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Sample records for project 02-erd-069 discovering

  1. Final Report for LDRD Project 02-ERD-069: Discovering the Unknown Mechanism(s) of Virulence in a BW, Class A Select Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, P; Garcia, E

    2003-02-06

    The goal of this proposed effort was to assess the difficulty in identifying and characterizing virulence candidate genes in an organism for which very limited data exists. This was accomplished by first addressing the finishing phase of draft-sequenced F. tularensis genomes and conducting comparative analyses to determine the coding potential of each genome; to discover the differences in genome structure and content, and to identify potential genes whose products may be involved in the F. tularensis virulence process. The project was divided into three parts: (1) Genome finishing: This part involves determining the order and orientation of the consensus sequences of contigs obtained from Phrap assemblies of random draft genomic sequences. This tedious process consists of linking contig ends using information embedded in each sequence file that relates the sequence to the original cloned insert. Since inserts are sequenced from both ends, we can establish a link between these paired-ends in different contigs and thus order and orient contigs. Since these genomes carry numerous copies of insertion sequences, these repeated elements ''confuse'' the Phrap assembly program. It is thus necessary to break these contigs apart at the repeated sequences and individually join the proper flanking regions using paired-end information, or using results of comparisons against a similar genome. Larger repeated elements such as the small subunit ribosomal RNA operon require verification with PCR. Tandem repeats require manual intervention and typically rely on single nucleotide polymorphisms to be resolved. Remaining gaps require PCR reactions and sequencing. Once the genomes have been ''closed'', low quality regions are addressed by resequencing reactions. (2) Genome analysis: The final consensus sequences are processed by combining the results of three gene modelers: Glimmer, Critica and Generation. The final gene models are submitted to a battery of homology searches and

  2. "Discover Diversities": A Trans-Inter-Disciplinary (SEMEP) Project for Different School Levels and Teachers' Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilo, Miranda; Gavio, Brigitte; Scaldarella, Elda; Di Carlo, Caterina; Martorano, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    "Discover Diversities" is a wide thematic developed within the SEMEP (South-Eastern Mediterranean Environmental Project) project, supported by UNESCO (United Nation Education, Science and Culture Organization). SEMEP is essentially a project for science education, focusing on Mediterranean environment. As the Mediterranean has been the cradle of…

  3. Building a City: A Spin Off Project. Part II of Students Discovering Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Adele

    1988-01-01

    Discusses "Students Discovering Cities" and related activities, explaining how the program evolved into a city planning project for fourth graders in West Jordan, Utah. Describes the final stage of the project in which students "built" their city inside the school gymnasium, complete with streets, lights, cardboard buildings, and green spaces.…

  4. Discovering beaten paths in collaborative ontology-engineering projects using Markov chains.

    PubMed

    Walk, Simon; Singer, Philipp; Strohmaier, Markus; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A; Noy, Natalya F

    2014-10-01

    Biomedical taxonomies, thesauri and ontologies in the form of the International Classification of Diseases as a taxonomy or the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus as an OWL-based ontology, play a critical role in acquiring, representing and processing information about human health. With increasing adoption and relevance, biomedical ontologies have also significantly increased in size. For example, the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, which is currently under active development by the World Health Organization contains nearly 50,000 classes representing a vast variety of different diseases and causes of death. This evolution in terms of size was accompanied by an evolution in the way ontologies are engineered. Because no single individual has the expertise to develop such large-scale ontologies, ontology-engineering projects have evolved from small-scale efforts involving just a few domain experts to large-scale projects that require effective collaboration between dozens or even hundreds of experts, practitioners and other stakeholders. Understanding the way these different stakeholders collaborate will enable us to improve editing environments that support such collaborations. In this paper, we uncover how large ontology-engineering projects, such as the International Classification of Diseases in its 11th revision, unfold by analyzing usage logs of five different biomedical ontology-engineering projects of varying sizes and scopes using Markov chains. We discover intriguing interaction patterns (e.g., which properties users frequently change after specific given ones) that suggest that large collaborative ontology-engineering projects are governed by a few general principles that determine and drive development. From our analysis, we identify commonalities and differences between different projects that have implications for project managers, ontology editors, developers and contributors working on collaborative ontology

  5. Discovering Beaten Paths in Collaborative Ontology-Engineering Projects using Markov Chains

    PubMed Central

    Walk, Simon; Singer, Philipp; Strohmaier, Markus; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A.; Noy, Natalya F.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical taxonomies, thesauri and ontologies in the form of the International Classification of Diseases as a taxonomy or the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus as an OWL-based ontology, play a critical role in acquiring, representing and processing information about human health. With increasing adoption and relevance, biomedical ontologies have also significantly increased in size. For example, the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, which is currently under active development by the World Health Organization contains nearly 50, 000 classes representing a vast variety of different diseases and causes of death. This evolution in terms of size was accompanied by an evolution in the way ontologies are engineered. Because no single individual has the expertise to develop such large-scale ontologies, ontology-engineering projects have evolved from small-scale efforts involving just a few domain experts to large-scale projects that require effective collaboration between dozens or even hundreds of experts, practitioners and other stakeholders. Understanding the way these different stakeholders collaborate will enable us to improve editing environments that support such collaborations. In this paper, we uncover how large ontology-engineering projects, such as the International Classification of Diseases in its 11th revision, unfold by analyzing usage logs of five different biomedical ontology-engineering projects of varying sizes and scopes using Markov chains. We discover intriguing interaction patterns (e.g., which properties users frequently change after specific given ones) that suggest that large collaborative ontology-engineering projects are governed by a few general principles that determine and drive development. From our analysis, we identify commonalities and differences between different projects that have implications for project managers, ontology editors, developers and contributors working on collaborative ontology

  6. Discovering beaten paths in collaborative ontology-engineering projects using Markov chains.

    PubMed

    Walk, Simon; Singer, Philipp; Strohmaier, Markus; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A; Noy, Natalya F

    2014-10-01

    Biomedical taxonomies, thesauri and ontologies in the form of the International Classification of Diseases as a taxonomy or the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus as an OWL-based ontology, play a critical role in acquiring, representing and processing information about human health. With increasing adoption and relevance, biomedical ontologies have also significantly increased in size. For example, the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, which is currently under active development by the World Health Organization contains nearly 50,000 classes representing a vast variety of different diseases and causes of death. This evolution in terms of size was accompanied by an evolution in the way ontologies are engineered. Because no single individual has the expertise to develop such large-scale ontologies, ontology-engineering projects have evolved from small-scale efforts involving just a few domain experts to large-scale projects that require effective collaboration between dozens or even hundreds of experts, practitioners and other stakeholders. Understanding the way these different stakeholders collaborate will enable us to improve editing environments that support such collaborations. In this paper, we uncover how large ontology-engineering projects, such as the International Classification of Diseases in its 11th revision, unfold by analyzing usage logs of five different biomedical ontology-engineering projects of varying sizes and scopes using Markov chains. We discover intriguing interaction patterns (e.g., which properties users frequently change after specific given ones) that suggest that large collaborative ontology-engineering projects are governed by a few general principles that determine and drive development. From our analysis, we identify commonalities and differences between different projects that have implications for project managers, ontology editors, developers and contributors working on collaborative ontology

  7. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  8. Athlome Project Consortium: a concerted effort to discover genomic and other "omic" markers of athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Pitsiladis, Yannis P; Tanaka, Masashi; Eynon, Nir; Bouchard, Claude; North, Kathryn N; Williams, Alun G; Collins, Malcolm; Moran, Colin N; Britton, Steven L; Fuku, Noriyuki; Ashley, Euan A; Klissouras, Vassilis; Lucia, Alejandro; Ahmetov, Ildus I; de Geus, Eco; Alsayrafi, Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Despite numerous attempts to discover genetic variants associated with elite athletic performance, injury predisposition, and elite/world-class athletic status, there has been limited progress to date. Past reliance on candidate gene studies predominantly focusing on genotyping a limited number of single nucleotide polymorphisms or the insertion/deletion variants in small, often heterogeneous cohorts (i.e., made up of athletes of quite different sport specialties) have not generated the kind of results that could offer solid opportunities to bridge the gap between basic research in exercise sciences and deliverables in biomedicine. A retrospective view of genetic association studies with complex disease traits indicates that transition to hypothesis-free genome-wide approaches will be more fruitful. In studies of complex disease, it is well recognized that the magnitude of genetic association is often smaller than initially anticipated, and, as such, large sample sizes are required to identify the gene effects robustly. A symposium was held in Athens and on the Greek island of Santorini from 14-17 May 2015 to review the main findings in exercise genetics and genomics and to explore promising trends and possibilities. The symposium also offered a forum for the development of a position stand (the Santorini Declaration). Among the participants, many were involved in ongoing collaborative studies (e.g., ELITE, GAMES, Gene SMART, GENESIS, and POWERGENE). A consensus emerged among participants that it would be advantageous to bring together all current studies and those recently launched into one new large collaborative initiative, which was subsequently named the Athlome Project Consortium.

  9. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  10. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1996-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  11. A Calculus I Project: Discovering the Derivative of an Exponential Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Anne Ludington

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a project one teacher assigns to Calculus I students at the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Loyola College in Baltimore, Maryland. The project is introduced to the students early in the semester and requires the use of technology, team work, and the completion of an extensive writing component. The goal of the project…

  12. Discovering new genetic and psychosocial pathways in Major Depressive Disorder: the NewMood project.

    PubMed

    Freeborough, Annabel; Kimpton, Jessica

    2011-09-01

    The World Health Organisation predicts that Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) will be the second greatest contributor to the global burden of disease by 2020, however, the neurobiological mechanisms behind the disease and the risk factors for it are yet unknown. NewMood (New Molecules for Mood Disorders) was a research project funded by the EU, collaborating work from 10 European countries with the aim of finding new molecular mechanisms behind MDD to develop more effective treatment options. This review explains the aims and objectives of NewMood and how it intends to achieve them with regards to the current literature. It also outlines two of its most recent projects: genome wide association replication study for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) increasing susceptibility to MDD and stress related pathways in depression using the cortisol awakening response (CAR). Both of these studies had significant results and could further contribute to our current understanding of MDD.

  13. An ear turned to ``The Cosmos'': 50 projects to discover the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Puerto, Carmen

    2011-06-01

    In 1609, as Galileo pointed the sky with a telescope, he observed Jupiter's satellites and changed our vision of the universe. Four hundred years later, we celebrate this event all over the world, and also in the Canaries. 2009, the International Year of Astronomy, is a very special year for the Science and Cosmos Museum (Museo de la Ciencia y el Cosmos). This was the first museum in Spain supported by a public entity, The Local Government of Tenerife (Cabildo de Tenerife), through its Autonomous Council of Museums (Organismo Autónomo de Museos y Centros), and a research centre, the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Fifteen years later, this museum, which receives 50,000 visitors a year, celebrates the International Year of Astronomy with fifty projects described in this paper.

  14. THE PROJECT: an Observatory / Transport Spaceship for Discovering and Populating Habitable Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilston, S.

    1998-12-01

    Recent extrasolar planet discoveries and related progress in astrophysics have refined our knowledge of the implications of the Drake equation. The Space Interferometry Mission and the planned Terrestrial Planet Finder will deepen this understanding, and begin pointing the way to places we need to explore at closer range. If the correct resolution of the Fermi paradox regarding intelligent extraterrestrials (``where are they?") is found to lie in the actual scarcity of such beings, it may turn out that we are more advanced than most other life-forms in our galaxy. In this case, a main purpose in finding planets may be to find places for us to go: astronomy will once again play a major role in human navigation and migration. We describe a strawman design concept for an astronomical observatory ship designed for launch beyond our solar system within several hundred years. This ship design would employ plausible physics, biology, technology, sociology, and economics to carry one million passengers in a one-G environment shielded from space radiation. A cruising speed under 0.01 c, slower than in many science-fiction concepts, minimizes power requirements and the danger from collisional impacts. The ship would contain all subsystems needed to sustain multi-generational life on a voyage of thousands of years, as well as the observatories to identify for human settlement a habitable extrasolar planet. Even the modestly advanced technology described here could spread intelligent life throughout our galaxy within 40 million years, a very small fraction of the galaxy's age. Motivation for such an ambitious project is three-fold: expanding our knowledge of the universe, enlisting the efforts and enthusiasms of humankind toward a very grand goal which will stimulate progress in all aspects of our cultures and technologies, and participating in the process of spreading life so its survivability and fruition are enhanced.

  15. Discovering Deserts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Discovering Deserts." Contents are organized into the following sections: (1)…

  16. Discovering Technicolor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, J. R.; Antipin, O.; Azuelos, G.; Del Debbio, L.; Del Nobile, E.; Di Chiara, S.; Hapola, T.; Järvinen, M.; Lowdon, P. J.; Maravin, Y.; Masina, I.; Nardecchia, M.; Pica, C.; Sannino, F.

    2011-09-01

    We provide a pedagogical introduction to extensions of the Standard Model in which the Higgs is composite. These extensions are known as models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking or, in brief, Technicolor. Material covered includes: motivations for Technicolor, the construction of underlying gauge theories leading to minimal models of Technicolor, the comparison with electroweak precision data, the low-energy effective theory, the spectrum of the states common to most of the Technicolor models, the decays of the composite particles and the experimental signals at the Large Hadron Collider. The level of the presentation is aimed at readers familiar with the Standard Model but who have little or no prior exposure to Technicolor. Several extensions of the Standard Model featuring a composite Higgs can be reduced to the effective Lagrangian introduced in the text. We establish the relevant experimental benchmarks for Vanilla, Running, Walking, and Custodial Technicolor, and a natural fourth family of leptons, by laying out the framework to discover these models at the Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Discovering Constructivism: How a Project-Oriented Activity-Based Media Production Course Effectively Employed Constructivist Teaching Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Glenn T.

    2012-01-01

    Author uses his experience leading a project-oriented special-topics course as a case study in constructivist teaching methods. Citing relevant literature from the education field, this paper considers why students chosen to work for course credit on a promotional video for a university program considered the project their greatest academic…

  18. Student Discovers New Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    A West Virginia high-school student has discovered a new pulsar, using data from the giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Shay Bloxton, 15, a participant in a project in which students analyze data from the radio telescope, spotted evidence of the pulsar on October 15. Bloxton, along with NRAO astronomers observed the object again one month later. The new observation confirmed that the object is a pulsar, a rotating, superdense neutron star. Bloxton is a sophomore at Nicholas County High School in Summersville, West Virginia. "I was very excited when I found out I had actually made a discovery," Bloxton said. She went to Green Bank in November to participate in the follow-up observation. She termed that visit "a great experience." "It also helped me learn a lot about how observations with the GBT are actually done," she added. The project in which she participated, called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC), is a joint project of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University, funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Pulsars are known for their lighthouse-like beams of radio waves that sweep through space as the neutron star rotates, creating a pulse as the beam sweeps by the Earth. First discovered in 1967, pulsars serve as valuable natural "laboratories" for physicists studying exotic states of matter, quantum mechanics and General Relativity. The GBT, dedicated in 2000, has become one of the world's leading tools for discovering and studying pulsars. The PSC, led by NRAO Education Officer Sue Ann Heatherly and Project Director Rachel Rosen, includes training for teachers and student leaders, and provides parcels of data from the GBT to student teams. The project involves teachers and students in helping astronomers analyze data from 1500 hours of observing with the GBT. The 120 terabytes of data were produced by 70,000 individual pointings of the giant, 17-million-pound telescope. Some 300 hours of the

  19. DISCOVER-AQ

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-07

    ... of satellites to monitor air quality for public health and environmental benefit. Through targeted airborne and ground-based observations, ... Relevant Documents:  DISCOVER-AQ - Airborne Science Data for Atmospheric Composition DISCOVER-AQ - NASA Earth ...

  20. Discovering Mendeleev's Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Donna

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that introduces the historical developments in science that led to the discovery of the periodic table and lets students experience scientific discovery firsthand. Enables students to learn about patterns among the elements and experience how scientists analyze data to discover patterns and build models. (JRH)

  1. Discovering the Artist Within.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamill, Sam

    1999-01-01

    Describes a personal artistic struggle against heroin addiction, advising teachers of the difficulty of working to discover and express one's developing self. Considers the effect of poetry and philosophy on the developing creative process. Provides samples of the author's own poetry to demonstrate creative development, as an example to Montessori…

  2. Discovering the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Barrie W.

    1999-04-01

    Discovering the Solar System Barrie W. Jones The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK Discovering the Solar System is a comprehensive, up-to-date account of the Solar System and of the ways in which the various bodies have been investigated and modelled. The approach is thematic, with sequences of chapters on the interiors of planetary bodies, on their surfaces, and on their atmospheres. Within each sequence there is a chapter on general principles and processes followed by one or two chapters on specific bodies. There is also an introductory chapter, a chapter on the origin of the Solar System, and a chapter on asteroids, comets and meteorites. Liberally illustrated with diagrams, black and white photographs and colour plates, Discovering the Solar System also features: * tables of essential data * question and answers within the text * end of section review questions with answers and comments Discovering the Solar System is essential reading for all undergraduate students for whom astronomy or planetary science are components of their degrees, and for those at a more advanced level approaching the subject for the first time. It will also be of great interest to non-specialists with a keen interest in astronomy. A small amount of scientific knowledge is assumed plus familiarity with basic algebra and graphs. There is no calculus. Praise for this book includes: ".certainly qualifies as an authoritative text. The author clearly has an encyclopedic knowledge of the subject." Meteorics and Planetary Science ".liberally doused with relevant graphs, tables, and black and white figures of good quality." EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union ".one of the best books on the Solar System I have seen. The general accuracy and quality of the content is excellent." Journal of the British Astronomical Association

  3. The Araucaria Project: the Distance to the Sculptor Group Galaxy NGC 247 from Cepheid Variables Discovered in a Wide-Field Imaging Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Varela, Alejandro; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Udalski, Andrzej; Soszyński, Igor; Walker, Alistair; Bresolin, Fabio; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Szewczyk, Olaf; Szymański, Michał; Kubiak, Marcin; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz

    2008-11-01

    We report on the discovery of a Cepheid population in the Sculptor Group spiral galaxy NGC 247 for the first time. On the basis of wide-field images collected in photometric surveys in V and I bands that were conducted with three different telescopes and cameras, 23 Cepheid variables were discovered with periods ranging from 17 to 131 days. We have constructed the period-luminosity relations from these data and obtained distance moduli to NGC 247 of 28.20 ± 0.05 mag (internal error) in V, 28.04 ± 0.06 mag in I, and 27.80 ± 0.09 mag in the reddening-independent Wesenheit index. From our optical data we have determined the total mean reddening of the Cepheids in NGC 247 to be E(B - V) = 0.13 mag, which brings the true distance modulus determinations from the V and I bands into excellent agreement with the distance determination in the Wesenheit index. The best estimate for the true distance modulus of NGC 247 from our optical Cepheid photometry is 27.80 ± 0.09 (internal error) ±0.09 mag (systematic error), which is in excellent agreement with other recent distance determinations for NGC 247 from the tip of the red giant branch method and from the Tully-Fisher relation. The distance for NGC 247 places this galaxy at twice the distance of two other Sculptor Group galaxies, NGC 300 and NGC 55, yielding supporting evidence for the filament-like structure of this group of galaxies. The reported distance value is tied to an assumed Large Magellanic Cloud distance modulus of 18.50 mag. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3 m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, the 2.2 m ESO/MPI telescope at the European Southern Observatory for Large Programme 171.D-0004, and the 4.0 m Blanco telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. This work is part of the PhD thesis of A.G.V.

  4. The 'PUCE CAFE' Project: the First 15K Coffee Microarray, a New Tool for Discovering Candidate Genes correlated to Agronomic and Quality Traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of coffee biology will have an impact on future agronomical improvements for this economically important tree. During the past years, EST collections were generated in Coffee, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics. Results The "PUCE CAFE" Project, organized by the scientific consortium NESTLE/IRD/CIRAD, has developed an oligo-based microarray using 15,721 unigenes derived from published coffee EST sequences mostly obtained from different stages of fruit development and leaves in Coffea Canephora (Robusta). Hybridizations for two independent experiments served to compare global gene expression profiles in three types of tissue matter (mature beans, leaves and flowers) in C. canephora as well as in the leaves of three different coffee species (C. canephora, C. eugenoides and C. arabica). Microarray construction, statistical analyses and validation by Q-PCR analysis are presented in this study. Conclusion We have generated the first 15 K coffee array during this PUCE CAFE project, granted by Génoplante (the French consortium for plant genomics). This new tool will help study functional genomics in a wide range of experiments on various plant tissues, such as analyzing bean maturation or resistance to pathogens or drought. Furthermore, the use of this array has proven to be valid in different coffee species (diploid or tetraploid), drastically enlarging its impact for high-throughput gene expression in the community of coffee research. PMID:21208403

  5. Discovering system requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B.; Dean, F.F.

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  6. World Spatiotemporal Analytics and Mapping Project (wstamp): Discovering, Exploring, and Mapping Spatiotemporal Patterns across the World's Largest Open Soruce Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, R.; Piburn, J.; Sorokine, A.; Myers, A.; Moehl, J.; White, D.

    2015-07-01

    The application of spatiotemporal (ST) analytics to integrated data from major sources such as the World Bank, United Nations, and dozens of others holds tremendous potential for shedding new light on the evolution of cultural, health, economic, and geopolitical landscapes on a global level. Realizing this potential first requires an ST data model that addresses challenges in properly merging data from multiple authors, with evolving ontological perspectives, semantical differences, and changing attributes, as well as content that is textual, numeric, categorical, and hierarchical. Equally challenging is the development of analytical and visualization approaches that provide a serious exploration of this integrated data while remaining accessible to practitioners with varied backgrounds. The WSTAMP project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has yielded two major results in addressing these challenges: 1) development of the WSTAMP database, a significant advance in ST data modeling that integrates 10,000+ attributes covering over 200 nation states spanning over 50 years from over 30 major sources and 2) a novel online ST exploratory and analysis tool providing an array of modern statistical and visualization techniques for analyzing these data temporally, spatially, and spatiotemporally under a standard analytic workflow. We discuss the status of this work and report on major findings.

  7. BINARIES DISCOVERED BY THE MUCHFUSS PROJECT: SDSS J08205+0008-AN ECLIPSING SUBDWARF B BINARY WITH A BROWN DWARF COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Geier, S.; Schaffenroth, V.; Drechsel, H.; Heber, U.; Kupfer, T.; Tillich, A.; Oestensen, R. H.; Smolders, K.; Degroote, P.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Barlow, B. N.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R.; Napiwotzki, R.

    2011-04-20

    Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are extreme horizontal branch stars believed to originate from close binary evolution. Indeed about half of the known sdB stars are found in close binaries with periods ranging from a few hours to a few days. The enormous mass loss required to remove the hydrogen envelope of the red-giant progenitor almost entirely can be explained by common envelope ejection. A rare subclass of these binaries are the eclipsing HW Vir binaries where the sdB is orbited by a dwarf M star. Here, we report the discovery of an HW Vir system in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. A most likely substellar object ({approx_equal}0.068 M{sub sun}) was found to orbit the hot subdwarf J08205+0008 with a period of 0.096 days. Since the eclipses are total, the system parameters are very well constrained. J08205+0008 has the lowest unambiguously measured companion mass yet found in a subdwarf B binary. This implies that the most likely substellar companion has not only survived the engulfment by the red-giant envelope, but also triggered its ejection and enabled the sdB star to form. The system provides evidence that brown dwarfs may indeed be able to significantly affect late stellar evolution.

  8. The Red Radio Ring: a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared radio galaxy at z = 2.553 discovered through the citizen science project SPACE WARPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geach, J. E.; More, A.; Verma, A.; Marshall, P. J.; Jackson, N.; Belles, P.-E.; Beswick, R.; Baeten, E.; Chavez, M.; Cornen, C.; Cox, B. E.; Erben, T.; Erickson, N. J.; Garrington, S.; Harrison, P. A.; Harrington, K.; Hughes, D. H.; Ivison, R. J.; Jordan, C.; Lin, Y.-T.; Leauthaud, A.; Lintott, C.; Lynn, S.; Kapadia, A.; Kneib, J.-P.; Macmillan, C.; Makler, M.; Miller, G.; Montaña, A.; Mujica, R.; Muxlow, T.; Narayanan, G.; O'Briain, D.; O'Brien, T.; Oguri, M.; Paget, E.; Parrish, M.; Ross, N. P.; Rozo, E.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez-Argüelles, D.; Simpson, R.; Snyder, C.; Schloerb, F. P.; Tecza, M.; Wang, W.-H.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Wilcox, J.; Viero, M.; Wilson, G. W.; Yun, M. S.; Zeballos, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared galaxy (intrinsic LIR ≈ 1013 L⊙) with strong radio emission (intrinsic L1.4 GHz ≈ 1025 W Hz-1) at z = 2.553. The source was identified in the citizen science project SPACE WARPS through the visual inspection of tens of thousands of iJKs colour composite images of luminous red galaxies (LRGs), groups and clusters of galaxies and quasars. Appearing as a partial Einstein ring (re ≈ 3 arcsec) around an LRG at z = 0.2, the galaxy is extremely bright in the sub-millimetre for a cosmological source, with the thermal dust emission approaching 1 Jy at peak. The redshift of the lensed galaxy is determined through the detection of the CO(3→2) molecular emission line with the Large Millimetre Telescope's Redshift Search Receiver and through [O III] and Hα line detections in the near-infrared from Subaru/Infrared Camera and Spectrograph. We have resolved the radio emission with high-resolution (300-400 mas) eMERLIN L-band and Very Large Array C-band imaging. These observations are used in combination with the near-infrared imaging to construct a lens model, which indicates a lensing magnification of μ ≈ 10. The source reconstruction appears to support a radio morphology comprised of a compact (<250 pc) core and more extended component, perhaps indicative of an active nucleus and jet or lobe.

  9. Binaries discovered by the SPY project . V. GD 687 - a massive double degenerate binary progenitor that will merge within a Hubble time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Heber, U.; Kupfer, T.; Napiwotzki, R.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: The ESO SN Ia Progenitor Survey (SPY) aims at finding merging double degenerate binaries as candidates for supernova type Ia (SN Ia) explosions. A white dwarf merger has also been suggested to explain the formation of rare types of stars like R CrB, extreme helium or He sdO stars. Here we present the hot subdwarf B binary GD 687, which will merge in less than a Hubble time. Methods: The orbital parameters of the close binary have been determined from time resolved spectroscopy. Since GD 687 is a single-lined binary, the spectra contain only information about the subdwarf primary and its orbit. From high resolution spectra the projected rotational velocity was derived. Assuming orbital synchronisation, the inclination of the system and the mass of the unseen companion were constrained. Results: The derived inclination is i = 39.3+6.2-5.6 °. The mass M2 = 0.71-0.21+0.22 M_⊙ indicates that the companion must be a white dwarf, most likely of C/O composition. This is only the fourth case that an sdB companion has been proven to be a white dwarf unambiguously. Its mass is somewhat larger than the average white dwarf mass, but may be as high as 0.93 M_⊙ in which case the total mass of the system comes close to the Chandrasekhar limit. Conclusions: GD 687 will evolve into a double degenerate system and merge to form a rare supermassive white dwarf with a mass in excess of solar. A death in a sub-Chandrasekhar supernova is also conceivable. Based on observations at the Paranal Observatory of the European Southern Observatory for programme No. 165.H-0588(A). Based on observations at the La Silla Observatory of the European Southern Observatory for programmes No. 072.D-0510(B), 079.D-0288(A), 080.D-0685(A) and 084.D-0348(A).

  10. Binaries discovered by the MUCHFUSS project. SDSS J162256.66+473051.1: An eclipsing subdwarf B binary with a brown dwarf companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffenroth, V.; Geier, S.; Heber, U.; Kupfer, T.; Ziegerer, E.; Heuser, C.; Classen, L.; Cordes, O.

    2014-04-01

    Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are core helium-burning stars located on the extreme horizontal branch. About half of the known sdB stars are found in close binaries. Their short orbital periods of 1.2 h to a few days suggest that they are post common-envelope systems. Eclipsing hot subdwarf binaries are rare but are important in determining the fundamental stellar parameters. Low-mass companions are identified by the reflection effect. In most cases, the companion is a main sequence star near the stellar mass limit. Here, we report the discovery of an eclipsing hot subdwarf binary SDSS J162256.66+473051.1 (J1622) with very short orbital period (0.0697 d), which has been found in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. The lightcurve shows grazing eclipses and a prominent reflection effect. An analysis of the light- and radial velocity (RV) curves indicated a mass ratio of q = 0.1325, an RV semi-amplitude K = 47.2 km s-1, and an inclination of i = 72.33°. We show that a companion mass of 0.064 M⊙, which is well below the hydrogen-burning limit, is the most plausible solution, which implies a mass close to the canonical mass (0.47 M⊙) of the sdB star. Therefore, the companion is a brown dwarf, which has not only survived the engulfment by the red-giant envelope but also triggered its ejection and enabled the sdB star to form. The rotation of J1622 is expected to be tidally locked to the orbit. However, J1622 rotates too slowly (vrot = 74.5 ± 7 km s-1) to be synchronized, challenging tidal interaction models. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. World Spatiotemporal Analytics and Mapping Project (WSTAMP): Discovering, Exploring, and Mapping Spatiotemporal Patterns across the World s Largest Open Source Geographic Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Robert N; Piburn, Jesse O; Sorokine, Alexandre; Myers, Aaron T; White, Devin A

    2015-01-01

    The application of spatiotemporal (ST) analytics to integrated data from major sources such as the World Bank, United Nations, and dozens of others holds tremendous potential for shedding new light on the evolution of cultural, health, economic, and geopolitical landscapes on a global level. Realizing this potential first requires an ST data model that addresses challenges in properly merging data from multiple authors, with evolving ontological perspectives, semantical differences, and changing attributes, as well as content that is textual, numeric, categorical, and hierarchical. Equally challenging is the development of analytical and visualization approaches that provide a serious exploration of this integrated data while remaining accessible to practitioners with varied backgrounds. The WSTAMP project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has yielded two major results in addressing these challenges: 1) development of the WSTAMP database, a significant advance in ST data modeling that integrates 10,000+ attributes covering over 200 nation states spanning over 50 years from over 30 major sources and 2) a novel online ST exploratory and analysis tool providing an array of modern statistical and visualization techniques for analyzing these data temporally, spatially, and spatiotemporally under a standard analytic workflow. We discuss the status of this work and report on major findings. Acknowledgment Prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6285, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U. S. Department of Energy under contract no. DEAC05-00OR22725. Copyright This manuscript has been authored by employees of UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Accordingly, the United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or

  12. Metadata Management on the SCEC PetaSHA Project: Helping Users Describe, Discover, Understand, and Use Simulation Data in a Large-Scale Scientific Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D.; Deelman, E.; Maechling, P.; Wong-Barnum, M.; Jordan, T. H.; Meyers, D.

    2007-12-01

    Large scientific collaborations, such as the SCEC Petascale Cyberfacility for Physics-based Seismic Hazard Analysis (PetaSHA) Project, involve interactions between many scientists who exchange ideas and research results. These groups must organize, manage, and make accessible their community materials of observational data, derivative (research) results, computational products, and community software. The integration of scientific workflows as a paradigm to solve complex computations provides advantages of efficiency, reliability, repeatability, choices, and ease of use. The underlying resource needed for a scientific workflow to function and create discoverable and exchangeable products is the construction, tracking, and preservation of metadata. In the scientific workflow environment there is a two-tier structure of metadata. Workflow-level metadata and provenance describe operational steps, identity of resources, execution status, and product locations and names. Domain-level metadata essentially define the scientific meaning of data, codes and products. To a large degree the metadata at these two levels are separate. However, between these two levels is a subset of metadata produced at one level but is needed by the other. This crossover metadata suggests that some commonality in metadata handling is needed. SCEC researchers are collaborating with computer scientists at SDSC, the USC Information Sciences Institute, and Carnegie Mellon Univ. in order to perform earthquake science using high-performance computational resources. A primary objective of the "PetaSHA" collaboration is to perform physics-based estimations of strong ground motion associated with real and hypothetical earthquakes located within Southern California. Construction of 3D earth models, earthquake representations, and numerical simulation of seismic waves are key components of these estimations. Scientific workflows are used to orchestrate the sequences of scientific tasks and to access

  13. Discovering Community: Activities for Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute on Out-of-School Time, Wellesley College, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The project activities highlighted in this publication were conducted within the framework of school-based afterschool programs operated by community-based organizations. The intention of the Discovering Community initiative, created by The After-School Corporation and MetLife Foundation, is to foster greater collaborations and mutual respect…

  14. Explore and Discover

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to improve your aerobic and anaerobic fitness by carrying weighted objects in this activity. The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to challenge students to se...

  15. Discovering the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry; Bieri, Lydia; Sandage, Foreword by Allan

    2009-03-01

    Acknowledgments; Foreword; 1. Introduction; 2. Cosmological concepts at the end of the Middle Ages; 3. Nebulae as a new astronomical phenomenon; 4. On the construction of the Heavens; 5. Island universes turn into astronomical facts: a universe of galaxies; 6. The early cosmology of Einstein and de Sitter; 7. The dynamical universe of Friedmann; 8. Redshifts: how to reconcile Slipher and de Sitter?; 9. Lemaître discovers the expanding universe; 10. Hubble's contribution of 1929; 11. The breakthrough for the expanding universe; 12. Hubble's anger about de Sitter; 13. Robertson and Tolman join the game; 14. The Einstein-de Sitter universe; 15. Are Sun and Earth older than the universe?; 16. In search of alternative tracks; 17. The seed for the Big Bang; 18. Summary and Postscript; Appendix; References; Index.

  16. Lightest exoplanet yet discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Well-known exoplanet researcher Michel Mayor today announced the discovery of the lightest exoplanet found so far. The planet, "e", in the famous system Gliese 581, is only about twice the mass of our Earth. The team also refined the orbit of the planet Gliese 581 d, first discovered in 2007, placing it well within the habitable zone, where liquid water oceans could exist. These amazing discoveries are the outcome of more than four years of observations using the most successful low-mass-exoplanet hunter in the world, the HARPS spectrograph attached to the 3.6-metre ESO telescope at La Silla, Chile. ESO PR Photo 15a/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Photo 15b/09 A planet in the habitable zone ESO PR Video 15a/09 ESOcast 6 ESO PR Video 15b/09 VNR A-roll ESO PR Video 15c/09 Zoom-in on Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15d/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15e/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 d ESO PR Video 15f/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 system ESO PR Video 15g/09 The radial velocity method ESO PR Video 15h/09 Statement in English ESO PR Video 15i/09 Statement in French ESO PR Video 15j/09 La Silla Observatory "The holy grail of current exoplanet research is the detection of a rocky, Earth-like planet in the ‘habitable zone' -- a region around the host star with the right conditions for water to be liquid on a planet's surface", says Michel Mayor from the Geneva Observatory, who led the European team to this stunning breakthrough. Planet Gliese 581 e orbits its host star - located only 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra ("the Scales") -- in just 3.15 days. "With only 1.9 Earth-masses, it is the least massive exoplanet ever detected and is, very likely, a rocky planet", says co-author Xavier Bonfils from Grenoble Observatory. Being so close to its host star, the planet is not in the habitable zone. But another planet in this system appears to be. From previous observations -- also obtained with the HARPS spectrograph

  17. Discovering General Multidimensional Associations

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Ben; Murrell, Daniel; Murrell, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    When two variables are related by a known function, the coefficient of determination (denoted R2) measures the proportion of the total variance in the observations explained by that function. For linear relationships, this is equal to the square of the correlation coefficient, ρ. When the parametric form of the relationship is unknown, however, it is unclear how to estimate the proportion of explained variance equitably—assigning similar values to equally noisy relationships. Here we demonstrate how to directly estimate a generalised R2 when the form of the relationship is unknown, and we consider the performance of the Maximal Information Coefficient (MIC)—a recently proposed information theoretic measure of dependence. We show that our approach behaves equitably, has more power than MIC to detect association between variables, and converges faster with increasing sample size. Most importantly, our approach generalises to higher dimensions, estimating the strength of multivariate relationships (Y against A, B, …) as well as measuring association while controlling for covariates (Y against X controlling for C). An R package named matie (“Measuring Association and Testing Independence Efficiently”) is available (http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/matie/). PMID:26991498

  18. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Denneau, L.; Stalder, B.; Heinze, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-04-01

    Seven bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  19. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-03-01

    Seven bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  20. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Six bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  1. Two Transients discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Two transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  2. Strontium-90 Error Discovered in Subcontract Laboratory Spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Brown A. S. Nagel

    1999-07-31

    West Valley Demonstration Project health physicists and environment scientists discovered a series of errors in a subcontractor's spreadsheet being used to reduce data as part of their strontium-90 analytical process.

  3. Digimarc Discover on Google Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Eliot; Rodriguez, Tony; Lord, John; Alattar, Adnan

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of the Digimarc® Discover platform on Google Glass, enabling the reading of a watermark embedded in a printed material or audio. The embedded watermark typically contains a unique code that identifies the containing media or object and a synchronization signal that allows the watermark to be read robustly. The Digimarc Discover smartphone application can read the watermark from a small portion of printed image presented at any orientation or reasonable distance. Likewise, Discover can read the recently introduced Digimarc Barcode to identify and manage consumer packaged goods in the retail channel. The Digimarc Barcode has several advantages over the traditional barcode and is expected to save the retail industry millions of dollars when deployed at scale. Discover can also read an audio watermark from ambient audio captured using a microphone. The Digimarc Discover platform has been widely deployed on the iPad, iPhone and many Android-based devices, but it has not yet been implemented on a head-worn wearable device, such as Google Glass. Implementing Discover on Google Glass is a challenging task due to the current hardware and software limitations of the device. This paper identifies the challenges encountered in porting Discover to the Google Glass and reports on the solutions created to deliver a prototype implementation.

  4. Temperate Lakes Discovered on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vixie, Graham; Barnes, Jason W.; Jackson, Brian; Wilson, Paul

    2012-04-01

    We have discovered two temperate lakes on Titan using Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Three key features help to identify these surface features as lakes: morphology, albedo, and specular reflection. The presence of lakes at the mid-latitudes mean liquid can accumulate and remain stable outside of the poles. We first identify a lake surface by looking for possible shorelines with a lacustrine morphology. Then, we apply a simple atmospheric correction that produces an approximate surface albedo. Next, we prepare cylindrical projection maps of the brightness of the sky as seen from any points on the surface to identify specular reflections. Our techniques can then be applied to other areas, such as Arrakis Planitia, to test for liquid. Currently, all the known lakes on Titan are concentrated at the poles. Lakes have been suggested in the tropic zone by Griffith et al. Our discovery of non-transient, temperate lakes has important implications for Titan's hydrologic cycle. Clouds have been recorded accumulating in the mid-latitudes and areas have been darkened by rainfall but later brightened after evaporation (Turtle et al. 2011). Stable temperate lakes would affect total rainfall, liquid accumulation, evaporation rates, and infiltration. Polaznik Macula (Figure 1) is a great candidate for lake filling, evaporation rates, and stability. References: Griffith, C., et al.: "Evidence for Lakes on Titan's Tropical Surface". AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts #42, Vol. 42, pp. 1077, 2010. Turtle, E. P., et al.: "Rapid and Extensive Surface Changes Near Titan's Equator: Evidence of April Showers". Science, Vol. 331, pp. 1414-, 2011. Figure 1: Polaznik Macula is the large, dark area central to the figure. The encircled dark blue areas represent positively identified lake regions in the T66 flyby. The light blue areas represent lake candidates still under analysis. The green circle marks a non-lake surface feature enclosed by a

  5. News & Views Evaluation of Projects for Basic Research of Scientific Instruments in 2008 Completed NSFC Former President Tang Ao-qing Passed Away Professor Tang Aoqing and NSFC Carbon Nanotube Film-Based Speaker Developed in Tsinghua University Dinosaur Footprint Fossils Discovered in Xinjiang New Method for Early Cancer Diagnosis New Progress Achieved by NSFC Project in Basic Research of Black Hole Physics New progress in Organic FET 67 NSFC-RFBR Cooperative Projects Approved for 2008 Spin Configuration and Super-exchange Mechanism in Molecular Magnets Observed NSFC Strengthens its Funding in Wenchuan Concerns Go to Disaster's Impact on Economy and Emergency Response Thirty-seven NSFC-KOSEF Cooperative Projects Approved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of Projects for Basic Research of Scientific Instruments in 2008 Completed NSFC Former President Tang Ao-qing Passed Away Professor Tang Aoqing and NSFC Carbon Nanotube Film-Based Speaker Developed in Tsinghua University Dinosaur Footprint Fossils Discovered in Xinjiang New Method for Early Cancer Diagnosis New Progress Achieved by NSFC Project in Basic Research of Black Hole Physics New progress in Organic FET 67 NSFC-RFBR Cooperative Projects Approved for 2008 Spin Configuration and Super-exchange Mechanism in Molecular Magnets Observed NSFC Strengthens its Funding in Wenchuan Concerns Go to Disaster's Impact on Economy and Emergency Response Thirty-seven NSFC-KOSEF Cooperative Projects Approved

  6. Families Discover the Outdoors Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Polly

    1980-01-01

    An idea for hands-on activities for families to use in discovering the outdoors together when visiting parks is described. Family packs contain discovery and natural history cards, thermometers, magnifiers, insect boxes, photographs of animals and plants, a pencil, and a feedback form. (SA)

  7. Discovering Your Place in History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carol

    2006-01-01

    The Historica Foundation of Canada has a mandate to provide or support programs and resources for the teaching of Canadian history in Canadian schools. This paper outlines how Historica discovered what was needed and the programs and resources they developed to fulfill their mandate.

  8. The Universe for all to discover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.; Ballesteros, F.; Espinós, H.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Lanzara, M.; Moya, M. J.; Navarro, J.

    2015-05-01

    In the title of this paper, we have changed the slogan of the International Year of Astronomy, ``The Universe yours to discover" to ``The Universe for all to discover" in order to emphasize the need to think about broader audiences when we plan astronomical activities at school or during outreach events. The strategy we propose follows what is known as the Universal Design for Learning (UDL). UDL allows to reach to the general public as well as to audiences which might be regarded as ``special" because they have some disability. It has been shown that everybody has a preferred style of learning (some remember better what they see, others what they hear or what they touch) and therefore, everybody is more or less able under the different styles of learning. Through this talk I am going to outline some of the principles of the UDL that can be applied in the teaching and communication of Astronomy, along with an example of its implementation in the project ``A Touch of the Universe".

  9. Discovering New Light States at Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Harnik, Roni; Kaplan, Jared; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-11

    Experiments designed to measure neutrino oscillations also provide major opportunities for discovering very weakly coupled states. In order to produce neutrinos, experiments such as LSND collide thousands of Coulombs of protons into fixed targets, while MINOS and MiniBooNE also focus and then dump beams of muons. The neutrino detectors beyond these beam dumps are therefore an excellent arena in which to look for long-lived pseudoscalars or for vector bosons that kinetically mix with the photon. We show that these experiments have significant sensitivity beyond previous beam dumps, and are able to partially close the gap between laboratory experiments and supernovae constraints on pseudoscalars. Future upgrades to the NuMI beamline and Project X will lead to even greater opportunities for discovery. We also discuss thin target experiments with muon beams, such as those available in COMPASS, and show that they constitute a powerful probe for leptophilic PNGBs.

  10. Discovering the Theorem of Pythagoras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattanzio, Robert (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    In this 'Project Mathematics! series, sponsored by the California Institute of Technology, Pythagoraus' theorem a(exp 2) + b(exp 2) = c(exp 2) is discussed and the history behind this theorem is explained. hrough live film footage and computer animation, applications in real life are presented and the significance of and uses for this theorem are put into practice.

  11. Glowing Hot Transiting Exoplanet Discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    VLT Spectra Indicate Shortest-Known-Period Planet Orbiting OGLE-TR-3 Summary More than 100 exoplanets in orbit around stars other than the Sun have been found so far. But while their orbital periods and distances from their central stars are well known, their true masses cannot be determined with certainty, only lower limits. This fundamental limitation is inherent in the common observational method to discover exoplanets - the measurements of small and regular changes in the central star's velocity, caused by the planet's gravitational pull as it orbits the star. However, in two cases so far, it has been found that the exoplanet's orbit happens to be positioned in such a way that the planet moves in front of the stellar disk, as seen from the Earth. This "transit" event causes a small and temporary dip in the star's brightness, as the planet covers a small part of its surface, which can be observed. The additional knowledge of the spatial orientation of the planetary orbit then permits a direct determination of the planet's true mass. Now, a group of German astronomers [1] have found a third star in which a planet, somewhat larger than Jupiter, but only half as massive, moves in front of the central star every 28.5 hours . The crucial observation of this solar-type star, designated OGLE-TR-3 [2] was made with the high-dispersion UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). It is the exoplanet with the shortest period found so far and it is very close to the star, only 3.5 million km away. The hemisphere that faces the star must be extremely hot, about 2000 °C and the planet is obviously losing its atmosphere at high rate . PR Photo 10a/03 : The star OGLE-TR-3 . PR Photo 10b/03 : VLT UVES spectrum of OGLE-TR-3. PR Photo 10c/03 : Relation between stellar brightness and velocity (diagram). PR Photo 10d/03 : Observed velocity variation of OGLE-TR-3. PR Photo 10e/03 : Observed brightness variation of OGLE-TR-3. The search

  12. Discovering Mobile Social Networks by Semantic Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jason J.; Choi, Kwang Sun; Park, Sung Hyuk

    It has been important for telecommunication companies to discover social networks from mobile subscribers. They have attempted to provide a number of recommendation services, but they realized that the services were not successful. In this chapter, we present semantic technologies for discovering social networks. The process is mainly composed of two steps; (1) profile identification and (2) context understanding. Through developing a Next generation Contents dElivery (NICE) platform, we were able to generate various services based on the discovered social networks.

  13. Discover Space: an IYA program for libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.

    2009-12-01

    Across the country, there is a growing concern regarding the number of students entering science and technology careers. While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement. This is particularly true when family interactions are factored in. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. The nation’s more than 17,000 public libraries attract diverse audiences in almost every community. Science exhibits in libraries could potentially reach many adults and upper elementary and middle school students with STEM content. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is partnering with the American Library Association (ALA) to develop a pilot exhibit called Discover Space. The exhibit includes two areas: Space Storms and Star Quest and is currently on tour in Colorado. It is a featured IYA outreach project from SSI. This presentation will focus on the results of a national survey of libraries that SSI and ALA conducted in 2008 about interest in STEM exhibits as well as the development process that was used to design and fabricate the exhibit. Preliminary evaluation results will also be shared. The presentation will conclude with an examination of how this program could benefit underserved communities around the country.

  14. Scientists Discover Sugar in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    . Glycolaldehyde is a simpler molecular cousin to table sugar, the scientists say. The sugar molecule was detected in a large cloud of gas and dust some 26,000 light-years away, near the center of our Galaxy. Such clouds, often many light-years across, are the material from which new stars are formed. Though very rarified by Earth standards, these interstellar clouds are the sites of complex chemical reactions that occur over hundreds of thousands or millions of years. So far, about 120 different molecules have been discovered in these clouds. Most of these molecules contain a small number of atoms, and only a few molecules with eight or more atoms have been found in interstellar clouds. The 12 Meter Telescope "Finding glycolaldehyde in one of these interstellar clouds means that such molecules can be formed even in very rarified conditions," said Hollis. "We don't yet understand how it could be formed there," he added. "A combination of more astronomical observations and theoretical chemistry work will be required to resolve the mystery of how this molecule is formed in space." "We hope this discovery inspires renewed efforts to find even more kinds of molecules, so that, with a better idea of the total picture, we may be able to deduce the details of the prebiotic chemistry taking place in interstellar clouds," Hollis said. The discovery was made by detecting faint radio emission from the sugar molecules in the interstellar cloud. Molecules rotate end-for-end, and as they change from one rotational energy state to another, they emit radio waves at precise frequencies. The "family" of radio frequencies emitted by a particular molecule forms a unique "fingerprint" that scientists can use to identify that molecule. The scientists identified glycolaldehyde by detecting six frequencies of radio emission in what is termed the millimeter-wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum -- a region between more-familiar microwaves and infrared radiation. The NRAO 12 Meter Telescope

  15. Probable Bright Supernovae discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-01-01

    Three bright transients, which are probable supernovae, have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  16. Possible Nearby Transient discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, D.; Smith, K. W.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-01-01

    A transient, which is a possible nearby supernova, has been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  17. Probable Bright Supernova discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-09-01

    A bright transient, which is a probable supernova, has been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  18. Kepler Discovers Its First Rocky Planet

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission confirmed the discovery of its first rocky planet, named Kepler-10b. Measuring 1.4 times the size of Earth, it is the smallest planet ever discovered outside our solar system....

  19. Did the ancient egyptians discover Algol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetsu, L.; Porceddu, S.; Porceddu, S.; Lyytinen, J.; Kajatkari, P.; Markkanen, T.; Toivari-Viitala, J.

    2013-02-01

    Fabritius discovered the first variable star, Mira, in 1596. Holwarda determined the 11 months period of Mira in 1638. Montanari discovered the next variable star, Algol, in 1669. Its period, 2.867 days, was determined by Goodricke (178). Algol was associated with demon-like creatures, "Gorgon" in ancient Greek and "ghoul" in ancient Arab mythology. This indicates that its variability was discovered much before 1669 (Wilk 1996), but this mythological evidence is ambiguous (Davis 1975). For thousands of years, the Ancient Egyptian Scribes (AES) observed stars for timekeeping in a region, where there are nearly 300 clear nights a year. We discovered a significant periodicity of 2.850 days in their calendar for lucky and unlucky days dated to 1224 BC, "the Cairo Calendar". Several astrophysical and astronomical tests supported our conclusion that this was the period of Algol three millennia ago. The "ghoulish habits" of Algol could explain this 0.017 days period increase (Battersby 2012).

  20. Kepler Discovers Earth-size Planet Candidates

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission has discovered its first Earth-size planet candidates and its first candidates in the habitable zone, a region where liquid water could exist on a planet's surface. Five of th...

  1. Fermi discovers giant bubbles in Milky Way

    NASA Video Gallery

    Using data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, scientists have recently discovered a gigantic, mysterious structure in our galaxy. This feature looks like a pair of bubbles extending above...

  2. Discover Mathematics in the Physical World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan

    2011-04-01

    Playing with perspective windows generated an initial idea related to mathematics; an extended experiment with paper cards along the desk helped me to discover the geometry; reading Galileo's Sidereal Messenger allowed me to apply the geometry that I discovered to understand the magnitude of Galileo's telescope. Galileo's study of motion, like pendulum and inclined plane, deepened my (and my classmates') curiosity and fascination with his ingenious use of mathematics.

  3. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-06-01

    galaxies as they were 5,000 million years ago. Knowing the intensity of the X-ray emission as measured by ROSAT and also the distance, the astronomers were then able to estimate the total X-ray energy emitted by this cluster. It was found to be extremely high [3], in fact higher than that of any other cluster ever observed by ROSAT. It amounts to no less than 1.5 million million times the total energy emitted by the Sun. It is believed that this strong X-ray emission originates in a hot gas located between the galaxies in the cluster. The high temperature indicates that the components of the gas move very rapidly; this is related to the strong gravitational field within the cluster. THE GRAVITATIONAL ARCS To their great surprise and delight, the astronomers also discovered two bright arcs, 5 - 6 arcseconds long and symmetrically placed about 35 arcseconds to the North-East and South-West of the brightest galaxies in the cluster (see the photo). They were detected on exposures of only 3 minutes duration with the 2.2-metre telescope and are among the brightest such arcs ever found. At the indicated distance, the arcs are situated at a projected distance of about 500,000 light-years from the centre of the cluster. It is an interesting possibility that the two arcs may in fact be two images of the same, very distant galaxy, that is situated far beyond RXJ1347.5-1145 and whose light has been bent and split by this cluster's strong gravitational field. This strange phenomenon was first discovered in the late 1970's and is referred to as gravitational lensing. Quite a few examples are now known, in most cases in the form of double or multiple images of quasars. About three dozen cases involve well visible galaxy clusters and elongated arcs, but few, if any, of these arcs are as bright as those seen in the present cluster. This particular arc configuration enables a very accurate determination of the total mass of the cluster, once the distance of the background galaxy has been

  4. Regulatory RNAs discovered in unexpected places.

    PubMed

    Pek, Jun Wei; Okamura, Katsutomo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have discovered both small and long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) encoded in unexpected places. These ncRNA genes were surprises at the time of their discovery, but many quickly became well-accepted families of functional regulatory RNA species. Even after years of extensive gene annotation studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies, new types of ncRNA genes continue to be discovered in unexpected places. We highlight ncRNAs that have atypical structures and that are encoded in what are generally considered 'junk' sequences, such as spacers and introns. We also discuss current bottlenecks in the approaches for identifying novel ncRNAs and the possibility that many remain to be discovered. PMID:26424536

  5. DISCOVERING PATIENT PHENOTYPES USING GENERALIZED LOW RANK MODELS

    PubMed Central

    SCHULER, ALEJANDRO; LIU, VINCENT; WAN, JOE; CALLAHAN, ALISON; UDELL, MADELEINE; STARK, DAVID E.; SHAH, NIGAM H.

    2016-01-01

    The practice of medicine is predicated on discovering commonalities or distinguishing characteristics among patients to inform corresponding treatment. Given a patient grouping (hereafter referred to as a phenotype), clinicians can implement a treatment pathway accounting for the underlying cause of disease in that phenotype. Traditionally, phenotypes have been discovered by intuition, experience in practice, and advancements in basic science, but these approaches are often heuristic, labor intensive, and can take decades to produce actionable knowledge. Although our understanding of disease has progressed substantially in the past century, there are still important domains in which our phenotypes are murky, such as in behavioral health or in hospital settings. To accelerate phenotype discovery, researchers have used machine learning to find patterns in electronic health records, but have often been thwarted by missing data, sparsity, and data heterogeneity. In this study, we use a flexible framework called Generalized Low Rank Modeling (GLRM) to overcome these barriers and discover phenotypes in two sources of patient data. First, we analyze data from the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample (NIS), which contains upwards of 8 million hospitalization records consisting of administrative codes and demographic information. Second, we analyze a small (N=1746), local dataset documenting the clinical progression of autism spectrum disorder patients using granular features from the electronic health record, including text from physician notes. We demonstrate that low rank modeling successfully captures known and putative phenotypes in these vastly different datasets. PMID:26776181

  6. Did Viking discover life on Mars?

    PubMed

    Klein, H P

    1999-12-01

    A major argument in the claim that life had been discovered during the Viking mission to Mars is that the results obtained in the Labeled Release (LR) experiment are analogous to those observed with terrestrial microorganisms. This assertion is critically examined and found to be implausible.

  7. PSN in PGC938372 discovered by MASTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumkov, V.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kornilov, V.; Kuvshinov, D.; Vlasenko, D.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Porosheva, T.; Podesta, R. C.; Levato, O. H.; Lopez, C.; Podestan, F.; Saffe, C.; Potter, S.

    2016-09-01

    MASTER-IAC auto-detection system( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 05h 07m 27.73s -13d 24m 16.1s on 2016-09-06.23199 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is 17.2m (limit 19.4m).

  8. MASTER: bright PSN discovered in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumkov, V.; Lipunov, V.; Podesta, R.; Levato, H.; Buckley, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Vladimirov, V.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Chazov, V.; Lopez, C.; Podesta, F.; Saffe, C.; Pogrosheva, T.; Shurpakov, S.

    2016-10-01

    MASTER-OAFA (located in Argentina) auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., 2010, Advances in Astronomy, vol. 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 22h 01m 01.36s -40d 15m 26.7s on 2016-10-31.08091 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is 16.9m (mlim=19.9m).

  9. Discovering Diabetes Complications: an Ontology Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Daghistani, Tahani; Shammari, Riyad Al; Razzak, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a serious disease that spread in the world dramatically. The diabetes patient has an average of risk to experience complications. Take advantage of recorded information to build ontology as information technology solution will help to predict patients who have average of risk level with certain complication. It is helpful to search and present patient’s history regarding different risk factors. Discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Method: We designed ontology based model, using adult diabetes patients’ data, to discover the rules of diabetes with its complications in disease to disease relationship. Result: Various rules between different risk factors of diabetes Patients and certain complications generated. Furthermore, new complications (diseases) might be discovered as new finding of this study, discovering diabetes complications could be useful to prevent or delay the complications. Conclusion: The system can identify the patients who are suffering from certain risk factors such as high body mass index (obesity) and starting controlling and maintaining plan. PMID:26862251

  10. Pseudomonas blight discovered on raspberry in Watsonville

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the winter (February) of 2013, a field of raspberries in Watsonville was discovered to be infected with Pseudomonas syringae, the causal agent of Pseudomonas blight disease. This was the first documentation of this disease on raspberry in our region. The infection of raspberry plants is manifeste...

  11. Discovering English with the Sketch Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, James

    2014-01-01

    "Discovering English with the Sketch Engine" is the title of a new book (Thomas, 2014) which introduces the use of corpora in language study, teaching, writing and translating. It focuses on using the Sketch Engine to identify patterns of normal usage in many aspects of English ranging from morphology to discourse and pragmatics. This…

  12. Discover the U.S.A.!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popovich, Michele

    2000-01-01

    Describes Discover the USA, an interdisciplinary unit for middle school students that uses trip-planning software and World Wide Web-based resources to teach organizational, research, writing, computer, and practical math and geography skills. Students plan a 1-month road trip in the United States, then take the trip, keeping records of routes,…

  13. Did Viking discover life on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.

    1999-01-01

    A major argument in the claim that life had been discovered during the Viking mission to Mars is that the results obtained in the Labeled Release (LR) experiment are analogous to those observed with terrestrial microorganisms. This assertion is critically examined and found to be implausible.

  14. Absence of the appendix discovered during childhood.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Michelle V; Doyle, Alex; Bernstein, Sean; Jackman, Selma

    2014-01-01

    Absence of the appendix is rare. Isolated cases are usually discovered in adult patients or cadavers. We report the case of a 14 year old boy who was found to have no appendix on laparotomy for assumed acute appendicitis and use this opportunity to highlight the growing surgical uses of this vestigial structure.

  15. Discovering Integration through a Physical Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Derek; Magnes, Jenny; Schwarz, Gregory; Hartke, John

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines a method of conducting a laboratory designed to discover mathematical integration with students. The results are produced and verified in the laboratory by students. Understanding that an integral is defined by the area bounded by a function of x and the x-axis from a point a to a point b is challenging. Students often have…

  16. Discovering the Sequential Structure of Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John R.; Fincham, Jon M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-voxel pattern recognition techniques combined with Hidden Markov models can be used to discover the mental states that people go through in performing a task. The combined method identifies both the mental states and how their durations vary with experimental conditions. We apply this method to a task where participants solve novel…

  17. Discover Presidential Log Cabins. Teacher's Discussion Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Discover Presidential Log Cabins is a set of materials designed to help educate 6-8 grade students about the significance of three log cabin sites occupied by George Washington, Ulysses Grant, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt. This teacher's discussion guide is intended for use as part of a larger, comprehensive social studies program, and…

  18. Discovering Alaska's Salmon: A Children's Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaney, Laurel

    This children's activity book helps students discover Alaska's salmon. Information is provided about salmon and where they live. The salmon life cycle and food chains are also discussed. Different kinds of salmon such as Chum Salmon, Chinook Salmon, Coho Salmon, Sockeye Salmon, and Pink Salmon are introduced, and various activities on salmon are…

  19. Discovering Science through Art-Based Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberts, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Art and science are intrinsically linked; the essence of art and science is discovery. Both artists and scientists work in a systematic but creative way--knowledge and understanding are built up through pieces of art or a series of labs. In the classroom, integrating science and visual art can provide students with the latitude to think, discover,…

  20. Television: A Medium for Discovering Diversity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selva, Marta; Sola, Anna

    1995-01-01

    Examines television news programs as media for discovering diversity. Discusses television as a means of information and communication, its role in the creation of public opinion, its inability to permit understanding, and the need for empirical research to assess its influence on cognitive processes. (AEF)

  1. Did Viking discover life on Mars?

    PubMed

    Klein, H P

    1999-12-01

    A major argument in the claim that life had been discovered during the Viking mission to Mars is that the results obtained in the Labeled Release (LR) experiment are analogous to those observed with terrestrial microorganisms. This assertion is critically examined and found to be implausible. PMID:10666745

  2. Discover Earth: Earth's Energy Budget or Can You Spare a Sun?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Tom; Peters, Dale E.; Steeley, Jeanne

    1999-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction, and provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park.

  3. Libre: A Framework for Sharing and Discovering Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, J.; Duerr, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    To enable peer review and re-use, data must be publicly shareable and discoverable. The Libre project within the NSIDC, in conjunction with other members of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners and the Polar Information Commons, provides a framework for collaborative publishing of open science data. This talk describes the Libre framework as a model for “freeing” science data. Libre uses technologies such as Atom feeds to enable syndication of data sets and services. Open Search services allow the feeds to be discovered. An aggregator, like a news reader, provides notice for new or changed data sets and services. With these technologies, the Libre project provides both open-source tooling and a road map for similar efforts in other fields.

  4. ESA's Integral discovers hidden black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-10-01

    discovered so far? Astronomers, who have been observing the object regularly, guess that it had remained invisible because there must be a very thick shell of obscuring material surrounding it. If that was the case, only the most energetic radiation from the object could get through the shell; less-energetic radiation would be blocked. That could explain why space telescopes that are sensitive only to low-energy radiation had overlooked the object, while Integral, specialised in detecting very energetic emissions, did see it. To test their theory, astronomers turned to ESA's XMM-Newton space observatory, which observes the sky in the X-ray wavelengths. As well as being sensitive to high-energy radiation, XMM-Newton is also able to check for the presence of obscuring material. Indeed, XMM-Newton detected this object last February, as well as the existence of a dense 'cocoon' of cold gas with a diameter of similar size to that of the Earth's orbit around the Sun. This obscuring material forming the cocoon is probably 'stellar wind', namely gas ejected by the supermassive companion star. Astronomers think that this gas may be accreted by the compact black hole, forming a dense shell around it. This obscuring cloud traps most of the energy produced inside it. The main author of these results, Roland Walter of the Integral Science Data Centre, Switzerland, explained: "Only photons with the highest energies [above 10 keV] could escape from that cocoon. IGR J16318-4848 has therefore not been detected by surveys performed at lower energies, nor by previous gamma-ray missions that were much less sensitive than Integral." The question now is to find out how many of these objects lurk in the Galaxy. XMM-Newton and Integral together are the perfect tools to do the job. They have already discovered two more new sources embedded in obscuring material. Future observations are planned. Christoph Winkler, ESA Project Scientist for Integral, said: "These early examples of using two

  5. MASTER: 2 OT discovered in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumkov, V.; Pogrosheva, T.; Lipunov, V.; Podesta, R.; Levato, H.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Vladimirov, V.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Chazov, V.; Lopez, C.; Podesta, F.; Saffe, C.

    2016-10-01

    MASTER-OAFA, located in Argentina, with auto-detection system (Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 03h 19m 42.92s -45d 30m 13.9s on 2016-10-27.27597 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is 16.9m (mlim=20.8m).

  6. What if Fleming had not discovered penicillin?

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Wainwright, Milton; Alahmadi, Tahani Awad; Salleeh, Hashim Bin; Faden, Asmaa A; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam

    2014-09-01

    What would have happened had Alexander Fleming not discovered penicillin in 1928? Perhaps the obvious answer is that, someone else would have discovered penicillin during 1930s and the Oxford group, would still have purified it sometime in the early 1940s. Here, however, in this counterfactual account of the penicillin story, it is argued that without Fleming, penicillin might still be undiscovered and the antibiotic age would never have dawned. As a result, many of the recent developments in medicine, such as organ transplantation, might have been delayed or, at best, made more hazardous. Penicillin might have come onto the scene a few years later but, had Fleming overlooked the discovery, it seems certain that penicillin would not have saved countless Allied lives, during and after D-Day. Instead of having enjoyed fifty and more years of the antibiotic age, it is argued here, that we would have had to rely upon highly developed sulphonamides, so-called "supasulfas", and other chemically-derived antibacterial drugs. Indeed, it might be the case that, even well into this new millennium, the antibiotic age has yet to dawn, and medicine is still waiting for someone to chance upon penicillin. Here we discuss what might have happened had Fleming not discovered penicillin and come to the conclusion that the medical armoury available today would have been far different and might have relied solely upon highly developed varieties of sulphonamides or similar, synthetic, non-antibiotic antibacterial agents. PMID:25183937

  7. What if Fleming had not discovered penicillin?

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Wainwright, Milton; Alahmadi, Tahani Awad; Salleeh, Hashim Bin; Faden, Asmaa A.; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam

    2014-01-01

    What would have happened had Alexander Fleming not discovered penicillin in 1928? Perhaps the obvious answer is that, someone else would have discovered penicillin during 1930s and the Oxford group, would still have purified it sometime in the early 1940s. Here, however, in this counterfactual account of the penicillin story, it is argued that without Fleming, penicillin might still be undiscovered and the antibiotic age would never have dawned. As a result, many of the recent developments in medicine, such as organ transplantation, might have been delayed or, at best, made more hazardous. Penicillin might have come onto the scene a few years later but, had Fleming overlooked the discovery, it seems certain that penicillin would not have saved countless Allied lives, during and after D-Day. Instead of having enjoyed fifty and more years of the antibiotic age, it is argued here, that we would have had to rely upon highly developed sulphonamides, so-called “supasulfas”, and other chemically-derived antibacterial drugs. Indeed, it might be the case that, even well into this new millennium, the antibiotic age has yet to dawn, and medicine is still waiting for someone to chance upon penicillin. Here we discuss what might have happened had Fleming not discovered penicillin and come to the conclusion that the medical armoury available today would have been far different and might have relied solely upon highly developed varieties of sulphonamides or similar, synthetic, non-antibiotic antibacterial agents. PMID:25183937

  8. What if Fleming had not discovered penicillin?

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Wainwright, Milton; Alahmadi, Tahani Awad; Salleeh, Hashim Bin; Faden, Asmaa A; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam

    2014-09-01

    What would have happened had Alexander Fleming not discovered penicillin in 1928? Perhaps the obvious answer is that, someone else would have discovered penicillin during 1930s and the Oxford group, would still have purified it sometime in the early 1940s. Here, however, in this counterfactual account of the penicillin story, it is argued that without Fleming, penicillin might still be undiscovered and the antibiotic age would never have dawned. As a result, many of the recent developments in medicine, such as organ transplantation, might have been delayed or, at best, made more hazardous. Penicillin might have come onto the scene a few years later but, had Fleming overlooked the discovery, it seems certain that penicillin would not have saved countless Allied lives, during and after D-Day. Instead of having enjoyed fifty and more years of the antibiotic age, it is argued here, that we would have had to rely upon highly developed sulphonamides, so-called "supasulfas", and other chemically-derived antibacterial drugs. Indeed, it might be the case that, even well into this new millennium, the antibiotic age has yet to dawn, and medicine is still waiting for someone to chance upon penicillin. Here we discuss what might have happened had Fleming not discovered penicillin and come to the conclusion that the medical armoury available today would have been far different and might have relied solely upon highly developed varieties of sulphonamides or similar, synthetic, non-antibiotic antibacterial agents.

  9. Astronomers Discover Six-Image Gravitational Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    An international team of astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to discover the first gravitational lens in which the single image of a very distant galaxy has been split into six different images. The unique configuration is produced by the gravitational effect of three galaxies along the line of sight between the more-distant galaxy and Earth. Optical and Radio Images of Gravitational Lens "This is the first gravitational lens with more than four images of the background object that is produced by a small group of galaxies rather than a large cluster of galaxies," said David Rusin, who just received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. "Such systems are expected to be extremely rare, so this discovery is an important stepping stone. Because this is an intermediate case between gravitational lenses produced by single galaxies and lenses produced by large clusters of galaxies, it will give us insights we can't get from other types of lenses," Rusin added. The gravitational lens, called CLASS B1359+154, consists of a galaxy more than 11 billion light-years away in the constellation Bootes, with a trio of galaxies more than 7 billion light-years away along the same line of sight. The more-distant galaxy shows signs that it contains a massive black hole at its core and also has regions in which new stars are forming. The gravitational effect of the intervening galaxies has caused the light and radio waves from the single, more-distant galaxy to be "bent" to form six images as seen from Earth. Four of these images appear outside the triangle formed by the three intermediate galaxies and two appear inside that triangle. "This lens system is a very interesting case to study because it is more complicated than lenses produced by single galaxies, and yet simpler than lenses produced by clusters of numerous galaxies," said Chris Kochanek of the Harvard

  10. Discovering Functional Units in Continuous Speech

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung-Joo; Lacerda, Francisco; Holt, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Language learning requires that listeners discover acoustically variable functional units like phonetic categories and words from an unfamiliar, continuous acoustic stream. Although many category learning studies have examined how listeners learn to generalize across the acoustic variability inherent in the signals that convey the functional units of language, these studies have tended to focus upon category learning across isolated sound exemplars. However, continuous input presents many additional learning challenges that may impact category learning. Listeners may not know the timescale of the functional unit, its relative position in the continuous input, or its relationship to other evolving input regularities. Moving laboratory-based studies of isolated category exemplars toward more natural input is important to modeling language learning, but very little is known about how listeners discover categories embedded in continuous sound. In 3 experiments, adult participants heard acoustically variable sound category instances embedded in acoustically variable and unfamiliar sound streams within a video game task. This task was inherently rich in multisensory regularities with the to-be-learned categories and likely to engage procedural learning without requiring explicit categorization, segmentation, or even attention to the sounds. After 100 min of game play, participants categorized familiar sound streams in which target words were embedded and generalized this learning to novel streams as well as isolated instances of the target words. The findings demonstrate that even without a priori knowledge, listeners can discover input regularities that have the best predictive control over the environment for both non-native speech and nonspeech signals, emphasizing the generality of the learning. PMID:26010592

  11. Discovering functional units in continuous speech.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung-Joo; Lacerda, Francisco; Holt, Lori L

    2015-08-01

    Language learning requires that listeners discover acoustically variable functional units like phonetic categories and words from an unfamiliar, continuous acoustic stream. Although many category learning studies have examined how listeners learn to generalize across the acoustic variability inherent in the signals that convey the functional units of language, these studies have tended to focus upon category learning across isolated sound exemplars. However, continuous input presents many additional learning challenges that may impact category learning. Listeners may not know the timescale of the functional unit, its relative position in the continuous input, or its relationship to other evolving input regularities. Moving laboratory-based studies of isolated category exemplars toward more natural input is important to modeling language learning, but very little is known about how listeners discover categories embedded in continuous sound. In 3 experiments, adult participants heard acoustically variable sound category instances embedded in acoustically variable and unfamiliar sound streams within a video game task. This task was inherently rich in multisensory regularities with the to-be-learned categories and likely to engage procedural learning without requiring explicit categorization, segmentation, or even attention to the sounds. After 100 min of game play, participants categorized familiar sound streams in which target words were embedded and generalized this learning to novel streams as well as isolated instances of the target words. The findings demonstrate that even without a priori knowledge, listeners can discover input regularities that have the best predictive control over the environment for both non-native speech and nonspeech signals, emphasizing the generality of the learning. PMID:26010592

  12. Discovering social groups without having relational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, John; Zhang, Zhongfei; Lewin, Ronny; Decker, Michael

    2004-04-01

    Who is associated with whom? Who communicates with whom? When two or more individuals get together is there an intended purpose? Who are the leaders/important individuals of the group? What is the organizational structure of the group? These are just a few of the questions that are covered under the topic of social network analysis. Data mining, specifically community generation, attempts to automatically discover and learn these social models. In this paper we present one class of problems which we have called the uni-party data community generation paradigm. We discuss various applications, a methodology and results from two problem domains.

  13. Discovering Communicable Models from Earth Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark; Langley, Pat; Potter, Christopher; Klooster, Steven; Torregrosa, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes how we used regression rules to improve upon results previously published in the Earth science literature. In such a scientific application of machine learning, it is crucially important for the learned models to be understandable and communicable. We recount how we selected a learning algorithm to maximize communicability, and then describe two visualization techniques that we developed to aid in understanding the model by exploiting the spatial nature of the data. We also report how evaluating the learned models across time let us discover an error in the data.

  14. Discovering viroids--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Diener, Theodor O

    2003-10-01

    During 1970 and 1971, I discovered that a devastating disease of potato plants is not caused by a virus, as had been assumed, but by a new type of subviral pathogen, the viroid. Viroids are so small--one fiftieth of the size of the smallest viruses--that many scientists initially doubted their existence. We now know that viroids cause many damaging diseases of crop plants. Fortunately, new methods that are based on the unique properties of viroids now promise effective control. PMID:15040183

  15. Planet Imager Discovers Young Kuiper Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-07-01

    A debris disk just discovered around a nearby star is the closest thing yet seen to a young version of the Kuiper belt. This disk could be a key to better understanding the interactions between debris disks and planets, as well as how our solar system evolved early on in its lifetime. Hunting for an analog The best way to understand how the Kuiper belt — home to Pluto and thousands of other remnants of early icy planet formation in our solar system — developed would be to witness a similar debris disk in an earlier stage of its life. But before now, none of the disks we've discovered have been similar to our own: the rings are typically too large, the central star too massive, or the stars exist in regions very unlike what we think our Sun's birthplace was like. A collaboration led by Thayne Currie (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) has changed this using the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), part of a new generation of extreme adaptive-optics systems. The team discovered a debris disk of roughly the same size as the Kuiper belt orbiting the star HD 115600, located in the nearest OB association. The star is only slightly more massive than our Sun, and it lives in a star-forming region similar to the early Sun's environment. HD 115600 is different in one key way, however: it is only 15 million years old. This means that observing it gives us the perfect opportunity to observe how our solar system might have behaved when it was much younger. A promising future GPI's spatially-resolved spectroscopy, combined with measurements of the reflectivity of the disk, have led the team to suspect that the disk might be composed partly of water ice, just as the Kuiper belt is. The disk also shows evidence of having been sculpted by the motions of giant planets orbiting the central star, in much the same way as the outer planets of our solar system may have shaped the Kuiper belt. The observations of HD 115600 are some of the very first to emerge from GPI and the new

  16. Great Explorations: Discovering Science in the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Maria, Ed.; And Others

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Library Institute was a project that brought together 28 school and public librarians from the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area to discuss science, mathematics, and technology. education reform and what can be done to bring it about. This book discusses the project in 12 chapters:…

  17. Discovering Structural Regularity in 3D Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Mark; Mitra, Niloy J.; Wallner, Johannes; Pottmann, Helmut; Guibas, Leonidas J.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a computational framework for discovering regular or repeated geometric structures in 3D shapes. We describe and classify possible regular structures and present an effective algorithm for detecting such repeated geometric patterns in point- or mesh-based models. Our method assumes no prior knowledge of the geometry or spatial location of the individual elements that define the pattern. Structure discovery is made possible by a careful analysis of pairwise similarity transformations that reveals prominent lattice structures in a suitable model of transformation space. We introduce an optimization method for detecting such uniform grids specifically designed to deal with outliers and missing elements. This yields a robust algorithm that successfully discovers complex regular structures amidst clutter, noise, and missing geometry. The accuracy of the extracted generating transformations is further improved using a novel simultaneous registration method in the spatial domain. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm on a variety of examples and show applications to compression, model repair, and geometry synthesis. PMID:21170292

  18. Final Technical Report: Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Saurabh W. Jha

    2012-10-03

    The final technical report from the project "Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae" led at Rutgers the State University of New Jersey by Prof. Saurabh W. Jha is presented, including all publications resulting from this award.

  19. Discovering, Supporting, and Promoting Young Children's Passions and Interests: One Teacher's Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes the journey of one kindergarten teacher as she discovered, supported, and promoted the passions and interests of an at-risk kindergarten student, and shared in his joys of learning. Details an inquiry project about snakes, initiated by the student's knowledge about snakes, involving field trips, class discussion, learning centers, and…

  20. Discovering the Art of Mathematics: Using String Art to Investigate Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Renesse, Christine; Ecke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    One goal of our Discovering the Art of Mathematics project is to empower students in the liberal arts to become confident creators of art and imaginative creators of mathematics. In this paper, we describe our experience with using string art to guide liberal arts students in exploring ideas of calculus. We provide excerpts from our inquiry-based…

  1. When Two Circles Determine a Triangle. Discovering and Proving a Geometrical Condition in a Computer Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metaxas, Nikolaos; Karagiannidou, Andromachi

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of mathematical relationships enables students to formulate conjectures as well as to search for mathematical arguments to support these conjectures. In this project students are asked to discover the sufficient and necessary condition so that two circles form the circumscribed and inscribed circle of a triangle and investigate how…

  2. Discovering the 'Magic' of Target Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier, Linda J.; Ackenbom, Charles R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes target marketing of children's summer camps, emphasizing the benefits of collaborative advertising campaigns. Discusses the scope and economics of four model campaigns. Outlines the design, implementation, and evaluation of collaborative marketing projects. (SV)

  3. How to See a Recently Discovered Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientist Peter Nugent discusses a recently discovered supernova that is closer to Earth — approximately 21 million light-years away — than any other of its kind in a generation. Astronomers believe they caught the supernova within hours of its explosion, a rare feat made possible with a specialized survey telescope and state-of-the-art computational tools. The finding of such a supernova so early and so close has energized the astronomical community as they are scrambling to observe it with as many telescopes as possible, including the Hubble Space Telescope. More info on how to see it: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/31/glimpse-cosmic-explosion/ News release: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/25/supernova/

  4. Michael Maier--nine newly discovered letters.

    PubMed

    Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas; Tilton, Hereward

    2014-02-01

    The authors provide a transcription, translation, and evaluation of nine newly discovered letters from the alchemist Michael Maier (1568-1622) to Gebhardt Johann von Alvensleben (1576-1631), a noble landholder in the vicinity of Magdeburg. Stemming from the final year of his life, this correspondence casts new light on Maier's biography, detailing his efforts to secure patronage amid the financial crisis of the early Thirty Years' War. While his ill-fated quest to perfect potable gold continued to form the central focus of his patronage suits, Maier also offered his services in several arts that he had condemned in his printed works, namely astrology and "supernatural" magic. Remarks concerning his previously unknown acquaintance with Heinrich Khunrath call for a re-evaluation of Maier's negotiation of the discursive boundaries between Lutheran orthodoxy and Paracelsianism. The letters also reveal Maier's substantial contribution to a work previously ascribed solely to the English alchemist Francis Anthony. PMID:25241502

  5. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. These results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings. PMID:25411881

  6. Discovering, Indexing and Interlinking Information Resources.

    PubMed

    Celli, Fabrizio; Keizer, Johannes; Jaques, Yves; Konstantopoulos, Stasinos; Vudragović, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    The social media revolution is having a dramatic effect on the world of scientific publication. Scientists now publish their research interests, theories and outcomes across numerous channels, including personal blogs and other thematic web spaces where ideas, activities and partial results are discussed. Accordingly, information systems that facilitate access to scientific literature must learn to cope with this valuable and varied data, evolving to make this research easily discoverable and available to end users. In this paper we describe the incremental process of discovering web resources in the domain of agricultural science and technology. Making use of Linked Open Data methodologies, we interlink a wide array of custom-crawled resources with the AGRIS bibliographic database in order to enrich the user experience of the AGRIS website. We also discuss the SemaGrow Stack, a query federation and data integration infrastructure used to estimate the semantic distance between crawled web resources and AGRIS. PMID:26834982

  7. Discovering Complex Ordered Phases of Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, An-Chang

    2012-02-01

    Block copolymers with their rich phase behavior and ordering transitions have become a paradigm for the study of structured soft materials. Understanding the structures and phase transitions in block copolymers has been one of the most active research areas in polymer science in the past two decades. One of the achievements is the self-consistent field theory (SCFT), which provides a powerful framework for the study of ordered phase of block copolymers. I will present a generic strategy to discover complex ordered phases of block copolymers within the SCFT framework. Specifically, a combination of real-space and reciprocal-space techniques is used to explore possible ordered phases in multiblock copolymer melts. These candidate phases can then be used to construct phase diagrams. Application of this strategy to linear and star ABC triblock copolymers has led to the discovery of a rich array of ordered phases.

  8. Michael Maier--nine newly discovered letters.

    PubMed

    Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas; Tilton, Hereward

    2014-02-01

    The authors provide a transcription, translation, and evaluation of nine newly discovered letters from the alchemist Michael Maier (1568-1622) to Gebhardt Johann von Alvensleben (1576-1631), a noble landholder in the vicinity of Magdeburg. Stemming from the final year of his life, this correspondence casts new light on Maier's biography, detailing his efforts to secure patronage amid the financial crisis of the early Thirty Years' War. While his ill-fated quest to perfect potable gold continued to form the central focus of his patronage suits, Maier also offered his services in several arts that he had condemned in his printed works, namely astrology and "supernatural" magic. Remarks concerning his previously unknown acquaintance with Heinrich Khunrath call for a re-evaluation of Maier's negotiation of the discursive boundaries between Lutheran orthodoxy and Paracelsianism. The letters also reveal Maier's substantial contribution to a work previously ascribed solely to the English alchemist Francis Anthony.

  9. Discovering, Indexing and Interlinking Information Resources

    PubMed Central

    Celli, Fabrizio; Keizer, Johannes; Jaques, Yves; Konstantopoulos, Stasinos; Vudragović, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    The social media revolution is having a dramatic effect on the world of scientific publication. Scientists now publish their research interests, theories and outcomes across numerous channels, including personal blogs and other thematic web spaces where ideas, activities and partial results are discussed. Accordingly, information systems that facilitate access to scientific literature must learn to cope with this valuable and varied data, evolving to make this research easily discoverable and available to end users. In this paper we describe the incremental process of discovering web resources in the domain of agricultural science and technology. Making use of Linked Open Data methodologies, we interlink a wide array of custom-crawled resources with the AGRIS bibliographic database in order to enrich the user experience of the AGRIS website. We also discuss the SemaGrow Stack, a query federation and data integration infrastructure used to estimate the semantic distance between crawled web resources and AGRIS. PMID:26834982

  10. Flupirtine, a re-discovered drug, revisited.

    PubMed

    Szelenyi, Istvan

    2013-03-01

    Flupirtine was developed long before K(V)7 (KCNQ) channels were known. However, it was clear from the beginning that flupirtine is neither an opioid nor a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic. Its unique muscle relaxing activity was discovered by serendipity. In the meantime, broad and intensive research has resulted in a partial clarification of its mode of action. Flupirtine is the first therapeutically used K(V)7 channel activator with additional GABA(A)ergic mechanisms and thus the first representative of a novel class of analgesics. The presently accepted main mode of its action, potassium K(V)7 (KCNQ) channel activation, opens a series of further therapeutic possibilities. One of them has now been realized: its back-up compound, the bioisostere retigabine, has been approved for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:23322112

  11. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.

  12. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-11-02

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provides detailed physical insight. While theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor – a highly accelerated, first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor we show new pathways for glycine synthesis frommore » primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, providing new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. Ultimately, these results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.« less

  13. Discovering Rules by Meta-level Abduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Katsumi; Furukawa, Koichi; Kobayashi, Ikuo; Nabeshima, Hidetomo

    This paper addresses discovery of unknown relations from incomplete network data by abduction. Given a network information such as causal relations and metabolic pathways, we want to infer missing links and nodes in the network to account for observations. To this end, we introduce a framework of meta-level abduction, which performs abduction in the meta level. This is implemented in SOLAR, an automated deduction system for consequence finding, using a first-order representation for algebraic properties of causality and the full-clausal form of network information and constraints. Meta-level abduction by SOLAR is powerful enough to infer missing rules, missing facts, and unknown causes that involve predicate invention in the form of existentially quantified hypotheses. We also show an application of rule abduction to discover certain physical techniques and related integrity constraints within the subject area of Skill Science.

  14. How to See a Recently Discovered Supernova

    ScienceCinema

    Nugent, Peter

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientist Peter Nugent discusses a recently discovered supernova that is closer to Earth — approximately 21 million light-years away — than any other of its kind in a generation. Astronomers believe they caught the supernova within hours of its explosion, a rare feat made possible with a specialized survey telescope and state-of-the-art computational tools. The finding of such a supernova so early and so close has energized the astronomical community as they are scrambling to observe it with as many telescopes as possible, including the Hubble Space Telescope. More info on how to see it: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/31/glimpse-cosmic-explosion/ News release: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/25/supernova/

  15. Discovering Sentinel Rules for Business Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelfart, Morten; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    This paper proposes the concept of sentinel rules for multi-dimensional data that warns users when measure data concerning the external environment changes. For instance, a surge in negative blogging about a company could trigger a sentinel rule warning that revenue will decrease within two months, so a new course of action can be taken. Hereby, we expand the window of opportunity for organizations and facilitate successful navigation even though the world behaves chaotically. Since sentinel rules are at the schema level as opposed to the data level, and operate on data changes as opposed to absolute data values, we are able to discover strong and useful sentinel rules that would otherwise be hidden when using sequential pattern mining or correlation techniques. We present a method for sentinel rule discovery and an implementation of this method that scales linearly on large data volumes.

  16. Discovering New Drugs on the Cellular Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    With the Vision for Space Exploration calling for a sustained human presence in space, astronauts will need to grow plants, while in orbit, for nourishment that they will not receive from only consuming dehydrated foods. As a potential source of food for long-duration missions, space-grown plants could also give astronauts an important psychological boost, as fresh vegetables could serve as a welcomed change from monotonous meals consisting of reconstituted foods in plastic bags. Even more, these plants could likely aid in the recycling of air and wastewater on spacecraft. With a helping hand from a company by the name of Biolog, Inc., NASA is studying the impacts of decreased gravity and spaceborne bacteria on the plants being grown for food in space. With a helping hand from NASA, this very same company is creating powerful new cell- and bacteria-analysis tools for use in discovering and developing new drugs on Earth.

  17. Discovering, Indexing and Interlinking Information Resources.

    PubMed

    Celli, Fabrizio; Keizer, Johannes; Jaques, Yves; Konstantopoulos, Stasinos; Vudragović, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    The social media revolution is having a dramatic effect on the world of scientific publication. Scientists now publish their research interests, theories and outcomes across numerous channels, including personal blogs and other thematic web spaces where ideas, activities and partial results are discussed. Accordingly, information systems that facilitate access to scientific literature must learn to cope with this valuable and varied data, evolving to make this research easily discoverable and available to end users. In this paper we describe the incremental process of discovering web resources in the domain of agricultural science and technology. Making use of Linked Open Data methodologies, we interlink a wide array of custom-crawled resources with the AGRIS bibliographic database in order to enrich the user experience of the AGRIS website. We also discuss the SemaGrow Stack, a query federation and data integration infrastructure used to estimate the semantic distance between crawled web resources and AGRIS.

  18. Discovering Me: Music Activities for Special Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Keith P.; And Others

    The book contains information on musical activities which were field tested in Project PASE (Program in the Arts for Special Education, Pennsylvania) classrooms with a wide range of exceptionalities from preschool age to adolescence. Activities are seen to help children become more aware of their bodies, feelings, and themselves; feel important…

  19. A Newly Discovered Highly Variable IDV Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabanyi, K. E.; Marchili, N.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Fuhrmann, L.; Britzen, S.; Witzel, A.; Zensus, J. A.; Liu, X.; Huagang, S.; Han, J. L.

    Short time scale radio variations of compact extragalactic radio quasars and blazars known as IntraDay Variability (IDV) can be explained in at least some sources as a propagation effect; the variations are interpreted as scintillation of radio waves in the turbulent interstellar medium of the Milky Way. One of the most convincing observational arguments in favour of a propagationinduced variability scenario is the observed annual modulation in the characteristic variability time scale due to the Earth's orbital motion. So far there are only two sources known with a well-constrained seasonal cycle. J1128+592 is a recently discovered, highly variable IDV source. Previous, densely time-sampled flux-density measurements with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope (Germany) and the Urumqi 25-m radio telescope (China), strongly indicate an annual modulation of the time scale. Here, we summarise the annual modulation model derived using all the measurements, carried out in the last 2.5 years. Bursts, Pulses and Flickering:Wide-field monitoring of the dynamic radio sky June 12-15 2007 Kerastari, Tripolis, Greece

  20. How the antihypertensive losartan was discovered.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Gaurab

    2006-11-01

    Based on interviews and publications, this case study is a history of how DuPont scientists discovered losartan, the first angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Essential aspects of the story include: i) the discovery occurred at a young and inexperienced pharmaceutical business; ii) three bench scientists had recently graduated from PhD programmes and only the fourth had any industrial research experience; iii) pivotal to its success was the support and risk-taking of the highly experienced and recently hired head of pharmaceutical research; iv) a timely patent issued to Takeda Chemical Industries suggested a new line of research; v) a mistake made by an inexperienced pharmacologist yielded pivotal information; vi) the bench scientists were given the freedom to explore while being supported by research managers; vii) luck favoured the scientists in losartan's subreceptor-binding and metabolite; and viii) the marketing group insisted that losartan not be developed until Merck expressed an interest in the drug candidate. Today, losartan is a multibillion dollar drug. PMID:23506070

  1. Discovering the structure of mathematical problem solving.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Lee, Hee Seung; Fincham, Jon M

    2014-08-15

    The goal of this research is to discover the stages of mathematical problem solving, the factors that influence the duration of these stages, and how these stages are related to the learning of a new mathematical competence. Using a combination of multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) and hidden Markov models (HMM), we found that participants went through 5 major phases in solving a class of problems: A Define Phase where they identified the problem to be solved, an Encode Phase where they encoded the needed information, a Compute Phase where they performed the necessary arithmetic calculations, a Transform Phase where they performed any mathematical transformations, and a Respond Phase where they entered an answer. The Define Phase is characterized by activity in visual attention and default network regions, the Encode Phase by activity in visual regions, the Compute Phase by activity in regions active in mathematical tasks, the Transform Phase by activity in mathematical and response regions, and the Respond phase by activity in motor regions. The duration of the Compute and Transform Phases were the only ones that varied with condition. Two features distinguished the mastery trials on which participants came to understand a new problem type. First, the duration of late phases of the problem solution increased. Second, there was increased activation in the rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC) and angular gyrus (AG), regions associated with metacognition. This indicates the importance of reflection to successful learning. PMID:24746954

  2. Discovering Alzheimer Genetic Biomarkers Using Bayesian Networks.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Fayroz F; Zayed, Nourhan; Fakhr, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contribute most of the genetic variation to the human genome. SNPs associate with many complex and common diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Discovering SNP biomarkers at different loci can improve early diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. Bayesian network provides a comprehensible and modular framework for representing interactions between genes or single SNPs. Here, different Bayesian network structure learning algorithms have been applied in whole genome sequencing (WGS) data for detecting the causal AD SNPs and gene-SNP interactions. We focused on polymorphisms in the top ten genes associated with AD and identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. New SNP biomarkers were observed to be significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease. These SNPs are rs7530069, rs113464261, rs114506298, rs73504429, rs7929589, rs76306710, and rs668134. The obtained results demonstrated the effectiveness of using BN for identifying AD causal SNPs with acceptable accuracy. The results guarantee that the SNP set detected by Markov blanket based methods has a strong association with AD disease and achieves better performance than both naïve Bayes and tree augmented naïve Bayes. Minimal augmented Markov blanket reaches accuracy of 66.13% and sensitivity of 88.87% versus 61.58% and 59.43% in naïve Bayes, respectively. PMID:26366461

  3. Discovering Alzheimer Genetic Biomarkers Using Bayesian Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Fayroz F.; Zayed, Nourhan; Fakhr, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contribute most of the genetic variation to the human genome. SNPs associate with many complex and common diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Discovering SNP biomarkers at different loci can improve early diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. Bayesian network provides a comprehensible and modular framework for representing interactions between genes or single SNPs. Here, different Bayesian network structure learning algorithms have been applied in whole genome sequencing (WGS) data for detecting the causal AD SNPs and gene-SNP interactions. We focused on polymorphisms in the top ten genes associated with AD and identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. New SNP biomarkers were observed to be significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease. These SNPs are rs7530069, rs113464261, rs114506298, rs73504429, rs7929589, rs76306710, and rs668134. The obtained results demonstrated the effectiveness of using BN for identifying AD causal SNPs with acceptable accuracy. The results guarantee that the SNP set detected by Markov blanket based methods has a strong association with AD disease and achieves better performance than both naïve Bayes and tree augmented naïve Bayes. Minimal augmented Markov blanket reaches accuracy of 66.13% and sensitivity of 88.87% versus 61.58% and 59.43% in naïve Bayes, respectively. PMID:26366461

  4. Astronomers Discover Fastest-Spinning Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope have discovered the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, a 20-mile-diameter superdense pulsar whirling faster than the blades of a kitchen blender. Their work yields important new information about the nature of one of the most exotic forms of matter known in the Universe. Pulsar Graphic Pulsars Are Spinning Neutron Stars CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) "We believe that the matter in neutron stars is denser than an atomic nucleus, but it is unclear by how much. Our observations of such a rapidly rotating star set a hard upper limit on its size, and hence on how dense the star can be.," said Jason Hessels, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal. Hessels and his colleagues presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. Pulsars are spinning neutron stars that sling "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is left after a massive star explodes at the end of its "normal" life. With no nuclear fuel left to produce energy to offset the stellar remnant's weight, its material is compressed to extreme densities. The pressure squeezes together most of its protons and electrons to form neutrons; hence, the name "neutron star." "Neutron stars are incredible laboratories for learning about the physics of the fundamental particles of nature, and this pulsar has given us an important new limit," explained Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and one of Hessels' collaborators on this work. The scientists discovered the pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, in a globular cluster of stars called Terzan 5, located some 28,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The newly-discovered pulsar is spinning 716 times per second, or at 716 Hertz (Hz), readily beating the previous record of 642 Hz from a pulsar

  5. Discovering the Ancient Maya From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, T. L.

    2007-01-01

    The Peten region of northern Guatemala contains some of the most significant Mayan archeological sites in Latin America. It was in this region that the Maya civilization began, flourished, and abruptly disappeared. Remote sensing technology is helping to locate and map ancient Maya sites that are threatened today by accelerating deforestation and looting. Thematic Mapper, IKONOS, and QuickBird satellite, and airborne STAR-3i and AIRSAR radar data, combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are successfully detecting ancient Maya features such as sites, roadways, canals, and water reservoirs. Satellite imagery is also being used to map the bajos, which are seasonally flooded swamps that cover over 40% of the land surface. Through the use of various airborne and satellite sensor systems we have been able to detect and map ancient causeways, temples, reservoirs, and land forms, and locate these features on the ground through GPS technology. Recently, we have discovered that there is a strong relationship between a tropical forest vegetation signature in satellite imagery and the location of archeological sites. We believe that the use o f limestone and lime plasters in ancient Maya construction affects the moisture, nutrition, and plant species of the surface vegetation. We have mapped these vegetation signatures in the imagery and verified through field survey that they are indicative of archeological sites. Through the use of remote sensing and GIS technology it is possible to identify unrecorded archeological features in a dense tropical forest environment and monitor these cultural features for their protection.

  6. Discovering the Ancient Maya from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, T. L.

    2008-01-01

    The Pet6n region of northern Guatemala contains some of the most significant Mayan archeological sites in Latin America. It was in this region that the Maya civilization began, flourished, and abruptly disappeared. Remote sensing technology is helping to locate and map ancient Maya sites that are threatened today by accelerating deforestation and looting. Thematic Mapper, IKONOS, and QuickBird satellite, and airborne STAR-3i and AIRSAR radar data, combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are successfully detecting ancient Maya features such as sites, roadways, canals, and water reservoirs. Satellite imagery is also being used to map the bajos, which are seasonally flooded swamps that cover over 40% of the land surface. Through the use of various airborne and satellite sensor systems we have been able to detect and map ancient causeways, temples, reservoirs, and land forms, and locate these features on the ground through GPS technology. Recently, we have discovered that there is a strong relationship between a tropical forest vegetation signature in satellite imagery and the location of archeological sites. We believe that the use of limestone and lime plasters in ancient Maya construction affects the moisture, nutrition, and plant species of the surface vegetation. We have mapped these vegetation signatures in the imagery and verified through field survey that they are indicative of archeological sites. Through the use of remote sensing and GIS technology it is possible to identify unrecorded archeological features in a dense tropical forest environment and monitor these cultural features for their protection.

  7. Discovering the structure of mathematical problem solving.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Lee, Hee Seung; Fincham, Jon M

    2014-08-15

    The goal of this research is to discover the stages of mathematical problem solving, the factors that influence the duration of these stages, and how these stages are related to the learning of a new mathematical competence. Using a combination of multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) and hidden Markov models (HMM), we found that participants went through 5 major phases in solving a class of problems: A Define Phase where they identified the problem to be solved, an Encode Phase where they encoded the needed information, a Compute Phase where they performed the necessary arithmetic calculations, a Transform Phase where they performed any mathematical transformations, and a Respond Phase where they entered an answer. The Define Phase is characterized by activity in visual attention and default network regions, the Encode Phase by activity in visual regions, the Compute Phase by activity in regions active in mathematical tasks, the Transform Phase by activity in mathematical and response regions, and the Respond phase by activity in motor regions. The duration of the Compute and Transform Phases were the only ones that varied with condition. Two features distinguished the mastery trials on which participants came to understand a new problem type. First, the duration of late phases of the problem solution increased. Second, there was increased activation in the rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC) and angular gyrus (AG), regions associated with metacognition. This indicates the importance of reflection to successful learning.

  8. DISCOVER Near Real-Time Ocean Data Products: Examples of Uses and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. K.; Wentz, F. J.; Gentemann, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    Scientists at Remote Sensing Systems produce satellite microwave ocean data products for DISCOVER, a NASA MEaSUREs project. These ocean products include ocean surface winds, sea surface temperatures, atmospheric water vapor, cloud liquid water and rain rates created from passive microwave instrument data including that from SSM/I, TMI, AMSR-E, SSMIS and WindSat. Many users download DISCOVER data products in near real-time and use them within their specific applications. For example, some of the applications include ocean weather assessment for military sortie determination, sea surface temperature front identification for use by fishermen, and whale and turtle habitat monitoring. We will present the processing steps used to create the near real-time DISCOVER data, show several examples of user applications and discuss the benefits and limitations users find in applying our data products to their needs.

  9. THE MOST LUMINOUS GALAXIES DISCOVERED BY WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chao-Wei; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Wu, Jingwen; Wright, Edward L.; Assef, Roberto J.; Blain, Andrew W.; Bridge, Carrie R.; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Cutri, Roc M.; Masci, Frank J.; Yan, Lin; Griffith, Roger L.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Petty, Sara M.; Stanford, S. Adam; and others

    2015-06-01

    We present 20 Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)-selected galaxies with bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} > 10{sup 14} L{sub ☉}, including five with infrared luminosities L{sub IR} ≡ L{sub (rest} {sub 8–1000} {sub μm)} > 10{sup 14} L{sub ☉}. These “extremely luminous infrared galaxies,” or ELIRGs, were discovered using the “W1W2-dropout” selection criteria which requires marginal or non-detections at 3.4 and 4.6 μm (W1 and W2, respectively) but strong detections at 12 and 22 μm in the WISE survey. Their spectral energy distributions are dominated by emission at rest-frame 4–10 μm, suggesting that hot dust with T{sub d} ∼ 450 K is responsible for the high luminosities. These galaxies are likely powered by highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and there is no evidence suggesting these systems are beamed or lensed. We compare this WISE-selected sample with 116 optically selected quasars that reach the same L{sub bol} level, corresponding to the most luminous unobscured quasars in the literature. We find that the rest-frame 5.8 and 7.8 μm luminosities of the WISE-selected ELIRGs can be 30%–80% higher than that of the unobscured quasars. The existence of AGNs with L{sub bol} > 10{sup 14} L{sub ☉} at z > 3 suggests that these supermassive black holes are born with large mass, or have very rapid mass assembly. For black hole seed masses ∼10{sup 3} M{sub ☉}, either sustained super-Eddington accretion is needed, or the radiative efficiency must be <15%, implying a black hole with slow spin, possibly due to chaotic accretion.

  10. Discovering New R Coronae Borealis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Tisserand, Patrick; Welch, Douglas L.; LeBleu, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are rare hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich supergiants. Two evolutionary scenarios have been suggested, a double degenerate merger of two white dwarfs, or a final helium shell flash in a PN central star. The evidence pointing toward a white-dwarf merger or a final-flash origin for RCB stars is contradictory. The distribution on the sky and radial velocities of the RCB stars tend toward those of the bulge population but a much larger sample of stars is needed to determine the true population. We need to discover RCB stars much more efficiently. In order to do this, we have used a series of IR color-color cuts, using the recent release of the WISE All-Sky Catalog, to produce a sample of 2200 candidates that may yield over 200 new RCB star identifications. Most of these candidates do not have lightcurves, the traditional technique of identifying RCB stars from their characteristic large and irregular light variations. We have obtained optical spectra of several hundred candidates and have confirmed over 40 new RCB stars in the Galaxy. We are attempting to develop a quantitative spectral classification system for the RCB stars so that they can be identified without an accompanying light curve. The cooler RCB stars look like carbon stars with strong C2 bands, but they can be differentiated from carbon stars by their extreme hydrogen deficiency and very low 13C/12C ratio. Also, the red CN bands are much weaker in RCB stars than in carbon stars. The number of RCB stars in the Galaxy may be consistent with the predicted number of He/CO white-dwarf mergers. Solving the mystery of how the RCB stars evolve would be a watershed event in the study of stellar evolution that will lead to a better understanding of other important types of stellar merger events such as Type Ia SNe.

  11. HUBBLE AND KECK DISCOVER GALAXY BUILDING BLOCK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a very small, faint galaxy 'building block' newly discovered by a unique collaboration between ground- and space-based telescopes. Hubble and the 10-meter Keck Telescopes in Hawaii joined forces, using a galaxy cluster which acts as gravitational lens to detect what scientists believe is one of the smallest very distant objects ever found. The galaxy cluster Abell 2218 was used by a team of European and American astronomers led by Richard Ellis (Caltech) in their systematic search for intrinsically faint distant star-forming systems. Without help from Abell 2218's exceptional magnifying power to make objects appear about 30 times brighter, the galaxy building block would have been undetectable. In the image to the right, the object is seen distorted into two nearly identical, very red 'images' by the gravitational lens. The image pair represents the magnified result of a single background object gravitationally lensed by Abell 2218 and viewed at a distance of 13.4 billion light-years. The intriguing object contains only one million stars, far fewer than a mature galaxy, and scientists believe it is very young. Such young star-forming systems of low mass at early cosmic times are likely to be the objects from which present-day galaxies have formed. In the image to the left, the full overview of the galaxy cluster Abell 2218 is seen. This image was taken by Hubble in 1999 at the completion of Hubble Servicing Mission 3A. Credit: NASA, ESA, Richard Ellis (Caltech) and Jean-Paul Kneib (Observatoire Midi-Pyrenees, France) Acknowledgment: NASA, A. Fruchter and the ERO Team (STScI and ST-ECF)

  12. DISCOVERING HABITABLE EARTHS, HOT JUPITERS, AND OTHER CLOSE PLANETS WITH MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, R.

    2012-06-20

    Searches for planets via gravitational lensing have focused on cases in which the projected separation, a, between planet and star is comparable to the Einstein radius, R{sub E} . This paper considers smaller orbital separations and demonstrates that evidence of close-orbit planets can be found in the low-magnification portion of the light curves generated by the central star. We develop a protocol for discovering hot Jupiters as well as Neptune-mass and Earth-mass planets in the stellar habitable zone. When planets are not discovered, our method can be used to quantify the probability that the lens star does not have planets within specified ranges of the orbital separation and mass ratio. Nearby close-orbit planets discovered by lensing can be subject to follow-up observations to study the newly discovered planets or to discover other planets orbiting the same star. Careful study of the low-magnification portions of lensing light curves should produce, in addition to the discoveries of close-orbit planets, definite detections of wide-orbit planets through the discovery of 'repeating' lensing events. We show that events exhibiting extremely high magnification can effectively be probed for planets in close, intermediate, and wide distance regimes simply by adding several-time-per-night monitoring in the low-magnification wings, possibly leading to gravitational lensing discoveries of multiple planets occupying a broad range of orbits, from close to wide, in a single planetary system.

  13. Discover Earth: an earth system science program for libraries and their communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.

    2011-12-01

    The view from space has deepened our understanding of Earth as a global, dynamic system. Instruments on satellites and spacecraft, coupled with advances in ground-based research, have provided us with astonishing new perspectives of our planet. Now more than ever, enhancing the public's understanding of Earth's physical and biological systems is vital to helping citizens make informed policy decisions especially when they are faced with the consequences of global climate change. While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. The Space Science Institute's National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. STAR-Net includes two exhibitions: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. The Discover Earth exhibition will focus on local earth science topics-such as weather, water cycle, and ecosystem changes-as well as a global view of our changing planet. The main take-away message (or Big Idea) for this exhibition is that the global environment changes - and is changed by - the host community's local environment. The project team is testing whether this approach will be a good strategy for engaging the public, especially in rural America. This presentation will provide an overview of the Discover Earth project and how it is integrating climate change ideas into the exhibit

  14. VLA Discovers Giant Rings Around Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have discovered giant, ring-like structures around a cluster of galaxies. The discovery provides tantalizing new information about how such galaxy clusters are assembled, about magnetic fields in the vast spaces between galaxy clusters, and possibly about the origin of cosmic rays. Radio-Optical Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (Radio/Optical) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Above, a combined radio/optical image shows the galaxy cluster Abell 3376 in visible light (blue) and radio (red) images. The giant radio arcs surrounding the cluster were discovered using the Very Large Array. The visible-light image is from the Digitized Sky survey. Below, an X-ray image of Abell 3376 made using the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton telescope shows a spectacular, bullet-shaped region of X-rays coming from gas heated to 60 million degrees Kelvin. The bullet shape results from the supersonic collision of a smaller smaller galaxy subcluster with the main body of the larger cluster. Click on images for larger version. X-Ray Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (X-Ray) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, ESA "These giant, radio-emitting rings probably are the result of shock waves caused by violent collisions of smaller groups of galaxies within the cluster," said Joydeep Bagchi, of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, who led an international research team. The scientists reported their findings in the November 3 edition of the journal Science. The newly-discovered ring segments, some 6 million light-years across, surround a galaxy cluster called Abell 3376, more than 600 million light-years from Earth. They were revealed because fast-moving electrons emitted radio waves as they spiraled around magnetic field lines in intergalactic space. "Even from this large distance, the feeble radio waves were easily picked up by the VLA

  15. New Galactic supernova remnants discovered with IPHAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, L.; Parker, Q. A.; Contreras, M. E.; Olguín, L.; Frew, D. J.; Stupar, M.; Vázquez, R.; Wright, N. J.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Morris, R. A. H.

    2013-05-01

    As part of a systematic search programme of a 10° wide strip of the northern Galactic plane, we present preliminary evidence for the discovery of four (and possibly five) new supernova remnants (SNRs). The pilot search area covered the 19-20 h right ascension zone sampling from +20° to +55° in declination using binned mosaic images from the Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric Hα Survey (IPHAS). The optical identification of the candidate SNRs was based mainly on their filamentary and arc-like emission morphologies, their apparently coherent, even if fractured, structure and clear disconnection from any diffuse neighbouring H II region type nebulosity. Follow-up optical spectroscopy was undertaken, sampling carefully across prominent features of these faint sources. The resulting spectra revealed typical emission-line ratios for shock-excited nebulae which are characteristic of SNRs, which, along with the latest diagnostic diagrams, strongly support the likely SNR nature of these sources: G038.7-1.3 (IPHASX J190640.5+042819), G067.6+0.9 (IPHASX J195744.9+305306), G066.0-0.0 (IPHASX J195749.2+290259) and G065.8-0.5 (IPHASX J195920.4+283740). A fifth possible younger, higher density nebula SNR candidate, G067.8+0.5 (IPHASX J200002.4+305035), was discovered ˜5 arcmin to the west of IPHASX J195744.9+305306, and it warrants further study. A multiwavelength cross-check from available archived data in the regions of these candidates was also performed with a focus on possible radio counterparts. A close positional match between previously unrecognized radio structures at several frequencies and across various components of the Hα optical image data was found for all SNR candidates. This lends further direct support for the SNR nature of these objects. Evolved SNRs may have very weak and/or highly fragmented radio emission which could explain why they had not been previously recognized, but the association becomes clear in combination with the optical emission.

  16. Discovering Extrasolar Planets with Microlensing Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambsganss, J.

    2016-06-01

    An astronomical survey is commonly understood as a mapping of a large region of the sky, either photometrically (possibly in various filters/wavelength ranges) or spectroscopically. Often, catalogs of objects are produced/provided as the main product or a by-product. However, with the advent of large CCD cameras and dedicated telescopes with wide-field imaging capabilities, it became possible in the early 1990s, to map the same region of the sky over and over again. In principle, such data sets could be combined to get very deep stacked images of the regions of interest. However, I will report on a completely different use of such repeated maps: Exploring the time domain for particular kinds of stellar variability, namely microlens-induced magnifications in search of exoplanets. Such a time-domain microlensing survey was originally proposed by Bohdan Paczynski in 1986 in order to search for dark matter objects in the Galactic halo. Only a few years later three teams started this endeavour. I will report on the history and current state of gravitational microlensing surveys. By now, routinely 100 million stars in the Galactic Bulge are monitored a few times per week by so-called survey teams. All stars with constant apparent brightness and those following known variability patterns are filtered out in order to detect the roughly 2000 microlensing events per year which are produced by stellar lenses. These microlensing events are identified "online" while still in their early phases and then monitored with much higher cadence by so-called follow-up teams. The most interesting of such events are those produced by a star-plus-planet lens. By now of order 30 exoplanets have been discovered by these combined microlensing surveys. Microlensing searches for extrasolar planets are complementary to other exoplanet search techniques. There are two particular advantages: The microlensing method is sensitive down to Earth-mass planets even with ground-based telecopes, and it

  17. The Impact of Discovering Life beyond Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2015-10-01

    Introduction: astrobiology and society Steven J. Dick; Part I. Motivations and Approaches. How Do We Frame the Problems of Discovery and Impact?: Introduction; 1. Current approaches to finding life beyond earth, and what happens if we do Seth Shostak; 2. The philosophy of astrobiology: the Copernican and Darwinian presuppositions Iris Fry; 3. History, discovery, analogy: three approaches to the impact of discovering life beyond earth Steven J. Dick; 4. Silent impact: why the discovery of extraterrestrial life should be silent Clément Vidal; Part II. Transcending Anthropocentrism. How Do We Move beyond our Own Preconceptions of Life, Intelligence and Culture?: Introduction; 5. The landscape of life Dirk Schulze-Makuch; 6. The landscape of intelligence Lori Marino; 7. Universal biology: assessing universality from a single example Carlos Mariscal; 8. Equating culture, civilization, and moral development in imagining extraterrestrial intelligence: anthropocentric assumptions? John Traphagan; 9. Communicating with the other: infinity, geometry, and universal math and science Douglas Vakoch; Part III. Philosophical, Theological, and Moral Impact. How Do We Comprehend the Cultural Challenges Raised by Discovery?: Introduction; 10. Life, intelligence and the pursuit of value in cosmic evolution Mark Lupisella; 11. 'Klaatu barada nikto' - or, do they really think like us? Michael Ruse; 12. Alien minds Susan Schneider; 13. The moral subject of astrobiology: guideposts for exploring our ethical and political responsibilities towards extraterrestrial life Elspeth Wilson and Carol Cleland; 14. Astrobiology and theology Robin Lovin; 15. Would you baptize an extraterrestrial? Guy Consolmagno, SJ; Part IV. Practical Considerations: How Should Society Prepare for Discovery - and Non-Discovery?: Introduction; 16. Is there anything new about astrobiology and society? Jane Maienschein; 17. Evaluating preparedness for the discovery of extraterrestrial life: considering potential

  18. PSLQ: An Algorithm to Discover Integer Relations

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, J. M.

    2009-04-03

    Let x = (x{sub 1}, x{sub 2} {hor_ellipsis}, x{sub n}) be a vector of real or complex numbers. x is said to possess an integer relation if there exist integers a{sub i}, not all zero, such that a{sub 1}x{sub 1} + a{sub 2}x{sub 2} + {hor_ellipsis} + a{sub n}x{sub n} = 0. By an integer relation algorithm, we mean a practical computational scheme that can recover the vector of integers ai, if it exists, or can produce bounds within which no integer relation exists. As we will see in the examples below, an integer relation algorithm can be used to recognize a computed constant in terms of a formula involving known constants, or to discover an underlying relation between quantities that can be computed to high precision. At the present time, the most effective algorithm for integer relation detection is the 'PSLQ' algorithm of mathematician-sculptor Helaman Ferguson [10, 4]. Some efficient 'multi-level' implementations of PSLQ, as well as a variant of PSLQ that is well-suited for highly parallel computer systems, are given in [4]. PSLQ constructs a sequence of integer-valued matrices B{sub n} that reduces the vector y = xB{sub n}, until either the relation is found (as one of the columns of B{sub n}), or else precision is exhausted. At the same time, PSLQ generates a steadily growing bound on the size of any possible relation. When a relation is found, the size of smallest entry of the vector y abruptly drops to roughly 'epsilon' (i.e. 10{sup -p}, where p is the number of digits of precision). The size of this drop can be viewed as a 'confidence level' that the relation is real and not merely a numerical artifact - a drop of 20 or more orders of magnitude almost always indicates a real relation. Very high precision arithmetic must be used in PSLQ. If one wishes to recover a relation of length n, with coefficients of maximum size d digits, then the input vector x must be specified to at least nd digits, and one must employ nd-digit floating-point arithmetic. Maple and

  19. Astronomers Discover Six-Image Gravitational Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    An international team of astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to discover the first gravitational lens in which the single image of a very distant galaxy has been split into six different images. The unique configuration is produced by the gravitational effect of three galaxies along the line of sight between the more-distant galaxy and Earth. Optical and Radio Images of Gravitational Lens "This is the first gravitational lens with more than four images of the background object that is produced by a small group of galaxies rather than a large cluster of galaxies," said David Rusin, who just received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. "Such systems are expected to be extremely rare, so this discovery is an important stepping stone. Because this is an intermediate case between gravitational lenses produced by single galaxies and lenses produced by large clusters of galaxies, it will give us insights we can't get from other types of lenses," Rusin added. The gravitational lens, called CLASS B1359+154, consists of a galaxy more than 11 billion light-years away in the constellation Bootes, with a trio of galaxies more than 7 billion light-years away along the same line of sight. The more-distant galaxy shows signs that it contains a massive black hole at its core and also has regions in which new stars are forming. The gravitational effect of the intervening galaxies has caused the light and radio waves from the single, more-distant galaxy to be "bent" to form six images as seen from Earth. Four of these images appear outside the triangle formed by the three intermediate galaxies and two appear inside that triangle. "This lens system is a very interesting case to study because it is more complicated than lenses produced by single galaxies, and yet simpler than lenses produced by clusters of numerous galaxies," said Chris Kochanek of the Harvard

  20. Discovering DNA encodes heredity and prions are infectious proteins.

    PubMed

    Prusiner, Stanley B; McCarty, Maclyn

    2006-01-01

    The resemblance between the discoveries that DNA is the basis of heredity and that prions are infectious proteins is remarkable. Though four decades separated these two discoveries, the biochemical methodologies and scientific philosophies that were employed are surprisingly similar. In both cases, bioassays available at the time that the projects were initiated proved to be inadequate to support purification studies. Improved bioassays allowed the transforming principle (TP) to be purified from pneumococci and prions from scrapie-infected hamster brains. Publications describing TP as composed of DNA prompted some scientists to contend that undetected proteins must contaminate TP enriched fractions. The simplicity of DNA was thought to prevent it from encoding genetic information. By the time prions were discovered, the genomes of all infectious pathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites had been shown to be comprised of nucleic acids and so an antithetical refrain became widely echoed: DNA or RNA molecules must be hiding among the proteins of prions. Finding the unexpected and being asked to demonstrate unequivocally the absence of a possible contaminant represent uncanny parallels between the discoveries that DNA encodes the genotype and that prions are infectious proteins.

  1. Spirit Discovers New Class of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    . %' indicates that the numbers tell what percentage of the total weight of each rock is silica (on the horizontal scale) and what percentage is oxides of sodium and potassium (on the vertical scale). The thin lines separate volcanic rock types identified on Earth by different scientific names such as foidite and picrobasalt. Various classes of Gusev rocks (see box in upper right) all plot either on or to the left of the green lines, which define 'alkaline' and 'subalkaline' categories (subalkaline rocks have more silica than alkaline rocks).

    Members of the rover team have named different classes of rocks after specimens examined by Spirit that represent their overall character. During the rover's travels, Spirit discovered that Adirondack-class rocks littered the Gusev plains; that Backstay, Irvine, and Wishstone-class rocks occurred as loose blocks on the northwest slope of 'Husband Hill'; and that outcrops of Algonquin-class rocks protruded in several places on the southeast face.

    These rocks have less silica than all previously analyzed Mars samples, which are subalkaline. The previously analyzed Mars samples include Martian meteorites found on Earth and rocks analyzed by the Mars Pathfinder rover in 1997. Gusev is the first documented example of an alkaline igneous province on Mars.

  2. High-School Student Discovers Strange Astronomical Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    A West Virginia high-school student analyzing data from a giant radio telescope has discovered a new astronomical object -- a strange type of neutron star called a rotating radio transient. Lucas Bolyard, a sophomore at South Harrison High School in Clarksburg, WV, made the discovery while participating in a project in which students are trained to scrutinize data from the National Science Foundation's giant Robert C. Byrd Green The project, called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC), is a joint project of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU), funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Bolyard made the discovery in March, after he already had studied more than 2,000 data plots from the GBT and found nothing. "I was home on a weekend and had nothing to do, so I decided to look at some more plots from the GBT," he said. "I saw a plot with a pulse, but there was a lot of radio interference, too. The pulse almost got dismissed as interference," he added. Nonetheless, he reported it, and it went on a list of candidates for West Virginia University astronomers Maura McLaughlin and Duncan Lorimer to re-examine, scheduling new observations of the region of sky from which the pulse came. Disappointingly, the follow-up observations showed nothing, indicating that the object was not a normal pulsar. However, the astronomers explained to Bolyard that his pulse still might have come from a rotating radio transient. Confirmation didn't come until July. Bolyard was at the NRAO's Green Bank Observatory with fellow PSC students. The night before, the group had been observing with the GBT in the wee hours, and all were very tired. Then Lorimer showed Bolyard a new plot of his pulse, reprocessed from raw data, indicating that it is real, not interference, and that Bolyard is likely the discoverer of one of only about 30 rotating radio transients known. Suddenly, Bolyard said, he wasn't tired anymore. "That news made me full

  3. Reviews Book: The 4% Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy and the Race to Discover the Rest of Reality Book: Quantitative Understanding of Biosystems: An Introduction to Biophysics Book: Edison's Electric Light: The Art of Invention Book: The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology Equipment: Voicebox Equipment: Tracker 4 Books: Hands-On Introduction to NI LabVIEW with Vernier, and Engineering Projects with NI LabVIEW and Vernier Places to Visit: Discovery Museum Book: Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-11-01

    WE RECOMMEND Quantitative Understanding of Biosystems: An Introduction to Biophysics Text applies physics to biology concepts Edison's Electric Light: The Art of Invention Edison's light still shines brightly The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology Anecdotes explore cosmology Voicebox Voicebox kit discovers the physics and evolution of speech Tracker 4 Free software tracks motion analysis Hands-On Introduction to NI LabVIEW with Vernier, and Engineering Projects with NI LabVIEW and Vernier Books support the LabVIEW software Discovery Museum Newcastle museum offers science enjoyment for all Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction Philosophy opens up science questions WORTH A LOOK The 4% Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy and the Race to Discover the Rest of Reality Book researches the universe WEB WATCH Superconductivity websites are popular

  4. Most Powerful Eruption in the Universe Discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    emission within the cavities shows that jets from the black hole erupted to create the cavities. Gas is being pushed away from the black hole at supersonic speeds over a distance of about a million light years. The mass of the displaced gas equals about a trillion Suns, more than the mass of all the stars in the Milky Way. LA Radio & Chandra X-ray Composite of MS 0735.6+7421 VLA Radio & Chandra X-ray Composite of MS 0735.6+7421 The rapid growth of supermassive black holes is usually detected by observing very bright radiation from the centers of galaxies in the optical and X-ray wavebands, or luminous radio jets. In MS 0735 no bright central radiation is found and the radio jets are faint. Therefore, the true nature of MS 0735 is only revealed through X-ray observations of the hot cluster gas. "Until now we had no idea that this black hole was gorging itself", said co-author Michael Wise of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "The discovery of this eruption shows that X-ray telescopes are necessary to understand some of the most violent events in the Universe." The astronomers estimated how much energy was needed to create the cavities by calculating the density, temperature and pressure of the hot gas. By making a standard assumption, that 10% of the gravitational energy goes into launching the jets, they estimated how much material the black hole swallowed. Size Comparison of MS 0735.6+7421 & Perseus Cluster Size Comparison of MS 0735.6+7421 & Perseus Cluster Besides generating the cavities, some of the energy from this eruption should keep the hot gas around the black hole from cooling, and some of it may also generate large-scale magnetic fields in the galaxy cluster. Chandra observers have discovered other cavities in galaxy clusters, but this one is easily the largest and the most powerful. For example, the energy content here exceeds that of the Perseus cavities by 250 times, and dwarfs the cavities in M87 by a factor of 10,000. NASA's Marshall Space Flight

  5. Carbon Atmosphere Discovered On Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    without pulsations would require a tiny size, consistent only with exotic stars made of strange quark matter. "Our carbon veil solves one of the big questions about the neutron star in Cas A," said Craig Heinke. "People have been willing to consider some weird explanations, so it's a relief to discover a less peculiar solution." Unlike most astronomical objects, neutron stars are small enough to understand on a human scale. For example, neutron stars typically have a diameter of about 14 miles, only slightly longer than a half-marathon. The atmosphere of a neutron star is on an even smaller scale. The researchers calculate that the carbon atmosphere is only about 4 inches thick, because it has been compressed by a surface gravity that is 100 billion times stronger than on Earth. "For people who are used to hearing about immense sizes of things in space, it might be a surprise that we can study something so small," said Ho. "It's also funny to think that such a thin veil over this star played a key role in frustrating researchers." In Earth's time frame, the estimated age of the neutron star in Cas A is only several hundred years, making it about ten times younger than other neutron stars with detected surface emission. Therefore, the Cas A neutron star gives a unique window into the early life of a cooling neutron star. The carbon itself comes from a combination of material that has fallen back after the supernova, and nuclear reactions on the hot surface of the neutron star which convert hydrogen and helium into carbon. The X-ray spectrum and lack of pulsar activity suggest that the magnetic field on the surface of this neutron star is relatively weak. Similarly low magnetic fields are implied for several other young neutron stars by study of their weak X-ray pulsations. It is not known whether these neutron stars will have low magnetic fields for their entire lives, and never become radio pulsars, or whether processes in their interior will lead to the development of

  6. Youngest Stellar Explosion in Our Galaxy Discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have found the remains of the youngest supernova, or exploded star, in our Galaxy. The supernova remnant, hidden behind a thick veil of gas and dust, was revealed by the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which could see through the murk. The object is the first example of a "missing population" of young supernova remnants. 1985 and 2008 VLA Images Move cursor over image to blink. VLA Images of G1.9+0.3 in 1985 and 2008: Circle for size comparison. CREDIT: Green, et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF From observing supernovae in other galaxies, astronomers have estimated that about three such stellar explosions should occur in our Milky Way every century. However, the most recent one known until now occurred around 1680, creating the remnant called Cassiopeia A. The newly-discovered object is the remnant of an explosion only about 140 years ago. "If the supernova rate estimates are correct, there should be the remnants of about 10 supernova explosions in the Milky Way that are younger than Cassiopeia A," said David Green of the University of Cambridge in the UK, who led the VLA study. "It's great to finally track one of them down." Supernova explosions, which mark the violent death of a star, release tremendous amounts of energy and spew heavy elements such as calcium and iron into interstellar space. They thus seed the clouds of gas and dust from which new stars and planets are formed and, through their blast shocks, can even trigger such formation. The lack of evidence for young supernova remnants in the Milky Way had caused astronomers to wonder if our Galaxy, which appears otherwise normal, differed in some unknown way from others. Alternatively, scientists thought that the "missing" Milky Way supernovae perhaps indicated that their understanding of the relationship between supernovae and other galactic processes was in error. The astronomers made their discovery by measuring the expansion of the debris from

  7. DISCOVER: Concurrent Validity, Gender Differences, and Identification of Minority Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 257 Navajo Indians and Mexican American elementary students, used the Raven Progressive Matrices to examined the concurrent validity of the DISCOVER assessment. Results provided some evidence for concurrent validity and showed that, through the use of the DISCOVER assessment, 22.9 percent were identified as gifted. (Contains…

  8. 76 FR 4393 - Discover Financial Services Negotiated Service Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Financial Services negotiated service agreement to the market dominant product list. This notice addresses... 3020, et seq., to add a Discover Financial Services (DFS) negotiated service agreement to the market... Data and Request to Add Discover Financial Services Negotiated Service Agreement to the...

  9. Biological Activity of Recently Discovered Halogenated Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents the biological activity—antibacterial, antifungal, anti-parasitic, antiviral, antitumor, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and enzymatic activity—of halogenated marine natural products discovered in the past five years. Newly discovered examples that do not report biological activity are not included. PMID:26133553

  10. Objective Earth, a planet to discover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borel, G.

    2003-04-01

    Objective Earth is an innovative project part of the "Swiss Virtual Campus", a federal program launched and financially supported by the Swiss University Conference and the Swiss Universities. Objective Earth is an online course devised for first year university students in Geosciences, but is also ideal for people who need or want to broaden their knowledge in Earth Sciences (biologists, civil engineers, high school teachers, etc.). The course is multilingual (English, German, French). The disciplines are integrated in a global approach to the "Earth System," the educational focus is on understanding all the important processes and their interactions in the global context. The pedagogical effort has been placed upon the global understanding of the main processes and their interactions. Our goal is for students to develop the ability to apply their knowledge in a comprehensive way to tackle definite geological problems. Thus, very particular attention has been put on the contextualization of the learning, combining didactically the academic notions and the practical situations. By the study of a thematic context, we intend to deliberately connect the phenomena described by the different disciplines of the geosciences (geology, geography, geophysics, mineralogy) to the way they physically occur in nature. Pages that are delivered to the user are assembled at run-time by the system. Information resources are stored and managed in XML which is the ideal format for structured-documents. Furthermore, using XML, the course structure can be processed separately from the content and re-used in other areas. This technical choice also offers a great flexibility for future developments.

  11. Youngest Stellar Explosion in Our Galaxy Discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have found the remains of the youngest supernova, or exploded star, in our Galaxy. The supernova remnant, hidden behind a thick veil of gas and dust, was revealed by the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which could see through the murk. The object is the first example of a "missing population" of young supernova remnants. 1985 and 2008 VLA Images Move cursor over image to blink. VLA Images of G1.9+0.3 in 1985 and 2008: Circle for size comparison. CREDIT: Green, et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF From observing supernovae in other galaxies, astronomers have estimated that about three such stellar explosions should occur in our Milky Way every century. However, the most recent one known until now occurred around 1680, creating the remnant called Cassiopeia A. The newly-discovered object is the remnant of an explosion only about 140 years ago. "If the supernova rate estimates are correct, there should be the remnants of about 10 supernova explosions in the Milky Way that are younger than Cassiopeia A," said David Green of the University of Cambridge in the UK, who led the VLA study. "It's great to finally track one of them down." Supernova explosions, which mark the violent death of a star, release tremendous amounts of energy and spew heavy elements such as calcium and iron into interstellar space. They thus seed the clouds of gas and dust from which new stars and planets are formed and, through their blast shocks, can even trigger such formation. The lack of evidence for young supernova remnants in the Milky Way had caused astronomers to wonder if our Galaxy, which appears otherwise normal, differed in some unknown way from others. Alternatively, scientists thought that the "missing" Milky Way supernovae perhaps indicated that their understanding of the relationship between supernovae and other galactic processes was in error. The astronomers made their discovery by measuring the expansion of the debris from

  12. The Community Discovered: The Search for Meaning through the Integration of Art and Technology in K-12 Education. Evaluation Progress Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdouch, Ronald; Grandgenett, Neal; Topp, Neal; Ostler, Elliott; Pawloski, Bob; Timms, Mike; Peterson, Joan

    This fourth evaluation progress report concerns the "Community Discovered" project, currently completing its third year of operation, a 5-year project that links technology and the visual and performing arts with other subject areas to transform the education of K-12 students in Nebraska and nationwide. The report states that the project builds…

  13. Project: "Project!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    In November 2006, the editors of "Campus Technology" launched their first-ever High-Resolution Projection Study, to find out if the latest in projector technology could really make a significant difference in teaching, learning, and educational innovation on US campuses. The author and her colleagues asked campus educators, technologists, and…

  14. NASA's Kepler Mission Discovers Multiple Planets Orbiting Twin Suns

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission has discovered the first transiting circumbinary system -- multiple planets orbiting two suns -- 4,900 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Cygnus, proving that more t...

  15. First Multi-Planet System Discovered by Kepler

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler Mission has discovered the first confirmed planetary system with more than one planet transiting the same star. The announcement of the discovery of the two planets, Kepler 9b and 9c,...

  16. Cochlear Implants Keep Twin Sisters Learning, Discovering Together

    MedlinePlus

    ... University. Photo: Johns Hopkins University Keep Twin Sisters Learning, Discovering Together Mia and Isabelle Jeppsen, 10, share ... her mother, gratefully, "There's the obvious benefit of learning to read, write and communicate with facility and ...

  17. NASA's Kepler Discovers Its Smallest 'Habitable Zone' Planets to Date

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission has discovered two new planetary systems that include three super-Earth-size planets in the "habitable zone," the range of distance from a star where the surface temperature o...

  18. Evaluation and Comparison of Methods for Measuring Ozone and NO2 Concentrations in Ambient Air during DISCOVER-AQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient evaluations of the various ozone and NO2 methods were conducted during field intensive studies as part of the NASA DISCOVER-AQ project conducted during July 2011 near Baltimore, MD; January – February 2013 in the San Juaquin valley, CA; September 2013 in Houston, TX...

  19. “Fine-Scale Application of the coupled WRF-CMAQ System to the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ Campaign”

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DISCOVER-AQ project (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality), is a joint collaboration between NASA, U.S. EPA and a number of other local organizations with the goal of characterizing air quality in ...

  20. Discovering New Minerals at Micron to Nanoscales: A SEM-EBSD-EPMA Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.

    2014-12-01

    With high-resolution analytical field emission scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalyzer, we are now capable to characterize Earth and planetary materials easier and faster down to nanoscales. Nanofeatures (such as inclusions, exsolution, zonation, coatings, pores) in minerals and rocks are being discovered. Nanominerals and nanoparticles are being revealed. New minerals and new materials are being identified. During our ongoing nanomineralogy investigation since 2006, more than twenty five new minerals have been discovered at micron to nanoscales. Fifteen of them are from the Allende meteorite, including new refractory minerals like allendeite, hexamolybdenum, tistarite, panguite and kangite, which are among the first solids formed in our solar system. Each of the new extraterrestrial minerals reveals distinctive forming environments, providing insights into nebula or parent-body processes. Presented here are a few nanomineralogy projects demonstrating how to find and characterize new minerals with an integrated SEM-EBSD-EPMA approach.

  1. Talkoot Portals: Discover, Tag, Share, and Reuse Collaborative Science Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Ramachandran, R.; Lynnes, C.

    2009-05-01

    discoverable using tag search, and advertised using "service casts" and "interest casts" (Atom feeds). Multiple science workflow systems will be plugged into the system, with initial support for UAH's Mining Workflow Composer and the open-source Active BPEL engine, and JPL's SciFlo engine and the VizFlow visual programming interface. With the ability to share and execute analysis workflows, Talkoot portals can be used to do collaborative science in addition to communicate ideas and results. It will be useful for different science domains, mission teams, research projects and organizations. Thus, it will help to solve the "sociological" problem of bringing together disparate groups of researchers, and the technical problem of advertising, discovering, developing, documenting, and maintaining inter-agency science workflows. The presentation will discuss the goals of and barriers to Science 2.0, the social web technologies employed in the Talkoot software appliance (e.g. CMS, social tagging, personal presence, advertising by feeds, etc.), illustrate the resulting collaborative capabilities, and show early prototypes of the web interfaces (e.g. embedded workflows).

  2. Development of a global land cover characteristics database and IGBP DISCover from 1 km AVHRR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loveland, T.R.; Reed, B.C.; Brown, J.F.; Ohlen, D.O.; Zhu, Z.; Yang, L.; Merchant, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy produced a 1 km resolution global land cover characteristics database for use in a wide range of continental- to global-scale environmental studies. This database provides a unique view of the broad patterns of the biogeographical and ecoclimatic diversity of the global land surface, and presents a detailed interpretation of the extent of human development. The project was carried out as an International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, Data and Information Systems (IGBP-DIS) initiative. The IGBP DISCover global land cover product is an integral component of the global land cover database. DISCover includes 17 general land cover classes defined to meet the needs of IGBP core science projects. A formal accuracy assessment of the DISCover data layer will be completed in 1998. The 1 km global land cover database was developed through a continent-by-continent unsupervised classification of 1 km monthly Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) composites covering 1992-1993. Extensive post-classification stratification was necessary to resolve spectral/temporal confusion between disparate land cover types. The complete global database consists of 961 seasonal land cover regions that capture patterns of land cover, seasonality and relative primary productivity. The seasonal land cover regions were aggregated to produce seven separate land cover data sets used for global environmental modelling and assessment. The data sets include IGBP DISCover, U.S. Geological Survey Anderson System, Simple Biosphere Model, Simple Biosphere Model 2, Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme, Olson Ecosystems and Running Global Remote Sensing Land Cover. The database also includes all digital sources that were used in the classification. The complete database can be sourced from the website: http://edcwww.cr.usgs.gov/landdaac/glcc/glcc.html.

  3. Discovering communities in complex networks by edge label propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xingpeng; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wang, Xiaofan

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of the community structure of real-world networks is still an open problem. Many methods have been proposed to shed light on this problem, and most of these have focused on discovering node community. However, link community is also a powerful framework for discovering overlapping communities. Here we present a novel edge label propagation algorithm (ELPA), which combines the natural advantage of link communities with the efficiency of the label propagation algorithm (LPA). ELPA can discover both link communities and node communities. We evaluated ELPA on both synthetic and real-world networks, and compared it with five state-of-the-art methods. The results demonstrate that ELPA performs competitively with other algorithms.

  4. Discovering communities in complex networks by edge label propagation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xingpeng; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wang, Xiaofan

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the community structure of real-world networks is still an open problem. Many methods have been proposed to shed light on this problem, and most of these have focused on discovering node community. However, link community is also a powerful framework for discovering overlapping communities. Here we present a novel edge label propagation algorithm (ELPA), which combines the natural advantage of link communities with the efficiency of the label propagation algorithm (LPA). ELPA can discover both link communities and node communities. We evaluated ELPA on both synthetic and real-world networks, and compared it with five state-of-the-art methods. The results demonstrate that ELPA performs competitively with other algorithms. PMID:26926830

  5. Discovering communities in complex networks by edge label propagation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xingpeng; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wang, Xiaofan

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the community structure of real-world networks is still an open problem. Many methods have been proposed to shed light on this problem, and most of these have focused on discovering node community. However, link community is also a powerful framework for discovering overlapping communities. Here we present a novel edge label propagation algorithm (ELPA), which combines the natural advantage of link communities with the efficiency of the label propagation algorithm (LPA). ELPA can discover both link communities and node communities. We evaluated ELPA on both synthetic and real-world networks, and compared it with five state-of-the-art methods. The results demonstrate that ELPA performs competitively with other algorithms. PMID:26926830

  6. Will cosmic strings be discovered using the Space Telescope?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacynski, B.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic strings are topologically stable defects in the vacuum of space which may be produced by a phase transition in the early universe. Here, it is suggested that observations of very distant galaxies are a more useful means of discovering strings than quasar observations. It is argued that if there is only one string out to redshift z - about 1 the probability that it crosses a random image obtained using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) of the Space Telescope is about 0.0001. In order to discover a cosmic string the Space Telescope WFC will be required to operate almost continuously in primary and serendipity modes, and a cosmic string, if it exists, may be discovered within the first few years of operation.

  7. Discover Earth: An earth system science program for libraries and their communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, L.; Dusenbery, P.

    2010-12-01

    The view from space has deepened our understanding of Earth as a global, dynamic system. Instruments on satellites and spacecraft, coupled with advances in ground-based research, have provided us with astonishing new perspectives of our planet. Now more than ever, enhancing the public’s understanding of Earth’s physical and biological systems is vital to helping citizens make informed policy decisions especially when they are faced with the consequences of global climate change. In spite of this relevance, there are many obstacles to achieving broad public understanding of key earth system science (ESS) concepts. Strategies for addressing climate change can only succeed with the full engagement of the general public. As reported by U.S. News and World Report in 2010, small towns in rural America are emerging as the front line in the climate change debate in the country. The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. There are two distinct components of STAR-Net: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. The overarching goal of the project is to reach underserved youth and their families with informal STEM learning experiences. The Discover Earth part of STAR_Net will produce ESS

  8. The Community Discovered: The Search for Meaning through the Integration of Art and Technology in K-12 Education. Annual Progress Report No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coufal, Kathy L.; Grandgenett, Neal F.

    This third evaluation progress report concerns a 5-year project that links technology and the visual and performing arts with other subject areas to transform the education of K-12 students in Nebraska and nationwide. The report states that the "Community Discovered" project is continuing to make substantial and consistent progress in its…

  9. Discovering robust knowledge from dynamic closed-world data

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Chun-Nan; Knoblock, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    Many applications of knowledge discovery require the knowledge to be consistent with data. Examples include discovering rules for query optimization, database integration, decision support, etc. However, databases usually change over time and make machine-discovered knowledge inconsistent with data. Useful knowledge should be robust against database changes so that it is unlikely to become inconsistent after database changes. This paper defines this notion of robustness, describes how to estimate the robustness of Horn-clause rules in closed-world databases, and describes how the robustness estimation can be applied in rule discovery systems.

  10. Ongoing analysis of DISCOVER-AQ observations and their implications for remote sensing of air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, J. H.; Pickering, K. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Clark, R. D.; Cohen, R. C.; Diskin, G. S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Fried, A.; Herman, J. R.; Hoff, R. M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Janz, S. J.; Kleb, M. M.; Szykman, J.; Thompson, A. M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Yang, M. M.; Holben, B. N.

    2015-12-01

    Improving the remote sensing of air quality has been the primary focus of a series of four field studies conducted by a project called DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to AirQuality). Operating as an integrated observing system, DISCOVER-AQ has employed multiple aircraft and ground instrumentation to conduct multi-perspective observations of the distribution of gaseous and particulate pollution in the lower atmosphere over contrasting regions of the U.S. that are currently in violation of National Ambient Air Quality Standards. The four study areas include Maryland (Baltimore-Washington corridor), California (southern San Joaquin Valley), Texas (Greater Houston area), and Colorado (Denver/Northern Front Range). The DISCOVER-AQ observations are actively being used to promote improvements in remote sensing in the following ways: Characterizing vertical structure in the atmosphere and its diurnal patterns to develop improved a priori information for satellite retrievals; Examining horizontal variability to assess the spatial scales needed to resolve emissions and photochemistry; Determining correlative relationships between remotely sensed and in situ observations; Assessing the value of ground-based remote sensing to provide information on impact of boundary layer dynamics and mixing on air pollution. Current progress on analysis of these datasets and their relevance to future geostationary satellite observations as well as augmentation of air quality monitoring networks with ground-based remote sensing will be discussed.

  11. Challenges and opportunities for remote sensing of air quality: Insights from DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, J. H.; Pickering, K. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Clark, R. D.; Cohen, R. C.; Diskin, G. S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Fried, A.; Holben, B. N.; Herman, J. R.; Hoff, R. M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Janz, S. J.; Szykman, J.; Thompson, A. M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Yang, M. M.; Chen, G.; Kleb, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Improving the remote sensing of air quality has been the primary focus of a series of four field studies conducted by a project called DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to Air Quality). Operating as an integrated observing system, DISCOVER-AQ has employed multiple aircraft and ground instrumentation to conduct multi-perspective observations of the distribution of gaseous and particulate pollution in the lower atmosphere over contrasting regions of the U.S. that are currently in violation of National Ambient Air Quality Standards. The four study areas include Maryland (Baltimore-Washington corridor), California (southern San Joaquin Valley), Texas (Greater Houston area), and Colorado (Denver/Northern Front Range). The DISCOVER-AQ observations are actively being used to promote improvements in remote sensing in the following ways: Characterizing vertical structure in the atmosphere and its diurnal patterns to develop improved a priori information for satellite retrievals; Examining horizontal variability to assess the spatial scales needed to resolve emissions and photochemistry; Determining correlative relationships between remotely sensed and in situ observations; Assessing the value of ground-based remote sensing to provide information on impact of boundary layer dynamics and mixing on air pollution. Examples of the ongoing analysis of these datasets and their relevance to future geostationary satellite observations as well as augmentation of air quality monitoring networks with ground-based remote sensing will be discussed.

  12. Let Students Discover an Important Physical Property of a Slinky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gash, Philip

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes a simple experiment that lets first-year physics and engineering students discover an important physical property of a Slinky. The restoring force for the fundamental oscillation frequency is provided only by those coils between the support and the Slinky center of mass.

  13. Two new Galactic novae discovered in the VVV disk images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, C. Contreras; Lucas, P. W.; Saito, R. K.; Minniti, D.; Kurtev, R.

    2016-04-01

    We report two novae in the Galactic plane discovered serendipitously during a search for high amplitude variable young stellar objects (Contreras Pena et al. 2016, arXiv:1602.06267) in the VVV Survey data (vvvsurvey.org; Minniti et al. 2010, New Astronomy, 15, 433).

  14. Words, Words, Words: Helping Students Discover the Power of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Robert Perrin emphasizes the active and playful power that can be discovered from specificity of language. Students observe the impact carefully chosen words have in their daily lives by examining names of products and colors used for particular contexts and audiences, as well as names given to inventions, highlighting the vibrancy of…

  15. Let Students Discover an Important Physical Property of a Slinky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gash, Philip

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a simple experiment that lets first-year physics and engineering students discover an important physical property of a Slinky. The restoring force for the fundamental oscillation frequency is provided only by those coils between the support and the Slinky center of mass.

  16. Discovering Theorems in Abstract Algebra Using the Software "GAP"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyth, Russell D.; Rainbolt, Julianne G.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional abstract algebra course typically consists of the professor stating and then proving a sequence of theorems. As an alternative to this classical structure, the students could be expected to discover some of the theorems even before they are motivated by classroom examples. This can be done by using a software system to explore a…

  17. The Regression Trunk Approach to Discover Treatment Covariate Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dusseldorp, Elise; Meulman, Jacqueline J.

    2004-01-01

    The regression trunk approach (RTA) is an integration of regression trees and multiple linear regression analysis. In this paper RTA is used to discover treatment covariate interactions, in the regression of one continuous variable on a treatment variable with "multiple" covariates. The performance of RTA is compared to the classical method of…

  18. Discovering Hidden Analogies in an Online Humanities Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    Drawing upon an efficacious method for discovering previously unknown causes of medical syndromes and searching in the Humanities Index, an illuminating new humanities analogy between the epistemological ideas of Robert Frost and the ancient Greek philosopher Carneades was found by constructing a search statement in which proper names were coupled…

  19. New variable stars discovered in the fields of three Galactic open clusters using the VVV survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, T.; Minniti, D.; Dékány, I.; Clariá, J. J.; Alonso-García, J.; Gramajo, L. V.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-11-01

    This project is a massive near-infrared (NIR) search for variable stars in highly reddened and obscured open cluster (OC) fields projected on regions of the Galactic bulge and disk. The search is performed using photometric NIR data in the J-, H- and Ks- bands obtained from the Vista Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) Survey. We performed in each cluster field a variability search using Stetson's variability statistics to select the variable candidates. Later, those candidates were subjected to a frequency analysis using the Generalized Lomb-Scargle and the Phase Dispersion Minimization algorithms. The number of independent observations range between 63 and 73. The newly discovered variables in this study, 157 in total in three different known OCs, are classified based on their light curve shapes, periods, amplitudes and their location in the corresponding color-magnitude (J -Ks ,Ks) and color-color (H -Ks , J - H) diagrams. We found 5 possible Cepheid stars which, based on the period-luminosity relation, are very likely type II Cepheids located behind the bulge. Among the newly discovered variables, there are eclipsing binaries, δ Scuti, as well as background RR Lyrae stars. Using the new version of the Wilson & Devinney code as well as the "Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries" (PHOEBE) code, we analyzed some of the best eclipsing binaries we discovered. Our results show that these studied systems turn out to be ranging from detached to double-contact binaries, with low eccentricities and high inclinations of approximately 80°. Their surface temperatures range between 3500 K and 8000 K.

  20. Discover, Visualize, and Deliver Geospatial Data through OGC Standards-based WebGIS System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yaxing; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Cook, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    Geospatial data are important to understand the Earth - ecosystem dynamics, land cover changes, resource management, and human interactions with the Earth to name a few. One of the biggest difficulties users face is to discover, access, and assemble distributed, large volume, heterogeneous geospatial data to conduct geo-analysis. Traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery lack the capabilities of resource sharing and automation across systems or organizational boundaries. They require users to download the data ldquoas-isrdquo in their original file format, projection, and extent. Also, discovering data served by traditional methods requires prior knowledge of data location, and processing requires specialized expertise. These drawbacks of traditional methods create additional burden to users, introduce too much overhead to research, and also reduce the potential usage of the data. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), researchers working on NASA-sponsored projects: Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) and Modeling and Synthesis Thematic Data Center (MAST-DC) have tapped into the benefits of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to overcome the drawbacks of traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery. The OGC standards-based approach facilitates data sharing and interoperability across network, organizational, and geopolitical boundaries. Tools and services based on OGC standards deliver the data in many user defined formats and allow users to visualize the data prior to download. This paper introduces an approach taken to visualize and deliver ORNL DAAC, MAST-DC, and other relevant geospatial data through OGC standards-based Web Services, including Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Feature Service (WFS). It also introduces a WebGIS system built on top of OGC services that helps users discover, visualize, and access geospatial data.

  1. Despite Appearances, Cosmic Explosions Have Common Origin, Astronomers Discover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    A Fourth of July fireworks display features bright explosions that light the sky with different colors, yet all have the same cause. They just put their explosive energy into different colors of light. Similarly, astronomers have discovered, a variety of bright cosmic explosions all have the same origin and the same amount of total energy. This is the conclusion of an international team of astronomers that used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to study the closest known gamma-ray burst earlier this year. Artist's conception of burst Artist's Conception of Twin Jets in Energetic Cosmic Explosion CREDIT: Dana Berry, SkyWorks Digital (Click on Image for Larger Version) "For some reason we don't yet understand, these explosions put greatly varying percentages of their explosive energy into the gamma-ray portion of their output," said Dale Frail, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. That means, he said, that both strong and weak gamma-ray bursts, along with X-ray flashes, which emit almost no gamma rays, are just different forms of the same cosmic beast. The research team reported their results in the November 13 issue of the scientific journal Nature. The scientists trained the VLA on a gamma-ray burst discovered using NASA's HETE-2 satellite last March 29. This burst, dubbed GRB 030329, was the closest such burst yet seen, about 2.6 billion light-years from Earth. Because of this relative proximity, the burst was bright, with visible light from its explosion reaching a level that could be seen in amateur telescopes. As the burst faded, astronomers noted an underlying distinctive signature of a supernova explosion, confirming that the event was associated with the death of a massive star. Since 1999, astronomers have known that the strong outbursts of gamma rays, X-rays, visible light and radio waves from these bursts form beams, like those from a flashlight, rather than spreading in all directions

  2. Distant World in Peril Discovered from La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Giant Exoplanet Orbits Giant Star Summary When, in a distant future, the Sun begins to expand and evolves into a "giant" star, the surface temperature on the Earth will rise dramatically and our home planet will eventually be incinerated by that central body. Fortunately for us, this dramatic event is several billion years away. However, that sad fate will befall another planet, just discovered in orbit about the giant star HD 47536, already within a few tens of millions of years. At a distance of nearly 400 light-years from us, it is the second-remotest planetary system discovered to date [1]. This is an interesting side-result of a major research project, now carried out by a European-Brazilian team of astronomers [2]. In the course of a three-year spectroscopic survey, they have observed about 80 giant stars in the southern sky with the advanced FEROS spectrograph on the 1.52-m telescope installed at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile). It is one of these stars that has just been found to host a giant planet. This is only the fourth such case known and with a diameter of about 33 million km (or 23.5 times that of our Sun), HD 47536 is by far the largest of those giant stars [1]. The distance of the planet from the star is still of the order of 300 million km (or twice the distance of the Earth from the Sun), a safe margin now, but this will not always be so. The orbital period is 712 days, i.e., somewhat less than two Earth years, and the planet's mass is 5 - 10 times that of Jupiter. The presence of exoplanets in orbit around giant stars, some of which will eventually perish into their central star (be "cannibalized"), provides a possible explanation of the anomalous abundance of certain chemical elements that is observed in the atmospheres of some stars, cf. ESO PR 10/01. This interesting discovery bodes well for coming observations of exoplanetary systems with new, more powerful instruments, like HARPS to be installed next year at the ESO 3.6-m telescope on

  3. Updating strategies for isolating and discovering giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Jacques Yaacoub Bou; Andreani, Julien; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    Almost fifteen years ago, the discovery of Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, the first giant virus, changed how we define a virus. It was discovered incidentally in a process of isolating Legionella sp. from environmental samples in the context of pneumonia epidemics using a co-culture system with Acanthamoeba. Since then, much effort and improvement has been put into the original technique. In addition to the known families of Mimiviridae and Marseilleviridae, four new proposed families of giant viruses have been isolated: Pandoravirus, Pithovirus, Faustovirus and Mollivirus. Major improvements were based on enrichment systems, targeted use of antibiotics and high-throughput methods. The most recent development, using flow cytometry for isolation and presumptive identification systems, opens a path to large environmental surveys that may discover new giant virus families in new protozoa supports used for culture support. PMID:27039269

  4. Discovering the Higgs boson with low mass muon pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.

    2009-06-01

    Many models of electroweak symmetry breaking have an additional light pseudoscalar. If the Higgs boson can decay to a new pseudoscalar, LEP searches for the Higgs can be significantly altered and the Higgs can be as light as 86 GeV. Discovering the Higgs boson in these models is challenging when the pseudoscalar is lighter than 10 GeV because it decays dominantly into tau leptons. In this paper, we discuss discovering the Higgs in a subdominant decay mode where one of the pseudoscalars decays to a pair of muons. This search allows for potential discovery of a cascade-decaying Higgs boson with the complete Tevatron data set or early data at the LHC.

  5. Line drawing of anomaly discovered in redesigned shuttle motor nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Line drawing titled 'DM-9 Case-to-Nozzle Joint' shows anomaly discovered in redesigned shuttle motor nozzle. The second full-duration test firing of NASA's redesigned Space Shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM), designated DM-9, was conducted 12-23-87 at Morton Thiokol's Wasatch facility in Utah. A post-test examination of the motor has revealed an anomaly in one nozzle component. Material was discovered missing from the nozzle outer boot ring, a large carbon phenolic composite ring used to anchor one end of the flexible boot that allows the nozzle to move and 'steer' the vehicle. About one-third of the missing 160 degrees of missing ring material was found adjacent to the forward nozzle section inside the motor. This diagram shows the location of the nozzle joint on an assembled SRM, and points out the shaded location of the outer boot ring that circles the motor within the nozzle joint.

  6. Re-discovering ancient wheat varieties as functional foods

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    With the gluten-free food market worth almost $1.6 bn in 2011, there is every reason for renewed interest in ancient grains. This resurgent interest is expressed in re-discovering ancient varieties as functional foods. In particular, people affected by celiac disease have to avoid all gluten in their diet and several ancient grains may offer an important alternative. PMID:26151025

  7. MASTER: OT discovered during inspection of HESE 58537957 trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurina, N.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kornilov, V.; Kuvshinov, D.; Vlasenko, D.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Shumkov, V.; Potter, S.

    2016-08-01

    MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 349171 ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 13h 08m 45.02s -32d 32m 54.9s on 2016-08-24.73811 UT during inspection of HESE alert ( 58537957 trigger number ) http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/notices_amon/58537957_128340.amon . The OT unfiltered magnitude is 19.6m (limit 20.5m).

  8. Re-discovering ancient wheat varieties as functional foods.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Raymond

    2015-07-01

    With the gluten-free food market worth almost $1.6 bn in 2011, there is every reason for renewed interest in ancient grains. This resurgent interest is expressed in re-discovering ancient varieties as functional foods. In particular, people affected by celiac disease have to avoid all gluten in their diet and several ancient grains may offer an important alternative. PMID:26151025

  9. Why Ampère did not discover electromagnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, L. Pearce

    1986-04-01

    In 1832, after Michael Faraday had announced his discovery of electromagnetic induction, Andre-Marie Ampère claimed that he had actually discovered the induction of one current by another in 1822. In fact, he had, but did not really publish the fact at that time. This article explores the reasons for Ampère's failure to lay claim to a discovery that would have guaranteed him scientific immortality.

  10. Re-Discovering Mendel: The Case of Carl Correns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Carl Erich Correns (1864-1933) is remembered in the annals of science as one of the three botanists who re-discovered Mendel's laws. He can also, however, be regarded as one of the founding figures of classical genetics in Germany. Between 1894 and 1899 he carried out the crossing experiments with corn and peas that led to the re-statement of…

  11. What are karrikins and how were they 'discovered' by plants?

    PubMed

    Flematti, Gavin R; Dixon, Kingsley W; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Karrikins are a family of compounds produced by wildfires that can stimulate the germination of dormant seeds of plants from numerous families. Seed plants could have 'discovered' karrikins during fire-prone times in the Cretaceous period when flowering plants were evolving rapidly. Recent research suggests that karrikins mimic an unidentified endogenous compound that has roles in seed germination and early plant development. The endogenous signalling compound is presumably not only similar to karrikins, but also to the related strigolactone hormones. PMID:26689715

  12. Discovering graphical Granger causality using the truncating lasso penalty

    PubMed Central

    Shojaie, Ali; Michailidis, George

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Components of biological systems interact with each other in order to carry out vital cell functions. Such information can be used to improve estimation and inference, and to obtain better insights into the underlying cellular mechanisms. Discovering regulatory interactions among genes is therefore an important problem in systems biology. Whole-genome expression data over time provides an opportunity to determine how the expression levels of genes are affected by changes in transcription levels of other genes, and can therefore be used to discover regulatory interactions among genes. Results: In this article, we propose a novel penalization method, called truncating lasso, for estimation of causal relationships from time-course gene expression data. The proposed penalty can correctly determine the order of the underlying time series, and improves the performance of the lasso-type estimators. Moreover, the resulting estimate provides information on the time lag between activation of transcription factors and their effects on regulated genes. We provide an efficient algorithm for estimation of model parameters, and show that the proposed method can consistently discover causal relationships in the large p, small n setting. The performance of the proposed model is evaluated favorably in simulated, as well as real, data examples. Availability: The proposed truncating lasso method is implemented in the R-package ‘grangerTlasso’ and is freely available at http://www.stat.lsa.umich.edu/∼shojaie/ Contact: shojaie@umich.edu PMID:20823316

  13. Discovering Pair-wise Synergies in Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Cao, Dan; Gao, Jun; Yuan, Zheming

    2016-01-01

    Informative gene selection can have important implications for the improvement of cancer diagnosis and the identification of new drug targets. Individual-gene-ranking methods ignore interactions between genes. Furthermore, popular pair-wise gene evaluation methods, e.g. TSP and TSG, are helpless for discovering pair-wise interactions. Several efforts to discover pair-wise synergy have been made based on the information approach, such as EMBP and FeatKNN. However, the methods which are employed to estimate mutual information, e.g. binarization, histogram-based and KNN estimators, depend on known data or domain characteristics. Recently, Reshef et al. proposed a novel maximal information coefficient (MIC) measure to capture a wide range of associations between two variables that has the property of generality. An extension from MIC(X; Y) to MIC(X1; X2; Y) is therefore desired. We developed an approximation algorithm for estimating MIC(X1; X2; Y) where Y is a discrete variable. MIC(X1; X2; Y) is employed to detect pair-wise synergy in simulation and cancer microarray data. The results indicate that MIC(X1; X2; Y) also has the property of generality. It can discover synergic genes that are undetectable by reference feature selection methods such as MIC(X; Y) and TSG. Synergic genes can distinguish different phenotypes. Finally, the biological relevance of these synergic genes is validated with GO annotation and OUgene database. PMID:27470995

  14. Discovering Pair-wise Synergies in Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Cao, Dan; Gao, Jun; Yuan, Zheming

    2016-01-01

    Informative gene selection can have important implications for the improvement of cancer diagnosis and the identification of new drug targets. Individual-gene-ranking methods ignore interactions between genes. Furthermore, popular pair-wise gene evaluation methods, e.g. TSP and TSG, are helpless for discovering pair-wise interactions. Several efforts to discover pair-wise synergy have been made based on the information approach, such as EMBP and FeatKNN. However, the methods which are employed to estimate mutual information, e.g. binarization, histogram-based and KNN estimators, depend on known data or domain characteristics. Recently, Reshef et al. proposed a novel maximal information coefficient (MIC) measure to capture a wide range of associations between two variables that has the property of generality. An extension from MIC(X; Y) to MIC(X1; X2; Y) is therefore desired. We developed an approximation algorithm for estimating MIC(X1; X2; Y) where Y is a discrete variable. MIC(X1; X2; Y) is employed to detect pair-wise synergy in simulation and cancer microarray data. The results indicate that MIC(X1; X2; Y) also has the property of generality. It can discover synergic genes that are undetectable by reference feature selection methods such as MIC(X; Y) and TSG. Synergic genes can distinguish different phenotypes. Finally, the biological relevance of these synergic genes is validated with GO annotation and OUgene database. PMID:27470995

  15. Discovering Health Topics in Social Media Using Topic Models

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Michael J.; Dredze, Mark

    2014-01-01

    By aggregating self-reported health statuses across millions of users, we seek to characterize the variety of health information discussed in Twitter. We describe a topic modeling framework for discovering health topics in Twitter, a social media website. This is an exploratory approach with the goal of understanding what health topics are commonly discussed in social media. This paper describes in detail a statistical topic model created for this purpose, the Ailment Topic Aspect Model (ATAM), as well as our system for filtering general Twitter data based on health keywords and supervised classification. We show how ATAM and other topic models can automatically infer health topics in 144 million Twitter messages from 2011 to 2013. ATAM discovered 13 coherent clusters of Twitter messages, some of which correlate with seasonal influenza (r = 0.689) and allergies (r = 0.810) temporal surveillance data, as well as exercise (r = .534) and obesity (r = −.631) related geographic survey data in the United States. These results demonstrate that it is possible to automatically discover topics that attain statistically significant correlations with ground truth data, despite using minimal human supervision and no historical data to train the model, in contrast to prior work. Additionally, these results demonstrate that a single general-purpose model can identify many different health topics in social media. PMID:25084530

  16. Discovering System Health Anomalies Using Data Mining Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriastava, Ashok, N.

    2005-01-01

    We present a data mining framework for the analysis and discovery of anomalies in high-dimensional time series of sensor measurements that would be found in an Integrated System Health Monitoring system. We specifically treat the problem of discovering anomalous features in the time series that may be indicative of a system anomaly, or in the case of a manned system, an anomaly due to the human. Identification of these anomalies is crucial to building stable, reusable, and cost-efficient systems. The framework consists of an analysis platform and new algorithms that can scale to thousands of sensor streams to discovers temporal anomalies. We discuss the mathematical framework that underlies the system and also describe in detail how this framework is general enough to encompass both discrete and continuous sensor measurements. We also describe a new set of data mining algorithms based on kernel methods and hidden Markov models that allow for the rapid assimilation, analysis, and discovery of system anomalies. We then describe the performance of the system on a real-world problem in the aircraft domain where we analyze the cockpit data from aircraft as well as data from the aircraft propulsion, control, and guidance systems. These data are discrete and continuous sensor measurements and are dealt with seamlessly in order to discover anomalous flights. We conclude with recommendations that describe the tradeoffs in building an integrated scalable platform for robust anomaly detection in ISHM applications.

  17. An Overview of Ozone and Precursor Temporal and Spatial Variability in DISCOVER-AQ Study Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, K. E.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Loughner, C.; Flynn, C.; Crawford, J. H.; Clark, R. D.; Fried, A.; Herman, J. R.; Janz, S. J.; Lamsal, L. N.; Silverman, M. L.; Stein Zweers, D. C.; Szykman, J.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    One of the major goals of the NASA Earth Venture - 1 DISCOVER-AQ project is to better quantify the spatial and temporal variability of pollutant gases in the lower troposphere, as this information is required for the design of new atmospheric chemistry satellite instruments. This objective has been addressed through a series of four field experiments (Baltimore-Washington, San Joaquin Valley, Houston, and Denver). DISCOVER-AQ observations that lend themselves to this analysis include in-situ measurements of trace gases by the NASA P-3B aircraft (spiral profiles and constant altitude flight legs), trace gas columns from the surface-based network of Pandora UV/Vis spectrometers, trace gas columns from the Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM) on board the NASA King Air, and in-situ tethered balloon observations. We make use of the P-3B observations to assess spatial variability and evaluate regional model simulations through the use of structure functions, which yield the mean difference in column abundance or mixing ratio between observation points at specified distances apart over a designated length of time. Agreement between the observations and model output indicates that the model can be used to derive more comprehensive variability analyses than are possible with the aircraft data. Subsequently, the structure function approach can be used to compute the mean difference over various time intervals to yield temporal variability estimates. The continuous Pandora data also allow for comprehensive temporal variability estimates for the tropospheric column, as does the frequent tethered balloon profiling at fixed sites for the lower portion of the boundary layer. Additionally, the fine-resolution pixels of the ACAM data allow further detailed spatial analysis. A second DISCOVER-AQ objective is to assess the relationship between column observations and surface air quality. We examine the temporal variability of these measurements over the daytime hours, and the

  18. Discovering Astronomy: An Astro 101 e-book

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawl, Stephen J.; Byrd, Gene; Deustua, Susana E.; LoPresto, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Discovering Astronomy, now available in its 6th edition as an eText, has many advantages and features for your students. We have partnered with etextink.com and WebAssign.net to produce an affordable set of cost-saving options for your students. Also available is the Discovering Astronomy Activity Manual, which provides students with an active-learning experience.Our etext is device independent and thus accessible through any web browser. Americans with Disabilities Act compatibility provides access for all students. Hotlinks to outside sites provide further information for interested students. Lecture demonstration videos of important concepts, made specifically for this new edition, are embedded within the text as appropriate. Students can highlight text, take notes, and bookmark locations within the text. Important terms are linked to the glossary. Search capabilities allow students to easily find what they want.Instructors can interact with their students directly through the etext once the class roster has been provided. For example, instructors can embed assignments into their students' etext and add their own notes and updates, which are immediately visible to their students.Updates can be quickly made by us as new findings become available. For example, updates from New Horizons were added at the time of the closest approach to Pluto, and an update on the recent announcement of current water on Mars was added the day of the announcement.We will present results of our own experience with college and high school students' use of Discovering Astronomy in online courses.Details of the book, a sample chapter, and other information are available at discoveringastronomy.weebly.com.

  19. Exposed water ice discovered near the south pole of Mars.

    PubMed

    Titus, Timothy N; Kieffer, Hugh H; Christensen, Phillip R

    2003-02-14

    The Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) has discovered water ice exposed near the edge of Mars' southern perennial polar cap. The surface H2O ice was first observed by THEMIS as a region that was cooler than expected for dry soil at that latitude during the summer season. Diurnal and seasonal temperature trends derived from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations indicate that there is H2O ice at the surface. Viking observations, and the few other relevant THEMIS observations, indicate that surface H2O ice may be widespread around and under the perennial CO2 cap.

  20. Discovering Communicable Scientific Knowledge from Spatio-Temporal Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabacher, Mark; Langley, Pat; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes how we used regression rules to improve upon a result previously published in the Earth science literature. In such a scientific application of machine learning, it is crucially important for the learned models to be understandable and communicable. We recount how we selected a learning algorithm to maximize communicability, and then describe two visualization techniques that we developed to aid in understanding the model by exploiting the spatial nature of the data. We also report how evaluating the learned models across time let us discover an error in the data.

  1. An Incidentally Discovered Pedunculated Degenerative Cyst on the Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajasubramanian, Ashwin K; Zalawadiya, Sandip K; Afonso, Luis C

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of a pedunculated cystic mass on the aortic valve discovered in a patient presenting for a routine echocardiogram. The highly mobile nature of the mass warranted prompt surgical removal to prevent cardioembolic complications. The mass was preoperatively thought to be a papillary fibroelastoma. However, the patient's history, mass morphology, and histopathology pointed toward a simple degenerative cyst--previously unreported on the aortic valve. This report describes this rare finding, discusses relevant differential diagnoses, and underscores the importance of surgical intervention in such cases. PMID:26522574

  2. Marquette Island: A Distinct Mafic Lithology Discovered by Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Gellert, R.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; Fleischer, I.; Jolliff, B. L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Ming, D. W.; Yingst, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    While rolling over the Meridiani Planum sedimentary terrane, the rover Opportunity has occasionally discovered large, > 10 cm erratics. Most of these have proven to be meteorites [1], but one - Bounce Rock - is a martian basaltic rock similar in composition to the meteorite EETA79001 lithology B [2]. Presently, Opportunity is intensively investigating an --30 cm tall rock named Marquette Island that may be a distinct type of martian mafic lithology. We report the results of its continuing investigation using the Microscopic Imager (MI); Mossbauer Spectrometer (MB) and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). A companion abstract discusses the results of Panoramic Camera (Pancam) imaging of the rock [3].

  3. Insights into newly discovered marks and readers of epigenetic information.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Forest H; Strahl, Brian D; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2016-08-18

    The field of chromatin biology has been advancing at an accelerated pace. Recent discoveries of previously uncharacterized sites and types of post-translational modifications (PTMs) and the identification of new sets of proteins responsible for the deposition, removal, and reading of these marks continue raising the complexity of an already exceedingly complicated biological phenomenon. In this Perspective article we examine the biological importance of new types and sites of histone PTMs and summarize the molecular mechanisms of chromatin engagement by newly discovered epigenetic readers. We also highlight the imperative role of structural insights in understanding PTM-reader interactions and discuss future directions to enhance the knowledge of PTM readout. PMID:27538025

  4. Exposed water ice discovered near the south pole of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Titus, T.N.; Kieffer, H.H.; Christensen, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) has discovered water ice exposed near the edge of Mars' southern perennial polar cap. The surface H2O ice was first observed by THEMIS as a region that was cooler than expected for dry soil at that latitude during the summer season. Diurnal and seasonal temperature trends derived from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations indicate that there is H2O ice at the surface. Viking observations, and the few other relevant THEMIS observations, indicate that surface H2O ice may be widespread around and under the perennial CO2 cap.

  5. Sir Alexander Fleming: Scottish researcher who discovered penicillin.

    PubMed

    Ligon, B Lee

    2004-01-01

    The discovery and development of penicillin changed the entire direction of approaches to treating infectious diseases and saved the lives of millions of people. Indeed, the development of penicillin was a watershed event in the battle against infectious diseases, and the individual who discovered it, Sir Alexander Fleming, remains a prominent individual in the annals of medical history. This article focuses primarily on the personal life of Alexander Fleming, an individual who had a remarkable diversity of interests and who made many contributions to science and medicine.

  6. Observational data and orbits of the asteroids discovered at the Baldone Observatory in 2008--2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černis, K.; Wlodarczyk, I.; Eglitis, I.

    The paper presents statistics of the asteroids observed and discovered at the Baldone Observatory, Latvia, in 2008--2013 within the project for astrometric observations of the near-Earth objects (NEOs), the main belt asteroids and comets. CCD observations of the asteroids were obtained with the 0.80/1.20 m, f/3 Schmidt telescope and a ST-10XME 15 × 10 mm CCD camera. In the Minor Planet Circulars and the Minor Planet Electronic Circulars (2008--2013) we published 3511 astrometric positions of 826 asteroids. Among them, 43 asteroids were newly discovered at Baldone. For 36 of these asteroids the precise orbits are calculated. Because of short observational arc and small number of observations, a few asteroids have low-precision orbits and their tracks have been lost. For seven objects with poorly known orbits we present their ephemerides for 2015--2016. The orbits and the evolution of orbital elements of two asteroids, (428694) 2008 OS9 from the Apollo group and the Centaur (330836) Orius (2009 HW77), are recalculated including new observations obtained after 2011.

  7. A New Species of Frog (Anura: Dicroglossidae) Discovered from the Mega City of Dhaka.

    PubMed

    Howlader, Mohammad Sajid Ali; Nair, Abhilash; Merilä, Juha

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new species of frog of the genus Zakerana discovered from the urban core of Dhaka, Bangladesh, one of the most densely populated cities in the world. Although the new species is morphologically similar to the geographically proximate congeners in the Bangladeshi cricket frog group, we show that it can be distinguished from all congeners on the basis of morphological characters, advertisement calls and variation in two mitochondrial DNA genes (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA). Apart from several diagnostic differences in body proportions, the new species differs from other Zakerana species in having a flattened snout (from ventral view) projecting over the lower jaw, and diagnostic trapezoid-shaped red markings on the vocal sac in males. Molecular genetic analyses show that the new species is highly divergent (3.1-20.1% sequence divergence) from all congeneric species, and forms a well-supported clade with its sister species, Zakerana asmati. The discovery of a new amphibian species from the urban core of Dhaka together with several recent descriptions of new amphibian species from Bangladesh may indicate that more amphibian species remain to be discovered from this country.

  8. A New Species of Frog (Anura: Dicroglossidae) Discovered from the Mega City of Dhaka

    PubMed Central

    Howlader, Mohammad Sajid Ali; Nair, Abhilash; Merilä, Juha

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new species of frog of the genus Zakerana discovered from the urban core of Dhaka, Bangladesh, one of the most densely populated cities in the world. Although the new species is morphologically similar to the geographically proximate congeners in the Bangladeshi cricket frog group, we show that it can be distinguished from all congeners on the basis of morphological characters, advertisement calls and variation in two mitochondrial DNA genes (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA). Apart from several diagnostic differences in body proportions, the new species differs from other Zakerana species in having a flattened snout (from ventral view) projecting over the lower jaw, and diagnostic trapezoid-shaped red markings on the vocal sac in males. Molecular genetic analyses show that the new species is highly divergent (3.1–20.1% sequence divergence) from all congeneric species, and forms a well-supported clade with its sister species, Zakerana asmati. The discovery of a new amphibian species from the urban core of Dhaka together with several recent descriptions of new amphibian species from Bangladesh may indicate that more amphibian species remain to be discovered from this country. PMID:26934699

  9. Isolated Star-Forming Cloud Discovered in Intracluster Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Subaru and VLT Join Forces in New Study of Virgo Galaxy Cluster [1] Summary At a distance of some 50 million light-years, the Virgo Cluster is the nearest galaxy cluster. It is located in the zodiacal constellation of the same name (The Virgin) and is a large and dense assembly of hundreds of galaxies. The "intracluster" space between the Virgo galaxies is permeated by hot X-ray emitting gas and, as has become clear recently, by a sparse "intracluster population of stars". So far, stars have been observed to form in the luminous parts of galaxies. The most massive young stars are often visible indirectly by the strong emission from surrounding cocoons of hot gas, which is heated by the intense radiation from the embedded stars. These "HII regions" (pronounced "Eitch-Two" and so named because of their content of ionized hydrogen) may be very bright and they often trace the beautiful spiral arms seen in disk galaxies like our own Milky Way. New observations by the Japanese 8-m Subaru telescope and the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) have now shown that massive stars can also form in isolation, far from the luminous parts of galaxies. During a most productive co-operation between astronomers working at these two world-class telescopes, a compact HII region has been discovered at the very boundary between the outer halo of a Virgo cluster galaxy and Virgo intracluster space. This cloud is illuminated and heated by a few hot and massive young stars. The estimated total mass of the stars in the cloud is only a few hundred times that of the Sun. Such an object is rare at the present epoch. However, there may have been more in the past, at which time they were perhaps responsible for the formation of a fraction of the intracluster stellar population in clusters of galaxies. Massive stars in such isolated HII regions will explode as supernovae at the end of their short lives, and enrich the intracluster medium with heavy elements. Observations of two other Virgo cluster

  10. Involving Students in a Collaborative Project to Help Discover Inexpensive, Stable Materials for Solar Photoelectrolysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anunson, Paige N.; Winkler, Gates R.; Winkler, Jay R.; Parkinson, Bruce A.; Christus, Jennifer D. Schuttlefield

    2013-01-01

    In general, laboratory experiments focus on traditional chemical disciplines. While this approach allows students the ability to learn and explore fundamental concepts in a specific area, it does not always encourage students to explore interdisciplinary science. Often little transfer of knowledge from one area to another is observed, as students…

  11. Discovering Hidden Resources: Assistive Technology Recycling, Refurbishing, and Redistribution. RESNA Technical Assistance Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RESNA: Association for the Advancement of Rehabilitation Technology, Arlington, VA.

    This monograph discusses the benefits of recycling and reusing assistive technology for students with disabilities. It begins by discussing the benefits of recycled assistive technology for suppliers, students, and consumers, and then profiles programmatic models for assistive technology recycling programs. The advantages and disadvantages for…

  12. The "Discover" Project: Improving Assessment and Curriculum for Diverse Gifted Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maker, C. June

    2005-01-01

    C. June Maker, Professor at the University of Arizona, has developed a unique performance-based assessment in which children are observed by teams of teachers, counselors, paraprofessionals, administrators, specialists in education of the gifted and bilingual education, and local community members. The assessment, designed initially to …

  13. Totally Tree-mendous Activities: Projects To Discover the Beauty and Benefits of Trees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollister, Sarah

    This teacher's guide supplies information and hands-on activities to teach about trees from several disciplines. Activities are grouped into six areas that cover botany, social studies, arts and literature (aesthetics), and trees as a resource. Sections include: (1) Tree Identification, which defines trees and leaves and presents activities that…

  14. Independent Research Projects Using Protein Extraction: Affordable Ways to Inquire, Discover & Publish for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pu, Rongsun

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how to use protein extraction, quantification, and analysis in the undergraduate teaching laboratory to engage students in inquiry-based, discovery-driven learning. Detailed instructions for obtaining proteins from animal tissues, using BCA assay to quantify the proteins, and data analysis are provided. The experimental…

  15. Discovering the 80%. Final Project Report by the National Commission on Working Women, 1977-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Work and Learning, Washington, DC.

    Phase 1 of the National Commission on Working Women (NCWW) process for change was dedicated to learning and communicating problems of the 33 million women (80% of the female workforce) who are in the lowest paying and least regarded jobs. Three principal means were developed to reach as many of the 80% as possible: regional dialogues, national…

  16. Novel Virophages Discovered in a Freshwater Lake in China

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chaowen; Zhang, Weijia; Zhou, Xuewen; Wang, Hongming; Sun, Guowei; Xiao, Jinzhou; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Virophages are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are parasites of giant DNA viruses that infect unicellular eukaryotes. Here we identify a novel group of virophages, named Dishui Lake virophages (DSLVs) that were discovered in Dishui Lake (DSL): an artificial freshwater lake in Shanghai, China. Based on PCR and metagenomic analysis, the complete genome of DSLV1 was found to be circular and 28,788 base pairs in length, with a G+C content 43.2%, and 28 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Fifteen of the DSLV1 ORFs have sequence similarity to known virophages. Two DSLV1 ORFs exhibited sequence similarity to that of prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) and chloroviruses (Phycodnaviridae), respectively, suggesting horizontal gene transfer occurred between these large algal DNA viruses and DSLV1. 46 other virophages-related contigs were also obtained, including six homologous major capsid protein (MCP) gene. Phylogenetic analysis of these MCPs showed that DSLVs are closely related to OLV (Organic Lake virophage) and YSLVs (Yellowstone Lake virophages), especially to YSLV3, except for YSLV7. These results indicate that freshwater ecotopes are the hotbed for discovering novel virophages as well as understanding their diversity and properties. PMID:26834726

  17. Discovering loose group movement patterns from animal trajectories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Yuwei; Luo, Ze; Xiong, Yan; Prosser, Diann J.; Newman, Scott H.; Takekawa, John Y.; Yan, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    The technical advances of positioning technologies enable us to track animal movements at finer spatial and temporal scales, and further help to discover a variety of complex interactive relationships. In this paper, considering the loose gathering characteristics of the real-life groups' members during the movements, we propose two kinds of loose group movement patterns and corresponding discovery algorithms. Firstly, we propose the weakly consistent group movement pattern which allows the gathering of a part of the members and individual temporary leave from the whole during the movements. To tolerate the high dispersion of the group at some moments (i.e. to adapt the discontinuity of the group's gatherings), we further scheme the weakly consistent and continuous group movement pattern. The extensive experimental analysis and comparison with the real and synthetic data shows that the group pattern discovery algorithms proposed in this paper are similar to the the real-life frequent divergences of the members during the movements, can discover more complete memberships, and have considerable performance.

  18. Novel Virophages Discovered in a Freshwater Lake in China.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chaowen; Zhang, Weijia; Zhou, Xuewen; Wang, Hongming; Sun, Guowei; Xiao, Jinzhou; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Virophages are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are parasites of giant DNA viruses that infect unicellular eukaryotes. Here we identify a novel group of virophages, named Dishui Lake virophages (DSLVs) that were discovered in Dishui Lake (DSL): an artificial freshwater lake in Shanghai, China. Based on PCR and metagenomic analysis, the complete genome of DSLV1 was found to be circular and 28,788 base pairs in length, with a G+C content 43.2%, and 28 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Fifteen of the DSLV1 ORFs have sequence similarity to known virophages. Two DSLV1 ORFs exhibited sequence similarity to that of prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) and chloroviruses (Phycodnaviridae), respectively, suggesting horizontal gene transfer occurred between these large algal DNA viruses and DSLV1. 46 other virophages-related contigs were also obtained, including six homologous major capsid protein (MCP) gene. Phylogenetic analysis of these MCPs showed that DSLVs are closely related to OLV (Organic Lake virophage) and YSLVs (Yellowstone Lake virophages), especially to YSLV3, except for YSLV7. These results indicate that freshwater ecotopes are the hotbed for discovering novel virophages as well as understanding their diversity and properties. PMID:26834726

  19. Visual analytics for discovering node groups in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    Given the abundance of relational data from a variety of sources, it is becoming increasingly more important to be able to discover hidden structures in the topology of real-world complex networks. In this talk, I will extend the usual definition of groups as densely connected sets of nodes and show that many real networks have groups distinguished by a diverse combinations of node properties, but not by the density of links alone. To overcome the virtually unlimited ways to potentially distinguish groups, we have developed an exploratory analysis tool that exploit human visual ability. In this visual analytical approach, the user input from visual interaction is integrated into the analysis to discover unknown group structures, rather than simply detecting a known type of structure. I will also address the problem of determining an appropriate number of groups, when it is not known a priori. I will demonstrate that our method can effectively find and characterize a variety of group structures in model and real-world networks, including community and k -partite structures defined by link density, as well as groups distinguished by combinations of other node properties. Funded by FODAVA NSF-DMS-0808860.

  20. Novel Virophages Discovered in a Freshwater Lake in China.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chaowen; Zhang, Weijia; Zhou, Xuewen; Wang, Hongming; Sun, Guowei; Xiao, Jinzhou; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Virophages are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are parasites of giant DNA viruses that infect unicellular eukaryotes. Here we identify a novel group of virophages, named Dishui Lake virophages (DSLVs) that were discovered in Dishui Lake (DSL): an artificial freshwater lake in Shanghai, China. Based on PCR and metagenomic analysis, the complete genome of DSLV1 was found to be circular and 28,788 base pairs in length, with a G+C content 43.2%, and 28 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Fifteen of the DSLV1 ORFs have sequence similarity to known virophages. Two DSLV1 ORFs exhibited sequence similarity to that of prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae) and chloroviruses (Phycodnaviridae), respectively, suggesting horizontal gene transfer occurred between these large algal DNA viruses and DSLV1. 46 other virophages-related contigs were also obtained, including six homologous major capsid protein (MCP) gene. Phylogenetic analysis of these MCPs showed that DSLVs are closely related to OLV (Organic Lake virophage) and YSLVs (Yellowstone Lake virophages), especially to YSLV3, except for YSLV7. These results indicate that freshwater ecotopes are the hotbed for discovering novel virophages as well as understanding their diversity and properties.

  1. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Guillen, Eduardo; Love, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for any particular antigen remains limited. Microengraving is a soft lithographic technique that provides a rapid and efficient alternative for discovering new mAbs. This protocol describes how to use microengraving to screen mouse hybridomas to establish new cell lines producing unique mAbs. Single cells from a polyclonal population are isolated into an array of microscale wells (~105 cells per screen). The array is then used to print a protein microarray, where each element contains the antibodies captured from individual wells. The antibodies on the microarray are screened with antigens of interest, and mapped to the corresponding cells, which are then recovered from their microwells by micromanipulation. Screening and retrieval require approximately 1–3 d (9–12 d including the steps for preparing arrays of microwells). PMID:19528952

  2. Discover the Cosmos - Bringing Cutting Edge Science to Schools across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-03-01

    The fast growing number of science data repositories is opening enormous possibilities to scientists all over the world. The emergence of citizen science projects is engaging in science discovery a large number of citizens globally. Astronomical research is now a possibility to anyone having a computer and some form of data access. This opens a very interesting and strategic possibility to engage large audiences in the making and understanding of science. On another perspective it would be only natural to imagine that soon enough data mining will be an active part of the academic path of university or even secondary schools students. The possibility is very exciting but the road not very promising. Even in the most developed nations, where all schools are equipped with modern ICT facilities the use of such possibilities is still a very rare episode. The Galileo Teacher Training Program GTTP, a legacy of IYA2009, is participating in some of the most emblematic projects funded by the European Commission and targeting modern tools, resources and methodologies for science teaching. One of this projects is Discover the Cosmos which is aiming to target this issue by empowering educators with the necessary skills to embark on this innovative path: teaching science while doing science.

  3. Discover Health Services Near You! The North Dakota Story: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Rieke, Judith L.; Safratowich, Michael; Markland, Mary J.

    2010-01-01

    Since the 2003 launch of NC Health Info, the National Library of Medicine has encouraged the development of Go Local databases. A team of Go Local enthusiasts at North Dakota’s only medical school library wanted to obtain NLM funding and build a resource for their rural state. Although short on staff, money, and time, the team found a way to realize a Go Local database that serves the state’s residents and helps them “Discover Health Services Near You!” A team approach and collaboration with health providers and organizations worked well in this small rural state. North Dakota’s Go Local project offers a low-cost model that stresses collaboration, teamwork and technology. Part I, which appears in this issue, describes the rural setting, explains how the project was conceived, and the processes necessary to begin building the database. Part II, which will appear in the next issue, details how records were created, including developing the input style guide and indexing decisions, the NLM testing and review process, the maintenance and auditing process, and publicity and promotion of the project. PMID:20448842

  4. Newly Discovered AGN and their Multi-year Light Curves from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, Edward J.; Olling, R.; Mushotzky, R.

    2014-01-01

    Variability seen at the center of a galaxy is an easy and reliable way to identify AGN. The Kepler space mission provides the ability to find galaxies with very low amplitude variability over a wide range in time delays. We report on a 2 year project to monitor ~400 galaxies with Kepler and our reduction software to stabilize long term photometric trends. We will present light curves for several of our newly discovered AGN with variability measured from the 30 minute to ~2 year timescales. The optical variability that Kepler explores is probably related to accretion disk instabilities, variation in accretion rate or changes in the accretion disk's structure. We developed, in a white paper, a future Kepler project to monitor of order 10,000 galaxies. Statistical analysis of light curves from hundreds of AGN would reveal the physical character of gas, dust or stars falling into AGN or eclipsing the light source and allow better models to be developed of the inner accretion disks/tori. In addition, this project should also find a large number of supernovae and other exotic transient events such as stellar tidal disruption and eta Carinae or P-Cygni type outbursts.

  5. Discover Health Services Near You! The North Dakota Story: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Safratowich, Michael; Markland, Mary J.; Rieke, Judith L.

    2010-01-01

    Since the 2003 launch of NC Health Info, the National Library of Medicine has encouraged the development of Go Local databases. A team of Go Local enthusiasts at North Dakota’s only medical school library wanted to obtain NLM funding and build a resource for their rural state. Although short on staff, money, and time, the team found a way to realize a Go Local database that serves the state’s residents and helps them “Discover Health Services Near You!” A team approach and collaboration with health providers and organizations worked well in this small rural state. North Dakota’s Go Local project offers a low-cost model that stresses collaboration, teamwork and technology. Part I which appeared in the last issue describes the rural setting, explains how the project was conceived, and the processes necessary to begin building the database. Part II which appears in this issue details how records were created including developing the input style guide and indexing decisions, the NLM testing and review process, the maintenance and auditing process, and publicity and promotion of the project. PMID:20436944

  6. Distant World in Peril Discovered from La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Giant Exoplanet Orbits Giant Star Summary When, in a distant future, the Sun begins to expand and evolves into a "giant" star, the surface temperature on the Earth will rise dramatically and our home planet will eventually be incinerated by that central body. Fortunately for us, this dramatic event is several billion years away. However, that sad fate will befall another planet, just discovered in orbit about the giant star HD 47536, already within a few tens of millions of years. At a distance of nearly 400 light-years from us, it is the second-remotest planetary system discovered to date [1]. This is an interesting side-result of a major research project, now carried out by a European-Brazilian team of astronomers [2]. In the course of a three-year spectroscopic survey, they have observed about 80 giant stars in the southern sky with the advanced FEROS spectrograph on the 1.52-m telescope installed at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile). It is one of these stars that has just been found to host a giant planet. This is only the fourth such case known and with a diameter of about 33 million km (or 23.5 times that of our Sun), HD 47536 is by far the largest of those giant stars [1]. The distance of the planet from the star is still of the order of 300 million km (or twice the distance of the Earth from the Sun), a safe margin now, but this will not always be so. The orbital period is 712 days, i.e., somewhat less than two Earth years, and the planet's mass is 5 - 10 times that of Jupiter. The presence of exoplanets in orbit around giant stars, some of which will eventually perish into their central star (be "cannibalized"), provides a possible explanation of the anomalous abundance of certain chemical elements that is observed in the atmospheres of some stars, cf. ESO PR 10/01. This interesting discovery bodes well for coming observations of exoplanetary systems with new, more powerful instruments, like HARPS to be installed next year at the ESO 3.6-m telescope on

  7. Fine-scale application of the WRF-CMAQ modeling system to the 2013 DISCOVER-AQ San Joaquin Valley study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DISCOVER-AQ project (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality), is a joint collaboration between NASA, U.S. EPA and a number of other local organizations with the goal of characterizing air quality in ...

  8. LIMNOBIUM SPONGIA (HYDROCHARITACEAE) DISCOVERED IN NEW ENGLAND. (U915544)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  9. Cardiopulmonary exercise: a recently discovered secret of tai chi.

    PubMed

    Ng, R K

    1992-08-01

    Every piece of literature or book about tai chi claims it to be the supreme martial art (soft style) and a therapeutic exercise. Nevertheless, none of the authors can describe scientifically how and why it works. Many people did not gain any health benefit in practicing tai chi and only very few people were able to apply its legendary secret power. During the last 10 years, the author thought he had discovered the secret in Hong Kong and brought it to Los Angeles. The secret lies in the fundamental movements of the body, called tai chi basic exercise routines. The entry level of the exercise has many similarities with medical treatments for respiratory illness and with walking exercise--the most recommended aerobic exercise for coronary artery disease. PMID:1399544

  10. A Systematic Approach to Discover and Characterize Natural Plant Biostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Povero, Giovanni; Mejia, Juan F.; Di Tommaso, Donata; Piaggesi, Alberto; Warrior, Prem

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural plant biostimulants is proposed as an innovative solution to address the challenges to sustainable agriculture, to ensure optimal nutrient uptake, crop yield, quality, and tolerance to abiotic stress. However, the process of selection and characterization of plant biostimulant matrices is complex and involves a series of rigorous evaluations customized to the needs of the plant. Here, we propose a highly differentiated plant biostimulant development and production platform, which involves a combination of technology, processes, and know-how. Chemistry, biology and omic concepts are combined/integrated to investigate and understand the specific mode(s) of action of bioactive ingredients. The proposed approach allows to predict and characterize the function of natural compounds as biostimulants. By managing and analyzing massive amounts of complex data, it is therefore possible to discover, evaluate and validate new product candidates, thus expanding the uses of existing products to meet the emerging needs of agriculture. PMID:27092156

  11. Aerial exposure tolerance of a newly discovered galaxiid.

    PubMed

    Chakona, A; Swartz, E R; Magellan, K

    2011-03-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate tolerance and physiological responses of Galaxias'nebula', a newly discovered and widespread African galaxiid, to aerial exposure. This species can tolerate emersion for at least 36 h. Changes in water level and dewatering did not induce the fish to burrow into the substratum or find refugia, nor was there detectable mucus production following aerial exposure. Opercular movement, a proxy for gill ventilation rate, however, did vary with changes in water level. The initial steady ventilation rate increased significantly when the fish were partially emersed and ventilation ceased immediately upon total air exposure. When fish were re-immersed, there was first a period of hyperactivity with a corresponding inflated gill ventilation rate which was restored to pretreatment levels within 2 h. This is the first documented case of amphibious capabilities in an African galaxiid, which has implications for the interpretation of its widespread distribution pattern.

  12. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mohite, Aditya; Nie, Wanyi

    2015-01-29

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.

  13. Cassini discovers a kinematic spiral ring around Saturn.

    PubMed

    Charnoz, S; Porco, C C; Déau, E; Brahic, A; Spitale, J N; Bacques, G; Baillie, K

    2005-11-25

    Since the time of the Voyager flybys of Saturn in 1980-1981, Saturn's eccentric F ring has been known to be accompanied on either side by faint strands of material. New Cassini observations show that these strands, initially interpreted as concentric ring segments, are in fact connected and form a single one-arm trailing spiral winding at least three times around Saturn. The spiral rotates around Saturn with the orbital motion of its constituent particles. This structure is likely the result of differential orbital motion stretching an initial cloud of particles scattered from the dense core of the F ring. Different scenarios of formation, implying ringlet-satellite interactions, are explored. A recently discovered moon candidate, S/2004 S6, is on an orbit that crosses the F-ring core at the intersection of the spiral with the ring, which suggests a dynamical connection between S/2004 S6 and the spiral.

  14. Adrenal Pheochromocytoma Incidentally Discovered in a Patient With Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Petramala, Luigi; Concistrè, Antonio; Marinelli, Cristiano; Zinnamosca, Laura; Iannucci, Gino; Lucia, Piernatale; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Letizia, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the diagnostic route of pheochromocytoma (PHEO) in a patient under dopaminergic treatment. A 70-year-old man with Parkinsonism and under treatment with levodopa and carbidopa came to our observation for evaluation of arterial hypertension and right adrenal mass discovered incidentally. To evaluate adrenal hormone levels we performed a dexamethasone suppression test, plasma aldosterone levels and 24-hr urinary metanephrine, which revealed elevated levels of catecholamines metabolities. 123-I-metaiodobenzylguanidine SPECT scintiscan revealed raised activity within the right adrenal gland concordant with the mass. The diagnosis of PHEO was posed and an elective laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed; histopathological examination confirmed the PHEO diagnosis. Recently the coexistence of PHEO and Parkinsonism is a very rare association of diseases, with only 3 cases reported in literature. In this article, another case is reported and diagnostic procedures are discussed. PMID:26496334

  15. Gastrointestinal parasitoses discovered in agricultural workers in South Bohemia, Czechoslovakia.

    PubMed

    Stĕrba, J; Ditrich, O; Prokopic, J; Kadlcík, K

    1988-01-01

    In the years from 1975 to 1982 1,750 persons, mostly employed by agricultural enterprises in the South Bohemian Region in Czechoslovakia, were examined. We discovered seven species of parasites: Taenia saginata in 0.3%, Enterobius vermicularis in 10.1%, Giardia lamblia in 1.0%, Endolimax nana in 0.8%, Entamoeba coli in 0.7%, Entamoeba hartmanni in 0.2%, and Chilomastix mesnili in 0.5%. The greatest number of parasites was found in students of the Secondary agricultural and technical school. Only two species of parasites were diagnosed in children of the employees. The incidence of E. vermicularis was 75% in children, in adult employees of agricultural enterprises, however, only 9.8%. PMID:3169645

  16. How did Archimedes discover the law of buoyancy by experiment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Hidetaka

    2016-03-01

    After Archimedes and Vitruvius era, for more than 2000 years, it has been believed that the displaced water measurement of golden crown is impossible, and at his Eureka moment, Archimedes discovered the law of buoyancy (Proposition 7 of his principles) and proved the theft of a goldsmith by weighing the golden crown in water. A previous study showed that a small amount of displaced water was able to be measured with enough accuracy by the introduced method. Archimedes measured the weight of displaced water. He did not find the law of buoyancy but rather specific gravity of things at the moment. After which, Archimedes continued to measure the specific gravity of various solids and fluids. Through these measurements, he reached the discovery of the law of buoyancy directly by experiment. In this paper, the process to the discovery of Archimedes' principle (Proposition 5) is presented.

  17. Drifting sub-pulses in two newly discovered pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, S. M.; Edwards, R.; Bailes, M.

    2001-12-01

    We have detected the rare phenomenon of stable, drifting sub-pulse behaviour in two pulsars discovered in the recent Swinburne intermediate latitude pulsar survey. The pulsars, PSR J1231-47 and PSR J1919+0134, have approximate periods (P) of 1.873 and 1.6039s respectively. Both pulsars have multicomponent profiles, and distinct drifting is observed across them. We have identified a single drift mode in both pulsars: the drift rate for PSR J1231-47 being 5.4(1) ms P-1 and 5.8(2) ms P-1 for PSR 1919+0134. The drifting is linear across the profile with no departure from linearity at the edges within the sensitivity of our observations.

  18. Discovering Related Clinical Concepts Using Large Amounts of Clinical Notes.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Kavita; Lloyd, Shane; Sarkar, Vikren

    2016-01-01

    The ability to find highly related clinical concepts is essential for many applications such as for hypothesis generation, query expansion for medical literature search, search results filtering, ICD-10 code filtering and many other applications. While manually constructed medical terminologies such as SNOMED CT can surface certain related concepts, these terminologies are inadequate as they depend on expertise of several subject matter experts making the terminology curation process open to geographic and language bias. In addition, these terminologies also provide no quantifiable evidence on how related the concepts are. In this work, we explore an unsupervised graphical approach to mine related concepts by leveraging the volume within large amounts of clinical notes. Our evaluation shows that we are able to use a data driven approach to discovering highly related concepts for various search terms including medications, symptoms and diseases. PMID:27656096

  19. Discovering Related Clinical Concepts Using Large Amounts of Clinical Notes

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Kavita; Lloyd, Shane; Sarkar, Vikren

    2016-01-01

    The ability to find highly related clinical concepts is essential for many applications such as for hypothesis generation, query expansion for medical literature search, search results filtering, ICD-10 code filtering and many other applications. While manually constructed medical terminologies such as SNOMED CT can surface certain related concepts, these terminologies are inadequate as they depend on expertise of several subject matter experts making the terminology curation process open to geographic and language bias. In addition, these terminologies also provide no quantifiable evidence on how related the concepts are. In this work, we explore an unsupervised graphical approach to mine related concepts by leveraging the volume within large amounts of clinical notes. Our evaluation shows that we are able to use a data driven approach to discovering highly related concepts for various search terms including medications, symptoms and diseases. PMID:27656096

  20. Detailed Abundances of Stars with Small Planets Discovered by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Simon C.; Vaz, Zachary A.; Katime Santrich, Orlando J.; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Smith, Verne V.; King, Jeremy R.; Ghezzi, Luan; Howell, Steve B.; Teske, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    We present newly derived stellar parameters and the detailed abundances of 19 elements of seven stars with small planets discovered by NASA's Kepler Mission. Each star save one has at least one planet with a radius less than 2 REarth, suggesting a primarily rocky composition. The stellar parameters and abundances are derived from high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution echelle spectroscopy obtained with the 10-m Keck I telescope and HIRES spectrometer using standard spectroscopic techniques. We compare the abundances to those of a general Galactic disk population and investigate possible abundance trends with condensation temperature of the elements.S.C.S. acknowledges support provided by grant NNX12AD19G to S.C.S. from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as part of the Kepler Participating Scientist Program.

  1. Re-discovering Mendel: The Case of Carl Correns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Carl Erich Correns (1864-1933) is remembered in the annals of science as one of the three botanists who re-discovered Mendel's laws. He can also, however, be regarded as one of the founding figures of classical genetics in Germany. Between 1894 and 1899 he carried out the crossing experiments with corn and peas that led to the re-statement of Gregor Mendel's (1822-1884) results. Between 1900 and 1910, he explored the complications of these laws, including the coupling of factors due to their chromosomal location and the inheritance of sex, in a great number of plant species. In later years Correns became interested in and experimented on phenomena of extra-nuclear inheritance.

  2. Discovering Mira Ceti: Celestial Change and Cosmic Continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Robert Alan

    In the short narrative that follows I introduce two new heroes. Although we begin with Fabricius's first sighting in 1596, the new pivot point in the drama is the collaboration between Hevelius and Boulliau that began around 1660. As it happens, Learned Europe paid little attention to Mira in the generation after the first scattered sightings of 1596, indeed, nearly 70 years passed before the New Star was given a working identity. Like Columbus discovering America, Fabricius and Holwarda saw different things - for convenience, I call them Fabricius's Star and Holwarda's Star. Hevelius's Historiola (Danzig, 1662) and Boulliau's Ad astronomos (Paris, 1667) presented a different vision. It made Mira famous. As I shall argue, if Hevelius gave Mira a history, Boulliau gave Mira a future.5 In the end, the New Star not only challenged the ancient cosmos, it became an enduring icon for the New Science, a returning reminder of celestial continuity and cosmic order.

  3. Cardiopulmonary exercise: a recently discovered secret of tai chi.

    PubMed

    Ng, R K

    1992-08-01

    Every piece of literature or book about tai chi claims it to be the supreme martial art (soft style) and a therapeutic exercise. Nevertheless, none of the authors can describe scientifically how and why it works. Many people did not gain any health benefit in practicing tai chi and only very few people were able to apply its legendary secret power. During the last 10 years, the author thought he had discovered the secret in Hong Kong and brought it to Los Angeles. The secret lies in the fundamental movements of the body, called tai chi basic exercise routines. The entry level of the exercise has many similarities with medical treatments for respiratory illness and with walking exercise--the most recommended aerobic exercise for coronary artery disease.

  4. Quantify spatial relations to discover handwritten graphical symbols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinpeng; Mouchère, Harold; Viard-Gaudin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    To model a handwritten graphical language, spatial relations describe how the strokes are positioned in the 2-dimensional space. Most of existing handwriting recognition systems make use of some predefined spatial relations. However, considering a complex graphical language, it is hard to express manually all the spatial relations. Another possibility would be to use a clustering technique to discover the spatial relations. In this paper, we discuss how to create a relational graph between strokes (nodes) labeled with graphemes in a graphical language. Then we vectorize spatial relations (edges) for clustering and quantization. As the targeted application, we extract the repetitive sub-graphs (graphical symbols) composed of graphemes and learned spatial relations. On two handwriting databases, a simple mathematical expression database and a complex flowchart database, the unsupervised spatial relations outperform the predefined spatial relations. In addition, we visualize the frequent patterns on two text-lines containing Chinese characters.

  5. Discovering Related Clinical Concepts Using Large Amounts of Clinical Notes.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Kavita; Lloyd, Shane; Sarkar, Vikren

    2016-01-01

    The ability to find highly related clinical concepts is essential for many applications such as for hypothesis generation, query expansion for medical literature search, search results filtering, ICD-10 code filtering and many other applications. While manually constructed medical terminologies such as SNOMED CT can surface certain related concepts, these terminologies are inadequate as they depend on expertise of several subject matter experts making the terminology curation process open to geographic and language bias. In addition, these terminologies also provide no quantifiable evidence on how related the concepts are. In this work, we explore an unsupervised graphical approach to mine related concepts by leveraging the volume within large amounts of clinical notes. Our evaluation shows that we are able to use a data driven approach to discovering highly related concepts for various search terms including medications, symptoms and diseases.

  6. A Systematic Approach to Discover and Characterize Natural Plant Biostimulants.

    PubMed

    Povero, Giovanni; Mejia, Juan F; Di Tommaso, Donata; Piaggesi, Alberto; Warrior, Prem

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural plant biostimulants is proposed as an innovative solution to address the challenges to sustainable agriculture, to ensure optimal nutrient uptake, crop yield, quality, and tolerance to abiotic stress. However, the process of selection and characterization of plant biostimulant matrices is complex and involves a series of rigorous evaluations customized to the needs of the plant. Here, we propose a highly differentiated plant biostimulant development and production platform, which involves a combination of technology, processes, and know-how. Chemistry, biology and omic concepts are combined/integrated to investigate and understand the specific mode(s) of action of bioactive ingredients. The proposed approach allows to predict and characterize the function of natural compounds as biostimulants. By managing and analyzing massive amounts of complex data, it is therefore possible to discover, evaluate and validate new product candidates, thus expanding the uses of existing products to meet the emerging needs of agriculture. PMID:27092156

  7. Discovering Related Clinical Concepts Using Large Amounts of Clinical Notes

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Kavita; Lloyd, Shane; Sarkar, Vikren

    2016-01-01

    The ability to find highly related clinical concepts is essential for many applications such as for hypothesis generation, query expansion for medical literature search, search results filtering, ICD-10 code filtering and many other applications. While manually constructed medical terminologies such as SNOMED CT can surface certain related concepts, these terminologies are inadequate as they depend on expertise of several subject matter experts making the terminology curation process open to geographic and language bias. In addition, these terminologies also provide no quantifiable evidence on how related the concepts are. In this work, we explore an unsupervised graphical approach to mine related concepts by leveraging the volume within large amounts of clinical notes. Our evaluation shows that we are able to use a data driven approach to discovering highly related concepts for various search terms including medications, symptoms and diseases.

  8. Discovering cancer biomarkers from clinical samples by protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Niu, Xin; Cheng, Li; Yang, Li-Na; Li, Qing; Wang, Yang; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Zhou, Shu-Min

    2015-02-01

    Cancer biomarkers are of potential use in early cancer diagnosis, anticancer therapy development, and monitoring the responses to treatments. Protein-based cancer biomarkers are major forms in use, as they are much easier to be monitored in body fluids or tissues. For cancer biomarker discovery, high-throughput techniques such as protein microarrays hold great promises, because they are capable of global unbiased monitoring but with a miniaturized format. In doing so, novel and cancer type specific biomarkers can be systematically discovered at an affordable cost. In this review, we give a relatively complete picture on protein microarrays applied to clinical samples for cancer biomarker discovery, and conclude this review with the future perspectives. PMID:25523829

  9. [Recently discovered hormones with a role in energy homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Krykorková, I; Nedvídková, J

    2003-02-01

    Adipocytal hormones resistin and adiponectin and gastric peptide ghrelin are recently discovered hormones, which are considered to take part in energy metabolism regulation. Resistin is expressed in adipose tissue only and its increased levels could cause insulin resistance and thus link obesity with type 2 diabetes. Adiponectin, as well as resistin, are products of genes, expressed in adipose tissue. Adiponectin could prevent development of aterosclerosis and it could play a role in anti-inflammatory reactions. Ghrelin is produced mainly in the stomach. Beside its role in long-term regulation of energy metabolism, it is involved in the short-term regulation of feeding. Main roles of resistin, adiponectin and ghrelin are summarised in the presented overview.

  10. Discovering opinion leaders for medical topics using news articles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid identification of subject experts for medical topics helps in improving the implementation of discoveries by speeding the time to market drugs and aiding in clinical trial recruitment, etc. Identifying such people who influence opinion through social network analysis is gaining prominence. In this work, we explore how to combine named entity recognition from unstructured news articles with social network analysis to discover opinion leaders for a given medical topic. Methods We employed a Conditional Random Field algorithm to extract three categories of entities from health-related new articles: Person, Organization and Location. We used the latter two to disambiguate polysemy and synonymy for the person names, used simple rules to identify the subject experts, and then applied social network analysis techniques to discover the opinion leaders among them based on their media presence. A network was created by linking each pair of subject experts who are mentioned together in an article. The social network analysis metrics (including centrality metrics such as Betweenness, Closeness, Degree and Eigenvector) are used for ranking the subject experts based on their power in information flow. Results We extracted 734,204 person mentions from 147,528 news articles related to obesity from January 1, 2007 through July 22, 2010. Of these, 147,879 mentions have been marked as subject experts. The F-score of extracting person names is 88.5%. More than 80% of the subject experts who rank among top 20 in at least one of the metrics could be considered as opinion leaders in obesity. Conclusion The analysis of the network of subject experts with media presence revealed that an opinion leader might have fewer mentions in the news articles, but a high network centrality measure and vice-versa. Betweenness, Closeness and Degree centrality measures were shown to supplement frequency counts in the task of finding subject experts. Further, opinion leaders missed in

  11. Discovering Tradeoffs, Vulnerabilities, and Dependencies within Water Resources Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing recognition and interest in using emerging computational tools for discovering the tradeoffs that emerge across complex combinations infrastructure options, adaptive operations, and sign posts. As a field concerned with "deep uncertainties", it is logically consistent to include a more direct acknowledgement that our choices for dealing with computationally demanding simulations, advanced search algorithms, and sensitivity analysis tools are themselves subject to failures that could adversely bias our understanding of how systems' vulnerabilities change with proposed actions. Balancing simplicity versus complexity in our computational frameworks is nontrivial given that we are often exploring high impact irreversible decisions. It is not always clear that accepted models even encompass important failure modes. Moreover as they become more complex and computationally demanding the benefits and consequences of simplifications are often untested. This presentation discusses our efforts to address these challenges through our "many-objective robust decision making" (MORDM) framework for the design and management water resources systems. The MORDM framework has four core components: (1) elicited problem conception and formulation, (2) parallel many-objective search, (3) interactive visual analytics, and (4) negotiated selection of robust alternatives. Problem conception and formulation is the process of abstracting a practical design problem into a mathematical representation. We build on the emerging work in visual analytics to exploit interactive visualization of both the design space and the objective space in multiple heterogeneous linked views that permit exploration and discovery. Many-objective search produces tradeoff solutions from potentially competing problem formulations that can each consider up to ten conflicting objectives based on current computational search capabilities. Negotiated design selection uses interactive visualization

  12. Helping the public 'Discover Health' in their local library. Providing health information in public libraries: a partnership approach in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Henry, Elspeth; Marley, Lesley

    2004-06-01

    A partnership between the Specialist Health Promotion Service of NHS Tayside and Dundee City Council developed a project, 'Discover Health', to bring health information to the public. The two main formats used were traditional leaflets and Internet access via the People's Network, both available in public libraries. The steering group for the project was made up of staff from both organisations. The NHS side secured the funding; the Council side provided the accommodation and information and communication technologies. The partnership worked well, and the project is continuing, with expansion in the pipeline for other areas within Tayside. The various aspects of the functioning of the partnership are discussed. A literature review of similar initiatives is included.

  13. Discovering unexpected information using a building energy visualization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, B.; Rodriguez, N.; Puech, W.; Vasques, X.

    2013-03-01

    Building energy consumption is an important problem in construction field, old buildings are gap of energy and they need to be refactored. Energy footprint of buildings needs to be reduced. New buildings are designed to be suitable with energy efficiency paradigm. To improve energy efficiency, Building Management Systems (BMS) are used: BMS are IT (Information Technology) systems composed by a rules engine and a database connected to sensors. Unfortunately, BMS are only monitoring systems: they cannot predict and mine efficiently building information. RIDER project has emerged from this observation. This project is conducted by several French companies and universities, IBM at Montpellier, France, leads the project. The main goal of this project is to create a smart and scalable BMS. This new kind of BMS will be able to dig into data and predict events. This IT system is based on component paradigm and the core can be extended with external components. Some of them are developed during the project: data mining, building generation model and visualization. All of these components will provide new features to improve rules used by the core. In this paper, we will focus on the visualization component. This visualization use a volume rendering method based on sensors data interpolation and a correlation method to create new views. We will present the visualization method used and which rules can be provided by this component.

  14. Newly Discovered Clouds Found Floating High Above Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    GREEN BANK, WV -- New studies with the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have revealed a previously unknown population of discrete hydrogen clouds in the gaseous halo that surrounds the Milky Way Galaxy. These clouds were discovered in the transition zone between the Milky Way and intergalactic space, and provide tantalizing evidence that supernova-powered "galactic fountains" continually blast superheated hydrogen gas into our Galactic suburbs. Hydrogen Clouds Graphic Artist's Rendering of the Milky Way (background) with insert showing GBT image of newly-discovered clouds of Hydrogen gas above the plane of the Galaxy. Credit: Kirk Woellert/National Science Foundation. Extending far above the star-filled disk of the Milky Way is an atmosphere, or halo, of hydrogen gas. "By studying this halo, we can learn a great deal about the processes that are going on inside our Galaxy as well as beyond its borders," said Jay Lockman, an astronomer with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia. "It has remained a mystery, however, how this halo formed and what has prevented gravitational forces from collapsing the gas into a thin layer long ago." Some astronomers have speculated that this gas is distributed as a diffuse mist held up by either magnetic fields or cosmic rays streaming out of the plane of the Milky Way. Others believed that it is made of innumerable long-lived hydrogen clouds bobbing up and down like balls tossed by a juggler. Early observations with other telescopes discovered that there was some neutral hydrogen gas floating far above the Galaxy's plane, but these instruments were not sensitive enough to reveal any structure or resolve questions about its origin. Lockman's studies for the first time show a clear picture of the structure of the gas. Rather than a mist, the halo is in fact full of discrete clouds, each containing 50-to-100 solar masses of hydrogen and averaging about 100

  15. The CUAHSI Water Data Center: Empowering scientists to discover, use, store, and share water data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, A. L.; Hooper, R. P.; Arrigo, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    control. The WDC enables this by making both kinds of sources available in the same search interface. c. Data provenance: the appropriateness of data for use in a specific model or analysis often depends upon the exact details of how data was gathered and processed. The WDC will aid this by curating standards for metadata that are as descriptive as practical of the collection procedures. "Plug and play" sensor interfaces will fill in metadata appropriate to each sensor without human intervention. d. Contextual search: discovering data based upon geological (e.g. aquifer) or geographic (e.g., location in a stream network) features external to metadata. e. Data-driven search: discovering data that exhibit quality factors that are not described by the metadata. The WDC will partner with researchers desiring contextual and data driven search, and make results available to all. Many major data providers (e.g. federal agencies) are not mandated to provide access to data other than those they collect. The HIS project assembled data from over 90 different sources, thus demonstrating the promise of this approach. Meeting the grand challenges listed above will greatly enhance scientists' ability to discover, interpret, access, and analyze water data from across domains and sources to test Earth system hypotheses.

  16. Viking 75 Project.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. S., Jr.; Sibbers, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the Viking Project, a current effort to explore Mars using two unmanned spacecraft, consisting of an orbiter and lander each, during the 1975-1976 opportunity. The experiments on the surface will deal principally with biology, geology, and meteorology. If life is discovered on Mars, the dramatic find would greatly expand the field of exobiology and lead to a remarkable opportunity to study life that may be similar or different from our own.

  17. Earth's Largest Meteorite Impact Craters discovered in South America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellndorfer, J. M.; Schmidt-Falkenberg, H.

    2014-12-01

    Novel analysis of high resolution InSAR-based digital elevation data from the year 2001 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission combined with a recently produced dataset of pan-tropical vegetation height from ALOS-1 SAR and IceSAT/GLAS Lidar estimates led to the quasi-bald-Earth discovery of four sizable near-perfect circle arcs in South America under dense tropical forests ranging in length from 216 km to 441 km. Terrain elevation profiles of cross-sections across the arcs show a distinct vertical rising and falling in elevations of hundreds of meters over a horizontal distance of tens of kilometers. It is hypothesized that these sizable arcs and associated rim-like topographic terrain features are remnants of huge meteorite impact craters with diameters ranging from 770 km to 1,310 km, thus forming potentially the largest known impact carter structures discovered on Earth today. The potential impact crater rim structures are located north of the eastern Amazon River, in the coastal region of Recife and Natal, and in the Brazilian, Bolivian and Paraguayan border region encompassing the Pantanal. Elevation profiles, hillshades and gray-shaded elevation maps were produced to support the geomorphologic analysis. It is also speculated whether in three of the four potential impact craters, central uplift domes or peaks, which are typical for complex impact crater structures can be identified. The worlds largest iron ore mining area of Carajás in Para, Brazil, falls exactly in the center of the largest hypothesized circular impact crater showing topographic elevations similar to the rim structure discovered 655 km to the north-north-west. Based on the topographic/geomorphologic driven hypothesis, geologic exploration of these topographic features is needed to test whether indeed meteorite impact craters could be verified, what the more exact ellipsoidal shapes of the potential impact craters might be, and to determine when during geologic times the impacts would have taken

  18. Discovering asteroids temporarily captured by the Earth with LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorets, Grigori; Granvik, Mikael; Jones, Lynne; Jedicke, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Granvik et al. (2012, Icarus 218) predict that there is a population of small asteroids orbiting the Earth at any given time. These asteroids have been temporarily captured by the Earth from the much larger population of near-Earth asteroids. Temporarily-captured asteroids have elliptic geocentric orbits and come to within 0.03 au from the Earth. We divide the population into temporarily-captured orbiters (TCOs, or minimoons) that make at least one full revolution around the Earth, and into temporarily-captured flybys (TCFs) which make less than one revolution around the Earth. Recent results suggest that at any given time there is one 2--3-meter-diameter asteroid captured on a geocentric orbit within 0.03 au from the Earth (Fedorets et al., in preparation). At any given time, there is a dozen 1-meter-diameter captured asteroids, 2--3 of which are TCFs.The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will become operational in early 2020's. LSST is expected cover the available sky from its location in Chile every 4 nights for the duration of a 10 years. The observational cadence combined with the expected limited magnitude, r=24.5, suggest that LSST will detect a new minimoon once a month (Bolin et al. 2014, Icarus 241). Only one minimoon, asteroid 2006 RH120, has so far been discovered (Kwiatkowski et al. 2009, A&A 495).Whereas Bolin et al. (2014, Icarus 241) investigated possibilities for detecting minimoons by current and upcoming survey telescopes we extend the analysis to include the linking of minimoon detections, that is, aiming at extracting minimoon trajectories and, further, minimoon orbits from LSST data. We will test the performance of the current LSST pipeline with simulated TCO and TCF data assuming a realistic magnitude distribution derived from a novel NEO model by Granvik et al. (in preparation).Proving that minimoons can be discovered using LSST data will increase the scientific interest towards them, perhaps primarily as a population of asteroids in

  19. Discovering the Determinants of Chemistry Course Perceptions in Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Robert F.; Traverse, Maria A.; Feakes, Debra A.; Gibbs, Karen A.; Rohde, Rodney E.

    2010-01-01

    The primary goals of this project were to develop a reliable instrument to measure the chemistry course perceptions (CCP) of undergraduate chemistry students and to determine the predictors of CCP of undergraduate students as they enter their first college chemistry class. In a pilot study, 250 undergraduate students were solicited with 57…

  20. River of Words: Discovering a Sense of Place and Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Jeffrey Marshall

    2006-01-01

    One of the most powerful ways middle school students learn about themselves is through writing, and one of the most effective ways for students to learn about themselves is by writing about a place. At Cosgriff, a K-8 Catholic School in Salt Lake City, Utah, teachers have put this idea into practice by participating in the River of Words project.…

  1. A Country Discovered: Upper Juniors Explore Meanings in "Hamlet."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dennis

    1989-01-01

    Describes a project in England in which a class of 9- to 11-year olds enthusiastically and successfully explored the play "Hamlet" by writing about, discussing, performing, and visually interpreting the actual text. The teacher suggests that, with a little creativity, Shakespeare is very accessible to children. (SM)

  2. Inner solar system material discovered in the Oort cloud

    PubMed Central

    Meech, Karen J.; Yang, Bin; Kleyna, Jan; Hainaut, Olivier R.; Berdyugina, Svetlana; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Micheli, Marco; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    We have observed C/2014 S3 (PANSTARRS), a recently discovered object on a cometary orbit coming from the Oort cloud that is physically similar to an inner main belt rocky S-type asteroid. Recent dynamical models successfully reproduce the key characteristics of our current solar system; some of these models require significant migration of the giant planets, whereas others do not. These models provide different predictions on the presence of rocky material expelled from the inner solar system in the Oort cloud. C/2014 S3 could be the key to verifying these predictions of the migration-based dynamical models. Furthermore, this object displays a very faint, weak level of comet-like activity, five to six orders of magnitude less than that of typical ice-rich comets on similar Orbits coming from the Oort cloud. For the nearly tailless appearance, we are calling C/2014 S3 a Manx object. Various arguments convince us that this activity is produced by sublimation of volatile ice, that is, normal cometary activity. The activity implies that C/2014 S3 has retained a tiny fraction of the water that is expected to be present at its formation distance in the inner solar system. We may be looking at fresh inner solar system Earth-forming material that was ejected from the inner solar system and preserved for billions of years in the Oort cloud. PMID:27386512

  3. Oxygen and carbon discovered in exoplanet atmosphere `blow-off'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Oxygen and carbon discovered in exoplanet atmosphere ‘blow-off’ hi-res Size hi-res: 1096 kb Credits: ESA/Alfred Vidal-Madjar (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, France) Oxygen and carbon discovered in exoplanet atmosphere ‘blow-off’ This artist’s impression shows an extended ellipsoidal envelope - the shape of a rugby-ball - of oxygen and carbon discovered around the well-known extrasolar planet HD 209458b. An international team of astronomers led by Alfred Vidal-Madjar (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, France) observed the first signs of oxygen and carbon in the atmosphere of a planet beyond our Solar System for the first time using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The atoms of carbon and oxygen are swept up from the lower atmosphere with the flow of escaping atmospheric atomic hydrogen - like dust in a supersonic whirlwind - in a process called atmospheric ‘blow off’. Oxygen and carbon have been detected in the atmosphere of a planet beyond our Solar System for the first time. Scientists using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed the famous extrasolar planet HD 209458b passing in front of its parent star, and found oxygen and carbon surrounding the planet in an extended ellipsoidal envelope - the shape of a rugby-ball. These atoms are swept up from the lower atmosphere with the flow of the escaping atmospheric atomic hydrogen, like dust in a supersonic whirlwind. The team led by Alfred Vidal-Madjar (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, France) reports this discovery in a forthcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters. The planet, called HD 209458b, may sound familiar. It is already an extrasolar planet with an astounding list of firsts: the first extrasolar planet discovered transiting its sun, the first with an atmosphere, the first observed to have an evaporating hydrogen atmosphere (in 2003 by the same team of scientists) and now the first to have an atmosphere containing oxygen and carbon. Furthermore

  4. Discovering Numerical Differences between Animal and Plant microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenbang; Xin, Dawei; Qi, Zhaoming; Chen, Qingshan

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that there are many differences between animal and plant microRNAs (miRNAs), and that numerical features based on sequence and structure can be used to predict the function of individual miRNAs. However, there is little research regarding numerical differences between animal and plant miRNAs, and whether a single numerical feature or combination of features could be used to distinguish animal and plant miRNAs or not. Therefore, in current study we aimed to discover numerical features that could be used to accomplish this. We performed a large-scale analysis of 132 miRNA numerical features, and identified 17 highly significant distinguishing features. However, none of the features independently could clearly differentiate animal and plant miRNAs. By further analysis, we found a four-feature subset that included helix number, stack number, length of pre-miRNA, and minimum free energy, and developed a logistic classifier that could distinguish animal and plant miRNAs effectively. The precision of the classifier was greater than 80%. Using this tool, we confirmed that there were universal differences between animal and plant miRNAs, and that a single feature was unable to adequately distinguish the difference. This feature set and classifier represent a valuable tool for identifying differences between animal and plant miRNAs at a molecular level. PMID:27768749

  5. Discovering Psychological Principles by Mining Naturally Occurring Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Robert L; Lupyan, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The very expertise with which psychologists wield their tools for achieving laboratory control may have had the unwelcome effect of blinding psychologists to the possibilities of discovering principles of behavior without conducting experiments. When creatively interrogated, a diverse range of large, real-world data sets provides powerful diagnostic tools for revealing principles of human judgment, perception, categorization, decision-making, language use, inference, problem solving, and representation. Examples of these data sets include patterns of website links, dictionaries, logs of group interactions, collections of images and image tags, text corpora, history of financial transactions, trends in twitter tag usage and propagation, patents, consumer product sales, performance in high-stakes sporting events, dialect maps, and scientific citations. The goal of this issue is to present some exemplary case studies of mining naturally existing data sets to reveal important principles and phenomena in cognitive science, and to discuss some of the underlying issues involved with conducting traditional experiments, analyses of naturally occurring data, computational modeling, and the synthesis of all three methods. PMID:27404718

  6. Children's strategies for discovering cause-effect relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitsky, Alan N.; Hunt, Charles R.

    This study describes strategies children use to solve a complex problem. The problem asked children to figure out how to control a vehicle that they drove by pressing particular keys on a computer. The problem can be viewed as scientific in that variables must be identified and hypotheses formulated and tested to discover cause-effect relationships. Subjects were fifth and sixth graders sampled from public and private schools. The primary purpose of the study was to examine the transition between implicit, immature problem-solving strategies and explicit, mature theorizing characteristic of scientific problem solving. The study manipulated the problem perspective subjects were given and the number of cause-effect relationships in the problem. The study's description of children's problem solving highlights focusing, problem-solving behavior that is aimed at forming a mental representation, model, or theory about the problem, as a key link between mature and immature reasoning. Subject's school and school X perspective interaction was found to affect problem-solving performance.

  7. Inner solar system material discovered in the Oort cloud.

    PubMed

    Meech, Karen J; Yang, Bin; Kleyna, Jan; Hainaut, Olivier R; Berdyugina, Svetlana; Keane, Jacqueline V; Micheli, Marco; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Wainscoat, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    We have observed C/2014 S3 (PANSTARRS), a recently discovered object on a cometary orbit coming from the Oort cloud that is physically similar to an inner main belt rocky S-type asteroid. Recent dynamical models successfully reproduce the key characteristics of our current solar system; some of these models require significant migration of the giant planets, whereas others do not. These models provide different predictions on the presence of rocky material expelled from the inner solar system in the Oort cloud. C/2014 S3 could be the key to verifying these predictions of the migration-based dynamical models. Furthermore, this object displays a very faint, weak level of comet-like activity, five to six orders of magnitude less than that of typical ice-rich comets on similar Orbits coming from the Oort cloud. For the nearly tailless appearance, we are calling C/2014 S3 a Manx object. Various arguments convince us that this activity is produced by sublimation of volatile ice, that is, normal cometary activity. The activity implies that C/2014 S3 has retained a tiny fraction of the water that is expected to be present at its formation distance in the inner solar system. We may be looking at fresh inner solar system Earth-forming material that was ejected from the inner solar system and preserved for billions of years in the Oort cloud. PMID:27386512

  8. Discovering Psychological Principles by Mining Naturally Occurring Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Robert L; Lupyan, Gary

    2016-07-01

    The very expertise with which psychologists wield their tools for achieving laboratory control may have had the unwelcome effect of blinding psychologists to the possibilities of discovering principles of behavior without conducting experiments. When creatively interrogated, a diverse range of large, real-world data sets provides powerful diagnostic tools for revealing principles of human judgment, perception, categorization, decision-making, language use, inference, problem solving, and representation. Examples of these data sets include patterns of website links, dictionaries, logs of group interactions, collections of images and image tags, text corpora, history of financial transactions, trends in twitter tag usage and propagation, patents, consumer product sales, performance in high-stakes sporting events, dialect maps, and scientific citations. The goal of this issue is to present some exemplary case studies of mining naturally existing data sets to reveal important principles and phenomena in cognitive science, and to discuss some of the underlying issues involved with conducting traditional experiments, analyses of naturally occurring data, computational modeling, and the synthesis of all three methods.

  9. Commentary: discovering a different model of medical student education.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert T

    2012-12-01

    Traditional medical schools in modern academic health centers make discoveries, create new knowledge and technology, provide innovative care to the sickest patients, and educate future academic and practicing physicians. Unfortunately, the growth of the research and clinical care missions has sometimes resulted in a loss of emphasis on the general professional education of medical students. The author concludes that it may not be practical for many established medical schools to functionally return to the reason they were created: for the education of medical students.He had the opportunity to discover a different model of medical student education at the first new MD-granting medical school created in the United States in 25 years (in 2000), the Florida State University College of Medicine. He was initially skeptical about how its distributed regional campuses model, using practicing primary care physicians to help medical students learn in mainly ambulatory settings, could be effective. But his experience as a faculty member at the school convinced him that the model works very well.He proposes a better alignment of form and function for many established medical schools and an extension of the regional community-based model to the formation of community-based primary care graduate medical education programs determined by physician workforce needs and available resources.

  10. Discovering discriminative graphlets for aerial image categories recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luming; Han, Yahong; Yang, Yi; Song, Mingli; Yan, Shuicheng; Tian, Qi

    2013-12-01

    Recognizing aerial image categories is useful for scene annotation and surveillance. Local features have been demonstrated to be robust to image transformations, including occlusions and clutters. However, the geometric property of an aerial image (i.e., the topology and relative displacement of local features), which is key to discriminating aerial image categories, cannot be effectively represented by state-of-the-art generic visual descriptors. To solve this problem, we propose a recognition model that mines graphlets from aerial images, where graphlets are small connected subgraphs reflecting both the geometric property and color/texture distribution of an aerial image. More specifically, each aerial image is decomposed into a set of basic components (e.g., road and playground) and a region adjacency graph (RAG) is accordingly constructed to model their spatial interactions. Aerial image categories recognition can subsequently be casted as RAG-to-RAG matching. Based on graph theory, RAG-to-RAG matching is conducted by comparing all their respective graphlets. Because the number of graphlets is huge, we derive a manifold embedding algorithm to measure different-sized graphlets, after which we select graphlets that have highly discriminative and low redundancy topologies. Through quantizing the selected graphlets from each aerial image into a feature vector, we use support vector machine to discriminate aerial image categories. Experimental results indicate that our method outperforms several state-of-the-art object/scene recognition models, and the visualized graphlets indicate that the discriminative patterns are discovered by our proposed approach. PMID:23955764

  11. Unified Photo Enhancement by Discovering Aesthetic Communities From Flickr.

    PubMed

    Hong, Richang; Zhang, Luming; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-03-01

    Photo enhancement refers to the process of increasing the aesthetic appeal of a photo, such as changing the photo aspect ratio and spatial recomposition. It is a widely used technique in the printing industry, graphic design, and cinematography. In this paper, we propose a unified and socially aware photo enhancement framework which can leverage the experience of photographers with various aesthetic topics (e.g., portrait and landscape). We focus on photos from the image hosting site Flickr, which has 87 million users and to which more than 3.5 million photos are uploaded daily. First, a tagwise regularized topic model is proposed to describe the aesthetic topic of each Flickr user, and coherent and interpretable topics are discovered by leveraging both the visual features and tags of photos. Next, a graph is constructed to describe the similarities in aesthetic topics between the users. Noticeably, densely connected users have similar aesthetic topics, which are categorized into different communities by a dense subgraph mining algorithm. Finally, a probabilistic model is exploited to enhance the aesthetic attractiveness of a test photo by leveraging the photographic experiences of Flickr users from the corresponding communities of that photo. Paired-comparison-based user studies show that our method performs competitively on photo retargeting and recomposition. Moreover, our approach accurately detects aesthetic communities in a photo set crawled from nearly 100000 Flickr users.

  12. Discovering modes of an image population through mixture modeling.

    PubMed

    Sabuncu, Mert R; Balci, Serdar K; Golland, Polina

    2008-01-01

    We present iCluster, a fast and efficient algorithm that clusters a set of images while co-registering them using a parameterized, nonlinear transformation model. The output is a small number of template images that represent different modes in a population. This is in contrast with traditional approaches that assume a single template to construct atlases. We validate and explore the algorithm in two experiments. First, we employ iCluster to partition a data set of 416 whole brain MR volumes of subjects aged 18-96 years into three sub-groups, which mainly correspond to age groups. The templates reveal significant structural differences across these age groups that confirm previous findings in aging research. In the second experiment, we run iCluster on a group of 30 patients with dementia and 30 age-matched healthy controls. The algorithm produced three modes that mainly corresponded to a sub-population of healthy controls, a sub-population of patients with dementia and a mixture group that contained both types. These results suggest that the algorithm can be used to discover sub-populations that correspond to interesting structural or functional "modes".

  13. Discovering Patterns in Brain Signals Using Decision Trees

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Even with emerging technologies, such as Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) systems, understanding how our brains work is a very difficult challenge. So we propose to use a data mining technique to help us in this task. As a case of study, we analyzed the brain's behaviour of blind people and sighted people in a spatial activity. There is a common belief that blind people compensate their lack of vision using the other senses. If an object is given to sighted people and we asked them to identify this object, probably the sense of vision will be the most determinant one. If the same experiment was repeated with blind people, they will have to use other senses to identify the object. In this work, we propose a methodology that uses decision trees (DT) to investigate the difference of how the brains of blind people and people with vision react against a spatial problem. We choose the DT algorithm because it can discover patterns in the brain signal, and its presentation is human interpretable. Our results show that using DT to analyze brain signals can help us to understand the brain's behaviour. PMID:27688746

  14. Newly Discovered Alpha-poor Stars in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Q. F.; Zhao, G.

    2015-06-01

    We present an abundance analysis for two newly discovered α-poor stars based on high-resolution spectroscopy. These stars were previously identified in the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) Data Release 1 as candidate α-poor stars. We observed these candidate α-poor stars with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) spectrograph on the 6.5 m Magellan-Clay Telescope located at Las Campanas Observatory. This high-resolution analysis confirms the low [α/Fe] abundance ratios for these stars compared to those of the majority of Galactic stars with comparable metallicities ([Fe/H] ∼ -0.5). The large deficiencies of α-elements suggest that these stars possess an anomalous chemical enrichment history. To have found such α-poor stars in our sample indicates that large scatters of the α-element abundance ratios may exist near solar metallicity. These results also demonstrate that our method is capable of selecting α-poor stars from low-resolution stellar spectra.

  15. Discovering Transcription and Splicing Networks in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wen, Jianguo; Chang, Chung-che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    More and more transcription factors and their motifs have been reported and linked to specific gene expression levels. However, focusing only on transcription is not sufficient for mechanism research. Most genes, especially in eukaryotes, are alternatively spliced to different isoforms. Some of these isoforms increase the biodiversity of proteins. From this viewpoint, transcription and splicing are two of important mechanisms to modulate expression levels of isoforms. To integrate these two kinds of regulation, we built a linear regression model to select a subset of transcription factors and splicing factors for each co-expressed isoforms using least-angle regression approach. Then, we applied this method to investigate the mechanism of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a precursor lesion of acute myeloid leukemia. Results suggested that expression levels of most isoforms were regulated by a set of selected regulatory factors. Some of the detected factors, such as EGR1 and STAT family, are highly correlated with progression of MDS. We discovered that the splicing factor SRSF11 experienced alternative splicing switch, and in turn induced different amino acid sequences between MDS and controls. This splicing switch causes two different splicing mechanisms. Polymerase Chain Reaction experiments also confirmed that one of its isoforms was over-expressed in MDS. We analyzed the regulatory networks constructed from the co-expressed isoforms and their regulatory factors in MDS. Many of these networks were enriched in the herpes simplex infection pathway which involves many splicing factors, and pathways in cancers and acute or chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:24244432

  16. Discovering interacting domains and motifs in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Willy; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ng, See-Kiong

    2013-01-01

    Many important biological processes, such as the signaling pathways, require protein-protein interactions (PPIs) that are designed for fast response to stimuli. These interactions are usually transient, easily formed, and disrupted, yet specific. Many of these transient interactions involve the binding of a protein domain to a short stretch (3-10) of amino acid residues, which can be characterized by a sequence pattern, i.e., a short linear motif (SLiM). We call these interacting domains and motifs domain-SLiM interactions. Existing methods have focused on discovering SLiMs in the interacting proteins' sequence data. With the recent increase in protein structures, we have a new opportunity to detect SLiMs directly from the proteins' 3D structures instead of their linear sequences. In this chapter, we describe a computational method called SLiMDIet to directly detect SLiMs on domain interfaces extracted from 3D structures of PPIs. SLiMDIet comprises two steps: (1) interaction interfaces belonging to the same domain are extracted and grouped together using structural clustering and (2) the extracted interaction interfaces in each cluster are structurally aligned to extract the corresponding SLiM. Using SLiMDIet, de novo SLiMs interacting with protein domains can be computationally detected from structurally clustered domain-SLiM interactions for PFAM domains which have available 3D structures in the PDB database.

  17. Unified Photo Enhancement by Discovering Aesthetic Communities From Flickr.

    PubMed

    Hong, Richang; Zhang, Luming; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-03-01

    Photo enhancement refers to the process of increasing the aesthetic appeal of a photo, such as changing the photo aspect ratio and spatial recomposition. It is a widely used technique in the printing industry, graphic design, and cinematography. In this paper, we propose a unified and socially aware photo enhancement framework which can leverage the experience of photographers with various aesthetic topics (e.g., portrait and landscape). We focus on photos from the image hosting site Flickr, which has 87 million users and to which more than 3.5 million photos are uploaded daily. First, a tagwise regularized topic model is proposed to describe the aesthetic topic of each Flickr user, and coherent and interpretable topics are discovered by leveraging both the visual features and tags of photos. Next, a graph is constructed to describe the similarities in aesthetic topics between the users. Noticeably, densely connected users have similar aesthetic topics, which are categorized into different communities by a dense subgraph mining algorithm. Finally, a probabilistic model is exploited to enhance the aesthetic attractiveness of a test photo by leveraging the photographic experiences of Flickr users from the corresponding communities of that photo. Paired-comparison-based user studies show that our method performs competitively on photo retargeting and recomposition. Moreover, our approach accurately detects aesthetic communities in a photo set crawled from nearly 100000 Flickr users. PMID:26742134

  18. Discovering Patterns in Brain Signals Using Decision Trees

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Even with emerging technologies, such as Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) systems, understanding how our brains work is a very difficult challenge. So we propose to use a data mining technique to help us in this task. As a case of study, we analyzed the brain's behaviour of blind people and sighted people in a spatial activity. There is a common belief that blind people compensate their lack of vision using the other senses. If an object is given to sighted people and we asked them to identify this object, probably the sense of vision will be the most determinant one. If the same experiment was repeated with blind people, they will have to use other senses to identify the object. In this work, we propose a methodology that uses decision trees (DT) to investigate the difference of how the brains of blind people and people with vision react against a spatial problem. We choose the DT algorithm because it can discover patterns in the brain signal, and its presentation is human interpretable. Our results show that using DT to analyze brain signals can help us to understand the brain's behaviour.

  19. More Far-Side Deep Moonquake Nests Discovered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Jackson, John A.; Jackson, Katherine G.

    2004-01-01

    As reported last year, we started to reanalyze the seismic data acquired from 1969 to 1977 with a network of stations established on the Moon during the Apollo mission. The reason for the reanalysis was because recent advances in computer technology make it possible to employ much more sophisticated analysis techniques than was possible previously. The primary objective of the reanalysis was to search for deep moonquakes on the far side of the Moon and, if found, to use them to infer the structure of the Moon's deep interior, including a possible central core. The first step was to identify any new deep moonquakes that escaped our earlier search by applying a combination of waveform cross-correlation and single-link cluster analysis, and then to see if any of them are from previously unknown nests of deep moonquakes. We positively identified 7245 deep moonquakes, more than a five-fold increase from the previous 1360. We also found at least 88 previously unknown deep-moonquake nests. The question was whether any of these newly discovered nets were on the far side of the Moon, and we now report that our analysis of the data indicates that some of them are indeed on the far side.

  20. Inner solar system material discovered in the Oort cloud.

    PubMed

    Meech, Karen J; Yang, Bin; Kleyna, Jan; Hainaut, Olivier R; Berdyugina, Svetlana; Keane, Jacqueline V; Micheli, Marco; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Wainscoat, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    We have observed C/2014 S3 (PANSTARRS), a recently discovered object on a cometary orbit coming from the Oort cloud that is physically similar to an inner main belt rocky S-type asteroid. Recent dynamical models successfully reproduce the key characteristics of our current solar system; some of these models require significant migration of the giant planets, whereas others do not. These models provide different predictions on the presence of rocky material expelled from the inner solar system in the Oort cloud. C/2014 S3 could be the key to verifying these predictions of the migration-based dynamical models. Furthermore, this object displays a very faint, weak level of comet-like activity, five to six orders of magnitude less than that of typical ice-rich comets on similar Orbits coming from the Oort cloud. For the nearly tailless appearance, we are calling C/2014 S3 a Manx object. Various arguments convince us that this activity is produced by sublimation of volatile ice, that is, normal cometary activity. The activity implies that C/2014 S3 has retained a tiny fraction of the water that is expected to be present at its formation distance in the inner solar system. We may be looking at fresh inner solar system Earth-forming material that was ejected from the inner solar system and preserved for billions of years in the Oort cloud.

  1. Prediction of Human Activity by Discovering Temporal Sequence Patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Fu, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Early prediction of ongoing human activity has become more valuable in a large variety of time-critical applications. To build an effective representation for prediction, human activities can be characterized by a complex temporal composition of constituent simple actions and interacting objects. Different from early detection on short-duration simple actions, we propose a novel framework for long -duration complex activity prediction by discovering three key aspects of activity: Causality, Context-cue, and Predictability. The major contributions of our work include: (1) a general framework is proposed to systematically address the problem of complex activity prediction by mining temporal sequence patterns; (2) probabilistic suffix tree (PST) is introduced to model causal relationships between constituent actions, where both large and small order Markov dependencies between action units are captured; (3) the context-cue, especially interactive objects information, is modeled through sequential pattern mining (SPM), where a series of action and object co-occurrence are encoded as a complex symbolic sequence; (4) we also present a predictive accumulative function (PAF) to depict the predictability of each kind of activity. The effectiveness of our approach is evaluated on two experimental scenarios with two data sets for each: action-only prediction and context-aware prediction. Our method achieves superior performance for predicting global activity classes and local action units. PMID:26353344

  2. Comparison of Observed and Simulated Boundary Layer Height Estimates during Discover-Aq July 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, C.; Pickering, K. E.; Ferrare, R. A.; Scarino, A. J.; Delgado, R.; Martins, D. K.; Lenschow, D. H.; Loughner, C.; Thompson, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The first deployment of the NASA Earth Venture -1 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project was conducted during July 2011 in the Baltimore-Washington region. The P-3B aircraft provided in situ vertical profiles of meteorological quantities, trace gases, and aerosols over six Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) air quality monitoring sites over fourteen flight days. The UC-12 aircraft provided continuous remote sensing observations of aerosols over its flight track with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). Additionally, several MDE sites were equipped with the ground-based Micro-Pulse Lidar (MPL) instrument, also providing continuous, remotely sensed aerosol observations, and two sites launched ozonesondes during the campaign. A major goal of DISCOVER-AQ is to understand the processes linking trace gas column abundances to surface concentrations, including vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). In support of this goal, estimates of the PBL height output by the WRF/CMAQ model system (ACM2 PBL scheme and Pleim-Xiu surface layer scheme) were compared to observational estimates of PBL height during the July 2011 deployment. WRF/CMAQ typically demonstrated a high bias in PBL height relative to the meteorological PBL height estimates (those based on the potential temperature profile measured by the P-3B or ozonesondes), while the model demonstrated a low bias relative to PBL height estimates based on the aerosol backscatter profile (HSRL and MPL data). Additionally, the model tended to overpredict the PBL height on days when the PBL was well mixed, and underpredicted when the PBL was poorly mixed. Preliminary results from an intercomparison of the WRF model run with six different PBL schemes (ACM2, YSU, MYJ, MYNN, QNSE, and BouLac schemes) will also be presented.

  3. Variability of O3 and NO2 Profile Shapes during DISCOVER-AQ July 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, C.; Pickering, K. E.; Lamsal, L. N.; Herman, J. R.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Chen, G.; Liu, X.; Loughner, C.; Thompson, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The first deployment of the NASA Earth Venture -1 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project was conducted during July 2011 in the Baltimore-Washington region. The P-3B aircraft provided in situ vertical profiles of meteorological quantities, trace gases, and aerosols over six Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) air quality monitoring sites over fourteen flight days. Additionally, two sites launched ozonesondes and operated tethersondes during the campaign, supplementing the P-3B profiles. A major goal of DISCOVER-AQ is to understand the processes linking column abundances to surface concentrations for O3 and NO2, which includes understanding the variability of the in situ O3 and NO2 profile shapes used to compute the lower tropospheric column abundances. In support of this goal, a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed for the O3 and NO2 P-3B and sonde profiles for the Maryland 2011 campaign, allowing classes of profile shapes to be identified at each surface site. These classes were related to differences in vertical mixing, as indicated by profiles of potential temperature, CO, and short-lived trace gas species, as well as the impact of the bay breeze at one site. Such an analysis of profile variability will also be useful to assess the representativeness of the assumed profile shapes used in satellite retrievals for O3 and NO2. Further, profile shapes for these species were compared with those from the CMAQ model to assess its performance. Lastly, the average diurnal variation of the O3 and NO2 column abundances over the July 2011 campaign was assessed at each site to elucidate the diurnal cycle for these columns and results were compared to the once-per-day OMI column observations.

  4. Repulsive parallel MCMC algorithm for discovering diverse motifs from large sequence sets

    PubMed Central

    Ikebata, Hisaki; Yoshida, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The motif discovery problem consists of finding recurring patterns of short strings in a set of nucleotide sequences. This classical problem is receiving renewed attention as most early motif discovery methods lack the ability to handle large data of recent genome-wide ChIP studies. New ChIP-tailored methods focus on reducing computation time and pay little regard to the accuracy of motif detection. Unlike such methods, our method focuses on increasing the detection accuracy while maintaining the computation efficiency at an acceptable level. The major advantage of our method is that it can mine diverse multiple motifs undetectable by current methods. Results: The repulsive parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo (RPMCMC) algorithm that we propose is a parallel version of the widely used Gibbs motif sampler. RPMCMC is run on parallel interacting motif samplers. A repulsive force is generated when different motifs produced by different samplers near each other. Thus, different samplers explore different motifs. In this way, we can detect much more diverse motifs than conventional methods can. Through application to 228 transcription factor ChIP-seq datasets of the ENCODE project, we show that the RPMCMC algorithm can find many reliable cofactor interacting motifs that existing methods are unable to discover. Availability and implementation: A C++ implementation of RPMCMC and discovered cofactor motifs for the 228 ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets are available from http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/yoshidalab/motif. Contact: ikebata.hisaki@ism.ac.jp, yoshidar@ism.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available from Bioinformatics online. PMID:25583120

  5. A Transport Analysis of In Situ Airborne Ozone Measurements from the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkinson, H. L.; Brent, L. C.; He, H.; Loughner, C.; Stehr, J. W.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Baltimore and Washington are currently designated as nonattainment areas with respect to the 2008 EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for 8-hour Ozone (O3). Tropospheric O3 is the dominant component of summertime photochemical smog, and at high levels, has deleterious effects on human health, ecosystems, and materials. The University of Maryland (UMD) Regional Atmospheric Measurement Modeling and Prediction Program (RAMMPP) strives to improve understanding of air quality in the Mid-Atlantic States and to elucidate contributions of pollutants such as O3 from regional transport versus local sources through a combination of modeling and in situ measurements. The NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) project investigates the connection between column measurements and surface conditions to explore the potential of remote sensing observations in diagnosing air quality at ground level where pollutants can affect human health. During the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ field campaign, in situ airborne measurements of trace gases and aerosols were performed along the Interstate 95 corridor between Baltimore and Washington from the NASA P3B aircraft. To augment this data and provide regional context, measurements of trace gases and aerosols were also performed by the RAMMPP Cessna 402B aircraft over nearby airports in Maryland and Virginia. This work presents an analysis of O3 measurements made by the Ultraviolet (UV) Photometric Ambient O3 Analyzer on the RAMMPP Cessna 402B and by the NCAR 4-Channel Chemiluminescence instrument on the NASA P3B. In this analysis, spatial and temporal patterns of O3 data are examined within the context of forward and backward trajectories calculated from 12-km North American Mesoscale (NAM) meteorological data using the NOAA Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) Model and from a high resolution Weather Research and

  6. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  7. Observational data and orbits of the asteroids discovered at the Molėtai Observatory in 2005-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černis, K.; Wlodarczyk, I.; Zdanavičius, J.

    The paper presents statistics of the asteroids observed and discovered at the Molėtai Observatory, Lithuania, in 2005-2007 within the project for astrometric observations of the near-Earth objects (NEOs), the main belt asteroids and comets. CCD observations of asteroids were obtained with the 35/51 cm Maksutov-type meniscus telescope and the 1.65 m Ritchey-Chretien reflector. In the Minor Planet Circulars and the Minor Planet Electronic Circulars (2005-2007) we published 17 003 astrometric positions of 2980 asteroids. Among them 112 were new normal asteroids and one NEO (2006 SF77) discovered at Molėtai; a few NEOs were found by our team independently. For the asteroids discovered at Molėtai their precise orbits were calculated. Because of short observational arc, a few asteroids have low-precision orbits and some asteroids have been lost. For three of them with low-precision orbital elements (NEO 2006 SF77 and two Mars crossers - 2006 SN368 and 2007 VM315), we present their ephemerides for 2016-2018.

  8. Discovering the Role of Grain Boundary Complexions in Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Harmer, Martin P.

    2015-03-19

    in a range of materials systems, and to characterize their structures, range of stability and selected physical properties. First, an Au-based bilayer interfacial phase was discovered at a bicrystal boundary in the Si-Au system. This bilayer transitioned abruptly to an intrinsic (“clean”) grain boundary phase, suggesting first-order phase behavior. This study represents the discovery of grain boundary complexions in a completely new system, i.e., a semiconductor-metal system, giving further support to the expectation that grain boundary complexions are a general phenomenon not limited to any particular class of materials. The TiO2-CuO system exhibited four grain boundary interfacial phases: a monolayer, disordered bilayer, disordered trilayer, and non-wetting nanoscale amorphous drop (which likely resulted from dewetting of a nanoscale IGF). SiO2 contamination was discovered in the TiO2-CuO samples, and we hypothesize that this impurity may have caused an “order-disorder” transition to occur. In other words, we expect that pure TiO2-CuO may have a higher tendency to exhibit ordered bilayer and trilayer complexions, which may also exhibit a well-defined order-disorder transition temperature. In this effort we have also identified unique complexion transitions in yttria and strontium titanate.

  9. Discovering associations among diagnosis groups using topic modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ding Cheng; Thermeau, Terry; Chute, Christopher; Liu, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid growth of electronic medical records (EMR), there is an increasing need of automatically extract patterns or rules from EMR data with machine learning and data mining technqiues. In this work, we applied unsupervised statistical model, latent Dirichlet allocations (LDA), to cluster patient diagnoics groups from Rochester Epidemiology Projects (REP). The initial results show that LDA holds the potential for broad application in epidemiogloy as well as other biomedical studies due to its unsupervised nature and great interpretive power. PMID:25954576

  10. PTF discovers a young type IIn SN in NGC 151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrent, J.; Levitan, D.; Howell, A.; Thomas, R. C.; Nugent, P.; Sullivan, M.; Kasliwal, M.; Ofek, E. O.; Quimby, R.; Ben-Ami, S.; Xu, D.; Arcavi, I.; Gal-Yam, A.; Cenko, C. B.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of a new supernova in NGC 151. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  11. Discovering Associations Among Diagnosis Groups Using Topic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ding Cheng; Thermeau, Terry; Chute, Christopher; Liu, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid growth of electronic medical records (EMR), there is an increasing need of automatically extract patterns or rules from EMR data with machine learning and data mining technqiues. In this work, we applied unsupervised statistical model, latent Dirichlet allocations (LDA), to cluster patient diagnoics groups from Rochester Epidemiology Projects (REP). The initial results show that LDA holds the potential for broad application in epidemiogloy as well as other biomedical studies due to its unsupervised nature and great interpretive power. PMID:25954576

  12. Multiwavelength diagnostics for newly discovered PNe in the outer LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, W.; Parker, Q. A.

    2014-04-01

    We have extended our PNe survey to the outer ~64deg^2 of the LMC using maps from the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey (MCELS) and the UKST H-alpha and red surveys. Although the MCELS survey has poorer ~5 arcsecond resolution than the UKST survey, it has the advantage of additional narrow-band filters at H-alpha, [OIII] and [SII], providing improved diagnostic capabilities. The UKST survey has a similar angular resolution (~2 arcsec from 0.67 arcsec pixels) to our original median stacked map of the central 25deg^2 of the central LMC, but lacks the depth advantages provided by median stacking. Using these data to uncover new emission line candidates we have so far spectroscopically confirmed an extra 63 LMC PNe which we present here. We have also independently recovered and spectroscopically confirmed 107 of the 109 (98%) PNe that were previously known to exist in the outer LMC. The majority of our newly discovered and previously known PNe were confirmed using the AAOmega, multi-object fibre spectroscopy system on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) and the 6dF multi-object spectrograph on the UK Schmidt Telescope (UKST). These newly identified PNe were cross-checked using extant multi-wavelength imaging surveys in the near and mid-infrared in particular and against the latest emission-line ratio diagnostic plots for improved confidence in PNe identification. These new identifications raise the number of known PNe in the LMC to 715, approaching the number of 900 predicted by stellar evolutionary theory. We present accurate positions, diagnostic plots based on de-reddened emission lines, multi-wavelength SEDs and mid-infrared plots based on SAGE spitzer data.

  13. Encoded expansion: an efficient algorithm to discover identical string motifs.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Aqil M; Al-Ssulami, Abdulrakeeb

    2014-01-01

    A major task in computational biology is the discovery of short recurring string patterns known as motifs. Most of the schemes to discover motifs are either stochastic or combinatorial in nature. Stochastic approaches do not guarantee finding the correct motifs, while the combinatorial schemes tend to have an exponential time complexity with respect to motif length. To alleviate the cost, the combinatorial approach exploits dynamic data structures such as trees or graphs. Recently (Karci (2009) Efficient automatic exact motif discovery algorithms for biological sequences, Expert Systems with Applications 36:7952-7963) devised a deterministic algorithm that finds all the identical copies of string motifs of all sizes [Formula: see text] in theoretical time complexity of [Formula: see text] and a space complexity of [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] is the length of the input sequence and [Formula: see text] is the length of the longest possible string motif. In this paper, we present a significant improvement on Karci's original algorithm. The algorithm that we propose reports all identical string motifs of sizes [Formula: see text] that occur at least [Formula: see text] times. Our algorithm starts with string motifs of size 2, and at each iteration it expands the candidate string motifs by one symbol throwing out those that occur less than [Formula: see text] times in the entire input sequence. We use a simple array and data encoding to achieve theoretical worst-case time complexity of [Formula: see text] and a space complexity of [Formula: see text] Encoding of the substrings can speed up the process of comparison between string motifs. Experimental results on random and real biological sequences confirm that our algorithm has indeed a linear time complexity and it is more scalable in terms of sequence length than the existing algorithms. PMID:24871320

  14. Discovering discovery patterns with predication-based Semantic Indexing

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Trevor; Widdows, Dominic; Schvaneveldt, Roger W.; Davies, Peter; Rindflesch, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we utilize methods of hyperdimensional computing to mediate the identification of therapeutically useful connections for the purpose of literature-based discovery. Our approach, named Predication-based Semantic Indexing, is utilized to identify empirically sequences of relationships known as “discovery patterns”, such as “drug x INHIBITS substance y, substance y CAUSES disease z” that link pharmaceutical substances to diseases they are known to treat. These sequences are derived from semantic predications extracted from the biomedical literature by the SemRep system, and subsequently utilized to direct the search for known treatments for a held out set of diseases. Rapid and efficient inference is accomplished through the application of geometric operators in PSI space, allowing for both the derivation of discovery patterns from a large set of known TREATS relationships, and the application of these discovered patterns to constrain search for therapeutic relationships at scale. Our results include the rediscovery of discovery patterns that have been constructed manually by other authors in previous research, as well as the discovery of a set of previously unrecognized patterns. The application of these patterns to direct search through PSI space results in better recovery of therapeutic relationships than is accomplished with models based on distributional statistics alone. These results demonstrate the utility of efficient approximate inference in geometric space as a means to identify therapeutic relationships, suggesting a role of these methods in drug repurposing efforts. In addition, the results provide strong support for the utility of the discovery pattern approach pioneered by Hristovski and his colleagues. PMID:22841748

  15. Discovering Higgs Bosons of the MSSM using Jet Substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam; Roy, Tuhin S.; Spannowsky, Michael

    2010-06-01

    We present a qualitatively new approach to discover Higgs bosons of the MSSM at the LHC using jet substructure techniques applied to boosted Higgs decays. These techniques are ideally suited to the MSSM, since the lightest Higgs boson overwhelmingly decays to b{bar b} throughout the entire parameter space, while the heavier neutral Higgs bosons, if light enough to be produced in a cascade, also predominantly decay to b{bar b}. The Higgs production we consider arises from superpartner production where superpartners cascade decay into Higgs bosons. We study this mode of Higgs production for several superpartner hierarchies: m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}},{sub {tilde B}} > m{sub h} + {mu}; m{tilde q};m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}},{sub {tilde B}} > m {sub h,H,A} + {mu}; and m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}} > m{sub h} + {mu} with m{sub {tilde B}} {approx} {mu}. In these cascades, the Higgs bosons are boosted, with pT > 200 GeV a large fraction of the time. Since Higgs bosons appear in cascades originating from squarks and/or gluinos, the cross section for events with at least one Higgs boson can be the same order as squark/gluino production. Given 10 fb{sup -1} of 14 TeV LHC data, with m{sub {tilde q}} {approx}< 1 TeV, and one of the above superpartner mass hierarchies, our estimate of S{radical} B of the Higgs signal is sufficiently high that the b{bar b} mode can become the discovery mode of the lightest Higgs boson of the MSSM.

  16. Discovering discovery patterns with Predication-based Semantic Indexing.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Trevor; Widdows, Dominic; Schvaneveldt, Roger W; Davies, Peter; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we utilize methods of hyperdimensional computing to mediate the identification of therapeutically useful connections for the purpose of literature-based discovery. Our approach, named Predication-based Semantic Indexing, is utilized to identify empirically sequences of relationships known as "discovery patterns", such as "drug x INHIBITS substance y, substance y CAUSES disease z" that link pharmaceutical substances to diseases they are known to treat. These sequences are derived from semantic predications extracted from the biomedical literature by the SemRep system, and subsequently utilized to direct the search for known treatments for a held out set of diseases. Rapid and efficient inference is accomplished through the application of geometric operators in PSI space, allowing for both the derivation of discovery patterns from a large set of known TREATS relationships, and the application of these discovered patterns to constrain search for therapeutic relationships at scale. Our results include the rediscovery of discovery patterns that have been constructed manually by other authors in previous research, as well as the discovery of a set of previously unrecognized patterns. The application of these patterns to direct search through PSI space results in better recovery of therapeutic relationships than is accomplished with models based on distributional statistics alone. These results demonstrate the utility of efficient approximate inference in geometric space as a means to identify therapeutic relationships, suggesting a role of these methods in drug repurposing efforts. In addition, the results provide strong support for the utility of the discovery pattern approach pioneered by Hristovski and his colleagues.

  17. The Spy VI child: a newly discovered Neandertal infant.

    PubMed

    Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Rougier, Hélène; Maureille, Bruno; Higham, Thomas; van der Plicht, Johannes; De Clerck, Nora; Semal, Patrick

    2010-12-01

    Spy cave (Jemeppe-sur-Sambre, Belgium) is reputed for the two adult Neandertal individuals discovered in situ in 1886. Recent reassessment of the Spy collections has allowed direct radiocarbon dating of these individuals. The sorting of all of the faunal collections has also led to the discovery of the remains of a Neandertal child, Spy VI. This individual is represented by two mandibular corpus fragments. The left fragment is the most complete and both sides preserve the mental foramen. Four deciduous teeth are associated with these mandibular remains: three incisors and one canine. The lower left canine (Spy 645a) conjoins with the corresponding alveolar socket in the left part of the mandible. Following extant standards, the developmental stage of the preserved teeth indicate an age at death of about one and a half years. In addition to performing a classical morphometric comparative study of the mandible and teeth, we have evaluated the dental tissue proportions using high-resolution microtomographic techniques. Our results show that Spy VI generally falls within the Neandertal range of variation. However, this specimen also exhibits particular traits, notably in the dental internal structural organization, which reveals that variation in the immature Neandertal variation is larger than what was variation currently represented by the available fossil record. These observations demonstrate the need for investigating the frequency and expression of immature Neandertal traits in fossil anterior teeth, as well as their temporal and geographic variation. Direct radiocarbon dating of the Spy VI specimen has been conducted in two different laboratories. The results of Spy VI confirm the age previously determined for the two adults, making the Spy Neandertal remains the youngest ever directly dated in northwest Europe.

  18. Encoded Expansion: An Efficient Algorithm to Discover Identical String Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, Aqil M.; Al-Ssulami, Abdulrakeeb

    2014-01-01

    A major task in computational biology is the discovery of short recurring string patterns known as motifs. Most of the schemes to discover motifs are either stochastic or combinatorial in nature. Stochastic approaches do not guarantee finding the correct motifs, while the combinatorial schemes tend to have an exponential time complexity with respect to motif length. To alleviate the cost, the combinatorial approach exploits dynamic data structures such as trees or graphs. Recently (Karci (2009) Efficient automatic exact motif discovery algorithms for biological sequences, Expert Systems with Applications 36:7952–7963) devised a deterministic algorithm that finds all the identical copies of string motifs of all sizes in theoretical time complexity of and a space complexity of where is the length of the input sequence and is the length of the longest possible string motif. In this paper, we present a significant improvement on Karci's original algorithm. The algorithm that we propose reports all identical string motifs of sizes that occur at least times. Our algorithm starts with string motifs of size 2, and at each iteration it expands the candidate string motifs by one symbol throwing out those that occur less than times in the entire input sequence. We use a simple array and data encoding to achieve theoretical worst-case time complexity of and a space complexity of Encoding of the substrings can speed up the process of comparison between string motifs. Experimental results on random and real biological sequences confirm that our algorithm has indeed a linear time complexity and it is more scalable in terms of sequence length than the existing algorithms. PMID:24871320

  19. Encoded expansion: an efficient algorithm to discover identical string motifs.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Aqil M; Al-Ssulami, Abdulrakeeb

    2014-01-01

    A major task in computational biology is the discovery of short recurring string patterns known as motifs. Most of the schemes to discover motifs are either stochastic or combinatorial in nature. Stochastic approaches do not guarantee finding the correct motifs, while the combinatorial schemes tend to have an exponential time complexity with respect to motif length. To alleviate the cost, the combinatorial approach exploits dynamic data structures such as trees or graphs. Recently (Karci (2009) Efficient automatic exact motif discovery algorithms for biological sequences, Expert Systems with Applications 36:7952-7963) devised a deterministic algorithm that finds all the identical copies of string motifs of all sizes [Formula: see text] in theoretical time complexity of [Formula: see text] and a space complexity of [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] is the length of the input sequence and [Formula: see text] is the length of the longest possible string motif. In this paper, we present a significant improvement on Karci's original algorithm. The algorithm that we propose reports all identical string motifs of sizes [Formula: see text] that occur at least [Formula: see text] times. Our algorithm starts with string motifs of size 2, and at each iteration it expands the candidate string motifs by one symbol throwing out those that occur less than [Formula: see text] times in the entire input sequence. We use a simple array and data encoding to achieve theoretical worst-case time complexity of [Formula: see text] and a space complexity of [Formula: see text] Encoding of the substrings can speed up the process of comparison between string motifs. Experimental results on random and real biological sequences confirm that our algorithm has indeed a linear time complexity and it is more scalable in terms of sequence length than the existing algorithms.

  20. Discovering superconductors: A path to new science and higher Tc's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geballe, T. H.; Koster, Gertjan

    2005-08-01

    The search for superconductivity in new and unexpected structures has been ongoing since the initial discovery in Leiden over 9 decades ago. Though the successes are few the rewards are great. Our meeting here today is a direct result of Bednorz and Mueller's discovery of cuprate superconductivity [1]. The questions which have arisen as a result of this single discovery have uncovered inadequacies of theory and stimulated new ways of thinking. Understanding the mechanism(s) of high temperature superconductivity is among the foremost challenges of theoretical and experimental research today [2]. Searching for new superconductors has always been a fruitful research enterprise, and as we see, there are new opportunities for doing so today. For more than 4 decades after the initial discovery there was no microscopic theory (the most outstanding theorists from Heisenberg down tried and failed to come up with a satisfactory theory) and the experimental basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms was inadequate. It must have been a surprise for Kamerlingh Onnes, after taking care to use the purest Hg he could obtain in the investigation that led to the discovery of superconductivity, to find that ordinary solder was also superconducting. In 1932 Meissner discovered barely metallic copper sulfide was superconducting, while high conductivity copper itself was not superconducting. These puzzles and others like it suggested that a comprehensive search for new superconductors might reveal a pattern of occurrence that would reveal clues, and prompted John Hulm and Bernd Matthias, with encouragement from Enrico Fermi [3] in 1951 to undertake a full-scale effort to find new superconductors. This was a propitious time for such an undertaking for a number of reasons. Today parallel reasons exist.

  1. Genomic DNA enrichment using sequence capture microarrays: a novel approach to discover sequence nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Wayne E; Parkin, Isobel A; Gajardo, Humberto A; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Higgins, Erin; Sidebottom, Christine; Sharpe, Andrew G; Snowdon, Rod J; Federico, Maria L; Iniguez-Luy, Federico L

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genomic selection methodologies, or sequence capture, allow for DNA enrichment and large-scale resequencing and characterization of natural genetic variation in species with complex genomes, such as rapeseed canola (Brassica napus L., AACC, 2n=38). The main goal of this project was to combine sequence capture with next generation sequencing (NGS) to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in specific areas of the B. napus genome historically associated (via quantitative trait loci -QTL- analysis) to traits of agronomical and nutritional importance. A 2.1 million feature sequence capture platform was designed to interrogate DNA sequence variation across 47 specific genomic regions, representing 51.2 Mb of the Brassica A and C genomes, in ten diverse rapeseed genotypes. All ten genotypes were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences chemistry and to assess the effect of increased sequence depth, two genotypes were also sequenced using Illumina HiSeq chemistry. As a result, 589,367 potentially useful SNPs were identified. Analysis of sequence coverage indicated a four-fold increased representation of target regions, with 57% of the filtered SNPs falling within these regions. Sixty percent of discovered SNPs corresponded to transitions while 40% were transversions. Interestingly, fifty eight percent of the SNPs were found in genic regions while 42% were found in intergenic regions. Further, a high percentage of genic SNPs was found in exons (65% and 64% for the A and C genomes, respectively). Two different genotyping assays were used to validate the discovered SNPs. Validation rates ranged from 61.5% to 84% of tested SNPs, underpinning the effectiveness of this SNP discovery approach. Most importantly, the discovered SNPs were associated with agronomically important regions of the B. napus genome generating a novel data resource for research and breeding this crop species.

  2. Discovering motifs in ranked lists of DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Eden, Eran; Lipson, Doron; Yogev, Sivan; Yakhini, Zohar

    2007-03-23

    Computational methods for discovery of sequence elements that are enriched in a target set compared with a background set are fundamental in molecular biology research. One example is the discovery of transcription factor binding motifs that are inferred from ChIP-chip (chromatin immuno-precipitation on a microarray) measurements. Several major challenges in sequence motif discovery still require consideration: (i) the need for a principled approach to partitioning the data into target and background sets; (ii) the lack of rigorous models and of an exact p-value for measuring motif enrichment; (iii) the need for an appropriate framework for accounting for motif multiplicity; (iv) the tendency, in many of the existing methods, to report presumably significant motifs even when applied to randomly generated data. In this paper we present a statistical framework for discovering enriched sequence elements in ranked lists that resolves these four issues. We demonstrate the implementation of this framework in a software application, termed DRIM (discovery of rank imbalanced motifs), which identifies sequence motifs in lists of ranked DNA sequences. We applied DRIM to ChIP-chip and CpG methylation data and obtained the following results. (i) Identification of 50 novel putative transcription factor (TF) binding sites in yeast ChIP-chip data. The biological function of some of them was further investigated to gain new insights on transcription regulation networks in yeast. For example, our discoveries enable the elucidation of the network of the TF ARO80. Another finding concerns a systematic TF binding enhancement to sequences containing CA repeats. (ii) Discovery of novel motifs in human cancer CpG methylation data. Remarkably, most of these motifs are similar to DNA sequence elements bound by the Polycomb complex that promotes histone methylation. Our findings thus support a model in which histone methylation and CpG methylation are mechanistically linked. Overall, we

  3. Data mining algorithm for discovering matrix association regions (MARs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gautam B.; Krawetz, Shephan A.

    2000-04-01

    Lately, there has been considerable interest in applying Data Mining techniques to scientific and data analysis problems in bioinformatics. Data mining research is being fueled by novel application areas that are helping the development of newer applied algorithms in the field of bioinformatics, an emerging discipline representing the integration of biological and information sciences. This is a shift in paradigm from the earlier and the continuing data mining efforts in marketing research and support for business intelligence. The problem described in this paper is along a new dimension in DNA sequence analysis research and supplements the previously studied stochastic models for evolution and variability. The discovery of novel patterns from genetic databases as described is quite significant because biological patterns play an important role in a large variety of cellular processes and constitute the basis for gene therapy. Biological databases containing the genetic codes from a wide variety of organisms, including humans, have continued their exponential growth over the last decade. At the time of this writing, the GenBank database contains over 300 million sequences and over 2.5 billion characters of sequenced nucleotides. The focus of this paper is on developing a general data mining algorithm for discovering regions of locus control, i.e. those regions that are instrumental for determining cell type. One such type of element of locus control are the MARs or the Matrix Association Regions. Our limited knowledge about MARs has hampered their detection using classical pattern recognition techniques. Consequently, their detection is formulated by utilizing a statistical interestingness measure derived from a set of empirical features that are known to be associated with MARs. This paper presents a systematic approach for finding associations between such empirical features in genomic sequences, and for utilizing this knowledge to detect biologically interesting

  4. Astronomers Discover New Star-Forming Regions in Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Astronomers studying the Milky Way have discovered a large number of previously-unknown regions where massive stars are being formed. Their discovery provides important new information about the structure of our home Galaxy and promises to yield new clues about the chemical composition of the Galaxy. "We can clearly relate the locations of these star-forming sites to the overall structure of the Galaxy. Further studies will allow us to better understand the process of star formation and to compare the chemical composition of such sites at widely different distances from the Galaxy's center," said Thomas Bania, of Boston University. Bania worked with Loren Anderson of the Astrophysical Laboratory of Marseille in France, Dana Balser of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and Robert Rood of the University of Virginia. The scientists presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Miami, Florida. The star-forming regions the astronomers sought, called H II regions, are sites where hydrogen atoms are ionized, or stripped of their electrons, by the intense radiation of the massive, young stars. To find these regions hidden from visible-light detection by the Milky Way's gas and dust, the researchers used infrared and radio telescopes. "We found our targets by using the results of infrared surveys done with NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and of surveys done with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope," Anderson said. "Objects that appear bright in both the Spitzer and VLA images we studied are good candidates for H II regions," he explained. The astronomers then used the NSF's giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, an extremely sensitive radio telescope. With the GBT, they were able to detect specific radio frequencies emitted by electrons as they recombined with protons to form hydrogen. This evidence of recombination confirmed that the regions contained ionized

  5. Chandra Observations of Eight Sources Discovered by INTEGRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John A.; Krivonos, Roman; Wang, Qinan; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rahoui, Farid; Rodriguez, Jerome; Fornasini, Francesca M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on 0.3-10 keV observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of eight hard X-ray sources discovered within 8° of the Galactic plane by the International Gamma-ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite. The short (˜5 ks) Chandra observations of the IGR source fields have yielded very likely identifications of X-ray counterparts for three of the IGR sources: IGR J14091-6108, IGR J18088-2741, and IGR J18381-0924. The first two have very hard spectra in the Chandra band that can be described by a power law with photon indices of Γ = 0.6 ± 0.4 and -{0.7}-0.3+0.4, respectively (90% confidence errors are given), and both have a unique near-IR counterpart consistent with the Chandra position. IGR J14091-6108 also displays a strong iron line and a relatively low X-ray luminosity, and we argue that the most likely source type is a cataclysmic variable (CV), although we do not completely rule out the possibility of a high mass X-ray binary. IGR J18088-2741 has an optical counterpart with a previously measured 6.84 hr periodicity, which may be the binary orbital period. We also detect five cycles of a possible 800-950 s period in the Chandra light curve, which may be the compact object spin period. We suggest that IGR J18088-2741 is also most likely a CV. For IGR J18381-0924, the spectrum is intrinsically softer with {{Γ }}={1.5}-0.4+0.5, and it is moderately absorbed, NH = (4 ± 1) × 1022 cm-2. There are two near-IR sources consistent with the Chandra position, and they are both classified as galaxies, making it likely that IGR J18381-0924 is an active galactic nucleus. For the other five IGR sources, we provide lists of nearby Chandra sources, which may be used along with further observations to identify the correct counterparts, and we discuss the implications of the low inferred Chandra count rates for these five sources.

  6. Three Novel Virophage Genomes Discovered from Yellowstone Lake Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jinglie; Sun, Dawei; Childers, Alyson; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virophages are a unique group of circular double-stranded DNA viruses that are considered parasites of giant DNA viruses, which in turn are known to infect eukaryotic hosts. In this study, the genomes of three novel Yellowstone Lake virophages (YSLVs)—YSLV5, YSLV6, and YSLV7—were identified from Yellowstone Lake through metagenomic analyses. The relative abundance of these three novel virophages and previously identified Yellowstone Lake virophages YSLV1 to -4 were determined in different locations of the lake, revealing that most of the sampled locations in the lake, including both mesophilic and thermophilic habitats, had multiple virophage genotypes. This likely reflects the diverse habitats or diversity of the eukaryotic hosts and their associated giant viruses that serve as putative hosts for these virophages. YSLV5 has a 29,767-bp genome with 32 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), YSLV6 has a 24,837-bp genome with 29 predicted ORFs, and YSLV7 has a 23,193-bp genome with 26 predicted ORFs. Based on multilocus phylogenetic analysis, YSLV6 shows a close evolutionary relationship with YSLV1 to -4, whereas YSLV5 and YSLV7 are distantly related to the others, and YSLV7 represents the fourth novel virophage lineage. In addition, the genome of YSLV5 has a G+C content of 51.1% that is much higher than all other known virophages, indicating a unique host range for YSLV5. These results suggest that virophages are abundant and have diverse genotypes that likely mirror diverse giant viral and eukaryotic hosts within the Yellowstone Lake ecosystem. IMPORTANCE This study discovered novel virophages present within the Yellowstone Lake ecosystem using a conserved major capsid protein as a phylogenetic anchor for assembly of sequence reads from Yellowstone Lake metagenomic samples. The three novel virophage genomes (YSLV5 to -7) were completed by identifying specific environmental samples containing these respective virophages, and closing gaps by targeted PCR

  7. The Most Distant Object Yet Discovered in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    ESO's Very Large Telescope has shown that a faint gamma-ray burst detected last Thursday is the signature of the explosion of the earliest, most distant known object in the Universe (a redshift of 8.2). The explosion apparently took place more than 13 billion years ago, only about 600 million years after the Big Bang. ESO PR Photo 17a/09 Artist's impression of a gamma-ray burst Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous amount of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events in the Universe. They are thought to be mostly associated with the explosion of stars that collapse into black holes. The gamma-ray burst GRB 090423 was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite during the morning (CEST) of Thursday 23 April 2009. The 10 second burst was located in the constellation of Leo (the Lion). It was soon being followed by a whole range of telescopes on the ground, including the 2.2-metre ESO/MPG telescope at La Silla and ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal, both in Chile. VLT infrared observations, made 17 hours after the burst detection, allowed astronomers to establish the distance to the explosion. "We find that the light coming from the explosion has been stretched, or redshifted, considerably by the expansion of the Universe", says Nial Tanvir, the leader of the team who made the VLT observations. "With a redshift of 8.2 this is the most remote gamma-ray burst ever detected, and also the most distant object ever discovered -- by some way." Because light moves at a finite speed, looking farther into the Universe means looking back in time. The explosion occurred when the Universe was about 600 million years old, less than 5 percent of its current age. It is believed that the very first stars only formed when the Universe was between 200 and 400 million years old. "This discovery proves the importance of gamma-ray bursts in probing the

  8. Despite Appearances, Cosmic Explosions Have Common Origin, Astronomers Discover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    A Fourth of July fireworks display features bright explosions that light the sky with different colors, yet all have the same cause. They just put their explosive energy into different colors of light. Similarly, astronomers have discovered, a variety of bright cosmic explosions all have the same origin and the same amount of total energy. This is the conclusion of an international team of astronomers that used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to study the closest known gamma-ray burst earlier this year. Artist's conception of burst Artist's Conception of Twin Jets in Energetic Cosmic Explosion CREDIT: Dana Berry, SkyWorks Digital (Click on Image for Larger Version) "For some reason we don't yet understand, these explosions put greatly varying percentages of their explosive energy into the gamma-ray portion of their output," said Dale Frail, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. That means, he said, that both strong and weak gamma-ray bursts, along with X-ray flashes, which emit almost no gamma rays, are just different forms of the same cosmic beast. The research team reported their results in the November 13 issue of the scientific journal Nature. The scientists trained the VLA on a gamma-ray burst discovered using NASA's HETE-2 satellite last March 29. This burst, dubbed GRB 030329, was the closest such burst yet seen, about 2.6 billion light-years from Earth. Because of this relative proximity, the burst was bright, with visible light from its explosion reaching a level that could be seen in amateur telescopes. As the burst faded, astronomers noted an underlying distinctive signature of a supernova explosion, confirming that the event was associated with the death of a massive star. Since 1999, astronomers have known that the strong outbursts of gamma rays, X-rays, visible light and radio waves from these bursts form beams, like those from a flashlight, rather than spreading in all directions

  9. LHS 6343 C: A TRANSITING FIELD BROWN DWARF DISCOVERED BY THE KEPLER MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, John Asher; Crepp, Justin R.; Morton, Timothy D.; Apps, Kevin; Gazak, J. Zachary; Crossfield, Ian J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoff W.; Chubak, Carly; Isaacson, Howard

    2011-04-01

    We report the discovery of a brown dwarf that transits one member of the M+M binary system LHS 6343 AB every 12.71 days. The transits were discovered using photometric data from the Kepler public data release. The LHS 6343 stellar system was previously identified as a single high proper motion M dwarf. We use adaptive optics imaging to resolve the system into two low-mass stars with masses 0.370 {+-} 0.009 M{sub sun} and 0.30 {+-} 0.01 M{sub sun}, respectively, and a projected separation of 0.''55. High-resolution spectroscopy shows that the more massive component undergoes Doppler variations consistent with Keplerian motion, with a period equal to the transit period and an amplitude consistent with a companion mass of M{sub C} = 62.7 {+-} 2.4 M{sub Jup}. Based on our analysis of the transit light curve, we estimate the radius of the companion to be R{sub C} = 0.833 {+-} 0.021 R{sub Jup}, which is consistent with theoretical predictions of the radius of a >1 Gyr brown dwarf.

  10. Psychotherapy and moralising rhetoric in Galen's newly discovered Avoiding Distress (Peri Alypias).

    PubMed

    Xenophontos, Sophia

    2014-10-01

    In this article, I examine Galen's credentials as an ethical philosopher on the basis of his recently discovered essay Avoiding Distress (Peri alypias). As compensation for the scholarly neglect from which Galen's ethics suffers, I argue that his moral agenda is an essential part of his philosophical discourse, one that situates him firmly within the tradition of practical ethics of the Roman period. Galen's engagement with Stoic psychotherapy and the Platonic-Aristotelian educational model affirms his ethical authority; on the other hand, his distinctive moralising features such as the autobiographical perspective of his narrative and the intimacy between author and addressee render his Avoiding Distress exceptional among other essays, Greek or Latin, treating anxiety. Additionally, I show that Galen's self-projection as a therapist of the emotions corresponds to his role as a practising physician, especially as regards the construction of authority, the efficacy of his therapy and the importance of personal experience as attested in his medical accounts. Finally, the diligence with which Galen retextures his moral advice in his On the Affections and Errors of the Soul - a work of different nature and intent in relation to Avoiding Distress - is a testimony to the dynamics of his ethics and more widely to his philosophical medicine. The philosopher's lecture room is a 'hospital': you ought not to walk out of it in a state of pleasure, but in pain; for you are not in good condition when you arrive. Epictetus, Discourses 3.23.30.

  11. Photographs and Committees: Activities That Help Students Discover Permutations and Combinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szydlik, Jennifer Earles

    2000-01-01

    Presents problem situations that support students when discovering the multiplication principle, permutations, combinations, Pascal's triangle, and relationships among those objects in a concrete context. (ASK)

  12. Planetary dreams : the quest to discover life beyond earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Robert

    1999-03-01

    The Quest To Discover Life Beyond Earth. "The 'dreams' that I write of are not the usual ones, the images that come up in our minds involuntarily during certain stages of sleep, but rather the hopes and expectations that we have lavished upon other worlds around us."-from the Preface. The surprisingly long history of debate over extraterrestrial life is full of marvelous visions of what life "out there" might be like, as well as remarkable stories of alleged sightings and heated disputes about the probability that life might actually have arisen more than once. In Planetary Dreams, acclaimed author Robert Shapiro explores this rich history of dreams and debates in search of the best current answers to the most elusive and compelling of all questions: Are we alone? In his pursuit, he presents three contrasting views regarding how life might have started: through Divine Creation, by a highly unlikely stroke of luck, or by the inevitable process of a natural law that he terms the Life Principle. We are treated to a lively fictional dinner debate among the leading proponents of these schools of thought-with the last named group arguing that life has almost surely formed in many places throughout the universe, and the others that life may well be entirely unique to our own blue planet. To set the stage for a deep exploration of the question, the author then leads us on a fantastic journey through the museum of the cosmos, an imagined building that holds models of the universe at different degrees of magnification. We then journey deep into inner space to view the astonishingly intricate life of a single cell, and learn why the origin of such a complex object from simple chemical mixtures poses one of the most profound enigmas known to science. Writing in a wonderfully entertaining style, Shapiro then reviews the competing theories about the start of life on Earth, and suggests the debate may best be settled by finding signs of life on the other worlds of our solar

  13. Astronomers Discover First Negatively-charged Molecule in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Cambridge, MA - Astronomers have discovered the first negatively charged molecule in space, identifying it from radio signals that were a mystery until now. While about 130 neutral and 14 positively charged molecules are known to exist in interstellar space, this is the first negative molecule, or anion, to be found. "We've spotted a rare and exotic species, like the white tiger of space," said astronomer Michael McCarthy of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). By learning more about the rich broth of chemicals found in interstellar space, astronomers hope to explain how the young Earth converted these basic ingredients into the essential chemicals for life. This new finding helps to advance scientists' understanding of the chemistry of the interstellar medium, and hence the birthplaces of planets. McCarthy worked with CfA colleagues Carl Gottlieb, Harshal Gupta (also from the Univ. of Texas), and Patrick Thaddeus to identify the molecular anion known as C6H-: a linear chain of six carbon atoms with one hydrogen atom at the end and an "extra" electron. Such molecules were thought to be extremely rare because ultraviolet light that suffuses space easily knocks electrons off molecules. The large size of C6H-, larger than most neutral and all positive molecules known in space, may increase its stability in the harsh cosmic environment. "The discovery of C6H- resolves a long-standing enigma in astrochemistry: the apparent lack of negatively charged molecules in space," stated Thaddeus. The team first conducted laboratory experiments to determine exactly what radio frequencies to use in their search. Then, they used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to hunt for C6H- in celestial objects. In particular, they targeted locations in which previous searches had spotted unidentified radio signals at the appropriate frequencies. They found C6H- in two very different locations-a shell of gas surrounding the evolved red giant

  14. DISCOVER-AQ: an innovative approach to study the vertical distribution of air quality constituents in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisthaler, Armin; Crawford, James H.; Müller, Markus; Mikoviny, Tomas; Cady-Pereira, Karen E.

    2014-05-01

    DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) is a multi-year NASA research project to improve remote sensing of air quality from space. Satellite-based measurements of air pollutants typically provide information integrated over the total atmospheric column while it is the lowermost part of the atmosphere that is of interest from a public health perspective. DISCOVER-AQ has implemented a new field observation strategy to collect a comprehensive dataset on the vertical distribution of air pollutants in the atmosphere. In situ measurements from the NASA P-3B Airborne Science Laboratory generate profile information of air quality constituents over a set of selected ground monitoring sites. Ground and profile information is tied to column information collected by active and passive remote sensors looking downward from a second King Air aircraft flying higher in the atmosphere above the P-3B. Vertical profiles of air pollutants are measured repetitively during different times of the day and under different meteorological conditions occurring in the timeframe of 1-month field campaigns. Targeted regions in the U.S. affected by poor air quality include the Washington/Baltimore metropolitan area (June/July 2011), the San Joaquin Valley in California (January/February 2013), the Houston metropolitan area (September 2013) and the Northern Front Range area in Colorado (June/July 2014). Herein, we will present the DISCOVER-AQ project to the European community and show preliminary analyses of the obtained data. The latter will focus on non-methane hydrocarbons and ammonia, being the species measured by our newly developed airborne PTR-ToF-MS instrument (see session AS4.17). In situ ammonia data collected over the San Joaquin Valley are in promising agreement with satellite data obtained from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). Web site: http://discover-aq.larc.nasa.gov/ Funding

  15. Extrasolar Planet in Double Star System Discovered from La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    Early Success With New Swiss Telescope During the past three years, about fifteen planetary companions have been discovered in orbits around dwarf stars. They have revealed to astrophysicists a broad diversity of planetary systems at other stars. Giant planets with masses ranging from half to several times the mass of Jupiter, the largest planet in our own solar system, have been detected with various telescopes. The orbital periods range from 3.1 to 1650 days; while some of the orbits are of circular shape, others are very elongated. The observed diversity naturally raises questions about how these exoplanets are formed. Now, following only a few months of observations, a Swiss team of astronomers [1], working with a new Swiss astronomical facility at the ESO La Silla Observatory mainly dedicated to the search for exoplanets, has made its first planetary detection. It is a massive planet moving in an almost circular orbit around a nearby star that is itself the primary component of a double star system. The Geneva southern extrasolar planet search programme ESO PR Photo 45a/98 ESO PR Photo 45a/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 640 pix - 456k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 2400 pix - 2.7Mb] ESO PR Photo 45b/98 ESO PR Photo 45b/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 953 pix - 296k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 3572 pix - 2.3Mb] PR Photo 45a/98 (left) is a view of the dome with the 1.2-m Swiss Leonard Euler Telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. The telescope itself is shown in Photo 45b/98 (right). In June 1998, the CORALIE echelle spectrograph was mounted at the 1.2-m Swiss telescope at La Silla and the commissioning phase was begun, during which the telescope and the spectrograph would be trimmed to perfection. This facility is specifically designed for high-precision radial-velocity measurements and it will mostly be used for an ambitious search for large extrasolar planets around stars in the southern celestial hemisphere. Over 1000 stars will be investigated. Such a vast observational

  16. Discovering biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries for information retrieval and database curation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Identifying relevant papers from the literature is a common task in biocuration. Most current biomedical literature search systems primarily rely on matching user keywords. Semantic search, on the other hand, seeks to improve search accuracy by understanding the entities and contextual relations in user keywords. However, past research has mostly focused on semantically identifying biological entities (e.g. chemicals, diseases and genes) with little effort on discovering semantic relations. In this work, we aim to discover biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries in an automated and unsupervised fashion. Specifically, we focus on extracting and understanding the contextual information (or context patterns) that is used by PubMed users to represent semantic relations between entities such as ‘CHEMICAL-1 compared to CHEMICAL-2.’ With the advances in automatic named entity recognition, we first tag entities in PubMed queries and then use tagged entities as knowledge to recognize pattern semantics. More specifically, we transform PubMed queries into context patterns involving participating entities, which are subsequently projected to latent topics via latent semantic analysis (LSA) to avoid the data sparseness and specificity issues. Finally, we mine semantically similar contextual patterns or semantic relations based on LSA topic distributions. Our two separate evaluation experiments of chemical-chemical (CC) and chemical–disease (CD) relations show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms a baseline method, which simply measures pattern semantics by similarity in participating entities. The highest performance achieved by our approach is nearly 0.9 and 0.85 respectively for the CC and CD task when compared against the ground truth in terms of normalized discounted cumulative gain (nDCG), a standard measure of ranking quality. These results suggest that our approach can effectively identify and return related semantic patterns in a ranked

  17. Discovering biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries for information retrieval and database curation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Identifying relevant papers from the literature is a common task in biocuration. Most current biomedical literature search systems primarily rely on matching user keywords. Semantic search, on the other hand, seeks to improve search accuracy by understanding the entities and contextual relations in user keywords. However, past research has mostly focused on semantically identifying biological entities (e.g. chemicals, diseases and genes) with little effort on discovering semantic relations. In this work, we aim to discover biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries in an automated and unsupervised fashion. Specifically, we focus on extracting and understanding the contextual information (or context patterns) that is used by PubMed users to represent semantic relations between entities such as 'CHEMICAL-1 compared to CHEMICAL-2' With the advances in automatic named entity recognition, we first tag entities in PubMed queries and then use tagged entities as knowledge to recognize pattern semantics. More specifically, we transform PubMed queries into context patterns involving participating entities, which are subsequently projected to latent topics via latent semantic analysis (LSA) to avoid the data sparseness and specificity issues. Finally, we mine semantically similar contextual patterns or semantic relations based on LSA topic distributions. Our two separate evaluation experiments of chemical-chemical (CC) and chemical-disease (CD) relations show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms a baseline method, which simply measures pattern semantics by similarity in participating entities. The highest performance achieved by our approach is nearly 0.9 and 0.85 respectively for the CC and CD task when compared against the ground truth in terms of normalized discounted cumulative gain (nDCG), a standard measure of ranking quality. These results suggest that our approach can effectively identify and return related semantic patterns in a ranked order

  18. A new method for discovering behavior patterns among animal movements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.; Luo, Ze; Takekawa, J.; Prosser, Diann J.; Xiong, Y.; Newman, S.; Xiao, X.; Batbayar, N.; Spragens, Kyle A; Balachandran, S.; Yan, B.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced satellite tracking technologies enable biologists to track animal movements at fine spatial and temporal scales. The resultant data present opportunities and challenges for understanding animal behavioral mechanisms. In this paper, we develop a new method to elucidate animal movement patterns from tracking data. Here, we propose the notion of continuous behavior patterns as a concise representation of popular migration routes and underlying sequential behaviors during migration. Each stage in the pattern is characterized in terms of space (i.e., the places traversed during movements) and time (i.e. the time spent in those places); that is, the behavioral state corresponding to a stage is inferred according to the spatiotemporal and sequential context. Hence, the pattern may be interpreted predictably. We develop a candidate generation and refinement framework to derive all continuous behavior patterns from raw trajectories. In the framework, we first define the representative spots to denote the underlying potential behavioral states that are extracted from individual trajectories according to the similarity of relaxed continuous locations in certain distinct time intervals. We determine the common behaviors of multiple individuals according to the spatiotemporal proximity of representative spots and apply a projection-based extension approach to generate candidate sequential behavior sequences as candidate patterns. Finally, the candidate generation procedure is combined with a refinement procedure to derive continuous behavior patterns. We apply an ordered processing strategy to accelerate candidate refinement. The proposed patterns and discovery framework are evaluated through conceptual experiments on both real GPS-tracking and large synthetic datasets.

  19. A new method for discovering behavior patterns among animal movements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwei; Luo, Ze; Takekawa, John; Prosser, Diann; Xiong, Yan; Newman, Scott; Xiao, Xiangming; Batbayar, Nyambayar; Spragens, Kyle; Balachandran, Sivananinthaperumal; Yan, Baoping

    2016-01-01

    Advanced satellite tracking technologies enable biologists to track animal movements at fine spatial and temporal scales. The resultant data present opportunities and challenges for understanding animal behavioral mechanisms. In this paper, we develop a new method to elucidate animal movement patterns from tracking data. Here, we propose the notion of continuous behavior patterns as a concise representation of popular migration routes and underlying sequential behaviors during migration. Each stage in the pattern is characterized in terms of space (i.e., the places traversed during movements) and time (i.e. the time spent in those places); that is, the behavioral state corresponding to a stage is inferred according to the spatiotemporal and sequential context. Hence, the pattern may be interpreted predictably. We develop a candidate generation and refinement framework to derive all continuous behavior patterns from raw trajectories. In the framework, we first define the representative spots to denote the underlying potential behavioral states that are extracted from individual trajectories according to the similarity of relaxed continuous locations in certain distinct time intervals. We determine the common behaviors of multiple individuals according to the spatiotemporal proximity of representative spots and apply a projection-based extension approach to generate candidate sequential behavior sequences as candidate patterns. Finally, the candidate generation procedure is combined with a refinement procedure to derive continuous behavior patterns. We apply an ordered processing strategy to accelerate candidate refinement. The proposed patterns and discovery framework are evaluated through conceptual experiments on both real GPS-tracking and large synthetic datasets. PMID:27217810

  20. Discovering NOAA Climate Data and Product Services (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, R.; Ansari, S.; Reid, G.

    2009-12-01

    The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) archives climate data for the US and the world. These data are provided through traditional web systems as well as web services. The web service implementation follows standards set by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Simple object access protocol (SOAP) and representational state transfer (REST) are the two types of services provided. Provision of many data and product services from multiple organizations presents consumers with the difficulty of discovery. Standards based collection level metadata describe these data and products. This information delivered using a catalog service (CSW) in combination with an ontology service provides a robust mechanism for data discovery. Service endpoints or clients that use service endpoints are embedded within the metadata providing customers with tools to access and interrogate the fine details of the data. These technologies are demonstrated in current NCDC projects such as NOAA Climate Services Portal (NCSP), National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Pacific Climate Information System (PaCIS) and work with the Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Science (CUAHSI).

  1. Chandra Discovers Eruption and Pulsation in Nova Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered a giant outburst of X-rays and unusual cyclical pulsing from a white dwarf star that is closely orbiting another star -- the first time either of these phenomena has been seen in X-rays. The observations are helping scientists better understand the thermonuclear explosions that occur in certain binary star systems. The observations of Nova Aquilae were reported today at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium by an international team led by Sumner Starrfield of Arizona State University. "We found two important results in our Chandra observations. The first was an underlying pulsation every 40 minutes in the X-ray brightness, which we believe comes from the cyclical expansion and contraction of the outer layers of the white dwarf," said Starrfield. "The other result was an enormous flare of X-rays that lasted for 15 minutes. Nothing like this has been seen before from a nova, and we don't know how to explain it." Novas occur on a white dwarf (a star which used up all its nuclear fuel and shrank to roughly the size of the Earth) that is orbiting a normal size star. Strong gravity tides drag hydrogen gas off the normal star and onto the white dwarf, where it can take more than 100,000 years for enough hydrogen to accumulate to ignite nuclear fusion reactions. Gradually, these reactions intensify until a cosmic-sized hydrogen bomb blast results. The outer layers of the white dwarf are then blown away, producing a nova outburst that can be observed for a period of months to years as the material expands into space. "Chandra has allowed us to see deep into the gases ejected by this giant explosion and extract unparalleled information on the evolution of the white dwarf whose surface is exploding," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The brightening of Nova Aquilae was first detected by optical astronomers in December 1999. "Although this star is at a distance of more than 6

  2. Extrasolar Planet in Double Star System Discovered from La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    Early Success With New Swiss Telescope During the past three years, about fifteen planetary companions have been discovered in orbits around dwarf stars. They have revealed to astrophysicists a broad diversity of planetary systems at other stars. Giant planets with masses ranging from half to several times the mass of Jupiter, the largest planet in our own solar system, have been detected with various telescopes. The orbital periods range from 3.1 to 1650 days; while some of the orbits are of circular shape, others are very elongated. The observed diversity naturally raises questions about how these exoplanets are formed. Now, following only a few months of observations, a Swiss team of astronomers [1], working with a new Swiss astronomical facility at the ESO La Silla Observatory mainly dedicated to the search for exoplanets, has made its first planetary detection. It is a massive planet moving in an almost circular orbit around a nearby star that is itself the primary component of a double star system. The Geneva southern extrasolar planet search programme ESO PR Photo 45a/98 ESO PR Photo 45a/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 640 pix - 456k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 2400 pix - 2.7Mb] ESO PR Photo 45b/98 ESO PR Photo 45b/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 953 pix - 296k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 3572 pix - 2.3Mb] PR Photo 45a/98 (left) is a view of the dome with the 1.2-m Swiss Leonard Euler Telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. The telescope itself is shown in Photo 45b/98 (right). In June 1998, the CORALIE echelle spectrograph was mounted at the 1.2-m Swiss telescope at La Silla and the commissioning phase was begun, during which the telescope and the spectrograph would be trimmed to perfection. This facility is specifically designed for high-precision radial-velocity measurements and it will mostly be used for an ambitious search for large extrasolar planets around stars in the southern celestial hemisphere. Over 1000 stars will be investigated. Such a vast observational

  3. Chandra Discovers "Rivers Of Gravity" That Define Cosmic Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-07-01

    NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered part of an intergalactic web of hot gas and dark matter that contains most of the material in the universe. The hot gas, which appears to lie like a fog in channels carved by rivers of gravity, has been hidden from view since the time galaxies formed. “The Chandra observations, together with ultraviolet observations, are a major advance in our understanding of how the universe evolved over the last 10 billion years,” said Fabrizio Nicastro of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Mass. and head of one of the teams of scientists involved in the discovery. Four independent teams of scientists, whose results appear as separate papers in The Astrophysical Journal, used Chandra to detect intergalactic gas with temperatures ranging from 300,000 to 5 million degrees Celsius. This gas forms part of a gigantic system of hot gas and dark matter that defines the cosmic landscape. The gaseous component alone contains more material than all the stars in the universe. “We had strong suspicions from the Big Bang theory and observations of the early universe that this gas exists in the present era, but like a stealth aircraft it had eluded our detection,” said Claude Canizares of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), who along with Taotao Fang, led of one of the teams. The hot gas detected by Chandra can be used to trace the presence of the more massive dark matter component. The discovery of the hot gas may eventually enable astronomers to map of the distribution of dark matter in the universe and perhaps understand its origin. Ultraviolet telescopes had detected cooler components of the hot gas system, but because of its high temperatures most of it is detectable only with an extremely sensitive X-ray telescope. The various groups used two techniques to probe the intergalactic gas. One method uses the absorbing effects of the gas on X-rays from distant galaxies. On their way to

  4. Scientists discover massive jet streams flowing inside the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    the Earth. The Stanford research team has been viewing the Sun's surface with one of these instruments called a Michelson Doppler Imager that can measure the vertical motion of the Sun's surface at one million different points once per minute. The measurements show the effects of sound waves that permeate the interior. The researchers then apply techniques similar to Earth based seismology and computer aided tomography to infer and map the flow patterns and temperature beneath the Sun's roiling surface. "These techniques allow us to peer inside the Sun using sound waves, much like a doctor can look inside a pregnant woman with a sonogram," said Dr. Schou. Currently, the Stanford scientists have both identified new structures in the interior of the Sun and clarified the form of previously discovered ones. Understanding their relationship to solar activity will require more observations and time for analysis. "At this point, we do not know whether the plasma streams snake around like the jet stream on Earth, or whether it is a less dynamic feature," said Dr. Douglas Gough, of Cambridge University, UK. "It is intriguing to speculate that these streams may affect solar weather like the terrestrial jetstream impacts weather patterns on Earth, but this is completely unclear right now. The same speculation may apply to the other flows we've observed, or they may act in concert. It will be especially helpful to make observations as the Sun enters its next active cycle, expected to peak around the year 2001." NOTE TO EDITORS: Images to support this story and further information are available from : ESA Public Relations Division Tel: +33.1(0)53.69.7155 Fax: +33.1(0)53.69.7690 The images also can be found at the following Internet address: http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/

  5. Scientists discover massive jet streams flowing inside the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-08-01

    the Earth. The Stanford research team has been viewing the Sun's surface with one of these instruments called a Michelson Doppler Imager that can measure the vertical motion of the Sun's surface at one million different points once per minute. The measurements show the effects of sound waves that permeate the interior. The researchers then apply techniques similar to Earth based seismology and computer aided tomography to infer and map the flow patterns and temperature beneath the Sun's roiling surface. "These techniques allow us to peer inside the Sun using sound waves, much like a doctor can look inside a pregnant woman with a sonogram," said Dr. Schou. Currently, the Stanford scientists have both identified new structures in the interior of the Sun and clarified the form of previously discovered ones. Understanding their relationship to solar activity will require more observations and time for analysis. "At this point, we do not know whether the plasma streams snake around like the jet stream on Earth, or whether it is a less dynamic feature," said Dr. Douglas Gough, of Cambridge University, UK. "It is intriguing to speculate that these streams may affect solar weather like the terrestrial jetstream impacts weather patterns on Earth, but this is completely unclear right now. The same speculation may apply to the other flows we've observed, or they may act in concert. It will be especially helpful to make observations as the Sun enters its next active cycle, expected to peak around the year 2001." NOTE TO EDITORS: Images to support this story and further information are available from : ESA Public Relations Division Tel: +33.1(0)53.69.7155 Fax: +33.1(0)53.69.7690 The images also can be found at the following Internet address: http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/

  6. Astronomers Discover Most Massive Neutron Star Yet Known

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have discovered the most massive neutron star yet found, a discovery with strong and wide-ranging impacts across several fields of physics and astrophysics. "This neutron star is twice as massive as our Sun. This is surprising, and that much mass means that several theoretical models for the internal composition of neutron stars now are ruled out," said Paul Demorest, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This mass measurement also has implications for our understanding of all matter at extremely high densities and many details of nuclear physics," he added. Neutron stars are the superdense "corpses" of massive stars that have exploded as supernovae. With all their mass packed into a sphere the size of a small city, their protons and electrons are crushed together into neutrons. A neutron star can be several times more dense than an atomic nucleus, and a thimbleful of neutron-star material would weigh more than 500 million tons. This tremendous density makes neutron stars an ideal natural "laboratory" for studying the most dense and exotic states of matter known to physics. The scientists used an effect of Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity to measure the mass of the neutron star and its orbiting companion, a white dwarf star. The neutron star is a pulsar, emitting lighthouse-like beams of radio waves that sweep through space as it rotates. This pulsar, called PSR J1614-2230, spins 317 times per second, and the companion completes an orbit in just under nine days. The pair, some 3,000 light-years distant, are in an orbit seen almost exactly edge-on from Earth. That orientation was the key to making the mass measurement. As the orbit carries the white dwarf directly in front of the pulsar, the radio waves from the pulsar that reach Earth must travel very close to the white dwarf. This close passage causes them to be delayed in their arrival by the distortion of

  7. 32 CFR 644.533 - Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale. 644.533 Section 644.533 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF... Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements § 644.533 Contamination discovered...

  8. 32 CFR 644.533 - Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale. 644.533 Section 644.533 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF... Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements § 644.533 Contamination discovered...

  9. Receiving and Discovering Information: Two Role-Playing Simulations of the World War I Conscription Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarlane, John

    1999-01-01

    Proposes two approaches to using role-playing in the history classroom: (1) providing factual information to the students; and (2) allowing them to discover the experiences of historical actors. Expounds that the recommended role-playing simulations help students discover why Canadians were divided over the conscription issue in World War I. (CMK)

  10. The Use of a Performance Assessment for Identifying Gifted Lebanese Students: Is DISCOVER Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of DISCOVER, a performance- based assessment in identifying gifted Lebanese students. The sample consisted of 248 students (121 boys, 127 girls) from Grades 3-5 at two private schools in Beirut, Lebanon. Students were administered DISCOVER and the Raven Standard Progressive Matrices…

  11. DISCOVER-AQ Ground Remote Sensing TraceGas Data (ICT)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-07

    ... N/A Platform:  Ground-based Pandora Network Spatial Coverage:  36.88N, (-77.59, -74.71) ... Relevant Documents:  DISCOVER-AQ - Airborne Science Data for Atmospheric Composition DISCOVER-AQ - NASA Earth ...

  12. 32 CFR 644.533 - Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale. 644.533 Section 644.533 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF... Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements § 644.533 Contamination discovered...

  13. 32 CFR 644.533 - Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale. 644.533 Section 644.533 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF... Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements § 644.533 Contamination discovered...

  14. 32 CFR 644.533 - Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Contamination discovered after return of land to owner, or sale. 644.533 Section 644.533 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF... Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements § 644.533 Contamination discovered...

  15. Discovering "The Italian Flag" by Fernando Melani (1907-1985).

    PubMed

    Carlesi, Serena; Bartolozzi, Giovanni; Cucci, Costanza; Marchiafava, Veronica; Picollo, Marcello; La Nasa, Jacopo; Di Girolamo, Francesca; Dilillo, Marialaura; Modugno, Francesca; Degano, Ilaria; Colombini, Maria Perla; Legnaioli, Stefano; Lorenzetti, Giulia; Palleschi, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    In the occasion of the celebrations for the 150th anniversary of the founding of Italy (1861-2011), it was decided to analyse the artwork "The Italian Flag" (La Bandiera Italiana) created by the artist Fernando Melani (Pistoia, 1907-1985), one of the precursors of the Poor Art artistic movement in Italy. This project is a follow-up to a previous study which was mainly focused on the pigments and dyes found in his home-studio. The main goal of this paper is to identify a correct diagnostic plan, based on the use of a combination of non-invasive and micro-invasive methodologies, in order to determine the state of preservation and define the best conservation procedures for a contemporary artwork. Visible, infrared and infrared false colour images as well as the Fibre Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) technique were applied in situ to analyse The Italian Flag. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and micro-Raman spectroscopies, Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS), High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Diode Arrays Detection (HPLC-DAD) and Mass Spectrometric Detection (HPLC-ESI-Q-ToF) were all applied to three small samples detached from the three painted (green-blue, white and red-yellow, respectively) areas of the flag. The combination of the data obtained with all these techniques made possible a comprehensive understanding of both the chemical composition and physical behaviour of the materials used by the artist and supported curators in defining the preventive conservation of this artwork. PMID:27267284

  16. Discovering "The Italian Flag" by Fernando Melani (1907-1985)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlesi, Serena; Bartolozzi, Giovanni; Cucci, Costanza; Marchiafava, Veronica; Picollo, Marcello; La Nasa, Jacopo; Di Girolamo, Francesca; Dilillo, Marialaura; Modugno, Francesca; Degano, Ilaria; Colombini, Maria Perla; Legnaioli, Stefano; Lorenzetti, Giulia; Palleschi, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    In the occasion of the celebrations for the 150th anniversary of the founding of Italy (1861-2011), it was decided to analyse the artwork "The Italian Flag" (La Bandiera Italiana) created by the artist Fernando Melani (Pistoia, 1907-1985), one of the precursors of the Poor Art artistic movement in Italy. This project is a follow-up to a previous study which was mainly focused on the pigments and dyes found in his home-studio. The main goal of this paper is to identify a correct diagnostic plan, based on the use of a combination of non-invasive and micro-invasive methodologies, in order to determine the state of preservation and define the best conservation procedures for a contemporary artwork. Visible, infrared and infrared false colour images as well as the Fibre Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) technique were applied in situ to analyse The Italian Flag. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and micro-Raman spectroscopies, Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS), High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Diode Arrays Detection (HPLC-DAD) and Mass Spectrometric Detection (HPLC-ESI-Q-ToF) were all applied to three small samples detached from the three painted (green-blue, white and red-yellow, respectively) areas of the flag. The combination of the data obtained with all these techniques made possible a comprehensive understanding of both the chemical composition and physical behaviour of the materials used by the artist and supported curators in defining the preventive conservation of this artwork.

  17. TWENTY-FIVE SUBARCSECOND BINARIES DISCOVERED BY LUNAR OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Richichi, A.; Fors, O.; Cusano, F.; Moerchen, M.

    2013-09-15

    We report on 25 subarcsecond binaries, detected for the first time by means of lunar occultations in the near-infrared (near-IR) as part of a long-term program using the ISAAC instrument at the ESO Very Large Telescope. The primaries have magnitudes in the range K = 3.8-10.4, and the companions in the range K = 6.4-12.1. The magnitude differences have a median value of 2.8, with the largest being 5.4. The projected separations are in the range 6-748 mas and with a median of 18 mas, or about three times less than the diffraction limit of the telescope. Among our binary detections are a pre-main-sequence star and an enigmatic Mira-like variable previously suspected to have a companion. Additionally, we quote an accurate first-time near-IR detection of a previously known wider binary. We discuss our findings on an individual basis as far as made possible by the available literature, and we examine them from a statistical point of view. We derive a typical frequency of binarity among field stars of Almost-Equal-To 10%, in the resolution and sensitivity range afforded by the technique ( Almost-Equal-To 0.''003 to Almost-Equal-To 0.''5, and K Almost-Equal-To 12 mag, respectively). This is in line with previous results using the same technique but we point out interesting differences that we can trace up to sensitivity, time sampling, and average distance of the targets. Finally, we discuss the prospects for further follow-up studies.

  18. LIGO Discovers the Merger of Two Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    is: how do binary black holes form? Two primary mechanisms have been proposed:A binary star system contains two stars that are each massive enough to individually collapse into a black hole. If the binary isnt disrupted during the two collapse events, this forms an isolated black-hole binary.Single black holes form in dense cluster environments and then because they are the most massive objects sink to the center of the cluster. There they form pairs through dynamical interactions.Now that were able to observe black-hole binaries through gravitational-wave detections, one way we could distinguish between the two formation mechanisms is from spin measurements. If we discover a clear preference for the misalignment of the two black holes spins, this would favor formation in clusters, where theres no reason for the original spins to be aligned.The current, single detection is not enough to provide constraints, but if we can compile a large enough sample of events, we can start to present a statistical case favoring one channel over the other.What does GW150914 mean for the future of gravitational-wave detection?The fact that Advanced LIGO detected an event even before the start of its first official observing run is certainly promising! The LIGO team estimates that the volume the detectors can probe will still increase by at least a factor of ~10 as the observing runs become more sensitive and of longer duration.Aerial view of the Virgo interferometer near Pisa, Italy. [Virgo Collaboration]In addition, LIGO is not alone in the gravitational-wave game. LIGOs counterpart in Europe, Virgo, is also undergoing design upgrades to increase its sensitivity. Within this year, Virgo should be able to take data simultaneously with LIGO, allowing for better localization of sources. And the launch of (e)LISA, ESAs planned space-based interferometer, will grant us access to a new frequency range, opening a further window to the gravitational-wave sky.The detection of GW150914 marks

  19. Project Wild (Project Tame).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenthaler, David

    For 37 states in the United States, Project Wild has become an officially sanctioned, distributed and funded "environemtnal and conservation education program." For those who are striving to implement focused, sequential, learning programs, as well as those who wish to promote harmony through a non-anthropocentric world view, Project Wild may…

  20. Fastest Pulsar Speeding Out of Galaxy, Astronomers Discover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-08-01

    any firm conclusions," said Wouter Vlemmings of the Jodrell Bank Observatory in the UK and Cornell University in the U.S. The observations of B1508+55 were part of a larger project to use the VLBA to measure the distances and motions of numerous pulsars. "This is the first result of this long-term project, and it's pretty exciting to have something so spectacular come this early," Brisken said. The VLBA observations were made at radio frequencies between 1.4 and 1.7 GigaHertz. Chatterjee, Vlemmings and Brisken worked with Joseph Lazio of the Naval Research Laboratory, James Cordes of Cornell University, Miller Goss of NRAO, Stephen Thorsett of the University of California, Santa Cruz, Edward Fomalont of NRAO, Andrew Lyne and Michael Kramer, both of Jodrell Bank Observatory. The scientists presented their findings in the September 1 issue of the Astrophysical Journal Letters. The VLBA is a system of ten radio-telescope antennas, each with a dish 25 meters (82 feet) in diameter and weighing 240 tons. From Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii to St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the VLBA spans more than 5,000 miles, providing astronomers with the sharpest vision of any telescope on Earth or in space. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  1. ADONIS Discovers Dust Disk around a Star with a Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-10-01

    and a planet, that combination may indeed be comparatively common among solar-type stars. Our own Solar system also contains dust. When the dust scatters the sunlight, this can be observed as "zodiacal light" , a cone of faint light extending above the western horizon soon after sunset or the eastern just before sunrise. The same phenomenon should thus be observable from the planet orbiting iota Horologii . PR Photo 27/00 : The disk at iota Horologii . The exoplanet at iota Horologii Last year, the star iota Horologii was found to have a planetary companion, at least twice as heavy as Jupiter, the largest planet in the Solar System. It was the first exoplanet to be discovered in an almost earth-like orbit, cf. ESO PR 12/99 ). This discovery was based on long-term measurements of the radial velocity of iota Horologii by means of the 1.4-m Coudé Auxiliary Telescope (CAT) at La Silla. The extremely accurate observations were made with the Coude-Echelle-Spectrometer (CES) which is now connected to the ESO 3.6-m telescope. With the combination of spectroscopic (CES) and high-angular resolution (ADONIS) observational facilities at one telescope, the 3.6-m is uniquely suited for this type of front-line research. Dust disks and planets around stars Dust disks around stars still retain information about the formation processes of the exoplanetary systems as they are formed by collisions of planetesimals or proto-planets. However, it is still a somewhat controversial issue exactly how the presence of giant planets influences these collisions or whether the existence of a planetary system can be inferred from observed structures in dust disks. To cast more light on this fundamental issue, it is necessary to search for systems which have both a planet and a dust disk. Our own Solar System contains a significant amount of dust particles which can be seen during very clear evenings and nights by naked eye as a diffuse band of light in the sky - the "zodiacal light". Observations

  2. Studies of gravitational lens systems discovered in the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusin, David Joseph

    2001-11-01

    This thesis describes research conducted on and inspired by the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS), which searches for new cases of gravitational lensing among compact radio sources. CLASS aims to provide the largest and best-studied sample of lens systems for use in constraining the properties of galaxy mass distributions, determining the Hubble parameter and placing limits on the cosmological constant. The goal of this thesis was to complete observations of the CLASS sample, discover and thoroughly investigate new lenses, and apply them to interesting astrophysical problems. We begin with a detailed overview of the CLASS project, including scientific goals, the radio source sample, survey observations, candidate selection and follow-ups. Results are then presented from the third phase of the CLASS survey (CLASS-3), which yielded three new gravitational lens systems. 130850+054 and 131152+199 both consist of a pair of lensed images. 131359+154 features six images of a single source, and is the first arcsecond-scale system in which a source is lensed into more than four images. We also present observations and modeling of the CLASS-2 gravitational lens B2319+051. We use the absence of detectable central images in deep radio maps of CLASS lens systems to place powerful constraints on the inner mass profiles of leasing galaxies. These analyses imply that the profile slopes cannot be much shallower than isothermal. Finally, we consider the relative frequency of two and four-image lens systems, and demonstrate that there is a statistically significant overdensity of quads in the CLASS sample. We investigate a range of factors that may be increasing the frequency of radio quads, including external shear fields, mass distributions flatter than the light, shallow leasing mass profiles, finite core radii, satellite galaxies, and alterations to the luminosity function for faint flat-spectrum radio sources. Surprisingly, none of these mechanisms provide a particularly

  3. Psychotherapy and Moralising Rhetoric in Galen’s Newly Discovered Avoiding Distress (Peri Alypias)

    PubMed Central

    Xenophontos, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I examine Galen’s credentials as an ethical philosopher on the basis of his recently discovered essay Avoiding Distress (Peri alypias). As compensation for the scholarly neglect from which Galen’s ethics suffers, I argue that his moral agenda is an essential part of his philosophical discourse, one that situates him firmly within the tradition of practical ethics of the Roman period. Galen’s engagement with Stoic psychotherapy and the Platonic-Aristotelian educational model affirms his ethical authority; on the other hand, his distinctive moralising features such as the autobiographical perspective of his narrative and the intimacy between author and addressee render his Avoiding Distress exceptional among other essays, Greek or Latin, treating anxiety. Additionally, I show that Galen’s self-projection as a therapist of the emotions corresponds to his role as a practising physician, especially as regards the construction of authority, the efficacy of his therapy and the importance of personal experience as attested in his medical accounts. Finally, the diligence with which Galen retextures his moral advice in his On the Affections and Errors of the Soul – a work of different nature and intent in relation to Avoiding Distress – is a testimony to the dynamics of his ethics and more widely to his philosophical medicine. The philosopher’s lecture room is a ‘hospital’: you ought not to walk out of it in a state of pleasure, but in pain; for you are not in good condition when you arrive. Epictetus, Discourses 3.23.30 PMID:25284896

  4. Modern Observations of Hubble's First-discovered Cepheid in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, M.; Henden, A.; Goff, W.; Smith, S.; Sabo, R.; Walker, G.; Buchheim, R.; Belcheva, G.; Crawford, T.; Cook, M.; Dvorak, S.; Harris, B.

    2011-12-01

    We present a modern ephemeris and modern light curve of the first-discovered Cepheid variable in M31, Edwin Hubble's M31-V1. Observers of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) undertook these observations during the latter half of 2010. The observations were in support of an outreach program by the Space Telescope Science Institute's Hubble Heritage project, but the resulting data are the first concentrated observations of M31-V1 made in modern times. AAVSO observers obtained 214 V-band, Rc-band, and unfiltered observations from which a current ephemeris was derived. The ephemeris derived from these observations is JDMax = 2,455,430.5( ± 0.5) + 31.4( ± 0.1)E. The period derived from the 2010 data is in agreement with the historic values of the period, but the single season of data precludes a more precise determination of the period or measurement of the period change using these data alone. However, using an ephemeris based upon the period derived by Baade and Swope, we are able to fit all of the observed data acceptably well. Continued observations in the modern era will be very valuable in linking these modern data with data from the 1920s-1930s and 1950s and will enable us to measure period change in this historic Cepheid. In particular, we strongly encourage intensive observations of this star around predicted times of maximum to constrain the date of maximum to better than 0.5 days.

  5. Mining literatures to discover novel multiple biological associations in a disease context.

    PubMed

    Faro, Alberto; Giordano, Daniela; Maiorana, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The text mining methods proposed to discover associations between pairs of biological entities by mining a scientific literature often extract associations already existing in the literature, whereas their extensions supervise too much the discovery process with heuristics and ontologies that limit the research space. On the other hand, the methods that search novel associations applying the text mining methods to two literatures do not avoid the risk of discovering syllogisms based on faulty premises. For this reason, the paper proposes a method that helps the users to discover associations among biological entities by mining the literature using an unsupervised clustering approach. The discovered multiple associations are derived from binary associations to limit the computational load without compromising the methodology accuracy. A case study demonstrates how the tool derived from the methodology works in practice. A comparison between this tool and other tools available in the literature points out the methodology effectiveness. PMID:26510304

  6. Discovering Your Radiant Self: A Transpersonal Approach to Expressing Your Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klimek, Paula; Canfield, Jack

    1979-01-01

    Presents a process combining a drawing experience with exercises learned in psychosynthesis training to help people discover what transpersonal qualities are attempting to manifest themselves through their personalities. (Author/BEF)

  7. ASASSN-16bh: A Very Bright CV Candidate Discovered By ASAS-SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonian, G.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Basu, U.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.

    2016-02-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source.

  8. Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Discovering Sustainable Solutions to Power and Secure America’s Future

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    Sustainability is fundamental to the Department of Energy’s research mission and operations as reflected in the Department’s Strategic Plan. Our overarching mission is to discover the solutions to power and secure America’s future.

  9. “Application and evaluation of the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system to the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ campaign in the Baltimore-Washington D.C. area.”

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DISCOVER-AQ project (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality), is a joint collaboration between NASA, U.S. EPA and a number of other local organizations with the goal of characterizing air quality in ...

  10. The Best and the Brightest: Tidal Disruption Events Discovered by ASAS-SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN

    2016-01-01

    Even today only human eyes scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the visible sky to 17th magnitude every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes in the northern and southern hemispheres. Having been in operation for two years, ASAS-SN is discovering new transient objects daily, and while the primary goal of ASAS-SN is a complete survey of bright, nearby supernovae, ASAS-SN also discovers many other interesting nearby transients. Notably, ASAS-SN has discovered three bright tidal disruption events (TDEs), the three closest such events ever discovered at optical wavelengths, providing the opportunity to obtain detailed follow-up data at many wavelengths. ASAS-SN is discovering roughly 1 TDE for every 60 Type Ia supernovae, a rate that is significantly higher than other surveys. By virtue of their brightness, TDEs discovered by ASAS-SN can also be studied in unprecedented detail for many months, allowing deeper insight into their physics.

  11. Talkoot Portals: Discover, Tag, Share, and Reuse Collaborative Science Workflows (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; Ramachandran, R.; Lynnes, C.

    2009-12-01

    interest will be discoverable using tag search, and advertised using “service casts” and “interest casts” (Atom feeds). Multiple science workflow systems will be plugged into the system, with initial support for UAH’s Mining Workflow Composer and the open-source Active BPEL engine, and JPL’s SciFlo engine and the VizFlow visual programming interface. With the ability to share and execute analysis workflows, Talkoot portals can be used to do collaborative science in addition to communicate ideas and results. It will be useful for different science domains, mission teams, research projects and organizations. Thus, it will help to solve the “sociological” problem of bringing together disparate groups of researchers, and the technical problem of advertising, discovering, developing, documenting, and maintaining inter-agency science workflows. The presentation will discuss the goals of and barriers to Science 2.0, the social web technologies employed in the Talkoot software appliance (e.g. CMS, social tagging, personal presence, advertising by feeds, etc.), illustrate the resulting collaborative capabilities, and show early prototypes of the web interfaces (e.g. embedded workflows).

  12. Discovering Mozart.

    PubMed

    Rusk, Nicole

    2010-06-01

    High-throughput imaging of genome-wide RNA interference screens and systematic analysis of protein complexes involved in mitosis yield valuable resources and reveal new subunits of well-characterized complexes.

  13. Discovering astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    An overview of basic astronomical knowledge is presented with attention to the structure and dynamics of the stars and planets. Also dealt with are techniques of astronomical measurement, e.g., stellar spectrometry, radio astronomy, star catalogs, etc. Basic physical principles as they pertain to astronomy are reviewed, including the nature of light, gravitation, and electromagnetism. Finally, stellar evolution and cosmology are discussed with reference to the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe.

  14. Discovering Greatness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    People are confronting the most pressing challenge facing every family, school, and community--raising respectful children in a toxic world. In simpler societies, raising children was a shared task of the whole community, as adults and youth worked in harmony and mutual respect. Today, humans are the only species in creation living out of balance.…

  15. The 1000 Genomes Project: data management and community access.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Laura; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Smith, Richard; Kulesha, Eugene; Xiao, Chunlin; Toneva, Iliana; Vaughan, Brendan; Preuss, Don; Leinonen, Rasko; Shumway, Martin; Sherry, Stephen; Flicek, Paul

    2012-04-27

    The 1000 Genomes Project was launched as one of the largest distributed data collection and analysis projects ever undertaken in biology. In addition to the primary scientific goals of creating both a deep catalog of human genetic variation and extensive methods to accurately discover and characterize variation using new sequencing technologies, the project makes all of its data publicly available. Members of the project data coordination center have developed and deployed several tools to enable widespread data access.

  16. Projects Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  17. 25 CFR 224.87 - What are the obligations of a tribe if it discovers a violation or breach?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are the obligations of a tribe if it discovers a violation or breach? 224.87 Section 224.87 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... obligations of a tribe if it discovers a violation or breach? As soon as practicable after discovering...

  18. Reflections on an Adult Literacy Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dominica L.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses a project in Melbourne, Australia developed to explore the nature of the problem of illiteracy amongst non-migrant adults who had passed through the school system, to discover what sort of people were illiterate and to what extent, and to examine the influence of home and educational background, and to assess the ability of sensitive and…

  19. Endangered Species & Biodiversity: A Classroom Project & Theme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauro, Brook

    2012-01-01

    Students discover the factors contributing to species losses worldwide by conducting a project about endangered species as a component of a larger classroom theme of biodiversity. Groups conduct research using online endangered- species databases and present results to the class using PowerPoint. Students will improve computer research abilities…

  20. Tierra Nueva -- A passive solar cohousing project

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, K.; Cooper, P.

    1999-10-01

    California architects take on the formidable challenges of designing a cohousing project, and discover that the end result is well worth the effort. The Tierra Nueva Cohousing Project consists of living units, a common house, community orchard, community gardens, community play space, space for a future shop and at the periphery of the site, parking, carports and garages. The units use thermal mass, solar heating, passive solar cooling, perimeter insulation on slabs. Design was agreed to by the community as a whole.

  1. Dive and Discover: Bringing Oceanographic Research into the Classroom and to the General Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornari, D. J.; Fino, D.; Humphris, S. E.; Fruth, L. L.; Dean, S.

    2001-12-01

    We have developed the "Dive and Discover" web site for use in classrooms and for the general public to provide near real-time, daily access to oceanographic research expeditions, particularly those using deep submergence vehicles operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The site was one of five science sites nominated for a 2001 Webby Award, was selected by Scientific American as one of the top five sites in the category of earth and environmental science, and was one of Eisenhower National Clearinghouse's "digital dozen" for science resources. The web site consists of two major components. A series of educational modules provide both general educational information about the oceans and the people that study them, as well as cruise-specific information about the natural systems being studied, the participating scientists, and the data and sample-collecting methodologies and technologies being used. The second component consists of modules that allow access to near real-time updates of the progress of the cruise, images of seafloor features and animals, samples of data being collected and used on board, and general information about life on board. In addition, a Mail Buoy provides e-mail access for students to ask questions of the scientists on board the ship during the course of the expedition. COSI Toledo have a linked Educator's Companion that gives access to COSI project management tips, background information, activities, correlations to national science education standards, assessment tools, and a vast array of resources to assist educators in using the web site. We have worked with teachers and students from all over the United States to test, evaluate, and refine the web site during five cruises in the Pacific and Indian Oceans over the last two years. These cruises focused on various problems associated with mid-ocean ridge volcanism, and the chemical, physical and biological processes associated with seafloor hydrothermal activity. Our intention

  2. A Generalized Bio-inspired Method for Discovering Sequence-based Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Elena S.; Curtis, Darren S.; Phillips, Aaron R.; Teuton, Jeremy R.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2013-06-07

    Many phenomena that we wish to discover are comprised of sequences of events or event primitives. Often signatures are constructed to identify such phenomena using either distributions or frequencies of attributes, or specific subsequences that are known to correlate to the phenomena. Distribution-based identification does not capture the essence of the sequence of behaviors and therefore may suffer from lack of specificity. At the other extreme, using specific subsequences to identify target phenomena is often too specific and suffers from lower sensitivity when natural variations arise in the phenomena, measuring process, or data analysis. We introduce here a method for discovering signatures for phenomena that are well characterized by sequences of event primitives. In this paper, we describe the steps taken and lessons learned in generalizing a sequence analysis method, BLAST, for use on non-biological datasets including expressing and operating on alphabets of varying length, constructing a reward/penalty model for arbitrary datasets, and discovering low complexity segments in sequence data by extending BLAST’s native low-complexity estimating algorithms. We also present several case studies that demonstrate the utility of this method to discovering signatures in a wide array of applications including network traffic, software analysis, server characterization, and others. Finally, we demonstrate how signatures discovered using this method can be expressed using a variety of model formalisms, each having its own relative benefit.

  3. Extragalactic Transients Discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jonathan; Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN

    2016-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes can scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the extra-galactic sky down to V~17 mag every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes, hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, in the northern and southern hemispheres. The primary goal of ASAS-SN is to discover bright, nearby supernovae (SNe), we are discovering more than 60% of supernovae with V<17. Since June 2013, we have discovered 224 supernovae, 133 in 2015 alone (as of September 30, 2015). ASAS-SN has also discovered many other interesting extragalactic transients, including the three closest tidal disruption events (TDEs) ever discovered at optical wavelengths. The nearby nature of ASASSN discoveries allows detailed follow-up across a wide wavelength coverage; here we present some of these data on recent ASAS-SN extragalactic transients.

  4. Richest Planetary System Discovered - Up to seven planets orbiting a Sun-like star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    Astronomers using ESO's world-leading HARPS instrument have discovered a planetary system containing at least five planets, orbiting the Sun-like star HD 10180. The researchers also have tantalising evidence that two other planets may be present, one of which would have the lowest mass ever found. This would make the system similar to our Solar System in terms of the number of planets (seven as compared to the Solar System's eight planets). Furthermore, the team also found evidence that the distances of the planets from their star follow a regular pattern, as also seen in our Solar System. "We have found what is most likely the system with the most planets yet discovered," says Christophe Lovis, lead author of the paper reporting the result. "This remarkable discovery also highlights the fact that we are now entering a new era in exoplanet research: the study of complex planetary systems and not just of individual planets. Studies of planetary motions in the new system reveal complex gravitational interactions between the planets and give us insights into the long-term evolution of the system." The team of astronomers used the HARPS spectrograph, attached to ESO's 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla, Chile, for a six-year-long study of the Sun-like star HD 10180, located 127 light-years away in the southern constellation of Hydrus (the Male Water Snake). HARPS is an instrument with unrivalled measurement stability and great precision and is the world's most successful exoplanet hunter. Thanks to the 190 individual HARPS measurements, the astronomers detected the tiny back and forth motions of the star caused by the complex gravitational attractions from five or more planets. The five strongest signals correspond to planets with Neptune-like masses - between 13 and 25 Earth masses [1] - which orbit the star with periods ranging from about 6 to 600 days. These planets are located between 0.06 and 1.4 times the Earth-Sun distance from their central star. "We also have

  5. Examination of the relationship between project management critical success factors and project success of oil and gas drilling projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagba, Tonye J.

    Oil and gas drilling projects are the primary means by which oil companies recover large volumes of commercially available hydrocarbons from deep reservoirs. These types of projects are complex in nature, involving management of multiple stakeholder interfaces, multidisciplinary personnel, complex contractor relationships, and turbulent environmental and market conditions, necessitating the application of proven project management best practices and critical success factors (CSFs) to achieve success. Although there is some practitioner oriented literature on project management CSFs for drilling projects, none of these is based on empirical evidence, from research. In addition, the literature has reported alarming rates of oil and gas drilling project failure, which is attributable not to technical factors, but to failure of project management. The aim of this quantitative correlational study therefore, was to discover an empirically verified list of project management CSFs, which consistent application leads to successful implementation of oil and gas drilling projects. The study collected survey data online, from a random sample of 127 oil and gas drilling personnel who were members of LinkedIn's online community "Drilling Supervisors, Managers, and Engineers". The results of the study indicated that 10 project management factors are individually related to project success of oil and gas drilling projects. These 10 CSFs are namely; Project mission, Top management support, Project schedule/plan, Client consultation, Personnel, Technical tasks, Client acceptance, Monitoring and feedback, Communication, and Troubleshooting. In addition, the study found that the relationships between the 10 CSFs and drilling project success is unaffected by participant and project demographics---role of project personnel, and project location. The significance of these findings are both practical, and theoretical. Practically, application of an empirically verified CSFs list to oil

  6. Initial Comparisons of In-Situ, Model, and Remotely-Sensed NO2 Observations During DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Flynn, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Krotkov, N. A.; Herman, J. R.; Janz, S. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Lee, P.

    2011-12-01

    The first deployment of the Earth Venture -1 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project was conducted during July 2011 in the Baltimore-Washington region. Two aircraft (a P-3B for in-situ sampling and a King Air for remote sensing) were used along with an extensive array of surface-based, in-situ, and remote sensing instrumentation. Fourteen flight days were accomplished by both aircraft and over 250 profiles of trace gases and aerosols were performed by the P-3B over surface air quality monitoring stations, which were specially outfitted with Pandora UV/Vis spectrometers recording NO2 columns. The P-3B instrument suite included in-situ NO2 observations. The King Air flew the ACAM UV/Vis spectrometer, providing NO2 column amounts from approximately 8 km to the surface. This combination of observations allows linkage of surface NO2 with its vertical distribution, with remotely-sensed column amounts observed from the surface Pandoras , the ACAM instrument, and with satellite observations from Aura/OMI. Tropospheric NO2 columns from the Pandoras were estimated by subtracting the stratospheric component derived by the OMI NO2 algorithm from the total columns observed by these surface-based spectrometers. In addition, forecasts of NO2 from a NOAA experimental version of the CMAQ regional air quality model were made available to DISCOVER-AQ. A preliminary comparison of tropospheric column NO2 densities from the integration of in-situ P-3B observations, those derived from the Pandoras and ACAM, from the new Goddard OMI tropospheric NO2 algorithm, and from CMAQ will be presented. Interpretation will be provided for differences that are noted.

  7. A strategy to discover new organizers identifies a putative heart organizer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Claire; Khan, Mohsin A F; Wong, Frances; Solovieva, Tatiana; Oliveira, Nidia M M; Baldock, Richard A; Tickle, Cheryll; Burt, Dave W; Stern, Claudio D

    2016-01-01

    Organizers are regions of the embryo that can both induce new fates and impart pattern on other regions. So far, surprisingly few organizers have been discovered, considering the number of patterned tissue types generated during development. This may be because their discovery has relied on transplantation and ablation experiments. Here we describe a new approach, using chick embryos, to discover organizers based on a common gene expression signature, and use it to uncover the anterior intestinal portal (AIP) endoderm as a putative heart organizer. We show that the AIP can induce cardiac identity from non-cardiac mesoderm and that it can pattern this by specifying ventricular and suppressing atrial regional identity. We also uncover some of the signals responsible. The method holds promise as a tool to discover other novel organizers acting during development.

  8. A strategy to discover new organizers identifies a putative heart organizer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Claire; Khan, Mohsin A. F.; Wong, Frances; Solovieva, Tatiana; Oliveira, Nidia M. M.; Baldock, Richard A.; Tickle, Cheryll; Burt, Dave W.; Stern, Claudio D.

    2016-01-01

    Organizers are regions of the embryo that can both induce new fates and impart pattern on other regions. So far, surprisingly few organizers have been discovered, considering the number of patterned tissue types generated during development. This may be because their discovery has relied on transplantation and ablation experiments. Here we describe a new approach, using chick embryos, to discover organizers based on a common gene expression signature, and use it to uncover the anterior intestinal portal (AIP) endoderm as a putative heart organizer. We show that the AIP can induce cardiac identity from non-cardiac mesoderm and that it can pattern this by specifying ventricular and suppressing atrial regional identity. We also uncover some of the signals responsible. The method holds promise as a tool to discover other novel organizers acting during development. PMID:27557800

  9. A functional variomics tool for discovering drug resistance genes and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiwei; Chen, Kaifu; Zhang, Jianhuai; Li, Yongxiang; Wang, Hui; Cui, Dandan; Tang, Jiangwu; Liu, Yong; Shi, Xiaomin; Li, Wei; Liu, Dan; Chen, Rui; Sucgang, Richard S.; Pan, Xuewen

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive discovery of genetic mechanisms of drug resistance and identification of in vivo drug targets represent significant challenges. Here we present a functional variomics technology in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This tool analyzes numerous genetic variants and effectively tackles both problems simultaneously. Using this tool, we discovered almost all genes that, due to mutations or modest overexpression, confer resistance to rapamycin, cycloheximide, and amphotericin B. Most significant among the resistance genes were drug targets, including multiple targets of a given drug. With amphotericin B, we discovered the highly conserved membrane protein Pmp3 as a potent resistance factor and a possible novel target. Widespread application of this tool should allow rapid identification of conserved resistance mechanisms and targets of many more compounds. New genes and alleles that confer resistance to other stresses can also be discovered. Similar tools in other systems such as human cell lines will also be useful. PMID:23416056

  10. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Podzorov, Vitaly

    2012-10-28

    The scope of this project is to investigate fundamental aspects of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) grown at the surface of organic semiconductors and other electronic materials, recently discovered in our group (Fig. 1) [1]. Understanding the growth mechanism and structure of these SAMs, as well as investigating the effect of SAM-induced high surface conductivity, are the main thrusts of the project. An additional thrust of the project is to find new ways of surface doping or surface gating of novel semiconductors, in which electronic traps at the interface would be passivated. Molecular self assembly is an exciting research area of modern materials science, playing an important role in a variety of emerging applications, such as organic and molecular electronics, bioengineering, sensors and actuators. The current effort in this field has been focused on two experimental platforms: SAMs on metals (e.g., Au) and SAMs on inorganic oxides (e.g., SiO2). We have recently discovered the third platform, molecular self-assembly at the surface of carbon-based electronic materials (organic semiconductors, graphene and CNTs), which opens new opportunities for fundamental research and applications (Fig. 1) [1, 2, 3]. One of the most intriguing aspects of the new discovery is that formation of an FTS self-assembled monolayer on these materials induces a high-density mobile charges, with n up to 1014 cm-2, resulting in a large surface conductivity, σ ≈ 10-5 S·square-1 [1]. The effect is due to an interfacial electron transfer from the semiconductor to the SAM, resulting in a 0.54 V potential drop across the 1.3 nm-thick SAM, as recently revealed by Kelvin probe microscopy in rubrene [4].

  11. The Araucaria Project: The Distance to the Sculptor Group Galaxy NGC 55 from a Newly Discovered Abundant Cepheid Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Soszyński, Igor; Udalski, Andrzej; Bresolin, Fabio; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Mennickent, Ronald; Walker, Alistair; Garcia, Alejandro; Szewczyk, Olaf; Szymański, MichaŁ; Kubiak, Marcin; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz

    2006-12-01

    We have detected, for the first time, Cepheid variables in the Sculptor Group SB(s)m galaxy NGC 55. From wide-field images obtained in the optical V and I bands during 77 nights in 2002-2003, we have found 143 Cepheids with periods ranging from 5.6 to 175.9 days; 133 of these objects have periods longer than 10 days, making NGC 55 to date the galaxy with the largest known number of long-period Cepheids in the Sculptor Group. We construct period-luminosity relations from our data and obtain distance moduli corrected for the small foreground reddening to NGC 55 of 26.79+/-0.04 mag (internal error) in V, 26.66+/-0.03 mag in I, and 26.40+/-0.05 mag in the reddening-independent V-I Wesenheit index. The trend of increasing distance moduli with shorter wavelength hints at the existence of significant reddening intrinsic to NGC 55, which affects the measured Cepheid magnitudes. From our data we determine the intrinsic mean reddening of the Cepheids in NGC 55 as E(B-V)=0.102 mag, which brings the distance determinations from the different bands into excellent agreement. Our best distance estimate for NGC 55 from the present optical Cepheid photometry is 26.40+/-0.05 (internal error) +/-0.09 mag (systematic error). This value is tied to an assumed LMC distance of 18.50 mag. Our quoted systematic error of the present NGC 55 Cepheid distance does not take into account the current uncertainty in the distance of the fiducial LMC galaxy itself. Within the small respective uncertainties, the Sculptor Group galaxies NGC 55 and NGC 300 are at the same distance of 1.9 Mpc, strengthening the case for a physical association of these galaxies. Based on observations obtained with the 1.3 m Warsaw telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  12. Genome-based approach to discover new livestock pest control technologies: The horn fly (Haematobia irritans) genome sequencing project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasion of the Americas by the horn fly, H. irritans, has resulted in control issues throughout the continent. Insecticide resistance is a major complicating factor with efforts to manage this pest. Stakeholder focus groups identified the horn fly as the top priority arthropod pest affecting cattle...

  13. The JASON Project: Discover Scientific Treasure as You Accompany Scientists to the Bottom of the Mediterranean Sea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Describes an underwater expedition which will allow students to participate in activities without being physically present. Provides a list of participating museums and examples of activities from curriculum materials which include a poster, bathymetric map, and 25 lessons. (RT)

  14. What Is Going on Inside the Arrows? Discovering the Hidden Springs in Causal Models

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Watters, Alexander; Glymour, Clark

    2016-01-01

    Using Gebharter's (2014) representation, we consider aspects of the problem of discovering the structure of unmeasured sub-mechanisms when the variables in those sub-mechanisms have not been measured. Exploiting an early insight of Sober's (1998), we provide a correct algorithm for identifying latent, endogenous structure—sub-mechanisms—for a restricted class of structures. The algorithm can be merged with other methods for discovering causal relations among unmeasured variables, and feedback relations between measured variables and unobserved causes can sometimes be learned. PMID:27313331

  15. IGBP-DIS global 1 km land cover data set, DISCover: First results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loveland, T.R.; Belward, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    The International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme Data and Information System (IGBP-DIS) is co-ordinating the development of global land data sets from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data. The first is a 1 km spatial resolution land cover product `DISCover', based on monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index composites from 1992 and 1993. DISCover is a 17 class land cover dataset based on the science requirements of IGBP elements. Mapping uses unsupervised classification with post-classification refinement using ancillary data. Draft Africa, North America and South America products are now available for peer review.

  16. Development of Procedures for Assessing the Impact of Vocational Education Research and Development on Vocational Education (Project IMPACT). Volume 4--A Case Study of Illinois Projects in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hook, Colin; Ethridge, James

    As part of Project IMPACT's efforts to identify and develop procedures for complying with the impact requirements of Public Law 94-482, a case study was made of Illinois Projects in Horticulture. Fourteen horticulture projects in high schools and junior colleges were discovered through a previous study, personal interviews with two University of…

  17. A Phenomenological Study to Discover Low-Income Adults' Perceptions and Expectations Regarding Financial Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Brigid Ann

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored the perceptions and expectations of low income adults regarding financial literacy to discover ways to increase attendance in financial literacy programs designs for this cohort. The study utilized interviews with closed-ended questions to establish the participants' backgrounds, then opened-ended questions to…

  18. Protocols for Teaching Students How to Search for, Discover, and Evaluate Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, William I., Jr.; Hale, Dena H.

    2011-01-01

    The authors introduce and develop protocols to guide aspiring entrepreneurs' behaviors in searching for and discovering innovative ideas that may have commercial potential. Systematic search has emerged as a theory-based, prescriptive framework to guide innovative behavior. Grounded in Fiet's theory of search and discovery, this article provides…

  19. Discovering Inexpensive, Effective Catalysts for Solar Energy Conversion: An Authentic Research Laboratory Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaner, Sarah E.; Hooker, Paul D.; Nickel, Anne-Marie; Leichtfuss, Amanda R.; Adams, Carissa S.; de la Cerda, Dionisia; She, Yuqi; Gerken, James B.; Pokhrel, Ravi; Ambrose, Nicholas J.; Khaliqi, David; Stahl, Shannon S.; Schuttlefield Christus, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical water oxidation is a major focus of solar energy conversion efforts. A new laboratory experiment has been developed that utilizes real-time, hands-on research to discover catalysts for solar energy conversion. The HARPOON, or Heterogeneous Anodes Rapidly Perused for Oxygen Overpotential Neutralization, experiment allows an array of…

  20. "Discovering the Cell": An Educational Game about Cell and Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Carolina N.; Alves, Gutemberg G.; Cardona, Tania da S.; Melim, Leandra M. C.; Luz, Mauricio R. M. P.; Araujo-Jorge, Tania C.; Henriques-Pons, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The role of games within education becomes clearer as students become more active and are able to take decisions, solve problems and react to the results of those decisions. The educational board game "Discovering the Cell" ("Celula Adentro"), is based on problem-solving learning. This investigative game attempts to stimulate reasoning and…

  1. Radio detection of the near-IR discovered supernova 2010P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Illana, R.; Romero-Canizales, C.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.; Kankare, E.; Mattila, S.; Ryder, S. D.

    2012-09-01

    We report the radio detection of supernova 2010P (cf. CBETs 2145, 2149) in Arp 299 in EVLA (8459 MHz) observations from 15th Jun 2011. SN2010P was discovered in near-IR images on 18th Jan 2010, and classified as a Type Ib/IIb SN based on its optical spectrum obtained on 11th Feb 2010 (cf. CBET 2189).

  2. Discovering Socialization Priorities in Turkish Society Based on What the Value of Success Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aypay, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discover socialization priorities based on what the value of success means in Turkish society. For this purpose, two related scales have been developed to identify the beliefs of adults in Turkish society towards defining the value of success and the areas in which adults perceive themselves as successful based on…

  3. Watch, Discover, Think, and Act: A Model for Patient Education Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, L. K.; Shegog, R.; Parcel, G. S.; Gold, R. S.; Fernandez, M.; Czyzewski, D. I.; Sockrider, M. M.; Berlin, N.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development of the Watch, Discover, Think, and Act asthma self-management computer program for inner-city children with asthma. The intervention focuses on teaching two categories of behaviors: asthma specific behaviors such as taking preventive medication, and self-regulatory processes such as monitoring symptoms and solving asthma…

  4. The origin of Hydrilla verticillata recently discovered at a South African dam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrilla was discovered during February 2006 at the Pongolapoort Dam on the Pongola River, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Its presence there threatens a multimillion rand fishing and tourism industry. The South African Plant Protection Research Institute initiated control measures, a survey of the sur...

  5. A Novel Method for Discovering Fuzzy Sequential Patterns Using the Simple Fuzzy Partition Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ruey-Shun; Hu, Yi-Chung

    2003-01-01

    Discusses sequential patterns, data mining, knowledge acquisition, and fuzzy sequential patterns described by natural language. Proposes a fuzzy data mining technique to discover fuzzy sequential patterns by using the simple partition method which allows the linguistic interpretation of each fuzzy set to be easily obtained. (Author/LRW)

  6. DISCOVER-AQ SJV Surface Measurements and Initial Comparisons with Photochemical Model Simulations

    EPA Science Inventory

    NASA’s DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) campaign studied the air quality throughout California’s San Joaquin Valley (SJV) during January and February of 2013. The SJV is a...

  7. The international geosphere biosphere programme data and information system global land cover data set (DIScover)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loveland, T.R.; Belward, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    The International Geosphere Biosphere Programme Data and Information System (IGBP-DIS), through the mapping expertise of the U.S. Geological Survey and the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, recently guided the completion of a 1-km resolution global land cover data set from advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data. The 1-km resolution land cover product, 'DISCover,' was based on monthly normalized difference vegetation index composites from 1992 and 1993. The development of DISCover was coordinated by the IGBP-DIS Land Cover Working Group as part of the IGBP-DIS Focus 1 activity. DISCover is a 17-class land cover data set based on the scientific requirements of IGBP elements. The mapping used unsupervised classification and postclassification refinement using ancillary data. The development of this data set was motivated by the need for global land cover data with higher spatial resolution, improved temporal specificity, and known classification accuracy. The completed DISCover data set will soon be validated to determine the accuracy of the global classification.

  8. Preliminary study of microtektites first discovered in the central Pacific by China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanchang, P.; Shong, Y.; Xi, M.; Shijie, S.

    1984-01-01

    Electron probe analysis was used to determine the chemical composition of microtektites discovered in the Central Pacific. An X-ray energy spectrum analysis was made, and the surface microstructure was investigated. The found microtektites appear to be younger than the microtektites reported in the Asia Australia Strewn Field.

  9. Separation Anxiety: An in-Class Game Designed to Help Students Discover Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samide, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    An in-class activity has been developed to assist students in discovering chromatographic separations. Designed on the basis of plate theory, the game has students use instructor-provided partition coefficients to establish equilibrium for two different items between a stationary and mobile phase. As students work through equilibration and mobile…

  10. Who Can Be a Hero?: Helen Keller, Annie Sullivan, and Discovering Strength of Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Kathleen Dunlevy; Bernheim, Rachel Oestreicher

    2005-01-01

    "A Study of Heroes: Making a Difference Using Your Heart, Intellect, and Talents" is a program originally developed in diverse school communities. Students learn to distinguish between the concepts of hero and celebrity and to discover the real heroes in their own families, schools, communities, and most importantly--within themselves. This…

  11. Exploring National Parks & Monuments: Students Can Discover National Monuments, National Parks & Natural Wonders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Cynthia Light Brown, author of "Discover National Monuments, National Parks: Natural Wonders," a book that introduces readers ages 8-12 to the history and science behind some of the amazing natural sites in the United States. In this interview, Cynthia Light Brown describes how she became interested in…

  12. First records of Nocomis biguttatus (Hornyhead Chub) from West Virginia discovered in museum voucher specimens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Cincotta, Daniel A.; Starnes, Wayne C.

    2013-01-01

    Specimens of Nocomis biguttatus (Hornyhead Chub) from South Fork Hughes River (Little Kanawha River drainage, WV) were discovered in two museum lots at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. These accessions, collected in 1960 and 1966, represent an addition to the state fauna and are the first distribution records for this species from the Appalachian Plateau, WV

  13. Examining Pre-K Professional Development Programs: Discovering the Road to Exceptional Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sheila D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to discover and interpret the experiences of pre-k teachers in an urban school district located in a Northeastern region of the United States. Using a basic qualitative research design, fifteen participants were recruited by a purposeful sampling method to be interviewed after the implementation…

  14. Discovering the Thermodynamics of Simultaneous Equilibria: An Entropy Analysis Activity Involving Consecutive Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    An activity is presented in which the thermodynamics of simultaneous, consecutive equilibria are explored. The activity is appropriate for second-year high school or AP chemistry. Students discover that a reactant-favored (entropy-diminishing or endergonic) reaction can be caused to happen if it is coupled with a product-favored reaction of…

  15. Evaluation of the Discover Drug Education Curriculum for Grades K-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ronald D.; Butler, Joan M.

    A major purpose of this study was to establish and test a procedure for evaluating drug education curricula that allows for a more objective view of the effectiveness of drug education materials and the instructional delivery system. A major focus of the study was to determine the extent to which the Discover Curriculum affected student outcomes.…

  16. A comparison of the IGBP DISCover and University of Maryland 1 km global land cover products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, M.C.; Reed, B.

    2000-01-01

    Two global 1 km land cover data sets derived from 1992-1993 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data are currently available, the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme Data and Information System (IGBP-DIS) DISCover and the University of Maryland (UMd) 1 km land cover maps. This paper makes a preliminary comparison of the methodologies and results of the two products. The DISCover methodology employed an unsupervised clustering classification scheme on a per-continent basis using 12 monthly maximum NDVI composites as inputs. The UMd approach employed a supervised classification tree method in which temporal metrics derived from all AVHRR bands and the NDVI were used to predict class membership across the entire globe. The DISCover map uses the IGBP classification scheme, while the UMd map employs a modified IGBP scheme minus the classes of permanent wetlands, cropland/natural vegetation mosaic and ice and snow. Global area totals of aggregated vegetation types are very similar and have a per-pixel agreement of 74%. For tall versus short/no vegetation, the per-pixel agreement is 84%. For broad vegetation types, core areas map similarly, while transition zones around core areas differ significantly. This results in high regional variability between the maps. Individual class agreement between the two 1 km maps is 49%. Comparison of the maps at a nominal 0.5 resolution with two global ground-based maps shows an improvement of thematic concurrency of 46% when viewing average class agreement. The absence of the cropland mosaic class creates a difficulty in comparing the maps, due to its significant extent in the DISCover map. The DISCover map, in general, has more forest, while the UMd map has considerably more area in the intermediate tree cover classes of woody savanna/ woodland and savanna/wooded grassland.

  17. Precambrian crust beneath the Mesozoic northern Canadian Cordillera discovered by Lithoprobe seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Frederick A.; Clowes, Ronald M.; Snyder, David B.; van der Velden, Arie J.; Hall, Kevin W.; Erdmer, Philippe; Evenchick, Carol A.

    2004-04-01

    The Cordillera in northern Canada is underlain by westward tapering layers that can be followed from outcrops of Proterozoic strata in the Foreland belt to the lowermost crust of the orogenic interior, a distance of as much as 500 km across strike. They are interpreted as stratified Proterozoic rocks, including ˜1.8-0.7 Ga supracrustal rocks and their basement. The layering was discovered on two new deep seismic reflection profiles in the Yukon (Line 3; ˜650 km) and northern British Columbia (Line 2; ˜1245 km in two segments) that were acquired as part of the Lithoprobe Slave-Northern Cordillera Lithospheric Evolution (SNORCLE) transect. In the Mackenzie Mountains of the eastern Yukon, the layering in Line 3 is visible between 5.0 and 12.0 s (˜15 to 36 km depth). It is followed southwestward for nearly 650 km (˜500 km across strike) and thins to less than 1.0 s (˜3.0-3.5 km thickness) near the Moho at the Yukon-Alaska international boundary. In the northern Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, the upper part of the layering on Line 2 correlates with outcrops of Proterozoic (1.76-1.0 Ga) strata in the Muskwa anticlinorium. At this location, the layering is at least 15 km thick and is followed westward then southward into the middle and lower crust for ˜700 km (˜300 km across strike). It disappears as a thin taper at the base of the crust ˜150 km east of the coast of the Alaskan panhandle. The only significant disruption in the layering occurs at the Tintina fault zone, a late to postorogenic strike-slip fault with up to 800 km of displacement, which appears as a vertical zone of little reflectivity that disrupts the continuity of the deep layering on both profiles (˜300 km apart). The base of the layered reflection zone coincides with the Moho, which exhibits variable character and undulates in a series of broad arches with widths of ˜150 km. In general, the mantle appears to have few reflections. However, at the southwest end of Line 3 near the Alaska

  18. HIP 38939B: A NEW BENCHMARK T DWARF IN THE GALACTIC PLANE DISCOVERED WITH Pan-STARRS1

    SciTech Connect

    Deacon, Niall R.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Kaiser, N.; Morgan, J. S.; Sweeney, W. E.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.; Redstone, Joshua; Goldman, Bertrand; Price, P. A.

    2012-08-20

    We report the discovery of a wide brown dwarf companion to the mildly metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.24), low Galactic latitude (b = 1.{sup 0}88) K4V star HIP 38939. The companion was discovered by its common proper motion with the primary and its red optical (Pan-STARRS1) and blue infrared (Two Micron All Sky Survey) colors. It has a projected separation of 1630 AU and a near-infrared spectral type of T4.5. As such it is one of only three known companions to a main-sequence star which have early/mid T spectral types of (the others being HN Peg B and {epsilon} Indi B). Using chromospheric activity we estimate an age for the primary of 900{+-}{sup 1900}{sub 600} Myr. This value is also in agreement with the age derived from the star's weak ROSAT detection. Comparison with evolutionary models for this age range indicates that HIP 38939B falls in the mass range 38 {+-} 20 M{sub Jup} with an effective temperature range of 1090 {+-} 60 K. Fitting our spectrum with atmospheric models gives a best-fitting temperature of 1100 K. We include our object in an analysis of the population of benchmark T dwarfs and find that while older atmospheric models appeared to overpredict the temperature of the coolest objects compared to evolutionary models, more recent atmospheric models provide better agreement.

  19. Project Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston School Dept., RI.

    Covered in the short discussion of Project Gifted for Intermediate grade children are program description, instructional strategy, classification of question categories to cue various levels of thinking, traits common to intellectually gifted students, and procedure for selection of students participating in Project Gifted. Project Gifted is…

  20. An early sophisticated East Polynesian voyaging canoe discovered on New Zealand's coast.

    PubMed

    Johns, Dilys A; Irwin, Geoffrey J; Sung, Yun K

    2014-10-14

    The colonization of the islands of East Polynesia was a remarkable episode in the history of human migration and seafaring. We report on an ocean-sailing canoe dating from close to that time. A large section of a complex composite canoe was discovered recently at Anaweka on the New Zealand coast. The canoe dates to approximately A.D. 1400 and was contemporary with continuing interisland voyaging. It was built in New Zealand as an early adaptation to a new environment, and a sea turtle carved on its hull makes symbolic connections with wider Polynesian culture and art. We describe the find and identify and radiocarbon date the construction materials. We present a reconstruction of the whole canoe and compare it to another early canoe previously discovered in the Society Islands.

  1. Discovering words in fluent speech: the contribution of two kinds of statistical information.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Erik D; Erickson, Lucy C

    2012-01-01

    To efficiently segment fluent speech, infants must discover the predominant phonological form of words in the native language. In English, for example, content words typically begin with a stressed syllable. To discover this regularity, infants need to identify a set of words. We propose that statistical learning plays two roles in this process. First, it provides a cue that allows infants to segment words from fluent speech, even without language-specific phonological knowledge. Second, once infants have identified a set of lexical forms, they can learn from the distribution of acoustic features across those word forms. The current experiments demonstrate both processes are available to 5-month-old infants. This demonstration of sensitivity to statistical structure in speech, weighted more heavily than phonological cues to segmentation at an early age, is consistent with theoretical accounts that claim statistical learning plays a role in helping infants to adapt to the structure of their native language from very early in life.

  2. Discovering novel neuroactive drugs through high-throughput behavior-based chemical screening in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Giancarlo; Lakhani, Parth; Kokel, David

    2014-01-01

    Most neuroactive drugs were discovered through unexpected behavioral observations. Systematic behavioral screening is inefficient in most model organisms. But, automated technologies are enabling a new phase of discovery-based research in central nervous system (CNS) pharmacology. Researchers are using large-scale behavior-based chemical screens in zebrafish to discover compounds with new structures, targets, and functions. These compounds are powerful tools for understanding CNS signaling pathways. Substantial differences between human and zebrafish biology will make it difficult to translate these discoveries to clinical medicine. However, given the molecular genetic similarities between humans and zebrafish, it is likely that some of these compounds will have translational utility. We predict that the greatest new successes in CNS drug discovery will leverage many model systems, including in vitro assays, cells, rodents, and zebrafish. PMID:25104936

  3. HATS-1b: THE FIRST TRANSITING PLANET DISCOVERED BY THE HATSouth SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Penev, K.; Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Conroy, P.; Jordan, A.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Mohler, M.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csak, B.; Beky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-1b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V = 12.05 G dwarf star GSC 6652-00186, and the first planet discovered by HATSouth, a global network of autonomous wide-field telescopes. HATS-1b has a period of P Almost-Equal-To 3.4465 days, mass of M{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 1.86 M{sub J}, and radius of R{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 1.30 R{sub J}. The host star has a mass of 0.99 M{sub Sun} and radius of 1.04 R{sub Sun }. The discovery light curve of HATS-1b has near-continuous coverage over several multi-day timespans, demonstrating the power of using a global network of telescopes to discover transiting planets.

  4. Discovering words in fluent speech: the contribution of two kinds of statistical information.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Erik D; Erickson, Lucy C

    2012-01-01

    To efficiently segment fluent speech, infants must discover the predominant phonological form of words in the native language. In English, for example, content words typically begin with a stressed syllable. To discover this regularity, infants need to identify a set of words. We propose that statistical learning plays two roles in this process. First, it provides a cue that allows infants to segment words from fluent speech, even without language-specific phonological knowledge. Second, once infants have identified a set of lexical forms, they can learn from the distribution of acoustic features across those word forms. The current experiments demonstrate both processes are available to 5-month-old infants. This demonstration of sensitivity to statistical structure in speech, weighted more heavily than phonological cues to segmentation at an early age, is consistent with theoretical accounts that claim statistical learning plays a role in helping infants to adapt to the structure of their native language from very early in life. PMID:23335903

  5. An early sophisticated East Polynesian voyaging canoe discovered on New Zealand's coast.

    PubMed

    Johns, Dilys A; Irwin, Geoffrey J; Sung, Yun K

    2014-10-14

    The colonization of the islands of East Polynesia was a remarkable episode in the history of human migration and seafaring. We report on an ocean-sailing canoe dating from close to that time. A large section of a complex composite canoe was discovered recently at Anaweka on the New Zealand coast. The canoe dates to approximately A.D. 1400 and was contemporary with continuing interisland voyaging. It was built in New Zealand as an early adaptation to a new environment, and a sea turtle carved on its hull makes symbolic connections with wider Polynesian culture and art. We describe the find and identify and radiocarbon date the construction materials. We present a reconstruction of the whole canoe and compare it to another early canoe previously discovered in the Society Islands. PMID:25267657

  6. RAT J1953+1859: a dwarf nova discovered through high amplitude QPOs in quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Gavin; Hakala, Pasi; Barclay, Thomas; Wheatley, Peter; Marshall, George; Lehto, Harry; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Nelemans, Gijs; Potter, Stephen; Todd, Ian

    2009-09-01

    We report the discovery of an accreting binary, RAT J1953+1859, made during the RApid Temporal Survey (RATS) on the Isaac Newton Telescope. It showed high amplitude (0.3 mag) quasi-periodic oscillations on a time-scale of ~20 min. Further observations made using the Nordic Optical Telescope showed it to be ~4 mag brighter than in the discovery images. These photometric observations, together with radial velocity data taken using the William Herschel Telescope, point to an orbital period of ~90 min. These data suggest that RAT J1953+1859 is a dwarf novae of the SU UMa type. What makes RAT J1953+1859 unusual is that it is the first such system to be discovered as a result of high amplitude QPOs during quiescence. This suggests that high-cadence wide-field surveys could be another means to discover cataclysmic variables as a result of their short period variability.

  7. An early sophisticated East Polynesian voyaging canoe discovered on New Zealand's coast

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Dilys A.; Irwin, Geoffrey J.; Sung, Yun K.

    2014-01-01

    The colonization of the islands of East Polynesia was a remarkable episode in the history of human migration and seafaring. We report on an ocean-sailing canoe dating from close to that time. A large section of a complex composite canoe was discovered recently at Anaweka on the New Zealand coast. The canoe dates to approximately A.D. 1400 and was contemporary with continuing interisland voyaging. It was built in New Zealand as an early adaptation to a new environment, and a sea turtle carved on its hull makes symbolic connections with wider Polynesian culture and art. We describe the find and identify and radiocarbon date the construction materials. We present a reconstruction of the whole canoe and compare it to another early canoe previously discovered in the Society Islands. PMID:25267657

  8. A newly-discovered accurate early drawing of M51, the Whirlpool Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, William; Holberg, J. B.

    2008-07-01

    We have discovered a lost drawing of M51, the nebula in which spiral structure was first discovered by Lord Rosse. The drawing was made in April 1862 by Jean Chacornac at the Paris Observatory using Lèon Foucault's newly-completed 80-cm silvered-glass reflecting telescope. Comparison with modern images shows that Chacornac's drawing was more accurate with respect to gross structure and showed fainter details than any other nineteenth century drawing, although its superiority would not have been apparent at the time without nebular photography to provide a standard against which to judge drawing quality. M51 is now known as the Whirlpool Nebula, but the astronomical appropriation of ‘whirlpool’ predates Rosse's discovery.

  9. cPPB-aE is discovered from photosynthetic benthic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Norico; Tanaka, Ayumi; Horiguchi, Takeo

    2014-02-01

    Although chlorophyll degradation pathways in higher plants have been well studied, little is known about the mechanisms of chlorophyll degradation in microalgae. In this article, we report the occurrence of a chlorophyll a derivative that has never been discovered in photosynthetic organisms. This chlorophyll derivative emits no fluorescence and has a peculiar absorbance peak at 425, 451, 625, and 685 nm. From these features, it was identified as 13(2) ,17(3) -cyclopheophorbide a enol (cPPB-aE), reported as a degradation product of chlorophyll a derived from prey algal cells in heterotrophic protists. We discovered cPPB-aE in six benthic photosynthetic dinoflagellates that are phylogenetically separated into four clades based on SSU rDNA molecular phylogeny. This is the first report of this chlorophyll derivative in photosynthetic organisms and we suggest that the derivative is used to quench excess light energy.

  10. Spiking neurons can discover predictive features by aggregate-label learning.

    PubMed

    Gütig, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The brain routinely discovers sensory clues that predict opportunities or dangers. However, it is unclear how neural learning processes can bridge the typically long delays between sensory clues and behavioral outcomes. Here, I introduce a learning concept, aggregate-label learning, that enables biologically plausible model neurons to solve this temporal credit assignment problem. Aggregate-label learning matches a neuron's number of output spikes to a feedback signal that is proportional to the number of clues but carries no information about their timing. Aggregate-label learning outperforms stochastic reinforcement learning at identifying predictive clues and is able to solve unsegmented speech-recognition tasks. Furthermore, it allows unsupervised neural networks to discover reoccurring constellations of sensory features even when they are widely dispersed across space and time.

  11. Chandra ToO observations of Gaia-discovered tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonker, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The Gaia satellite is predicted to discover more than 100 Tidal Disruption Events per year. A small fraction should have X-ray emission bright enough to allow detailed Chandra follow-up observations. These observations can be compared with the theoretical predictions for the outflows and presence of absorption lines and edges. Tidal disruption events are also our only way to determine black hole properties of otherwise dormant black holes in galaxies beyond a few local galaxies.

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Newly Discovered Fibrous Aggregates of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Yuge, Ryota; Nihey, Fumiyuki; Toyama, Kiyohiko; Yudasaka, Masako

    2016-09-01

    Fibrous aggregates composed of radially assembled graphene-based single-walled nanotubules are prepared, named here as fibrous aggregates of single-walled carbon nanohorns (fib-CNHs), whose structure resembles that of chenille stems. The newly discovered fib-CNHs are 30-100 nm in diameter and 1-10 μm in length. The fib-CNHs show high dispersibility and conductivity. The fib-CNHs increase the advantages of nanocarbons in various fields. PMID:27226221

  13. Mixture of Switching Linear Dynamics to Discover Behavior Patterns in Object Tracks.

    PubMed

    Kooij, Julian F P; Englebienne, Gwenn; Gavrila, Dariu M

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel non-parametric Bayesian model to jointly discover the dynamics of low-level actions and high-level behaviors of tracked objects. In our approach, actions capture both linear, low-level object dynamics, and an additional spatial distribution on where the dynamic occurs. Furthermore, behavior classes capture high-level temporal motion dependencies in Markov chains of actions, thus each learned behavior is a switching linear dynamical system. The number of actions and behaviors is discovered from the data itself using Dirichlet Processes. We are especially interested in cases where tracks can exhibit large kinematic and spatial variations, e.g. person tracks in open environments, as found in the visual surveillance and intelligent vehicle domains. The model handles real-valued features directly, so no information is lost by quantizing measurements into 'visual words', and variations in standing, walking and running can be discovered without discrete thresholds. We describe inference using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling and validate our approach on several artificial and real-world pedestrian track datasets from the surveillance and intelligent vehicle domain. We show that our model can distinguish between relevant behavior patterns that an existing state-of-the-art hierarchical model for clustering and simpler model variants cannot. The software and the artificial and surveillance datasets are made publicly available for benchmarking purposes.

  14. Extragalactic Transients Discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN Team

    2015-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the extra-galactic sky down to V~17 mag every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes in the northern and southern hemispheres, hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network. The primary goal of ASAS-SN is a complete survey of bright, nearby supernovae (SNe), and since April 2013 ASAS-SN has discovered over 40 new Type-Ia SNe and over 15 new core collapse SNe, including roughly half of all the SNe currently visible with V<17 mag. ASAS-SN also discovers many other interesting extragalactic transients, the most exciting of which was the recent tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-14ae at ~200 Mpc, the closest TDE ever discovered at optical wavelengths. The brightness of these nearby events allows detailed follow-up at many wavelengths. Here we present some of these data on recent ASAS-SN extragalactic transients.

  15. Improving the Interpretability of Classification Rules Discovered by an Ant Colony Algorithm: Extended Results.

    PubMed

    Otero, Fernando E B; Freitas, Alex A

    2016-01-01

    Most ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithms for inducing classification rules use a ACO-based procedure to create a rule in a one-at-a-time fashion. An improved search strategy has been proposed in the cAnt-Miner[Formula: see text] algorithm, where an ACO-based procedure is used to create a complete list of rules (ordered rules), i.e., the ACO search is guided by the quality of a list of rules instead of an individual rule. In this paper we propose an extension of the cAnt-Miner[Formula: see text] algorithm to discover a set of rules (unordered rules). The main motivations for this work are to improve the interpretation of individual rules by discovering a set of rules and to evaluate the impact on the predictive accuracy of the algorithm. We also propose a new measure to evaluate the interpretability of the discovered rules to mitigate the fact that the commonly used model size measure ignores how the rules are used to make a class prediction. Comparisons with state-of-the-art rule induction algorithms, support vector machines, and the cAnt-Miner[Formula: see text] producing ordered rules are also presented.

  16. Discovering Multimodal Behavior in Ms. Pac-Man through Evolution of Modular Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Schrum, Jacob; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Ms. Pac-Man is a challenging video game in which multiple modes of behavior are required: Ms. Pac-Man must escape ghosts when they are threats and catch them when they are edible, in addition to eating all pills in each level. Past approaches to learning behavior in Ms. Pac-Man have treated the game as a single task to be learned using monolithic policy representations. In contrast, this paper uses a framework called Modular Multi-objective NEAT (MM-NEAT) to evolve modular neural networks. Each module defines a separate behavior. The modules are used at different times according to a policy that can be human-designed (i.e. Multitask) or discovered automatically by evolution. The appropriate number of modules can be fixed or discovered using a genetic operator called Module Mutation. Several versions of Module Mutation are evaluated in this paper. Both fixed modular networks and Module Mutation networks outperform monolithic networks and Multitask networks. Interestingly, the best networks dedicate modules to critical behaviors (such as escaping when surrounded after luring ghosts near a power pill) that do not follow the customary division of the game into chasing edible and escaping threat ghosts. The results demonstrate that MM-NEAT can discover interesting and effective behavior for agents in challenging games. PMID:27030803

  17. Mixture of Switching Linear Dynamics to Discover Behavior Patterns in Object Tracks.

    PubMed

    Kooij, Julian F P; Englebienne, Gwenn; Gavrila, Dariu M

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel non-parametric Bayesian model to jointly discover the dynamics of low-level actions and high-level behaviors of tracked objects. In our approach, actions capture both linear, low-level object dynamics, and an additional spatial distribution on where the dynamic occurs. Furthermore, behavior classes capture high-level temporal motion dependencies in Markov chains of actions, thus each learned behavior is a switching linear dynamical system. The number of actions and behaviors is discovered from the data itself using Dirichlet Processes. We are especially interested in cases where tracks can exhibit large kinematic and spatial variations, e.g. person tracks in open environments, as found in the visual surveillance and intelligent vehicle domains. The model handles real-valued features directly, so no information is lost by quantizing measurements into 'visual words', and variations in standing, walking and running can be discovered without discrete thresholds. We describe inference using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling and validate our approach on several artificial and real-world pedestrian track datasets from the surveillance and intelligent vehicle domain. We show that our model can distinguish between relevant behavior patterns that an existing state-of-the-art hierarchical model for clustering and simpler model variants cannot. The software and the artificial and surveillance datasets are made publicly available for benchmarking purposes. PMID:26761737

  18. SPIRITS15c: An Unusual Transient Discovered in the Mid-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jencson, Jacob; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; SPIRITS Team

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic infrared (IR) sky is only now beginning to be explored. SPIRITS, the SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey, is a systematic search of 194 nearby galaxies (< 20 Mpc), on timescales ranging from one week to few years, for mid-IR transients in the Spitzer/IRAC bands at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. The SPIRITS team is discovering over 40 transients and 1200 strong variables annually, some of which lie in the luminosity gap between novae and supernovae. Here, we highlight an especially interesting transient discovered by SPIRITS in IC 2163 in February 2015. SPIRITS15c is one of our most luminous and reddest transients discovered thus far. Its spectrum shows a broad ~ 8000 km s-1 He I emission line, but almost no other strong spectral features. We explore a number of possible physical phenomena to explain this event including a massive stellar merger, an electron-capture supernova, and even a more exotic scenario similar to the unusual, He-rich, nova-like outburst of V445 Puppis in 2000.

  19. Application and evaluation of the WRF-CMAQ modeling system to the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ Baltimore-Washington D.C. study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, W.; Gilliam, R. C.; Pouliot, G. A.; Godowitch, J. M.; Pleim, J.; Hogrefe, C.; Kang, D.; Roselle, S. J.; Mathur, R.

    2013-12-01

    The DISCOVER-AQ project (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality), is a joint collaboration between NASA, U.S. EPA and a number of other local organizations with the goal of characterizing air quality in urban areas using satellite, aircraft, vertical profiler and ground based measurements (http://discover-aq.larc.nasa.gov). In July 2011, the DISCOVER-AQ project conducted intensive air quality measurements in the Baltimore, MD and Washington, D.C. area in the eastern U.S. To take advantage of these unique data, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to simulate the meteorology and air quality in the same region using 12-km, 4-km and 1-km horizontal grid spacings. The goal of the modeling exercise is to demonstrate the capability of the coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system to simulate air quality at fine grid spacings in an urban area. Development of new data assimilation techniques and the use of higher resolution input data for the WRF model have been implemented to improve the meteorological results, particularly at the 4-km and 1-km grid resolutions. In addition, a number of updates to the CMAQ model were made to enhance the capability of the modeling system to accurately represent the magnitude and spatial distribution of pollutants at fine model resolutions. Data collected during the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ campaign, which include aircraft transects and spirals, ship measurements in the Chesapeake Bay, ozonesondes, tethered balloon measurements, DRAGON aerosol optical depth measurements, LIDAR measurements, and intensive ground-based site measurements, are used to evaluate results from the WRF-CMAQ modeling system for July 2011 at the three model grid resolutions. The results of the comparisons of the model results to these measurements will be presented, along with results from the various sensitivity simulations

  20. Effective Monitoring and Control of Outsourced Software Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponisio, Laura; Vruggink, Peter

    In our study of four outsourcing projects we discover mechanisms to support managerial decision making during software development processes. We report on Customer Office, a framework used in practice that facilitates reasoning about projects by highlighting information paths and making co-ordination issues explicit. The results suggest a key role of modularisation and standardisation to assist in value creation, by facilitating information flow and keeping the overview of the project. The practical implications of our findings are guidelines for managing outsourcing projects such as to have a modularised view of the project based on knowledge domains and to standardise co-ordination operations.

  1. UnCommon Knowledge: Projects That Help Middle-School-Age Youth Discover the Science and Mathematics in Everyday Life. Volume Two: Hands-On Math Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Carolyn S.; Cohen, Sara; Keyes, Marian; Kusimo, Patricia S.; Lunsford, Crystal

    This guide contains hands-on mathematics activities to connect middle-school students to the traditional knowledge of their grandparents and elders. Because girls often lose interest in math at the middle-school level, and because women in some communities (especially in rural areas) are seldom involved in work with an obvious math basis, the…

  2. UnCommon Knowledge: Projects That Help Middle-School-Age Youth Discover the Science and Mathematics in Everyday Life. Volume One: Hands-On Science Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Carolyn S.; Keyes, Marian; Kusimo, Patricia S.; Lunsford, Crystal

    This guide contains hands-on science activities to connect middle-school students to the traditional knowledge of their grandparents and elders. Because girls often lose interest in science at the middle-school level, and because women in some communities (especially in rural areas) are seldom involved in work with an obvious science basis, the…

  3. 43 CFR 3832.45 - How do I obtain any minerals that I discover within my tunnel site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... discover within my tunnel site? 3832.45 Section 3832.45 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.45 How do I obtain any minerals that I discover within my tunnel site? (a) Even if you have located the tunnel site, you must separately locate a lode...

  4. 43 CFR 3832.45 - How do I obtain any minerals that I discover within my tunnel site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... discover within my tunnel site? 3832.45 Section 3832.45 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.45 How do I obtain any minerals that I discover within my tunnel site? (a) Even if you have located the tunnel site, you must separately locate a lode...

  5. 43 CFR 3832.45 - How do I obtain any minerals that I discover within my tunnel site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... discover within my tunnel site? 3832.45 Section 3832.45 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.45 How do I obtain any minerals that I discover within my tunnel site? (a) Even if you have located the tunnel site, you must separately locate a lode...

  6. 43 CFR 3832.45 - How do I obtain any minerals that I discover within my tunnel site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... discover within my tunnel site? 3832.45 Section 3832.45 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to...) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.45 How do I obtain any minerals that I discover within my tunnel site? (a) Even if you have located the tunnel site, you must separately locate a lode...

  7. Why good projects fail anyway.

    PubMed

    Matta, Nadim F; Ashkenas, Ronald N

    2003-09-01

    Big projects fail at an astonishing rate--more than half the time, by some estimates. It's not hard to understand why. Complicated long-term projects are customarily developed by a series of teams working along parallel tracks. If managers fail to anticipate everything that might fall through the cracks, those tracks will not converge successfully at the end to reach the goal. Take a companywide CRM project. Traditionally, one team might analyze customers, another select the software, a third develop training programs, and so forth. When the project's finally complete, though, it may turn out that the salespeople won't enter in the requisite data because they don't understand why they need to. This very problem has, in fact, derailed many CRM programs at major organizations. There is a way to uncover unanticipated problems while the project is still in development. The key is to inject into the overall plan a series of miniprojects, or "rapid-results initiatives," which each have as their goal a miniature version of the overall goal. In the CRM project, a single team might be charged with increasing the revenues of one sales group in one region by 25% within four months. To reach that goal, team members would have to draw on the work of all the parallel teams. But in just four months, they would discover the salespeople's resistance and probably other unforeseen issues, such as, perhaps, the need to divvy up commissions for joint-selling efforts. The World Bank has used rapid-results initiatives to great effect to keep a sweeping 16-year project on track and deliver visible results years ahead of schedule. In taking an in-depth look at this project, and others, the authors show why this approach is so effective and how the initiatives are managed in conjunction with more traditional project activities.

  8. Map projections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1993-01-01

    A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface. This cannot be done without some distortion. Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection. The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important features. Mapmakers and mathematicians have devised almost limitless ways to project the image of the globe onto paper. Scientists at the U. S. Geological Survey have designed projections for their specific needs—such as the Space Oblique Mercator, which allows mapping from satellites with little or no distortion. This document gives the key properties, characteristics, and preferred uses of many historically important projections and of those frequently used by mapmakers today.

  9. The COMPADRE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, S. E.

    2004-12-01

    ComPADRE is a joint project of the American Association of Physics Teachers, the American Astronomical Society, the American Institute of Physics/Society of Physics Students, and the American Physical Society. The project's goals are to provide focused collections of educational resources that support communities whose core membership belongs to and identifies with the societies. These resources are available to a broad audience. The partnership of physics and astronomy professional societies is vital to the success of comPADRE, since the societies provide a stable, sustaining force for the collections developed here. The American Astronomical Society is building the Astronomycenter to support instructors of undergraduate introductory astronomy courses. The sources of material include links to online resources such as astronomical images, applets, laboratory simulations, and electronic and print journals. The sources of material will be identified, selected and assessed by reviewers, drawn from the community of instructors. The Astronomycenter will collect, annotate, organize, and deliver the very best of this material. ComPADRE is currently funded by a two-year grant from the National Science Foundations NSDL (National Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education Digital Library) program. The NSDL is an NSF effort to support science literacy, at all levels, through access to the materials and methods by which we discover the nature of the physical universe.

  10. Discovering functional modules by topic modeling RNA-Seq based toxicogenomic data.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ke; Gong, Binsheng; Lee, Mikyung; Liu, Zhichao; Xu, Joshua; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida

    2014-09-15

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) endeavors to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms through exploring gene expression profiles in response to toxic substances. Recently, RNA-Seq is increasingly regarded as a more powerful alternative to microarrays in TGx studies. However, realizing RNA-Seq's full potential requires novel approaches to extracting information from the complex TGx data. Considering read counts as the number of times a word occurs in a document, gene expression profiles from RNA-Seq are analogous to a word by document matrix used in text mining. Topic modeling aiming at to discover the latent structures in text corpora would be helpful to explore RNA-Seq based TGx data. In this study, topic modeling was applied on a typical RNA-Seq based TGx data set to discover hidden functional modules. The RNA-Seq based gene expression profiles were transformed into "documents", on which latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) was used to build a topic model. We found samples treated by the compounds with the same modes of actions (MoAs) could be clustered based on topic similarities. The topic most relevant to each cluster was identified as a "marker" topic, which was interpreted by gene enrichment analysis with MoAs then confirmed by compound and pathways associations mined from literature. To further validate the "marker" topics, we tested topic transferability from RNA-Seq to microarrays. The RNA-Seq based gene expression profile of a topic specifically associated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) signaling pathway was used to query samples with similar expression profiles in two different microarray data sets, yielding accuracy of about 85%. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the applicability of topic modeling to discover functional modules in RNA-Seq data and suggests a valuable computational tool for leveraging information within TGx data in RNA-Seq era. PMID:25083553

  11. Fine-scale WRF-CMAQ Modeling for the 2013 DISCOVER-AQ Campaign in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, R. C.; Pleim, J. E.; Appel, W.

    2014-12-01

    Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) is an ongoing four year NASA campaign to improve remote sensing in order to better resolve the distribution of pollutants in the lower atmosphere for public health reasons. These observational campaigns are a prime opportunity to evaluate and improve weather and air quality models, in particular the finer scales, since the collected observations are not only unique (boundary layer profiles, planetary boundary layer height and LIDAR), but of high spatial density. For the first campaign in the Washington DC-Baltimore region, a number of meteorological model improvements were crucial for quality results at the finer grid scales. The main techniques tested in the DISCOVER-AQ Washington DC-Baltimore experiment were iterative indirect soil nudging, a simple urban parameterization based on highly resolved impervious surface data, and the use of a high resolution 1 km sea surface temperature dataset. A fourth technique, first tested in a separate cold season application in the US Rocky Mountains, was the assimilation of high resolution 1 km SNOw Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) data for better snow cover representation in retrospective modeling. These methods will be leveraged using a nested 12-4-2 km WRF-CMAQ modeling platform for the 2013 DISCOVER-AQ California campaign where the 2 km domain covers the entire San Joaquin Valley (SJV), coastal areas and all of Los Angeles. The purpose is to demonstrate methods to derive high quality meteorology for retrospective air quality modeling over geographically complex areas of the Western US where current coarser resolution modeling may not be sufficient. Accurate air quality modeling is particularly important for California, which has some of the most polluted areas in the US, within the SJV. Furthermore, this work may inform modeling in other areas of the Intermountain West that are experiencing air

  12. Mutations, associated with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, discovered in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Bagyinszky, Eva; Youn, Young Chul; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, SangYun

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of senile dementia, is a genetically complex disorder. In most Asian countries, the population and the number of AD patients are growing rapidly, and the genetics of AD has been extensively studied, except in Japan. However, recent studies have been started to investigate the genes and mutations associated with AD in Korea, the People’s Republic of China, and Malaysia. This review describes all of the known mutations in three early-onset AD (EOAD) causative genes (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) that were discovered in Asian countries. Most of the EOAD-associated mutations have been detected in PSEN1, and several novel PSEN1 mutations were recently identified in patients from various parts of the world, including Asia. Until 2014, no PSEN2 mutations were found in Asian patients; however, emerging studies from Korea and the People’s Republic of China discovered probably pathogenic PSEN2 mutations. Since several novel mutations were discovered in these three genes, we also discuss the predictions on their pathogenic nature. This review briefly summarizes genome-wide association studies of late-onset AD and the genes that might be associated with AD in Asian countries. Standard sequencing is a widely used method, but it has limitations in terms of time, cost, and efficacy. Next-generation sequencing strategies could facilitate genetic analysis and association studies. Genetic testing is important for the accurate diagnosis and for understanding disease-associated pathways and might also improve disease therapy and prevention. PMID:27799753

  13. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  14. Why are membrane targets discovered by phenotypic screens and genome sequencing in Mycobacterium tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Goldman, Robert C

    2013-11-01

    High through put screening (HTS) was extensively used in attempts to discover new TB drugs from libraries of pure small molecule compounds many of which complied with the rule of five. Coupled with new methods for determining the target of lead compounds by resistance selection followed by genome sequencing, screening for growth inhibitors led to several recent reports of compounds linked to specific antitubercular targets. This systematic approach to drug discovery appears at present to select for small, hydrophobic molecules affecting the function of essential membrane proteins, for example DprE, MmpL3, AtpE, QcrB, and Pks13. All of these molecules possessed bactericidal activity in vitro. Mutations in GlpK were also selected with hydrophobic compounds identified by screening for growth inhibitors. The chemical properties of the compounds reported are considered in the context of uptake and possible mechanisms of inhibition of membrane bound targets based on other model systems (e.g. cardiovascular drugs affecting voltage-gated L-type calcium channels, daptomycin, telavancin, gramicidin S, and role of boundary lipids). The relationship between hydrophobicity, compound uptake, and mode of action are addressed. Compared to the average calculated logP for approved TB drugs of -1.0, the average for these hydrophobic compounds is 4.0 representing a major shift in hydrophobicity of 5 orders of magnitude. Furthermore several hydrophobic compounds in the Prestwick Chemical Library (FDA approved drugs) inhibit growth of M. tuberculosis at 10 μg/ml or less and have an average calculated logP of 5.7 signaling caution with respect to specificity. Key recommendations are made regarding follow-up of the hydrophobic leads recently discovered using phenotypic screening and target elucidation by genome sequencing. Consideration is also given to the properties of small molecule screening libraries, the types of molecules and targets recently discovered as antitubercular leads

  15. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity.

    PubMed

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Weiner, Michael W; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Hansell, Narelle K; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-03-19

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain's connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain's wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases.

  16. Chandra Discovers X-Ray Ring Around Cosmic Powerhouse in Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    After barely two months in space, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has taken a stunning image of the Crab Nebula, the spectacular remains of a stellar explosion, and has revealed something never seen before: a brilliant ring around the nebula's heart. Combined with observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, the image provides important clues to the puzzle of how the cosmic "generator," a pulsing neutron star, energizes the nebula, which still glows brightly almost 1,000 years after the explosion. "The inner ring is unique," said Professor Jeff Hester of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ. "It has never been seen before, and it should tell us a lot about how the energy from the pulsar gets into the nebula. It's like finding the transmission lines between the power plant and the light bulb." Professor Mal Ruderman of Columbia University, New York, NY, agreed. "The X-rays Chandra sees are the best tracer of where the energy is. With images such as these, we can directly diagnose what is going on." What is going on, according to Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra Project Scientist from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, is awesome. "The Crab pulsar is accelerating particles up to the speed of light and flinging them out into interstellar space at an incredible rate." The image shows tilted rings or waves of high-energy particles that appear to have been flung outward over the distance of a light year from the central star, and high-energy jets of particles blasting away from the neutron star in a direction perpendicular to the spiral. Hubble Space Telescope images have shown moving knots and wisps around the neutron star, and previous X-ray images have shown the outer parts of the jet and hinted at the ring structure. With Chandra's exceptional resolution, the jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and the ring pattern clearly appears. The image was made with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and High Energy Transmission

  17. High School Students Discover Neutron Star Using Chandra and VLA Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    strengthened the team's case that a pulsar powers the supernova remnant by confirming the existence of the point-like source and discovering a cloud, or nebula, of high-energy electrons around the central object. Such nebulas are a common characteristic of pulsars. "The experience of doing new and relevant science has been one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had," said Olbert, a senior at NCSSM and lead author on the paper submitted to the Astrophysical Journal. "I never expected to publish a scientific paper while I was still in high school." The remnant of the IC443 supernova is a well-studied object. Astronomers have searched this region (roughly 5,000 light years from Earth) for the neutron star created in the explosion that they thought should be there, judging from the size and dynamics of the supernova remnant. The comet-shaped appearance of the cloud of high-energy particles indicates that the neutron star is moving through IC 443. Like the wake of a supersonic airplane, the swept-back shape of the nebula around the neutron star allowed the students to measure the speed it is traveling away from its origin. Using this result and the apparent distance that the neutron star has traveled from the center of the supernova remnant, the students calculated that the light from the initial explosion arrived at Earth about 30,000 years ago, thus addressing an outstanding question about IC 443. Neutron stars, such as the one found by the NCSSM team, are the compact hot embers of very massive stars that have exhausted their fuel and expelled their own shells. The remaining cores, often no more than 10 miles in diameter, are very dense objects that sometimes spin and release beams of particles along their magnetic poles. Created in 1998 by the non-profit Siemens Foundation, the Siemens-Westinghouse Science & Technology Competition promotes and advances science and mathematics education in America. The Competition is open to individuals and teams of high school

  18. Newly discovered sediment rock-hosted disseminated gold deposits in the People's Republic of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Charles G.; Ashley, Roger P.; Chou, I. -Ming; Huang, Zushu; Chaoyuan, Wan; Li, Wenkang

    1988-01-01

    Five deposits discovered in Guizhou Province, Yata, Getang, Sanchahe, Ceyang, and Banqi are described for the first time in Western literature. The deposits have geologic features and geochemical signatures that are remarkably similar to those of sedimentary rock-hosted precious metal deposits in the United States. The sizes of the deposits are as yet undetermined, but they each contain significant reserves at average grades of 4 to 5 g of gold per metric ton. Exploration and drilling are in progress at all of the deposits, and other areas where the geologic setting and geochemical anomalies are similar are being tested.

  19. Swarm intelligence in bioinformatics: methods and implementations for discovering patterns of multiple sequences.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhihua; Zhang, Yi

    2014-02-01

    As a promising and innovative research field, bioinformatics has attracted increasing attention recently. Beneath the enormous number of open problems in this field, one fundamental issue is about the accurate and efficient computational methodology that can deal with tremendous amounts of data. In this paper, we survey some applications of swarm intelligence to discover patterns of multiple sequences. To provide a deep insight, ant colony optimization, particle swarm optimization, artificial bee colony and artificial fish swarm algorithm are selected, and their applications to multiple sequence alignment and motif detecting problem are discussed.

  20. Discovering novel causal patterns from biomedical natural-language texts using Bayesian nets.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, John; Rivas, Alejandro

    2008-11-01

    Most of the biomedicine text mining approaches do not deal with specific cause--effect patterns that may explain the discoveries. In order to fill this gap, this paper proposes an effective new model for text mining from biomedicine literature that helps to discover cause--effect hypotheses related to diseases, drugs, etc. The supervised approach combines Bayesian inference methods with natural-language processing techniques in order to generate simple and interesting patterns. The results of applying the model to biomedicine text databases and its comparison with other state-of-the-art methods are also discussed.

  1. Microanalytical study of some cosmic dust discovered in sea-floor sediments in China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shijie, Z.; Hanchang, P.; Zhong, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The study of cosmic dust can provide useful data in the investigation of the origin of the Earth and the evolution of celestial bodies. Three types of cosmic dust (ferriginous, siliceous, and glassy) were discovered in the seafloor sediments near China. Their chemical composition and microstructure were examined by X-ray diffraction, fractography, and electron microscopy. The major mineral in an iron-containing cosmic dust is magnetite. The silicate spheres contain sundry metals and metal oxides. Glassy microtektites are similar in composition to tektites, and are found in all the major meteorite areas worldwide.

  2. Observations of candidate oscillating eclipsing binaries and two newly discovered pulsating variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakos, A.; Niarchos, P.

    2009-03-01

    CCD observations of 24 eclipsing binary systems with spectral types ranging between A0-F0, candidate for containing pulsating components, were obtained. Appropriate exposure times in one or more photometric filters were used so that short-periodic pulsations could be detected. Their light curves were analyzed using the Period04 software in order to search for pulsational behaviour. Two new variable stars, namely GSC 2673-1583 and GSC 3641-0359, were discov- ered as by-product during the observations of eclipsing variables. The Fourier analysis of the observations of each star, the dominant pulsation frequencies and the derived frequency spectra are also presented.

  3. Palomar Transient Factory Discovers Another Possible super- Chandrasekhar Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, P. E.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Suzuki, N.; Cucchiara, A.; Botyanszki, J.; Hsiao, E. Y.

    2010-10-01

    The Type Ia supernova science working group of the Palomar Transient Factory (ATEL#1964) reports the discovery of a possible super-Chandrasekhar mass supernova, PTF10xgx. The supernova is at RA = 00:12:23.15, Dec = +02:30:44.1 (J2000) in the galaxy identified as APMUKS(BJ) B000949.39+021401.7 (Maddox et al. 1990, MNRAS, 243, 692). The supernova was discovered and classified by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, based on observations made with the Palomar 48-inch Oschin Schmidt telescope.

  4. A Fragment-Based Method to Discover Irreversible Covalent Inhibitors of Cysteine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A novel fragment-based drug discovery approach is reported which irreversibly tethers drug-like fragments to catalytic cysteines. We attached an electrophile to 100 fragments without significant alterations in the reactivity of the electrophile. A mass spectrometry assay discovered three nonpeptidic inhibitors of the cysteine protease papain. The identified compounds display the characteristics of irreversible inhibitors. The irreversible tethering system also displays specificity: the three identified papain inhibitors did not covalently react with UbcH7, USP08, or GST-tagged human rhinovirus 3C protease. PMID:24870364

  5. Project EASIER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvord, David J.; Tack, Leland R.; Dallam, Jerald W.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of Project EASIER, a collaborative electronic-data interchange for networking Iowa local school districts, education agencies, community colleges, universities, and the Department of Education. The primary goal of this project is to develop and implement a system for collection of student information for state and federal…

  6. Effects of PBL Mixing on Simulated NO2 Profile Shapes in the Coupled WRF/CMAQ Model and Comparison to Observations during DISCOVER-AQ July 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Pickering, K. E.; Loughner, C.; Crawford, J. H.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Diskin, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    The first deployment of the NASA Earth Venture -1 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project was conducted during July 2011 in the Baltimore-Washington region. The P-3B aircraft provided in situ vertical profiles of meteorological quantities, trace gases, and aerosols over six Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) air quality monitoring sites over fourteen flight days. A major goal of DISCOVER-AQ is to better understand the processes, such as vertical mixing, controlling profile shape and linking column abundances to surface concentrations for NO2. Model vertical profiles are vital for obtaining accurate satellite retrievals of NO2 and thereby improving the applicability of satellite data for air quality analyses. Accurate simulatiions of the diurnal evolution of the NO2 profiles will be especially important for geostationary satellite retrievals. Model simulations performed using six commonly used PBL schemes with the coupled WRF/CMAQ model will be used to investigate the impact of vertical mixing on NO2 profile shapes. These modeled profiles will also be compared to the observed profiles to evaluate which PBL scheme (if any) best captures the in situ profiles, as well as PBL depth and the observed state of mixing. Lastly, the impact of PBL scheme on the column-surface relationship for NO2 will also be evaluated, and compared to observations.

  7. Measured and modeled CO and NOy in DISCOVER-AQ: An evaluation of emissions and chemistry over the eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Daniel C.; Loughner, Christopher P.; Diskin, Glenn; Weinheimer, Andrew; Canty, Timothy P.; Salawitch, Ross J.; Worden, Helen M.; Fried, Alan; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2014-10-01

    Data collected during the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ field campaign in the Baltimore Washington region were used to evaluate CO and NOx emissions in the National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The average emissions ratio for the region was seen to be 11.2 ± 1.2 mol CO/mol NOx, 21% higher than that predicted by the NEI. Comparisons between in situ and remote observations and CMAQ model output show agreement in CO emissions of 15 ± 11% while NOx emissions are overestimated by 51-70% in Maryland. Satellite observations of CO by MOPITT show agreement with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model within 3% over most of the eastern United States. CMAQ NOy mixing ratios were a factor of two higher than observations and result from a combination of errors in emissions and PAN and alkyl nitrate chemistry, as shown by comparison of three CMAQ model runs. Point source NOx emissions are monitored and agree with modeled emissions within 1% on a monthly basis. Because of this accuracy and the NEI assertion that approximately 3/4 of emissions in the Baltimore Washington region are from mobile sources, the MOVES model's treatment of emissions from aging vehicles should be investigated; the NEI overestimate of NOx emissions could indicate that engines produce less NOx and catalytic converters degrade more slowly than assumed by MOVES2010. The recently released 2011 NEI has an even lower CO/NOx emissions ratio than the projection used in this study; it overestimates NOx emissions by an even larger margin. The implications of these findings for US air quality policy are that NOx concentrations near areas of heavy traffic are overestimated and ozone production rates in these locations are slower than models indicate. Results also indicate that ambient ozone concentrations will respond more efficiently to NOx emissions controls but additional sources may need to be targeted for reductions.

  8. Discovering Symmetry in Everyday Environments: A Creative Approach to Teaching Symmetry and Point Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchigami, Kei; Schrandt, Matthew; Miessler, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    A hands-on symmetry project is proposed as an innovative way of teaching point groups to undergraduate chemistry students. Traditionally, courses teaching symmetry require students to identify the point group of a given object. This project asks the reverse: students are instructed to identify an object that matches each point group. Doing so…

  9. Exploring the Everyday Context of Chemical Elements: Discovering the Elements of Car Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a project about the chemical elements made by 15-year-old Spanish high school students of Chemistry. It focuses on context-based teaching combined with the advantages of creating a large mural which subsequently is exposed in the school. The project consisted of researching the chemical elements in the different materials that…

  10. BIRI: a new approach for automatically discovering and indexing available public bioinformatics resources from the literature

    PubMed Central

    de la Calle, Guillermo; García-Remesal, Miguel; Chiesa, Stefano; de la Iglesia, Diana; Maojo, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Background The rapid evolution of Internet technologies and the collaborative approaches that dominate the field have stimulated the development of numerous bioinformatics resources. To address this new framework, several initiatives have tried to organize these services and resources. In this paper, we present the BioInformatics Resource Inventory (BIRI), a new approach for automatically discovering and indexing available public bioinformatics resources using information extracted from the scientific literature. The index generated can be automatically updated by adding additional manuscripts describing new resources. We have developed web services and applications to test and validate our approach. It has not been designed to replace current indexes but to extend their capabilities with richer functionalities. Results We developed a web service to provide a set of high-level query primitives to access the index. The web service can be used by third-party web services or web-based applications. To test the web service, we created a pilot web application to access a preliminary knowledge base of resources. We tested our tool using an initial set of 400 abstracts. Almost 90% of the resources described in the abstracts were correctly classified. More than 500 descriptions of functionalities were extracted. Conclusion These experiments suggest the feasibility of our approach for automatically discovering and indexing current and future bioinformatics resources. Given the domain-independent characteristics of this tool, it is currently being applied by the authors in other areas, such as medical nanoinformatics. BIRI is available at . PMID:19811635

  11. Discovering governing equations from data by sparse identification of nonlinear dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Steven L; Proctor, Joshua L; Kutz, J Nathan

    2016-04-12

    Extracting governing equations from data is a central challenge in many diverse areas of science and engineering. Data are abundant whereas models often remain elusive, as in climate science, neuroscience, ecology, finance, and epidemiology, to name only a few examples. In this work, we combine sparsity-promoting techniques and machine learning with nonlinear dynamical systems to discover governing equations from noisy measurement data. The only assumption about the structure of the model is that there are only a few important terms that govern the dynamics, so that the equations are sparse in the space of possible functions; this assumption holds for many physical systems in an appropriate basis. In particular, we use sparse regression to determine the fewest terms in the dynamic governing equations required to accurately represent the data. This results in parsimonious models that balance accuracy with model complexity to avoid overfitting. We demonstrate the algorithm on a wide range of problems, from simple canonical systems, including linear and nonlinear oscillators and the chaotic Lorenz system, to the fluid vortex shedding behind an obstacle. The fluid example illustrates the ability of this method to discover the underlying dynamics of a system that took experts in the community nearly 30 years to resolve. We also show that this method generalizes to parameterized systems and systems that are time-varying or have external forcing. PMID:27035946

  12. Phenomena Discovered During Immersion of Steel Parts into Liquid Quenchants (Overview)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobasko, Nikolai I.

    2014-12-01

    In the paper, new phenomena are discussed which were discovered during investigation of the intensive quenching processes. It is shown that in many cases film boiling is prevented completely during quenching of steel parts in cold liquids, especially in water salt solutions. In this case, the part surface temperature drops almost immediately to the liquid boiling point at the beginning of the quench and then maintains at this level for a relatively long time, i.e., the so-called self-regulated thermal process is established. A simple equation for determining the duration of the self-regulated thermal process is proposed. Thermal waves are generated during an immersion of steel parts into a cold liquid and after the self-regulated thermal process is completed. The thermal waves move in opposite direction from where the cooling process starts. The self-regulated thermal process was used to develop an original intensive quenching technology (IQ-2 process). It can be a basis for developing other new technologies such as an austempering and a martempering in cold liquids under pressure. Discovered effects of thermal waves can be used for determining a duration of the self-regulated thermal process and for reconstructing an existing theory on the double electrical layer. Practical examples of calculations of the duration of the self-regulated thermal process are provided in the paper.

  13. Medicinal benefits of marine invertebrates: sources for discovering natural drug candidates.

    PubMed

    De Zoysa, Mahanama

    2012-01-01

    Marine invertebrates are one of the major groups of organisms, which could be diversified under the major taxonomic groups of Porifera, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, and many other minor phyla. To date, range of medicinal benefits and a significant number of marine natural products (MNPs) have been discovered from marine invertebrates. Seafood diet from edible marine invertebrates such as mollusks and crustaceans has been linked with various medicinal benefits to improve human health. Among marine invertebrates, spongers from phylum Porifera is the most dominant group responsible for discovering large number of MNPs, which have been used as template to develop therapeutic drugs. MNPs isolated from invertebrates have shown wide range of therapeutic properties including antimicrobial, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anticoagulant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, wound healing and immune modulator, and other medicinal effects. Therefore, marine invertebrates are rich sources of chemical diversity and health benefits for developing drug candidates, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, and molecular probes that can be supported to increase the healthy life span of human.

  14. Real-time aerosol data assimilation experiments during the 2014 FRAPPE/DISCOVER-AQ field mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) and Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field missions were conducted over the Front Range of Colorado during July and August, 2014. Prior to, and during this period, much of the continental US were impacted by smoke from Canadian and Pacific Northwest wildfires, including the Front Range. This study assesses the impact of real-time assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrievals from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites within the Real-time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS) through comparisons of aerosol predictions with observations for two parallel forecasts that were conducted during FRAPPE/DISCOVER-AQ, one with and one without MODIS AOD assimilation. Results of these real-time assimilation experiments demonstrate that assimilation of MODIS AOD improves the prediction of large-scale smoke events such as those that occurred during July and August, 2014. These assimilation experiments help to guide the development of future operational aerosol forecasting systems within the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) Global Forecasting System (GFS) Aerosol Component (NGAC) under development at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP).

  15. Fragment virtual screening based on Bayesian categorization for discovering novel VEGFR-2 scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Jiao, Yu; Xiong, Xiao; Liu, Haichun; Ran, Ting; Xu, Jinxing; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Pan, Jing; Qiao, Xin; Shi, Zhihao; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of novel scaffolds against a specific target has long been one of the most significant but challengeable goals in discovering lead compounds. A scaffold that binds in important regions of the active pocket is more favorable as a starting point because scaffolds generally possess greater optimization possibilities. However, due to the lack of sufficient chemical space diversity of the databases and the ineffectiveness of the screening methods, it still remains a great challenge to discover novel active scaffolds. Since the strengths and weaknesses of both fragment-based drug design and traditional virtual screening (VS), we proposed a fragment VS concept based on Bayesian categorization for the discovery of novel scaffolds. This work investigated the proposal through an application on VEGFR-2 target. Firstly, scaffold and structural diversity of chemical space for 10 compound databases were explicitly evaluated. Simultaneously, a robust Bayesian classification model was constructed for screening not only compound databases but also their corresponding fragment databases. Although analysis of the scaffold diversity demonstrated a very unevenly distribution of scaffolds over molecules, results showed that our Bayesian model behaved better in screening fragments than molecules. Through a literature retrospective research, several generated fragments with relatively high Bayesian scores indeed exhibit VEGFR-2 biological activity, which strongly proved the effectiveness of fragment VS based on Bayesian categorization models. This investigation of Bayesian-based fragment VS can further emphasize the necessity for enrichment of compound databases employed in lead discovery by amplifying the diversity of databases with novel structures.

  16. Conserved biosynthetic pathways for phosalacine, bialaphos and newly discovered phosphonic acid natural products.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Joshua A V; Zhang, Jun Kai; Yu, Xiaomin; Metcalf, William W

    2016-01-01

    Natural products containing phosphonic or phosphinic acid functionalities often display potent biological activities with applications in medicine and agriculture. The herbicide phosphinothricin-tripeptide (PTT) was the first phosphinate natural product discovered, yet despite numerous studies, questions remain surrounding key transformations required for its biosynthesis. In particular, the enzymology required to convert phosphonoformate to carboxyphosphonoenolpyruvate and the mechanisms underlying phosphorus methylation remain poorly understood. In addition, the model for non-ribosomal peptide synthetase assembly of the intact tripeptide product has undergone numerous revisions that have yet to be experimentally tested. To further investigate the biosynthesis of this unusual natural product, we completely sequenced the PTT biosynthetic locus from Streptomyces hygroscopicus and compared it with the orthologous cluster from Streptomyces viridochromogenes. We also sequenced and analyzed the closely related phosalacine (PAL) biosynthetic locus from Kitasatospora phosalacinea. Using data drawn from the comparative analysis of the PTT and PAL pathways, we also evaluate three related recently discovered phosphonate biosynthetic loci from Streptomyces sviceus, Streptomyces sp. WM6386 and Frankia alni. Our observations address long-standing biosynthetic questions related to PTT and PAL production and suggest that additional members of this pharmacologically important class await discovery. PMID:26328935

  17. Conserved biosynthetic pathways for phosalacine, bialaphos and newly discovered phosphonic acid natural products

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Joshua A. V; Zhang, Jun Kai; Yu, Xiaomin; Metcalf, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products containing phosphonic or phosphinic acid functionalities often display potent biological activities with applications in medicine and agriculture. The herbicide phosphinothricin-tripeptide (PTT) was the first phosphinate natural product discovered, yet despite numerous studies, questions remain surrounding key transformations required for its biosynthesis. In particular, the enzymology required to convert phosphonoformate to carboxyphosphonoenolpyruvate and the mechanisms underlying phosphorus-methylation remain poorly understood. In addition, the model for NRPS assembly of the intact tripeptide product has undergone numerous revisions that have yet to be experimentally tested. To further investigate the biosynthesis of this unusual natural product, we completely sequenced the PTT biosynthetic locus from Streptomyces hygroscopicus and compared it to the orthologous cluster from Streptomyces viridochromogenes. We also sequenced and analysed the closely related phosalacine (PAL) biosynthetic locus from Kitasatospora phosalacinea. Using data drawn from the comparative analysis of the PTT and PAL pathways, we also evaluate three related recently discovered phosphonate biosynthetic loci from Streptomyces sviceus, Streptomyces sp. WM6386 and Frankia alni. Our observations address long-standing biosynthetic questions related to PTT and PAL production and suggest that additional members of this pharmacologically important class await discovery. PMID:26328935

  18. Discovering free energy basins for macromolecular systems via guided multiscale simulation.

    PubMed

    Sereda, Yuriy V; Singharoy, Abhishek B; Jarrold, Martin F; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2012-07-26

    An approach for the automated discovery of low free energy states of macromolecular systems is presented. The method does not involve delineating the entire free energy landscape but proceeds in a sequential free energy minimizing state discovery; i.e., it first discovers one low free energy state and then automatically seeks a distinct neighboring one. These states and the associated ensembles of atomistic configurations are characterized by coarse-grained variables capturing the large-scale structure of the system. A key facet of our approach is the identification of such coarse-grained variables. Evolution of these variables is governed by Langevin dynamics driven by thermal-average forces and mediated by diffusivities, both of which are constructed by an ensemble of short molecular dynamics runs. In the present approach, the thermal-average forces are modified to account for the entropy changes following from our knowledge of the free energy basins already discovered. Such forces guide the system away from the known free energy minima, over free energy barriers, and to a new one. The theory is demonstrated for lactoferrin, known to have multiple energy-minimizing structures. The approach is validated using experimental structures and traditional molecular dynamics. The method can be generalized to enable the interpretation of nanocharacterization data (e.g., ion mobility-mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, chemical labeling, and nanopore measurements).

  19. Using machine learning to predict gene expression and discover sequence motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejing

    Recently, large amounts of experimental data for complex biological systems have become available. We use tools and algorithms from machine learning to build data-driven predictive models. We first present a novel algorithm to discover gene sequence motifs associated with temporal expression patterns of genes. Our algorithm, which is based on partial least squares (PLS) regression, is able to directly model the flow of information, from gene sequence to gene expression, to learn cis regulatory motifs and characterize associated gene expression patterns. Our algorithm outperforms traditional computational methods e.g. clustering in motif discovery. We then present a study of extending a machine learning model for transcriptional regulation predictive of genetic regulatory response to Caenorhabditis elegans. We show meaningful results both in terms of prediction accuracy on the test experiments and biological information extracted from the regulatory program. The model discovers DNA binding sites ab initio. We also present a case study where we detect a signal of lineage-specific regulation. Finally we present a comparative study on learning predictive models for motif discovery, based on different boosting algorithms: Adaptive Boosting (AdaBoost), Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Totally Corrective Boosting (TotalBoost). We evaluate and compare the performance of the three boosting algorithms via both statistical and biological validation, for hypoxia response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  20. Discovering governing equations from data by sparse identification of nonlinear dynamical systems

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Steven L.; Proctor, Joshua L.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Extracting governing equations from data is a central challenge in many diverse areas of science and engineering. Data are abundant whereas models often remain elusive, as in climate science, neuroscience, ecology, finance, and epidemiology, to name only a few examples. In this work, we combine sparsity-promoting techniques and machine learning with nonlinear dynamical systems to discover governing equations from noisy measurement data. The only assumption about the structure of the model is that there are only a few important terms that govern the dynamics, so that the equations are sparse in the space of possible functions; this assumption holds for many physical systems in an appropriate basis. In particular, we use sparse regression to determine the fewest terms in the dynamic governing equations required to accurately represent the data. This results in parsimonious models that balance accuracy with model complexity to avoid overfitting. We demonstrate the algorithm on a wide range of problems, from simple canonical systems, including linear and nonlinear oscillators and the chaotic Lorenz system, to the fluid vortex shedding behind an obstacle. The fluid example illustrates the ability of this method to discover the underlying dynamics of a system that took experts in the community nearly 30 years to resolve. We also show that this method generalizes to parameterized systems and systems that are time-varying or have external forcing. PMID:27035946

  1. Bioturbo similarity searching: combining chemical and biological similarity to discover structurally diverse bioactive molecules.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Anne Mai; Lounkine, Eugen; Glick, Meir

    2013-03-25

    Virtual screening using bioactivity profiles has become an integral part of currently applied hit finding methods in pharmaceutical industry. However, a significant drawback of this approach is that it is only applicable to compounds that have been biologically tested in the past and have sufficient activity annotations for meaningful profile comparisons. Although bioactivity data generated in pharmaceutical institutions are growing on an unprecedented scale, the number of biologically annotated compounds still covers only a minuscule fraction of chemical space. For a newly synthesized compound or an isolated natural product to be biologically characterized across multiple assays, it may take a considerable amount of time. Consequently, this chemical matter will not be included in virtual screening campaigns based on bioactivity profiles. To overcome this problem, we herein introduce bioturbo similarity searching that uses chemical similarity to map molecules without biological annotations into bioactivity space and then searches for biologically similar compounds in this reference system. In benchmark calculations on primary screening data, we demonstrate that our approach generally achieves higher hit rates and identifies structurally more diverse compounds than approaches using chemical information only. Furthermore, our method is able to discover hits with novel modes of inhibition that traditional 2D and 3D similarity approaches are unlikely to discover. Test calculations on a set of natural products reveal the practical utility of the approach for identifying novel and synthetically more accessible chemical matter.

  2. Discovering Functional Novelty in Metagenomes: Examples from Light-Mediated Processes▿

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amoolya H.; Doerks, Tobias; Letunic, Ivica; Raes, Jeroen; Bork, Peer

    2009-01-01

    The emerging coverage of diverse habitats by metagenomic shotgun data opens new avenues of discovering functional novelty using computational tools. Here, we apply three different concepts for predicting novel functions within light-mediated microbial pathways in five diverse environments. Using phylogenetic approaches, we discovered two novel deep-branching subfamilies of photolyases (involved in light-mediated repair) distributed abundantly in high-UV environments. Using neighborhood approaches, we were able to assign seven novel functional partners in luciferase synthesis, nitrogen metabolism, and quorum sensing to BLUF domain-containing proteins (involved in light sensing). Finally, by domain analysis, for RcaE proteins (involved in chromatic adaptation), we predict 16 novel domain architectures that indicate novel functionalities in habitats with little or no light. Quantification of protein abundance in the various environments supports our findings that bacteria utilize light for sensing, repair, and adaptation far more widely than previously thought. While the discoveries illustrate the opportunities in function discovery, we also discuss the immense conceptual and practical challenges that come along with this new type of data. PMID:18849420

  3. A strategy to discover decoy chemokine ligands with an anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Dayana; Daubeuf, François; Do, Quoc Tuan; Utard, Valérie; Villa, Pascal; Haiech, Jacques; Bonnet, Dominique; Hibert, Marcel; Bernard, Philippe; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Excessive signaling by chemokines has been associated with chronic inflammation or cancer, thus attracting substantial attention as promising therapeutic targets. Inspired by chemokine-clearing molecules shaped by pathogens to escape the immune system, we designed a generic screening assay to discover chemokine neutralizing molecules (neutraligands) and unambiguously distinguish them from molecules that block the receptor (receptor antagonists). This assay, called TRIC-r, combines time-resolved intracellular calcium recordings with pre-incubation of bioactive compounds either with the chemokine or the receptor-expressing cells. We describe here the identification of high affinity neutraligands of CCL17 and CCL22, two chemokines involved in the Th2-type of lung inflammation. The decoy molecules inhibit in vitro CCL17- or CCL22-induced intracellular calcium responses, CCR4 endocytosis and human T cell migration. In vivo, they inhibit inflammation in a murine model of asthma, in particular the recruitment of eosinophils, dendritic cells and CD4+T cells. Altogether, we developed a successful strategy to discover as new class of pharmacological tools to potently control cell chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26442456

  4. Providing a Standardized Approach for Cataloging, Discovering, and Utilizing Open Source Geospatial Software and Tools through NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, T. B.

    2006-12-01

    A standardized approach for discovery and access to geospatial software packages is vital for a user community that depends on interoperable open source software for their organization. Many of the projects that provide software are dispersed and decentralized, thus creating a challenge to users discovering these packages. NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) contains descriptions of open source geospatial software and provides users direct access to the software. Users can search by full-text or controlled service topic keywords. These keywords, which are proposed by GCMD staff and open to community feedback, allow users to navigate to unique software types and refine by specific Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. These standards include Web Map Services, Web Feature Services, and Web Coverage Services. This poster will demonstrate how the geospatial user community can utilize the GCMD's intuitive keyword interface to search and directly access geospatial services. The poster will also show users how to create service descriptions using freely available online tools.

  5. A framework for extracting and representing project knowledge contexts using topic models and dynamic knowledge maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Li, Zheng; Li, Shuliang; Zhang, Yanyan

    2015-07-01

    There is still a lack of effective paradigms and tools for analysing and discovering the contents and relationships of project knowledge contexts in the field of project management. In this paper, a new framework for extracting and representing project knowledge contexts using topic models and dynamic knowledge maps under big data environments is proposed and developed. The conceptual paradigm, theoretical underpinning, extended topic model, and illustration examples of the ontology model for project knowledge maps are presented, with further research work envisaged.

  6. Verification of CMAQ modeling with Discover-AQ campaigns against measurements and efficacy of emission inversion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, P.; Tang, Y.; Pan, L.; Szykman, J.; Plessel, T.; Tong, D.; Liu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    NASA has led a few DISCOVER-AQ campaigns in recent years: (1) Baltimore/Washington in July 2011, (2) Central valley, CA in January - February 2013, (3) Houston, TX in September 2013, and co-led with NCAR (4) Front Range, CO in July - August 2014. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory has participated in all these campaigns in the role of air quality forecasting support. For some of these campaigns post analyses were performed with the possible help of after-the-fact observed data from satellite retrieved radiances to constrain emissions through the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) developed at the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation. It is our experience that despite the vastly different chemical regime, season, terrain, and meteorological conditions of the domain for the campaigns, we found that the emissions input and the U.S. EPA Community Air Quality model (CMAQ), the forecasting chemical transport model used to generate the forecast had severely under-estimated formaldehyde (HCHO), and carbon monoxide (CO) aloft between surface and the middle of the free troposphere - 500 hPa. Post analyses point to two strong suspects of these deficiencies: (a) emission projection fed into CMAQ, and/or (b) erroneously fast removal of the species. We investigate both of these potential deficiencies and for the former possible reason we looked into data assimilation and possible inverse modeling to adjust emission projection for CMAQ. We will elaborate more on the CRTM which plays a critical role in this aspect of remedying erroneous inputs to CMAQ. In addition, we will utilize some satellite products to improve initial fields of aerosols and CO for air quality forecasting. Suomi NPP VIIRS aerosol optical depth (AOD) environmental data record (EDR) delivers global aerosol information daily. The Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) operationally generates vertical profiles of atmospheric carbonate EDRs (CO, CO2, and CH4) and ozone during day and night. The AOD

  7. TIARA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, P.

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the Test Infrastructure and Accelerator Research Area - the TIARA project[1] is to consolidate and support the European R&D program in the field of physics and techniques of particle accelerators. This project, partially funded by the European Commission, groups 11 participants from 8 European countries, including Poland. Its present, threeyear (2011-2013) preparatory phase (PP) is shortly described in this paper. The project is divided into 9 work packages (WP). We will concentrate on four of them dedicated to governance, R&D infrastructures, joint R&D programming, and education and training, in which Polish participants are actively involved.

  8. Economic Education Projects: Abstracts from the 1979-80 Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, George E., Ed.

    Over 175 economics education projects submitted to the 1979-1980 National Awards Program for Teaching Economics are abstracted. The aim of this annual competition is to discover outstanding classroom teaching practices while encouraging teachers to include and improve economics instruction in the classroom. Citations are contained in separate…

  9. Head of Human Genome Project Retracts 5 Journal Articles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Karla

    1996-01-01

    Five published leukemia studies have been retracted by the director of the Human Genome Project because they were based on falsified data from a graduate student, although some of the conclusions are still supported. Inconsistencies were discovered by a peer reviewer and were also found in the student's other work. (MSE)

  10. New Options for Usability Testing Projects in Business Communication Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of recording technologies makes it easier to include usability testing projects in business communication courses. Usability testing is a method of discovering whether people can navigate, read, and understand a print or electronic communication well enough to achieve a particular purpose in a reasonable time frame.…

  11. Chandra Discovers X-ray Source at the Center of Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Culminating 25 years of searching by astronomers, researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology say that a faint X-ray source, newly detected by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, may be the long-sought X-ray emission from a known supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Frederick K. Baganoff and colleagues from Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and the University of California, Los Angeles, will present their findings today in Atlanta at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Baganoff, lead scientist for the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) team's "Sagittarius A* and the Galactic Center" project and postdoctoral research associate at MIT, said that the precise positional coincidence between the new X-ray source and the radio position of a long-known source called Sagittarius A* "encourages us to believe that the two are the same." Sagittarius A* is a point-like, variable radio source at the center of our galaxy. It looks like a faint quasar and is believed to be powered by gaseous matter falling into a supermassive black hole with 2.6 million times the mass of our Sun. Chandra's remarkable detection of this X-ray source has placed astronomers within a couple of years of a coveted prize: measuring the spectrum of energy produced by Sagittarius A* to determine in detail how the supermassive black hole that powers it works. "The race to be the first to detect X-rays from Sagittarius A* is one of the hottest and longest-running in all of X-ray astronomy," Baganoff said. "Theorists are eager to hear the results of our observation so they can test their ideas." But now that an X-ray source close to Sagittarius A* has been found, it has taken researchers by surprise by being much fainter than expected. "There must be something unusual about the environment around this black hole that affects how it is fed and how the gravitational energy released from the infalling matter is

  12. Planet from another galaxy discovered - Galactic cannibalism brings an exoplanet of extragalactic origin within astronomers' reach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    An exoplanet orbiting a star that entered our Milky Way from another galaxy has been detected by a European team of astronomers using the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. The Jupiter-like planet is particularly unusual, as it is orbiting a star nearing the end of its life and could be about to be engulfed by it, giving tantalising clues about the fate of our own planetary system in the distant future. Over the last 15 years, astronomers have detected nearly 500 planets orbiting stars in our cosmic neighbourhood, but none outside our Milky Way has been confirmed [1]. Now, however, a planet with a minimum mass 1.25 times that of Jupiter [2] has been discovered orbiting a star of extragalactic origin, even though the star now finds itself within our own galaxy. It is part of the so-called Helmi stream [3] - a group of stars that originally belonged to a dwarf galaxy that was devoured by our galaxy, the Milky Way, in an act of galactic cannibalism about six to nine billion years ago. The results are published today in Science Express. "This discovery is very exciting," says Rainer Klement of the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA), who was responsible for the selection of the target stars for this study. "For the first time, astronomers have detected a planetary system in a stellar stream of extragalactic origin. Because of the great distances involved, there are no confirmed detections of planets in other galaxies. But this cosmic merger has brought an extragalactic planet within our reach." The star is known as HIP 13044, and it lies about 2000 light-years from Earth in the southern constellation of Fornax (the Furnace). The astronomers detected the planet, called HIP 13044 b, by looking for the tiny telltale wobbles of the star caused by the gravitational tug of an orbiting companion. For these precise observations, the team used the high-resolution spectrograph FEROS [4] attached to the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope [5] at

  13. Project Reptile!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diffily, Deborah

    2001-01-01

    Integrating curriculum is important in helping children make connections within and among areas. Presents a class project for kindergarten children which came out of the students' interests and desire to build a reptile exhibit. (ASK)

  14. Project Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Architectural Education, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Fellows of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Environmental Experience Stipends Program describe their project activities for 1973-74 including: an inservice course for teachers, television programs, graduate courses, high school courses, and workshops. (Author/PG)

  15. Alzheimer's Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... about the films on our message board . Watch films free online now "The Memory Loss Tapes" (85 ... ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT" is a presentation of HBO Documentary Films and the National Institute on Aging at the ...

  16. Geodynamics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Charles L.

    1977-01-01

    Describes activities of Geodynamics Project of the Federal Council on Science and Technology, such as the application of multichannel seismic-reflection techniques to study the nature of the deep crust and upper mantle. (MLH)

  17. Discover Our Earth: Web-Based Geophysical Data in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A.; Seber, D.; Danowski, D.; Brindisi, C.

    2002-12-01

    Discover Our Earth is a web-based system designed for classroom use, allowing access and display of geospatial data sets . It is an education and outreach module built as part of Cornell University's Geoscience Information System, originally constructed as a tool for geophysical research (http://atlas.geo.cornell.edu). Discover Our Earth has been used in university, high school and middle school classrooms. Working with real data is a powerful tool for helping students learn scientific principles, content, and the processes of scientific inquiry. In order to give students access to data that is otherwise difficult to work with, Discover Our Earth is comprised of several elements. The central component is a Java applet called QUEST (Quick Use Earth Study Tool). QUEST allows students to query and display data from three data sets selected from the 100+ housed within the Information System. Any attribute of earthquake, volcano, or topographic data can be selected and displayed, and multiple data sets can be overlain on each other, or on assorted background images (such as a geographic base map, age of the sea floor etc). Each image is saved in the QUEST history window, allowing students to compare multiple selections, or to animate a series of images as a "filmstrip." In order to help students better understand their results, the QUEST applet is supported by several other components. There are guides for both teacher and student. The student guide gives step-by-step instructions for a series of problems, and suggests others that will help students answer questions of local and global interest. The teacher guide provides background material, context, and answers to the student exercises. There are animations and 3-D visualizations that allow students to better interpret their maps. Additionally, there are interactive experiments on topics such as continental drift, isostasy, viscosity, that allow students to explore the physics that underlie the processes they are

  18. ENHANCED LENSING RATE BY CLUSTERING OF MASSIVE GALAXIES: NEWLY DISCOVERED SYSTEMS IN THE SLACS FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso

    2009-05-10

    Galaxy-scale strong gravitational lens systems are useful for a variety of astrophysical applications. However, their use is limited by the relatively small samples of lenses known to date. It is thus important to develop efficient ways to discover new systems both in present and forthcoming data sets. For future large high-resolution imaging surveys we anticipate an ever-growing need for efficiency and for independence from spectroscopic data. In this paper, we exploit the clustering of massive galaxies to perform a high-efficiency imaging search for gravitational lenses. Our data set comprises 44 fields imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), each of which is centered on a lens discovered by the Strong Lens ACS Survey (SLACS). We compare four different search methods: (1) automated detection with the HST Archive Galaxy-scale Gravitational Lens Survey (HAGGLeS) robot, (2) examining cutout images of bright galaxies (BGs) after subtraction of a smooth galaxy light distribution, (3) examining the unsubtracted BG cutouts, and (4) performing a full-frame visual inspection of the ACS images. We compute purity and completeness and consider investigator time for the four algorithms, using the main SLACS lenses as a testbed. The first and second algorithms perform the best. We present the four new lens systems discovered during this comprehensive search, as well as one other likely candidate. For each new lens we use the fundamental plane to estimate the lens velocity dispersion and predict, from the resulting lens geometry, the redshifts of the lensed sources. Two of these new systems are found in galaxy clusters, which include the SLACS lenses in the two respective fields. Overall we find that the enhanced lens abundance (30{sup +24} {sub -8} lenses deg{sup -2}) is higher than expected for random fields (12{sup +4} {sub -2} lenses deg{sup -2} for the COSMOS survey). Additionally, we find that the gravitational lenses we detect are

  19. Spitzer Observations of Exoplanets Discovered with the Kepler K2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichman, Charles; Livingston, John; Werner, Michael; Gorjian, Varoujan; Krick, Jessica; Deck, Katherine; Knutson, Heather; Wong, Ian; Petigura, Erik; Christiansen, Jessie; Ciardi, David; Greene, Thomas P.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Line, Mike; Crossfield, Ian; Howard, Andrew; Sinukoff, Evan

    2016-05-01

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope to observe two transiting planetary systems orbiting low-mass stars discovered in the Kepler K2 mission. The system K2-3 (EPIC 201367065) hosts three planets, while K2-26 (EPIC 202083828) hosts a single planet. Observations of all four objects in these two systems confirm and refine the orbital and physical parameters of the planets. The refined orbital information and more precise planet radii possible with Spitzer will be critical for future observations of these and other K2 targets. For K2-3b we find marginally significant evidence for a transit timing variation between the K2 and Spitzer epochs.

  20. Mining a clinical data warehouse to discover disease-finding associations using co-occurrence statistics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Markatou, Marianthi; Melton, Genevieve B; Chiang, Michael F; Hripcsak, George

    2005-01-01

    This paper applies co-occurrence statistics to discover disease-finding associations in a clinical data warehouse. We used two methods, chi2 statistics and the proportion confidence interval (PCI) method, to measure the dependence of pairs of diseases and findings, and then used heuristic cutoff values for association selection. An intrinsic evaluation showed that 94 percent of disease-finding associations obtained by chi2 statistics and 76.8 percent obtained by the PCI method were true associations. The selected associations were used to construct knowledge bases of disease-finding relations (KB-chi2, KB-PCI). An extrinsic evaluation showed that both KB-chi2 and KB-PCI could assist in eliminating clinically non-informative and redundant findings from problem lists generated by our automated problem list summarization system.

  1. NSF-ARCSS Freshwater Initiative (FWI): Synthesis as Coordination of Thought to Discover Emergent System Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorosmarty, C. J.; Hinzman, L. D.; Pundsack, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF-ARCSS program is undergoing a purposeful move toward system-wide and synthetic thinking. As part of this broader agenda, the NSF-ARCSS Freshwater Initiative (FWI) is embarking on its own synthesis. FWI synthesis has been organized around two fundamental approaches. The first avenue is a consolidation of existing quantitative information for constructing a comprehensive freshwater budget linking fluxes and stocks through the climate / terrestrial system, oceans, and sea-ice. The second avenue involves linkages of observational studies of paleo, historic, and contemporary water systems and simulation models of their behavior. These efforts represent both inductive and deductive approaches, and the FWI uses an operational definition of synthesis as a coordination of thought to discover emergent system properties to detect and understand Arctic water cycle change. This discussion will focus on recent results of analysis with acknowledgement of input from a broad set of FWI researchers.

  2. Mining a clinical data warehouse to discover disease-finding associations using co-occurrence statistics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hui; Markatou, Marianthi; Melton, Genevieve B.; Chiang, Michael F.; Hripcsak, George

    2005-01-01

    This paper applies co-occurrence statistics to discover disease-finding associations in a clinical data warehouse. We used two methods, χ2 statistics and the proportion confidence interval (PCI) method, to measure the dependence of pairs of diseases and findings, and then used heuristic cutoff values for association selection. An intrinsic evaluation showed that 94 percent of disease-finding associations obtained by χ2 statistics and 76.8 percent obtained by the PCI method were true associations. The selected associations were used to construct knowledge bases of disease-finding relations (KB-χ2, KB-PCI). An extrinsic evaluation showed that both KB-χ2 and KB-PCI could assist in eliminating clinically non-informative and redundant findings from problem lists generated by our automated problem list summarization system. PMID:16779011

  3. G306.3-0.9: A NEWLY DISCOVERED YOUNG GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Reis, Rubens C.; Loi, Shyeh T.; Murphy, Tara; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Gehrels, Neil; Petre, Robert; Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul

    2013-04-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of {approx}160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24 {mu}m, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  4. The emergence and cross species transmission of newly discovered tick-borne Bunyavirus in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Zhen; Xu, Jianguo

    2016-02-01

    A novel tick-borne Bunyavirus, discovered in China and later in South Korea and Japan, is now known as Huaiyangshan virus or severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus and has been identified as the causative agent of a hemorrhagic fever-like disease. Of five species of ticks carrying Huaiyangshan viruses, Haemaphysalis longicornis was the most abundant in regions where the virus was endemic. Its usual hosts (cattle, goats, dogs, rats and chickens) tested positive for Huaiyangshan virus RNA and had a high seroprevalence. The distribution of H. longicornis and the migratory routes of four wild fowl across China, South Korea and Japan are coincident. Thus a tick and migratory bird model for the transmission of the Huaiyangshan virus was proposed. PMID:26949898

  5. Strategy to discover diverse optimal molecules in the small molecule universe.

    PubMed

    Rupakheti, Chetan; Virshup, Aaron; Yang, Weitao; Beratan, David N

    2015-03-23

    The small molecule universe (SMU) is defined as a set of over 10(60) synthetically feasible organic molecules with molecular weight less than ∼500 Da. Exhaustive enumerations and evaluation of all SMU molecules for the purpose of discovering favorable structures is impossible. We take a stochastic approach and extend the ACSESS framework ( Virshup et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013 , 135 , 7296 - 7303 ) to develop diversity oriented molecular libraries that can generate a set of compounds that is representative of the small molecule universe and that also biases the library toward favorable physical property values. We show that the approach is efficient compared to exhaustive enumeration and to existing evolutionary algorithms for generating such libraries by testing in the NKp fitness landscape model and in the fully enumerated GDB-9 chemical universe containing 3 × 10(5) molecules.

  6. bioGUID: resolving, discovering, and minting identifiers for biodiversity informatics

    PubMed Central

    Page, Roderic DM

    2009-01-01

    Background Linking together the data of interest to biodiversity researchers (including specimen records, images, taxonomic names, and DNA sequences) requires services that can mint, resolve, and discover globally unique identifiers (including, but not limited to, DOIs, HTTP URIs, and LSIDs). Results bioGUID implements a range of services, the core ones being an OpenURL resolver for bibliographic resources, and a LSID resolver. The LSID resolver supports Linked Data-friendly resolution using HTTP 303 redirects and content negotiation. Additional services include journal ISSN look-up, author name matching, and a tool to monitor the status of biodiversity data providers. Conclusion bioGUID is available at . Source code is available from . PMID:19900301

  7. Strategy To Discover Diverse Optimal Molecules in the Small Molecule Universe

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule universe (SMU) is defined as a set of over 1060 synthetically feasible organic molecules with molecular weight less than ∼500 Da. Exhaustive enumerations and evaluation of all SMU molecules for the purpose of discovering favorable structures is impossible. We take a stochastic approach and extend the ACSESS framework (Virshup et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2013, 135, 7296–730323548177) to develop diversity oriented molecular libraries that can generate a set of compounds that is representative of the small molecule universe and that also biases the library toward favorable physical property values. We show that the approach is efficient compared to exhaustive enumeration and to existing evolutionary algorithms for generating such libraries by testing in the NKp fitness landscape model and in the fully enumerated GDB-9 chemical universe containing 3 × 105 molecules. PMID:25594586

  8. A U-Tube Experiment To Discover the Curve in Boyle's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Thomas G.; Parr, Amy

    1997-04-01

    A discovery-style experiment is described to enable introductory chemistry students to determine the pressure versus volume behavior of a gas over a wide pressure range to "discover" Boyle's Law. A small volume of air is trapped by water or mineral oil in the sealed end of a 10-mL graduated pipet that has been bent in the shape of a U. The external pressure is reduced using a water aspirator to expand the gas sample as far as possible. The volume of the gas as a function of pressure (measured with a Bourdon tube absolute pressure gauge) is recorded as air is leaked back into the system through a needle valve. The experiment overcomes some of the limitations of previous methods and offers opportunities for several levels of data analysis.

  9. TIMING AND INTERSTELLAR SCATTERING OF 35 DISTANT PULSARS DISCOVERED IN THE PALFA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Nice, D. J.; Altiere, E.; Farrington, D.; Popa, L.; Wang, Y.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Cordes, J. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Ransom, S. M.; Sanpa-arsa, S.; Allen, B.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Champion, D. J.; Crawford, F.; and others

    2013-07-20

    We have made extensive observations of 35 distant slow (non-recycled) pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Arecibo Observatory and Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation properties. Despite being a relatively distant population, these pulsars have properties that mirror those of the previously known pulsar population. Many of the sources exhibit timing noise, and one underwent a small glitch. We have used multifrequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of these pulsars. We find scattering to be higher than predicted along some lines of sight, particularly in the Cygnus region. Finally, we present XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the youngest and most energetic of the pulsars, J1856+0245, which has previously been associated with the GeV-TeV pulsar wind nebula HESS J1857+026.

  10. Sequential patterns mining and gene sequence visualization to discover novelty from microarray data.

    PubMed

    Sallaberry, A; Pecheur, N; Bringay, S; Roche, M; Teisseire, M

    2011-10-01

    Data mining allow users to discover novelty in huge amounts of data. Frequent pattern methods have proved to be efficient, but the extracted patterns are often too numerous and thus difficult to analyze by end users. In this paper, we focus on sequential pattern mining and propose a new visualization system to help end users analyze the extracted knowledge and to highlight novelty according to databases of referenced biological documents. Our system is based on three visualization techniques: clouds, solar systems, and treemaps. We show that these techniques are very helpful for identifying associations and hierarchical relationships between patterns among related documents. Sequential patterns extracted from gene data using our system were successfully evaluated by two biology laboratories working on Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

  11. Discovering protective CD8 T cell epitopes—no single immunologic property predicts it!

    PubMed Central

    Gilchuk, Pavlo; Hill, Timothy M.; Wilson, John T.; Joyce, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Once a burgeoning field of study, over the past decade or so, T cell epitope discovery has lost some luster. The contributory factors perchance are the general notion that any newly discovered epitope will reveal very little about an immune response and that knowledge of epitopes are less critical for vaccine design. Despite these notions, the breadth and depth of T cell epitopes derived from clinically important microbial agents of human diseases largely remain ill defined. We review here a flurry of recent reports that have rebirthed the field. These reports reveal that epitope discovery is an essential step toward rational vaccine design and critical for monitoring vaccination efficacy. The new findings also indicate that neither immunogenicity nor immunodominance predict protective immunity. Hence, an immunogenic epitope is but a peptide unless proven protective against disease. PMID:25660347

  12. The Scientific Work of John A. McClelland: A Recently Discovered Manuscript

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    John Alexander McClelland (1870-1920) was educated at Queen’s College Galway and the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge. He was Professor of Experimental Physics at University College Dublin from 1900 to 1920. He was best known for his pioneering work on the scattering of β rays and on the conductivity of gases and the mobility of ions. He established a research school on atmospheric aerosols that was continued by his successor, John James Nolan (1887-1952), which strongly influenced physics research in Ireland up to the present. A recently discovered manuscript of a commemorative address by Nolan in 1920, which is reproduced in Appendix I, is a unique contemporary summary of McClelland’s research and character, and is an important contribution to the history of experimental physics in Ireland.

  13. See It First: Interactively and Visually Discovering Interesting Satellite Data with NASA Worldview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, R. A.; Joshi, T.; McGann, J. M.; Ilavajhala, S.; Timmons, E.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Murphy, K. J.; Cechini, M.; Davies, D.

    2013-12-01

    Complementing NASA's traditional method to data discovery via "metadata-first" searching, the Worldview web mapping client takes a "see it first" approach for visually discovering interesting satellite data. It uses the responsive Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) to provide an interactive interface for browsing 90+ products from Terra, Aqua, and Aura in full resolution and generally within three hours of observation. Launched at Fall 2011 AGU, Worldview's original domain was near-real time applications such as monitoring wildfires and flooding events. Since then, its scope and available imagery have expanded to include science applications and functionality such as the ability to download full-resolution image representations of the data and the original data granules. Worldview is also mobile-friendly and can be used on most tablet and smartphone devices.

  14. Health status of a recently discovered population of feral swine in Kansas.

    PubMed

    Gipson, P S; Veatch, J K; Matlack, R S; Jones, D P

    1999-07-01

    Twenty feral hogs (Sus scrofa) from a newly discovered population on Fort Riley Army Base (Kansas, USA) were shot and examined from November 1993 through February 1994 to assess the health of the population. The hogs were generally healthy, although serologic evidence indicated that some individuals had been exposed to parvovirus, enterovirus, and swine influenza. We found no indications of brucellosis, pseudorabies, or porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome. Lung worms (Metastrongylus spp.), round worms (Ascaris suum), and whipworms (Trichuris suis) were found in nine, four and two of the hogs, respectively. Seven hogs had infestations of lice (Haematopinus suis). Fence-line contacts were documented between four wild boars and domestic sows, and in three cases wild boars entered pens containing domestic sows. We recommend that hogs be examined periodically from this and other wild populations to monitor health status since new animals may enter populations through deliberate translocation, escape from shooting preserves or domestic swine producers, or dispersal from other feral populations.

  15. G306.3-0.9: A Newly Discovered Young Galactic Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Loi, Syheh T.; Murphy, Tara; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Gehrels, Neil; Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Petre, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of 160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24µm, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  16. Local NASA Scientists Discover New Species of Organism in Mars-Like Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Microbiologist Dr. Elena V. Pikuta, and Astrobiologist Richard Hoover culture extremophiles, microorganisms that can live in extreme environments, in the astrobiology laboratory at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The scientists recently discovered a new species of extremophiles, Spirochaeta Americana. The species was found in Northern California's Mono Lake, an alkaline, briny oxygen-limited lake in a closed volcanic crater that Hoover believes may offer new clues to help identify sites to research for potential life on Mars. Hoover is an astrobiologist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and Pikuta is a microbiologist with the Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomy Research Laboratory at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The NSSTC is a partnership with MSFC, Alabama universities, industry, research institutes, and federal agencies.

  17. Health status of a recently discovered population of feral swine in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gipson, P.S.; Veatch, J.K.; Matlack, R.S.; Jones, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty feral hogs (Sus scrofa) from a newly discovered population on Fort Riley Army Base (Kansas, USA) were shot and examined from November 1993 through February 1994 to assess the health of the population. The hogs were generally healthy, although serologic evidence indicated that some individuals had been exposed to parvovirus, enterovirus, and swine influenza. We found no indications of brucellosis, pseudorabies, or porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome. Lung worms (Metastrongylus spp.), round worms (Ascaris suum), and whipworms (Trichuris suis) were found in nine, four and two of the hogs, respectively. Seven hogs had infestations of lice (Haematopinus suis). Fence-line contacts were documented between four wild boars and domestic sows, and in three cases wild boars entered pens containing domestic sows. We recommend that hogs be examined periodically from this and other wild populations to monitor health status since new animals may enter populations through deliberate translocation, escape from shooting preserves or domestic swine producers, or dispersal from other feral populations.

  18. sp3-hybridized framework structure of group-14 elements discovered by genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Group-14 elements, including C, Si, Ge, and Sn, can form various stable and metastable structures. Finding new metastable structures of group-14 elements with desirable physical properties for new technological applications has attracted a lot of interest. Using a genetic algorithm, we discovered a new low-energy metastable distorted sp3-hybridized framework structure of the group-14 elements. It has P42/mnm symmetry with 12 atoms per unit cell. The void volume of this structure is as large as 139.7Å3 for Si P42/mnm, and it can be used for gas or metal-atom encapsulation. Band-structure calculations show that P42/mnm structures of Si and Ge are semiconducting with energy band gaps close to the optimal values for optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications. With metal-atom encapsulation, the P42/mnm structure would also be a candidate for rattling-mediated superconducting or used as thermoelectric materials.

  19. Evaluating WRF Simulations of Urban Boundary Layer Processes during DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegarty, J. D.; Henderson, J.; Lewis, J. R.; McGrath-Spangler, E. L.; Scarino, A. J.; Ferrare, R. A.; DeCola, P.; Welton, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The accurate representation of processes in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) in meteorological models is of prime importance to air quality and greenhouse gas simulations as it governs the depth to which surface emissions are vertically mixed and influences the efficiency by which they are transported downwind. In this work we evaluate high resolution (~1 km) WRF simulations of PBL processes in the Washington DC - Baltimore and Houston urban areas during the respective DISCOVER-AQ 2011 and 2013 field campaigns using MPLNET micro-pulse lidar (MPL), mini-MPL, airborne high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL), Doppler wind profiler and CALIPSO satellite measurements along with complimentary surface and aircraft measurements. We will discuss how well WRF simulates the spatiotemporal variability of the PBL height in the urban areas and the development of fine-scale meteorological features such as bay and sea breezes that influence the air quality of the urban areas studied.

  20. Discovering operating modes in telemetry data from the Shuttle Reaction Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manganaris, Stefanos; Fisher, Doug; Kulkarni, Deepak

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of detecting and diagnosing faults in physical systems, for which suitable system models are not available. An architecture is proposed that integrates the on-line acquisition and exploitation of monitoring and diagnostic knowledge. The focus is on the component of the architecture that discovers classes of behaviors with similar characteristics by observing a system in operation. A characterization of behaviors based on best fitting approximation models is investigated. An experimental prototype has been implemented to test it. Preliminary results in diagnosing faults of the reaction control system of the space shuttle are presented. The merits and limitations of the approach are identified and directions for future work are set.