidence of midline gaps in the ligamentum flavum was 87%-100% between C3 and T2. The incidence decreased below this level and was the lowest at T4-T5 (8%). Among the levels with a gap, the location of a gap in the caudal third of the ligamentum flavum was more frequent than in the middle or cephalic portion of the ligamentum flavum. Conclusions The cervical and high thoracic ligamentum flavum frequently has midline intervals with various features, especially in the caudal portion of the intervertebral space. Therefore, the ligamentum flavum is not always reliable as a perceptible barrier to identify the epidural space at these vertebral levels. Additionally, it may be more useful to insert the needle into the cephalic portion of the intervertebral space than in the caudal portion. PMID:25317280

  12. [Noninvasive radiodiagnosis of aneurysms of the thoracic aorta].

    PubMed

    Todua, F I; Petsko, A R; Arablinskiĭ, A V; Kazanchian, P O; Nikitaev, N S; Sultanaliev, T A

    1990-05-01

    The paper is concerned with analysis of the results of X-ray investigation of 45 patients with aneurysms of the distal part of the arch and descending part of the thoracic aorta. Errors were made in 16 of 35 patients (35.6%) before admittance to hospital. X-ray investigation helped to establish correct diagnosis of aneurysm of the aorta in 42 of 45 patients (93.3%) on the basis of the detection of intense additional shadow formation in left pulmonary field, inseparable from the aortic shadow. The use of a new method of ultrasound diagnosis--duplex scanning--made it possible to establish the presence of aneurysm and to determine its sizes as well as to visualize the relation of the left subclavicular artery to aneurysm in 17 of 21 patients. CT-semiotics of aneurysms of the descending part of the thoracic aorta consisted in its dilatation over 3.5 cm, wall calcification, thrombosis of the cavity and change of the adjacent structures. Basing on the analysis of these signs correct diagnosis was established in 34 of 35 examinees (97.1%).

  13. Treatment of acute thoracic aortic syndromes using endovascular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Uğuz, Emrah; Canyiğit, Murat; Hıdıroğlu, Mete; Şener, Erol

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Acute thoracic aortic syndrome (ATAS) is a novel term to define emergency aortic conditions with common clinical features and challenges. Traditional management of ATAS includes surgical replacement of the aorta and is correlated with high perioperative mortality and morbidity. We aimed to evaluate our experience and outcomes in patients presenting with ATAS, managed by endovascular techniques. METHODS This cohort consisted of 31 consecutive patients (24 males; mean age, 57.5±13.81 years; range, 19–84 years) with acute thoracic aortic pathologies who underwent endovascular repair between January 2011 and January 2015. The study was designed as a retrospective analysis of prospectively maintained data. RESULTS Complicated acute type-B aortic dissection was the most common pathology (35.5%). All aortic stent-grafts (n=37) and dissection stents (n=9) were implanted with 100% procedural success. The overall in-hospital mortality was 9.7%. The mean follow-up duration of patients who were alive at 30 days was 25.9±11.49 months (3–53 months). So far, there have been no late deaths after 30 days. CONCLUSION In the high-risk setting of ATAS, endovascular procedures come forward as novel therapeutic strategies with promising results. Endovascular repair of ATAS can be considered as a first-line treatment alternative under emergency conditions with encouraging results, particularly when conventional surgical repair cannot be implemented due to prohibitive comorbidities. PMID:27113420

  14. The European Congenital Heart Defects Surgery Database experience: Pediatric European Cardiothoracic Surgical Registry of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Maruszewski, Bohdan; Tobota, Zdzislaw

    2002-01-01

    The initial purpose of collecting data on the outcome of congenital heart surgery procedures across Europe was to make possible comparison of results and definition of mortality and morbidity risk factors as well as targeting research activities. The European Congenital Heart Surgeons Foundation, established in 1992, created the European Congenital Heart Defects Database, precursor to today's Pediatric European Cardiothoracic Surgical Registry. In 1999, initiatives of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery resulted in a series of conferences aimed at arriving at a standardized nomenclature and reporting strategies as a foundation for an international database. In April 2000 the International Congenital Heart Surgery Nomenclature and Database Project published a minimum dataset of 21 items and lists of 150 diagnoses, 200 procedures, and 32 complications, as well as 28 extracardiac anomalies and 17 preoperative risk factors. Since January 2000 the Pediatric European Cardiothoracic Surgical Registry has officially operated from the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Children's Memorial Health Institute in Warsaw, Poland, under the auspices of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and the responsibility of Bohdan Maruszewski. As of March 2001, 84 cardiothoracic units from 33 countries had registered in the database and data on almost 4,000 procedures have been collected. Participation in the database is free of charge through the internet for all participants. Development of data validation protocols is a work in progress.

  15. Contraction of rat thoracic aorta strips induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, H.; Lederis, K.

    1987-02-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced a slow and progressive increase in tension of rat thoracic aorta strips in the presence of extracellular CaS . Complete relaxation could not be obtained in CaS -free buffer containing 1 mM ethyleneglycol-bis(US -aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 10 X M PMA. In the absence of extracellular CaS , PMA (10 X M) induced a small but sustained contraction which was not altered by the addition of another 2 mM EGTA and 3 x 10 V M verapamil. Papaverine (10 U M) relaxed the PMA-induced contraction to the base line, but phentolamine (10 V M), cyproheptadine (10 V M), atropine (10 V M) and tetrodotoxine (10 W M) did not change the contraction. CaS -depleted muscle strips, prepared by four repeated applications of 10 X M norepinephrine in CaS -free buffer, were contracted by 10 X M PMA, but at a lower maximum tension than nontreated strips. The action of PMA on rat aorta strips in CaS -free buffer did not require the presence of the adventitial layer or endothelial cells. These results suggest that PMA may induce activation of protein kinase C and smooth muscle contraction in the absence of extracellular CaS , without an increase in myoplasmic CaS .

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Thoracic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Balter, Peter A.; Rebueno, Neal; Sharp, Hadley J.; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides excellent local control with acceptable toxicity for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, the efficacy and safety of SBRT for patients previously given thoracic radiation therapy is not known. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed outcomes after SBRT for recurrent disease among patients previously given radiation therapy to the chest. Materials and Methods: A search of medical records for patients treated with SBRT to the thorax after prior fractionated radiation therapy to the chest at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center revealed 36 such cases. The median follow-up time after SBRT was 15 months. The endpoints analyzed were overall survival, local control, and the incidence and severity of treatment-related toxicity. Results: SBRT provided in-field local control for 92% of patients; at 2 years, the actuarial overall survival rate was 59%, and the actuarial progression-free survival rate was 26%, with the primary site of failure being intrathoracic relapse. Fifty percent of patients experienced worsening of dyspnea after SBRT, with 19% requiring oxygen supplementation; 30% of patients experienced chest wall pain and 8% Grade 3 esophagitis. No Grade 4 or 5 toxic effects were noted. Conclusions: SBRT can provide excellent in-field tumor control in patients who have received prior radiation therapy. Toxicity was significant but manageable. The high rate of intrathoracic failure indicates the need for further study to identify patients who would derive the most benefit from SBRT for this purpose.

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta signaling in thoracic aortic aneurysm development: a paradox in pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Spinale, Francis G.; Ikonomidis, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) are potentially devastating, and due to their asymptomatic behavior, pose a serious health risk characterized by the lack of medical treatment options and high rates of surgical morbidity and mortality. Independent of the inciting stimuli (biochemical/mechanical), TAA development proceeds by a multifactorial process influenced by both cellular and extracellular mechanisms, resulting in alterations of the structure and composition of the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM). While the role of enhanced ECM proteolysis in TAA formation remains undisputed, little attention has been focused on the upstream signaling events that drive the remodeling process. Recent evidence highlighting the dysregulation of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling in ascending TAAs from Marfan syndrome patients has stimulated an interest in this intracellular signaling pathway. However, paradoxical discoveries have implicated both enhanced TGF-β signaling and loss of function TGF-β receptor mutations, in aneurysm formation; obfuscating a clear functional role for TGF-β in aneurysm development. In an effort to elucidate this subject, TGF-β signaling and its role in vascular remodeling and pathology will be reviewed, with the aim of identifying potential mechanisms of how TGF-β signaling may contribute to the formation and progression of TAA. PMID:18765947

  18. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. PMID:27316567

  19. Thoracic epidural angiolipoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Du, Yong; Yang, Han-Feng; Hu, Fu-Bi; Huang, Ya-Yong; Li, Bing; Zee, Chi-Shing

    2013-04-28

    Angiolipoma of the spine is a benign neoplasm consisting of both mature fatty tissue and abnormal vascular elements, and usually presents with a slow progressive clinical course. Our patient presented with bilateral lower extremity weakness and chest-back numbness. Physical examination revealed adipose elements superficial hypesthesia below the T5 level and analgesia below the T6 level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed an avidly and heterogeneously enhancing mass which was located in the posterior epidural space. Compression of the thoracic cord by the fusiform mass was seen between T3-T4. During the operation, a flesh pink vascular mass (4.7 cm × 1.0 cm × 1.0 cm) with obscure margin and strong but pliable texture was found in the posterior epidural space extending from T3 to T4. There was no infiltration of the dura or the adjacent bony spine. Histopathological study of the surgical specimen showed a typical angiolipoma. We review the previously documented cases of spinal extradural angiolipomas performed with MRI.

  20. FRACTURE-DISLOCATION OF THE THORACIC SPINE DURING SECOND TRIMESTER OF PREGNANCY: CASE REPORT AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Gotfryd, Alberto Ofenhejm; Franzin, Fernando José; Poletto, Patricia Rios; Neto, Nicola Jorge Carneiro; Júnior, Roberto César Nogueira; Júnior, Luiz Carlos Lopes Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Spinal fractures associated with spinal cord injury rarely affect pregnant patients. The authors present the case of a 20-year-old woman in her 20th week of pregnancy, who suffered fracture-dislocation of the thoracic spine (T4-T5) and underwent decompression, reduction and posterior fusion with pedicle screws. Despite the complete spinal cord injury presented, the pregnancy progressed uneventfully and resulted in birth via normal delivery of a healthy newborn at term. Some particular features of this case, like the care needed in using ionizing radiation, the surgical approach and delivery, use of steroids and pregnancy complications in such patients are discussed here. Only a multidisciplinary team composed by physicians from different specialties (spinal surgeons, obstetricians and physiatrists), nurses and physiotherapists is capable of assisting pregnant patients with spinal cord injuries satisfactorily. PMID:27047862

  1. Automatic learning-based beam angle selection for thoracic IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Marshall, Andrea; Purdie, Thomas G. Jaffray, David A.; Levinshtein, Alex; Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia; Pekar, Vladimir

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The treatment of thoracic cancer using external beam radiation requires an optimal selection of the radiation beam directions to ensure effective coverage of the target volume and to avoid unnecessary treatment of normal healthy tissues. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning is a lengthy process, which requires the planner to iterate between choosing beam angles, specifying dose–volume objectives and executing IMRT optimization. In thorax treatment planning, where there are no class solutions for beam placement, beam angle selection is performed manually, based on the planner’s clinical experience. The purpose of this work is to propose and study a computationally efficient framework that utilizes machine learning to automatically select treatment beam angles. Such a framework may be helpful for reducing the overall planning workload. Methods: The authors introduce an automated beam selection method, based on learning the relationships between beam angles and anatomical features. Using a large set of clinically approved IMRT plans, a random forest regression algorithm is trained to map a multitude of anatomical features into an individual beam score. An optimization scheme is then built to select and adjust the beam angles, considering the learned interbeam dependencies. The validity and quality of the automatically selected beams evaluated using the manually selected beams from the corresponding clinical plans as the ground truth. Results: The analysis included 149 clinically approved thoracic IMRT plans. For a randomly selected test subset of 27 plans, IMRT plans were generated using automatically selected beams and compared to the clinical plans. The comparison of the predicted and the clinical beam angles demonstrated a good average correspondence between the two (angular distance 16.8° ± 10°, correlation 0.75 ± 0.2). The dose distributions of the semiautomatic and clinical plans were equivalent in terms of primary target volume

  2. The Chicago Thoracic Oncology Database Consortium: A Multisite Database Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Carey, George B; Tan, Yi-Hung Carol; Bokhary, Ujala; Itkonen, Michelle; Szeto, Kyle; Wallace, James; Campbell, Nicholas; Hensing, Thomas; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: An increasing amount of clinical data is available to biomedical researchers, but specifically designed database and informatics infrastructures are needed to handle this data effectively. Multiple research groups should be able to pool and share this data in an efficient manner. The Chicago Thoracic Oncology Database Consortium (CTODC) was created to standardize data collection and facilitate the pooling and sharing of data at institutions throughout Chicago and across the world. We assessed the CTODC by conducting a proof of principle investigation on lung cancer patients who took erlotinib. This study does not look into epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but rather it discusses the development and utilization of the database involved. Methods:  We have implemented the Thoracic Oncology Program Database Project (TOPDP) Microsoft Access, the Thoracic Oncology Research Program (TORP) Velos, and the TORP REDCap databases for translational research efforts. Standard operating procedures (SOPs) were created to document the construction and proper utilization of these databases. These SOPs have been made available freely to other institutions that have implemented their own databases patterned on these SOPs. Results: A cohort of 373 lung cancer patients who took erlotinib was identified. The EGFR mutation statuses of patients were analyzed. Out of the 70 patients that were tested, 55 had mutations while 15 did not. In terms of overall survival and duration of treatment, the cohort demonstrated that EGFR-mutated patients had a longer duration of erlotinib treatment and longer overall survival compared to their EGFR wild-type counterparts who received erlotinib. Discussion: The investigation successfully yielded data from all institutions of the CTODC. While the investigation identified challenges, such as the difficulty of data transfer and potential duplication of patient data, these issues can be resolved

  3. Long-Term Results after Proximal Thoracic Aortic Redo Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Czerny, Martin; Barchichat, Ilan; Meszaros, Katharina; Sodeck, Gottfried H.; Weber, Alberto; Reineke, David; Englberger, Lars; Schönhoff, Florian; Kadner, Alexander; Jenni, Hansjörg; Schmidli, Jürg; Carrel, Thierry P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate early and mid-term results in patients undergoing proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery. Methods We analyzed 60 patients (median age 60 years, median logistic EuroSCORE 40) who underwent proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery between January 2005 and April 2012. Outcome and risk factors were analyzed. Results In hospital mortality was 13%, perioperative neurologic injury was 7%. Fifty percent of patients underwent redo surgery in an urgent or emergency setting. In 65%, partial or total arch replacement with or without conventional or frozen elephant trunk extension was performed. The preoperative logistic EuroSCORE I confirmed to be a reliable predictor of adverse outcome- (ROC 0.786, 95%CI 0.64–0.93) as did the new EuroSCORE II model: ROC 0.882 95%CI 0.78–0.98. Extensive individual logistic EuroSCORE I levels more than 67 showed an OR of 7.01, 95%CI 1.43–34.27. A EuroSCORE II larger than 28 showed an OR of 4.44 (95%CI 1.4–14.06). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified a critical preoperative state (OR 7.96, 95%CI 1.51–38.79) but not advanced age (OR 2.46, 95%CI 0.48–12.66) as the strongest independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Median follow-up was 23 months (1–52 months). One year and five year actuarial survival rates were 83% and 69% respectively. Freedom from reoperation during follow-up was 100%. Conclusions Despite a substantial early attrition rate in patients presenting with a critical preoperative state, proximal thoracic aortic redo surgery provides excellent early and mid-term results. Higher EuroSCORE I and II levels and a critical preoperative state but not advanced age are independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. As a consequence, age alone should no longer be regarded as a contraindication for surgical treatment in this particular group of patients. PMID:23469220

  4. The top view for analysis of scoliosis progression

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Tarlton, M.A.; Cook, L.T.; Berridge, A.S.; Asher, M.A.

    1983-05-01

    Using computerized spinal analysis, a new top view was developed that displays the spine as if the observer were above and looking down on the patient. Serial top views were obtained of 12 patients with idiopathic scoliosis. In five patients with clinically stable curves, the top views showed no change. One patient with an enlaring rib hump was seen on the top view to have progressive kyphosis but stable scoliosis. Six patients with progressive scoliosis all demonstrated collapse of the thoracic curve in the anteroposterior direction. Five of these six patients had associated lumbar curves. Three lumbar curves demonstrated collapse in the anteroposterior direction similar to the collapse of the thoracic curves, and the other two curves appeared elongated in the anteroposterior direction.

  5. Minimal aortic injury of the thoracic aorta: imaging appearances and outcome.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Martin L D; Lehnert, Bruce E; Lungren, Rachel S; Narparla, Chitti Babu; Mitsumori, Lee; Gross, Joel A; Starnes, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the frequency, computed tomographic angiography (CTA) imaging appearance, management, and outcome of patients who present with minimal thoracic aortic injury. This retrospective study was Institutional Review Board-approved. Eighty-one patients with blunt traumatic aortic injuries (BTAI) were identified between 2004 and 2008, comprising 23 patients with minimal aortic injury (MAI) (mean age, 43.2 years ±18.2 years; 12 males and 11 females) and 58 patients with non-minimal aortic injury (mean age, 42.6 years ±22.7 years). CTA imaging was reviewed for each patient to differentiate those with MAI from those with non-MAI BTAI. Inclusion criteria for MAI on CTA were: post-traumatic abnormality of the internal contour of the aorta wall projecting into the lumen, intimal flap, intraluminal filling defect, intramural hematoma, and no evidence of an abnormality to the external contour of the aorta. Relevant follow-up imaging for MAI patients was also reviewed for resolution, stability, or progression of the vascular injury. The electronic medical record of each patient was reviewed and mechanism of injury, injury severity score, associated injuries, type and date of management, outcome, and days from injury to last medical consultation. Minimal aortic injury represented 28.4 % of all BTAI over the study period. Mean injury severity score (37.1), age (43.2 years), and gender did not differ significantly between MAI and non-MAI types of BTAI. Most MAI occurred in the descending thoracic aorta (16/23, 69 %). Without operative or endovascular repair, there was no death or complication due to MAI. One death occurred secondary to MAI (4.4 %) in a patient who underwent endovascular repair and surgical bypass, compared with an overall mortality rate of 8.6 % in the non-MAI BTAI group (p = 0.508). The most common CT appearance of MAI was a rounded or triangular intra-luminal aortic filling detect (18/23 patients, 78 %). In a mean of 466 days of

  6. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Sac Rupture for Type IIIa Endoleak in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Mangini, Monica Bracchi, Elena Recaldini, Chiara; Cocozza, Eugenio; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Carlo Lagana, Domenico Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    Elective endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pathology has been applied in a variety of conditions. The complications of thoracic aortic stenting are also well recognized. Endoleak after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is the most frequent complication; among them, type III is the least frequent. Endovascular treatment of type III endoleak is generally performed under elective conditions; less frequently, in emergency. We report a successful emergency endovascular management of post-thoracic endovascular repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture due to type IIIa endoleak.

  7. Asian perspectives in thoracic surgery: clinical innovation in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Yu; Lin, Chen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The development of minimally-invasive surgery of the thorax began in the 1990s, but not until the recent decade did we see dramatic improvements in patient care and refinement of technique. The current generation has witnessed the evolution from traditional thoracotomy, to a single-port, non-intubated thoracoscopic approach. The investigation of subxiphoid single-port, transumbilical approach, and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) in animal model are also undergoing. In Taiwan, several talented young surgeons have vigorously devoted their ideas and innovations to this field, making the Taiwan surgical society vivid and prosperous. The desire to improve, and willingness to change are the foundation of those surgeons. Providing better patient care is their impetus to strive for improvement. This article provides an account of how minimally-invasive thoracic surgery has evolved in recent years, and what clinical innovations have been developed by the Taiwan surgical society. PMID:27651935

  8. [New targets and new drugs in thoracic oncology].

    PubMed

    Rouviere, D; Bousquet, E; Pons, E; Milia, J-D; Guibert, N; Mazieres, J

    2015-10-01

    A number of mechanisms that drive oncogenesis have been deciphered over the last 20 years. The main oncogenic factors in the field of thoracic oncology are mutations of EGFR, KRAS, and EML4-ALK translocation, which are most often reported in adenocarcinomas. However, new molecular targets have been highlighted recently including BRAF mutations, HER2 or PI3K, new translocations such as ROS1 or KIF5B-RET. Molecular abnormalities have also been identified in tumors other than adenocarcinoma (squamous and small cell carcinoma). Therapeutic strategies have been designed to inhibit these signaling pathways including monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Some of these molecules are now approved as therapies, others are currently undergoing testing in clinical trials. We here present a review of novel targeted agents for lung cancer.

  9. Solitary fibrous tumor of the thoracic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomoyuki; Moriyama, Eiji; Beck, Hiroichi; Sonobe, Hiroshi

    2005-07-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with a rare case of primary solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) occurring in the extramedullary thoracic spinal cord. T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed the tumor as a mildly hypointense area with homogeneous enhancement by gadolinium. T2-weighted MR imaging showed a hypointense mass with peritumoral edema. The tumor arose from one of the posterior spinal roots, with no attachment to the dura. The tumor was clearly circumscribed from the surrounding cord tissue and easily removed. Histological examination showed the tumor predominantly consisted of spindle cells separated by abundant collagen matrix fibers. Tumor cells were strongly positive for vimentin and CD34, but negative for glial fibrillary acidic protein, S-100 protein, epithelial membrane antigen, myelin basic protein, and keratin. SFT should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell central nervous system neoplasms, although SFT is extremely rare in the spinal cord.

  10. Aortic Angiosarcoma: A Rare Cause for Leaking Thoracic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, S. L. Locke, R.; Sandison, A.; Jenkins, M.; Hamady, M.

    2011-02-15

    Primary malignant tumours of the aorta are rare. They present with aneurysm formation, arterial occlusion, and embolic phenomenon. We report the case of a 56-year-old man whose initial presentation and investigations lead to emergency endovascular stenting of a descending thoracic aneurysm with a contained leak. Initial response was favourable, yet the patient presented again with worsening symptoms. The circum-aortic haematoma expanded by 50% on subsequent imaging, but no endoleak was identified. When altered bone marrow signal was identified on magnetic resonance imaging, the possibility of malignancy was considered. A metastatic skin lesion was then biopsied, which demonstrated morphological and immunohistochemical features consistent with metastases from a pleomorphic sarcoma of the aorta.

  11. Shoulder-lap seat belts and thoracic transection.

    PubMed

    Byard, R W

    2002-06-01

    While seat belt usage significantly decreases mortality and morbidity from traffic accidents, specific injuries may also occur. Two cases are described in adults where the wearing of three point restraints (shoulder-lap belts) in a serious high-speed vehicle accident resulted in fatal injuries to both a driver and a passenger. 'Mirror image' fractures of the sternum, rib cage and clavicles, with separation of the two halves of the rib cages and underlying trauma to the hearts and thoracic aortae resulted in death in both victims. Profound life-threatening internal injuries may be caused by seat belts in the absence of significant cutaneous injury. The pattern of internal trauma can also be useful in determining whether a seat belt was worn at the time of the accident, and on which side of the vehicle the deceased was sitting.

  12. Asian perspectives in thoracic surgery: clinical innovation in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Yu; Lin, Chen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The development of minimally-invasive surgery of the thorax began in the 1990s, but not until the recent decade did we see dramatic improvements in patient care and refinement of technique. The current generation has witnessed the evolution from traditional thoracotomy, to a single-port, non-intubated thoracoscopic approach. The investigation of subxiphoid single-port, transumbilical approach, and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) in animal model are also undergoing. In Taiwan, several talented young surgeons have vigorously devoted their ideas and innovations to this field, making the Taiwan surgical society vivid and prosperous. The desire to improve, and willingness to change are the foundation of those surgeons. Providing better patient care is their impetus to strive for improvement. This article provides an account of how minimally-invasive thoracic surgery has evolved in recent years, and what clinical innovations have been developed by the Taiwan surgical society.

  13. Thoracic aorta aneurysm successfully operated on during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Biskupski, Andrzej; Kuligowska, Ewelina; Listewnik, Mariusz; Brykczyński, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of an asymptomatic 26-year-old female patient with a huge thoracic aneurysm discovered at a routine echo screening. The patient had previously been operated on for coarctation of the aorta in childhood and also had diagnosed bicuspid aortic valve. The operation was carried out in extracorporeal circulation at the 22nd week of gestation without any complications. A few months later in the 38th week of pregnancy a baby girl was delivered by cesarean section with an Apgar score of 10. The patient is scheduled for implantation of a stent graft to the descending aorta, because the CT of the chest done a few months after delivery confirmed presence of a significant aneurysm located just below the left subclavian artery. PMID:26336442

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D A

    2001-10-01

    MRI is an extremely useful technique for the evaluation of the thoracic aorta. It provides a comprehensive evaluation of all the important structures within the chest and allows for high-resolution imaging of both the aortic lumen and the wall itself. As such, it is a sensitive method for delineating the extent of disease, branch-vessel involvement, and superimposed complications. Technical advances, such as stepped-table MRA and bolus-timing strategies, continue to improve overall image quality. In addition, the recent development of blood-pool contrast agents may further impact the diagnostic yield. Given these facts, MRI is likely to remain a mainstay in this patient population for years to come. PMID:11715325

  15. Compartmental responses after thoracic irradiation of mice: Strain differences

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.-S.; Liu, W.-C.; Jung, S.-M.; Chen, F.-H.; Wu, C.-R.; McBride, William H.; Lee, C.-C.; Hong, J.-H. . E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To examine and compare the molecular and cellular processes leading to radiation fibrosis and pneumonitis in C57BL/6J and C3H/HeN mice. Methods and Materials: At indicated times after various doses of thoracic irradiation, the cell populations obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage of C57BL/6J mice were differentially analyzed by cytology and assessed by RNase protection (RPA) assay for levels of cytokines and related genes. The molecular responses in bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) populations were compared with those in whole lung of C57BL/6J mice and with those of C3H/HeN mice. The former strain develops late radiation fibrosis, whereas the latter develop subacute radiation pneumonitis. Results: In C57BL/6J mice, a decrease in the total number of BAL cells was found 1 week after 6, 12, or 20 Gy thoracic irradiation with a subsequent dose-dependent increase up to 6 months. After 12 and 20 Gy, large, foamy macrophages and multinucleated cells became evident in BAL at 3 weeks, only to disappear at 4 months and reappear at 6 months. This biphasic response was mirrored by changes expression of mRNA for proinflammatory cytokines and the Mac-1 macrophage-associated antigen. As with BAL, whole lung tissue also showed biphasic cytokine and Mac-1 mRNA responses, but there were striking temporal differences between the two compartments, with changes in whole lung tissue correlating better than BAL with the onset of fibrosis in this strain. The radiation-induced proinflammatory mRNA responses had strain-dependent and strain-independent components. Thoracic irradiation of C3H/HeN induced similar increases in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-1{alpha}/{beta}, and interferon (IFN)-{gamma} mRNA expression in lung as it did in C57BL/6J mice during the 'presymptom' phase at 1-2 months. However, immediately preceding and during the pneumonitic time period at 3-4 months, TNF-{alpha} and IL-1{alpha}/{beta} mRNAs were highly upregulated in C3H/HeN mice, which

  16. Marfan Syndrome and Related Heritable Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Julie; Renard, Marjolijn; Campens, Laurence; Mosquera, Laura Muino; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul; Callewaert, Bert; Kodolitsch, Yskert von

    2015-01-01

    In this overview we aim to address a number of recent insights and developments regarding clinical aspects, etiology, and treatment of Heritable Thoracic Aortic Disease (H-TAD). We will focus on monogenetic disorders related to aortic aneurysms. H-TADs are rare but they provide a unique basis for the study of underlying pathogenetic pathways in the complex disease process of aneurysm formation. The understanding of pathomechanisms may help us to identify medical treatment targets to improve prognosis. Among the monogenetic aneurysm disorders, Marfan syndrome is considered as a paradigm entity and many insights are derived from the study of clinical, genetic and animal models for Marfan syndrome. We will therefore first provide a detailed overview of the various aspects of Marfan syndrome after which we will give an overview of related H-TAD entities. PMID:26306841

  17. Asian perspectives in thoracic surgery: clinical innovation in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao-Yu; Lin, Chen-Sung; Liu, Chia-Chuan

    2016-08-01

    The development of minimally-invasive surgery of the thorax began in the 1990s, but not until the recent decade did we see dramatic improvements in patient care and refinement of technique. The current generation has witnessed the evolution from traditional thoracotomy, to a single-port, non-intubated thoracoscopic approach. The investigation of subxiphoid single-port, transumbilical approach, and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) in animal model are also undergoing. In Taiwan, several talented young surgeons have vigorously devoted their ideas and innovations to this field, making the Taiwan surgical society vivid and prosperous. The desire to improve, and willingness to change are the foundation of those surgeons. Providing better patient care is their impetus to strive for improvement. This article provides an account of how minimally-invasive thoracic surgery has evolved in recent years, and what clinical innovations have been developed by the Taiwan surgical society. PMID:27651935

  18. Excision of Thoracic Chondrosarcoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Rishi; Theodore, Pierre; Mummaneni, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are cartilage-matrix-forming tumors that make up 20-27% of primary malignant bone tumors and are the third most common primary bone malignancy after multiple myelomas and osteosarcomas. Radiographic assessment of this condition includes plain radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor characterization and delineation of intraosseous and extraosseous involvement. Most chondrosarcomas are refractory to chemotherapy and radiation therapy; therefore, wide en bloc surgical excision offers the best chance for cure. Chondrosarcomas frequently affect the pelvis and upper and lower extremities. In rare instances, the chest wall can be involved, with chondrosarcomas occurring in the ribs, sternum, anterior costosternal junction, and posterior costotransverse junction. In this article, we present a patient with thoracic chondrosarcoma centered at the left T7 costotransverse joint with effacement of the left T7-T8 neuroforamen. We also detail our operative technique of wide en bloc chondrosarcoma excision and review current literature on this topic. PMID:27588229

  19. Excision of Thoracic Chondrosarcoma: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Le, Hai V; Wadhwa, Rishi; Theodore, Pierre; Mummaneni, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are cartilage-matrix-forming tumors that make up 20-27% of primary malignant bone tumors and are the third most common primary bone malignancy after multiple myelomas and osteosarcomas. Radiographic assessment of this condition includes plain radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor characterization and delineation of intraosseous and extraosseous involvement. Most chondrosarcomas are refractory to chemotherapy and radiation therapy; therefore, wide en bloc surgical excision offers the best chance for cure. Chondrosarcomas frequently affect the pelvis and upper and lower extremities. In rare instances, the chest wall can be involved, with chondrosarcomas occurring in the ribs, sternum, anterior costosternal junction, and posterior costotransverse junction. In this article, we present a patient with thoracic chondrosarcoma centered at the left T7 costotransverse joint with effacement of the left T7-T8 neuroforamen. We also detail our operative technique of wide en bloc chondrosarcoma excision and review current literature on this topic. PMID:27588229

  20. A Case Of Atypical Presentation of Thoracic Osteomyelitis & Paraspinal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Utkarsh

    2008-01-01

    Here presented is a case involving a 44-year-old man with a chief complaint of sharp lateral right-sided rib pain with notable radiation to the anterior portion of the thorax and minor radiation around the lateral back. The etiology of the pain and radiculopathy, which was initially attributed to a right-sided rib fracture, was later accurately credited to a paraspinal abscess discovered on a lateral X-ray of the thoracic spine. Subsequently, studies including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed Tomography (CT), and bone scan all confirmed the diagnosis of a paraspinal abscess between the right lobe and its neighboring T9 and T10 vertebrae. The mass was biopsied and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. Appropriate surgical and medical intervention was possible due to the early diagnosis of the abscess. PMID:19148317

  1. Thoracic outlet syndrome secondary to a mid-clavicle malunion.

    PubMed

    Beliaev, Andrei M; Fougere, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old man presented with a painful 'clunking' sensation in the right mid-clavicle, and pain and dysaesthesia along the medial aspect of his right arm and hand. Three months earlier, he had been involved in a vehicle accident and sustained a right clavicle fracture. He had a large step off of the right clavicle with a medialisation of the right shoulder. At 90° abduction in external rotation of both shoulders he developed pain, paraesthesia and disappearance of the right radial artery pulsation. CT of the right shoulder in the neutral position demonstrated the clavicle-to-first rib distance of 5.5 mm, MRI showed the clavicular bone callus had a mass effect with effacement of anterior fat adjacent to the brachial plexus cords. He was diagnosed with thoracic outlet syndrome and underwent a corrective right clavicle osteotomy with the use of an AcuMed superior clavicle plate. PMID:26045517

  2. Electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy and robotic-assisted thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Christie, Sara

    2014-06-01

    With the use of electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy and robotics, lung lesions can be diagnosed and resected during one surgical procedure. Global positioning system technology allows surgeons to identify and mark a thoracic tumor, and then robotics technology allows them to perform minimally invasive resection and cancer staging procedures. Nurses on the perioperative robotics team must consider the logistics of providing safe and competent care when performing combined procedures during one surgical encounter. Instrumentation, OR organization and room setup, and patient positioning are important factors to consider to complete the procedure systematically and efficiently. This revolutionary concept of combining navigational bronchoscopy with robotics requires a team of dedicated nurses to facilitate the sequence of events essential for providing optimal patient outcomes in highly advanced surgical procedures.

  3. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Via Internal Iliac Artery Conduit].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Taro; Tobe, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Hironobu; Ijyuin, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Masato; Oka, Takanori; Misato, Takuya; Tsunemi, Kotaro; Tanimura, Nobuhiro

    2016-09-01

    A 77-year-old man with a history of stent implantation in the right common iliac artery(CIA) and the left external iliac artery(EIA) was admitted to our hospital for a rapid growth of an aneurysm( max 53 mm) at Th11 level of the descending aorta. Although thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was required, there were many problems about access rout. The infrarenal abdominal aorta and the left EIA were severely calcified, and the lumens of the right CIA stent(5.3 mm) and the left EIA stent( 4.3 mm) were small in size. Besides, the left CIA was short(13 mm). Therefore, TEVAR was performed by retrograde approach from the left internal iliac artery( IIA) with a tube graft conduit in the hybrid operation room. IIA is a useful option for an access rout in endovascular aortic repair. PMID:27586313

  4. A severe case of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bucek, R A; Schnürer, G; Ahmadi, A; Maca, T H; Meissl, G; Minar, E

    2000-11-24

    We report a 21-year-old patient who presented at the outpatient department of angiology with incipient necroses in the fingertips of the right hand. Colour-coded duplex sonography and angiography demonstrated occlusion of the right brachial, ulnar and radial arteries, obviously resulting from an embolism from the subclavian artery narrowed by a cervical rib. After partly successful local thrombolysis this accessory rib was resected. We review angiologic signs and neurological symptoms of the thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) and analyse the current literature regarding diagnostic procedures and treatment. This complicated and severe case of TOS in a young patient ending with paresis of the right arm and partial finger amputation emphasises the importance of early diagnosis of this condition. PMID:11142135

  5. Asian perspectives in thoracic surgery: clinical innovation in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao-Yu; Lin, Chen-Sung; Liu, Chia-Chuan

    2016-08-01

    The development of minimally-invasive surgery of the thorax began in the 1990s, but not until the recent decade did we see dramatic improvements in patient care and refinement of technique. The current generation has witnessed the evolution from traditional thoracotomy, to a single-port, non-intubated thoracoscopic approach. The investigation of subxiphoid single-port, transumbilical approach, and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) in animal model are also undergoing. In Taiwan, several talented young surgeons have vigorously devoted their ideas and innovations to this field, making the Taiwan surgical society vivid and prosperous. The desire to improve, and willingness to change are the foundation of those surgeons. Providing better patient care is their impetus to strive for improvement. This article provides an account of how minimally-invasive thoracic surgery has evolved in recent years, and what clinical innovations have been developed by the Taiwan surgical society.

  6. T cells generated in the absence of a thoracic thymus fail to establish homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Smolarchuk, Christa; Zhu, Lin Fu; Chan, William F N; Anderson, Colin C

    2014-08-01

    Cervical thymus mimics the thoracic thymus in supporting T-cell development and exists in a subset of mice and humans. Importantly, it remains unknown whether the cervical thymus can generate T cells that are self-tolerant in the complete absence of signals from the thoracic thymus. Using a fetal liver reconstitution model in thoracic thymectomized RAG(-/-) mice, we found that T cells could be generated without contribution from the thoracic thymus. However, these mice had decreased T cells, increased proportions of effector memory T cells and Treg phenotype cells, increased serum IgG1/2b, and increased frequency of T cells expressing IFN-γ, IL-17 or IL-10. Half of the mice that received a thoracic thymectomy and fetal liver cells, unlike sham surgery controls, developed substantial morbidity with age. Disease was associated with lymphopenia-driven activation rather than inherent defects in the cervical thymus, as both thoracic and cervical thymocytes could generate disease in lymphopenic recipients. Administration of the homeostatic cytokine IL-7 caused a rapid, transient increase in T-cell numbers and reduced the time to disease onset. Together the data suggests that the cervical thymus can function in the complete absence of the thoracic thymus; however, the T cells generated do not establish homeostasis.

  7. Thoracic Kyphosis is Now Uncommon Amongst Children and Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barker, Nicki; Raghavan, Ashok; Buttling, Pauline; Douros, Kostas; Everard, Mark Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Historically, thoracic kyphosis has been reported to be common amongst patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The mechanisms leading to the development of this abnormality of the chest wall are not fully understood. In order to explore the prevalence of the condition amongst children with CF in the early twenty-first century and to explore factors that might be contributing to its development, a retrospective cross sectional study was undertaken in a regional CF unit. Data were obtained from 74 children with CF aged 8-16 years attending for their annual review. Thoracic kyphosis was measured from lateral chest X-ray using an alternative Cobb method. Lung function, disease severity, and nutritional status were also recorded. Correlations between measures were explored using a multiple linear regression model. The range of Cobb angles measured was 5.4-44.3° with thoracic kyphosis identified in only two subjects. There was no correlation between age and thoracic kyphosis, however, there was a significant correlation between lung function and thoracic kyphosis (p = 0.004). Regression coefficient (b) was -0.26 (95% CI: -0.44, -0.08). The prevalence of thoracic kyphosis is significantly less amongst children with CF than previously reported. This appears likely to be associated with the overall improvements in pulmonary status. Studies of older populations may bring further understanding of increasing thoracic kyphosis in people with CF. PMID:24596827

  8. Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement Guide Plate Produced by Three-Dimensional (3-D) Laser Printing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongliang; Guo, Kaijing; Yang, Huilin; Wu, Dongying; Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate produced by 3-D laser printing. Material/Methods Thoracic pedicle samples of 3 adult cadavers were randomly assigned for 3-D CT scans. The 3-D thoracic models were established by using medical Mimics software, and a screw path was designed with scanned data. Then the individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate models, matched to the backside of thoracic vertebral plates, were produced with a 3-D laser printer. Screws were placed with assistance of a guide plate. Then, the placement was assessed. Results With the data provided by CT scans, 27 individualized guide plates were produced by 3-D printing. There was no significant difference in sex and relevant parameters of left and right sides among individuals (P>0.05). Screws were placed with assistance of guide plates, and all screws were in the correct positions without penetration of pedicles, under direct observation and anatomic evaluation post-operatively. Conclusions A thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate can be produced by 3-D printing. With a high accuracy in placement and convenient operation, it provides a new method for accurate placement of thoracic pedicle screws. PMID:27194139

  9. Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement Guide Plate Produced by Three-Dimensional (3-D) Laser Printing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Guo, Kaijing; Yang, Huilin; Wu, Dongying; Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate produced by 3-D laser printing. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thoracic pedicle samples of 3 adult cadavers were randomly assigned for 3-D CT scans. The 3-D thoracic models were established by using medical Mimics software, and a screw path was designed with scanned data. Then the individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate models, matched to the backside of thoracic vertebral plates, were produced with a 3-D laser printer. Screws were placed with assistance of a guide plate. Then, the placement was assessed. RESULTS With the data provided by CT scans, 27 individualized guide plates were produced by 3-D printing. There was no significant difference in sex and relevant parameters of left and right sides among individuals (P>0.05). Screws were placed with assistance of guide plates, and all screws were in the correct positions without penetration of pedicles, under direct observation and anatomic evaluation post-operatively. CONCLUSIONS A thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate can be produced by 3-D printing. With a high accuracy in placement and convenient operation, it provides a new method for accurate placement of thoracic pedicle screws. PMID:27194139

  10. Unusual chest wall pain caused by thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kinshi; Yabuki, Shoji; Otani, Koji; Nikaido, Takuya; Otoshi, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is clinically rare. There are few cases of disc herniation of the thoracic spine in top athletes described in the literature. We herein present a rare case of chest wall pain due to thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher. A 30-year-old, left-handed pitcher complained of left-sided chest wall pain in the region of his lower ribs during a game. Neurological examination revealed hypoesthesia of the left side of the chest at the level of the lower thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed a left-sided paramedian disc herniation at the T9-T10 level. The player was initially prescribed rest, administration of pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), and subsequent physical rehabilitation. He was able to resume full training and pitching without medication 6 months after the onset. A follow-up MRI of the thoracic spine showed a reduction in the size of the herniated disc compared to the initial findings. Though relatively rare, thoracic disc herniation should be considered in cases of chest wall pain in athletes.

  11. Unusual chest wall pain caused by thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kinshi; Yabuki, Shoji; Otani, Koji; Nikaido, Takuya; Otoshi, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is clinically rare. There are few cases of disc herniation of the thoracic spine in top athletes described in the literature. We herein present a rare case of chest wall pain due to thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher. A 30-year-old, left-handed pitcher complained of left-sided chest wall pain in the region of his lower ribs during a game. Neurological examination revealed hypoesthesia of the left side of the chest at the level of the lower thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed a left-sided paramedian disc herniation at the T9-T10 level. The player was initially prescribed rest, administration of pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), and subsequent physical rehabilitation. He was able to resume full training and pitching without medication 6 months after the onset. A follow-up MRI of the thoracic spine showed a reduction in the size of the herniated disc compared to the initial findings. Though relatively rare, thoracic disc herniation should be considered in cases of chest wall pain in athletes. PMID:26983590

  12. A center of excellence for the medical application of lasers: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Berns, M.W.

    1994-04-01

    This progress report presents six areas where lasers are used in diagnostic or therapeutic uses. They are: oncology; pulmonary/thoracic surgery; dermatology/plastic surgery; obstetrics and gynecology; ophthalmology; and dentistry. Within each area research findings and all publications resulting from the research are summarized.

  13. 14-3-3 in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Swain, Mamuni; Willard, Belinda; Scholtz, Jaclyn; Svensson, Lars G.; Roselli, Eric E.; Pettersson, Gosta; Johnston, Douglas R.; Soltesz, Edward G.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Stuehr, Dennis; Daly, Thomas M.; Hoffman, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Large vessel vasculitides (LVV) are a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by injury to and anatomic modifications of large vessels, including the aorta and its branch vessels. Disease etiology is unknown. This study was undertaken to identify antigen targets within affected vessel walls in aortic root, ascending aorta, and aortic arch surgical specimens from patients with LVV, including giant cell arteritis, Takayasu arteritis, and isolated focal aortitis. Methods Thoracic aortic aneurysm specimens and autologous blood were acquired from consenting patients who underwent aorta reconstruction procedures. Aorta proteins were extracted from both patients with LVV and age-, race-, and sex-matched disease controls with noninflammatory aneurysms. A total of 108 serum samples from patients with LVV, matched controls, and controls with antinuclear antibodies, different forms of vasculitis, or sepsis were tested. Results Evaluation of 108 serum samples and 22 aortic tissue specimens showed that 78% of patients with LVV produced antibodies to 14-3-3 proteins in the aortic wall (93.7% specificity), whereas controls were less likely to do so (6.7% produced antibodies). LVV patient sera contained autoantibody sufficient to immunoprecipitate 14-3-3 protein(s) from aortic lysates. Three of 7 isoforms of 14-3-3 were found to be up-regulated in aorta specimens from patients with LVV, and 2 isoforms (ε and ζ) were found to be antigenic in LVV. Conclusion This is the first study to use sterile, snap-frozen thoracic aorta biopsy specimens to identify autoantigens in LVV. Our findings indicate that 78% of patients with LVV have antibody reactivity to 14-3-3 protein(s). The precise role of these antibodies and 14-3-3 proteins in LVV pathogenesis deserves further study. PMID:25917817

  14. Endograft Collapse After Endovascular Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bandorski, Dirk Brueck, Martin; Guenther, Hans-Ulrich; Manke, Christoph

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular treatment is an established therapy for thoracic aortic disease. Collapse of the endograft is a potentially fatal complication. We reviewed 16 patients with a thoracic endograft between 2001 and 2006. Medical records of the treated patients were studied. Data collected include age, gender, diagnosis, indication for endoluminal treatment, type of endograft, and time of follow up. All patients (n = 16; mean age, 61 years; range, 21-82 years) underwent computed tomography (CT) for location of the lesion and planning of the intervention. Time of follow-up with CT scan ranged from 1 to 61 months. Indications for endovascular treatment were degenerative aneurysm (n = 7; 44%), aortic dissection (n = 2; 12%), perforated aortic ulcer (n = 4; 25%), and traumatic aortic injury (n = 3; 19%). Three patients suffered from a collapse of the endograft (one patient distal, two patients proximal) between 3 and 8 days after endovascular treatment. These patients were younger (mean age, 37 {+-} 25 years vs. 67 {+-} 16 years; P < 0.05) and showed more oversizing (proximal, 36 {+-} 19.8% vs. 29 {+-} 20.7% [P > 0.05]; distal, 45 {+-} 23.5% vs. 38 {+-} 21.7% [P > 0.05]). Proximal collapse was corrected by placing a bare stent. In conclusion, risk factors for stent-graft collapse are a small lumen of the aorta and a small radius of the aortic arch curvature (young patients), as well as oversizing, which is an important risk factor and is described for different types of endografts and protheses (Gore TAG and Cook Zenith). Dilatation of the collapsed stent-graft is not sufficient. Following therapy implantation of a second stent or surgery is necessary in patients with a proximal endograft collapse. Distal endograft collapse can possibly be treated conservatively under close follow-up.

  15. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; González-Pascual, Montserrat; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; de Miguel-Yanes, José Mª; Méndez-Bailón, Manuel; de Miguel-Diez, Javier; Salinero-Fort, Miguel Ángel; Perez-Farinos, Napoleón; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; López-de-Andrés, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe trends in the rates of discharge due to thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) among patients with and without type 2 diabetes in Spain (2001–2012). We used national hospital discharge data to select all of the patients who were discharged from the hospital after TAAD. We focused our analysis on patients with TAAD in the primary diagnosis field. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status (diabetic or nondiabetic). Incidence was calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status. We divided the study period into 4 periods of 3 years each. We analyzed diagnostic and surgical procedures, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. We identified 48,746 patients who were discharged with TAAD. The rates of discharge due to TAAD increased significantly in both diabetic patients (12.65 cases per 100,000 in 2001/2003 to 23.92 cases per 100,000 in 2010/2012) and nondiabetic patients (17.39 to 21.75, respectively). The incidence was higher among nondiabetic patients than diabetic patients in 3 of the 4 time periods. The percentage of patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair increased in both groups, whereas the percentage of patients who underwent open repair decreased. The frequency of hospitalization increased at a higher rate among diabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07–1.20) than among nondiabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.08, 95% CI 1.07–1.11). The in-hospital mortality was lower in diabetic patients than in nondiabetic patients (odds ratio 0.83, 95% CI 0.69–0.99). The incidence rates were higher in nondiabetic patients. Hospitalizations seemed to increase at a higher rate among diabetic patients. Diabetic patients had a significantly lower mortality, possibly because of earlier diagnoses, and improved and more readily available treatments. PMID:27149499

  16. Bilateral Internal Thoracic Artery Configuration for Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Boodhwani, Munir; Hanet, Claude; de Kerchove, Laurent; Navarra, Emiliano; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-01-01

    Background— Bilateral internal thoracic arteries (BITA) have demonstrated superior patency and improved survival in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. However, the optimal configuration for BITA utilization and its effect on long-term outcome remains uncertain. Methods and Results— We randomly assigned 304 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting using BITA to either in situ or Y grafting configurations. The primary end point was 3-year angiographic patency. Secondary end points included major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (ie, death from any cause, stroke, myocardial infarction, or repeat revascularization) at 7 years. More coronary targets were able to be revascularized using internal thoracic arteries in patients randomized to Y grafting versus in situ group (3.2±0.8 versus 2.4±0.5 arteries/patient; P<0.01). The primary end point did not show significant differences in graft patency between groups. Secondary end points occurred more frequently in the in situ group (P=0.03), with 7-year rates of 34±10% in the in situ and 25±12% in the Y grafting groups, driven largely by a higher incidence of repeat revascularization in the in situ group (14±4.5% versus 7.4±3.2% at 7 years; P=0.009). There were no significant differences in hospital mortality or morbidity or in late survival, myocardial infarction, or stroke between groups. Conclusions— Three-year systematic angiographic follow-up revealed no significant difference in graft patency between the 2 BITA configurations. However, compared with in situ configuration, the use of BITA in a Y grafting configuration results in lower rates of major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events at 7 years. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01666366. PMID:27406988

  17. Enhanced recovery pathway for thoracic surgery in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Solli, Piergiorgio

    2016-01-01

    Background Enhanced recovery (ER) refers to a combination of perioperative interventions designed to minimise the impact of surgery on patients’ recovery in order to reduce postoperative complications and to allow an early discharge reducing hospital costs. Methods An ER protocol was established at our institution following a review of the best evidence available. We introduced a multi-disciplinary integrated perioperative pathway by engaging with every person involved, including the patients themselves. The programme was monitored using specifically-designed patients related outcome measures (PROMs). Results One-hundred and fifty-four ER patients were compared with 171 controls from the year before ER was introduced. There was an 80% increase in same-day admissions, with a net gain of more than 300 patient bed-days. The ER group had a significantly higher number of procedures performed by video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) (ER, 32.9% vs. 9.4%, P=0.0001) and a lower rate of admission to the intensive care unit (ER, 5.8% versus 12.9%, P=0.04). Patients on the ER programme had a significantly reduced postoperative length of stay (mean ER, 5.2 vs. 11.7 days, P<0.0001). Patient satisfaction was higher in the ER group after a patient survey. The project resulted in a net saving of £214,000 for the Trust for the 2013/2014 financial year. We were also able to increase the number of patients who underwent thoracic surgery in 2013/2014 by 30% (159 patients) compared with 2012/2013. Conclusions The ER pathway has proven to be a safe perioperative management strategy to improve patient satisfaction and to reduce the length of hospital stay and cost after major thoracic surgery, without increasing morbidity or mortality. PMID:26941974

  18. Origin of thoracic spinal network activity during locomotor-like activity in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Beliez, Lauriane; Barrière, Grégory; Bertrand, Sandrine S; Cazalets, Jean-René

    2015-04-15

    Effective quadrupedal locomotor behaviors require the coordination of many muscles in the limbs, back, neck, and tail. Because of the spinal motoneuronal somatotopic organization, motor coordination implies interactions among distant spinal networks. Here, we investigated some of the interactions between the lumbar locomotor networks that control limb movements and the thoracic networks that control the axial muscles involved in trunk movement. For this purpose, we used an in vitro isolated newborn rat spinal cord (from T2 to sacrococcygeal) preparation. Using extracellular ventral root recordings, we showed that, while the thoracic cord possesses an intrinsic rhythmogenic capacity, the lumbar circuits, if they are rhythmically active, will entrain the rhythmicity of the thoracic circuitry. However, if the lumbar circuits are rhythmically active, these latter circuits will entrain the rhythmicity of the thoracic circuitry. Blocking the synaptic transmission in some thoracic areas revealed that the lumbar locomotor network could trigger locomotor bursting in distant thoracic segments through short and long propriospinal pathways. Patch-clamp recordings revealed that 72% of the thoracic motoneurons (locomotor-driven motoneurons) expressed membrane potential oscillations and spiking activity coordinated with the locomotor activity expressed by the lumbar cord. A biphasic excitatory (glutamatergic)/inhibitory (glycinergic) synaptic drive was recorded in thoracic locomotor-driven motoneurons. Finally, we found evidence that part of this locomotor drive involved a monosynaptic component coming directly from the lumbar locomotor network. We conclude that the lumbar locomotor network plays a central role in the generation of locomotor outputs in the thoracic cord by acting at both the premotoneuronal and motoneuronal levels. PMID:25878284

  19. Evaluating the Efficacy of Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy for Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder with Blushing Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Súarez, Claudio; Palacios, Estela; Palacios, Fernanda; Matus, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: No study has yet compared the efficacy of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for treating facial blushing with other treatment or no treatment. We conducted a prospective, observational, open-label, clinical study to compare endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for blushing with generalized social anxiety disorder versus sertraline treatment and no treatment. Method: Three-hundred and thirty consecutive patients seeking treatment for their blushing were assessed by psychiatric interview and patient-rated scales. The Brief Social Phobia Scale was the primary outcome measure. Patients meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for generalized social anxiety disorder, scoring 20 points or more in the Brief Social Phobia Scale and 19 points or more in the Social Phobia Inventory were considered eligible and followed up for a mean of 11 months (range 1–64) after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or initiation of sertraline. Results: At baseline, 97 percent of the endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy-treated group, 87 percent of the sertraline-treated group, and 78 percent of the nontreated group rated their blushing as being “severe” or “extreme.” At follow up, 16 percent of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy-treated patients, 32 percent of sertraline-treated patients, and 57 percent of untreated patients reported this degree of blushing. At endpoint, Brief Social Phobia Scale total scores exhibited a greater decline with either treatment than with no treatment. Nonetheless, in comparison to no treatment, only the results obtained with endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy achieved statistical significance (p=0.003). Compensatory sweating occurred in 99 percent of patients who underwent endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. High degrees of satisfaction with treatment were reported by 89 percent of patients undergoing endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy and by 59 percent of patients taking medication. Conclusion

  20. Comparison of the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold after overhead assembly work and below knee assembly work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio following overhead work and below-knee work. [Subjects and Methods] Ten men (20–30 years) were recruited to this study. The thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold was measured after both overhead work and below-knee work. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds of the thoracic erector spinae muscle decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. Similarly, the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. [Conclusion] Below-knee work results in greater thoracic pain than overhead work. Future studies should investigate below-knee work in detail. This study confirmed the thoracic relaxation phenomenon in the mid-position of the thoracic erector spinae. PMID:26957744