Science.gov

Sample records for project global ocean

  1. GLobal Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAP): Data and Analyses

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sabine, C. L.; Key, R. M.; Feely, R. A.; Bullister, J. L.; Millero, F. J.; Wanninkhof, R.; Peng, T. H.; Kozyr, A.

    The GLobal Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAP) is a cooperative effort to coordinate global synthesis projects funded through NOAA, DOE, and NSF as part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study - Synthesis and Modeling Project (JGOFS-SMP). Cruises conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), JGOFS, and the NOAA Ocean-Atmosphere Exchange Study (OACES) over the decade of the 1990s have created an important oceanographic database for the scientific community investigating carbon cycling in the oceans. The unified data help to determine the global distributions of both natural and anthropogenic inorganic carbon, including radiocarbon. These estimates provide an important benchmark against which future observational studies will be compared. They also provide tools for the direct evaluation of numerical ocean carbon models. GLODAP information available through CDIAC includes gridded and bottle data, a live server, an interactive atlas that provides access to data plots, and other tools for viewing and interacting with the data. [from http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/oceans/glodap/Glopintrod.htm](Specialized Interface)

  2. An ensemble of eddy-permitting global ocean reanalyses from the MyOcean project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masina, Simona; Storto, Andrea; Ferry, Nicolas; Valdivieso, Maria; Haines, Keith; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Zuo, Hao; Drevillon, Marie; Parent, Laurent

    2017-08-01

    A set of four eddy-permitting global ocean reanalyses produced in the framework of the MyOcean project have been compared over the altimetry period 1993-2011. The main differences among the reanalyses used here come from the data assimilation scheme implemented to control the ocean state by inserting reprocessed observations of sea surface temperature (SST), in situ temperature and salinity profiles, sea level anomaly and sea-ice concentration. A first objective of this work includes assessing the interannual variability and trends for a series of parameters, usually considered in the community as essential ocean variables: SST, sea surface salinity, temperature and salinity averaged over meaningful layers of the water column, sea level, transports across pre-defined sections, and sea ice parameters. The eddy-permitting nature of the global reanalyses allows also to estimate eddy kinetic energy. The results show that in general there is a good consistency between the different reanalyses. An intercomparison against experiments without data assimilation was done during the MyOcean project and we conclude that data assimilation is crucial for correctly simulating some quantities such as regional trends of sea level as well as the eddy kinetic energy. A second objective is to show that the ensemble mean of reanalyses can be evaluated as one single system regarding its reliability in reproducing the climate signals, where both variability and uncertainties are assessed through the ensemble spread and signal-to-noise ratio. The main advantage of having access to several reanalyses differing in the way data assimilation is performed is that it becomes possible to assess part of the total uncertainty. Given the fact that we use very similar ocean models and atmospheric forcing, we can conclude that the spread of the ensemble of reanalyses is mainly representative of our ability to gauge uncertainty in the assimilation methods. This uncertainty changes a lot from one ocean

  3. An ensemble of eddy-permitting global ocean reanalyses from the MyOcean project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masina, Simona; Storto, Andrea; Ferry, Nicolas; Valdivieso, Maria; Haines, Keith; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Zuo, Hao; Drevillon, Marie; Parent, Laurent

    2015-07-01

    A set of four eddy-permitting global ocean reanalyses produced in the framework of the MyOcean project have been compared over the altimetry period 1993-2011. The main differences among the reanalyses used here come from the data assimilation scheme implemented to control the ocean state by inserting reprocessed observations of sea surface temperature (SST), in situ temperature and salinity profiles, sea level anomaly and sea-ice concentration. A first objective of this work includes assessing the interannual variability and trends for a series of parameters, usually considered in the community as essential ocean variables: SST, sea surface salinity, temperature and salinity averaged over meaningful layers of the water column, sea level, transports across pre-defined sections, and sea ice parameters. The eddy-permitting nature of the global reanalyses allows also to estimate eddy kinetic energy. The results show that in general there is a good consistency between the different reanalyses. An intercomparison against experiments without data assimilation was done during the MyOcean project and we conclude that data assimilation is crucial for correctly simulating some quantities such as regional trends of sea level as well as the eddy kinetic energy. A second objective is to show that the ensemble mean of reanalyses can be evaluated as one single system regarding its reliability in reproducing the climate signals, where both variability and uncertainties are assessed through the ensemble spread and signal-to-noise ratio. The main advantage of having access to several reanalyses differing in the way data assimilation is performed is that it becomes possible to assess part of the total uncertainty. Given the fact that we use very similar ocean models and atmospheric forcing, we can conclude that the spread of the ensemble of reanalyses is mainly representative of our ability to gauge uncertainty in the assimilation methods. This uncertainty changes a lot from one ocean

  4. A global ocean carbon climatology: Results from Global Data Analysis Project (GLODAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Robert; Kozyr, Alexander; Sabine, Chris; Lee, K.; Wanninkhof, R.; Bullister, J.L.; Feely, R. A.; Millero, F. J.; Mordy, C.; Peng, T.-H.

    2004-01-01

    During the 1990s, ocean sampling expeditions were carried out as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS), and the Ocean Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study (OACES). Subsequently, a group of U.S. scientists synthesized the data into easily usable and readily available products. This collaboration is known as the Global Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAP). Results were merged into a common format data set, segregated by ocean. For comparison purposes, each ocean data set includes a small number of high-quality historical cruises. The data were subjected to rigorous quality control procedures to eliminate systematic data measurement biases. The calibrated 1990s data were used to estimate anthropogenic CO{sub 2}, potential alkalinity, CFC watermass ages, CFC partial pressure, bomb-produced radiocarbon, and natural radiocarbon. These quantities were merged into the measured data files. The data were used to produce objectively gridded property maps at a 1{sup o} resolution on 33 depth surfaces chosen to match existing climatologies for temperature, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients. The mapped fields are interpreted as an annual mean distribution in spite of the inaccuracy in that assumption. Both the calibrated data and the gridded products are available from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. Here we describe the important details of the data treatment and the mapping procedure, and present summary quantities and integrals for the various parameters.

  5. Projecting coral reef futures under global warming and ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, John M; Connolly, Sean R; Marshall, Dustin J; Cohen, Anne L

    2011-07-22

    Many physiological responses in present-day coral reefs to climate change are interpreted as consistent with the imminent disappearance of modern reefs globally because of annual mass bleaching events, carbonate dissolution, and insufficient time for substantial evolutionary responses. Emerging evidence for variability in the coral calcification response to acidification, geographical variation in bleaching susceptibility and recovery, responses to past climate change, and potential rates of adaptation to rapid warming supports an alternative scenario in which reef degradation occurs with greater temporal and spatial heterogeneity than current projections suggest. Reducing uncertainty in projecting coral reef futures requires improved understanding of past responses to rapid climate change; physiological responses to interacting factors, such as temperature, acidification, and nutrients; and the costs and constraints imposed by acclimation and adaptation.

  6. The Argo Project: Global Ocean Observations for Understanding and Prediction of Climate Variability. Report for Calendar Year 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    environment of ocean ecosystems. Over 90% of the increased heat content due to global warming of the air/sea/ice climate system in the past 40...years occurred in the oceans. Climate stresses on ocean ecosystems have serious consequences, and sometimes dramatic ones, such as coral reef bleaching ...The Argo Project Global Ocean Observations for Understanding and Prediction of Climate Variability Report for Calendar Year 2005 Dean H

  7. The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 2 (GLODAPv2) - an internally consistent data product for the world ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Are; Key, Robert M.; van Heuven, Steven; Lauvset, Siv K.; Velo, Anton; Lin, Xiaohua; Schirnick, Carsten; Kozyr, Alex; Tanhua, Toste; Hoppema, Mario; Jutterström, Sara; Steinfeldt, Reiner; Jeansson, Emil; Ishii, Masao; Pérez, Fiz F.; Suzuki, Toru

    2016-08-01

    Version 2 of the Global Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAPv2) data product is composed of data from 724 scientific cruises covering the global ocean. It includes data assembled during the previous efforts GLODAPv1.1 (Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 1.1) in 2004, CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic) in 2009/2010, and PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) in 2013, as well as data from an additional 168 cruises. Data for 12 core variables (salinity, oxygen, nitrate, silicate, phosphate, dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and CCl4) have been subjected to extensive quality control, including systematic evaluation of bias. The data are available in two formats: (i) as submitted but updated to WOCE exchange format and (ii) as a merged and internally consistent data product. In the latter, adjustments have been applied to remove significant biases, respecting occurrences of any known or likely time trends or variations. Adjustments applied by previous efforts were re-evaluated. Hence, GLODAPv2 is not a simple merging of previous products with some new data added but a unique, internally consistent data product. This compiled and adjusted data product is believed to be consistent to better than 0.005 in salinity, 1 % in oxygen, 2 % in nitrate, 2 % in silicate, 2 % in phosphate, 4 µmol kg-1 in dissolved inorganic carbon, 6 µmol kg-1 in total alkalinity, 0.005 in pH, and 5 % for the halogenated transient tracers.The original data and their documentation and doi codes are available at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (oceans/GLODAPv2/" target="_blank">http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/GLODAPv2/). This site also provides access to the calibrated data product, which is provided as a single global file or four regional ones - the Arctic, Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans - under the doi:10.3334/CDIAC

  8. The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 2 (GLODAPv2) – an internally consistent data product for the world ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Are; Key, Robert M.; van Heuven, Steven; Lauvset, Siv K.; Velo, Anton; Lin, Xiaohua; Schirnick, Carsten; Kozyr, Alex; Tanhua, Toste; Hoppema, Mario; Jutterström, Sara; Steinfeldt, Reiner; Jeansson, Emil; Ishii, Masao; Pérez, Fiz F.; Suzuki, Toru

    2016-08-15

    Version 2 of the Global Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAPv2) data product is composed of data from 724 scientific cruises covering the global ocean. It includes data assembled during the previous efforts GLODAPv1.1 (Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 1.1) in 2004, CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic) in 2009/2010, and PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) in 2013, as well as data from an additional 168 cruises. Data for 12 core variables (salinity, oxygen, nitrate, silicate, phosphate, dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and CCl4) have been subjected to extensive quality control, including systematic evaluation of bias. The data are available in two formats: (i) as submitted but updated to WOCE exchange format and (ii) as a merged and internally consistent data product. In the latter, adjustments have been applied to remove significant biases, respecting occurrences of any known or likely time trends or variations. Adjustments applied by previous efforts were re-evaluated. Hence, GLODAPv2 is not a simple merging of previous products with some new data added but a unique, internally consistent data product. In conclusion, this compiled and adjusted data product is believed to be consistent to better than 0.005 in salinity, 1 % in oxygen, 2 % in nitrate, 2 % in silicate, 2 % in phosphate, 4 µmol kg-1 in dissolved inorganic carbon, 6 µmol kg-1 in total alkalinity, 0.005 in pH, and 5 % for the halogenated transient tracers.

  9. The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 2 (GLODAPv2) – an internally consistent data product for the world ocean

    DOE PAGES

    Olsen, Are; Key, Robert M.; van Heuven, Steven; ...

    2016-08-15

    Version 2 of the Global Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAPv2) data product is composed of data from 724 scientific cruises covering the global ocean. It includes data assembled during the previous efforts GLODAPv1.1 (Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 1.1) in 2004, CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic) in 2009/2010, and PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) in 2013, as well as data from an additional 168 cruises. Data for 12 core variables (salinity, oxygen, nitrate, silicate, phosphate, dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and CCl4) have been subjected to extensive quality control, including systematic evaluation of bias. Themore » data are available in two formats: (i) as submitted but updated to WOCE exchange format and (ii) as a merged and internally consistent data product. In the latter, adjustments have been applied to remove significant biases, respecting occurrences of any known or likely time trends or variations. Adjustments applied by previous efforts were re-evaluated. Hence, GLODAPv2 is not a simple merging of previous products with some new data added but a unique, internally consistent data product. In conclusion, this compiled and adjusted data product is believed to be consistent to better than 0.005 in salinity, 1 % in oxygen, 2 % in nitrate, 2 % in silicate, 2 % in phosphate, 4 µmol kg-1 in dissolved inorganic carbon, 6 µmol kg-1 in total alkalinity, 0.005 in pH, and 5 % for the halogenated transient tracers.« less

  10. The ARGO Project: Global Ocean Observations for Understanding and Prediction of Climate Variability. Report for Calendar Year 2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Over 90% of the increased heat content due to global warming of the air/sea/ice climate system in the past 40 years occurred in the oceans. Climate...stresses on ocean ecosystems have serious consequences, and sometimes dramatic ones, such as coral reef bleaching . In the future, the impacts of a...The Argo Project Global Ocean Observations for Understanding and Prediction of Climate Variability Report for Calendar Year 2004 Dean H

  11. Millennial-scale projection of oceanic oxygen change due to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akitomo; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Shigemitsu, Masahito; Oka, Akira; Takahashi, Kunio; Ohgaito, Rumi; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Global warming is expected to globally decrease ocean oxygen concentrations by sea surface warming and ocean circulation change. Oxygen reduction is expected to persist for a thousand years or more, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. However, long-term changes in ocean oxygen and circulation are still unclear. Here we simulate multimillennium changes in ocean circulation and oxygen under doubling and quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, using GCM (MIROC) and an offline biogeochemical model. In the first 500 years, global oxygen concentration decreases, consistent with previous studies. Thereafter, however, the oxygen concentration in the deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots at the end of the simulations, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker AMOC. This is because, after the initial cessation, the recovery and overshooting of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea enhance ventilation and supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean. Another contributor to deep ocean oxygenation is seawater warming, which reduces the export production and shifts the organic matter remineralization to the upper water column. Our results indicate that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in deep ocean, which is opposite to the centennial-scale global oxygen reduction and general expectation.

  12. The Ago Project: Global Ocean Observations for Understanding and Prediction of Climate Variability. Report for Calendar Year 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    defining the physical environment of ocean ecosystems. Over 90% of the increased heat content due to global warming of the air/sea/ice climate... coral reef bleaching . In the future, the impacts of a varying climate on the health of the seas and coastal ecosystems will become an increasingly...The Argo Project Global Ocean Observations for Understanding and Prediction of Climate Variability Report for Calendar Year 2005 Dean H

  13. Global Ocean Currents Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, T.; Sun, L.

    2016-02-01

    The NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information has released an ocean currents database portal that aims 1) to integrate global ocean currents observations from a variety of instruments with different resolution, accuracy and response to spatial and temporal variability into a uniform network common data form (NetCDF) format and 2) to provide a dedicated online data discovery, access to NCEI-hosted and distributed data sources for ocean currents data. The portal provides a tailored web application that allows users to search for ocean currents data by platform types and spatial/temporal ranges of their interest. The dedicated web application is available at http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/gocd/index.html. The NetCDF format supports widely-used data access protocols and catalog services such as OPeNDAP (Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol) and THREDDS (Thematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services), which the GOCD users can use data files with their favorite analysis and visualization client software without downloading to their local machine. The potential users of the ocean currents database include, but are not limited to, 1) ocean modelers for their model skills assessments, 2) scientists and researchers for studying the impact of ocean circulations on the climate variability, 3) ocean shipping industry for safety navigation and finding optimal routes for ship fuel efficiency, 4) ocean resources managers while planning for the optimal sites for wastes and sewages dumping and for renewable hydro-kinematic energy, and 5) state and federal governments to provide historical (analyzed) ocean circulations as an aid for search and rescue

  14. Projections of ocean acidification over the next three centuries using a simple global climate carbon-cycle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartin, C. A.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Patel, P.; Mundra, A.

    2015-12-01

    Continued oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 is projected to significantly alter the chemistry of the upper oceans, potentially having serious consequences for the marine ecosystems. Projections of ocean acidification are primarily determined from prescribed emission pathways within large scale earth system models. Rather than running the cumbersome earth system models, we can use a reduced-form model to quickly emulate the CMIP5 models for projection studies under arbitrary emission pathways and for uncertainty analyses of the marine carbonate system. In this study we highlight the capability of Hector v1.1, a reduced-form model, to project changes in the upper ocean carbonate system over the next three centuries. Hector is run under historical emissions and a high emissions scenario (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), comparing its output to observations and CMIP5 models that contain ocean biogeochemical cycles. Ocean acidification changes are already taking place, with significant changes projected to occur over the next 300 years. We project a low latitude (> 55°) surface ocean pH decrease from preindustrial conditions by 0.4 units to 7.77 at 2100, and an additional 0.27 units to 7.50 at 2300. Aragonite saturations decrease by 1.85 units to 2.21 at 2100 and an additional 0.80 units to 1.42 at 2300. Under a high emissions scenario, for every 1 °C of future warming we find a 0.107 unit pH decrease and a 0.438 unit decrease in aragonite saturations. Hector reproduces the global historical trends, and future projections with equivalent rates of change over time compared to observations and CMIP5 models. Hector is a robust tool that can be used for quick ocean acidification projections, accurately emulating large scale climate models under multiple emission pathways.

  15. Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) heat exchange project: A summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Niiler, P. P.

    1985-01-01

    A pilot data center to compute ocean atmosphere heat exchange over the tropical ocean is prposed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in response to the scientific needs of the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Program. Optimal methods will be used to estimate sea surface temperature (SET), surface wind speed, and humidity from spaceborne observations. A monthly summary of these parameters will be used to compute ocean atmosphere latent heat exchanges. Monthly fields of surface heat flux over tropical oceans will be constructed using estimations of latent heat exchanges and short wave radiation from satellite data. Verification of all satellite data sets with in situ measurements at a few locations will be provided. The data center will be an experimental active archive where the quality and quantity of data required for TOGA flux computation are managed. The center is essential to facilitate the construction of composite data sets from global measurements taken from different sensors on various satellites. It will provide efficient utilization and easy access to the large volume of satellite data available for studies of ocean atmosphere energy exchanges.

  16. Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, B. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Siegel, D. A.; Werdell, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton are free-floating algae that grow in the euphotic zone of the upper ocean, converting carbon dioxide, sunlight, and available nutrients into organic carbon through photosynthesis. Despite their microscopic size, these photoautotrophs are responsible for roughly half the net primary production on Earth (NPP; gross primary production minus respiration), fixing atmospheric CO2 into food that fuels our global ocean ecosystems. Phytoplankton thus play a critical role in the global carbon cycle, and their growth patterns are highly sensitive to environmental changes such as increased ocean temperatures that stratify the water column and prohibit the transfer of cold, nutrient richwaters to the upper ocean euphotic zone.

  17. Ocean acidification over the next three centuries using a simple global climate carbon-cycle model: projections and sensitivities

    DOE PAGES

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit; ...

    2016-08-01

    Continued oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 is projected to significantly alter the chemistry of the upper oceans over the next three centuries, with potentially serious consequences for marine ecosystems. Relatively few models have the capability to make projections of ocean acidification, limiting our ability to assess the impacts and probabilities of ocean changes. In this study we examine the ability of Hector v1.1, a reduced-form global model, to project changes in the upper ocean carbonate system over the next three centuries, and quantify the model's sensitivity to parametric inputs. Hector is run under prescribed emission pathways from the Representative Concentrationmore » Pathways (RCPs) and compared to both observations and a suite of Coupled Model Intercomparison (CMIP5) model outputs. Current observations confirm that ocean acidification is already taking place, and CMIP5 models project significant changes occurring to 2300. Hector is consistent with the observational record within both the high- (> 55°) and low-latitude oceans (< 55°). The model projects low-latitude surface ocean pH to decrease from preindustrial levels of 8.17 to 7.77 in 2100, and to 7.50 in 2300; aragonite saturation levels (ΩAr) decrease from 4.1 units to 2.2 in 2100 and 1.4 in 2300 under RCP 8.5. These magnitudes and trends of ocean acidification within Hector are largely consistent with the CMIP5 model outputs, although we identify some small biases within Hector's carbonate system. Of the parameters tested, changes in [H+] are most sensitive to parameters that directly affect atmospheric CO2 concentrations – Q10 (terrestrial respiration temperature response) as well as changes in ocean circulation, while changes in ΩAr saturation levels are sensitive to changes in ocean salinity and Q10. We conclude that Hector is a robust tool well suited for rapid ocean acidification projections and sensitivity analyses, and it is capable of emulating both current observations

  18. Ocean acidification over the next three centuries using a simple global climate carbon-cycle model: projections and sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit; Mundra, Anupriya

    2016-08-01

    Continued oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 is projected to significantly alter the chemistry of the upper oceans over the next three centuries, with potentially serious consequences for marine ecosystems. Relatively few models have the capability to make projections of ocean acidification, limiting our ability to assess the impacts and probabilities of ocean changes. In this study we examine the ability of Hector v1.1, a reduced-form global model, to project changes in the upper ocean carbonate system over the next three centuries, and quantify the model's sensitivity to parametric inputs. Hector is run under prescribed emission pathways from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and compared to both observations and a suite of Coupled Model Intercomparison (CMIP5) model outputs. Current observations confirm that ocean acidification is already taking place, and CMIP5 models project significant changes occurring to 2300. Hector is consistent with the observational record within both the high- (> 55°) and low-latitude oceans (< 55°). The model projects low-latitude surface ocean pH to decrease from preindustrial levels of 8.17 to 7.77 in 2100, and to 7.50 in 2300; aragonite saturation levels (ΩAr) decrease from 4.1 units to 2.2 in 2100 and 1.4 in 2300 under RCP 8.5. These magnitudes and trends of ocean acidification within Hector are largely consistent with the CMIP5 model outputs, although we identify some small biases within Hector's carbonate system. Of the parameters tested, changes in [H+] are most sensitive to parameters that directly affect atmospheric CO2 concentrations – Q10 (terrestrial respiration temperature response) as well as changes in ocean circulation, while changes in ΩAr saturation levels are sensitive to changes in ocean salinity and Q10. We conclude that Hector is a robust tool well suited for rapid ocean acidification projections

  19. Ocean acidification over the next three centuries using a simple global climate carbon-cycle model: projections and sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit; Mundra, Anupriya

    2016-08-01

    Continued oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 is projected to significantly alter the chemistry of the upper oceans over the next three centuries, with potentially serious consequences for marine ecosystems. Relatively few models have the capability to make projections of ocean acidification, limiting our ability to assess the impacts and probabilities of ocean changes. In this study we examine the ability of Hector v1.1, a reduced-form global model, to project changes in the upper ocean carbonate system over the next three centuries, and quantify the model's sensitivity to parametric inputs. Hector is run under prescribed emission pathways from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and compared to both observations and a suite of Coupled Model Intercomparison (CMIP5) model outputs. Current observations confirm that ocean acidification is already taking place, and CMIP5 models project significant changes occurring to 2300. Hector is consistent with the observational record within both the high- (> 55°) and low-latitude oceans (< 55°). The model projects low-latitude surface ocean pH to decrease from preindustrial levels of 8.17 to 7.77 in 2100, and to 7.50 in 2300; aragonite saturation levels (ΩAr) decrease from 4.1 units to 2.2 in 2100 and 1.4 in 2300 under RCP 8.5. These magnitudes and trends of ocean acidification within Hector are largely consistent with the CMIP5 model outputs, although we identify some small biases within Hector's carbonate system. Of the parameters tested, changes in [H+] are most sensitive to parameters that directly affect atmospheric CO2 concentrations - Q10 (terrestrial respiration temperature response) as well as changes in ocean circulation, while changes in ΩAr saturation levels are sensitive to changes in ocean salinity and Q10. We conclude that Hector is a robust tool well suited for rapid ocean acidification projections and sensitivity analyses, and it is capable of emulating both current observations and large

  20. Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, B. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Siegel, D. A.; Werdell, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are responsible for roughly half the net primary production (NPP) on Earth, fixing atmospheric CO2 into food that fuels global ocean ecosystems and drives the ocean's biogeochemical cycles. Phytoplankton growth is highly sensitive to variations in ocean physical properties, such as upper ocean stratification and light availability within this mixed layer. Satellite ocean color sensors, such as the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS; McClain 2009) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS; Esaias 1998), provide observations of sufficient frequency and geographic coverage to globally monitor physically-driven changes in phytoplankton distributions. In practice, ocean color sensors retrieve the spectral distribution of visible solar radiation reflected upward from beneath the ocean surface, which can then be related to changes in the photosynthetic phytoplankton pigment, chlorophyll- a (Chla; measured in mg m-3). Here, global Chla data for 2013 are evaluated within the context of the 16-year continuous record provided through the combined observations of SeaWiFS (1997-2010) and MODIS on Aqua (MODISA; 2002-present). Ocean color measurements from the recently launched Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS; 2011-present) are also considered, but results suggest that the temporal calibration of the VIIRS sensor is not yet sufficiently stable for quantitative global change studies. All MODISA (version 2013.1), SeaWiFS (version 2010.0), and VIIRS (version 2013.1) data presented here were produced by NASA using consistent Chla algorithms.

  1. Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, B. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Siegel, D. A.; Werdell, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are responsible for roughly half the net primary production (NPP) on Earth, fixing atmospheric CO2 into food that fuels global ocean ecosystems and drives the ocean's biogeochemical cycles. Phytoplankton growth is highly sensitive to variations in ocean physical properties, such as upper ocean stratification and light availability within this mixed layer. Satellite ocean color sensors, such as the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS; McClain 2009) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS; Esaias 1998), provide observations of sufficient frequency and geographic coverage to globally monitor physically-driven changes in phytoplankton distributions. In practice, ocean color sensors retrieve the spectral distribution of visible solar radiation reflected upward from beneath the ocean surface, which can then be related to changes in the photosynthetic phytoplankton pigment, chlorophyll- a (Chla; measured in mg m-3). Here, global Chla data for 2013 are evaluated within the context of the 16-year continuous record provided through the combined observations of SeaWiFS (1997-2010) and MODIS on Aqua (MODISA; 2002-present). Ocean color measurements from the recently launched Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS; 2011-present) are also considered, but results suggest that the temporal calibration of the VIIRS sensor is not yet sufficiently stable for quantitative global change studies. All MODISA (version 2013.1), SeaWiFS (version 2010.0), and VIIRS (version 2013.1) data presented here were produced by NASA using consistent Chla algorithms.

  2. Global ocean circulation by altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunsch, Carl; Haidvogel, D.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to determine the general circulation of the oceans and many of its climate and biochemical consequences through the optimum use of altimetry data from TOPEX/POSEIDON and related missions. Emphasis is on the global-scale circulation, as opposed to the regional scale, but some more local studies will be carried out. Because of funding limitations, the primary initial focus will be on the time-dependent global-scale circulation rather than the mean; eventually, the mean circulation must be dealt with as well.

  3. Analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) Project for Trends in Iron Uptake by Surface Ocean Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Toulza, Eve; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Blain, Stéphane; Piganeau, Gwenael

    2012-01-01

    Microbial metagenomes are DNA samples of the most abundant, and therefore most successful organisms at the sampling time and location for a given cell size range. The study of microbial communities via their DNA content has revolutionized our understanding of microbial ecology and evolution. Iron availability is a critical resource that limits microbial communities' growth in many oceanic areas. Here, we built a database of 2319 sequences, corresponding to 140 gene families of iron metabolism with a large phylogenetic spread, to explore the microbial strategies of iron acquisition in the ocean's bacterial community. We estimate iron metabolism strategies from metagenome gene content and investigate whether their prevalence varies with dissolved iron concentrations obtained from a biogeochemical model. We show significant quantitative and qualitative variations in iron metabolism pathways, with a higher proportion of iron metabolism genes in low iron environments. We found a striking difference between coastal and open ocean sites regarding Fe2+ versus Fe3+ uptake gene prevalence. We also show that non-specific siderophore uptake increases in low iron open ocean environments, suggesting bacteria may acquire iron from natural siderophore-like organic complexes. Despite the lack of knowledge of iron uptake mechanisms in most marine microorganisms, our approach provides insights into how the iron metabolic pathways of microbial communities may vary with seawater iron concentrations. PMID:22363520

  4. Ensemble global ocean forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassington, G. B.

    2016-02-01

    A novel time-lagged ensemble system based on multiple independent cycles has been performed in operations at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for the past 3 years. Despite the use of only four cycles the ensemble mean provided robustly higher skill and the ensemble variance was a reliable predictor of forecast errors. A spectral analysis comparing the ensemble mean with the members demonstrated the gradual increase in power of random errors with wavenumber up to a saturation length scale imposed by the resolution of the observing system. This system has been upgraded to a near-global 0.1 degree system in a new hybrid six-member ensemble system configuration including a new data assimilation system, cycling pattern and initialisation. The hybrid system consists of two ensemble members per day each with a 3 day cycle. We will outline the performance of both the deterministic and ensemble ocean forecast system.

  5. Global warming and changes in ocean circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, P.B.; Caldeira, K.C.

    1998-02-01

    This final report provides an overview of the goals and accomplishments of this project. Modeling and observational work has raised the possibility that global warming may cause changes in the circulation of the ocean. If such changes would occur they could have important climatic consequences. The first technical goal of this project was to investigate some of these possible changes in ocean circulation in a quantitative way, using a state-of -the-art numerical model of the ocean. Another goal was to develop our ocean model, a detailed three-dimensional numerical model of the ocean circulation and ocean carbon cycles. A major non-technical goal was to establish LLNL as a center of excellence in modelling the ocean circulation and carbon cycle.

  6. The MERSEA Project : development of a European system for operational monitoring and forecasting of the ocean physics, biogeochemistry and ecosystems, on global and regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desaubies, Y.; Mersea Consortium

    MERSEA (Marine EnviRonment and Security for the European Area) is an Integrated Project funded by the EC under the FP6, Space thematic priority for GMES, Ocean and Marine Applications. Forty agencies and industrial partners participate in the project whose aim is to provide an integrated service of global and regional ocean monitoring and forecasting to intermediate users and policy makers in support of safe and efficient offshore activities, environmental management, security, and sustainable use of marine resources. The system to be developed in this 4-year project (2004 - 2007) will be the Ocean and Marine services element of GMES to be established in 2008. At the core of the system is the collection, validation and assimilation of remote sensed and in situ data into ocean circulation models that allow for the self consistent merging of the data types, interpolation in time and space for uniform coverage, now-casting (i.e. data synthesis in real-time), forecasting, and hind-casting, and delivery of information products. The project will lead to a single high-resolution global ocean forecasting system shared by European partners together with a co-ordinated network of regional systems for European waters which will provide the platform required for coastal forecasting systems. During the project the main pre-operational systems will be transitioned towards operational status and three of the centres will converge on a single ocean model framework suitable for both the deep ocean and shelf-seas. The project will federate the resources and expertise of diverse institutes, agencies, and companies in the public and private sector, in the fields of satellite data processing, in situ ocean observing systems, data management, ocean and ecosystem modelling, ocean, marine and weather forecasting. A global high resolution model (1/12°) will be developed, as well as improved systems for the Arctic, Baltic, Mediterranean and NE Atlantic. Down-scaling to regional systems

  7. The GULLS project: a comparison of vulnerabilities across selected ocean hotspots and implications for adaptation to global change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, K.; Hobday, A. J.; Aswani, S.; Byfield, V.; Dutra, L.; Gasalla, M.; Haward, M.; Paytan, A.; Pecl, G.; Plaganyi-Lloyd, E.; Popova, K.; Salim, S. S.; Savage, C.; Sauer, W.; van Putten, I. E.; Visser, N.; Team, T G

    2016-12-01

    The GULLS project, `Global learning for local solutions: Reducing vulnerability of marine-dependent coastal communities' has been underway since October 2014. The project has been investigating six regional `hotspots': marine areas experiencing rapid warming. These are south-east Australia, Brazil, India, Solomon Islands, South Africa, and the Mozambique Channel and Madagascar. Rapid warming could be expected to have social, cultural and economic impacts that could affect these countries in different ways and may already be doing so. GULLS has focused on contributing to assessing and reducing the vulnerability of coastal communities and other stakeholders dependent on marine resources and to facilitate adaptation to climate change and variability through an integrated and trans-disciplinary approach. It includes participants from Australia, Brazil, India, Madagascar, New Zealand, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The research programme has been divided into six inter-linked components: ocean models, biological and ecological sensitivity analyses, system models, social vulnerability, policy mapping, and communication and education. This presentation will provide a brief overview of each of these components and describe the benefits that have resulted from the collaborative and transdisciplinary approach of GULLS. Following the standard vulnerability elements of exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity, the vulnerabilities of coastal communities and other stakeholders dependent on marine resources in the five hotspots will be compared using a set of indicators derived and populated from results of the research programme. The implications of similarities and differences between the hotspots for adaptation planning and options will be described.

  8. Intercomparison of the Arctic sea ice cover in global ocean-sea ice reanalyses from the ORA-IP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallier, Matthieu; Smith, Gregory C.; Dupont, Frédéric; Lemieux, Jean-François; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Hernandez, Fabrice; Msadek, Rym; Peterson, K. Andrew; Storto, Andrea; Toyoda, Takahiro; Valdivieso, Maria; Vernieres, Guillaume; Zuo, Hao; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Chang, You-Soon; Ferry, Nicolas; Garric, Gilles; Haines, Keith; Keeley, Sarah; Kovach, Robin M.; Kuragano, Tsurane; Masina, Simona; Tang, Yongming; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Wang, Xiaochun

    2017-08-01

    Ocean-sea ice reanalyses are crucial for assessing the variability and recent trends in the Arctic sea ice cover. This is especially true for sea ice volume, as long-term and large scale sea ice thickness observations are inexistent. Results from the Ocean ReAnalyses Intercomparison Project (ORA-IP) are presented, with a focus on Arctic sea ice fields reconstructed by state-of-the-art global ocean reanalyses. Differences between the various reanalyses are explored in terms of the effects of data assimilation, model physics and atmospheric forcing on properties of the sea ice cover, including concentration, thickness, velocity and snow. Amongst the 14 reanalyses studied here, 9 assimilate sea ice concentration, and none assimilate sea ice thickness data. The comparison reveals an overall agreement in the reconstructed concentration fields, mainly because of the constraints in surface temperature imposed by direct assimilation of ocean observations, prescribed or assimilated atmospheric forcing and assimilation of sea ice concentration. However, some spread still exists amongst the reanalyses, due to a variety of factors. In particular, a large spread in sea ice thickness is found within the ensemble of reanalyses, partially caused by the biases inherited from their sea ice model components. Biases are also affected by the assimilation of sea ice concentration and the treatment of sea ice thickness in the data assimilation process. An important outcome of this study is that the spatial distribution of ice volume varies widely between products, with no reanalysis standing out as clearly superior as compared to altimetry estimates. The ice thickness from systems without assimilation of sea ice concentration is not worse than that from systems constrained with sea ice observations. An evaluation of the sea ice velocity fields reveals that ice drifts too fast in most systems. As an ensemble, the ORA-IP reanalyses capture trends in Arctic sea ice area and extent

  9. Intercomparison of the Arctic sea ice cover in global ocean-sea ice reanalyses from the ORA-IP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallier, Matthieu; Smith, Gregory C.; Dupont, Frédéric; Lemieux, Jean-François; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Hernandez, Fabrice; Msadek, Rym; Peterson, K. Andrew; Storto, Andrea; Toyoda, Takahiro; Valdivieso, Maria; Vernieres, Guillaume; Zuo, Hao; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Chang, You-Soon; Ferry, Nicolas; Garric, Gilles; Haines, Keith; Keeley, Sarah; Kovach, Robin M.; Kuragano, Tsurane; Masina, Simona; Tang, Yongming; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Wang, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    Ocean-sea ice reanalyses are crucial for assessing the variability and recent trends in the Arctic sea ice cover. This is especially true for sea ice volume, as long-term and large scale sea ice thickness observations are inexistent. Results from the Ocean ReAnalyses Intercomparison Project (ORA-IP) are presented, with a focus on Arctic sea ice fields reconstructed by state-of-the-art global ocean reanalyses. Differences between the various reanalyses are explored in terms of the effects of data assimilation, model physics and atmospheric forcing on properties of the sea ice cover, including concentration, thickness, velocity and snow. Amongst the 14 reanalyses studied here, 9 assimilate sea ice concentration, and none assimilate sea ice thickness data. The comparison reveals an overall agreement in the reconstructed concentration fields, mainly because of the constraints in surface temperature imposed by direct assimilation of ocean observations, prescribed or assimilated atmospheric forcing and assimilation of sea ice concentration. However, some spread still exists amongst the reanalyses, due to a variety of factors. In particular, a large spread in sea ice thickness is found within the ensemble of reanalyses, partially caused by the biases inherited from their sea ice model components. Biases are also affected by the assimilation of sea ice concentration and the treatment of sea ice thickness in the data assimilation process. An important outcome of this study is that the spatial distribution of ice volume varies widely between products, with no reanalysis standing out as clearly superior as compared to altimetry estimates. The ice thickness from systems without assimilation of sea ice concentration is not worse than that from systems constrained with sea ice observations. An evaluation of the sea ice velocity fields reveals that ice drifts too fast in most systems. As an ensemble, the ORA-IP reanalyses capture trends in Arctic sea ice area and extent

  10. Trends in Selenium Utilization in Marine Microbial World Revealed through the Analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) Project

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2008-01-01

    Selenium is an important trace element that occurs in proteins in the form of selenocysteine (Sec) and in tRNAs in the form of selenouridine. Recent large-scale metagenomics projects provide an opportunity for understanding global trends in trace element utilization. Herein, we characterized the selenoproteome of the microbial marine community derived from the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) expedition. More than 3,600 selenoprotein gene sequences belonging to 58 protein families were detected, including sequences representing 7 newly identified selenoprotein families, such as homologs of ferredoxin–thioredoxin reductase and serine protease. In addition, a new eukaryotic selenoprotein family, thiol reductase GILT, was identified. Most GOS selenoprotein families originated from Cys-containing thiol oxidoreductases. In both Pacific and Atlantic microbial communities, SelW-like and SelD were the most widespread selenoproteins. Geographic location had little influence on Sec utilization as measured by selenoprotein variety and the number of selenoprotein genes detected; however, both higher temperature and marine (as opposed to freshwater and other aquatic) environment were associated with increased use of this amino acid. Selenoproteins were also detected with preference for either environment. We identified novel fusion forms of several selenoproteins that highlight redox activities of these proteins. Almost half of Cys-containing SelDs were fused with NADH dehydrogenase, whereas such SelD forms were rare in terrestrial organisms. The selenouridine utilization trait was also analyzed and showed an independent evolutionary relationship with Sec utilization. Overall, our study provides insights into global trends in microbial selenium utilization in marine environments. PMID:18551170

  11. Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Water and Salt Budgets of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James R.; Russell, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The annual flux of freshwater into the Arctic Ocean by the atmosphere and rivers is balanced by the export of sea ice and oceanic freshwater. Two 150-year simulations of a global climate model are used to examine how this balance might change if atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) increase. Relative to the control, the last 50-year period of the GHG experiment indicates that the total inflow of water from the atmosphere and rivers increases by 10% primarily due to an increase in river discharge, the annual sea-ice export decreases by about half, the oceanic liquid water export increases, salinity decreases, sea-ice cover decreases, and the total mass and sea-surface height of the Arctic Ocean increase. The closed, compact, and multi-phased nature of the hydrologic cycle in the Arctic Ocean makes it an ideal test of water budgets that could be included in model intercomparisons.

  12. Climate change signal and uncertainty in CMIP5-based projections of global ocean surface wave heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolan L.; Feng, Yang; Swail, Val R.

    2015-05-01

    This study uses the analysis of variance approaches to quantify the climate change signal and uncertainty in multimodel ensembles of statistical simulations of significant wave height (Hs), which are based on the CMIP5 historical, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 forcing scenario simulations of sea level pressure. Here the signal of climate change refers to the temporal variations caused by the prescribed forcing. "Significant" means "significantly different from zero at 5% level." In a four-model ensemble of Hs simulations, the common signal—the signal that is simulated in all the four models—is found to strengthen over time. For the historical followed by RCP8.5 scenario, the common signal in annual mean Hs is found to be significant in 16.6% and 82.2% of the area by year 2005 and 2099, respectively. The global average of the variance proportion of the common signal increases from 0.75% in year 2005 to 12.0% by year 2099. The signal is strongest in the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP), featuring significant increases in both the annual mean and maximum of Hs in this region. The climate model uncertainty (i.e., intermodel variability) is significant nearly globally; its magnitude is comparable to or greater than that of the common signal in most areas, except in the ETP where the signal is much larger. In a 20-model ensemble of Hs simulations for the period 2006-2099, the model uncertainty is found to be significant globally; it is about 10 times as large as the variability between the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. The copyright line for this article was changed on 10 JUNE 2015 after original online publication.

  13. Producing a Climate-Quality Database of Global Upper Ocean Profile Temperatures - The IQuOD (International Quality-controlled Ocean Database) Project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprintall, J.; Cowley, R.; Palmer, M. D.; Domingues, C. M.; Suzuki, T.; Ishii, M.; Boyer, T.; Goni, G. J.; Gouretski, V. V.; Macdonald, A. M.; Thresher, A.; Good, S. A.; Diggs, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Historical ocean temperature profile observations provide a critical element for a host of ocean and climate research activities. These include providing initial conditions for seasonal-to-decadal prediction systems, evaluating past variations in sea level and Earth's energy imbalance, ocean state estimation for studying variability and change, and climate model evaluation and development. The International Quality controlled Ocean Database (IQuOD) initiative represents a community effort to create the most globally complete temperature profile dataset, with (intelligent) metadata and assigned uncertainties. With an internationally coordinated effort organized by oceanographers, with data and ocean instrumentation expertise, and in close consultation with end users (e.g., climate modelers), the IQuOD initiative will assess and maximize the potential of an irreplaceable collection of ocean temperature observations (tens of millions of profiles collected at a cost of tens of billions of dollars, since 1772) to fulfil the demand for a climate-quality global database that can be used with greater confidence in a vast range of climate change related research and services of societal benefit. Progress towards version 1 of the IQuOD database, ongoing and future work will be presented. More information on IQuOD is available at www.iquod.org.

  14. Global Ocean Storage of Anthropogenic Carbon (GOSAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J C

    2002-04-02

    GOSAC was an EC-funded project (1998-2001) focused on improving the predictive capacity and accelerating development of global-scale, three-dimensional, ocean carbon-cycle models by means of standardized model evaluation and model intercomparison. Through the EC Environment and Climate Programme, GOSAC supported the participation of seven European modeling groups in the second phase of the larger international effort OCMIP (the Ocean Carbon-Cycle Model Intercomparison Project). OCMIP included model comparison and validation for both CO{sub 2} and other ocean circulation and biogeochemical tracers. Beyond the international OCMIP effort, GOSAC also supported the same EC ocean carbon cycle modeling groups to make simulations to evaluate the efficiency of purposeful sequestration of CO{sub 2} in the ocean. Such sequestration, below the thermocline has been proposed as a strategy to help mitigate the increase of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. Some technical and scientific highlights of GOSAC are given.

  15. The Global Ocean Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, Dana

    1992-01-01

    A Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) should be established now with international coordination (1) to address issues of global change, (2) to implement operational ENSO forecasts, (3) to provide the data required to apply global ocean circulation models, and (4) to extract the greatest value from the one billion dollar investment over the next ten years in ocean remote sensing by the world's space agencies. The objectives of GOOS will focus on climatic and oceanic predictions, on assessing coastal pollution, and in determining the sustainability of living marine resources and ecosystems. GOOS will be a complete system including satellite observations, in situ observations, numerical modeling of ocean processes, and data exchange and management. A series of practical and economic benefits will be derived from the information generated by GOOS. In addition to the marine science community, these benefits will be realized by the energy industries of the world, and by the world's fisheries. The basic oceanic variables that are required to meet the oceanic and predictability objectives of GOOS include wind velocity over the ocean, sea surface temperature and salinity, oceanic profiles of temperature and salinity, surface current, sea level, the extent and thickness of sea ice, the partial pressure of CO2 in surface waters, and the chlorophyll concentration of surface waters. Ocean circulation models and coupled ocean-atmosphere models can be used to evaluate observing system design, to assimilate diverse data sets from in situ and remotely sensed observations, and ultimately to predict future states of the system. The volume of ocean data will increase enormously over the next decade as new satellite systems are launched and as complementary in situ measuring systems are deployed. These data must be transmitted, quality controlled, exchanged, analyzed, and archived with the best state-of-the-art computational methods.

  16. The Global Ocean Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, Dana

    1992-01-01

    A Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) should be established now with international coordination (1) to address issues of global change, (2) to implement operational ENSO forecasts, (3) to provide the data required to apply global ocean circulation models, and (4) to extract the greatest value from the one billion dollar investment over the next ten years in ocean remote sensing by the world's space agencies. The objectives of GOOS will focus on climatic and oceanic predictions, on assessing coastal pollution, and in determining the sustainability of living marine resources and ecosystems. GOOS will be a complete system including satellite observations, in situ observations, numerical modeling of ocean processes, and data exchange and management. A series of practical and economic benefits will be derived from the information generated by GOOS. In addition to the marine science community, these benefits will be realized by the energy industries of the world, and by the world's fisheries. The basic oceanic variables that are required to meet the oceanic and predictability objectives of GOOS include wind velocity over the ocean, sea surface temperature and salinity, oceanic profiles of temperature and salinity, surface current, sea level, the extent and thickness of sea ice, the partial pressure of CO2 in surface waters, and the chlorophyll concentration of surface waters. Ocean circulation models and coupled ocean-atmosphere models can be used to evaluate observing system design, to assimilate diverse data sets from in situ and remotely sensed observations, and ultimately to predict future states of the system. The volume of ocean data will increase enormously over the next decade as new satellite systems are launched and as complementary in situ measuring systems are deployed. These data must be transmitted, quality controlled, exchanged, analyzed, and archived with the best state-of-the-art computational methods.

  17. Toward Submesocale Ocean Modelling and Observations for Global Ocean Forecast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillet, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mercator Ocean is the French oceanographic operational center involved in the development an operation of global high resolution ocean forecasting systems; it is part of the European Copernicus Marine service initiated during MyOcean project. Mercator Ocean currently delivers daily 1/12° global ocean forecast based on the NEMO model which allows for a good representation of mesoscale structures in main areas of the global ocean. Data assimilation of altimetry provides a precise initialization of the mesoscale structures while in situ observations, mainly based on the ARGO network, and satellite Sea Surface Temperature constrain water mass properties from the surface to intermediate depths. One of the main improvements scheduled in the coming years is the transitioning towards submesoscale permitting horizontal resolution (1/36°). On the basis of numerical simulations in selected areas and standard diagnostics developed to validate operational systems, we will discuss : i) The impact of the resolution increase at the basin scale. ii) Adequacy of numerical schemes, vertical resolution and physical parameterization. iii) Adequacy of currently implemented data assimilation procedures in particular with respect to new high resolution data set such as SWOT.

  18. Global Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telszewski, Maciej; Tanhua, Toste; Palacz, Artur

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of the marine carbon cycle and its numerous connections to carbon's atmospheric and terrestrial pathways means that a wide range of approaches have to be used in order to establish it's qualitative and quantitative role in the global climate system. Ocean carbon and biogeochemistry research, observations, and modelling are conducted at national, regional, and global levels to quantify the global ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2 and to understand controls of this process, the variability of uptake and vulnerability of carbon fluxes into the ocean. These science activities require support by a sustained, international effort that provides a central communication forum and coordination services to facilitate the compatibility and comparability of results from individual efforts and development of the ocean carbon data products that can be integrated with the terrestrial, atmospheric and human dimensions components of the global carbon cycle. The International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP) was created in 2005 by the IOC of UNESCO and the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research. IOCCP provides an international, program-independent forum for global coordination of ocean carbon and biogeochemistry observations and integration with global carbon cycle science programs. The IOCCP coordinates an ever-increasing set of observations-related activities in the following domains: underway observations of biogeochemical water properties, ocean interior observations, ship-based time-series observations, large-scale ocean acidification monitoring, inorganic nutrients observations, biogeochemical instruments and autonomous sensors and data and information creation. Our contribution is through the facilitation of the development of globally acceptable strategies, methodologies, practices and standards homogenizing efforts of the research community and scientific advisory groups as well as integrating the ocean biogeochemistry observations with the

  19. The global ocean microbiome.

    PubMed

    Moran, Mary Ann

    2015-12-11

    The microbiome of the largest environment on Earth has been gradually revealing its secrets over four decades of study. Despite the dispersed nature of substrates and the transience of surfaces, marine microbes drive essential transformations in all global elemental cycles. Much has been learned about the microbes that carry out key biogeochemical processes, but there are still plenty of ambiguities about the factors important in regulating activity, including the role of microbial interactions. Identifying the molecular "currencies" exchanged within the microbial community will provide key information on microbiome function and its vulnerability to environmental change. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Simulating PACE Global Ocean Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA PACE mission is a hyper-spectral radiometer planned for launch in the next decade. It is intended to provide new information on ocean biogeochemical constituents by parsing the details of high resolution spectral absorption and scattering. It is the first of its kind for global applications and as such, poses challenges for design and operation. To support pre-launch mission development and assess on-orbit capabilities, the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office has developed a dynamic simulation of global water-leaving radiances, using an ocean model containing multiple ocean phytoplankton groups, particulate detritus, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), and chromophoric dissolved organic carbon (CDOC) along with optical absorption and scattering processes at 1 nm spectral resolution. The purpose here is to assess the skill of the dynamic model and derived global radiances. Global bias, uncertainty, and correlation are derived using available modern satellite radiances at moderate spectral resolution. Total chlorophyll, PIC, and the absorption coefficient of CDOC (aCDOC), are simultaneously assimilated to improve the fidelity of the optical constituent fields. A 5-year simulation showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) comparisons of chlorophyll (r = 0.869), PIC (r = 0.868), and a CDOC (r =0.890) with satellite data. Additionally, diatoms (r = 0.890), cyanobacteria (r = 0.732), and coccolithophores (r = 0.716) were significantly correlated with in situ data. Global assimilated distributions of optical constituents were coupled with a radiative transfer model (Ocean-Atmosphere Spectral Irradiance Model, OASIM) to estimate normalized water-leaving radiances at 1 nm for the spectral range 250-800 nm. These unassimilated radiances were within 0.074 mW/sq cm/micron/sr of MODIS-Aqua radiances at 412, 443, 488, 531, 547, and 667 nm. This difference represented a bias of 10.4% (model low). A mean correlation of 0.706 (P < 0.05) was found with global

  1. Global Trends in Ocean Noise.

    PubMed

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    This ongoing work provides information about sound level trends from three ocean regions to compare with those of the North Pacific to determine whether increasing sound levels are a global phenomenon. Here the term soundscape is used to describe a measured physical property that can be selectively decomposed by frequency and sound level is used to provide insight relating to conditions ranging from the quietest conditions (sound floor) to the most extreme acoustic events. Acoustic time series from the Indian, South Atlantic, and Equatorial Pacific Oceans were used to quantify the rate and direction of low-frequency change over the past decade.

  2. Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James R.; Russell, Gary L.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The annual energy budget of the Arctic Ocean is characterized by a net heat loss at the air-sea interface that is balanced by oceanic heat transport into the Arctic. The energy loss at the air-sea interface is due to the combined effects of radiative, sensible, and latent heat fluxes. The inflow of heat by the ocean can be divided into two components: the transport of water masses of different temperatures between the Arctic and the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the export of sea ice, primarily through Fram Strait. Two 150-year simulations (1950-2099) of a global climate model are used to examine how this balance might change if atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) increase. One is a control simulation for the present climate with constant 1950 atmospheric composition, and the other is a transient experiment with observed GHGs from 1950 to 1990 and 0.5% annual compounded increases of CO2 after 1990. For the present climate the model agrees well with observations of radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, atmospheric advective energy transport into the Arctic, and surface air temperature. It also simulates the seasonal cycle and summer increase of cloud cover and the seasonal cycle of sea-ice cover. In addition, the changes in high-latitude surface air temperature and sea-ice cover in the GHG experiment are consistent with observed changes during the last 40 and 20 years, respectively. Relative to the control, the last 50-year period of the GHG experiment indicates that even though the net annual incident solar radiation at the surface decreases by 4.6 W(per square meters) (because of greater cloud cover and increased cloud optical depth), the absorbed solar radiation increases by 2.8 W(per square meters) (because of less sea ice). Increased cloud cover and warmer air also cause increased downward thermal radiation at the surface so that the net radiation into the ocean increases by 5.0 Wm-2. The annual increase in radiation into the ocean, however, is

  3. An overview of the SeaWiFS project and strategies for producing a climate research quality global ocean bio-optical time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Feldman, Gene C.; Hooker, Stanford B.

    2004-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Project Office was formally initiated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in 1990. Seven years later, the sensor was launched by Orbital Sciences Corporation under a data-buy contract to provide 5 years of science quality data for global ocean biogeochemistry research. To date, the SeaWiFS program has greatly exceeded the mission goals established over a decade ago in terms of data quality, data accessibility and usability, ocean community infrastructure development, cost efficiency, and community service. The SeaWiFS Project Office and its collaborators in the scientific community have made substantial contributions in the areas of satellite calibration, product validation, near-real time data access, field data collection, protocol development, in situ instrumentation technology, operational data system development, and desktop level-0 to level-3 processing software. One important aspect of the SeaWiFS program is the high level of science community cooperation and participation. This article summarizes the key activities and approaches the SeaWiFS Project Office pursued to define, achieve, and maintain the mission objectives. These achievements have enabled the user community to publish a large and growing volume of research such as those contributed to this special volume of Deep-Sea Research. Finally, some examples of major geophysical events (oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial) captured by SeaWiFS are presented to demonstrate the versatility of the sensor.

  4. Modelling the global coastal ocean.

    PubMed

    Holt, Jason; Harle, James; Proctor, Roger; Michel, Sylvain; Ashworth, Mike; Batstone, Crispian; Allen, Icarus; Holmes, Robert; Smyth, Tim; Haines, Keith; Bretherton, Dan; Smith, Gregory

    2009-03-13

    Shelf and coastal seas are regions of exceptionally high biological productivity, high rates of biogeochemical cycling and immense socio-economic importance. They are, however, poorly represented by the present generation of Earth system models, both in terms of resolution and process representation. Hence, these models cannot be used to elucidate the role of the coastal ocean in global biogeochemical cycles and the effects global change (both direct anthropogenic and climatic) are having on them. Here, we present a system for simulating all the coastal regions around the world (the Global Coastal Ocean Modelling System) in a systematic and practical fashion. It is based on automatically generating multiple nested model domains, using the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Ocean Modelling System coupled to the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model. Preliminary results from the system are presented. These demonstrate the viability of the concept, and we discuss the prospects for using the system to explore key areas of global change in shelf seas, such as their role in the carbon cycle and climate change effects on fisheries.

  5. The Global Supernova Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Global Supernova Project

    2017-06-01

    The Global Supernova Project is worldwide collaboration to study 600 supernovae of all types between May 2017 and July 2020. It is a Key Project at Las Cumbres Observatory, whose global robotic telescope network will provide lightcurves and spectra. Follow-up observations will be obtained on many other facilities, including Swift, VLA, K2, the NTT, IRTF, Keck, and Gemini. Observations are managed by the Supernova Exchange, a combination observatin database and telescope control system run by LCO. Here we report on results from the previous Supernova Key Project, and first results from the Global Supernova Project.

  6. Understanding Global Climate Change with Ocean Acoustic Tomography and Models,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    these scales in the global oceans in real-time. The cost for these measurements is projected to be less than the costs of mapping temperature and other variables in the atmosphere ( Spiesberger , 1992). (MM)

  7. The Argo Project: Global Ocean Observations for Understanding and Prediction of Climate Variability. Report for Calendar Year 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    past 40 years occurred in the oceans. Climate stresses on ocean ecosystems have serious consequences, and sometimes dramatic ones, such as coral reef ... bleaching . In the future, the impacts of a varying climate on the health of the seas and coastal ecosystems will become an increasingly important

  8. Global Troposphere Experiment Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.

    1997-01-01

    For the Global Troposphere Experiment project Pacific Exploratory Measurements West B (PEM West B), we made determinations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with isotopically labelled internal standards. This technique provides measurements with precision of 1 part-per-trillion by volume below 20 pptv and 1% above 20 pptv. Measurement of DMS and SO2 were performed with a time cycle of 5-6 minutes with intermittent zero checks. The detection limits were about 1 pptv for SO2 and 2 pptv for DMS. Over 700 measurements of each compound were made in flight. Volcanic impacts on the upper troposphere were again found as a result of deep convection in the tropics. Extensive emission of SO2 from the Pacific Rim land masses were primarily observed in the lower well-mixed part of the boundary layer but also in the upper part of the boundary layer. Analyses of the SO2 data with aerosol sulfate, beryllium-7, and lead-210 indicated that SO2, contributed to half or more of the observed total oxidized sulfur (SO2 plus aerosol sulfate) in free tropospheric air. Cloud processing and rain appeared to be responsible for lower SO2 levels between 3 and 8.5 km than above or below this region. During both phases of PEM-West, dimethyl sulfide did not appear to be a major source of sulfur dioxide in the upper free troposphere over the western Pacific Ocean. In 1991 the sources Of SO2 at high altitude appeared to be both anthropogenic and volcanic with an estimated 1% being solely from DMS. The primary difference for the increase in the DMS source was the very low concentration of SO2 at high altitude. In the midlatitude region near the Asian land masses, DMS in the mixed layer was lower than in the tropical region of the western Pacific. Convective cloud systems near volcanoes in the tropical convergence in the western Pacific troposphere were a major source of SO2 at high altitudes during PEM-West B. High levels of SO2 were

  9. Building a Global Ocean Science Education Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowcroft, G. A.; Tuddenham, P. T.; Pizziconi, R.

    2016-02-01

    It is imperative for ocean science education to be closely linked to ocean science research. This is especially important for research that addresses global concerns that cross national boundaries, including climate related issues. The results of research on these critical topics must find its way to the public, educators, and students of all ages around the globe. To facilitate this, opportunities are needed for ocean scientists and educators to convene and identify priorities and strategies for ocean science education. On June 26 and 27, 2015 the first Global Ocean Science Education (GOSE) Workshop was convened in the United States at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. The workshop, sponsored by the Consortium for Ocean Science Exploration and Engagement (COSEE) and the College of Exploration, had over 75 participants representing 15 nations. The workshop addressed critical global ocean science topics, current ocean science research and education priorities, advanced communication technologies, and leveraging international ocean research technologies. In addition, panels discussed elementary, secondary, undergraduate, graduate, and public education across the ocean basins with emphasis on opportunities for international collaboration. Special presentation topics included advancements in tropical cyclone forecasting, collaborations among Pacific Islands, ocean science for coastal resiliency, and trans-Atlantic collaboration. This presentation will focus on workshop outcomes as well as activities for growing a global ocean science education network. A summary of the workshop report will also be provided. The dates and location for the 2016 GOES Workshop will be announced. See http://www.coexploration.net/gose/index.html

  10. Decadal Changes in Global Ocean Chlorophyll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Conkright, Margarita E.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global ocean chlorophyll archive produced by the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) was revised using compatible algorithms with the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWIFS), and both were blended with in situ data. This methodology permitted a quantitative comparison of decadal changes in global ocean chlorophyll from the CZCS (1979-1986) and SeaWiFS (Sep. 1997-Dec. 2000) records. Global seasonal means of ocean chlorophyll decreased over the two observational segments, by 8% in winter to 16% in autumn. Chlorophyll in the high latitudes was responsible for most of the decadal change. Conversely, chlorophyll concentrations in the low latitudes increased. The differences and similarities of the two data records provide evidence of how the Earth's climate may be changing and how ocean biota respond. Furthermore, the results have implications for the ocean carbon cycle.

  11. Global relationship between oceanic geoid and topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazenave, A.; Dominh, K.; Allegre, C. J.; Marsh, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The transfer function of geoid over topography as a function of wavelength is derived. The relationship between oceanic geoid and seafloor depth is analyzed. The correction of the geoid and topological data for thermal cooling of the oceanic lithosphere, sediment loading, and crustal thickening induced by volcanism under large ocean plateaus is discussed. The global residual depth and geoid anomalies are computed. The admittance and correlation between residual depth and geoid anomalies as a function of wavelength are examined.

  12. Ocean Global Warming Impacts on the South America Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Da-Silva, Renato

    2016-03-01

    The global Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Model (OLAM) model was used to estimate the impacts of the global oceanic warming on the climate projections for the 21st Century focusing on the South America region. This new model is able to represent simultaneously the global and regional scales using a refining grid approach for the region of interest. First, the model was run for a 31-year control period consisting on the years 1960-1990 using the monthly Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) data as a driver for the ocean fluxes. Then, the model was run for the period 2010-2100 using the monthly projected SST from the Hadley Center model (HadCM3) as a driver for the oceanic changes. The model was set up with an icosahedral triangular global grid having about 250 km of grid spacing and with a refining grid resolution with the cells reaching about 32 km over the South America region. The results show an overall temperature increase mainly over the center of the Amazon basin caused by the increase of the greenhouse effect of the water vapor; a decrease on precipitation mainly over the northeast Brazil and an increase in the south and over the western Amazon region; and a major increase on the near surface wind speed. These results are similar to the global coupled models; however, OLAM has a novel type of grid that can provide the interaction between the global and regional scales simultaneously.

  13. Ocean U.S. GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Ocean U.S. GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) By Eric P. Chassignet1 and Harley E. Hurlburt2 1 COAPS ...UAcademia:U Florida State University/Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies ( COAPS ); University of Miami/Rosenstiel School of Marine and

  14. Multivariate Global Ocean Assimilation Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    representations of the four dimensional circulation of the ocean using data assimilation methods . We intend these representations to be applied in a variety of military, academic, as well as commercial applications.

  15. State of Climate 2011 - Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, D. A.; Antoine, D.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; d'Andon, O. H. Fanton; Fields, E.; Franz, B. A.; Goryl, P.; Maritorena, S.; McClain, C. R.; Wang, M.; Yoder, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton photosynthesis in the sun lit upper layer of the global ocean is the overwhelmingly dominant source of organic matter that fuels marine ecosystems. Phytoplankton contribute roughly half of the global (land and ocean) net primary production (NPP; gross photosynthesis minus plant respiration) and phytoplankton carbon fixation is the primary conduit through which atmospheric CO2 concentrations interact with the ocean s carbon cycle. Phytoplankton productivity depends on the availability of sunlight, macronutrients (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorous), and micronutrients (e.g., iron), and thus is sensitive to climate-driven changes in the delivery of these resources to the euphotic zone

  16. Southern Ocean biological impacts on global ocean oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, David P.; Kriest, Iris; Koeve, Wolfgang; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Southern Ocean (SO) physical and biological processes are known to have a large impact on global biogeochemistry. However, the role that SO biology plays in determining ocean oxygen concentrations is not completely understood. These dynamics are investigated here by shutting off SO biology in two marine biogeochemical models. The results suggest that SO biological processes reduce the ocean's oxygen content, mainly in the deep ocean, by 14 to 19%. However, since these processes also trap nutrients that would otherwise be transported northward to fuel productivity and subsequent organic matter export, consumption, and the accompanying oxygen consumption in midlatitude to low-latitude waters, SO biology helps to maintain higher oxygen concentrations in these subsurface waters. Thereby, SO biology can influence the size of the tropical oxygen minimum zones. As a result of ocean circulation the link between SO biological processes and remote oxygen changes operates on decadal to centennial time scales.

  17. Improved Global Ocean Color Using Polymer Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Francois; Ramon, Didier; Deschamps, ierre-Yves; Stum, Jacques

    2010-12-01

    A global ocean color product has been developed based on the use of the POLYMER algorithm to correct atmospheric scattering and sun glint and to process the data to a Level 2 ocean color product. Thanks to the use of this algorithm, the coverage and accuracy of the MERIS ocean color product have been significantly improved when compared to the standard product, therefore increasing its usefulness for global ocean monitor- ing applications like GLOBCOLOUR. We will present the latest developments of the algorithm, its first application to MODIS data and its validation against in-situ data from the MERMAID database. Examples will be shown of global NRT chlorophyll maps produced by CLS with POLYMER for operational applications like fishing or oil and gas industry, as well as its use by Scripps for a NASA study of the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

  18. Global Education for Ocean County College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rykiel, Joan Devlin

    This paper presents a rationale for establishing a global education curriculum at Ocean County College (OCC) (New Jersey) and proposes a workable curriculum, along with suggestions for implementation. The author distinguishes between multicultural and global education--both curricula address issues of cultural diversity, human rights, and…

  19. Requirements to Sustain Global Ocean Color Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengelt, C.; Yoder, J. A.; Antoine, D.; Del Castillo, C. E.; Evans, R. H.; Mobley, C.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Sathyendranath, S.; Schueler, C. F.; Siegel, D. A.; Wilson, C.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite measurements of ocean color provide a unique vantage point to measure global phytoplankton abundance and their contribution to the health of marine ecosystems, the global cycle of nutrients, oxygen, and carbon, and their response to long-term climate change. However, the United States is at risk of losing access to ocean color data because the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) has ceased operation, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is aging and planned new satellite missions might not be able to acquire data at the accuracy levels required for climate research. Given the importance of maintaining the ocean color time-series, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research requested the National Research Council (NRC) convene a committee of experts to review the minimum requirements to sustain global ocean color measurements for research and operational applications, and identify options to minimize the risk of a data gap. This poster summarizes the NRC report's findings. In particular, it reviews the minimum mission requirements to sustain at least the current capabilities for measuring ocean color at a global scale such as the need for post-launch vicarious calibration and monitoring of the sensor's stability. The poster will also summarize the report's recommendations regarding the options to improve the VIIRS/NPP mission. Moreover, it details how a data-centric planning effort could ensure that ocean color research can be advanced and maintained over the long term. The poster concludes that the ever broadening user community that depends on accurate and timely ocean color data highlights the urgency for fixing the VIIRS sensor and developing the next generation capability. In particular, NASA's climate continuity and decadal survey missions PACE/ACE, GEOCAPE and HyspIRI are required to advance ocean

  20. How Uncultivated Ocean Viruses Impact Global Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M. B.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean microbes drive local- and planetary-scale biogeochemical cycling, but do so under constraints imposed by viruses. Viruses can lyse microbes, which is thought to keep organic matter "small" and rapidly recycled (the `viral shunt'), but they can also metabolically reprogram their host cells by stealing "auxiliary metabolic genes" genes, or AMGs (e.g., photosynthesis genes for cyanobacterial viruses), from their hosts and using them to make more viruses during infection. Here I will present global-scale analyses that alter both of these paradigms. First, observations from viral metagenomic signatures suggest that viruses `sink' in the oceans, while network and modeling analyses revealed that a handful of viruses, rather than prokaryotes or eukaryotes, best predict carbon flux in the open oceans. These observations call into question the fundamental tenant of the viral shunt, and suggest that ocean viruses may aid sinking of carbon to the deep sea rather than constrain it to rapidly recycle in surface waters. Second, analyses from systematically collected and processed ocean viral metagenomic datasets (the Pacific Ocean Viromes and Global Ocean Viromes datasets) reveal that AMG-mediated viral metabolic reprogramming extends far beyond photosynthesis to also include nearly all of central carbon metabolism, as well as key genes in nitrogen and sulfur cycling. Together these findings suggest that viral roles in ocean biogeochemistry are extensive and provide a new baseline for future work designed to quantitatively evaluate the marine viral shunt.

  1. Global View of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    together to create a time-lapsed view of this remote and inhospitable region. So far, they have processed one season's worth of images.

    'We can see large cracks in the ice cover, where most ice grows, ' said Kwok. 'These cracks are much longer than previously thought, some as long as 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles),' Kwok continued. 'If the ice is thinning due to warming, we'll expect to see more of these long cracks over the Arctic Ocean. '

    Scientists believe this is one of the most significant breakthroughs in the last two decades of ice research. 'We are now in a position to better understand the sea ice cover and the role of the Arctic Ocean in global climate change, ' said Kwok.

    Radar can see through clouds and any kind of weather system, day or night, and as the Arctic regions are usually cloud-covered and subject to long, dark winters, radar is proving to be extremely useful. However, compiling these data into extremely detailed pictures of the Arctic is a challenging task.

    'This is truly a major innovation in terms of the quantities of data being processed and the novelty of the methods being used, ' said Verne Kaupp, director of the Alaska SAR Facility at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

    The mission is a joint project between JPL, the Alaska SAR Facility, and the Canadian Space Agency. Launched by NASA in 1995, the Radarsat satellite is operated by the Canadian Space Agency. JPL manages the Sea Ice Thickness Derived From High Resolution Radar Imagery project for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. The Earth Science Enterprise is dedicated to studying how natural and human-induced changes affect our global environment.

  2. Global View of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    together to create a time-lapsed view of this remote and inhospitable region. So far, they have processed one season's worth of images.

    'We can see large cracks in the ice cover, where most ice grows, ' said Kwok. 'These cracks are much longer than previously thought, some as long as 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles),' Kwok continued. 'If the ice is thinning due to warming, we'll expect to see more of these long cracks over the Arctic Ocean. '

    Scientists believe this is one of the most significant breakthroughs in the last two decades of ice research. 'We are now in a position to better understand the sea ice cover and the role of the Arctic Ocean in global climate change, ' said Kwok.

    Radar can see through clouds and any kind of weather system, day or night, and as the Arctic regions are usually cloud-covered and subject to long, dark winters, radar is proving to be extremely useful. However, compiling these data into extremely detailed pictures of the Arctic is a challenging task.

    'This is truly a major innovation in terms of the quantities of data being processed and the novelty of the methods being used, ' said Verne Kaupp, director of the Alaska SAR Facility at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

    The mission is a joint project between JPL, the Alaska SAR Facility, and the Canadian Space Agency. Launched by NASA in 1995, the Radarsat satellite is operated by the Canadian Space Agency. JPL manages the Sea Ice Thickness Derived From High Resolution Radar Imagery project for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. The Earth Science Enterprise is dedicated to studying how natural and human-induced changes affect our global environment.

  3. Ocean modeling in a global ocean observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Neville R.

    1993-08-01

    The oceanographic community is currently contemplating the design of a global ocean climate observing system to help monitor, describe, and understand the seasonal to decadal climate changes of the ocean and to provide the observations needed for climate prediction. This review attempts to define a role for modeling within that system, the central theme being that the observational and modeling elements must be developed in concert, with the presence of one enhancing the value of the other. Three distinct categories of model-to-data interface are identified. In the first class, models and data collection develop separately, being joined only by intermittent validation steps. In the second, and by far most important, class the model and data collection evolve together, either in a time-space data assimilation and prediction system, or through the application of inverse methods. In the final category, model information feeds back to the observing system design, and vice versa, and the model assimilation system provides quality control on the data. The key role of (atmospheric) models in the determination of surface fluxes to drive ocean models is discussed. A nontrivial role is proposed for ocean models whereby they provide additional, and largely independent, constraints on atmospheric forecast system estimates. The role of ocean models in the analysis of surface and upper ocean fields needs to be developed, particularly with respect to salinity and nonphysical fields. The use of models in rationalizing the choice of observation platforms is discussed, together with some of the difficulties in interpreting such studies. The state of tropical ocean prediction is reviewed with particular emphasis on systems that assimilate subsurface temperature data. A range of thermocline models are also reviewed with the emphasis on subduction and the problem of initializing and constraining models that resolve mesoscale eddies. Some of the issues involved in matching the models to

  4. Revaluating ocean warming impacts on global phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.; O'Malley, Robert T.; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Westberry, Toby K.; Graff, Jason R.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Milligan, Allen J.; Siegel, David A.; Brown, Matthew B.

    2016-03-01

    Global satellite observations document expansions of the low-chlorophyll central ocean gyres and an overall inverse relationship between anomalies in sea surface temperature and phytoplankton chlorophyll concentrations. These findings can provide an invaluable glimpse into potential future ocean changes, but only if the story they tell is accurately interpreted. Chlorophyll is not simply a measure of phytoplankton biomass, but also registers changes in intracellular pigmentation arising from light-driven (photoacclimation) and nutrient-driven physiological responses. Here, we show that the photoacclimation response is an important component of temporal chlorophyll variability across the global ocean. This attribution implies that contemporary relationships between chlorophyll changes and ocean warming are not indicative of proportional changes in productivity, as light-driven decreases in chlorophyll can be associated with constant or even increased photosynthesis. Extension of these results to future change, however, requires further evaluation of how the multifaceted stressors of a warmer, higher-CO2 world will impact plankton communities.

  5. The OceanLink Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narock, T.; Arko, R. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Chandler, C. L.; Cheatham, M.; Finin, T.; Hitzler, P.; Krisnadhi, A.; Raymond, L. M.; Shepherd, A.; Wiebe, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    A wide spectrum of maturing methods and tools, collectively characterized as the Semantic Web, is helping to vastly improve the dissemination of scientific research. Creating semantic integration requires input from both domain and cyberinfrastructure scientists. OceanLink, an NSF EarthCube Building Block, is demonstrating semantic technologies through the integration of geoscience data repositories, library holdings, conference abstracts, and funded research awards. Meeting project objectives involves applying semantic technologies to support data representation, discovery, sharing and integration. Our semantic cyberinfrastructure components include ontology design patterns, Linked Data collections, semantic provenance, and associated services to enhance data and knowledge discovery, interoperation, and integration. We discuss how these components are integrated, the continued automated and semi-automated creation of semantic metadata, and techniques we have developed to integrate ontologies, link resources, and preserve provenance and attribution.

  6. Southern Ocean: Its involvement in global change

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, A.L.

    1992-03-01

    Southern Ocean is the site of considerable water mass formation which cools and ventilates the modern world ocean. At the polar front zone, formation of cool, low salinity water sinks and spreads northward at intermediate depths limiting the downward penetration of the thermocline. Within the seasonal sea ice zone and along the margins of Antarctica, convection injects very cold oxygenated water into the deep and bottom ocean. These conditions developed as Antarctica shifted into its present configuration and grew a persistent glacial ice sheet, about 14 million years ago. The potential of the Southern Ocean to ventilate the deep and bottom ocean layers is related to occurrence of polynyas that form within the winter sea ice cover. Global climate changes would be expected to alter the polynya size and frequency. Under greenhouse-induced warming offshore polynyas may become less common as the static stability of the Southern Ocean mixed layer increases. This would diminish the Southern Ocean's cooling influence on the deep layers of the world ocean, resulting in a warmer deep ocean. The fate of coastal polynyas is less clear.

  7. Eddy Resolving Global Ocean Prediction including Tides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    for the global ocean. Isopycnal (density tracking) layers are best in the deep stratified ocean, pressure levels (nearly fixed depths) provide high...Adams, D. K., D. J. McGillicuddy Jr., L. Zamudio , A. M. Thurnherr, X. Liang, O. Rouxel, C. R. German, L. S. Mullineaux (2011), Surface-generated...Gaxiola-Castro, G., Zamudio , L., and Cervantes-Duarte, R. Net primary productivity, upwelling and coastal currents in the Gulf of Ulloa, Baja

  8. Including eddies in global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtner, Albert J.; Chervin, Robert M.

    The ocean is a turbulent fluid that is driven by winds and by surface exchanges of heat and moisture. It is as important as the atmosphere in governing climate through heat distribution, but so little is known about the ocean that it remains a “final frontier” on the face of the Earth. Many ocean currents are truly global in extent, such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the “conveyor belt” that connects the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans by flows around the southern tips of Africa and South America. It has long been a dream of some oceanographers to supplement the very limited observational knowledge by reconstructing the currents of the world ocean from the first principles of physics on a computer. However, until very recently, the prospect of doing this was thwarted by the fact that fluctuating currents known as “mesoscale eddies” could not be explicitly included in the calculation.

  9. ENACT: a project with multi-decadal ocean analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, M.; Huddleston, M.

    2002-12-01

    Partially supported by the European Commission, the 3-year ENACT project started in January 2002. (ENACT = ENhanced ocean data Assimilation and Climate predicTion). The objective is to improve global ocean analyses, and hence improve the accuracy of seasonal prediction schemes that use initial ocean conditions from such analyses. The production of global ocean analyses using a matrix of different assimilation methods (4d-var, EnKF, OI-type) and various ocean GCMs is an important part of ENACT. The analyses will extend back over 4 decades, linked to the ERA-40 atmospheric re-analysis. Within the limits of the experimental design, these multiple analyses will provide estimates of uncertainty regarding oceanic climate and variability. Part of the assessment will involve sets of retrospective seasonal (and beyond) forecasts. The Met Office currently uses an OI-type ocean data assimilation (ODA) scheme as part of its real-time CGCM-based seasonal forecast system, which is part of the Met Office/ECMWF multi-model system. Generation of the forecast 40-ensemble includes use of an ocean analysis 5-ensemble. For ENACT, various improvements to this ODA scheme will be implemented. In this presentation the ENACT project will be described, and some results from the current Met Office ocean analyses will be shown.

  10. The positive Indian Ocean Dipole-like response in the tropical Indian Ocean to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yiyong; Lu, Jian; Liu, Fukai; Wan, Xiuquan

    2016-04-01

    Climate models project a positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD)-like SST response in the tropical Indian Ocean to global warming. By employing the Community Earth System Model and applying an overriding technique to its ocean component (version 2 of the Parallel Ocean Program), this study investigates the similarities and differences of the formation mechanisms for the changes in the tropical Indian Ocean during the pIOD versus global warming. Results show that their formation processes and related seasonality are quite similar; in particular, wind-thermocline-SST feedback is the leading mechanism in producing the anomalous cooling over the eastern tropics in both cases. Some differences are also found, including the fact that the cooling effect of the vertical advection over the eastern tropical Indian Ocean is dominated by the anomalous vertical velocity during the pIOD but by the anomalous upper-ocean stratification under global warming. These findings are further examined through an analysis of the mixed layer heat budget.

  11. The positive Indian Ocean Dipole-like response in the tropical Indian Ocean to global warming

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yiyong; Lu, Jian; Liu, Fukai; ...

    2016-02-04

    Climate models project a positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD)-like SST response in the tropical Indian Ocean to global warming. By employing the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and applying an overriding technique to its ocean component Parallel Ocean Program version 2 (POP2), this study investigates the similarity and difference of the formation mechanisms for the changes in the tropical Indian Ocean during the pIOD versus global warming. Results show that their formation processes and related seasonality are quite similar; in particular, the Bjerknes feedback is the leading mechanism in producing the anomalous cooling over the eastern tropics in both cases.more » Some differences are also found, including that the cooling effect of the vertical advection over the eastern tropical Indian Ocean is dominated by the anomalous vertical velocity during the pIOD while it is dominated by the anomalous upper-ocean stratification under global warming. Lastly, these findings above are further examined with an analysis of the mixed layer heat budget.« less

  12. The positive Indian Ocean Dipole-like response in the tropical Indian Ocean to global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yiyong; Lu, Jian; Liu, Fukai; Wan, Xiuquan

    2016-02-04

    Climate models project a positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD)-like SST response in the tropical Indian Ocean to global warming. By employing the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and applying an overriding technique to its ocean component Parallel Ocean Program version 2 (POP2), this study investigates the similarity and difference of the formation mechanisms for the changes in the tropical Indian Ocean during the pIOD versus global warming. Results show that their formation processes and related seasonality are quite similar; in particular, the Bjerknes feedback is the leading mechanism in producing the anomalous cooling over the eastern tropics in both cases. Some differences are also found, including that the cooling effect of the vertical advection over the eastern tropical Indian Ocean is dominated by the anomalous vertical velocity during the pIOD while it is dominated by the anomalous upper-ocean stratification under global warming. Lastly, these findings above are further examined with an analysis of the mixed layer heat budget.

  13. Ocean plankton. Structure and function of the global ocean microbiome.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Shinichi; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Chaffron, Samuel; Kultima, Jens Roat; Labadie, Karine; Salazar, Guillem; Djahanschiri, Bardya; Zeller, Georg; Mende, Daniel R; Alberti, Adriana; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Costea, Paul I; Cruaud, Corinne; d'Ovidio, Francesco; Engelen, Stefan; Ferrera, Isabel; Gasol, Josep M; Guidi, Lionel; Hildebrand, Falk; Kokoszka, Florian; Lepoivre, Cyrille; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Poulain, Julie; Poulos, Bonnie T; Royo-Llonch, Marta; Sarmento, Hugo; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Bowler, Chris; de Vargas, Colomban; Gorsky, Gabriel; Grimsley, Nigel; Hingamp, Pascal; Iudicone, Daniele; Jaillon, Olivier; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Speich, Sabrina; Stemmann, Lars; Sullivan, Matthew B; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Karsenti, Eric; Raes, Jeroen; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer

    2015-05-22

    Microbes are dominant drivers of biogeochemical processes, yet drawing a global picture of functional diversity, microbial community structure, and their ecological determinants remains a grand challenge. We analyzed 7.2 terabases of metagenomic data from 243 Tara Oceans samples from 68 locations in epipelagic and mesopelagic waters across the globe to generate an ocean microbial reference gene catalog with >40 million nonredundant, mostly novel sequences from viruses, prokaryotes, and picoeukaryotes. Using 139 prokaryote-enriched samples, containing >35,000 species, we show vertical stratification with epipelagic community composition mostly driven by temperature rather than other environmental factors or geography. We identify ocean microbial core functionality and reveal that >73% of its abundance is shared with the human gut microbiome despite the physicochemical differences between these two ecosystems.

  14. Map of moisture over global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This map shows the presence of water vapor over global oceans. The imagery was produced by combining Special Sensor Microwave Imager measurements and computer models. This data will help scientists better understand how weather systems move water vapor from the tropics toward the poles producing precipitation.

  15. Global oceanic production of nitrous oxide

    PubMed Central

    Freing, Alina; Wallace, Douglas W. R.; Bange, Hermann W.

    2012-01-01

    We use transient time distributions calculated from tracer data together with in situ measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) to estimate the concentration of biologically produced N2O and N2O production rates in the ocean on a global scale. Our approach to estimate the N2O production rates integrates the effects of potentially varying production and decomposition mechanisms along the transport path of a water mass. We estimate that the oceanic N2O production is dominated by nitrification with a contribution of only approximately 7 per cent by denitrification. This indicates that previously used approaches have overestimated the contribution by denitrification. Shelf areas may account for only a negligible fraction of the global production; however, estuarine sources and coastal upwelling of N2O are not taken into account in our study. The largest amount of subsurface N2O is produced in the upper 500 m of the water column. The estimated global annual subsurface N2O production ranges from 3.1 ± 0.9 to 3.4 ± 0.9 Tg N yr−1. This is in agreement with estimates of the global N2O emissions to the atmosphere and indicates that a N2O source in the mixed layer is unlikely. The potential future development of the oceanic N2O source in view of the ongoing changes of the ocean environment (deoxygenation, warming, eutrophication and acidification) is discussed. PMID:22451110

  16. Global oceanic production of nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Freing, Alina; Wallace, Douglas W R; Bange, Hermann W

    2012-05-05

    We use transient time distributions calculated from tracer data together with in situ measurements of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) to estimate the concentration of biologically produced N(2)O and N(2)O production rates in the ocean on a global scale. Our approach to estimate the N(2)O production rates integrates the effects of potentially varying production and decomposition mechanisms along the transport path of a water mass. We estimate that the oceanic N(2)O production is dominated by nitrification with a contribution of only approximately 7 per cent by denitrification. This indicates that previously used approaches have overestimated the contribution by denitrification. Shelf areas may account for only a negligible fraction of the global production; however, estuarine sources and coastal upwelling of N(2)O are not taken into account in our study. The largest amount of subsurface N(2)O is produced in the upper 500 m of the water column. The estimated global annual subsurface N(2)O production ranges from 3.1 ± 0.9 to 3.4 ± 0.9 Tg N yr(-1). This is in agreement with estimates of the global N(2)O emissions to the atmosphere and indicates that a N(2)O source in the mixed layer is unlikely. The potential future development of the oceanic N(2)O source in view of the ongoing changes of the ocean environment (deoxygenation, warming, eutrophication and acidification) is discussed.

  17. Achieving Global Ocean Color Climate Data Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Ocean color, or the spectral distribution of visible light upwelling from beneath the ocean surface, carries information on the composition and concentration of biological constituents within the water column. The CZCS mission in 1978 demonstrated that quantitative ocean color measurements could be. made from spaceborne sensors, given sufficient corrections for atmospheric effects and a rigorous calibration and validation program. The launch of SeaWiFS in 1997 represents the beginning of NASA's ongoing efforts to develop a continuous ocean color data record with sufficient coverage and fidelity for global change research. Achievements in establishing and maintaining the consistency of the time-series through multiple missions and varying instrument designs will be highlighted in this talk, including measurements from NASA'S MODIS instruments currently flying on the Terra and Aqua platforms, as well as the MERIS sensor flown by ESA and the OCM-2 sensor recently launched by ISRO.

  18. The Global Ocean Observing System: One perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. Ron

    1992-01-01

    This document presents a possible organization for a Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) within the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and the joint ocean programs with the World Meteorological Organization. The document and the organization presented here is not intended to be definitive, complete or the best possible organization for such an observation program. It is presented at this time to demonstrate three points. The first point to be made is that an international program office for GOOS along the lines of the WOCE and TOGA IPOs is essential. The second point is that national programs will have to continue to collect data at the scale of WOCE plus TOGA and more. The third point is that there are many existing groups and committees within the IOC and joint IOC/WMO ocean programs that can contribute essential experience to and form part of the basis of a Global Ocean Observing System. It is particularly important to learn from what has worked and what has not worked in the past if a successful ocean observing system is to result.

  19. Global Project Management: Graduate Course

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    business and if the project will have successful performance. In the final project presentation, the student should address what countries they may...the idiosyncrasies of different countries in an effort to plan a successful global project execution. Alternate schedule. This class may be used for...required? * Will religious factors influence the project? 24-Mar-06 ENCE ft 24 13 GP Characteristics * Multiple Time Zones * Exchange rates * Long

  20. Characterizing global infrasonic ocean ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pichon, Alexis; Stutzman, Eleonore; Arduin, Fabrice; Sylvain, Leon

    2017-04-01

    The ability of the International Monitoring System (IMS) global infrasound network to detect atmospheric explosions and events of interest strongly depends on station specific ambient noise which includes both incoherent wind noise and real coherent infrasonic waves. To characterize the coherent ambient noise, a broadband array processing was performed on 10 years of continuous recordings at IMS stations. Multi-year comparisons between the observed and modeled directional microbarom amplitude variations at several IMS stations using two-dimensional wave energy spectrum ocean wave products are performed to build of a reference database of infrasound oceanic sources. Microseisms are attributed the same source processes as microbaroms, involving the interaction of standing ocean waves. To further evaluate oceanic wave action models, the infrasound analysis will be supplemented with several other approaches including microseisms collected at seismic instrumentation (single stations and arrays). The expected benefits of such studies concern the use of multi-year complementary data to finely characterize coupling mechanisms at the ocean-atmosphere interface. In return, a better knowledge of the source of the ambient ocean noise opens new perspectives by providing additional integrated constraints on the dynamics of the middle atmosphere and its disturbances where data coverage is sparse.

  1. III: OCEAN CIRCULATION: Global Ocean Data Assimilation and Geoid Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, C.; Stammer, D.

    2003-07-01

    Parts of geodesy and physical oceanography are about to mature into a single modeling problem involving the simultaneous estimation of the marine geoid and the general circulation. Both fields will benefit. To this end, we present an ocean state estimation (data assimilation) framework which is designed to obtain a dynamically consistent picture of the changing ocean circulation by combining global ocean data sets of arbitrary type with a general circulation model (GCM). The impact of geoid measurements on such estimates of the ocean circulation are numerous. For the mean circulation, a precise geoid describes the reference frame for dynamical signals in altimetric sea surface height observations. For the time-varying ocean signal, changing geoid information might be a valuable new information about correcting the changing flow field on time scales from a few month to a year, but the quantitative utility of such information has not yet been demonstrated. For a consistent estimate, some knowledge of the prior error covariances of all data fields is required. The final result must be consistent with prior error estimates for the data. State estimation is thus one of the few quantitative consistency checks for new geoid measurements anticipated from forthcoming space missions. Practical quantitative methods will yield a best possible estimate of the dynamical sea surface which, when combined with satellite altimetric surfaces, will produce a best-estimate marine geoid. The anticipated accuracy and precision of such estimates raises some novel modeling error issues which have not conventionally been of concern (the Boussinesq approximation, self-attraction and loading). Model skill at very high frequencies is a major concern because of the need to de-alias the data obtained by the inevitable oceanic temporal undersampling dictated by realistic satellite orbit configurations.

  2. Evaluating the deep-ocean circulation of a global ocean model using carbon isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, André; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Gebbie, Jake; Losch, Martin; Marchal, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    We study the sensitivity of a global three-dimensional biotic ocean carbon-cycle model to the parameterizations of gas exchange and biological productivity as well as to deep-ocean circulation strength, and we employ the carbon isotopic ratios δ13C and Δ14C of dissolved inorganic carbon for a systematic evaluation against observations. Radiocarbon (Δ14C) in particular offers the means to assess the model skill on a time scale of 100 to 1000 years relevant to the deep-ocean circulation. The carbon isotope ratios are included as tracers in the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The implementation involves the fractionation processes during photosynthesis and air-sea gas exchange. We present the results of sixteen simulations combining two different parameterizations of the piston velocity, two different parameterizations of biological productivity (including the effect of iron fertilization) and four different overturning rates. These simulations were first spun up to equilibrium (more than 10,000 years of model simulation) and then continued from AD 1765 to AD 2002. For the model evaluation, we followed the OCMIP-2 (Ocean Carbon-Cycle Model Intercomparision Project phase two) protocol, comparing the results to GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections Survey) and WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) δ13C and natural Δ14C data in the world ocean. The range of deep natural Δ14C (below 1000 m) for our single model (MITgcm) was smaller than for the group of different OCMIP-2 models. Furthermore, differences between different model parameterizations were smaller than for different overturning rates. We conclude that carbon isotope ratios are a useful tool to evaluate the deep-ocean circulation. Since they are also available from deep-sea sediment records, we postulate that the simulation of carbon isotope ratios in a global ocean model will aid in estimating the deep-ocean circulation and climate during present and past.

  3. Recent Trends in Global Ocean Chlorophyll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson; Casey, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Recent analyses of SeaWiFS data have shown that global ocean chlorophyll has increased more than 5% since 1998. The North Pacific ocean basin has increased nearly 19%. To understand the causes of these trends we have applied the newly developed NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Assimilation Model (OBAM), which is driven in mechanistic fashion by surface winds, sea surface temperature, atmospheric iron deposition, sea ice, and surface irradiance. The mode1 utilizes chlorophyll from SeaWiFS in a daily assimilation. The model has in place many of the climatic variables that can be expected to produce the changes observed in SeaWiFS data. Ths enables us to diagnose the model performance, the assimilation performance, and possible causes for the increase in chlorophyll.

  4. Recent Trends in Global Ocean Chlorophyll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson; Casey, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Recent analyses of SeaWiFS data have shown that global ocean chlorophyll has increased more than 5% since 1998. The North Pacific ocean basin has increased nearly 19%. To understand the causes of these trends we have applied the newly developed NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Assimilation Model (OBAM), which is driven in mechanistic fashion by surface winds, sea surface temperature, atmospheric iron deposition, sea ice, and surface irradiance. The mode1 utilizes chlorophyll from SeaWiFS in a daily assimilation. The model has in place many of the climatic variables that can be expected to produce the changes observed in SeaWiFS data. Ths enables us to diagnose the model performance, the assimilation performance, and possible causes for the increase in chlorophyll.

  5. Robust warming of the global upper ocean.

    PubMed

    Lyman, John M; Good, Simon A; Gouretski, Viktor V; Ishii, Masayoshi; Johnson, Gregory C; Palmer, Matthew D; Smith, Doug M; Willis, Josh K

    2010-05-20

    A large ( approximately 10(23) J) multi-decadal globally averaged warming signal in the upper 300 m of the world's oceans was reported roughly a decade ago and is attributed to warming associated with anthropogenic greenhouse gases. The majority of the Earth's total energy uptake during recent decades has occurred in the upper ocean, but the underlying uncertainties in ocean warming are unclear, limiting our ability to assess closure of sea-level budgets, the global radiation imbalance and climate models. For example, several teams have recently produced different multi-year estimates of the annually averaged global integral of upper-ocean heat content anomalies (hereafter OHCA curves) or, equivalently, the thermosteric sea-level rise. Patterns of interannual variability, in particular, differ among methods. Here we examine several sources of uncertainty that contribute to differences among OHCA curves from 1993 to 2008, focusing on the difficulties of correcting biases in expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data. XBT data constitute the majority of the in situ measurements of upper-ocean heat content from 1967 to 2002, and we find that the uncertainty due to choice of XBT bias correction dominates among-method variability in OHCA curves during our 1993-2008 study period. Accounting for multiple sources of uncertainty, a composite of several OHCA curves using different XBT bias corrections still yields a statistically significant linear warming trend for 1993-2008 of 0.64 W m(-2) (calculated for the Earth's entire surface area), with a 90-per-cent confidence interval of 0.53-0.75 W m(-2).

  6. Global Ocean Circulation Modeling with an Isopycnic Coordinate Model. Final Report for May 1, 1998 - April 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Bleck, R.

    2004-05-19

    The overall aim of this project was to continue development of a global version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM) with the intent of turning it into a full-fledged oceanic component of an earth system model.

  7. NSF final project report planning and implementation of the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, Hugh D.

    1996-07-01

    Conducted planning and implementation of ocean carbon dioxide hydrographic surveys ocean process studies, time-series studies of Bermuda and Hawaii, and sponsored scientific workshops for those activities.

  8. Ensemble-based global ocean data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T.; Casper, W. Riley; Jones, Philip W.

    2013-12-01

    We present results of experiments performing global, ensemble-based, ocean-only data assimilation and assess the utility of such data assimilation in improving model predictions. The POP (Parallel Ocean Program) Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) is forced by interannually varying atmospheric fields of version 2 of the Coordinated Ocean Reference Experiment (CORE) data set, and temperature and salinity observations from the World Ocean Database 2009 (WOD09) are assimilated. The assimilation experiments are conducted over a period of about two years starting January 1, 1990 using the framework of the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART). We find that an inflation scheme that blends the ensemble-based sample error covariance with a static estimate of ensemble spread is necessary for the assimilations to be effective in the ocean model. We call this Climatology-based Spread Inflation or CSI for short. The effectiveness of the proposed inflation scheme is investigated in a low-order model; a series of experiments in this context demonstrates its effectiveness. Using a number of diagnostics, we show that the resulting assimilated state of ocean circulation is more realistic: In particular, the sea surface temperature (SST) shows reduced errors with respect to an unassimilated SST data set, and the subsurface temperature shows reduced errors with respect to observations. Finally, towards assessing the utility of assimilations for predictions, we show that the use of an assimilated state as initial condition leads to improved hindcast skill over a significant period of time; that is when the OGCM is initialized with an assimilated state and run forward, it is better able to predict unassimilated observations of the WOD09 than a control non-assimilating run (≈ 20% reduction in error) over a period of about three months. The loss of skill beyond this period is conjectured to be due, in part, to model error and prevents an improvement in the representation of

  9. An operational global ocean forecast system and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, A.; Tolman, H. L.; Rivin, I.; Rajan, B.; Spindler, T.; Garraffo, Z. D.; Kim, H.

    2012-12-01

    A global Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) was implemented in operations at NCEP/NWS/NOAA on 10/25/2011. This system is based on an eddy resolving 1/12 degree global HYCOM (HYbrid Coordinates Ocean Model) and is part of a larger national backbone capability of ocean modeling at NWS in strong partnership with US Navy. The forecast system is run once a day and produces a 6 day long forecast using the daily initialization fields produced at NAVOCEANO using NCODA (Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation), a 3D multi-variate data assimilation methodology. As configured within RTOFS, HYCOM has a horizontal equatorial resolution of 0.08 degrees or ~9 km. The HYCOM grid is on a Mercator projection from 78.64 S to 47 N and north of this it employs an Arctic dipole patch where the poles are shifted over land to avoid a singularity at the North Pole. This gives a mid-latitude (polar) horizontal resolution of approximately 7 km (3.5 km). The coastline is fixed at 10 m isobath with open Bering Straits. This version employs 32 hybrid vertical coordinate surfaces with potential density referenced to 2000 m. Vertical coordinates can be isopycnals, often best for resolving deep water masses, levels of equal pressure (fixed depths), best for the well mixed unstratified upper ocean and sigma-levels (terrain-following), often the best choice in shallow water. The dynamic ocean model is coupled to a thermodynamic energy loan ice model and uses a non-slab mixed layer formulation. The forecast system is forced with 3-hourly momentum, radiation and precipitation fluxes from the operational Global Forecast System (GFS) fields. Results include global sea surface height and three dimensional fields of temperature, salinity, density and velocity fields used for validation and evaluation against available observations. Several downstream applications of this forecast system will also be discussed which include search and rescue operations at US Coast Guard, navigation safety information

  10. Global oceanic emissions of nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nevison, C.D.; Erickson, D.J.; Weiss, R.F.

    1995-08-15

    The global N{sub 2}O flux from the ocean to the atmosphere is calculated based on more than 60,000 expedition measurements of the N{sub 2}O anomaly in surface water. The expedition data are coupled to daily air-sea gas transfer coefficients modeled at 2.8{degrees} x 2.8{degrees} resolution to estimate a global ocean source of about 4 (1.2-6.8) Tg N yr{sup {minus}1}. The strongest source is predicted from the 40-60{degrees}S latitude band. Strong emissions also are predicted from the northern Pacific Ocean, the equatorial upwelling zone, and coastal upwelling zones occurring predominantly in the tropical northern hemisphere. High apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) at 100 m below the mixed layer is found to be correlated positively both to N{sub 2}O production at depth and to the surface N{sub 2}O anomaly. On the basis of these correlations, the expedition data are partitioned into two subsets associated with high and low AOU at depth. The zonally averaged monthly means in each subset are extrapolated to produce two latitude-by-month matrices in which monthly surface N{sub 2}O is expressed as the deviation from the annual mean. Both matrices contain large uncertainties. The low-AOU matrix, which mainly includes surface N{sub 2}O data from the North Atlantic and the subtropical gyres, suggests many regions with positive summer deviations and negative winter deviations, consistent with a seasonal cycle predominantly driven by seasonal heating and cooling of the surface ocean. The high-AOU subset, which includes the regions most important to the global N{sub 2}O ocean source, suggests some regions with positive winter deviations and negative summer deviations, consistent with a seasonal cycle predominantly driven by wintertime mixing of surface water with N{sub 2}O-rich deep water. Coupled seasonal changes in gas transfer coefficients and surface N{sub 2}O in these important source regions could strongly influence the global ocean source. 36 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Biogeography of the Global Ocean's Mesopelagic Zone.

    PubMed

    Proud, Roland; Cox, Martin J; Brierley, Andrew S

    2017-01-09

    The global ocean's near surface can be partitioned into distinct provinces on the basis of regional primary productivity and oceanography [1]. This ecological geography provides a valuable framework for understanding spatial variability in ecosystem function but has relevance only partway into the epipelagic zone (the top 200 m). The mesopelagic (200-1,000 m) makes up approximately 20% of the global ocean volume, plays important roles in biogeochemical cycling [2], and holds potentially huge fish resources [3-5]. It is, however, hidden from satellite observation, and a lack of globally consistent data has prevented development of a global-scale understanding. Acoustic deep scattering layers (DSLs) are prominent features of the mesopelagic. These vertically narrow (tens to hundreds of m) but horizontally extensive (continuous for tens to thousands of km) layers comprise fish and zooplankton and are readily detectable using echosounders. We have compiled a database of DSL characteristics globally. We show that DSL depth and acoustic backscattering intensity (a measure of biomass) can be modeled accurately using just surface primary productivity, temperature, and wind stress. Spatial variability in these environmental factors leads to a natural partition of the mesopelagic into ten distinct classes. These classes demark a more complex biogeography than the latitudinally banded schemes proposed before [6, 7]. Knowledge of how environmental factors influence the mesopelagic enables future change to be explored: we predict that by 2100 there will be widespread homogenization of mesopelagic communities and that mesopelagic biomass could increase by approximately 17%. The biomass increase requires increased trophic efficiency, which could arise because of ocean warming and DSL shallowing.

  12. CERN: A global project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Rüdiger

    2017-07-01

    In the most important shift of paradigm of its membership rules in 60 years, CERN in 2010 introduced a policy of “Geographical Enlargement” which for the first time opened the door for membership of non-European States in the Organization. This short article reviews briefly the history of CERN’s membership rules, discusses the rationale behind the new policy, its relationship with the emerging global roadmap of particle physics, and gives a short overview of the status of the enlargement process.

  13. Accelerated Prediction of the Polar Ice and Global Ocean (APPIGO)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    SEP 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Accelerated Prediction of the Polar Ice and Global...the Polar Ice and Global Ocean (APPIGO) Eric P. Chassignet Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies Florida State University phone: (850...architectures. These codes form the ocean and sea ice components of the Navy’s Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System (ACNFS) and the Navy Global Ocean

  14. SubArctic Oceans and Global Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhines, P. B.

    2004-12-01

    The passages connecting the Arctic Ocean with the Atlantic and Pacific, and their `mediterranean' basins, are focal points for the global meridional overturning circulation, and all of the climate impacts which this implies. It is also a difficult region to model accurately: the sensitivity of climate models to subpolar ocean dynamics is well-known. In this talk we stress the need to instrument and analyze the subpolar oceans, and some examples of sustained observations developing there. Results from satellite altimetry, recent Seaglider deployments from Greenland, and mooring arrays will be described. In particular we show the first Seaglider sections of hydrography and bio-optical profiles of the Labrador Sea (one of the first extended deployments of this autonomous undersea vehicle); we discuss the decline during the 1990s of the subpolar gyre circulation of the Atlantic from its great strength during the positive NAO period of the early 1990s, and its relevance to the salinity decline observed over a much longer period; we review observations of the flows at the Iceland-Scotland Ridge and Davis Strait, argued in terms of volume transport plots on the potential temperature/salinity plane; we display maps of the `convection resistance' (related to dynamic height) and its sensitivity to surface low-salinity water masses and their partition between shallow continental shelves and deep ocean. This is a particularly exciting time for climate studies, with fundamental properties of the atmosphere-ocean circulation under debate, even before one considers natural and human-induced variability. Is the four-decade long decline in subArctic salinity the result of increased hydrologic cycle, increased or altered Arctic outflow to the Atlantic, or slowing of the subpolar circulation? Is the basic intensity of the MOC more dependent on high-latitude buoyancy forcing, or wind- or tide-driven mixing in the upwelling branch, or possibly wind-stress at high latitude? Is the

  15. Adaptive wavelet simulation of global ocean dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevlahan, N. K.-R.; Dubos, T.; Aechtner, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to easily enforce solid-wall boundary conditions in the presence of complex coastlines, we propose a new mass and energy conserving Brinkman penalization for the rotating shallow water equations. This penalization does not lead to higher wave speeds in the solid region. The error estimates for the penalization are derived analytically and verified numerically for linearized one dimensional equations. The penalization is implemented in a conservative dynamically adaptive wavelet method for the rotating shallow water equations on the sphere with bathymetry and coastline data from NOAA's ETOPO1 database. This code could form the dynamical core for a future global ocean model. The potential of the dynamically adaptive ocean model is illustrated by using it to simulate the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and wind-driven gyres.

  16. Estimating photosynthetically available radiation at the ocean surface for primary production (3P Project): modeling, evaluation, and application to global MERIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramon, Didier; Jolivet, Dominique; Tan, Jing; Frouin, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The goal of the Photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) for Primary Production (3P) project is to provide robust, complete, and user-friendly satellite radiation products for ecosystem modeling, carbon cycle investigations, and climate change monitoring. A specific objective is to design and distribute a daily PAR product from MERIS and potentially the recent OLCI. In view of this, a PAR algorithm, based on the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) operational algorithm, has been developed. The algorithm takes into account statistical diurnal variability of clouds using 3-hourly International Satellite Cloud Climatology (ISCCP) data. The PAR modeling, simplified to accommodate the information available, is evaluated using a Monte Carlo tool that simulates the satellite radiance and corresponding daily PAR. The daily PAR estimates obtained from reduced resolution (i.e., 1 km) MERIS data are evaluated against in situ measurements routinely collected from fixed buoys and platforms, namely BOUSSOLE in the Mediterranean Sea, CCE- 1 and -2 off the West coast of the United States, and COVE in the coastal Atlantic Ocean. The agreement between estimated and measured values is good on a daily time scale and substantially improved on a monthly time scale, with a bias of 2.7 (7.7%) E/m2/day and RMS errors of 8.5 (24.9%) and 4.5 (12.9%) E/m2/day. The bias is reduced significantly (by 1.8%) when using diurnal cloud climatology. Overestimation in cloudy conditions is partly explained by decoupling the clear atmosphere from the cloud/surface layer. Large gaps in regions affected by sun glint (not processed because incorrectly interpreted as cloudy) are adequately filled in the monthly PAR imagery. The statistical performance is satisfactory for long-term studies of aquatic primary production, especially in view of the much larger uncertainties on the fraction of PAR absorbed by live algae and the quantum yield of carbon fixation.

  17. Is low frequency ocean sound increasing globally?

    PubMed

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Nichols, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency sound has increased in the Northeast Pacific Ocean over the past 60 yr [Ross (1993) Acoust. Bull. 18, 5-8; (2005) IEEE J. Ocean. Eng. 30, 257-261; Andrew, Howe, Mercer, and Dzieciuch (2002) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129, 642-651; McDonald, Hildebrand, and Wiggins (2006) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 711-717; Chapman and Price (2011) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129, EL161-EL165] and in the Indian Ocean over the past decade, [Miksis-Olds, Bradley, and Niu (2013) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 3464-3475]. More recently, Andrew, Howe, and Mercer's [(2011) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129, 642-651] observations in the Northeast Pacific show a level or slightly decreasing trend in low frequency noise. It remains unclear what the low frequency trends are in other regions of the world. In this work, data from the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty Organization International Monitoring System was used to examine the rate and magnitude of change in low frequency sound (5-115 Hz) over the past decade in the South Atlantic and Equatorial Pacific Oceans. The dominant source observed in the South Atlantic was seismic air gun signals, while shipping and biologic sources contributed more to the acoustic environment at the Equatorial Pacific location. Sound levels over the past 5-6 yr in the Equatorial Pacific have decreased. Decreases were also observed in the ambient sound floor in the South Atlantic Ocean. Based on these observations, it does not appear that low frequency sound levels are increasing globally.

  18. Coccolithophorid blooms in the global ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher W.; Yoder, James A.

    1994-01-01

    The global distribution pattern of coccolithophrid blooms was mapped in order to ascertain the prevalence of these blooms in the world's oceans and to estimate their worldwide production of CaCO3 and dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Mapping was accomplished by classifying pixels of 5-day global composites of coastal zone color scanner imagery into bloom and nonbloom classes using a supervised, multispectral classification scheme. Surface waters with the spectral signature of coccolithophorid blooms annually covered an average of 1.4 x 10(exp 6) sq km in the world oceans from 1979 to 1985, with the subpolar latitudes accounting for 71% of this surface area. Classified blooms were most extensive in the Subartic North Atlantic. Large expanses of the bloom signal were also detected in the North Pacific, on the Argentine shelf and slope, and in numerous lower latitude marginal seas and shelf regions. The greatest spatial extent of classified blooms in subpolar oceanic regions occurred in the months from summer to early autumn, while those in lower latitude marginal seas occurred in midwinter to early spring. Though the classification scheme was effcient in separating bloom and nonbloom classes during test simulations, and biogeographical literature generally confirms the resulting distribution pattern of blooms in the subpolar regions, the cause of the bloom signal is equivocal in some geographic areas, particularly on shelf regions at lower latitudes. Standing stock estimates suggest that the presumed Emiliania huxleyi blooms act as a significant source of calcite carbon and DMS sulfur on a regional scale. On a global scale, however, the satellite-detected coccolithophorid blooms are estimated to play only a minor role in the annual production of these two compounds and their flux from the surface mixed layer.

  19. Ocean Carbon Cycle Data from the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The U.S. JGOFS program, a component of the U.S Global Change Research Program, grew out of the recommendations of a National Academy of Sciences workshop in 1984. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP). Data are available throughout the U.S. JGOFS web site at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/ and from the U.S. JGOFS Data System at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/jg/dir/jgofs/. Major named segments of the project are: Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) Study, Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Study, Equatorial Pacific Process Study, North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (1989), Arabian Sea Process Study, and the Southern Ocean Process Study.

  20. Change in ocean subsurface environment to suppress tropical cyclone intensification under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ping; Lin, I.-I.; Chou, Chia; Huang, Rong-Hui

    2015-05-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are hazardous natural disasters. Because TC intensification is significantly controlled by atmosphere and ocean environments, changes in these environments may cause changes in TC intensity. Changes in surface and subsurface ocean conditions can both influence a TC's intensification. Regarding global warming, minimal exploration of the subsurface ocean has been undertaken. Here we investigate future subsurface ocean environment changes projected by 22 state-of-the-art climate models and suggest a suppressive effect of subsurface oceans on the intensification of future TCs. Under global warming, the subsurface vertical temperature profile can be sharpened in important TC regions, which may contribute to a stronger ocean coupling (cooling) effect during the intensification of future TCs. Regarding a TC, future subsurface ocean environments may be more suppressive than the existing subsurface ocean environments. This suppressive effect is not spatially uniform and may be weak in certain local areas.

  1. Change in ocean subsurface environment to suppress tropical cyclone intensification under global warming.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Lin, I-I; Chou, Chia; Huang, Rong-Hui

    2015-05-18

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are hazardous natural disasters. Because TC intensification is significantly controlled by atmosphere and ocean environments, changes in these environments may cause changes in TC intensity. Changes in surface and subsurface ocean conditions can both influence a TC's intensification. Regarding global warming, minimal exploration of the subsurface ocean has been undertaken. Here we investigate future subsurface ocean environment changes projected by 22 state-of-the-art climate models and suggest a suppressive effect of subsurface oceans on the intensification of future TCs. Under global warming, the subsurface vertical temperature profile can be sharpened in important TC regions, which may contribute to a stronger ocean coupling (cooling) effect during the intensification of future TCs. Regarding a TC, future subsurface ocean environments may be more suppressive than the existing subsurface ocean environments. This suppressive effect is not spatially uniform and may be weak in certain local areas.

  2. Change in ocean subsurface environment to suppress tropical cyclone intensification under global warming

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ping; Lin, I. -I; Chou, Chia; Huang, Rong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are hazardous natural disasters. Because TC intensification is significantly controlled by atmosphere and ocean environments, changes in these environments may cause changes in TC intensity. Changes in surface and subsurface ocean conditions can both influence a TC's intensification. Regarding global warming, minimal exploration of the subsurface ocean has been undertaken. Here we investigate future subsurface ocean environment changes projected by 22 state-of-the-art climate models and suggest a suppressive effect of subsurface oceans on the intensification of future TCs. Under global warming, the subsurface vertical temperature profile can be sharpened in important TC regions, which may contribute to a stronger ocean coupling (cooling) effect during the intensification of future TCs. Regarding a TC, future subsurface ocean environments may be more suppressive than the existing subsurface ocean environments. This suppressive effect is not spatially uniform and may be weak in certain local areas. PMID:25982028

  3. Satellite based Ocean Forecasting, the SOFT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmann, L.; Tintoré, J.; Moneris, S.

    2003-04-01

    The knowledge of future oceanic conditions would have enormous impact on human marine related areas. For such reasons, a number of international efforts are being carried out to obtain reliable and manageable ocean forecasting systems. Among the possible techniques that can be used to estimate the near future states of the ocean, an ocean forecasting system based on satellite imagery is developped through the Satelitte based Ocean ForecasTing project (SOFT). SOFT, established by the European Commission, considers the development of a forecasting system of the ocean space-time variability based on satellite data by using Artificial Intelligence techniques. This system will be merged with numerical simulation approaches, via assimilation techniques, to get a hybrid SOFT-numerical forecasting system of improved performance. The results of the project will provide efficient forecasting of sea-surface temperature structures, currents, dynamic height, and biological activity associated to chlorophyll fields. All these quantities could give valuable information on the planning and management of human activities in marine environments such as navigation, fisheries, pollution control, or coastal management. A detailed identification of present or new needs and potential end-users concerned by such an operational tool is being performed. The project would study solutions adapted to these specific needs.

  4. Global Warming 'Pause' - Oceans Reshuffle Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, V.; Willis, J. K.; Patzert, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the fact that greenhouse gases are still increasing and all other indicators show warming-related change (+0.0064 °C/year since 1880 or +0.0077 °C/year during 1993-2002), surface temperatures stopped climbing steadily during the past decade at a rate of +0.0010 °C/year from 2003 to 2012. We show that in recent years, the heat was being trapped in the subsurface waters of the western Pacific and eastern Indian oceans between 100 and 300 m. The movement of warm Pacific water below the surface, also related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation climatic pattern, temporarily affected surface temperatures and accounted for the global cooling trend in surface temperature. With the Pacific Decadal Oscillation possibly changing to a warm phase, it is likely that the oceans will drive a major surge in global surface warming sometime in the next decade or two. Reference: Nieves, V., Willis, J. K., and Patzert, W. C. (2015). Recent hiatus caused by decadal shift in Indo-Pacific heating. Science, aaa4521.

  5. NASA Global Hawk Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delfrate, John

    2008-01-01

    This joint NASA/NGSC study was conducted with the expectation that the Global Hawk Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration Phase was nearing completion. (final ACTD flight was in Aug 06) This study convinced the 303d that the 2 available ACTD aircraft should be transferred to NASA Dryden. Global Hawk is the only available system capable of simultaneously meeting the requirements for high altitude (65K ft), long endurance (>31 hours), power (10 KVA), and a large payload capacity (2000 lbs). There are important NASA and NOAA science data gathering and satellite validation requirements that can only be met with the combination of capabilities provided by the Global Hawk system. NASA Global Hawk Missions: Unmanned Aerial System AURA Validation Experiment. (UAS AVE) April-May 2009 is the target date. Flights will cover the Pacific Ocean region south of Hawaii. 10-15 NASA and NOAA sponsored instruments. Data will be used for satellite validation. Next planning meeting for UAS AVE is at Dryden in April. Unmanned Aerial System Synthetic Aperture Radar. (UAS SAR) Flights to begin in mid to late 2009. The SAR instrument, developed by JPL, is contained in a pod and is being flown on Dryden s G-III. Northrop Grumman is conducting a feasibility study on adding wing pods to the NASA Global Hawk aircraft. Hurricane and Severe Storm Research. Hurricane missions in 2010 and 2013. Planning workshop at Dryden in June.

  6. NASA Global Hawk Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelFrate, John; Naftel, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Global Hawk project planning. Global Hawk is the only available system capable of simultaneously meeting the requirements for high altitude (65K ft), long endurance (>31 hours), power (10 KVA), and a large payload capacity (2000 lbs). There are important science data gathering and satellite validation requirements that can only be met with the combination of capabilities provided by the Global Hawk system. Global Hawk will give a unique range, shown in maps, at a high altitude. An overview of the design of the aircraft, and the ground station is given. The flights are scheduled to begin in 2009, and will carry instruments that will be used to validate the Aura satellite data and also be used in hurricane and severe storm research.

  7. The global water systems project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, H.; Jaeger, C.; Leveque, C.; Lettenmaier, D.; Lins, H.; Meybeck, M.; Niasse, M.; Vorosmarty, C.

    2003-04-01

    The Global Water System (GWS) plays a central and integrative role in the dynamics of the Earth system. It is a regulator of biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes, and it is also is essential for sustenance of human societies. The GWS is increasingly modified by humans and through climate effects (facets of it have moved well outside the range of natural variability), without adequate understanding of how the system works. For understanding the changes, feedbacks and potentially critical thresholds within the Earth system, and eventually for better managing the GWS, new synthetic knowledge is required. The Global Water System Project (GWSP) is a new activity being undertaken jointly by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), International Geophshere-Biosphere Program (IGBP), International Human Dimensions Program (IHP), and Diversitas. It will address the GWS in a comprehensive fashion at the global scale, building upon the emerging new consolidated Earth systems data sets, global monitoring tools, and predictive and coupled modeling capabilities. The central scientific question that motivates the GWSP is: "How are humans changing the global water cycle, the associated biogeochemical cycles, and the biological components of the GWS, and what are the social feedbacks arising from these changes?" GWSP will be structured around three "framing questions": a) What are the relative magnitudes of global-scale changes in the global water system that are attributable to changing human activities, and to environmental factors such as climate variability and change?; b) What are the main mechanisms by which human activities are affecting the global water system; and c) To what extent is the global water system resilient to global change? Examples of issues that might be addressed under each of these questions are provided.

  8. Modeling Coccolithophores in the Global Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, W.

    2006-12-01

    Coccolithophores are important ecological and geochemical components of the global oceans. A global three- dimensional model was used to simulate their distributions in a multi-phytoplankton context. The realism of the simulation was supported by comparisons of model surface nutrients and total chlorophyll with in situ and satellite observations. Nitrate, silica, and dissolved iron surface distributions were positively correlated with in situ data across major oceanographic basins. Global annual departures were +18.9% for nitrate (model high), +5.4% for silica, and +45.0% for iron. Total surface chlorophyll was also positively correlated with satellite and in situ data sets across major basins. Global annual departures were -8.0% with SeaWiFS (model low), +1.1% with Aqua, and -17.1% with in situ data. Global annual primary production estimates were within 1% and 9% of estimates derived from SeaWiFS and Aqua, respectively, using a common primary production algorithm. Coccolithophore annual mean relative abundances were 2.6% lower than observations, but were positively correlated across basins. Two of the other three phytoplankton groups, diatoms and cyanobacteria, were also positively correlated with observations. Distributions of coccolithophores were dependent upon interactions and competition with the other phytoplankton groups. In this model coccolithophores had a competitive advantage over diatoms and chlorophytes by virtue of a greater ability to utilize nutrients and light at low values. However, their higher sinking rates placed them at a disadvantage when nutrients and light were plentiful. In very low nutrient conditions, such as the mid-ocean gyres, coccolithophores were unable to compete with the efficient nutrient utilization capability and low sinking rate of cyanobacteria. Comparisons of simulated coccolithophore distributions with satellite-derived estimates of calcite concentration and coccolithophore blooms showed some agreement, but also areas of

  9. Modeling coccolithophores in the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Casey, Nancy W.

    2007-03-01

    Coccolithophores are important ecological and geochemical components of the global oceans. A global three-dimensional model was used to simulate their distributions in a multi-phytoplankton context. The realism of the simulation was supported by comparisons of model surface nutrients and total chlorophyll with in situ and satellite observations. Nitrate, silica, and dissolved iron surface distributions were positively correlated with in situ data across major oceanographic basins. Global annual departures were +18.9% for nitrate (model high), +5.4% for silica, and +45.0% for iron. Total surface chlorophyll was also positively correlated with satellite and in situ data sets across major basins. Global annual departures were -8.0% with Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) (model low), +1.1% with Aqua, and -17.1% with in situ data. Global annual primary production estimates were within 1% and 9% of estimates derived from SeaWiFS and Aqua, respectively, using a common primary production algorithm. Coccolithophore annual mean relative abundances were 2.6% lower than observations, but were positively correlated across basins. Two of the other three phytoplankton groups, diatoms and cyanobacteria, were also positively correlated with observations. Distributions of coccolithophores were dependent upon interactions and competition with the other phytoplankton groups. In this model, coccolithophores had a competitive advantage over diatoms and chlorophytes by virtue of a greater ability to utilize nutrients and light at low values. However, their higher sinking rates placed them at a disadvantage when nutrients and light were plentiful. In very low nutrient conditions, such as the mid-ocean gyres, coccolithophores were unable to compete with the efficient nutrient utilization capability and low sinking rate of cyanobacteria. Comparisons of simulated coccolithophore distributions with satellite-derived estimates of calcite concentration and coccolithophore blooms

  10. The Ocean Food and Energy Farm Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Howard A.

    1976-01-01

    This three-phase, 15-year project is designed to explore and develop the ability to raise the grant California kelp and other marine organisms for food, fuels, fertilizers and plastics in the temperate and tropical oceans. The needed technology is established, but the economic feasibility is yet to be determined. (BT)

  11. The Ocean Food and Energy Farm Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Howard A.

    1976-01-01

    This three-phase, 15-year project is designed to explore and develop the ability to raise the grant California kelp and other marine organisms for food, fuels, fertilizers and plastics in the temperate and tropical oceans. The needed technology is established, but the economic feasibility is yet to be determined. (BT)

  12. Pliocene oceanic seaways and global climate.

    PubMed

    Karas, Cyrus; Nürnberg, Dirk; Bahr, André; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Herrle, Jens O; Tiedemann, Ralf; deMenocal, Peter B

    2017-01-05

    Tectonically induced changes in oceanic seaways had profound effects on global and regional climate during the Late Neogene. The constriction of the Central American Seaway reached a critical threshold during the early Pliocene ~4.8-4 million years (Ma) ago. Model simulations indicate the strengthening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) with a signature warming response in the Northern Hemisphere and cooling in the Southern Hemisphere. Subsequently, between ~4-3 Ma, the constriction of the Indonesian Seaway impacted regional climate and might have accelerated the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation. We here present Pliocene Atlantic interhemispheric sea surface temperature and salinity gradients (deduced from foraminiferal Mg/Ca and stable oxygen isotopes, δ(18)O) in combination with a recently published benthic stable carbon isotope (δ(13)C) record from the southernmost extent of North Atlantic Deep Water to reconstruct gateway-related changes in the AMOC mode. After an early reduction of the AMOC at ~5.3 Ma, we show in agreement with model simulations of the impacts of Central American Seaway closure a strengthened AMOC with a global climate signature. During ~3.8-3 Ma, we suggest a weakening of the AMOC in line with the global cooling trend, with possible contributions from the constriction of the Indonesian Seaway.

  13. Pliocene oceanic seaways and global climate

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Cyrus; Nürnberg, Dirk; Bahr, André; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Herrle, Jens O.; Tiedemann, Ralf; deMenocal, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    Tectonically induced changes in oceanic seaways had profound effects on global and regional climate during the Late Neogene. The constriction of the Central American Seaway reached a critical threshold during the early Pliocene ~4.8–4 million years (Ma) ago. Model simulations indicate the strengthening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) with a signature warming response in the Northern Hemisphere and cooling in the Southern Hemisphere. Subsequently, between ~4–3 Ma, the constriction of the Indonesian Seaway impacted regional climate and might have accelerated the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation. We here present Pliocene Atlantic interhemispheric sea surface temperature and salinity gradients (deduced from foraminiferal Mg/Ca and stable oxygen isotopes, δ18O) in combination with a recently published benthic stable carbon isotope (δ13C) record from the southernmost extent of North Atlantic Deep Water to reconstruct gateway-related changes in the AMOC mode. After an early reduction of the AMOC at ~5.3 Ma, we show in agreement with model simulations of the impacts of Central American Seaway closure a strengthened AMOC with a global climate signature. During ~3.8–3 Ma, we suggest a weakening of the AMOC in line with the global cooling trend, with possible contributions from the constriction of the Indonesian Seaway. PMID:28054561

  14. Pliocene oceanic seaways and global climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, Cyrus; Nürnberg, Dirk; Bahr, André; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Herrle, Jens O.; Tiedemann, Ralf; Demenocal, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    Tectonically induced changes in oceanic seaways had profound effects on global and regional climate during the Late Neogene. The constriction of the Central American Seaway reached a critical threshold during the early Pliocene ~4.8–4 million years (Ma) ago. Model simulations indicate the strengthening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) with a signature warming response in the Northern Hemisphere and cooling in the Southern Hemisphere. Subsequently, between ~4–3 Ma, the constriction of the Indonesian Seaway impacted regional climate and might have accelerated the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation. We here present Pliocene Atlantic interhemispheric sea surface temperature and salinity gradients (deduced from foraminiferal Mg/Ca and stable oxygen isotopes, δ18O) in combination with a recently published benthic stable carbon isotope (δ13C) record from the southernmost extent of North Atlantic Deep Water to reconstruct gateway-related changes in the AMOC mode. After an early reduction of the AMOC at ~5.3 Ma, we show in agreement with model simulations of the impacts of Central American Seaway closure a strengthened AMOC with a global climate signature. During ~3.8–3 Ma, we suggest a weakening of the AMOC in line with the global cooling trend, with possible contributions from the constriction of the Indonesian Seaway.

  15. Evaluation of Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment Products on South Florida Nested Simulations with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing simula- tions and prediction with GODAE global and basin-scale models have fulfilled the main GODAE objectives of developing state-of-the- art ...the Optimal Interpolation based Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System ( MODAS ). This system consists of daily operational 1/4° Sea Surface Height...used to project the surface information from altimetry SSH to the interior of the ocean. Relaxation to the MODAS 1/8° Sea Surface Temperature (SST

  16. Global Characterization of the Ocean Ridge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, A.; Langmuir, C. H.; Dalton, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-ocean ridge system is a window into the upper mantle, producing over 80% of Earth’s volcanism. Fundamental, first-order questions remain debated and require a reliable global perspective. Such questions include the relative roles of mantle temperature, mantle heterogeneity and spreading rate on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) compositions, and the importance of spreading rate to melting and fractionation processes. To address these issues and provide a common reference for geochemists and geophysicists, we have assembled a comprehensive petrological presentation of global MORB. The data are compiled from PetDB as well as unpublished data. Transforming the raw data into a useful catalog poses several challenges. First, to link each sample with a particular ridge segment requires defining the individual segments of the ridge system. Using the highest resolution bathymetry available, we identified 771 global ridge segments with a total length of 60,864km. For each segment we also generated a digital along-strike depth profile, enabling precise characterization of both mean depth and depth range. Second, as noted in earlier work, different laboratories calibrate their analyses to different standards, which can lead to significant, systematic offsets among analyses. It is therefore important to apply correction factors to the data to make them consistent with one another. Erroneous data and mislocated samples were identified and either eliminated or manually corrected, leading to a total dataset of 11,366 glass and 874 whole-rock analyses that have had interlab correction values carefully applied. These results show that the mean depth of the global ridge system is 2981m, calculated by averaging the segment mean depths, weighted by segment length. Of the 771 ridge segments, 476 have at least one basalt sample within 10km of the ridge axis but only 181 segments have samples from three or more unique locations. Using these data, a far more reliable composition can

  17. Global Ocean on Enceladus Artist Rendering

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-15

    This illustration is a speculative representation of the interior of Saturn's moon Enceladus with a global liquid water ocean between its rocky core and icy crust. The thickness of layers shown here is not to scale. Scientists on NASA's Cassini mission determined that the slight wobble of Enceladus as it orbits Saturn is much too large for the moon to be frozen from surface to core. The wobble, technically referred to as a libration, reveals that the crust of Enceladus is disconnected from its rocky interior. This graphic is an update to PIA19058, which showed only a regional sea beneath the south polar region of Enceladus. Enceladus is 313 miles (504 kilometers) across. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19656

  18. Picophytoplankton biomass distribution in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitenhuis, E. T.; Li, W. K. W.; Vaulot, D.; Lomas, M. W.; Landry, M. R.; Partensky, F.; Karl, D. M.; Ulloa, O.; Campbell, L.; Jacquet, S.; Lantoine, F.; Chavez, F.; Macias, D.; Gosselin, M.; McManus, G. B.

    2012-08-01

    The smallest marine phytoplankton, collectively termed picophytoplankton, have been routinely enumerated by flow cytometry since the late 1980s during cruises throughout most of the world ocean. We compiled a database of 40 946 data points, with separate abundance entries for Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and picoeukaryotes. We use average conversion factors for each of the three groups to convert the abundance data to carbon biomass. After gridding with 1° spacing, the database covers 2.4% of the ocean surface area, with the best data coverage in the North Atlantic, the South Pacific and North Indian basins, and at least some data in all other basins. The average picophytoplankton biomass is 12 ± 22 μg C l-1 or 1.9 g C m-2. We estimate a total global picophytoplankton biomass of 0.53-1.32 Pg C (17-39% Prochlorococcus, 12-15% Synechococcus and 49-69% picoeukaryotes), with an intermediate/best estimate of 0.74 Pg C. Future efforts in this area of research should focus on reporting calibrated cell size and collecting data in undersampled regions. http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.777385

  19. Picophytoplankton biomass distribution in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitenhuis, E. T.; Li, W. K. W.; Vaulot, D.; Lomas, M. W.; Landry, M.; Partensky, F.; Karl, D. M.; Ulloa, O.; Campbell, L.; Jacquet, S.; Lantoine, F.; Chavez, F.; Macias, D.; Gosselin, M.; McManus, G. B.

    2012-04-01

    The smallest marine phytoplankton, collectively termed picophytoplankton, have been routinely enumerated by flow cytometry since the late 1980s, during cruises throughout most of the world ocean. We compiled a database of 40 946 data points, with separate abundance entries for Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and picoeukaryotes. We use average conversion factors for each of the three groups to convert the abundance data to carbon biomass. After gridding with 1° spacing, the database covers 2.4% of the ocean surface area, with the best data coverage in the North Atlantic, the South Pacific and North Indian basins. The average picophytoplankton biomass is 12 ± 22 μg C l-1 or 1.9 g C m-2. We estimate a total global picophytoplankton biomass of 0.53-0.74 Pg C (17-39% Prochlorococcus, 12-15% Synechococcus and 49-69% picoeukaryotes). Future efforts in this area of research should focus on reporting calibrated cell size, and collecting data in undersampled regions.

  20. The Global S$_1$ Ocean Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    The small S$_1$ ocean tide is caused primarily by diurnal atmospheric pressure loading. Its excitation is therefore unlike any other diurnal tide. The global character of $S-1$ is here determined by numerical modeling and by analysis of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The two approaches yield reasonably consistent results, and large ( $ greater than $l\\cm) amplitudes in several regions are further confirmed by comparison with coastal tide gauges. Notwithstanding their excitation differences, S$-1$ and other diurnal tides are found to share several common features, such as relatively large amplitudes in the Arabian Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Gulf of Alaska. The most noticeable difference is the lack of an S$-1$ Antarctic Kelvin wave. These similarities and differences can be explained in terms of the coherences between near-diurnal oceanic normal modes and the underlying tidal forcings. While gravitational diurnal tidal forces excite primarily a 28-hour Antarctic-Pacific mode, the S$_1$ air tide excites several other near-diurnal modes, none of which has large amplitudes near Antarctica.

  1. Global deep ocean oxygenation by enhanced ventilation in the Southern Ocean under long-term global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Shigemitsu, M.; Oka, A.; Takahashi, K.; Ohgaito, R.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Global warming is expected to decrease ocean oxygen concentrations by less solubility of surface ocean and change in ocean circulation. The associated expansion of the oxygen minimum zone would have adverse impacts on marine organisms and ocean biogeochemical cycles. Oxygen reduction is expected to persist for a thousand years or more, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. However, long-term changes in ocean oxygen and circulation are still unclear. Here we simulate multimillennium changes in ocean circulation and oxygen under doubling and quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, using a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model and an offline biogeochemical model. In the first 500 years, global oxygen concentration decreases, consistent with previous studies. Thereafter, however, the oxygen concentration in the deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots at the end of the simulations, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. This is because, after the initial cessation, the recovery and overshooting of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea enhance ventilation and supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean. Another contributor to deep ocean oxygenation is seawater warming, which reduces the export production and shifts the organic matter remineralization to the upper water column. Our results indicate that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in deep ocean, which is opposite to the centennial-scale global oxygen reduction and general expectation.

  2. Variability in global ocean phytoplankton distribution over 1979-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotti, I.; Alvain, S.; Moulin, C.; Antoine, D.

    2009-04-01

    Recently, reanalysis of long-term ocean color data (CZCS and SeaWiFS; Antoine et al., 2005) has shown that world ocean average phytoplankton chlorophyll levels show an increase of 20% over the last two decades. It is however unknown whether this increase is associated with a change in the distribution of phytoplankton groups or if it simply corresponds to an increase of the productivity. Within the framework of the GLOBPHY project, the distribution of the phytoplankton groups was monitored by applying the PHYSAT method (Alvain et al., 2005) to the historical ocean color data series from CZCS, OCTS and SeaWiFS sensors. The PHYSAT algorithm allows identification of several phytoplankton, like nanoeucaryotes, prochlorococcus, synechococcus and diatoms. Because both sensors (OCTS-SeaWiFS) are very similar, OCTS data were processed with the standard PHYSAT algorithm to cover the 1996-1997 period during which a large El Niño event occurred, just before the SeaWiFS era. Our analysis of this dataset (1996-2006) evidences a strong variability in the distribution of phytoplankton groups at both regional and global scales. In the equatorial region (0°-5°S), a three-fold increase of nanoeucaryotes frequency was detected in opposition to a two-fold decrease of synechococcus during the early stages of El Niño conditions (May-June 1997, OCTS). The impact of this El Niño is however not confined to the Equatorial Pacific and has affected the global ocean. The processing of CZCS data with PHYSAT has required several adaptations of this algorithm due to the lower performances and the reduced number of spectral bands of the sensor. Despites higher uncertainties, the phytoplankton groups distribution obtained with CZCS is globally consistent with that of SeaWiFS. A comparison of variability in global phytoplankton distribution between 1979-1982 (CZCS) and 1999-2002 (SeaWiFS) suggests an increase in nanoeucaryotes at high latitudes (>40°) and in the equatorial region (10°S-10

  3. The MERCATOR 2 degree global ocean forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, N.; Tranchant, B.; Durand, E.

    2003-04-01

    In the framework of the MERCATOR project for operational oceanography, a global ocean forecasting system is being developed. It will be composed of a 1/4o resolution model assimilating satellite and in situ observations, using an optimal interpolation scheme. This global forecasting system, Prototype d'Océan Global (POG) should be running in a pre-operational mode during the GODAE period. In order to assess the feasibility, a lower resolution (~2o) configuration of the system, mini-POG is also developed and is underway to be operated in near real time. Both configurations (POG and mini-POG) are based on the OPA8.2 ocean model (Madec et al. 1998). The 2o configuration (the mini-POG model) is the standard global configuration (ORCA2) developed at LODYC (Paris). The assimilation method used is the reduced-order optimal interpolation (OI) scheme SOFA (De Mey and Benkiran, 2002) which is able to incorporate both altimeter and in situ observations. Up to now only the sea level anomaly from Topex-Poseidon &ERS2 measurements along tracks is assimilated with an univariate mode. The 2D increments of SLA are converted into 3D increments of T, S, U, V and TKE coefficients using an algorithm based on the lifting-lowering method of Cooper and Haines (1996). The PALM software enables to drive easily the ocean model, the assimilation and the observations. The model is spun up with the ERA15 reanalyses climatology. Then, it is forced with interannual surface forcing (ECMWF operational analyses) during several years of the Topex- Poseidon period. A Mean Sea Surface Height and spatial/temporal correlation scales is obtained and used to constrain the assimilation. The preliminary results of the system including assimilation of Topex-Poseidon &ERS2 sea level anomaly are presented.

  4. The NASA OCEAN project--an ocean-space analog

    PubMed

    Chamberland, D

    1996-01-01

    An advanced life support system (ALS) with bioregenerative components may one day be required for long-term, deep space exploration, in extended missions to Mars or in establishing long-term bases on the moon. Intensive research programs on such ALS systems have been ongoing throughout the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) since 1988. Notably, projects have been initiated at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Ames Research Center (ARC), and the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC). The KSC ALS work has been named the "Breadboard Project" because of its approach developing the components and combining them into a breadboard to understanding the bioregenerative ALS picture [also called a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)] in smaller pieces, similar to an electronic "breadboard." The Breadboard Project has been involved for 7 years in the study of higher crops grown in a 113 m3 chamber--the longest operating and largest such closed, controlled growth chamber in the world. This chamber has proven itself to be very successful in growing a wide variety of crops from seedlings to harvest and in helping researchers understand the complex biological cycle of such edible plants in closed, environmentally controlled environments. Because the system's ultimate use will be a more challenging environment, moving a specially designed piece of the system into extreme conditions was an important test. Engineers at KSC developed a compact, portable, functional plant module for testing in the world's only fixed seafloor laboratory at Key Largo, FL. The laboratory, called MarineLab, is operated out of the facilities of the Marine Resources Development Foundation in a lagoon of some 10 m depth. The project was called the OCEAN project (Ocean CELSS Experimental Analog NASA).

  5. Enhanced deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froelicher, T. L.; Jaccard, S.; Dunne, J. P.; Paynter, D.; Gruber, N.

    2014-12-01

    Twenty-first century coupled climate model simulations, observations from the recent past, and theoretical arguments suggest a consistent trend towards warmer ocean temperatures and fresher polar surface oceans in response to increased radiative forcing resulting in increased upper ocean stratification and reduced ventilation and oxygenation of the deep ocean. Paleo-proxy records of the warming at the end of the last ice age, however, suggests a different outcome, namely a better ventilated and oxygenated deep ocean with global warming. Here we use a four thousand year global warming simulation from a comprehensive Earth System Model (GFDL ESM2M) to show that this conundrum is a consequence of different rates of warming and that the deep ocean is actually better ventilated and oxygenated in a future warmer equilibrated climate consistent with paleo-proxy records. The enhanced deep ocean ventilation in the Southern Ocean occurs in spite of increased positive surface buoyancy fluxes and a constancy of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds - circumstances that would otherwise be expected to lead to a reduction in deep ocean ventilation. This ventilation recovery occurs through a global scale interaction of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation undergoing a multi-centennial recovery after an initial century of transient decrease and transports salinity-rich waters inform the subtropical surface ocean to the Southern Ocean interior on multi-century timescales. The subsequent upwelling of salinity-rich waters in the Southern Ocean strips away the freshwater cap that maintains vertical stability and increases open ocean convection and the formation of Antarctic Bottom Waters. As a result, the global ocean oxygen content and the nutrient supply from the deep ocean to the surface are higher in a warmer ocean. The implications for past and future changes in ocean heat and carbon storage will be discussed.

  6. Global data products help assess changes to ocean carbon sink

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Pfeil, Benjamin; Olsen, Are; Sabine, Christopher L.; Metzl, Nicolas; Hankin, Steven; Koyuk, Heather; Kozyr, Alex; Malczyk, Jeremy; Manke, Ansley; Telszewski, Maciej

    2012-03-20

    Net oceanic uptake of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) reduces global warming but also leads to ocean acidification [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 2007]. Understanding and predicting changes in the ocean carbon sink are critical to assessments of future climate change. Surface water CO2 measurements suggest large year-to-year variations in oceanic CO2 uptake for several regions [Doney et al., 2009]. However, there is much debate on whether these changes are cyclical or indicative of long-term trends. Sustained, globally coordinated observations of the surface ocean carbon cycle and systematic handling of such data are essential for assessing variation and trends in regional and global ocean carbon uptake, information necessary for accurate estimates of global and national carbon budgets.

  7. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project: First Algorithm Intercomparison Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, Phillip A.; Xie, Pingping

    1994-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) was established by the World Climate Research Program to produce global analyses of the area- and time-averaged precipitation for use in climate research. To achieve the required spatial coverage, the GPCP uses simple rainfall estimates derived from IR and microwave satellite observations. In this paper, we describe the GPCP and its first Algorithm Intercomparison Project (AIP/1), which compared a variety of rainfall estimates derived from Geostationary Meteorological Satellite visible and IR observations and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) microwave observations with rainfall derived from a combination of radar and raingage data over the Japanese islands and the adjacent ocean regions during the June and mid-July through mid-August periods of 1989. To investigate potential improvements in the use of satellite IR data for the estimation of large-scale rainfall for the GPCP, the relationship between rainfall and the fractional coverage of cold clouds in the AIP/1 dataset is examined. Linear regressions between fractional coverage and rainfall are analyzed for a number of latitude-longitude areas and for a range of averaging times. The results show distinct differences in the character of the relationship for different portions of the area. These results suggest that the simple IR-based estimation technique currently used in the GPCP can be used to estimate rainfall for global tropical and subtropical areas, provided that a method for adjusting the proportional coefficient for varying areas and seasons can be determined.

  8. Ocean Model, Analysis and Prediction System version 3: operational global ocean forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassington, Gary; Sandery, Paul; Sakov, Pavel; Freeman, Justin; Divakaran, Prasanth; Beckett, Duan

    2017-04-01

    The Ocean Model, Analysis and Prediction System version 3 (OceanMAPSv3) is a near-global (75S-75N; no sea-ice), uniform horizontal resolution (0.1°x0.1°), 51 vertical level ocean forecast system producing daily analyses and 7 day forecasts. This system was declared operational at the Bureau of Meteorology in April 2016 and subsequently upgraded to include ACCESS-G APS2 in June 2016 and finally ported to the Bureau's new supercomputer in Sep 2016. This system realises the original vision of the BLUElink projects (2003-2015) to provide global forecasts of the ocean geostrophic turbulence (eddies and fronts) in support of Naval operations as well as other national services. The analysis system has retained an ensemble-based optimal interpolation method with 144 stationary ensemble members derived from a multi-year hindcast. However, the BODAS code has been upgraded to a new code base ENKF-C. A new strategy for initialisation has been introduced leading to greater retention of analysis increments and reduced shock. The analysis cycle has been optimised for a 3-cycle system with 3 day observation windows retaining an advantage as a multi-cycle time-lagged ensemble. The sea surface temperature and sea surface height anomaly analysis errors in the Australian region are 0.34 degC and 6.2 cm respectively an improvement of 10% and 20% respectively over version 2. In addition, the RMSE of the 7 day forecast has lower error than the 1 day forecast from the previous system (version 2). International intercomparisons have shown that this system is comparable in performance with the two leading systems and is often the leading performer for surface temperature and upper ocean temperature. We present an overview of the system, the data assimilation and initialisation, demonstrate the performance and outline future directions.

  9. Are Global In-Situ Ocean Observations Fit-for-purpose? Applying the Framework for Ocean Observing in the Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visbeck, M.; Fischer, A. S.; Le Traon, P. Y.; Mowlem, M. C.; Speich, S.; Larkin, K.

    2015-12-01

    There are an increasing number of global, regional and local processes that are in need of integrated ocean information. In the sciences ocean information is needed to support physical ocean and climate studies for example within the World Climate Research Programme and its CLIVAR project, biogeochemical issues as articulated by the GCP, IMBER and SOLAS projects of ICSU-SCOR and Future Earth. This knowledge gets assessed in the area of climate by the IPCC and biodiversity by the IPBES processes. The recently released first World Ocean Assessment focuses more on ecosystem services and there is an expectation that the Sustainable Development Goals and in particular Goal 14 on the Ocean and Seas will generate new demands for integrated ocean observing from Climate to Fish and from Ocean Resources to Safe Navigation and on a healthy, productive and enjoyable ocean in more general terms. In recognition of those increasing needs for integrated ocean information we have recently launched the Horizon 2020 AtlantOS project to promote the transition from a loosely-coordinated set of existing ocean observing activities to a more integrated, more efficient, more sustainable and fit-for-purpose Atlantic Ocean Observing System. AtlantOS takes advantage of the Framework for Ocean observing that provided strategic guidance for the design of the project and its outcome. AtlantOS will advance the requirements and systems design, improving the readiness of observing networks and data systems, and engaging stakeholders around the Atlantic. AtlantOS will bring Atlantic nations together to strengthen their complementary contributions to and benefits from the internationally coordinated Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and the Blue Planet Initiative of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). AtlantOS will fill gaps of the in-situ observing system networks and will ensure that their data are readily accessible and useable. AtlantOS will demonstrate the utility of

  10. ODIP - Ocean Data Interoperability Platform - developing interoperabilty Pilot project 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.; Glaves, Helen

    2014-05-01

    Europe, the USA, Australia and IOC/IODE are making significant progress in facilitating the discovery and access of marine data through the development, implementation, population and operation of national, regional or international distributed ocean and marine observing and data management infrastructures such as SeaDataNet, Geo-Seas, IOOS, the Australian Ocean Portal and the IODE Ocean Data Portal. All of these developments are resulting in the development and implementation of standards for the formats of metadata, data, data products, quality control methods and flags, common vocabularies. They are also providing services for data discovery, viewing and downloading, and software tools for editing, conversions, communication, analysis and presentation, all of which are increasingly being adopted and used by their national and regional marine communities. There is also a general trend towards the use of the basic ISO and OGC standards, however these allow the use of different profiles and vocabularies. As a result there are differences in the standards used in the different regions which hinder their direct exchange and use at an international and global scale, and as a result act as a barrier to the realisation of global portals such as the IODE Ocean Data Portal and GEOSS. The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) project is supported by the EU FP7 Research Infrastructures programme, National Science Foundation (USA) and Australian government and has started 1st October 2012. ODIP includes all the major organisations engaged in ocean data management in EU, US, and Australia. ODIP is also supported by the IOC -IODE, closely linking this activity with its Ocean Data Portal (ODP) and Ocean Data Standards (ODS) projects. The ODIP platform aims to ease interoperability between the regional marine data management infrastructures. Therefore it facilitates an organised dialogue between the key infrastructure representatives by means of publishing best practice

  11. ODIP - Ocean Data Interoperability Platform - developing interoperabilty Pilot project 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, D.

    2014-12-01

    Europe, the USA, Australia and IOC/IODE are making significant progress in facilitating the discovery and access of marine data through the development, implementation, population and operation of national, regional or international distributed ocean and marine observing and data management infrastructures such as SeaDataNet, Geo-Seas, IOOS, the Australian Ocean Portal and the IODE Ocean Data Portal. All of these developments are resulting in the development and implementation of standards for the formats of metadata, data, data products, quality control methods and flags, common vocabularies. They are also providing services for data discovery, viewing and downloading, and software tools for editing, conversions, communication, analysis and presentation, all of which are increasingly being adopted and used by their national and regional marine communities.The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP)project is supported by the EU FP7 Research Infrastructures programme, National Science Foundation (USA) and Australian government and has started 1st October 2012. ODIP includes all the major organisations engaged in ocean data management in EU, US, and Australia. ODIP is also supported by the IOC -IODE, closely linking this activity with its Ocean Data Portal (ODP) and Ocean Data Standards (ODS) projects.The ODIP platform aims to ease interoperability between the regional marine data management infrastructures. Therefore it facilitates an organised dialogue between the key infrastructure representatives by means of publishing best practice, organising international workshops and fostering the development of common standards and interoperability solutions. These are evaluated and tested by means of prototype projects. The ODIP Prototype project 1 aims at establishing interoperability between the regional EU, USA and Australia data discovery and access services (SeaDataNet CDI, US NODC, and IMOS MCP) and contributing to the global GEOSS and IODE-ODP Portals. Use is

  12. Global Temperature and Salinity Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Searle, Ben

    1992-01-01

    Data exchange and data management programs have been evolving over many years. Within the international community there are two main programs to support the exchange, management and processing of real time and delayed mode data. The Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) operate the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) program which coordinates the exchange of delayed mode data between national oceanographic data centers, World Data Centers and the user community. The Integrated Global Ocean Services System is a joint IOC/World Meteorological Organization (WMO) program for the exchange and management of real-time data. These two programs are complemented by mechanisms that have been established within scientific programs to exchange and manage project data sets. In particular TOGA and WOCE have identified a data management requirement and established the appropriate infrastructure to achieve this. Where GTSPP fits into this existing framework is discussed.

  13. The Mercator-Ocean forecasting service: a 4D vision of the global ocean, serving the ocean services.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, F.

    2006-12-01

    Mercator Ocean is a public consortium formed in Toulouse in early 2002 by the six major players in the French oceanography community: the space agency CNES, the scientific research centre CNRS, IFREMER (the institute of marine research and exploration), the development research institute IRD, the Meo France weather service, and SHOM (the French Navy's hydrography & oceanography department). In 1995, these same organizations gave themselves seven years to achieve a challenging objective: to conceive, develop and implement France's first operational oceanography system. The unique system would be capable of describing, analysing and predicting conditions at the ocean surface and subsurface in real time, anytime, anywhere in the world, even in the most inhospitable seas. That objective was met on 17 January 2001 with the release of the first Mercator ocean bulletin, providing a two-week forecast for the entire North Atlantic. More than three thousands new forecast charts are now added to the MERCATOR bulletin every week. Building on these successes, a dedicated operational oceanography team, Mercator Ocean, was set up in 2002. Mercator-Ocean's mission is to deliver incremental improvements in the service provided by this new operational oceanography capability by increasing the resolution and the geographic coverage of the models used. The current high-resolution model offers a 6 km grid resolution, and the first models offering global ocean coverage has been implemented early 2004. A ¼° model is operated since October 2005. The services offered by Mercator-Ocean consist in a real-time general description of the physical state of the ocean (3D currents, temperature, salinity ). This is exactly in line with the so called Marine Core Service initiative developed by the operational oceanography community within the programs funded by the European Commission and the European Space Agency (Marcoast, Mersea, BOSS4GMES projects ). The downstream activities are now in

  14. Ocean farfield response to projected Arctic sea ice loss.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, Markus; Deser, Clara; Tomas, Robert

    2016-04-01

    An ensemble of 20 fully coupled CESM simulations is used to elucidate the ocean's role in shaping the global climate response to projected Arctic sea ice loss. The ensemble allows us to separate unambiguously between internal variability and forced changes. Thus, it is possible to identify the oceanic processes by which sea ice induced changes in Arctic and North Pacific sea level pressure are transmitted across the world ocean. Of particular interest is the Kelvin wave train that connects the North Atlantic with the equatorial Pacific. Within 10 years after the loss of sea ice the oceanic signal arrives in the Pacific and leads to a slow and steady deepening of the equatorial thermocline and, after another 5 decades, the subtropical thermocline. This suggests that the current Arctic sea ice loss already set into motion changes in tropical Pacific climate that will be felt several decades from now. We will dicuss these ocean induced changes in the mean climate as well as ENSO and explore possibilities of observational verification.

  15. How well do global ocean biogeochemistry models simulate dissolved iron distributions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Aumont, Olivier; DeAth, Ros; Dunne, John P.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Galbraith, Eric; Misumi, Kazuhiro; Moore, J. Keith; Ridgwell, Andy; Sherman, Elliot; Stock, Charles; Vichi, Marcello; Völker, Christoph; Yool, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Numerical models of ocean biogeochemistry are relied upon to make projections about the impact of climate change on marine resources and test hypotheses regarding the drivers of past changes in climate and ecosystems. In large areas of the ocean, iron availability regulates the functioning of marine ecosystems and hence the ocean carbon cycle. Accordingly, our ability to quantify the drivers and impacts of fluctuations in ocean ecosystems and carbon cycling in space and time relies on first achieving an appropriate representation of the modern marine iron cycle in models. When the iron distributions from 13 global ocean biogeochemistry models are compared against the latest oceanic sections from the GEOTRACES program, we find that all models struggle to reproduce many aspects of the observed spatial patterns. Models that reflect the emerging evidence for multiple iron sources or subtleties of its internal cycling perform much better in capturing observed features than their simpler contemporaries, particularly in the ocean interior. We show that the substantial uncertainty in the input fluxes of iron results in a very wide range of residence times across models, which has implications for the response of ecosystems and global carbon cycling to perturbations. Given this large uncertainty, iron fertilization experiments based on any single current generation model should be interpreted with caution. Improvements to how such models represent iron scavenging and also biological cycling are needed to raise confidence in their projections of global biogeochemical change in the ocean.

  16. Examination and comparison of SMOS and MyOcean global salinity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel-Rhoads, Yianna; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Zodiatis, George

    2014-05-01

    The recent availability of satellite remote sensing data of ocean salinity from SMOS, has promoted the oceanographic exploitation of these results and their comparison with other available ocean salinity databases, in order to determine the validity and accuracy of the SMOS measurements. Here, we examine monthly global SMOS salinity data for the years 2010 and 2011, and compare them with monthly global data from the project MyOcean during the above timeframe. The MyOcean project aims to deliver and operate a rigorous, robust and sustainable Ocean Monitoring and Forecasting system of the GMES Marine Service (OMF/GMS) to users for all marine applications. SMOS salinity data were obtained from the CP34 SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre (SMOS-BEC) site. Ten-day average satellite ocean salinity reprocessed data were obtained for 2010 and 2011, at 1 degree resolution from the ascending orbit, and averaged into monthly mean values. MyOcean global salinity data were obtained from the L4 reprocessing for 2010 and 2011, at 1/3 degree resolution. These data were then interpolated to 1x1 degree resolution and compared with the SMOS global monthly salinity data. Over the examined months, the SMOS satellite underestimates global salinity values relative to MyOcean, except for three occasions. In January 2010, SMOS overestimates salinity values (+0.112 psu), while for April 2010 (+0.02 psu) as well as for April 2011 (-0.017 psu) the SMOS satellite is recording similar salinity values as the MyOcean data. During September for both years, the highest discrepancy is observed between the two datasets, with the SMOS satellite recording salinities much lower than the MyOcean data (0.43 psu and 0.516 psu difference respectively). On a monthly basis, SMOS satellite records higher than MyOcean salinity values in the Gulf of Mexico, the delta of the Amazon River, off Rio Grande Brazil, as well as off the Antarctic coast (an overestimation possibly associated with the Antarctic Coastal Current

  17. Effects of ocean grid resolution on tropical cyclone-induced upper ocean responses using a global ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Sriver, Ryan L.

    2016-11-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) have the potential to influence regional and global climate through interactions with the upper ocean. Here we present results from a suite of ocean-only model experiments featuring the Community Earth System Model, in which we analyze the effect of tropical cyclone wind forcing on the global ocean using three different horizontal ocean grid resolutions (3°, 1°, and 0.1°). The ocean simulations are forced with identical atmospheric inputs from the Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiments version 2 (COREv2) normal year forcing conditions, featuring global blended TC winds from a fully coupled CESM simulation with a 25 km atmosphere. The simulated TC climatology shows good agreement with observational estimates of annual TC statistics, including annual frequency, intensity distributions, and geographic distributions. Each ocean simulation is composed of a 5 year spin-up with COREv2 normal year forcing, followed by 18 months with blended TC winds. In addition, we conduct corresponding control simulations for each grid resolution configuration without blended TC winds. We find that ocean horizontal and vertical grid resolutions affect TC-induced heat and momentum fluxes, poststorm cold wake features, and ocean subsurface temperature profiles. The responses are amplified for smaller grid spacing. Moreover, analyses show that the annually accumulated TC-induced ocean heat uptake is also sensitive to ocean grid resolution, which may have important implications for modeled ocean heat budgets and variability.

  18. Role of the Polar Oceans in Global Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    The project focused on ice-ocean model development and in particular on the assimilation of ice motion data and ice concentration data into both regional and global models. Many of the resulting publications below deal with improvements made in the physics treated by the model and the procedures for assimilating data. Several papers examine how the ability of the model to simulate the past behavior of the ice cover, especially to represent the ice thickness and ice deformation, is improved by data assimilation. A second aspect of the work involved interpretation of modeled behavior. Resulting papers treat the decline of arctic ice thickness over the last thirty years, and how that decline was caused by a slight warming of the near-surface atmosphere, and also how large variation in ice thickness are due to changes in wind patterns associated with a well- known oscillation of the atmospheric circulation. The research resulted in over 20 published papers on these topics.

  19. Eddy-Resolving Global Ocean Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    key observing system for mapping ocean eddies and current meanders, but sea surface temperature, temperature and salinity profiles, and atmospheric...for mapping ocean eddies and current meanders, but sea surface temperature, temperature and salinity profiles, and atmospheric forcing arc also...fronts, eddies, Rossby waves, and the associated temperature, salinity, currents, and sea surface height (SSH). Only since the turn of the century

  20. Accelerated Prediction of the Polar Ice and Global Ocean (APPIGO)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    circulation . In the southern ocean , POP-CESM has an overall higher ice thickness than in the HYCOM simulations, with maximum in the Weddell and Ross Seas...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Accelerated Prediction of the Polar Ice and Global Ocean ...APPIGO) Eric Chassignet Center for Ocean -Atmosphere Prediction Studies (COAPS) Florida State University, PO Box 3062840 Tallahassee, FL 32306

  1. Global Change Encyclopedia - A project for the international space year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Simard, R.; Manore, M.; Baker, R.; Clark, D.; Kineman, J.; Allen, J.; Ruzek, M.

    1991-01-01

    'Global Change Encyclopedia' is a project for the International Space Year in 1992. The project will produce a comprehensive set of satellite and other global data with relevance to studies of global change and of the earth as a system. These data will be packaged on CD-ROMs, accompanied by appropriate software for access, display and manipulation. On behalf of the Canadian Space Agency, the project is being carried out by the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration as major contributors. This paper highlights the background leading to the project, the concept and principal characteristics of the Encyclopedia itself, and the current status and plans.

  2. Ocean Tides. Part 1. Global Ocean Tidal Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    tidal loading found by Estes (1977). Following Thomson (1868), Darwin (1883), Doodson (1921), and Cartwright and Taylor (1971), the primary...Prandtl Number Fluid. Journal of Fluid Mechan- ics, 47, p. 305. Cartwright , D. E., and Tayler, R. J., 1971, New Computations of the Tide-Generating...Potential. Geophys. J. Roy. Astr. Soc., 23, p. 45. Cox, M. D., 1970. A Mathematical Model of the Indian Ocean. Deep- Sea Research, 17, p. 45. Darwin , G

  3. Acoustic Monitoring of Global Ocean Variability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-10

    known oceanic physics and dynamics, and ( b ) the other observational programs intended to examine related aspects of the same problem. Descriptions...characterization, of the order of 4% source duty cycles will extend for up to one year followed b ; a lower, long-term sampling cycle, characteristic of...Wunsch, and D. B . Haidvogel, 1992. Assimilation of sea surface topography into an ocean circulation model using a steady-state smoother. Submitted for

  4. Global Earth Response to Loading by Ocean Tide Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Strayer, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical and programming techniques to numerically calculate Earth response to global semidiurnal and diurnal ocean tide models were developed. Global vertical crustal deformations were evaluated for M sub 2, S sub 2, N sub 2, K sub 2, K sub 1, O sub 1, and P sub 1 ocean tide loading, while horizontal deformations were evaluated for the M sub 2 tidal load. Tidal gravity calculations were performed for M sub 2 tidal loads, and strain tensor elements were evaluated for M sub 2 loads. The M sub 2 solution used for the ocean tide included the effects of self-gravitation and crustal loading.

  5. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Quéré, C.; Buitenhuis, E. T.; Moriarty, R.; Alvain, S.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Chollet, S.; Enright, C.; Franklin, D. J.; Geider, R. J.; Harrison, S. P.; Hirst, A.; Larsen, S.; Legendre, L.; Platt, T.; Prentice, I. C.; Rivkin, R. B.; Sathyendranath, S.; Stephens, N.; Vogt, M.; Sailley, S.; Vallina, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    Global ocean biogeochemistry models currently employed in climate change projections use highly simplified representations of pelagic food webs. These food webs do not necessarily include critical pathways by which ecosystems interact with ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Here we present a global biogeochemical model which incorporates ecosystem dynamics based on the representation of ten plankton functional types (PFTs); six types of phytoplankton, three types of zooplankton, and heterotrophic bacteria. We improved the representation of zooplankton dynamics in our model through (a) the explicit inclusion of large, slow-growing zooplankton, and (b) the introduction of trophic cascades among the three zooplankton types. We use the model to quantitatively assess the relative roles of iron vs. grazing in determining phytoplankton biomass in the Southern Ocean High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) region during summer. When model simulations do not represent crustacean macrozooplankton grazing, they systematically overestimate Southern Ocean chlorophyll biomass during the summer, even when there was no iron deposition from dust. When model simulations included the developments of the zooplankton component, the simulation of phytoplankton biomass improved and the high chlorophyll summer bias in the Southern Ocean HNLC region largely disappeared. Our model results suggest that the observed low phytoplankton biomass in the Southern Ocean during summer is primarily explained by the dynamics of the Southern Ocean zooplankton community rather than iron limitation. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean.

  6. A Real-time Operational Global Ocean Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, A.; Rivin, I.

    2010-12-01

    Efforts are ongoing to implement a real-time operational global ocean forecast system at NCEP/NWS/NOAA. This system will be based on an eddy resolving 1/12 degree global HYCOM model (Chassignet et al., 2009) and is part of a larger national backbone capability of ocean modeling at NWS in a strong partnership with US Navy. Long term plans include coupling it to Hurricane prediction models (eg. HWRF) and for providing ocean component for seasonal to interannual climate forecast systems (eg. CFS). The forecast system will run once a day and produce a week long forecast using the daily initialization fields produced at NAVOCEANO using NCODA, a 3D multi-variate data assimilation methodology (Cummings, 2005). The operational ocean model configuration has 32 hybrid layers and a horizontal grid size of (4500 x 3298). It is forced with surface fluxes from the operational Global Forecast System (GFS) fields. References: Chassignet, E.P., H.E. Hurlburt, E.J. Metzger, O.M. Smedstad, J. Cummings, G.R. Halliwell, R. Bleck, R. Baraille, A.J. Wallcraft, C. Lozano, H.L. Tolman, A. Srinivasan, S. Hankin, P. Cornillon, R. Weisberg, A. Barth, R. He, F. Werner, and J. Wilkin, 2009. U.S. GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Oceanography, 22(2), 64-75. Cummings, J.A., 2005: Operational multivariate ocean data assimilation. Quart. J. Royal Met. Soc., Part C, 131(613), 3583-3604.

  7. The role of clouds and oceans in global greenhouse warming

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffert, M.I.

    1992-12-01

    During the past three years we have conducted several studies using models and a combination of satellite data, in situ meteorological and oceanic data, and paleoclimate reconstructions, under the DoE program, Quantifying the Link Between Change in Radiative Balance and Atmospheric Temperature''. Our goals were to investigate effects of global cloudiness variations on global climate and their implications for cloud feedback and continue development and application of NYU transient climate/ocean models, with emphasis on coupled effects of greenhouse warming and feedbacks by both the clouds and oceans. Our original research plan emphasized the use of cloud, surface temperature and ocean data sets interpreted by focused climate/ocean models to develop a cloud radiative forcing scenario for the past 100 years and to assess the transient climate response; to narrow key uncertainties in the system; and to identify those aspects of the climate system most likely to be affected by greenhouse warming over short, medium and long time scales.

  8. Multimillennium changes in dissolved oxygen under global warming: results from an AOGCM and offline ocean biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Shigemitsu, M.; Oka, A.; Takahashi, K.; Ohgaito, R.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term oceanic oxygen change due to global warming is still unclear; most future projections (such as CMIP5) are only performed until 2100. Indeed, few previous studies using conceptual models project oxygen change in the next thousands of years, showing persistent global oxygen reduction by about 30% in the next 2000 years, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. Yet, these models cannot sufficiently represent the ocean circulation change: the key driver of oxygen change. Moreover, considering serious effect oxygen reduction has on marine life and biogeochemical cycling, long-term oxygen change should be projected for higher validity. Therefore, we used a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) and an offline ocean biogeochemical model, investigating realistic long-term changes in oceanic oxygen concentration and ocean circulation. We integrated these models for 2000 years under atmospheric CO2 doubling and quadrupling. After global oxygen reduction in the first 500 years, oxygen concentration in deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea recovers and overshoots, after initial cessation. Thus, enhanced deep convection and associated Antarctic Bottom Water supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean, resulting global deep ocean oxygenation. We conclude that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in the deep ocean; contrary to past reported long-term oxygen reduction and general expectation. In presentation, we will discuss the mechanism of response of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea and show the volume changes of hypoxic waters.

  9. An assessment of upper ocean salinity content from the Ocean Reanalyses Inter-comparison Project (ORA-IP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Alves, O.; Wedd, R.; Balmaseda, M. A.; Chang, Y.; Chepurin, G.; Ferry, N.; Fujii, Y.; Gaillard, F.; Good, S. A.; Guinehut, S.; Haines, K.; Hernandez, F.; Lee, T.; Palmer, M.; Peterson, K. A.; Masuda, S.; Storto, A.; Toyoda, T.; Valdivieso, M.; Vernieres, G.; Wang, X.; Yin, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Many institutions worldwide have developed ocean reanalyses systems (ORAs) utilizing a variety of ocean models and assimilation techniques. However, the quality of salinity reanalyses arising from the various ORAs has not yet been comprehensively assessed. In this study, we assess the upper ocean salinity content (depth-averaged over 0-700 m) from 14 ORAs and 3 objective ocean analysis systems (OOAs) as part of the Ocean Reanalyses Intercomparison Project. Our results show that the best agreement between estimates of salinity from different ORAs is obtained in the tropical Pacific, likely due to relatively abundant atmospheric and oceanic observations in this region. The largest disagreement in salinity reanalyses is in the Southern Ocean along the Antarctic circumpolar current as a consequence of the sparseness of both atmospheric and oceanic observations in this region. The West Pacific warm pool is the largest region where the signal to noise ratio of reanalysed salinity anomalies is >1. Therefore, the current salinity reanalyses in the tropical Pacific Ocean may be more reliable than those in the Southern Ocean and regions along the western boundary currents. Moreover, we found that the assimilation of salinity in ocean regions with relatively strong ocean fronts is still a common problem as seen in most ORAs. The impact of the Argo data on the salinity reanalyses is visible, especially within the upper 500 m, where the interannual variability is large. The increasing trend in global-averaged salinity anomalies can only be found within the top 0-300 m layer, but with quite large diversity among different ORAs. Beneath the 300 m depth, the global-averaged salinity anomalies from most ORAs switch their trends from a slightly growing trend before 2002 to a decreasing trend after 2002. The rapid switch in the trend is most likely an artefact of the dramatic change in the observing system due to the implementation of Argo.

  10. Global observations of ocean Rossby waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chelton, D.B.; Schlax, M.G.

    1996-04-12

    Rossby waves play a critical role in the transient adjustment of ocean circulation to changes in large-scale atmospheric forcing. The TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite altimeter has detected Rossby waves throughout much of the world ocean from sea level signals with {approx_lt} 10-centimeters amplitude and {approx_lt} 500-kilometer wavelength. Outside of the tropics Rossby waves are abruptly amplified by major topographic features. Analysis of 3 years of data reveals discrepancies between observed and theoretical Rossby wave phase speeds that indicate that the standard theory for free, linear Rossby waves in an incomplete description of the observed waves. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Global coupled sea ice-ocean state estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenty, Ian; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Zhang, Hong

    2017-08-01

    We study the impact of synthesizing ocean and sea ice concentration data with a global, eddying coupled sea ice-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model with the goal of reproducing the 2004 three-dimensional time-evolving ice-ocean state. This work builds on the state estimation framework developed in the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean consortium by seeking a reconstruction of the global sea ice-ocean system that is simultaneously consistent with (1) a suite of in situ and remotely-sensed ocean and ice data and (2) the physics encoded in the numerical model. This dual consistency is successfully achieved here by adjusting only the model's initial hydrographic state and its atmospheric boundary conditions such that misfits between the model and data are minimized in a least-squares sense. We show that synthesizing both ocean and sea ice concentration data is required for the model to adequately reproduce the observed details of the sea ice annual cycle in both hemispheres. Surprisingly, only modest adjustments to our first-guess atmospheric state and ocean initial conditions are necessary to achieve model-data consistency, suggesting that atmospheric reanalysis products remain a leading source of errors for sea ice-ocean model hindcasts and reanalyses. The synthesis of sea ice data is found to ameliorate misfits in the high latitude ocean, especially with respect to upper ocean stratification, temperature, and salinity. Constraining the model to sea ice concentration modestly reduces ICESat-derived Arctic ice thickness errors by improving the temporal and spatial evolution of seasonal ice. Further increases in the accuracy of global sea ice thickness in the model likely require the direct synthesis of sea ice thickness data.

  12. Global coupled sea ice-ocean state estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenty, Ian; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Zhang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    We study the impact of synthesizing ocean and sea ice concentration data with a global, eddying coupled sea ice-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model with the goal of reproducing the 2004 three-dimensional time-evolving ice-ocean state. This work builds on the state estimation framework developed in the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean consortium by seeking a reconstruction of the global sea ice-ocean system that is simultaneously consistent with (1) a suite of in situ and remotely-sensed ocean and ice data and (2) the physics encoded in the numerical model. This dual consistency is successfully achieved here by adjusting only the model's initial hydrographic state and its atmospheric boundary conditions such that misfits between the model and data are minimized in a least-squares sense. We show that synthesizing both ocean and sea ice concentration data is required for the model to adequately reproduce the observed details of the sea ice annual cycle in both hemispheres. Surprisingly, only modest adjustments to our first-guess atmospheric state and ocean initial conditions are necessary to achieve model-data consistency, suggesting that atmospheric reanalysis products remain a leading source of errors for sea ice-ocean model hindcasts and reanalyses. The synthesis of sea ice data is found to ameliorate misfits in the high latitude ocean, especially with respect to upper ocean stratification, temperature, and salinity. Constraining the model to sea ice concentration modestly reduces ICESat-derived Arctic ice thickness errors by improving the temporal and spatial evolution of seasonal ice. Further increases in the accuracy of global sea ice thickness in the model likely require the direct synthesis of sea ice thickness data.

  13. Toward an Internal Gravity Wave Spectrum in Global Ocean Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-14

    14 MAY 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Toward an Internal Gravity Wave Spectrum in Global...resolution global ocean models forced by atmospheric fields and tides are beginning to display realistic internal gravity wave spectra, especially as

  14. Low-frequency variability of sea level as related to the heat balance of global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Niiler, P.; Patzert, W.

    1991-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON mission will determine global changes of sea level with unprecedented accuracy. Our main objective is the use TOPEX/POSEIDON data, concurrent in situ ocean measurements, and other satellite observations to document and diagnose physical processes by which heat is exchanged with the atmosphere, stored in the ocean, or transported by ocean circulation. During the prelaunch period, our objectives are to advise the project on an improved method of retrieving sea level data and prepare for the application of TOPEX/POSEIDON data by developing a diagnostic model using in situ measurements and altimeter observations from Geosat and the European Remote Sensing satellite.

  15. Tsunami Speed Variations in Density-stratified Compressible Global Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watada, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent tsunami observations in the deep ocean have accumulated unequivocal evidence that tsunami traveltime delays compared with the linear long-wave tsunami simulations occur during tsunami propagation in the deep ocean. The delay is up to 2% of the tsunami traveltime. Watada et al. [2013] investigated the cause of the delay using the normal mode theory of tsunamis and attributed the delay to the compressibility of seawater, the elasticity of the solid earth, and the gravitational potential change associated with mass motion during the passage of tsunamis. Tsunami speed variations in the deep ocean caused by seawater density stratification is investigated using a newly developed propagator matrix method that is applicable to seawater with depth-variable sound speeds and density gradients. For a 4-km deep ocean, the total tsunami speed reduction is 0.45% compared with incompressible homogeneous seawater; two thirds of the reduction is due to elastic energy stored in the water and one third is due to water density stratification mainly by hydrostatic compression. Tsunami speeds are computed for global ocean density and sound speed profiles and characteristic structures are discussed. Tsunami speed reductions are proportional to ocean depth with small variations, except for in warm Mediterranean seas. The impacts of seawater compressibility and the elasticity effect of the solid earth on tsunami traveltime should be included for precise modeling of trans-oceanic tsunamis. Data locations where a vertical ocean profile deeper than 2500 m is available in World Ocean Atlas 2009. The dark gray area indicates the Pacific Ocean defined in WOA09. a) Tsunami speed variations. Red, gray and black bars represent global, Pacific, and Mediterranean Sea, respectively. b) Regression lines of the tsunami velocity reduction for all oceans. c)Vertical ocean profiles at grid points indicated by the stars in Figure 1.

  16. Sharing Data in the Global Ocean Observing System (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, E. J.; McCurdy, A.; Young, J.; Fischer, A. S.

    2010-12-01

    We examine the evolution of data sharing in the field of physical oceanography to highlight the challenges now before us. Synoptic global observation of the ocean from space and in situ platforms has significantly matured over the last two decades. In the early 1990’s the community data sharing challenges facing the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) largely focused on the behavior of individual scientists. Satellite data sharing depended on the policy of individual agencies. Global data sets were delivered with considerable delay and with enormous personal sacrifice. In the 2000’s the requirements for global data sets and sustained observations from the likes of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change have led to data sharing and cooperation at a grander level. It is more effective and certainly more efficient. The Joint WMO/IOC Technical Commission on Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM) provided the means to organize many aspects of data collection and data dissemination globally, for the common good. In response the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites organized Virtual Constellations to enable the assembly and sharing of like kinds of satellite data (e.g., sea surface topography, ocean vector winds, and ocean color). Individuals in physical oceanography have largely adapted to the new rigors of sharing data for the common good, and as a result of this revolution new science has been enabled. Primary obstacles to sharing have shifted from the individual level to the national level. As we enter into the 2010’s the demands for ocean data continue to evolve with an expanded requirement for more real-time reporting and broader disciplinary coverage, to answer key scientific and societal questions. We are also seeing the development of more numerous national contributions to the global observing system. The drivers for the establishment of global ocean observing systems are expanding beyond climate to include biological and

  17. Climate change projection of the Tasman Sea from an Eddy-resolving Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matear, R. J.; Chamberlain, M. A.; Sun, C.; Feng, M.

    2013-06-01

    The ocean's western boundary current regions display the greatest rate of twentieth century warming and global climate models project that the accelerated rate of warming will continue with climate change. All existing global climate change projections come from simulations that do not fully resolve either these boundary currents or their eddies. Using an Ocean Eddy-resolving Model (OEM) that captures the dynamics of the East Australian Current (EAC) and its eddies we show the response of the Tasman Sea to climate change differs from what is projected with a coarse resolution Global Climate Model (GCM). With climate change, the OEM projects increased EAC transport with increased eddy activity and an approximately 1° southward latitudinal shift in the point where the EAC separates from the shelf and flows eastward. The OEM increased eddy activity in the Tasman Sea with climate change increases the nutrient supply to the upper ocean and causes an increase in the phytoplankton concentrations and primary productivity by 10% in the oligotrophic waters of the Tasman Sea. The increase in primary productivity is absent in the GCM climate change projection, which projects the region will have a decrease in primary productivity with climate change. Applying the OEM climate change projection for the Tasman Sea to other western boundary current regions suggests the projected intensification of all western boundary currents with climate change should increase eddy activity and provide an important nutrient supply mechanism to counter the increased stratification projected with global warming.

  18. Ecogenomics and potential biogeochemical impacts of globally abundant ocean viruses.

    PubMed

    Roux, Simon; Brum, Jennifer R; Dutilh, Bas E; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Duhaime, Melissa B; Loy, Alexander; Poulos, Bonnie T; Solonenko, Natalie; Lara, Elena; Poulain, Julie; Pesant, Stéphane; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Cruaud, Corinne; Alberti, Adriana; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Vaqué, Dolors; Bork, Peer; Acinas, Silvia G; Wincker, Patrick; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-09-29

    Ocean microbes drive biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. However, this cycling is constrained by viruses that affect community composition, metabolic activity, and evolutionary trajectories. Owing to challenges with the sampling and cultivation of viruses, genome-level viral diversity remains poorly described and grossly understudied, with less than 1% of observed surface-ocean viruses known. Here we assemble complete genomes and large genomic fragments from both surface- and deep-ocean viruses sampled during the Tara Oceans and Malaspina research expeditions, and analyse the resulting 'global ocean virome' dataset to present a global map of abundant, double-stranded DNA viruses complete with genomic and ecological contexts. A total of 15,222 epipelagic and mesopelagic viral populations were identified, comprising 867 viral clusters (defined as approximately genus-level groups). This roughly triples the number of known ocean viral populations and doubles the number of candidate bacterial and archaeal virus genera, providing a near-complete sampling of epipelagic communities at both the population and viral-cluster level. We found that 38 of the 867 viral clusters were locally or globally abundant, together accounting for nearly half of the viral populations in any global ocean virome sample. While two-thirds of these clusters represent newly described viruses lacking any cultivated representative, most could be computationally linked to dominant, ecologically relevant microbial hosts. Moreover, we identified 243 viral-encoded auxiliary metabolic genes, of which only 95 were previously known. Deeper analyses of four of these auxiliary metabolic genes (dsrC, soxYZ, P-II (also known as glnB) and amoC) revealed that abundant viruses may directly manipulate sulfur and nitrogen cycling throughout the epipelagic ocean. This viral catalog and functional analyses provide a necessary foundation for the meaningful integration of viruses into ecosystem models where they

  19. Ecogenomics and potential biogeochemical impacts of globally abundant ocean viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-09-01

    Ocean microbes drive biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. However, this cycling is constrained by viruses that affect community composition, metabolic activity, and evolutionary trajectories. Owing to challenges with the sampling and cultivation of viruses, genome-level viral diversity remains poorly described and grossly understudied, with less than 1% of observed surface-ocean viruses known. Here we assemble complete genomes and large genomic fragments from both surface- and deep-ocean viruses sampled during the Tara Oceans and Malaspina research expeditions, and analyse the resulting ‘global ocean virome’ dataset to present a global map of abundant, double-stranded DNA viruses complete with genomic and ecological contexts. A total of 15,222 epipelagic and mesopelagic viral populations were identified, comprising 867 viral clusters (defined as approximately genus-level groups). This roughly triples the number of known ocean viral populations and doubles the number of candidate bacterial and archaeal virus genera, providing a near-complete sampling of epipelagic communities at both the population and viral-cluster level. We found that 38 of the 867 viral clusters were locally or globally abundant, together accounting for nearly half of the viral populations in any global ocean virome sample. While two-thirds of these clusters represent newly described viruses lacking any cultivated representative, most could be computationally linked to dominant, ecologically relevant microbial hosts. Moreover, we identified 243 viral-encoded auxiliary metabolic genes, of which only 95 were previously known. Deeper analyses of four of these auxiliary metabolic genes (dsrC, soxYZ, P-II (also known as glnB) and amoC) revealed that abundant viruses may directly manipulate sulfur and nitrogen cycling throughout the epipelagic ocean. This viral catalog and functional analyses provide a necessary foundation for the meaningful integration of viruses into ecosystem models where

  20. Decoupling of Iron and Phosphate in the Global Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parekh, Payal

    2003-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for marine phytoplankton, limiting their growth in high nutrient, low chlorophyll regions of the ocean. I use a hierarchy of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry models to understand controls on global iron distribution. I formulate a mechanistic model of iron cycling which includes scavenging onto sinking particles and complexation with an organic ligand. The iron cycle is coupled to a phosphorus cycling model. Iron's aeolian source is prescribed. In the context of a highly idealized multi-box model scheme, the model can be brought into consistency with the relatively sparse ocean observations of iron in the oceans. This biogeochemical scheme is also implemented in a coarse resolution ocean general circulation model. This model also successfully reproduces the broad regional patterns of iron and phosphorus. In particular, the high macronutrient concentrations of the Southern Ocean result from iron limitation in the model. Due to the potential ability of iron to change the efficiency of the carbon pump in the remote Southern Ocean, I study Southern Ocean surface phosphate response to increased aeolian dust flux. My box model and GCM results suggest that a global ten fold increase in dust flux can support a phosphate drawdown of 0.25-0.5 micromolar.

  1. Decoupling of Iron and Phosphate in the Global Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parekh, Payal

    2003-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for marine phytoplankton, limiting their growth in high nutrient, low chlorophyll regions of the ocean. I use a hierarchy of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry models to understand controls on global iron distribution. I formulate a mechanistic model of iron cycling which includes scavenging onto sinking particles and complexation with an organic ligand. The iron cycle is coupled to a phosphorus cycling model. Iron's aeolian source is prescribed. In the context of a highly idealized multi-box model scheme, the model can be brought into consistency with the relatively sparse ocean observations of iron in the oceans. This biogeochemical scheme is also implemented in a coarse resolution ocean general circulation model. This model also successfully reproduces the broad regional patterns of iron and phosphorus. In particular, the high macronutrient concentrations of the Southern Ocean result from iron limitation in the model. Due to the potential ability of iron to change the efficiency of the carbon pump in the remote Southern Ocean, I study Southern Ocean surface phosphate response to increased aeolian dust flux. My box model and GCM results suggest that a global ten fold increase in dust flux can support a phosphate drawdown of 0.25-0.5 micromolar.

  2. Tides of global ice-covered oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    2016-08-01

    The tides of an ice-covered ocean are examined using a Cartesian representation of the elastic and fluid equations. Although unconstrained by any observations, the ocean tides of a Neoproterozoic "snowball" Earth could have been significantly larger than they are today. Time-mean tidal-residual circulations would then have been set up that are competitive with the circulation driven by geothermal heating. In any realistic configuration, the snowball Earth would have had an ice cover that is in the thin shell limit, but by permitting the ice thickness to become large, more interesting ice tidal response can be found, ones conceivably of application to bodies in the outer Solar System or hypothetical exoplanets. Little can be said concerning a reduction in tidal dissipation necessary to avoid a crisis in the history of the lunar orbit.

  3. Global Climate Change and Ocean Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, W.; Anderson, J.

    2011-12-01

    The New England Aquarium, collaborating with other aquariums across the country, is leading a national effort to enable aquariums and related informal science education institutions to effectively communicate the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on marine animals, habitats and ecosystems. Our goal is to build on visitors' emotional connection with ocean animals, connect to their deeply held values, help them understand causes and effects of climate change and motivate them to embrace effective solutions. Our objectives are to: (1) Build a national coalition of aquariums and related informal education institutions collaborating on climate change education; (2) Develop an interpretive framework for climate change and the ocean that is scientifically sound, research-based, field tested and evaluated; and (3) Build capacity of aquariums to interpret climate change via training for interpreters, interactive exhibits and activities and communities of practice for ongoing support. Centers of informal learning have the potential to bring important environmental issues to the public by presenting the facts, explaining the science, connecting with existing values and interests, and motivating concern and action. Centers that work with live animals (including aquariums, zoos, nature centers, national parks, national marine sanctuaries, etc.) are unique in that they attract large numbers of people of all ages (over 140 million in the US), have strong connections to the natural, and engage many visitors who may not come with a primary interest in science. Recent research indicates that that the public expects and trusts aquariums, zoos, and museums to communicate solutions to environmental and ocean issues, and to advance ocean conservation, and that climate change is the environmental issue of most concern to the public; Ironically, however, most people do not associate climate change with ocean health, or understand the critical role that the ocean plays in

  4. Variational Data Assimilation for the Global Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    profiles. One method is the Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System ( MODAS ) database, which models the time averaged co-variability of dynamic height...used in the MODAS method is derived from historical hydrographic data. Note that an upgrade to the MODAS synthetic profile capability, the Improved...ans real data constraints. MODAS does not suffer from these limitations, although MODAS may have marginal skill due to: (1) sampling limitations of

  5. Eddy Resolving Global Ocean Prediction including Tides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    best in the deep stratified ocean, pressure levels (nearly fixed depths) provide high vertical resolution in the mixed layer, and σ ­ levels (terrain...Metzger, E. J., Richman, J. G., Chassignet, E. P., Drillet, Y., Hecht, M. W., Le Galloudec, O., Shriver, J. F., Xu, X., and Zamudio , L., “Dynamical...Proceedings of the 2009 HPCMP User’s Group Conference, San Diego, CA. [published] 11 Zamudio , L., E. J. Metzger, and P. J. Hogan (2010), Gulf of California

  6. Diagnosing global ocean content changes in historically forced CMIP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Durack, P. J.; Stouffer, R. J.; Johnson, G. C.; Forest, C. E.

    2016-02-01

    Formal detection and attribution studies have used observations and climate models to identify an anthropogenic warming signature in the upper (0­700 m) ocean. Recently, as a result of the so-called surface warming hiatus, there has been considerable interest in global ocean heat content (OHC) changes in the deeper ocean, including natural and anthropogenically forced changes evidenced in observational, modelling, and data re-analysis studies. We rely on OHC change estimates from a diverse collection of measurement systems including data from the 19th Century Challenger expedition, a multi-decadal record of ship-based in-situ mostly upper ocean measurements, the more recent near-global Argo floats profiling to intermediate (2000 m) depths, and full-depth repeated transoceanic sections. By diagnosing simulated global OHC changes in historically-forced climate models in three depth layers, we show that the current generation of climate models is broadly consistent with multi-decadal estimates of upper, intermediate (700­-2000 m) and deep (2000 m­ bottom) global OHC changes as well as with Argo-based estimates over the most recent period. Our results suggest that approximately half of the 1860­ present human-caused increases in global ocean heat content may have occurred since 1998.

  7. CLIVAR-GSOP/GODAE Ocean Synthesis Inter-Comparison of Global Air-Sea Fluxes From Ocean and Coupled Reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The GODAE OceanView and CLIVAR-GSOP ocean synthesis program has been assessing the degree of consistency between global air-sea flux data sets obtained from ocean or coupled reanalyses (Valdivieso et al., 2014). So far, fifteen global air-sea heat flux products obtained from ocean or coupled reanalyses have been examined: seven are from low-resolution ocean reanalyses (BOM PEODAS, ECMWF ORAS4, JMA/MRI MOVEG2, JMA/MRI MOVECORE, Hamburg Univ. GECCO2, JPL ECCOv4, and NCEP GODAS), five are from eddy-permitting ocean reanalyses developed as part of the EU GMES MyOcean program (Mercator GLORYS2v1, Reading Univ. UR025.3, UR025.4, UKMO GloSea5, and CMCC C-GLORS), and the remaining three are couple reanalyses based on coupled climate models (JMA/MRI MOVE-C, GFDL ECDA and NCEP CFSR). The global heat closure in the products over the period 1993-2009 spanned by all data sets is presented in comparison with observational and atmospheric reanalysis estimates. Then, global maps of ensemble spread in the seasonal cycle, and of the Signal to Noise Ratio of interannual flux variability over the 17-yr common period are shown to illustrate the consistency between the products. We have also studied regional variability in the products, particularly at the OceanSITES project locations (such as, for instance, the TAO/TRITON and PIRATA arrays in the Tropical Pacific and Atlantic, respectively). Comparisons are being made with other products such as OAFlux latent and sensible heat fluxes (Yu et al., 2008) combined with ISCCP satellite-based radiation (Zhang et al., 2004), the ship-based NOC2.0 product (Berry and Kent, 2009), the Large and Yeager (2009) hybrid flux dataset CORE.2, and two atmospheric reanalysis products, the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis (referred to as ERAi, Dee et al., 2011) and the NCEP/DOE reanalysis R2 (referred to as NCEP-R2, Kanamitsu et al., 2002). Preliminary comparisons with the observational flux products from OceanSITES are also underway. References Berry, D

  8. Influence of the Southern Ocean on the Global deep ocean stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S.; Eisenman, I.; Stewart, A.

    2015-12-01

    The stratification of the deep ocean plays a key role in the climate system by influencing the ocean circulation and regulating the outgassing of CO2. Previous studies have suggested that Southern Ocean processes control the global ocean stratification below the main thermocline (i.e., below ~500m). In this study, three ocean-only simulations are carried out with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1): one control simulation forced with Pre-industrial (PI) surface conditions, a second control simulation forced with Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) surface conditions, and a test simulation forced with LGM surface conditions in southern high latitudes and PI surface conditions elsewhere. We find that the test simulation does broadly reproduce the LGM density stratification of the global ocean below 2000m, but not at intermediate depths between 500m and 1500m. We propose a mechanism whereby the stratification of the intermediate-depth waters is influenced by the differing effects on the surface buoyancy distribution of fixed versus restoring aspects of the surface buoyancy forcing. This implies the Southern Ocean exerts less influence over the global deep ocean stratification than has been previously suggested, at least when considering the difference between LGM and PI climates in CESM1.

  9. A daily global mesoscale ocean eddy dataset from satellite altimetry.

    PubMed

    Faghmous, James H; Frenger, Ivy; Yao, Yuanshun; Warmka, Robert; Lindell, Aron; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale ocean eddies are ubiquitous coherent rotating structures of water with radial scales on the order of 100 kilometers. Eddies play a key role in the transport and mixing of momentum and tracers across the World Ocean. We present a global daily mesoscale ocean eddy dataset that contains ~45 million mesoscale features and 3.3 million eddy trajectories that persist at least two days as identified in the AVISO dataset over a period of 1993-2014. This dataset, along with the open-source eddy identification software, extract eddies with any parameters (minimum size, lifetime, etc.), to study global eddy properties and dynamics, and to empirically estimate the impact eddies have on mass or heat transport. Furthermore, our open-source software may be used to identify mesoscale features in model simulations and compare them to observed features. Finally, this dataset can be used to study the interaction between mesoscale ocean eddies and other components of the Earth System.

  10. The forcing, shaping and possible consequences of ocean salinity changes in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, R.; Skliris, N.; Josey, S. A.; de Cuevas, B. A.

    2012-04-01

    The EN3 global ocean dataset (1950-2010) and various observational/reanalysis air-sea freshwater flux datasets are used to investigate long-term global ocean salinity changes in relation to changes in the surface freshwater budget. The obtained spatial pattern of multi-decadal change of surface salinity strongly resembles that of surface freshwater flux, with net evaporation/salinity increases (decreases) found in evaporation (precipitation) dominated regions. Large evaporation increase/saltening in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre and precipitation increase/freshening in the Western Pacific warm pool are highly correlated with the SST increase, suggesting an acceleration of the global hydrological cycle with possible links to the broad-scale surface warming. Moreover, results show an accentuation of the salinity contrast between Atlantic and Pacific Oceans throughout the water column as well as between the upper thermocline salinity maximum and the salinity minimum intermediate waters in both ocean basins. We also find a systematic freshening of the Southern Ocean with the decreasing salinity signal rapidly propagating via Subantarctic mode water (SAMW) at intermediate depths in the southern basins of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Using a hindcast of the global ocean circulation, water masses identified with key salinity anomalies are traced using particle trajectories to estimate the advective timescales on which salinity anomalies are spreading through the ocean interior. Based on our present understanding of the influence of salinity in the global ocean, three possible consequences of ongoing trends in the 3-D salinity field are highlighted: the extent to which positive surface salinity anomalies throughout much of the Atlantic are favourable for deep-water formation; the extent to which surface freshening in much of the tropical Pacific may inhibit surface mixed layer depth, and possible implications for SST; the dynamical influence, via

  11. A Global Ocean State Estimate at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrhein, D. E.; Wunsch, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Many features of Earth's climate at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ca. 20,000 years ago) remain a mystery, including the role of the ocean circulation in transporting thermal energy, salinity, and other tracers. Most efforts at reconstructing the ocean state during the LGM have relied either upon integrations of general circulation models under prescribed LGM boundary conditions or the interpretation of climate proxy records without explicit physical constraints. Here we describe a global, primitive equation simulation of the LGM ocean with boundary conditions (wind, surface air temperature, and other atmospheric variables) and mixing parameters derived by a least-squares fit of an ocean general circulation model to observations of deep ocean stable isotopes and sea surface temperatures at the LGM.

  12. Marine defaunation: animal loss in the global ocean.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Douglas J; Pinsky, Malin L; Palumbi, Stephen R; Estes, James A; Joyce, Francis H; Warner, Robert R

    2015-01-16

    Marine defaunation, or human-caused animal loss in the oceans, emerged forcefully only hundreds of years ago, whereas terrestrial defaunation has been occurring far longer. Though humans have caused few global marine extinctions, we have profoundly affected marine wildlife, altering the functioning and provisioning of services in every ocean. Current ocean trends, coupled with terrestrial defaunation lessons, suggest that marine defaunation rates will rapidly intensify as human use of the oceans industrializes. Though protected areas are a powerful tool to harness ocean productivity, especially when designed with future climate in mind, additional management strategies will be required. Overall, habitat degradation is likely to intensify as a major driver of marine wildlife loss. Proactive intervention can avert a marine defaunation disaster of the magnitude observed on land.

  13. Measuring Global Oceans and Terrestrial Freshwater From Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, Doug; Fu, Lee-Lueng; Mognard, Nelly; Cazenave, Anny; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Chelton, Dudley; Lettenmaier, Dennis

    2007-06-01

    Radar altimetry has revolutionized oceanography by providing global measurements of ocean surface topography (OST [e.g., Fu and Cazenave, 2001]). Long-term measurements of large-scale circulation and heat storage of the global oceans have led to discoveries such as the effects of changes in ocean circulation on climate (e.g., El Niño and La Niña). A critical limitation, however, is the 200- to 300-kilometer spacings between satellite orbital tracks, which are unable to resolve the currents and oceanic mesoscale processes that contain 90% of the kinetic energy of the oceans. In contrast to ocean observations, surface freshwater measurements are limited mostly to in situ networks of gauges that record water surface elevations at fixed points along river channels. Globally, the spatial and temporal distribution of water stored on the land surface and moving through river channels is known only crudely. Furthermore, water movement in wetlands and across floodplains throughout the world is essentially unmeasured, significantly limiting our understanding of flood processes.

  14. The timescales of global surface-ocean connectivity.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Bror F; Watson, James R

    2016-04-19

    Planktonic communities are shaped through a balance of local evolutionary adaptation and ecological succession driven in large part by migration. The timescales over which these processes operate are still largely unresolved. Here we use Lagrangian particle tracking and network theory to quantify the timescale over which surface currents connect different regions of the global ocean. We find that the fastest path between two patches--each randomly located anywhere in the surface ocean--is, on average, less than a decade. These results suggest that marine planktonic communities may keep pace with climate change--increasing temperatures, ocean acidification and changes in stratification over decadal timescales--through the advection of resilient types.

  15. US Navy Operational Global Ocean and Arctic Ice Prediction Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Wallcraft, L. Zamudio, D.S. Franklin, P.G. Posey, M.W. Phelps, P.J. Hogan , F.L. Bub, and C.J. DeHaan. 2014. US Navy operational global ocean and...from government, academia, and business ) funded by the National Ocean Partnership Program (Chassignet et al., 2009). Prediction systems were...Arctic Ocean is also important for strategic and economic reasons . Navy interest in the region has always been high but has grown over the past

  16. The self-consistent dynamic pole tide in global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic pole tide is characterized in a self-consistent manner by means of introducing a single nondifferential matrix equation compatible with the Liouville equation, modelling the ocean as global and of uniform depth. The deviations of the theory from the realistic ocean, associated with the nonglobality of the latter, are also given consideration, with an inference that in realistic oceans long-period modes of resonances would be increasingly likely to exist. The analysis of the nature of the pole tide and its effects on the Chandler wobble indicate that departures of the pole tide from the equilibrium may indeed be minimal.

  17. The timescales of global surface-ocean connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, Bror F.; Watson, James R.

    2016-04-01

    Planktonic communities are shaped through a balance of local evolutionary adaptation and ecological succession driven in large part by migration. The timescales over which these processes operate are still largely unresolved. Here we use Lagrangian particle tracking and network theory to quantify the timescale over which surface currents connect different regions of the global ocean. We find that the fastest path between two patches--each randomly located anywhere in the surface ocean--is, on average, less than a decade. These results suggest that marine planktonic communities may keep pace with climate change--increasing temperatures, ocean acidification and changes in stratification over decadal timescales--through the advection of resilient types.

  18. The self-consistent dynamic pole tide in global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic pole tide is characterized in a self-consistent manner by means of introducing a single nondifferential matrix equation compatible with the Liouville equation, modelling the ocean as global and of uniform depth. The deviations of the theory from the realistic ocean, associated with the nonglobality of the latter, are also given consideration, with an inference that in realistic oceans long-period modes of resonances would be increasingly likely to exist. The analysis of the nature of the pole tide and its effects on the Chandler wobble indicate that departures of the pole tide from the equilibrium may indeed be minimal.

  19. Distribution of diverse nitrogen fixers in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, F. M.; Follows, M. J.; Dutkiewicz, S.

    2010-09-01

    We employ a global three-dimensional model to simulate diverse phytoplanktonic diazotrophs (nitrogen fixers) in the oceans. In the model, the structure of the marine phytoplankton community self-assembles from a large number of potentially viable physiologies. Amongst them, analogs of Trichodesmium, unicellular diazotrophs and diatom-diazotroph associations (DDA) are successful and abundant. The simulated biogeography and nitrogen fixation rates of the modeled diazotrophs compare favorably with a compilation of published observations, which includes both traditional and molecular measurements of abundance and activity of marine diazotrophs. In the model, the diazotroph analogs occupy warm subtropical and tropical waters, with higher concentrations and nitrogen fixation rates in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and the Arabian Sea/Northern Indian Ocean, and lower values in the tropical and subtropical South Pacific Ocean. The three main diazotroph types typically co-exist in the model, although Trichodesmium analogs dominate the diazotroph population in much of the North and tropical Atlantic Ocean and the Arabian Sea, while unicellular-diazotroph analogs dominate in the South Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. This pattern reflects the relative degree of nutrient limitation by iron or phosphorus. The model suggests in addition that unicellular diazotrophs could add as much new nitrogen to the global ocean as Trichodesmium.

  20. Surface Heat Flux Corrections for Global Ocean Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garraffo, Z. D.; Hogan, P. J.; Mehra, A.; Rivin, I.; Balasubramaniyan, B.; Spindler, T. D.; Kim, H. C.; Paturi, S.

    2016-02-01

    RTOFS (Real Time Ocean Forecast System) - Global is the first global eddy resolving ocean forecast system implemented operationally at NOAA/NWS/NCEP in close collaboration with US Navy. Recently upgraded version 1.1 (which was developed and validated at NRL) uses the Hybrid Coordinates Ocean Model (HYCOM) at 1/12 degree coupled with Los Alamos Community sea ICE model (CICE). The forecast system runs once a day and produces forecasts from the daily initialization fields produced at NAVOCEANO (NAVal OCEANographic Office) which use NCODA (Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation), a 3DVAR data assimilation methodology (Cummings and Smedstad, 2013). After a two-day spin up with hourly NCEP's Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) atmospheric fluxes with the ocean model in forecast mode, the daily forecast cycle is forced with 3-hourly momentum, radiation and precipitation fluxes from NCEP's Global Forecast System fields for the next eight days. Following flux-corrections efforts at NRL (Metzger et al. 2013, NRL report), heat flux corrections are computed for the RTOFS v1.1 configuration. To assess sensitivity to upgrades in GFS/GDAS and HYCOM, these radiative corrections are compared with forecasts produced with other versions of NCEP forcing. Impacts of flux corrections in SST errors will be discussed.

  1. Global ocean modeling on the Connection Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Dukowicz, J.K.; Malone, R.C.

    1993-10-01

    The authors have developed a version of the Bryan-Cox-Semtner ocean model (Bryan, 1969; Semtner, 1976; Cox, 1984) for massively parallel computers. Such models are three-dimensional, Eulerian models that use latitude and longitude as the horizontal spherical coordinates and fixed depth levels as the vertical coordinate. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, with a turbulent eddy viscosity, and mass continuity equation are solved, subject to the hydrostatic and Boussinesq approximations. The traditional model formulation uses a rigid-lid approximation (vertical velocity = 0 at the ocean surface) to eliminate fast surface waves. These waves would otherwise require that a very short time step be used in numerical simulations, which would greatly increase the computational cost. To solve the equations with the rigid-lid assumption, the equations of motion are split into two parts: a set of twodimensional ``barotropic`` equations describing the vertically-averaged flow, and a set of three-dimensional ``baroclinic`` equations describing temperature, salinity and deviations of the horizontal velocities from the vertically-averaged flow.

  2. Projected climate change impact on oceanic acidification.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Ben I; Matear, Richard J

    2006-06-27

    Anthropogenic CO2 uptake by the ocean decreases the pH of seawater, leading to an 'acidification' which may have potential detrimental consequences on marine organisms. Ocean warming or circulation alterations induced by climate change has the potential to slowdown the rate of acidification of ocean waters by decreasing the amount of CO2 uptake by the ocean. However, a recent study showed that climate change affected the decrease in pH insignificantly. Here, we examine the sensitivity of future oceanic acidification to climate change feedbacks within a coupled atmosphere-ocean model and find that ocean warming dominates the climate change feedbacks. Our results show that the direct decrease in pH due to ocean warming is approximately equal to but opposite in magnitude to the indirect increase in pH associated with ocean warming (ie reduced DIC concentration of the upper ocean caused by lower solubility of CO2). As climate change feedbacks on pH approximately cancel, future oceanic acidification will closely follow future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This suggests the only way to slowdown or mitigate the potential biological consequences of future ocean acidification is to significantly reduce fossil-fuel emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere.

  3. Projected climate change impact on oceanic acidification

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Ben I; Matear, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic CO2 uptake by the ocean decreases the pH of seawater, leading to an 'acidification' which may have potential detrimental consequences on marine organisms [1]. Ocean warming or circulation alterations induced by climate change has the potential to slowdown the rate of acidification of ocean waters by decreasing the amount of CO2 uptake by the ocean [2]. However, a recent study showed that climate change affected the decrease in pH insignificantly [3]. Here, we examine the sensitivity of future oceanic acidification to climate change feedbacks within a coupled atmosphere-ocean model and find that ocean warming dominates the climate change feedbacks. Results Our results show that the direct decrease in pH due to ocean warming is approximately equal to but opposite in magnitude to the indirect increase in pH associated with ocean warming (ie reduced DIC concentration of the upper ocean caused by lower solubility of CO2). Conclusion As climate change feedbacks on pH approximately cancel, future oceanic acidification will closely follow future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This suggests the only way to slowdown or mitigate the potential biological consequences of future ocean acidification is to significantly reduce fossil-fuel emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. PMID:16930458

  4. Global environmental change issues in the western Indian ocean region

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, F.J.; Aubrey, D.G.; Gentile, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Global climate change caused by increased atmospheric trace gas loading is expected to cause a variety of direct and indirect impacts. These impacts include rising sea levels, changes in storm climates, changes in precipitation patterns, and alterations of ocean circulation patterns. The purpose of the paper is to place into a regional context for the Western Indian Ocean region the problems arising from changes in global climate. Specifically, the paper will focus on the potential for impacts in the coastal zone, where the indirect pressures of climate change and anthropogenic forcings (e.g. pollution, dredging, coral mining) and policy (land use, coastal zone) collide.

  5. Space-based lidar measurements of global ocean carbon stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Hu, Yongxiang; Hostetler, Chris A.; Dall'Olmo, Giorgio; Rodier, Sharon D.; Hair, John W.; Trepte, Charles R.

    2013-08-01

    Global ocean phytoplankton biomass (Cphyto) and total particulate organic carbon (POC) stocks have largely been characterized from space using passive ocean color measurements. A space-based light detection and ranging (lidar) system can provide valuable complementary observations for Cphyto and POC assessments, with benefits including day-night sampling, observations through absorbing aerosols and thin cloud layers, and capabilities for vertical profiling through the water column. Here we use measurements from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) to quantify global Cphyto and POC from retrievals of subsurface particulate backscatter coefficients (bbp). CALIOP bbp data compare favorably with airborne, ship-based, and passive ocean data and yield global average mixed-layer standing stocks of 0.44 Pg C for Cphyto and 1.9 Pg for POC. CALIOP-based Cphyto and POC data exhibit global distributions and seasonal variations consistent with ocean plankton ecology. Our findings support the use of spaceborne lidar measurements for advancing understanding of global plankton systems.

  6. A global ocean climatology of preindustrial and modern ocean δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eide, Marie; Olsen, Are; Ninnemann, Ulysses S.; Johannessen, Truls

    2017-03-01

    We present a global ocean climatology of dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C (‰) corrected for the 13C-Suess effect, preindustrial δ13C. This was constructed by first using Olsen and Ninnemann's (2010) back-calculation method on data from 25 World Ocean Circulation Experiment cruises to reconstruct the preindustrial δ13C on sections spanning all major oceans. Next, we developed five multilinear regression equations, one for each major ocean basin, which were applied on the World Ocean Atlas data to construct the climatology. This reveals the natural δ13C distribution in the global ocean. Compared to the modern distribution, the preindustrial δ13C spans a larger range of values. The maxima, of up to 1.8‰, occurs in the subtropical gyres of all basins, in the upper and intermediate waters of the North Atlantic, as well as in mode waters with a Southern Ocean origin. Particularly strong gradients occur at intermediate depths, revealing a strong potential for using δ13C as a tracer for changes in water mass geometry at these levels. Further, we identify a much tighter relationship between δ13C and apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) than between δ13C and phosphate. This arises because, in contrast to phosphate, AOU and δ13C are both partly reset when waters are ventilated in the Southern Ocean and underscore that δ13C is a highly robust proxy for past changes in ocean oxygen content and ocean ventilation. Our global preindustrial δ13C climatology is openly accessible and can be used, for example, for improved model evaluation and interpretation of sediment δ13C records.

  7. Global View of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-20

    NASA researchers have new [sic] insights into the mysteries of Arctic sea ice, thanks to the unique abilities of Canada's Radarsat satellite. The Arctic is the smallest of the world's four oceans, but it may play a large role in helping scientists monitor Earth's climate shifts. Using Radarsat's special sensors to take images at night and to peer through clouds, NASA researchers can now see the complete ice cover of the Arctic. This allows tracking of any shifts and changes, in unprecedented detail, over the course of an entire winter. The radar-generated, high-resolution images are up to 100 times better than those taken by previous satellites. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02970

  8. Going with the flow: the role of ocean circulation in global marine ecosystems under a changing climate.

    PubMed

    van Gennip, Simon J; Popova, Ekaterina E; Yool, Andrew; Pecl, Gretta T; Hobday, Alistair J; Sorte, Cascade J B

    2017-07-01

    Ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation and reduced productivity are widely considered to be the major stressors to ocean ecosystems induced by emissions of CO2 . However, an overlooked stressor is the change in ocean circulation in response to climate change. Strong changes in the intensity and position of the western boundary currents have already been observed, and the consequences of such changes for ecosystems are beginning to emerge. In this study, we address climatically induced changes in ocean circulation on a global scale but relevant to propagule dispersal for species inhabiting global shelf ecosystems, using a high-resolution global ocean model run under the IPCC RCP 8.5 scenario. The ¼ degree model resolution allows improved regional realism of the ocean circulation beyond that of available CMIP5-class models. We use a Lagrangian approach forced by modelled ocean circulation to simulate the circulation pathways that disperse planktonic life stages. Based on trajectory backtracking, we identify present-day coastal retention, dominant flow and dispersal range for coastal regions at the global scale. Projecting into the future, we identify areas of the strongest projected circulation change and present regional examples with the most significant modifications in their dominant pathways. Climatically induced changes in ocean circulation should be considered as an additional stressor of marine ecosystems in a similar way to ocean warming or acidification. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Vertical resolution of baroclinic modes in global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, K. D.; Hogg, A. McC.; Griffies, S. M.; Heerdegen, A. P.; Ward, M. L.; Spence, P.; England, M. H.

    2017-05-01

    Improvements in the horizontal resolution of global ocean models, motivated by the horizontal resolution requirements for specific flow features, has advanced modelling capabilities into the dynamical regime dominated by mesoscale variability. In contrast, the choice of the vertical grid remains a subjective choice, and it is not clear that efforts to improve vertical resolution adequately support their horizontal counterparts. Indeed, considering that the bulk of the vertical ocean dynamics (including convection) are parameterized, it is not immediately obvious what the vertical grid is supposed to resolve. Here, we propose that the primary purpose of the vertical grid in a hydrostatic ocean model is to resolve the vertical structure of horizontal flows, rather than to resolve vertical motion. With this principle we construct vertical grids based on their abilities to represent baroclinic modal structures commensurate with the theoretical capabilities of a given horizontal grid. This approach is designed to ensure that the vertical grids of global ocean models complement (and, importantly, to not undermine) the resolution capabilities of the horizontal grid. We find that for z-coordinate global ocean models, at least 50 well-positioned vertical levels are required to resolve the first baroclinic mode, with an additional 25 levels per subsequent mode. High-resolution ocean-sea ice simulations are used to illustrate some of the dynamical enhancements gained by improving the vertical resolution of a 1/10° global ocean model. These enhancements include substantial increases in the sea surface height variance (∼30% increase south of 40°S), the barotropic and baroclinic eddy kinetic energies (up to 200% increase on and surrounding the Antarctic continental shelf and slopes), and the overturning streamfunction in potential density space (near-tripling of the Antarctic Bottom Water cell at 65°S).

  10. Seafloor 2030 - Building a Global Ocean Map through International Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrini, V. L.; Wigley, R. A.; Falconer, R. K. H.; Jakobsson, M.; Allen, G.; Mayer, L. A.; Schmitt, T.; Rovere, M.; Weatherall, P.; Marks, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    With more than 85% of the ocean floor unmapped, a huge proportion of our planet remains unexplored. Creating a comprehensive map of seafloor bathymetry remains a true global challenge that can only be accomplished through collaboration and partnership between governments, industry, academia, research organizations and non-government organizations. The objective of Seafloor 2030 is to comprehensively map the global ocean floor to resolutions that enable exploration and improved understanding of ocean processes, while informing maritime policy and supporting the management of natural marine resources for a sustainable Blue Economy. Seafloor 2030 is the outcome of the Forum for Future of Ocean Floor Mapping held in Monaco in June 2016, which was held under the auspices of GEBCO and the Nippon Foundation of Japan. GEBCO is the only international organization mandated to map the global ocean floor and is guided by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO. The task of completely mapping the ocean floor will require new global coordination to ensure that both existing data are identified and that new mapping efforts are coordinated to help efficiently "map the gaps." Fundamental to achieving Seafloor 2030 will be greater access to data, tools and technology, particularly for developing and coastal nations. This includes bathymetric post-processing and analysis software, database technology, computing infrastructure and gridding techniques as well as the latest developments in seafloor mapping methods and emerging crowd-sourced bathymetry initiatives. The key to achieving this global bathymetric map is capacity building and education - including greater coordination between scientific research and industry and the effective engagement of international organizations such as the United Nations.

  11. Decadal Changes in Global Ocean Annual Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson; Conkright, Margarita E.; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Ginoux, Paul; Casey, Nancy W.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) has produced the first multi-year time series of global ocean chlorophyll observations since the demise of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) in 1986. Global observations from 1997-present from SeaWiFS combined with observations from 1979-1986 from the CZCS should in principle provide an opportunity to observe decadal changes in global ocean annual primary production, since chlorophyll is the primary driver for estimates of primary production. However, incompatibilities between algorithms have so far precluded quantitative analysis. We have developed and applied compatible processing methods for the CZCS, using modern advances in atmospheric correction and consistent bio-optical algorithms to advance the CZCS archive to comparable quality with SeaWiFS. We applied blending methodologies, where in situ data observations are incorporated into the CZCS and SeaWiFS data records, to provide improvement of the residuals. These re-analyzed, blended data records provide maximum compatibility and permit, for the first time, a quantitative analysis of the changes in global ocean primary production in the early-to-mid 1980's and the present, using synoptic satellite observations. An intercomparison of the global and regional primary production from these blended satellite observations is important to understand global climate change and the effects on ocean biota. Photosynthesis by chlorophyll-containing phytoplankton is responsible for biotic uptake of carbon in the oceans and potentially ultimately from the atmosphere. Global ocean annual primary decreased from the CZCS record to SeaWiFS, by nearly 6% from the early 1980s to the present. Annual primary production in the high latitudes was responsible for most of the decadal change. Conversely, primary production in the low latitudes generally increased, with the exception of the tropical Pacific. The differences and similarities of the two data records provide evidence

  12. Perfluoroalkylated substances in the global tropical and subtropical surface oceans.

    PubMed

    González-Gaya, Belén; Dachs, Jordi; Roscales, Jose L; Caballero, Gemma; Jiménez, Begoña

    2014-11-18

    In this study, perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs) were analyzed in 92 surface seawater samples taken during the Malaspina 2010 expedition which covered all the tropical and subtropical Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. Nine ionic PFASs including C6-C10 perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs), C4 and C6-C8 perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs) and two neutral precursors perfluoroalkyl sulfonamides (PFASAs), were identified and quantified. The Atlantic Ocean presented the broader range in concentrations of total PFASs (131-10900 pg/L, median 645 pg/L, n = 45) compared to the other oceanic basins, probably due to a better spatial coverage. Total concentrations in the Pacific ranged from 344 to 2500 pg/L (median = 527 pg/L, n = 27) and in the Indian Ocean from 176 to 1976 pg/L (median = 329, n = 18). Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) was the most abundant compound, accounting for 33% of the total PFASs globally, followed by perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA, 22%) and perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA, 12%), being the rest of the individual congeners under 10% of total PFASs, even for perfluorooctane carboxylic acid (PFOA, 6%). PFASAs accounted for less than 1% of the total PFASs concentration. This study reports the ubiquitous occurrence of PFCAs, PFSAs, and PFASAs in the global ocean, being the first attempt, to our knowledge, to show a comprehensive assessment in surface water samples collected in a single oceanic expedition covering tropical and subtropical oceans. The potential factors affecting their distribution patterns were assessed including the distance to coastal regions, oceanic subtropical gyres, currents and biogeochemical processes. Field evidence of biogeochemical controls on the occurrence of PFASs was tentatively assessed considering environmental variables (solar radiation, temperature, chlorophyll a concentrations among others), and these showed significant correlations with some PFASs, but explaining small to moderate percentages of variability

  13. Global Ocean Sedimentation Patterns: Plate Tectonic History Versus Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, A.; Reynolds, E.; Olson, P.; Hinnov, L. A.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Global sediment data (Whittaker et al., 2013) and carbonate content data (Archer, 1996) allows examination of ocean sedimentation evolution with respect to age of the underlying ocean crust (Müller et al., 2008). From these data, we construct time series of ocean sediment thickness and carbonate deposition rate for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian ocean basins for the past 120 Ma. These time series are unique to each basin and reflect an integrated response to plate tectonics and climate change. The goal is to parameterize ocean sedimentation tied to crustal age for paleoclimate studies. For each basin, total sediment thickness and carbonate deposition rate from 0.1 x 0.1 degree cells are binned according to basement crustal age; area-corrected moments (mean, variance, etc.) are calculated for each bin. Segmented linear fits identify trends in present-day carbonate deposition rates and changes in ocean sedimentation from 0 to 120 Ma. In the North and South Atlantic and Indian oceans, mean sediment thickness versus crustal age is well represented by three linear segments, with the slope of each segment increasing with increasing crustal age. However, the transition age between linear segments varies among the three basins. In contrast, mean sediment thickness in the North and South Pacific oceans are numerically smaller and well represented by two linear segments with slopes that decrease with increasing crustal age. These opposing trends are more consistent with the plate tectonic history of each basin being the controlling factor in sedimentation rates, rather than climate change. Unlike total sediment thickness, carbonate deposition rates decrease smoothly with crustal age in all basins, with the primary controls being ocean chemistry and water column depth.References: Archer, D., 1996, Global Biogeochem. Cycles 10, 159-174.Müller, R.D., et al., 2008, Science, 319, 1357-1362.Whittaker, J., et al., 2013, Geochem., Geophys., Geosyst. DOI: 10.1002/ggge.20181

  14. The Systems and Global Engineering Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, Henry; Janosz, David A., Jr.; Maietta, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Systems and Global Engineering (SAGE) Project in which students collaborate with others from around the world to model solutions to some of today's most significant global problems. Stevens Institute of Technology and the New Jersey Technology Education Association (NJTEA) have teamed up to develop innovative…

  15. The Systems and Global Engineering Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, Henry; Janosz, David A., Jr.; Maietta, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Systems and Global Engineering (SAGE) Project in which students collaborate with others from around the world to model solutions to some of today's most significant global problems. Stevens Institute of Technology and the New Jersey Technology Education Association (NJTEA) have teamed up to develop innovative…

  16. Potential increasing dominance of heterotrophy in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvale, K. F.; Meissner, K. J.; Keller, D. P.

    2015-07-01

    Autotrophy is largely resource-limited in the modern ocean. Paleo evidence indicates this was not necessarily the case in warmer climates, and modern observations as well as standard metabolic theory suggest continued ocean warming could shift global ecology towards heterotrophy, thereby reducing autotrophic nutrient limitation. Such a shift would entail strong nutrient recycling in the upper ocean and high rates of net primary production (NPP), yet low carbon export to the deep ocean and sediments. We demonstrate transition towards such a state in the early 22nd century as a response to business-as-usual representative concentration pathway forcing (RCP8.5) in an intermediate complexity Earth system model in three configurations; with and without an explicit calcifier phytoplankton class and calcite ballast model. In all models nutrient regeneration in the near-surface becomes an increasingly important driver of primary production. The near-linear relationship between changes in NPP and global sea surface temperature (SST) found over the 21st century becomes exponential above a 2-4{ }\\circ {{C}} global mean SST change. This transition to a more heterotrophic ocean agrees roughly with metabolic theory.

  17. Global ocean conveyor lowers extinction risk in the deep sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, Lea-Anne; Frank, Norbert; Hebbeln, Dierk; Weinberg, Claudia; Robinson, Laura; van de Flierdt, Tina; Dahl, Mikael; Douarin, Melanie; Morrison, Cheryl; Correa, Matthias Lopez; Rogers, Alex D.; Ruckelshausen, Mario; Roberts, J. Murray

    2014-01-01

    General paradigms of species extinction risk are urgently needed as global habitat loss and rapid climate change threaten Earth with what could be its sixth mass extinction. Using the stony coral Lophelia pertusa as a model organism with the potential for wide larval dispersal, we investigated how the global ocean conveyor drove an unprecedented post-glacial range expansion in Earth׳s largest biome, the deep sea. We compiled a unique ocean-scale dataset of published radiocarbon and uranium-series dates of fossil corals, the sedimentary protactinium–thorium record of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) strength, authigenic neodymium and lead isotopic ratios of circulation pathways, and coral biogeography, and integrated new Bayesian estimates of historic gene flow. Our compilation shows how the export of Southern Ocean and Mediterranean waters after the Younger Dryas 11.6 kyr ago simultaneously triggered two dispersal events in the western and eastern Atlantic respectively. Each pathway injected larvae from refugia into ocean currents powered by a re-invigorated AMOC that led to the fastest postglacial range expansion ever recorded, covering 7500 km in under 400 years. In addition to its role in modulating global climate, our study illuminates how the ocean conveyor creates broad geographic ranges that lower extinction risk in the deep sea.

  18. Global ocean conveyor lowers extinction risk in the deep sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Lea-Anne; Frank, Norbert; Hebbeln, Dierk; Wienberg, Claudia; Robinson, Laura; van de Flierdt, Tina; Dahl, Mikael; Douarin, Mélanie; Morrison, Cheryl L.; López Correa, Matthias; Rogers, Alex D.; Ruckelshausen, Mario; Roberts, J. Murray

    2014-06-01

    General paradigms of species extinction risk are urgently needed as global habitat loss and rapid climate change threaten Earth with what could be its sixth mass extinction. Using the stony coral Lophelia pertusa as a model organism with the potential for wide larval dispersal, we investigated how the global ocean conveyor drove an unprecedented post-glacial range expansion in Earth's largest biome, the deep sea. We compiled a unique ocean-scale dataset of published radiocarbon and uranium-series dates of fossil corals, the sedimentary protactinium-thorium record of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) strength, authigenic neodymium and lead isotopic ratios of circulation pathways, and coral biogeography, and integrated new Bayesian estimates of historic gene flow. Our compilation shows how the export of Southern Ocean and Mediterranean waters after the Younger Dryas 11.6 kyr ago simultaneously triggered two dispersal events in the western and eastern Atlantic respectively. Each pathway injected larvae from refugia into ocean currents powered by a re-invigorated AMOC that led to the fastest postglacial range expansion ever recorded, covering 7500 km in under 400 years. In addition to its role in modulating global climate, our study illuminates how the ocean conveyor creates broad geographic ranges that lower extinction risk in the deep sea.

  19. Satellite-detected fluorescence reveals global physiology of ocean phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrenfeld, M. J.; Westberry, T. K.; Boss, E. S.; O'Malley, R. T.; Siegel, D. A.; Wiggert, J. D.; Franz, B. A.; McClain, C. R.; Feldman, G. C.; Doney, S. C.; Moore, J. K.; Dall'Olmo, G.; Milligan, A. J.; Lima, I.; Mahowald, N.

    2009-05-01

    Phytoplankton photosynthesis links global ocean biology and climate-driven fluctuations in the physical environment. These interactions are largely expressed through changes in phytoplankton physiology, but physiological status has proven extremely challenging to characterize globally. Phytoplankton fluorescence does provide a rich source of physiological information long exploited in laboratory and field studies, and is now observed from space. Here we evaluate the physiological underpinnings of global variations in satellite-based phytoplankton chlorophyll fluorescence. The three dominant factors influencing fluorescence distributions are chlorophyll concentration, pigment packaging effects on light absorption, and light-dependent energy-quenching processes. After accounting for these three factors, resultant global distributions of quenching-corrected fluorescence quantum yields reveal a striking consistency with anticipated patterns of iron availability. High fluorescence quantum yields are typically found in low iron waters, while low quantum yields dominate regions where other environmental factors are most limiting to phytoplankton growth. Specific properties of photosynthetic membranes are discussed that provide a mechanistic view linking iron stress to satellite-detected fluorescence. Our results present satellite-based fluorescence as a valuable tool for evaluating nutrient stress predictions in ocean ecosystem models and give the first synoptic observational evidence that iron plays an important role in seasonal phytoplankton dynamics of the Indian Ocean. Satellite fluorescence may also provide a path for monitoring climate-phytoplankton physiology interactions and improving descriptions of phytoplankton light use efficiencies in ocean productivity models.

  20. NOAA's Role in Sustaining Global Ocean Observations: Future Plans for OAR's Ocean Observing and Monitoring Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, James; Legler, David; Piotrowicz, Stephen; Raymond, Megan; Smith, Emily; Tedesco, Kathy; Thurston, Sidney

    2017-04-01

    The Ocean Observing and Monitoring Division (OOMD, formerly the Climate Observation Division) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Program Office provides long-term, high-quality global observations, climate information and products for researchers, forecasters, assessments and other users of environmental information. In this context, OOMD-supported activities serve a foundational role in an enterprise that aims to advance 1) scientific understanding, 2) monitoring and prediction of climate and 3) understanding of potential impacts to enable a climate resilient society. Leveraging approximately 50% of the Global Ocean Observing System, OOMD employs an internationally-coordinated, multi-institution global strategy that brings together data from multiple platforms including surface drifting buoys, Argo profiling floats, flux/transport moorings (RAMA, PIRATA, OceanSITES), GLOSS tide gauges, SOOP-XBT and SOOP-CO2, ocean gliders and repeat hydrographic sections (GO-SHIP). OOMD also engages in outreach, education and capacity development activities to deliver training on the social-economic applications of ocean data. This presentation will highlight recent activities and plans for 2017 and beyond.

  1. Cloud and ocean effects on global greenhouse warming

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffert, M.I.

    1991-02-01

    Six months into the above-referenced grant, we are making good progress on our research plan. We intend to develop a new generation of transient climate/ocean model capable of reflecting feedbacks associated with clouds and ocean dynamics, and to use them to better constrain the transient climate response to increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. This is a necessary step in quantifying the links between radiative forcing of the atmosphere and climate response on 10--100 year time scales. The modelling work involves, on the one hand, developing a better characterization of cloud forcing and feedback, and on the other, a new generation of ocean/climate model incorporating feedbacks from the changing stratification of the ocean as heat is absorbed during periods of global warming. 3 figs.

  2. Tsunami speed variations in density-stratified compressible global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watada, Shingo

    2013-08-01

    Tsunami speed variations in the deep ocean caused by seawater density stratification is investigated using a newly developed propagator matrix method that is applicable to seawater with depth-variable sound speeds and density gradients. For a 4 km deep ocean, the total tsunami speed reduction is 0.44% compared with incompressible homogeneous seawater; two thirds of the reduction is due to elastic energy stored in the water and one third is due to water density stratification mainly by hydrostatic compression. Tsunami speeds are computed for global ocean density and sound speed profiles, and characteristic structures are discussed. Tsunami speed reductions are proportional to ocean depth with small variations, except in warm Mediterranean seas. The impacts of seawater compressibility and the elasticity effect of the solid earth on tsunami traveltime should be included for precise modeling of transoceanic tsunamis.

  3. Intraseasonal oscillation in global ocean temperature inferred from Argo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ruijin; Wei, Meng

    2013-01-01

    The intraseasonal oscillation (ISO; 14-97-day periods) of temperature in the upper 2000 m of the global ocean was studied based on Argo observations from 2003-2008. It is shown that near the surface the ISO existed mainly in a band east of 60°E, between 10°S and 10°N, and the region around the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). At other levels analyzed, the ISOs also existed in the regions of the Kuroshio, the Gulf Stream, the Indonesian throughflow, the Somalia current, and the subtropical countercurrent (STCC) of the North Pacific. The intraseasonal signals can be seen even at depths of about 2000 m in some regions of the global ocean. The largest amplitude of ISO appeared at the thermocline of the equatorial Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Ocean, with maximum standard deviation (STD) exceeding 1.2°C. The ACC, the Kuroshio, and the Gulf Stream regions all exhibited large STD for all levels analyzed. Especially at 1000 m, the largest STD appeared in the south and southeast of South Africa-a part of the ACC, with a maximum value that reached 0.5°C. The ratios of the intraseasonal temperature variance to the total variance at 1000 m and at the equator indicated that, in a considerable part of the global deep ocean, the ISO was dominant in the variations of temperature, since such a ratio exceeded even 50% there. A case study also confirmed the existence of the ISO in the deep ocean. These results provide useful information for the design of field observations in the global ocean. Analysis and discussion are also given for the mechanism of the ISO.

  4. The global oxidation state of the upper oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, J.; Harris, M.; Coggon, R. M.; Alt, J.; Smith-Duque, C. E.; Teagle, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The oxidation state of the oceanic crust is an important component of the Earth system. The widespread oxidation of the crust is a major contributor to the redox state of the mantle due to the subduction of hydrothermally altered oceanic crust, which supplies 10 - 25 % of the net ferric iron flux to the global mantle Fe3+/FeTOT budget (Lécuyer and Ricard, 1999). Secondly, the degree of oxidation of the upper oceanic crust provides a measure of the biomass of microbial life sub-basement (Bach and Edwards, 2003). Thirdly, oxidation state analyses of oceanic basalt give information on the environment and relative timings of local hydrothermal alteration events. To date comprehensive measurements of Fe3+/FeTOT for the oceanic crust are lacking. Post crystallisation oxidation processes, occurring predominantly in the upper basaltic layers of the crust, elevate ratios of ferric to total iron (Fe3+/FeTOT) from mantle levels of 0.16 ± 0.01 (Cottrell and Kelley, 2011). Ferrous (Fe2+/) iron is oxidised to ferric (Fe3+/) iron during reaction with oxidised seawater, which circulates through oceanic crust for tens of millions of years following crustal formation. This study integrates published data with new analyses from six ocean crustal boreholes to categorise the global oxidation state of the upper crust. Samples range from <1 to 129 Ma, and represent basalt from medium to superfast spreading centres, depths between <100 - 2000 mbsf, and at a variety of sedimentary cover rates and thicknesses. Results show that by 1 Ma, the Fe3+/FeTOT ratio of the bulk crust is already raised to an average of 0.28 ± 0.07, implying that the oxidation state is established very early in the lifetime of the ocean crust. Post 1 Ma, Fe3+/FeTOT ratios are more variable, reflecting the effects of prolonged exposure to circulating seawater, but are on average ~0.35.

  5. Projecting global datasets to achieve equal areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Usery, E.L.; Finn, M.P.; Cox, J.D.; Beard, T.; Ruhl, S.; Bearden, M.

    2003-01-01

    Scientists routinely accomplish global modeling in the raster domain, but recent research has indicated that the transformation of large areas through map projection equations leads to errors. This research attempts to gauge the extent of map projection and resampling effects on the tabulation of categorical areas by comparing the results of three datasets for seven common projections. The datasets, Global Land Cover, Holdridge Life Zones, and Global Vegetation, were compiled at resolutions of 30 arc-second, 1/2 degree, and 1 degree, respectively. These datasets were projected globally from spherical coordinates to plane representations. Results indicate significant problems in the implementation of global projection transformations in commercial software, as well as differences in areal accuracy across projections. The level of raster resolution directly affects the accuracy of areal tabulations, with higher resolution yielding higher accuracy. If the raster resolution is high enough for individual pixels to approximate points, the areal error tends to zero. The 30-arc-second cells appear to approximate this condition.

  6. Patterns and Emerging Trends in Global Ocean Health

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Benjamin S.; Longo, Catherine; Lowndes, Julia S. Stewart; Best, Benjamin D.; Frazier, Melanie; Katona, Steven K.; Kleisner, Kristin M.; Rosenberg, Andrew A.; Scarborough, Courtney; Selig, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    International and regional policies aimed at managing ocean ecosystem health need quantitative and comprehensive indices to synthesize information from a variety of sources, consistently measure progress, and communicate with key constituencies and the public. Here we present the second annual global assessment of the Ocean Health Index, reporting current scores and annual changes since 2012, recalculated using updated methods and data based on the best available science, for 221 coastal countries and territories. The Index measures performance of ten societal goals for healthy oceans on a quantitative scale of increasing health from 0 to 100, and combines these scores into a single Index score, for each country and globally. The global Index score improved one point (from 67 to 68), while many country-level Index and goal scores had larger changes. Per-country Index scores ranged from 41–95 and, on average, improved by 0.06 points (range -8 to +12). Globally, average scores increased for individual goals by as much as 6.5 points (coastal economies) and decreased by as much as 1.2 points (natural products). Annual updates of the Index, even when not all input data have been updated, provide valuable information to scientists, policy makers, and resource managers because patterns and trends can emerge from the data that have been updated. Changes of even a few points indicate potential successes (when scores increase) that merit recognition, or concerns (when scores decrease) that may require mitigative action, with changes of more than 10–20 points representing large shifts that deserve greater attention. Goal scores showed remarkably little covariance across regions, indicating low redundancy in the Index, such that each goal delivers information about a different facet of ocean health. Together these scores provide a snapshot of global ocean health and suggest where countries have made progress and where a need for further improvement exists. PMID:25774678

  7. Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Alex J.

    2014-08-23

    The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  8. Integrated studies of uncultured microbes in the global ocean (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, C.; Rusch, D.; Martiny, A.; Lasken, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) initiative at the J. Craig Venter Institute represents the most extensive metagenomic study of a single environment. Early findings highlighted the potential of shotgun metagenomics to expand our knowledge of marine microbial biodiversity and physiology. However, it also became clear that many of the abundant marine microbes remain uncultured, hindering a direct connection between phylogeny and ecophysiology. In two recent studies, a combination of single cell genomics and aggressive assembly of binned metagenomic data have resulted in the acquisition of multiple genomes for two uncultured but globally relevant organisms. Metabolic reconstructions of the whole genomes revealed unique physiological adaptations in marine Prochlorococcus to high nutrient, low Fe regions of the global ocean and illuminated the potential ecological role of the gamma-proteobacterial 16S clade SAR86. The internal reference genomes also facilitate fragment recruitment based biogeographical studies, both at the whole genome level and the protein level.

  9. Impacts of data assimilation on the global ocean carbonate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinelli, L.; Masina, S.; Vichi, M.; Storto, A.; Lovato, T.

    2016-06-01

    In an ocean reanalysis, historical observations are combined with ocean and biogeochemical general circulation models to produce a reconstruction of the oceanic properties in past decades. This is one possible method to better constrain the role of the ocean carbon cycle in the determination of the air-sea CO2 flux. In this work, we investigate how the assimilation of physical variables and subsequently the combined assimilation of physical data and inorganic carbon variables - namely dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity - affect the modelling of the marine carbonate system and the related air-sea CO2 fluxes. The performance of the two assimilation exercises are quantitatively assessed against the assimilated DIC and alkalinity data and the independent ocean surface pCO2 observations from global datasets. We obtain that the assimilation of physical observations has contrasting effects in different ocean basins when compared with the DIC and alkalinity data: it reduces the root-mean square error against the observed pCO2 in the Atlantic and Southern oceans, while increases the model error in the North Pacific and Indian Oceans. In both cases the corrected evaporation rates are the major factor determining the changes in concentrations. The assimilation of inorganic carbon variables on top of the physical data gives a generalized improvement in the model error of inorganic carbon variables, also improving the annual mean and spatial distribution of air-sea fluxes in agreement with other published estimates. These results indicate that data assimilation of physical and inorganic carbon data does not guarantee the improvement of the simulated pCO2 in all the oceanic regions; nevertheless, errors in pCO2 are reduced by a factor corresponding to those associated with the air-sea flux formulations.

  10. The Mercator-Ocean Forecasting Service: a 4D vision of the Global Ocean, Serving the Ocean Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumazou, V.; Baudel, S.; Vinay, G.; Nouel, L.

    2005-12-01

    Mercator-Ocean is a public interest grouping formed in Toulouse in early 2002 by six major players in the French oceanography community: the space agency CNES, the scientific research centre CNRS, IFREMER (the institute of marine research and exploration), the development research institute IRD, the Meteo-France weather service, and SHOM (the French Navy's hydrography & oceanography department). In 1995, these same organizations gave themselves seven years to achieve a challenging objective: to conceive, develop and implement France's first operational oceanography system. The unique system would be capable of describing, analysing and predicting conditions at the ocean surface and subsurface in real time, anytime, anywhere in the world, even in the most inhospitable seas. That objective was met on 17 January 2001 with the release of the first Mercator ocean bulletin, providing a two-week forecast for the entire North Atlantic. Two thousands new forecast charts are now added to the MERCATOR bulletin every week. Building on these successes, a dedicated operational oceanography team, Mercator Ocean, was set up in 2002. Mercator-Ocean's mission is to deliver incremental improvements in the service provided by this new operational oceanography capability by increasing the resolution and the geographic coverage of the models used. The current high-resolution model offers a 6 km grid resolution, and the first models offering global ocean coverage has been implemented early 2004. A 1/4(°) model will be operated by the end of 2006. Objective 1- Develop an operational oceanography system using three-dimensional simulation and a high-resolution primitive-equation model capable of assimilating satellite data (from the Jason altimetry satellite in particular) and in-situ ocean observation data (particularly those gathered by the CORIOLIS centre). 2- Support applications for commercial shipping and naval forces, promote sustainable stewardship of the world's oceans

  11. Mercator-Ocean monitoring and forecasting : a 4D vision of the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahurel, P.; Toumazou, V.

    Mercator Ocean is a public interest grouping formed in Toulouse in early 2002 by six major players in the French oceanography community: the space agency CNES, the scientific research centre CNRS, IFREMER (the institute of marine research and exploration), the development research institute IRD, the Météo France weather service, and SHOM (the French Navy's hydrography & oceanography department). In 1995, these same organizations gave themselves seven years to achieve a challenging objective: to conceive, develop and implement France's first operational oceanography system. The unique system would be capable of describing, analysing and predicting conditions at the ocean surface and subsurface in real time, anytime, anywhere in the world, even in the most inhospitable seas. That objective was met on 17 January 2001 with the release of the first Mercator ocean bulletin, providing a two-week forecast for the entire North Atlantic. Two thousands new forecast charts are now added to the MERCATOR bulletin every week. Building on these successes, a dedicated operational oceanography team, Mercator Ocean, was set up in 2002. Mercator Ocean's mission is to deliver incremental improvements in the service provided by this new operational oceanography capability by increasing the resolution and the geographic coverage of the models used. The new high-resolution model that is now on line offers 6 km grid resolution, and the first models offering global ocean coverage will be implemented in 2004. Over the next four years, Mercator Ocean also plans to establish a European Operational Oceanography Centre in Toulouse. Objective 1. Develop an operational oceanography system using three-dimensional simulation and a high-resolution primitive-equation model capable of assimilating satellite data (from the Jason altimetry satellite in particular) and in-situ ocean observation data (particularly those gathered by the CORIOLIS centre). 2. Support applications for commercial shipping and

  12. Long-term changes in dissolved oxygen concentrations in the ocean caused by protracted global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matear, R. J.; Hirst, A. C.

    2003-12-01

    In the Earth's geological record massive marine ecological change has been attributed to the occurrence of widespread anoxia in the ocean [, 2002; , 2002; , 1996]. Climate change projection till the end of this century predict a 4 to 7% decline in the dissolve oxygen in the ocean [, 2002; , 2000; , 2001; , 1998] suggesting the potential for global warming to eventually drive the deep ocean anoxic. To examine the multicentury impact of protracted global warming on oceanic concentrations of dissolved oxygen, we use a climate system model and a low-order oceanic biogeochemical model. The models are integrated for an atmospheric equivalent CO2 concentration, which is specified to triple according to a standard scenario from the late nineteenth to the late twenty-first century, and then is subsequently held constant at that elevated level for an additional 6 centuries. For the present day, the model successfully reproduced the large-scale features of the dissolved oxygen field in the ocean. In the global warming simulation, the physical model displays marked changes in high-latitude oceanic stratification and overturning, including near-cessation of deep water renewal for depths greater than about 1.5 km during the period of elevated stable CO2 concentration. Our model predicts a decline in oxygen concentration through most of the subsurface ocean. Concentration changes in the thermocline waters result mainly from solubility changes in the upstream source waters, while changes in the deep waters result mainly from lack of ventilation and ongoing consumption of oxygen by remineralization of sinking particulate organic matter. Changes in the upper 2 km of the ocean generally show signs of equilibration by the end of the integration, but at greater depths, there occurs a slow but steady decline through to the end of the integration. By the end of the integration, we simulate a doubling of the volume of hypoxic water (less than 10 μmol/kg) in the thermocline of the eastern

  13. (The ocean's role in the global carbon cycle)

    SciTech Connect

    Joos, L.F.

    1990-12-20

    The traveler collaborated with Dr. J. L. Sarmiento of the Program in Atmospheric Sciences, Princeton University, and Dr. U. Siegenthaler of the University of Bern in box-model studies of the potential enhancement of oceanic CO{sub 2} uptake by fertilizing the southern ocean with iron. As a result of this collaboration, a letter describing the results was submitted to the journal Nature. Sensitivity studies were carried out to gain a better understanding of the processes involved for a hypothetical iron fertilization of the ocean. An article that describes this work has been submitted to the journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles. The traveler and U. Siegenthaler are preparing a journal article describing a box model of the global carbon cycle that is an extension of the one-dimensional box-diffusion model. The traveler attended Oceanography 590b at the University of Washington in Friday Harbor. While at Friday Harbor, he started to collaborate with Drs. M. Warner, R. Gammon, and J. Bullister, all from the University of Washington, Seattle, to calibrate the global carbon cycle model with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-11 and CFC-12. The traveler started collaboration with Drs. J. C. Orr and J. L. Sarmiento to calculate apparent eddy diffusivities from the Princeton three-dimensional ocean model. The work is conducted by the University of Bern, Switzerland (the traveler is principal investigator), for a US Department of Energy program managed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Moriarty, Róisín; Alvain, Séverine; Aumont, Olivier; Bopp, Laurent; Chollet, Sophie; Enright, Clare; Franklin, Daniel J.; Geider, Richard J.; Harrison, Sandy P.; Hirst, Andrew G.; Larsen, Stuart; Legendre, Louis; Platt, Trevor; Prentice, I. Colin; Rivkin, Richard B.; Sailley, Sévrine; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Stephens, Nick; Vogt, Meike; Vallina, Sergio M.

    2016-07-01

    Global ocean biogeochemistry models currently employed in climate change projections use highly simplified representations of pelagic food webs. These food webs do not necessarily include critical pathways by which ecosystems interact with ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Here we present a global biogeochemical model which incorporates ecosystem dynamics based on the representation of ten plankton functional types (PFTs): six types of phytoplankton, three types of zooplankton, and heterotrophic procaryotes. We improved the representation of zooplankton dynamics in our model through (a) the explicit inclusion of large, slow-growing macrozooplankton (e.g. krill), and (b) the introduction of trophic cascades among the three zooplankton types. We use the model to quantitatively assess the relative roles of iron vs. grazing in determining phytoplankton biomass in the Southern Ocean high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region during summer. When model simulations do not include macrozooplankton grazing explicitly, they systematically overestimate Southern Ocean chlorophyll biomass during the summer, even when there is no iron deposition from dust. When model simulations include a slow-growing macrozooplankton and trophic cascades among three zooplankton types, the high-chlorophyll summer bias in the Southern Ocean HNLC region largely disappears. Our model results suggest that the observed low phytoplankton biomass in the Southern Ocean during summer is primarily explained by the dynamics of the Southern Ocean zooplankton community, despite iron limitation of phytoplankton community growth rates. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean.

  15. Biogeochemical drivers of the fate of riverine mercury discharged to the global and Arctic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxu; Jacob, Daniel J.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Amos, Helen M.; Long, Michael S.; Sunderland, Elsie M.

    2015-06-01

    Rivers discharge 28 ± 13 Mmol yr-1 of mercury (Hg) to ocean margins, an amount comparable to atmospheric deposition to the global oceans. Most of the Hg discharged by rivers is sequestered by burial of benthic sediment in estuaries or the coastal zone, but some is evaded to the atmosphere and some is exported to the open ocean. We investigate the fate of riverine Hg by developing a new global 3-D simulation for Hg in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model. The model includes plankton dynamics and carbon respiration (DARWIN project model) coupled to inorganic Hg chemistry. Results are consistent with observed spatial patterns and magnitudes of surface ocean Hg concentrations. We use observational constraints on seawater Hg concentrations and evasion to infer that most Hg from rivers is sorbed to refractory organic carbon and preferentially buried. Only 6% of Hg discharged by rivers (1.8 Mmol yr-1) is transported to the open ocean on a global basis. This fraction varies from a low of 2.6% in East Asia due to the barrier imposed by the Korean Peninsula and Japanese archipelago, up to 25% in eastern North America facilitated by the Gulf Stream. In the Arctic Ocean, low tributary particle loads and efficient degradation of particulate organic carbon by deltaic microbial communities favor a more labile riverine Hg pool. Evasion of Hg to the Arctic atmosphere is indirectly enhanced by heat transport during spring freshet that accelerates sea ice melt and ice rafting. Discharges of 0.23 Mmol Hg yr-1 from Arctic rivers can explain the observed summer maximum in the Arctic atmosphere, and this magnitude of releases is consistent with recent observations. Our work indicates that rivers are major contributors to Hg loads in the Arctic Ocean.

  16. Potential Increasing Dominance of Heterotrophy in the Global Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvale, K.; Meissner, K. J.; Keller, D. P.

    2016-02-01

    Autotrophs are largely limited by resources in the modern ocean. However, standard metabolic theory suggests continued ocean warming could globally benefit heterotrophs, thereby reducing autotrophic nutrient limitation. The paleo record as well as modern observations offer evidence this has happened in the past and could happen again. Increasing dominance of heterotrophs would result in strong nutrient recycling in the upper ocean and high rates of net primary production (NPP), yet low carbon export to the deep ocean and sediments. We describe the transition towards such a state in the early 22nd century as a response to business-as-usual Representative Concentration Pathway forcing (RCP8.5) in an intermediate complexity Earth system model in three configurations: with and without an explicit calcifier phytoplankton class and calcite ballast model. In all models nutrient regeneration in the near surface becomes an increasingly important driver of primary production. The near-linear relationship between changes in NPP and global sea surface temperature (SST) found over the 21st century becomes exponential above a 2-4 °C global mean SST change. This transition to a more heterotrophic ocean agrees roughly with metabolic theory. Inclusion of small phytoplankton and calcifiers increase the model NPP:SST sensitivity because of their relatively higher nutrient affinity than general phytoplankton. Accounting for organic carbon "protected" from remineralization by carbonate ballast mitigates the exponential increase in NPP and provides an increasingly important pathway for deep carbon export with higher SST changes, despite simultaneous increasing carbonate dissolution rates due to ocean acidification.

  17. Coastal Ocean Response to the Global Warming Acceleration and Hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, E.; Lu, W.; Yan, X. H.; Jiang, Y.; Kidwell, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Coastlines are fundamental to humans for habitation, commerce, and natural resources. Many coastal ecosystem disasters, caused by extreme sea surface temperature (SST), were reported when the global climate shifted from global warming to global surface warming hiatus after 1998. The task of understanding the coastal SST variations within the global context is an urgent matter. Our study on the global coastal SST from 1982 to 2013 revealed a significant cooling trend in the low and mid latitudes (31.4% of the global coastlines) after 1998, while 17.9% of the global coastlines changed from a cooling trend to a warming trend concurrently. The reverse in the Northern Pacific and Atlantic coincided with the phase shift of Pacific Decadal Oscillation and North Atlantic Oscillation. These coastal SST changes are larger than the changes of the global mean and open ocean, resulting in a fast increase of extremely hot/cold days, and thus extremely hot/cold events. Meanwhile, a continuous increase of SST was detected for a considerable portion of coastlines (46.7%) with a strengthened warming along the coastlines in the high northern latitudes. Our results suggest that the global warming continued after 1998, but with a modified weaker pattern in global coastal regions.

  18. The role of Pacific Trade Wind trends in driving ocean heat uptake and global hiatuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Nicola; England, Matthew; Gupta, Alexander Sen; Spence, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Previous work has noted the importance of the tropical Pacific in modulating global temperatures and in offsetting anthropogenic surface warming over decadal periods. This project investigates the role of Pacific Trade Wind changes in modulating the exchange of heat into and out of the sub-surface tropical Pacific Ocean. In particular, the trade wind acceleration observed since the early 1990's is examined, with a focus on ocean heat uptake dynamics associated with phase changes of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). A number of simulations are performed in an eddy-permitting global ocean model (MOM5) coupled to a sea ice model (SIS). To examine the recent period, the ocean model is forced with atmospheric CORE normal year forcing, with the observed Pacific wind trend from 1992-2013 superimposed linearly over the tropical Pacific region. The role of seasonally varying wind trends is further investigated by running a second experiment with seasonally varying wind anomalies added in the Pacific. To investigate how and when the subducted heat might re-surfaces from the ocean interior in the future, additional experiments are performed that include a ramp down of the trade winds under a variety of scenarios to mimic a future phase change in the IPO. This work has implications for decadal predictions of future global climate change.

  19. A Global Ocean Circulation Model based on a Mimetic Discretization Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The new general circulation model of the global ocean ICON-O is introduced. ICON-O based on the Ocean Primitive Equations: the incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in vector invariant form with a free surface plus the hydrostatic and the Boussinesq approximation. The model solves the ocean primitive equations on a triangular icosahedral grid with C-type staggering. The models dynamical core as well as its parametrizations such as the mesoscale eddy parametrization of Gent-McWilliams use a coherent discretization that is based on a mimetic discretization approach. We describe the new disretization and some of its properties. A sequence of simulations is presented that range from idealized process studies to long-term global ocean simulations. The Max Planck Institute for Meteorology and the German Weather Service have been collaborating through the ICON project to develop new coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models for climate research and numerical weather forecasting. The model ICON-O is the ocean component of the ICON modeling system.

  20. Global ocean current reconstruction from altimetric and microwave SST measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Haro, C.; Isern-Fontanet, J.

    2014-06-01

    Ocean currents are a key component to understanding many oceanic and climatic phenomena and knowledge of them is crucial for both navigation and operational applications. Currently, they are derived from Sea Surface Height (SSH) measurements provided by altimeters. However, distances between tracks and the limited number of available altimeters lead to errors in the accurate location of oceanic currents. In this study, we investigate the capability of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations to reconstruct surface currents at a global scale. The methodology we use consists of estimating the stream function by taking the phase from SST and the spectrum of SSH and then comparing it with altimetric measurements. Results reveal that SST provided by microwave radiometers can be used to retrieve ocean currents during winter near the major extratropical current systems, which are characterized by an intense mesoscale activity and the presence of strong thermal gradients. We have also found that surface ocean current reconstruction based on Surface Quasi-Geostrophic approach can be improved if the information about the energy spectrum provided by altimeters is used. This points to the development of a new method of reconstructing ocean currents based on the combination of the phase of SST images with the energy spectrum derived from along-track altimetric measurements.

  1. Global declines in oceanic nitrification rates as a consequence of ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Beman, J. Michael; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane; King, Andrew L.; Feng, Yuanyuan; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Andersson, Andreas; Bates, Nicholas R.; Popp, Brian N.; Hutchins, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification produced by dissolution of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in seawater has profound consequences for marine ecology and biogeochemistry. The oceans have absorbed one-third of CO2 emissions over the past two centuries, altering ocean chemistry, reducing seawater pH, and affecting marine animals and phytoplankton in multiple ways. Microbially mediated ocean biogeochemical processes will be pivotal in determining how the earth system responds to global environmental change; however, how they may be altered by ocean acidification is largely unknown. We show here that microbial nitrification rates decreased in every instance when pH was experimentally reduced (by 0.05–0.14) at multiple locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Nitrification is a central process in the nitrogen cycle that produces both the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide and oxidized forms of nitrogen used by phytoplankton and other microorganisms in the sea; at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series and Hawaii Ocean Time-series sites, experimental acidification decreased ammonia oxidation rates by 38% and 36%. Ammonia oxidation rates were also strongly and inversely correlated with pH along a gradient produced in the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea (r2 = 0.87, P < 0.05). Across all experiments, rates declined by 8–38% in low pH treatments, and the greatest absolute decrease occurred where rates were highest off the California coast. Collectively our results suggest that ocean acidification could reduce nitrification rates by 3–44% within the next few decades, affecting oceanic nitrous oxide production, reducing supplies of oxidized nitrogen in the upper layers of the ocean, and fundamentally altering nitrogen cycling in the sea. PMID:21173255

  2. Importance of ice-ocean interactions for the global ocean circulation: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosse, H.; Fichefet, T.

    1999-10-01

    Numerical experiments are conducted with a coarse-resolution global ice-ocean model in order to determine to what degree the sea ice-ocean exchanges of heat, salt/freshwater, and momentum control the general circulation of the world ocean on long timescales. These experiments reveal that the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) in the model results from the strong heat losses that occur at the oceanic surface in the high-latitude North Atlantic. The large-scale ice-ocean interactions have nearly no influence on this process. In particular, neglecting the freshwater flux associated with the southward ice transport at Fram Strait does not impact seriously on the salinity of the Greenland and Norwegian Seas. At equilibrium the absence of this freshwater flux is balanced by an enhanced oceanic freshwater transport from the Arctic. Furthermore, it appears that the model NADW formation does not critically depend on the media (ice or ocean) transporting the freshwater. Besides, both the salt/freshwater and heat exchanges between sea ice and ocean are crucial in the Southern Ocean for the deep water production, properties, and export. The large amount of brine released during ice formation on the model Antarctic continental shelf leads to very high salinities there. The resulting dense shelf waters are then transported toward great depths after some mixing with ambient waters, finally forming the Antarctic Bottom Water body. On the other hand, the net ice melting associated with ice convergence in some areas, such as the southwestern Pacific, stabilizes the water column and forbids deep mixing in these regions. Furthermore, the contact with the ice imposes that the polar surface waters must be maintained very close to their freezing point temperature. Our results suggest that this process takes an important part in increasing the density of the Antarctic Bottom Water. We also show that the modifications of the stress at the ocean surface induced by the internal

  3. Global declines in oceanic nitrification rates as a consequence of ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Beman, J Michael; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane; King, Andrew L; Feng, Yuanyuan; Fuhrman, Jed A; Andersson, Andreas; Bates, Nicholas R; Popp, Brian N; Hutchins, David A

    2011-01-04

    Ocean acidification produced by dissolution of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions in seawater has profound consequences for marine ecology and biogeochemistry. The oceans have absorbed one-third of CO(2) emissions over the past two centuries, altering ocean chemistry, reducing seawater pH, and affecting marine animals and phytoplankton in multiple ways. Microbially mediated ocean biogeochemical processes will be pivotal in determining how the earth system responds to global environmental change; however, how they may be altered by ocean acidification is largely unknown. We show here that microbial nitrification rates decreased in every instance when pH was experimentally reduced (by 0.05-0.14) at multiple locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Nitrification is a central process in the nitrogen cycle that produces both the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide and oxidized forms of nitrogen used by phytoplankton and other microorganisms in the sea; at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series and Hawaii Ocean Time-series sites, experimental acidification decreased ammonia oxidation rates by 38% and 36%. Ammonia oxidation rates were also strongly and inversely correlated with pH along a gradient produced in the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea (r(2) = 0.87, P < 0.05). Across all experiments, rates declined by 8-38% in low pH treatments, and the greatest absolute decrease occurred where rates were highest off the California coast. Collectively our results suggest that ocean acidification could reduce nitrification rates by 3-44% within the next few decades, affecting oceanic nitrous oxide production, reducing supplies of oxidized nitrogen in the upper layers of the ocean, and fundamentally altering nitrogen cycling in the sea.

  4. NROSS scatterometer - An instrument for global oceanic wind observations. [Navy Remote Ocean Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, F.; Winn, C.; Long, D.; Geuy, C.

    1984-01-01

    One of the instruments - the NROSS scatterometer or SCATT - to be launched on the Navy Remote Ocean Sensing System spacecraft in 1989 is discussed. To determine wind speed and direction that SCATT will measure the ocean normalized radar cross section (NRCS) by illuminating the ocean's surface with microwave pulses and measuring the return signal power. A wind retrieval algorithm is used to compute the wind speed and direction from the measured NRCS. Winds over at least 90 percent of the global, ice-free ocean will be observed at least once every two days. For NASA users, the system will retrieve winds with an accuracy of plus or minus 2 m/s or 10 percent whichever is greater, for wind speeds ranging from 3 to 30 m/s.

  5. A Coupled Ocean General Circulation, Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model of the Global Oceans: Seasonal Distributions of Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Busalacchi, Antonio (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ocean general circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. Biogeochemical processes in the model are determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability. and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms. chlorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Basin scale (greater than 1000 km) model chlorophyll results are in overall agreement with CZCS pigments in many global regions. Seasonal variability observed in the CZCS is also represented in the model. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of imagery are generally in conformance although occasional departures are apparent. Model nitrate distributions agree with in situ data, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The overall agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicates that the model dynamics offer a reasonably realistic simulation of phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on synoptic scales. This is especially true given that initial conditions are homogenous chlorophyll fields. The success of the model in producing a reasonable representation of chlorophyll and nutrient distributions and seasonal variability in the global oceans is attributed to the application of a generalized, processes-driven approach as opposed to regional parameterization and the existence of multiple phytoplankton groups with different physiological and physical properties. These factors enable the model to simultaneously represent many aspects of the great diversity of physical, biological, chemical, and radiative environments encountered in the global oceans.

  6. Validation of High Resolution IMERG Satellite Precipitation over the Global Oceans using OceanRAIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, Paul; Klepp, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Precipitation is a key parameter of the essential climate variables in the Earth System that is a key variable in the global water cycle. Observations of precipitation over oceans is relatively sparse. Satellite observations over oceans is the only viable means of measuring the spatially distribution of precipitation. In an effort to improve global precipitation observations, the research community has developed a state of the art precipitation dataset as part of the NASA/JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) program. The satellite gridded product that has been developed is called Integrated Multi-satelliE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG), which has a maximum spatial resolution of 0.1° x 0.1° and temporal 30 minute. Even with the advancements in retrievals, there is a need to quantify uncertainty of IMERG especially over oceans. To address this need, the OceanRAIN dataset has been used to create a comprehensive database to compare IMERG products. The OceanRAIN dataset was collected using an ODM-470 optical disdrometer that has been deployed on 12 research vessels worldwide with 6 long-term installations operating in all climatic regions, seasons and ocean basins. More than 5.5 million data samples have been collected on the OceanRAIN program. These data were matched to IMERG grids for the study period of 15 March 2014-31 January 2016. This evaluation produced over a 1000 matched pairs with precipitation observed at the surface. These matched pairs were used to evaluate the performance of IMERG for different latitudinal bands and precipitation regimes. The presentation will provide an overview of the study and summary of evaluation results.

  7. NASA Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project. Report 1; Data Processing Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, C. J.; Beckley, Brian D.; Ray, Richard D.; Wang, Yan-Ming; Tsaoussi, Lucia; Brenner, Anita; Williamson, Ron

    1998-01-01

    The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder program was created by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program Office to determine how satellite-based data sets can be processed and used to study global change. The data sets are designed to be long time-sedes data processed with stable calibration and community consensus algorithms to better assist the research community. The Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project involves the reprocessing of all altimeter observations with a consistent set of improved algorithms, based on the results from TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P), into easy-to-use data sets for the oceanographic community for climate research. This report describes the processing schemes used to produce a consistent data set and two of the products derived f rom these data. Other reports have been produced that: a) describe the validation of these data sets against tide gauge measurements and b) evaluate the statistical properties of the data that are relevant to climate change. The use of satellite altimetry for earth observations was proposed in the early 1960s. The first successful space based radar altimeter experiment was flown on SkyLab in 1974. The first successful satellite radar altimeter was flown aboard the Geos-3 spacecraft between 1975 and 1978. While a useful data set was collected from this mission for geophysical studies, the noise in the radar measured and incomplete global coverage precluded ft from inclusion in the Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder program. This program initiated its analysis with the Seasat mission, which was the first satellite radar altimeter flown for oceanography.

  8. Sources of uncertainties in 21st century projections of potential ocean ecosystem stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frölicher, Thomas L.; Rodgers, Keith B.; Stock, Charles A.; Cheung, William W. L.

    2016-08-01

    Future projections of potential ocean ecosystem stressors, such as acidification, warming, deoxygenation, and changes in ocean productivity, are uncertain due to incomplete understanding of fundamental processes, internal climate variability, and divergent carbon emission scenarios. This complicates climate change impact assessments. We evaluate the relative importance of these uncertainty sources in projections of potential stressors as a function of projection lead time and spatial scale. Internally generated climate variability is the dominant source of uncertainty in middle-to-low latitudes and in most coastal large marine ecosystems over the next few decades, suggesting irreducible uncertainty inherent in these short projections. Uncertainty in projections of century-scale global sea surface temperature (SST), global thermocline oxygen, and regional surface pH is dominated by scenario uncertainty, highlighting the critical importance of policy decisions on carbon emissions. In contrast, uncertainty in century-scale projections of net primary productivity, low-oxygen waters, and Southern Ocean SST is dominated by model uncertainty, underscoring that the importance of overcoming deficiencies in scientific understanding and improved process representation in Earth system models are critical for making more robust projections these potential stressors. We also show that changes in the combined potential stressors emerge from the noise in 39% (34-44%) of the ocean by 2016-2035 relative to the 1986-2005 reference period and in 54% (50-60%) of the ocean by 2076-2095 following a high-carbon emission scenario. Projected large changes in surface pH and SST can be reduced substantially and rapidly with aggressive carbon emission mitigation but only marginally for oxygen. The regional importance of model uncertainty and internal variability underscores the need for expanded and improved multimodel and large initial condition ensemble projections with Earth system models

  9. The dependence of global ocean modeling on background diapycnal mixing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zengan

    2014-01-01

    The Argo-derived background diapycnal mixing (BDM) proposed by Deng et al. (in publish) is introduced to and applied in Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Sensitive experiments are carried out using HYCOM to detect the responses of ocean surface temperature and Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) to BDM in a global context. Preliminary results show that utilizing a constant BDM, with the same order of magnitude as the realistic one, may cause significant deviation in temperature and MOC. It is found that the dependence of surface temperature and MOC on BDM is prominent. Surface temperature is decreased with the increase of BDM, because diapycnal mixing can promote the deep cold water return to the upper ocean. Comparing to the control run, more striking MOC changes can be caused by the larger variation in BDM.

  10. NASA Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project. Report 2; Data Set Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, C. J.; Ray, Richard D.; Beckley, Brian D.; Bremmer, Anita; Tsaoussi, Lucia S.; Wang, Yan-Ming

    1999-01-01

    The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder program was created by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program Office to determine how existing satellite-based data sets can be processed and used to study global change. The data sets are designed to be long time-series data processed with stable calibration and community consensus algorithms to better assist the research community. The Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project involves the reprocessing of all altimeter observations with a consistent set of improved algorithms, based on the results from TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P), into easy-to-use data sets for the oceanographic community for climate research. Details are currently presented in two technical reports: Report# 1: Data Processing Handbook Report #2: Data Set Validation This report describes the validation of the data sets against a global network of high quality tide gauge measurements and provides an estimate of the error budget. The first report describes the processing schemes used to produce the geodetic consistent data set comprised of SEASAT, GEOSAT, ERS-1, TOPEX/ POSEIDON, and ERS-2 satellite observations.

  11. Intercomparison of Latent Heat Fluxes Over Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Nelkin, Eric; Ardizzone, Joe; Atlas, Robert M.; Chou, Ming-Dah

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of momentum, moisture, and heat at the air-sea interface are essential for climate studies. Version 2 Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF2) has been derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) radiance measurements. This dataset, covering the period July 1987-December 2000 over global oceans, has a spatial resolution of 1 deg x 1 deg lat-long and a temporal resolution of 1 day. Turbulent fluxes are derived from the SSM/I surface winds and surface air humidity, as well as the 2-m air and sea surface temperatures (SST) of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, using a bulk aerodynamic algorithm based on the surface layer similarity theory. The GSSTF2 bulk flux model, and retrieved daily wind stress, latent heat flux, wind speed, and surface air humidity validate well with ship observations of ten field experiments over the tropical and midlatitude oceans during 1991-99. The global distributions of 1988-2000 annual- and seasonal-mean turbulent fluxes show reasonable patterns related to the atmospheric general circulation and seasonal variations. Latent heat fluxes and related input parameters over global oceans during 1992-93 have been compared among GSSTF1 (version 1), GSSTF2, HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data), NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, and one based on COADS (Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set). Our analyses suggest that the GSSTF2 latent heat flux, surface air humidity, surface wind, and SST are quite realistic compared to the other four flux datasets examined. However, significant differences are found among these five flux datasets. The GSSTF2, available at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/CAMPAIGN_DOCS/hydrology/hd_gsstf2.O.html, is useful for climate studies.

  12. Climatological distribution of aragonite saturation state in the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li-Qing; Feely, Richard A.; Carter, Brendan R.; Greeley, Dana J.; Gledhill, Dwight K.; Arzayus, Krisa M.

    2015-10-01

    Aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) in surface and subsurface waters of the global oceans was calculated from up-to-date (through the year of 2012) ocean station dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) data. Surface Ωarag in the open ocean was always supersaturated (Ω > 1), ranging between 1.1 and 4.2. It was above 2.0 (2.0-4.2) between 40°N and 40°S but decreased toward higher latitude to below 1.5 in polar areas. The influences of water temperature on the TA/DIC ratio, combined with the temperature effects on inorganic carbon equilibrium and apparent solubility product (K'sp), explain the latitudinal differences in surface Ωarag. Vertically, Ωarag was highest in the surface mixed layer. Higher hydrostatic pressure, lower water temperature, and more CO2 buildup from biological activity in the absence of air-sea gas exchange helped maintain lower Ωarag in the deep ocean. Below the thermocline, aerobic decomposition of organic matter along the pathway of global thermohaline circulation played an important role in controlling Ωarag distributions. Seasonally, surface Ωarag above 30° latitudes was about 0.06 to 0.55 higher during warmer months than during colder months in the open-ocean waters of both hemispheres. Decadal changes of Ωarag in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans showed that Ωarag in waters shallower than 100 m depth decreased by 0.10 ± 0.09 (-0.40 ± 0.37% yr-1) on average from the decade spanning 1989-1998 to the decade spanning 1998-2010.

  13. Global negative emissions capacity of ocean macronutrient fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Daniel P.

    2017-03-01

    In order to meet the goal of limiting global average temperature increase to less than 2 °C, it is increasingly apparent that negative emissions technologies of up to 10 Pg C yr‑1 will be needed before the end of the century. Recent research indicates that fertilization of the ocean with the macronutrients nitrogen and phosphorus where they limit primary production, may have sequestration advantages over fertilizing iron limited regions. Utilizing global datasets of oceanographic field measurements, and output from a high resolution global circulation model, the current study provides the first comprehensive assessment of the global potential for carbon sequestration from ocean macronutrient fertilization (OMF). Sufficient excess phosphate exists outside the iron limited surface ocean to support once-off sequestration of up to 3.6 Pg C by fertilization with nitrogen. Ongoing maximum capacity of nitrogen only fertilization is estimated at 0.7 ± 0.4 Pg C yr‑1. Sequestration capacity is expected to decrease from the upper toward the lower bound over time under continued intense fertilization. If N and P were used in combination the capacity is ultimately limited by societies willingness to utilize phosphate resources. Doubling current phosphate production would allow an additional 0.9 Pg C yr‑1 and consume 0.07% yr‑1 of known global resources. Therefore offsetting up to around 15% (1.5 Pg C yr‑1) of annual global CO2 emissions is assessed as being technically plausible. Environmental risks which to date have received little quantitative evaluation, could also limit the scale of implementation. These results reinforce the need to consider a multi-faceted approach to greenhouse gasses, including a reduction in emissions coupled with further research into negative emissions technologies.

  14. Enceladus's measured physical libration requires a global subsurface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. C.; Tajeddine, R.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Burns, J. A.; Joseph, J.; Loredo, T. J.; Helfenstein, P.; Porco, C.

    2016-01-01

    Several planetary satellites apparently have subsurface seas that are of great interest for, among other reasons, their possible habitability. The geologically diverse saturnian satellite Enceladus vigorously vents liquid water and vapor from fractures within a south polar depression and thus must have a liquid reservoir or active melting. However, the extent and location of any subsurface liquid region is not directly observable. We use measurements of control points across the surface of Enceladus accumulated over seven years of spacecraft observations to determine the satellite's precise rotation state, finding a forced physical libration of 0.120 ± 0.014° (2σ). This value is too large to be consistent with Enceladus's core being rigidly connected to its surface, and thus implies the presence of a global ocean rather than a localized polar sea. The maintenance of a global ocean within Enceladus is problematic according to many thermal models and so may constrain satellite properties or require a surprisingly dissipative Saturn.

  15. A daily global mesoscale ocean eddy dataset from satellite altimetry

    PubMed Central

    Faghmous, James H.; Frenger, Ivy; Yao, Yuanshun; Warmka, Robert; Lindell, Aron; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale ocean eddies are ubiquitous coherent rotating structures of water with radial scales on the order of 100 kilometers. Eddies play a key role in the transport and mixing of momentum and tracers across the World Ocean. We present a global daily mesoscale ocean eddy dataset that contains ~45 million mesoscale features and 3.3 million eddy trajectories that persist at least two days as identified in the AVISO dataset over a period of 1993–2014. This dataset, along with the open-source eddy identification software, extract eddies with any parameters (minimum size, lifetime, etc.), to study global eddy properties and dynamics, and to empirically estimate the impact eddies have on mass or heat transport. Furthermore, our open-source software may be used to identify mesoscale features in model simulations and compare them to observed features. Finally, this dataset can be used to study the interaction between mesoscale ocean eddies and other components of the Earth System. PMID:26097744

  16. Ocean Biogeochemistry and Phytoplankton Ecology in a Global Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. K.; Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, K.

    2005-05-01

    A coupled Biogeochemistry/Ecosystem/Circulation (BEC) model is used to examine ocean biogeochemistry and phytoplankton ecology at the global scale. Phytoplankton groups represented in the model include diatoms, diazotrophs, coccolithophores and picoplankton. The groups experience differential grazing pressure and compete for light and the potentially growth-limiting nutrients iron, nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, and silicate. The model includes several key aspects of the global nitrogen cycle including nitrogen fixation (by the diazotrophs), water column denitrification under low oxygen conditions, and atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the oceans. We examine how these nitrogen fluxes influence ecosystem structure and also how light and nutrient availability restrict phytoplankton growth rates over seasonal timescales. Atmospheric deposition of mineral dust also inputs dissolved iron to the ocean model. These iron additions modify phytoplankton community composition, and rates of production and export in the iron-limited High Nitrate, Low Chlorophyll regions, and indirectly modify ecosystem dynamics by altering rates of nitrogen fixation in nitrogen-depleted, tropical and subtropical regions. We will examine the links between dust/iron deposition and nitrogen cycling in the oceans.

  17. The new automatic precipitation phase distinction algorithm for OceanRAIN data over the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdanowitz, Jörg; Klepp, Christian; Bakan, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The hitherto lack of surface precipitation data over the global ocean limits the capabilities to validate recent and future precipitation satellite retrievals. The first systematic ship-based surface precipitation data set OceanRAIN (Ocean Rain And Ice-phase precipitation measurement Network) aims at providing in-situ precipitation data through particle size distributions (PSDs) from optical disdrometers deployed on research vessels (RVs). From the RV Polarstern, OceanRAIN currently contains more than four years of 1-minute resolution precipitation data, which corresponds to more than 200,000 minutes of precipitation. The calculation of the precipitation rate requires to know the precipitation phase (PP) of the falling particles. We develop a novel algorithm to automatically retrieve the PP using OceanRAIN data and ancillary meteorological measurements from RVs. The main objective is to improve accuracy and efficiency of the current time-consuming manual method of discriminating liquid and solid precipitation particles. The new PP distinction algorithm is based on the relation of air temperature and relative humidity (T-rH) with respect to PP. For first-time usage over oceanic areas, the land-retrieved coefficients of this empirical relationship are adjusted to OceanRAIN data. The measured PSD supports determining the PP in certain cases where large snow aggregates exist at distinctly positive air temperatures. The classification, based on T-rH and PSD, is statistically exploited and weighed with respect to the current weather conditions to obtain an overall PP probability at 1-minute resolution. The new PP distinction algorithm agrees in more than 92% (94% excl. mixed-phase) of precipitating cases with the manually-determined PP in the RV Polarstern data. The PP distinction algorithm complements the valuable information of OceanRAIN surface precipitation over the ocean.

  18. Satellite-Based Daily SSTs Over the Global Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-03

    combination of optimal interpolation and climatologically corrected persistence balances eddy resolving spatial and daily temporal resolution with improved...SST fields over the global resolving spatial and daily temporal resolution with ocean on time scales ranging from daily to annual from improved...measurements, drifting buoys, etc., do not provide enough [6] The AVHRR sensor is sensitive to the presence of spatial and temporal coverage over the

  19. Why ocean heat transport warms the global mean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herweijer, Celine; Seager, Richard; Winton, Michael; Clement, Amy

    2005-08-01

    Observational and modelling evidence suggest that poleward ocean heat transport (OHT) can vary in response to both natural climate variability and greenhouse warming. Recent modelling studies have shown that increased OHT warms both the tropical and global mean climates. Using two different coupled climate models with mixed-layer oceans, with and without OHT, along with a coupled model with a fixed-current ocean component in which the currents are uniformly reduced and increased by 50%, an attempt is made to explain why this may happen.OHT warms the global mean climate by 1 to 1.6K in the atmospheric general circulation (AGCM) ML model and 3.5K in the AGCM fixed current model. In each model the warming is attributed to an increase in atmospheric greenhouse trapping, primarily clear-sky greenhouse trapping, and a reduction in albedo. This occurs as OHT moistens the atmosphere, particularly at subtropical latitudes. This is not purely a thermodynamic response to the reduction in planetary albedo at these latitudes. It is a change in atmospheric circulation that both redistributes the water vapour and allows for a global atmospheric moistening—a positive 'dynamical' water vapour feedback. With increasing OHT the atmospheric water vapour content increases as atmospheric convection spreads out of the deep tropics. The global mean planetary albedo is decreased with increased OHT. This change is explained by a decrease in subtropical and mid-latitude low cloudiness, along with a reduction in high-latitude surface albedo due to decreased sea ice. The climate models with the mixed layer oceans underestimate both the subtropical low cloud cover and the high-latitude sea ice/surface albedo, and consequently have a smaller warming response to OHT.

  20. A Southern Ocean variability study using the Argo-based Model for Investigation of the Global Ocean (AMIGO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Konstantin

    2017-04-01

    The era of satellite observations of the ocean surface that started at the end of the 20th century and the development of the Argo project in the first years of the 21st century, designed to collect information of the upper 2000 m of the ocean using satellites, provides unique opportunities for continuous monitoring of the Global Ocean state. Starting from 2005, measurements with the Argo floats have been performed over the majority of the World Ocean. In November 2007, the Argo program reached coverage of 3000 simultaneously operating floats (one float in a three-degree square) planned during the development of the program. Currently, 4000 Argo floats autonomously profile the upper 2000-m water column of the ocean from Antarctica to Spitsbergen increasing World Ocean temperature and salinity databases by 12000 profiles per month. This makes it possible to solve problems on reconstructing and monitoring the ocean state on an almost real-time basis, study the ocean dynamics, obtain reasonable estimates of the climatic state of the ocean in the last decade and estimate existing intraclimatic trends. We present the newly developed Argo-Based Model for Investigation of the Global Ocean (AMIGO), which consists of a block for variational interpolation of the profiles of drifting Argo floats to a regular grid and a block for model hydrodynamic adjustment of variationally interpolated fields. Such a method makes it possible to obtain a full set of oceanographic characteristics - temperature, salinity, density, and current velocity - using irregularly located Argo measurements (the principle of the variational interpolation technique entails minimization of the misfit between the interpolated fields defined on the regular grid and irregularly distributed data; hence the optimal solution passes as close to the data as possible). The simulations were performed for the entire globe limited in the north by 85.5° N using 1° grid spacing in both longitude and latitude. At the

  1. Energetics of global ocean tides from Geosat altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, David E.; Ray, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    The present paper focuses on resonance and energetics of the daily tides, especially in the southern ocean, the distribution of gravitational power input of daily and half-daily tides, and comparison with other estimates of global dissipation rates. The present global tidal maps, derived from Geosat altimetry, compare favorably with ground truth data at about the same rms level as the models of Schwiderski (1983), and are slightly better in lunar than in solar tides. Diurnal admittances clearly show Kelvin wave structure in the southern ocean and confirm the resonant mode of Platzman (1984) at 28.5 + or - 0.1 hr with an apparent Q of about 4. Driving energy is found to enter dominantly in the North Pacific for the daily tides and is strongly peaked in the tropical oceans for the half-daily tides. Global rates of working on all major tide constituents except S2 agree well with independent results from analyses of gravity through satellite tracking. Comparison at S2 is improved by allowing for the air tide in gravitational results but suggests deficiencies in all solar tide models.

  2. Interannual and Spatial Variability of Global Ocean Heat/Freshwater Content Identified from GTSPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, P. C.; Sun, C.

    2013-12-01

    Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) is a cooperative international project since 1990. The GTSPP handles all temperature and salinity profile data including XBT, CTDs, thermistor chain data, and Argo observations. Near-real time gridded (T, S) dataset was established from GTSPP since 1990 with horizontal resolution of (1o×1o) and temporal increment of 1 month using the recently developed optimal spectral decomposition (OSD) method. With this new monthly varying gridded dataset, the upper ocean (surface to 300 m depth) heat content OHC300 and freshwater content FWC300 were calculated at each horizontal grid point. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was conducted on the temporally varying global 2D OHC300 anomaly relative to its seasonal variation. A new phenomenon, global ocean tripole, was discovered. The EOF-1 mode (44.2% variance) represents the classical El Nino/La Nina phenomenon. The EOF-2 mode (14.6%) represents the Indian Ocean Dipole mode and the El Nino Modoki. Its features and connection to climate variability is also discussed. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was conducted on the temporally varying global 2D FWC300 anomaly relative to its seasonal variation. The EOF-1 mode (73.7% variance) represents near global-scale variability with the largest anomaly appearing in the Indian Ocean near southeast of Africa. The first principal component (PC1) shows decadal variability. The temporal-spatial variability represented by the EOF-1 mode shows rapid increasing of global FWC300 from 1999 to 2005 and sustaining the high values after 2005. Interpretations of the observational results to recent global warming will also be presented.

  3. El Nino and the Global Ocean Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David

    1999-01-01

    Until a decade ago, an often-quoted expression in oceanography is that very few observations are recorded throughout the ocean. Now, the sentiment is no longer valid in the uppermost 10% of the tropical Pacific Ocean nor at the surface of the global ocean. One of the remarkable legacies of the 1985-1994 Tropical Oceans Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Program is an in situ marine meteorological and upper oceanographic measurement array throughout the equatorial Pacific to monitor the development and maintenance of El Nino episodes. The TOGA Observing System, which initially consisted of moored- and drifting-buoy arrays, a network of commercial ships, and coastal and island stations, now includes a constellation of satellites and data-assimilating models to simulate subsurface oceanographic conditions. The El Nino and La Nina tropical Pacific Ocean observing system represents the initial phase of an integrated global ocean observing system. Remarkable improvements have been made in ocean model simulation of subsurface currents, but some problems persist. For example, the simulation of the South Equatorial Current (SEC) remains an important challenge in the 2S-2N Pacific equatorial wave guide. During El Nino the SEC at the equator is reduced and sometimes the direction is reversed, becoming eastward. Both conditions allow warm water stored in the western Pacific to invade the eastern region, creating an El Nino episode. Assimilation of data is a tenet of faith to correct simulation errors caused by deficiencies in surface fluxes (especially wind stress) and parameterizations of subgrid-scale physical processes. In the first of two numerical experiments, the Pacific SEC was simulated with and without assimilation of subsurface temperature data. Along the equator, a very weak SEC occurred throughout the eastern Pacific, independent of assimilation of data. However, as displayed in the diagram, in the western Pacific there was no satisfactory agreement between the two

  4. El Nino and the Global Ocean Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David

    1999-01-01

    Until a decade ago, an often-quoted expression in oceanography is that very few observations are recorded throughout the ocean. Now, the sentiment is no longer valid in the uppermost 10% of the tropical Pacific Ocean nor at the surface of the global ocean. One of the remarkable legacies of the 1985-1994 Tropical Oceans Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Program is an in situ marine meteorological and upper oceanographic measurement array throughout the equatorial Pacific to monitor the development and maintenance of El Nino episodes. The TOGA Observing System, which initially consisted of moored- and drifting-buoy arrays, a network of commercial ships, and coastal and island stations, now includes a constellation of satellites and data-assimilating models to simulate subsurface oceanographic conditions. The El Nino and La Nina tropical Pacific Ocean observing system represents the initial phase of an integrated global ocean observing system. Remarkable improvements have been made in ocean model simulation of subsurface currents, but some problems persist. For example, the simulation of the South Equatorial Current (SEC) remains an important challenge in the 2S-2N Pacific equatorial wave guide. During El Nino the SEC at the equator is reduced and sometimes the direction is reversed, becoming eastward. Both conditions allow warm water stored in the western Pacific to invade the eastern region, creating an El Nino episode. Assimilation of data is a tenet of faith to correct simulation errors caused by deficiencies in surface fluxes (especially wind stress) and parameterizations of subgrid-scale physical processes. In the first of two numerical experiments, the Pacific SEC was simulated with and without assimilation of subsurface temperature data. Along the equator, a very weak SEC occurred throughout the eastern Pacific, independent of assimilation of data. However, as displayed in the diagram, in the western Pacific there was no satisfactory agreement between the two

  5. Tara Oceans' approach and new challenges in studying the ocean microbiome at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, L. P.; Sunagawa, S.; Chaffron, S.; Bowler, C.; Winker, P.; Karsenti, E.; Raes, J.; Acinas, S. G.; Bork, P.

    2016-02-01

    Drawing an ecosystem-wide picture of community structure, functional diversity and ecological drivers of the ocean microbiome has been a grand challenge. This has been primarily due to the lack of a systematically collected set of samples with associated environmental information at global scale. To address this limitation, Tara Oceans has so far collected more than 35,000 samples for genomic, morphological and environmental analyses from all major oceanic regions. Using an eco-systems biology approach, we analyzed 7.2 terabases of metagenomic data from 243 water samples that were collected at multiple depths to determine the main stratifying factors and environmental drivers of ocean microbial community structure and function. To this end, we constructed and annotated an ocean microbial reference gene catalog with >40 million non-redundant, mostly novel sequences from viruses, prokaryotes and picoeukaryotes. A focus on 139 prokaryote-enriched samples revealed microbiota to be primarily stratified into epipelagic and mesopelagic communities. For epipelagic communities, we disentangled co-correlations of environmental parameters and identified microbial communities composition to be mainly driven by temperature rather than geography. To resolve this overall pattern from community to species-level, we reconstructed clusters of core genes of dominant ocean microbial species and investigate their biogeography based on metagenomic profiling of single nucleotide polymorphisms. The integration of metatranscriptomic data is adding an additional layer of information to study their activity as a function of physicochemical differences of their environment.

  6. Oceanic primary production 2. Estimation at global scale from satellite (coastal zone color scanner) chlorophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, David; André, Jean-Michel; Morel, André

    A fast method has been proposed [Antoine and Morel, this issue] to compute the oceanic primary production from the upper ocean chlorophyll-like pigment concentration, as it can be routinely detected by a spaceborne ocean color sensor. This method is applied here to the monthly global maps of the photosynthetic pigments that were derived from the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) data archive [Feldman et al., 1989]. The photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) field is computed from the astronomical constant and by using an atmospheric model, thereafter combined with averaged cloud information, derived from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). The aim is to assess the seasonal evolution, as well as the spatial distribution of the photosynthetic carbon fixation within the world ocean and for a ``climatological year,'' to the extent that both the chlorophyll information and the cloud coverage statistics actually are averages obtained over several years. The computed global annual production actually ranges between 36.5 and 45.6 Gt C yr-1 according to the assumption which is made (0.8 or 1) about the ratio of active-to-total pigments (recall that chlorophyll and pheopigments are not radiometrically resolved by CZCS). The relative contributions to the global productivity of the various oceans and zonal belts are examined. By considering the hypotheses needed in such computations, the nature of the data used as inputs, and the results of the sensitivity studies, the global numbers have to be cautiously considered. Improving the reliability of the primary production estimates implies (1) new global data sets allowing a higher temporal resolution and a better coverage, (2) progress in the knowledge of physiological responses of phytoplankton and therefore refinements of the time and space dependent parameterizations of these responses.

  7. Pliocene three-dimensional global ocean temperature reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Robinson, M.M.; Foley, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    A snapshot of the thermal structure of the mid-Piacenzian ocean is obtained by combining the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping Project (PRISM3) multiproxy sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstruction with bottom water tempera-5 ture estimates produced using Mg/Ca paleothermometry. This reconstruction assumes a Pliocene water mass framework similar to that which exists today, with several important modifications. The area of formation of present day North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) was expanded and extended further north toward the Arctic Ocean during the mid-Piacenzian relative to today. This, combined with a deeper Greenland-Scotland Ridge, allowed a greater volume of warmer NADW to enter the Atlantic Ocean. In the Southern Ocean, the Polar Front Zone was expanded relative to present day, but shifted closer to the Antarctic continent. This, combined with at least seasonal reduction in sea ice extent, resulted in decreased Antarctic BottomWater (AABW) production (relative to present day) as well as possible changes in the depth of intermediate wa15 ters. The reconstructed mid-Piacenzian three-dimensional ocean was warmer overall than today, and the hypothesized aerial extent of water masses appears to fit the limited stable isotopic data available for this time period. ?? Author(s) 2009.

  8. Pliocene three-dimensional global ocean temperature reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Robinson, M.M.; Foley, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal structure of the mid-Piacenzian ocean is obtained by combining the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping Project (PRISM3) multiproxy sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstruction with bottom water temperature estimates from 27 locations produced using Mg/Ca paleothermometry based upon the ostracod genus Krithe. Deep water temperature estimates are skewed toward the Atlantic Basin (63% of the locations) and represent depths from 1000m to 4500 m. This reconstruction, meant to serve as a validation data set as well as an initialization for coupled numerical climate models, assumes a Pliocene water mass framework similar to that which exists today, with several important modifications. The area of formation of present day North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) was expanded and extended further north toward the Arctic Ocean during the mid-Piacenzian relative to today. This, combined with a deeper Greenland-Scotland Ridge, allowed a greater volume of warmer NADW to enter the Atlantic Ocean. In the Southern Ocean, the Polar Front Zone was expanded relative to present day, but shifted closer to the Antarctic continent. This, combined with at least seasonal reduction in sea ice extent, resulted in decreased Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) production (relative to present day) as well as possible changes in the depth of intermediate waters. The reconstructed mid-Piacenzian three-dimensional ocean was warmer overall than today, and the hypothesized aerial extent of water masses appears to fit the limited stable isotopic data available for this time period. ?? Author(s) 2009.

  9. A simulation of the global ocean circulation with resolved eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtner, Albert J.; Chervin, Robert M.

    1988-12-01

    A multilevel primitive-equation model has been constructed for the purpose of simulating ocean circulation on modern supercomputing architectures. The model is designed to take advantage of faster clock speeds, increased numbers of processors, and enlarged memories of machines expected to be available over the next decade. The model allows global eddy-resolving simulations to be conducted in support of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment. Furthermore, global ocean modeling is essential for proper representation of the full range of oceanic and climatic phenomena. The first such global eddy-resolving ocean calculation is reported here. A 20-year integration of a global ocean model with ½° grid spacing and 20 vertical levels has been carried out with realistic geometry and annual mean wind forcing. The temperature and salinity are constrained to Levitus gridded data above 25-m depth and below 710-m depth (on time scales of 1 month and 3 years, respectively), but the values in the main thermocline are unconstrained for the last decade of the calculation. The final years of the simulation allow the spontaneous formation of waves and eddies through the use of scale-selective viscosity and diffusion. A quasi-equilibrium state shows many realistic features of ocean circulation, including unstable separating western boundary currents, the known anomalous northward heat transport in the South Atlantic, and a global compensation for the abyssal spread of North Atlantic Deep Water via a long chain of thermocline mass transport from the tropical Pacific, through the Indonesian archipelago, across the Indian Ocean, and around the southern tip of Africa. This chain of thermocline transport is perhaps the most striking result from the model, and eddies and waves are evident along the entire 20,000-km path of the flow. The modeled Gulf Stream separates somewhat north of Cape Hatteras, produces warm- and cold-core rings, and maintains its integrity as a meadering thermal front

  10. The growth of finfish in global open-ocean aquaculture under climate change.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Dane H; Levin, Simon A; Watson, James R

    2017-10-11

    Aquaculture production is projected to expand from land-based operations to the open ocean as demand for seafood grows and competition increases for inputs to land-based aquaculture, such as freshwater and suitable land. In contrast to land-based production, open-ocean aquaculture is constrained by oceanographic factors, such as current speeds and seawater temperature, which are dynamic in time and space, and cannot easily be controlled. As such, the potential for offshore aquaculture to increase seafood production is tied to the physical state of the oceans. We employ a novel spatial model to estimate the potential of open-ocean finfish aquaculture globally, given physical, biological and technological constraints. Finfish growth potential for three common aquaculture species representing different thermal guilds-Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and cobia (Rachycentron canadum)-is compared across species and regions and with climate change, based on outputs of a high-resolution global climate model. Globally, there are ample areas that are physically suitable for fish growth and potential expansion of the nascent aquaculture industry. The effects of climate change are heterogeneous across species and regions, but areas with existing aquaculture industries are likely to see increases in growth rates. In areas where climate change results in reduced growth rates, adaptation measures, such as selective breeding, can probably offset potential production losses. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Design of components for the NASA OCEAN project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Jenna (Editor); Clift, James; Dumais, Bryan; Gardner, Shannon; Hernandez, Juan Carlos; Nolan, Laura; Park, Mia; Peoples, Don; Phillips, Elizabeth; Tillman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Fall 1993 semester of the EGM 4000 class was to design, fabricate, and test components for the 'Ocean CELSS Experimental Analog NASA' Project (OCEAN Project) and to aid in the future development of NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). The OCEAN project's specific aims are to place a human, Mr. Dennis Chamberland from NASA's Life Science Division of Research, into an underwater habitat off the shore of Key Largo, FL for three months. During his stay, he will monitor the hydroponic growth of food crops and evaluate the conditions necessary to have a successful harvest of edible food. The specific designs chosen to contribute to the OCEAN project by the EGM 4000 class are in the areas of hydroponic habitat monitoring, human health monitoring, and production of blue/green algae. The hydroponic monitoring system focused on monitoring the environment of the plants. This included the continuous sensing of the atmospheric and hydroponic nutrient solution temperatures. Methods for monitoring the continuous flow of the hydroponic nutrient solution across the plants and the continuous supply of power for these sensing devices were also incorporated into the design system. The human health monitoring system concentrated on continuously monitoring various concerns of the occupant in the underwater living habitat of the OCEAN project. These concerns included monitoring the enclosed environment for dangerous levels of carbon monoxide and smoke, high temperatures from fire, and the ceasing of the continuous airflow into the habitat. The blue/green algae project emphasized both the production and harvest of a future source of food. This project did not interact with any part of the OCEAN project. Rather, it was used to show the possibility of growing this kind of algae as a supplemental food source inside a controlled ecological life support system.

  12. Global and regional ocean carbon uptake and climate change: sensitivity to a substantial mitigation scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichi, Marcello; Manzini, Elisa; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Alessandri, Andrea; Patara, Lavinia; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    Under future scenarios of business-as-usual emissions, the ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon is anticipated to decrease because of ocean chemistry constraints and positive feedbacks in the carbon-climate dynamics, whereas it is still unknown how the oceanic carbon cycle will respond to more substantial mitigation scenarios. To evaluate the natural system response to prescribed atmospheric "target" concentrations and assess the response of the ocean carbon pool to these values, 2 centennial projection simulations have been performed with an Earth System Model that includes a fully coupled carbon cycle, forced in one case with a mitigation scenario and the other with the SRES A1B scenario. End of century ocean uptake with the mitigation scenario is projected to return to the same magnitude of carbon fluxes as simulated in 1960 in the Pacific Ocean and to lower values in the Atlantic. With A1B, the major ocean basins are instead projected to decrease the capacity for carbon uptake globally as found with simpler carbon cycle models, while at the regional level the response is contrasting. The model indicates that the equatorial Pacific may increase the carbon uptake rates in both scenarios, owing to enhancement of the biological carbon pump evidenced by an increase in Net Community Production (NCP) following changes in the subsurface equatorial circulation and enhanced iron availability from extratropical regions. NCP is a proxy of the bulk organic carbon made available to the higher trophic levels and potentially exportable from the surface layers. The model results indicate that, besides the localized increase in the equatorial Pacific, the NCP of lower trophic levels in the northern Pacific and Atlantic oceans is projected to be halved with respect to the current climate under a substantial mitigation scenario at the end of the twenty-first century. It is thus suggested that changes due to cumulative carbon emissions up to present and the projected concentration

  13. Ocean plankton. Determinants of community structure in the global plankton interactome.

    PubMed

    Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Faust, Karoline; Henry, Nicolas; Decelle, Johan; Colin, Sébastien; Carcillo, Fabrizio; Chaffron, Samuel; Ignacio-Espinosa, J Cesar; Roux, Simon; Vincent, Flora; Bittner, Lucie; Darzi, Youssef; Wang, Jun; Audic, Stéphane; Berline, Léo; Bontempi, Gianluca; Cabello, Ana M; Coppola, Laurent; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; d'Ovidio, Francesco; De Meester, Luc; Ferrera, Isabel; Garet-Delmas, Marie-José; Guidi, Lionel; Lara, Elena; Pesant, Stéphane; Royo-Llonch, Marta; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez, Pablo; Sebastian, Marta; Souffreau, Caroline; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Gorsky, Gabriel; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Speich, Sabrina; Stemmann, Lars; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; Sullivan, Matthew B; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen

    2015-05-22

    Species interaction networks are shaped by abiotic and biotic factors. Here, as part of the Tara Oceans project, we studied the photic zone interactome using environmental factors and organismal abundance profiles and found that environmental factors are incomplete predictors of community structure. We found associations across plankton functional types and phylogenetic groups to be nonrandomly distributed on the network and driven by both local and global patterns. We identified interactions among grazers, primary producers, viruses, and (mainly parasitic) symbionts and validated network-generated hypotheses using microscopy to confirm symbiotic relationships. We have thus provided a resource to support further research on ocean food webs and integrating biological components into ocean models. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Satellite Mission to Study Ocean Salinity and the Global Hydrological Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerloef, Gary; Torrusio, Sandra

    2009-05-01

    4th Aquariu/SAC-D Science Workshop; Puerto Madryn, Argentina, 3-5 December 2008; Important aspects of climate change in the 21st century will involve interactions between ocean circulation and the global hydrological cycle, and their links to land surface hydrology, the cryosphere, the atmosphere, and other realms. The Aquarius/Satelite Aplicaciones Cientificas-D (SAC-D) satellite mission is a multidisciplinary observatory that will provide measurements of ocean salinity, ocean winds, rain, sea ice, land/sea surface temperatures, soil moisture, nighttime light sources, atmospheric temperature/humidity soundings, and the space environment, as well as autonomous data relay from remote ground stations. Scheduled for launch in May 2010, the project involves international contributions by Argentina, the United States, Italy, Canada, France, and Brazil, and has an active public awareness and education program (see http://www.conae.gov.ar/satellites/sac-d.html and http://aquarius.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  15. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. P.; Baringer, M.; Bindoff, N. L.; Boyer, T.; Cheng, L. J.; Church, J. A.; Conroy, J. L.; Domingues, C. M.; Fasullo, J. T.; Gilson, J.; Goni, G.; Good, S. A.; Gorman, J. M.; Gouretski, V.; Ishii, M.; Johnson, G. C.; Kizu, S.; Lyman, J. M.; Macdonald, A. M.; Minkowycz, W. J.; Moffitt, S. E.; Palmer, M. D.; Piola, A. R.; Reseghetti, F.; Schuckmann, K.; Trenberth, K. E.; Velicogna, I.; Willis, J. K.

    2013-09-01

    evolution of ocean temperature measurement systems is presented with a focus on the development and accuracy of two critical devices in use today (expendable bathythermographs and conductivity-temperature-depth instruments used on Argo floats). A detailed discussion of the accuracy of these devices and a projection of the future of ocean temperature measurements are provided. The accuracy of ocean temperature measurements is discussed in detail in the context of ocean heat content, Earth's energy imbalance, and thermosteric sea level rise. Up-to-date estimates are provided for these three important quantities. The total energy imbalance at the top of atmosphere is best assessed by taking an inventory of changes in energy storage. The main storage is in the ocean, the latest values of which are presented. Furthermore, despite differences in measurement methods and analysis techniques, multiple studies show that there has been a multidecadal increase in the heat content of both the upper and deep ocean regions, which reflects the impact of anthropogenic warming. With respect to sea level rise, mutually reinforcing information from tide gauges and radar altimetry shows that presently, sea level is rising at approximately 3 mm yr-1 with contributions from both thermal expansion and mass accumulation from ice melt. The latest data for thermal expansion sea level rise are included here and analyzed.

  16. Penetration of UV irradiance into the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, T. J.

    2011-11-01

    A new global ocean-atmosphere model has been developed to determine the penetration of ultraviolet (UV) radiation through the water column. This is accomplished by combining an atmospheric UV irradiance model, taking into consideration the effects of aerosols, clouds, and the air-sea interface, with empirical in-water diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd(λUV)) relationships. These empirical relationships are derived from simultaneous in situ profiles of visible wavelength inherent optical properties and downwelling UV irradiances. The combined model is applied to global data sets using a look-up table approach to speed up calculation time. The atmospheric model compared against ˜3000 data points gave a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of between 10% and 15% at wavelengths of 305, 325, 340, and 380 nm; the coupled global model compared against 30 independent in-water irradiance profiles gave a logarithmic RMSE of between 0.15 and 0.35 at these wavelengths. On the global scale the 10% irradiance levels were found to be deepest in the oceanic gyres (˜18, 32, 44, and 70 m at 305, 325, 340 and 380 nm, respectively) and shallowest in the optically complex continental shelf regions. The calculated UV doses were shown to be spectrally and seasonally variable, with the highest values being encountered in the eastern Mediterranean during July, with values of ˜0.5, 4, 7, and 10 kJ m-2 d-1 nm-1 at 305, 325, 340, and 380 nm, respectively.

  17. Global warming-induced upper-ocean freshening and the intensification of super typhoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Foltz, Gregory R.; Leung, L. Ruby; Emanuel, Kerry A.

    2016-11-01

    Super typhoons (STYs), intense tropical cyclones of the western North Pacific, rank among the most destructive natural hazards globally. The violent winds of these storms induce deep mixing of the upper ocean, resulting in strong sea surface cooling and making STYs highly sensitive to ocean density stratification. Although a few studies examined the potential impacts of changes in ocean thermal structure on future tropical cyclones, they did not take into account changes in near-surface salinity. Here, using a combination of observations and coupled climate model simulations, we show that freshening of the upper ocean, caused by greater rainfall in places where typhoons form, tends to intensify STYs by reducing their ability to cool the upper ocean. We further demonstrate that the strengthening effect of this freshening over the period 1961-2008 is ~53% stronger than the suppressive effect of temperature, whereas under twenty-first century projections, the positive effect of salinity is about half of the negative effect of ocean temperature changes.

  18. Global warming-induced upper-ocean freshening and the intensification of super typhoons

    SciTech Connect

    Balaguru, Karthik; Foltz, Gregory R.; Leung, L. Ruby; Emanuel, Kerry A.

    2016-11-25

    Here, super typhoons (STYs), intense tropical cyclones of the western North Pacific, rank among the most destructive natural hazards globally. The violent winds of these storms induce deep mixing of the upper ocean, resulting in strong sea surface cooling and making STYs highly sensitive to ocean density stratification. Although a few studies examined the potential impacts of changes in ocean thermal structure on future tropical cyclones, they did not take into account changes in near-surface salinity. Here, using a combination of observations and coupled climate model simulations, we show that freshening of the upper ocean, caused by greater rainfall in places where typhoons form, tends to intensify STYs by reducing their ability to cool the upper ocean. We further demonstrate that the strengthening effect of this freshening over the period 1961–2008 is ~53% stronger than the suppressive effect of temperature, whereas under twenty-first century projections, the positive effect of salinity is about half of the negative effect of ocean temperature changes.

  19. Global warming-induced upper-ocean freshening and the intensification of super typhoons

    DOE PAGES

    Balaguru, Karthik; Foltz, Gregory R.; Leung, L. Ruby; ...

    2016-11-25

    Here, super typhoons (STYs), intense tropical cyclones of the western North Pacific, rank among the most destructive natural hazards globally. The violent winds of these storms induce deep mixing of the upper ocean, resulting in strong sea surface cooling and making STYs highly sensitive to ocean density stratification. Although a few studies examined the potential impacts of changes in ocean thermal structure on future tropical cyclones, they did not take into account changes in near-surface salinity. Here, using a combination of observations and coupled climate model simulations, we show that freshening of the upper ocean, caused by greater rainfall inmore » places where typhoons form, tends to intensify STYs by reducing their ability to cool the upper ocean. We further demonstrate that the strengthening effect of this freshening over the period 1961–2008 is ~53% stronger than the suppressive effect of temperature, whereas under twenty-first century projections, the positive effect of salinity is about half of the negative effect of ocean temperature changes.« less

  20. Global warming-induced upper-ocean freshening and the intensification of super typhoons

    PubMed Central

    Balaguru, Karthik; Foltz, Gregory R.; Leung, L. Ruby; Emanuel, Kerry A.

    2016-01-01

    Super typhoons (STYs), intense tropical cyclones of the western North Pacific, rank among the most destructive natural hazards globally. The violent winds of these storms induce deep mixing of the upper ocean, resulting in strong sea surface cooling and making STYs highly sensitive to ocean density stratification. Although a few studies examined the potential impacts of changes in ocean thermal structure on future tropical cyclones, they did not take into account changes in near-surface salinity. Here, using a combination of observations and coupled climate model simulations, we show that freshening of the upper ocean, caused by greater rainfall in places where typhoons form, tends to intensify STYs by reducing their ability to cool the upper ocean. We further demonstrate that the strengthening effect of this freshening over the period 1961–2008 is ∼53% stronger than the suppressive effect of temperature, whereas under twenty-first century projections, the positive effect of salinity is about half of the negative effect of ocean temperature changes. PMID:27886199

  1. Global warming-induced upper-ocean freshening and the intensification of super typhoons.

    PubMed

    Balaguru, Karthik; Foltz, Gregory R; Leung, L Ruby; Emanuel, Kerry A

    2016-11-25

    Super typhoons (STYs), intense tropical cyclones of the western North Pacific, rank among the most destructive natural hazards globally. The violent winds of these storms induce deep mixing of the upper ocean, resulting in strong sea surface cooling and making STYs highly sensitive to ocean density stratification. Although a few studies examined the potential impacts of changes in ocean thermal structure on future tropical cyclones, they did not take into account changes in near-surface salinity. Here, using a combination of observations and coupled climate model simulations, we show that freshening of the upper ocean, caused by greater rainfall in places where typhoons form, tends to intensify STYs by reducing their ability to cool the upper ocean. We further demonstrate that the strengthening effect of this freshening over the period 1961-2008 is ∼53% stronger than the suppressive effect of temperature, whereas under twenty-first century projections, the positive effect of salinity is about half of the negative effect of ocean temperature changes.

  2. Global Ocean Integrals and Means, with Trend Implications.

    PubMed

    Wunsch, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the ocean requires determining and explaining global integrals and equivalent average values of temperature (heat), salinity (freshwater and salt content), sea level, energy, and other properties. Attempts to determine means, integrals, and climatologies have been hindered by thinly and poorly distributed historical observations in a system in which both signals and background noise are spatially very inhomogeneous, leading to potentially large temporal bias errors that must be corrected at the 1% level or better. With the exception of the upper ocean in the current altimetric-Argo era, no clear documentation exists on the best methods for estimating means and their changes for quantities such as heat and freshwater at the levels required for anthropogenic signals. Underestimates of trends are as likely as overestimates; for example, recent inferences that multidecadal oceanic heat uptake has been greatly underestimated are plausible. For new or augmented observing systems, calculating the accuracies and precisions of global, multidecadal sampling densities for the full water column is necessary to avoid the irrecoverable loss of scientifically essential information.

  3. Antarctic and Southern Ocean influences on Late Pliocene global cooling.

    PubMed

    McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim; Carter, Lionel; Riesselman, Christina; Dunbar, Robert; Sjunneskog, Charlotte; Winter, Diane; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Warren, Courtney; Pagani, Mark; Schouten, Stefan; Willmott, Veronica; Levy, Richard; DeConto, Robert; Powell, Ross D

    2012-04-24

    The influence of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean on Late Pliocene global climate reconstructions has remained ambiguous due to a lack of well-dated Antarctic-proximal, paleoenvironmental records. Here we present ice sheet, sea-surface temperature, and sea ice reconstructions from the ANDRILL AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. We provide evidence for a major expansion of an ice sheet in the Ross Sea that began at ∼3.3 Ma, followed by a coastal sea surface temperature cooling of ∼2.5 °C, a stepwise expansion of sea ice, and polynya-style deep mixing in the Ross Sea between 3.3 and 2.5 Ma. The intensification of Antarctic cooling resulted in strengthened westerly winds and invigorated ocean circulation. The associated northward migration of Southern Ocean fronts has been linked with reduced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation by restricting surface water connectivity between the ocean basins, with implications for heat transport to the high latitudes of the North Atlantic. While our results do not exclude low-latitude mechanisms as drivers for Pliocene cooling, they indicate an additional role played by southern high-latitude cooling during development of the bipolar world.

  4. Antarctic and Southern Ocean influences on Late Pliocene global cooling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim; Carter, Lionel; Riesselman, Christina; Dunbar, Robert; Sjunneskog, Charlotte; Winter, Diane; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Warren, Courtney; Pagani, Mark; Schouten, Stefan; Willmott, Veronica; Levy, Richard; DeConto, Robert; Powell, Ross D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean on Late Pliocene global climate reconstructions has remained ambiguous due to a lack of well-dated Antarctic-proximal, paleoenvironmental records. Here we present ice sheet, sea-surface temperature, and sea ice reconstructions from the ANDRILL AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. We provide evidence for a major expansion of an ice sheet in the Ross Sea that began at ~3.3 Ma, followed by a coastal sea surface temperature cooling of ~2.5 °C, a stepwise expansion of sea ice, and polynya-style deep mixing in the Ross Sea between 3.3 and 2.5 Ma. The intensification of Antarctic cooling resulted in strengthened westerly winds and invigorated ocean circulation. The associated northward migration of Southern Ocean fronts has been linked with reduced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation by restricting surface water connectivity between the ocean basins, with implications for heat transport to the high latitudes of the North Atlantic. While our results do not exclude low-latitude mechanisms as drivers for Pliocene cooling, they indicate an additional role played by southern high-latitude cooling during development of the bipolar world.

  5. Attenuation coefficient of usable solar radiation of the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Junfang; Lee, Zhongping; Ondrusek, Michael; Kahru, Mati

    2016-05-01

    Usable solar radiation (USR) represents spectrally integrated solar energy in the spectral range of 400-560 nm, a domain where photons penetrate the most in oceanic waters and thus contribute to photosynthesis and heating at deeper depths. Through purely numerical simulations, it was found that the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling USR (Kd(USR), m-1) is nearly a constant vertically in the upper water column for clear waters and most turbid waters. Subsequently an empirical model was developed to estimate Kd(USR) based on the diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (Kd(490), m-1). We here evaluate this relationship using data collected from a wide range of oceanic and coastal environments and found that the relationship between Kd(490) and Kd(USR) developed via the numerical simulation is quite robust. We further refined this relationship to extend the applicability to "clearest" natural waters. This refined relationship was then used to produce sample distribution of Kd(USR) of global oceans. As expected, extremely low Kd(USR) (˜0.02 m-1) was observed in ocean gyres, while significantly higher Kd(USR) (˜5.2 m-1) was found in very turbid coastal regions. A useful application of Kd(USR) is to easily and accurately propagate surface USR to deeper depths, potentially to significantly improve the estimation of basin scale primary production and heat fluxes in the upper water column.

  6. Benchmarking the mesoscale variability in global ocean eddy-permitting numerical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollone, Andrea; Masina, Simona; Storto, Andrea; Iovino, Doroteaciro

    2017-08-01

    The role of data assimilation procedures on representing ocean mesoscale variability is assessed by applying eddy statistics to a state-of-the-art global ocean reanalysis (C-GLORS), a free global ocean simulation (performed with the NEMO system) and an observation-based dataset (ARMOR3D) used as an independent benchmark. Numerical results are computed on a 1/4 ∘ horizontal grid (ORCA025) and share the same resolution with ARMOR3D dataset. This "eddy-permitting" resolution is sufficient to allow ocean eddies to form. Further to assessing the eddy statistics from three different datasets, a global three-dimensional eddy detection system is implemented in order to bypass the need of regional-dependent definition of thresholds, typical of commonly adopted eddy detection algorithms. It thus provides full three-dimensional eddy statistics segmenting vertical profiles from local rotational velocities. This criterion is crucial for discerning real eddies from transient surface noise that inevitably affects any two-dimensional algorithm. Data assimilation enhances and corrects mesoscale variability on a wide range of features that cannot be well reproduced otherwise. The free simulation fairly reproduces eddies emerging from western boundary currents and deep baroclinic instabilities, while underestimates shallower vortexes that populate the full basin. The ocean reanalysis recovers most of the missing turbulence, shown by satellite products , that is not generated by the model itself and consistently projects surface variability deep into the water column. The comparison with the statistically reconstructed vertical profiles from ARMOR3D show that ocean data assimilation is able to embed variability into the model dynamics, constraining eddies with in situ and altimetry observation and generating them consistently with local environment.

  7. Benchmarking the mesoscale variability in global ocean eddy-permitting numerical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollone, Andrea; Masina, Simona; Storto, Andrea; Iovino, Doroteaciro

    2017-10-01

    The role of data assimilation procedures on representing ocean mesoscale variability is assessed by applying eddy statistics to a state-of-the-art global ocean reanalysis (C-GLORS), a free global ocean simulation (performed with the NEMO system) and an observation-based dataset (ARMOR3D) used as an independent benchmark. Numerical results are computed on a 1/4 ∘ horizontal grid (ORCA025) and share the same resolution with ARMOR3D dataset. This "eddy-permitting" resolution is sufficient to allow ocean eddies to form. Further to assessing the eddy statistics from three different datasets, a global three-dimensional eddy detection system is implemented in order to bypass the need of regional-dependent definition of thresholds, typical of commonly adopted eddy detection algorithms. It thus provides full three-dimensional eddy statistics segmenting vertical profiles from local rotational velocities. This criterion is crucial for discerning real eddies from transient surface noise that inevitably affects any two-dimensional algorithm. Data assimilation enhances and corrects mesoscale variability on a wide range of features that cannot be well reproduced otherwise. The free simulation fairly reproduces eddies emerging from western boundary currents and deep baroclinic instabilities, while underestimates shallower vortexes that populate the full basin. The ocean reanalysis recovers most of the missing turbulence, shown by satellite products , that is not generated by the model itself and consistently projects surface variability deep into the water column. The comparison with the statistically reconstructed vertical profiles from ARMOR3D show that ocean data assimilation is able to embed variability into the model dynamics, constraining eddies with in situ and altimetry observation and generating them consistently with local environment.

  8. Projected change in global fisheries revenues under climate change

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vicky W. Y.; Cheung, William W. L.; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Sumaila, U. Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies highlight the winners and losers in fisheries under climate change based on shifts in biomass, species composition and potential catches. Understanding how climate change is likely to alter the fisheries revenues of maritime countries is a crucial next step towards the development of effective socio-economic policy and food sustainability strategies to mitigate and adapt to climate change. Particularly, fish prices and cross-oceans connections through distant water fishing operations may largely modify the projected climate change impacts on fisheries revenues. However, these factors have not formally been considered in global studies. Here, using climate-living marine resources simulation models, we show that global fisheries revenues could drop by 35% more than the projected decrease in catches by the 2050 s under high CO2 emission scenarios. Regionally, the projected increases in fish catch in high latitudes may not translate into increases in revenues because of the increasing dominance of low value fish, and the decrease in catches by these countries’ vessels operating in more severely impacted distant waters. Also, we find that developing countries with high fisheries dependency are negatively impacted. Our results suggest the need to conduct full-fledged economic analyses of the potential economic effects of climate change on global marine fisheries. PMID:27600330

  9. Projected change in global fisheries revenues under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Vicky W. Y.; Cheung, William W. L.; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Sumaila, U. Rashid

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies highlight the winners and losers in fisheries under climate change based on shifts in biomass, species composition and potential catches. Understanding how climate change is likely to alter the fisheries revenues of maritime countries is a crucial next step towards the development of effective socio-economic policy and food sustainability strategies to mitigate and adapt to climate change. Particularly, fish prices and cross-oceans connections through distant water fishing operations may largely modify the projected climate change impacts on fisheries revenues. However, these factors have not formally been considered in global studies. Here, using climate-living marine resources simulation models, we show that global fisheries revenues could drop by 35% more than the projected decrease in catches by the 2050 s under high CO2 emission scenarios. Regionally, the projected increases in fish catch in high latitudes may not translate into increases in revenues because of the increasing dominance of low value fish, and the decrease in catches by these countries’ vessels operating in more severely impacted distant waters. Also, we find that developing countries with high fisheries dependency are negatively impacted. Our results suggest the need to conduct full-fledged economic analyses of the potential economic effects of climate change on global marine fisheries.

  10. Projected change in global fisheries revenues under climate change.

    PubMed

    Lam, Vicky W Y; Cheung, William W L; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Sumaila, U Rashid

    2016-09-07

    Previous studies highlight the winners and losers in fisheries under climate change based on shifts in biomass, species composition and potential catches. Understanding how climate change is likely to alter the fisheries revenues of maritime countries is a crucial next step towards the development of effective socio-economic policy and food sustainability strategies to mitigate and adapt to climate change. Particularly, fish prices and cross-oceans connections through distant water fishing operations may largely modify the projected climate change impacts on fisheries revenues. However, these factors have not formally been considered in global studies. Here, using climate-living marine resources simulation models, we show that global fisheries revenues could drop by 35% more than the projected decrease in catches by the 2050 s under high CO2 emission scenarios. Regionally, the projected increases in fish catch in high latitudes may not translate into increases in revenues because of the increasing dominance of low value fish, and the decrease in catches by these countries' vessels operating in more severely impacted distant waters. Also, we find that developing countries with high fisheries dependency are negatively impacted. Our results suggest the need to conduct full-fledged economic analyses of the potential economic effects of climate change on global marine fisheries.

  11. Subsurface Ocean Climate Data Records: Global Ocean Heat and Freshwater Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, T.; Locarnini, R. A.; Mishonov, A. V.; Reagan, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean is the main sink of excess heat in the Earth's climate system. It absorbs more than 90% of the Top of the Atmosphere imbalance between incoming solar radiation and outgoing long-wave radiation. The ocean, covering more than 70% of the Earth's surface, is also the major component of the planet's freshwater cycle. More than 60 years of in situ subsurface temperature and salinity data have been compiled and quality controlled in World Ocean Database of the National Centers for Environmental Information. These data have been used to calculate time series of global heat and salt changes in the ocean. Salt changes can be used to calculate freshwater changes, including from melting continental glaciers. Both time series provide a measure of the changes in the Earth's climate system: from heat sequestered in the ocean, to the rise of sea level due to thermosteric and halosteric components. The time series are updated every three months and are widely used in climate related studies. Method of quality control of the data, calculation of the time series, and dissemination and use of the time series are discussed.

  12. Assimilation of GRACE-derived oceanic mass distributions with a global ocean circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saynisch, J.; Bergmann-Wolf, I.; Thomas, M.

    2015-02-01

    To study the sub-seasonal distribution and generation of ocean mass anomalies, Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations of daily and monthly resolution are assimilated into a global ocean circulation model with an ensemble-based Kalman-Filter technique. The satellite gravimetry observations are processed to become time-variable fields of ocean mass distribution. Error budgets for the observations and the ocean model's initial state are estimated which contain the full covariance information. The consistency of the presented approach is demonstrated by increased agreement between GRACE observations and the ocean model. Furthermore, the simulations are compared with independent observations from 54 bottom pressure recorders. The assimilation improves the agreement to high-latitude recorders by up to 2 hPa. The improvements are caused by assimilation-induced changes in the atmospheric wind forcing, i.e., quantities not directly observed by GRACE. Finally, the use of the developed Kalman-Filter approach as a destriping filter to remove artificial noise contaminating the GRACE observations is presented.

  13. A Parallel Ocean Model With Adaptive Mesh Refinement Capability For Global Ocean Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Herrnstein, Aaron R.

    2005-12-01

    An ocean model with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability is presented for simulating ocean circulation on decade time scales. The model closely resembles the LLNL ocean general circulation model with some components incorporated from other well known ocean models when appropriate. Spatial components are discretized using finite differences on a staggered grid where tracer and pressure variables are defined at cell centers and velocities at cell vertices (B-grid). Horizontal motion is modeled explicitly with leapfrog and Euler forward-backward time integration, and vertical motion is modeled semi-implicitly. New AMR strategies are presented for horizontal refinement on a B-grid, leapfrog time integration, and time integration of coupled systems with unequal time steps. These AMR capabilities are added to the LLNL software package SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) and validated with standard benchmark tests. The ocean model is built on top of the amended SAMRAI library. The resulting model has the capability to dynamically increase resolution in localized areas of the domain. Limited basin tests are conducted using various refinement criteria and produce convergence trends in the model solution as refinement is increased. Carbon sequestration simulations are performed on decade time scales in domains the size of the North Atlantic and the global ocean. A suggestion is given for refinement criteria in such simulations. AMR predicts maximum pH changes and increases in CO2 concentration near the injection sites that are virtually unattainable with a uniform high resolution due to extremely long run times. Fine scale details near the injection sites are achieved by AMR with shorter run times than the finest uniform resolution tested despite the need for enhanced parallel performance. The North Atlantic simulations show a reduction in passive tracer errors when AMR is applied instead of a uniform coarse resolution. No

  14. A Global Eulerian Observatories pilot project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Send, U.; Geo Team

    2003-04-01

    A global system of deep-ocean Eulerian timeseries observatories (GEO) is being coordinated by an International Science Team. The system, which is currently in a pilot phase, comprises all sites that fulfil a set of criteria established by the Science Team and that are operating, funded, or for which concrete plans exist. The observatories include surface flux reference sites, mass/heat transport sites, and more general observatories that are typically either of physical or biogeochemical types. Currently there are approximately 60 observatories on the global map, a third of them operating/funded. In addition, the operational TAO/TRITON and PIRATA arrays contribute to a global network. An important requirement is that the data must be publicly available with minimum delay, and efforts are being encouraged to implement real-time data delivery wherever possible. The presentation discusses the status of the global array and recent developments resulting from a Science Team Meeting just prior to the EGS/AGU conference.

  15. The timescales of global surface-ocean connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Bror F.; Watson, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Planktonic communities are shaped through a balance of local evolutionary adaptation and ecological succession driven in large part by migration. The timescales over which these processes operate are still largely unresolved. Here we use Lagrangian particle tracking and network theory to quantify the timescale over which surface currents connect different regions of the global ocean. We find that the fastest path between two patches—each randomly located anywhere in the surface ocean—is, on average, less than a decade. These results suggest that marine planktonic communities may keep pace with climate change—increasing temperatures, ocean acidification and changes in stratification over decadal timescales—through the advection of resilient types. PMID:27093522

  16. The Nippon Foundation / GEBCO Indian Ocean Bathymetric Compilation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigley, R. A.; Hassan, N.; Chowdhury, M. Z.; Ranaweera, R.; Sy, X. L.; Runghen, H.; Arndt, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Indian Ocean Bathymetric Compilation (IOBC) project, undertaken by Nippon Foundation / GEBCO Scholars, is focused on building a regional bathymetric data compilation, of all publically-available bathymetric data within the Indian Ocean region from 30°N to 60° S and 10° to 147° E. One of the objectives of this project is the creation of a network of Nippon Foundation / GEBCO Scholars working together, derived from the thirty Scholars from fourteen nations bordering on the Indian Ocean who have graduated from this Postgraduate Certificate in Ocean Bathymetry (PCOB) training program training program at the University of New Hampshire. The IOBC project has provided students a working example during their course work and has been used as basis for student projects during their visits to another Laboratory at the end of their academic year. This multi-national, multi-disciplinary project team will continue to build on the skills gained during the PCOB program through additional training. The IOBC is being built using the methodology developed for the International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO) compilation (Arndt et al., 2013). This skill was transferred, through training workshops, to further support the ongoing development within the scholar's network. This capacity-building project is envisioned to connect other personnel from within all of the participating nations and organizations, resulting in additional capacity-building in this field of multi-resolution bathymetric grid generation in their home communities. An updated regional bathymetric map and grids of the Indian Ocean will be an invaluable tool for all fields of marine scientific research and resource management. In addition, it has implications for increased public safety by offering the best and most up-to-date depth data for modeling regional-scale oceanographic processes such as tsunami-wave propagation behavior amongst others.

  17. Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch.

    PubMed

    Cheung, William W L; Watson, Reg; Pauly, Daniel

    2013-05-16

    Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through distribution shifts, generally to higher latitudes and deeper waters. Consequently, fisheries should be affected by 'tropicalization' of catch (increasing dominance of warm-water species). However, a signature of such climate-change effects on global fisheries catch has so far not been detected. Here we report such an index, the mean temperature of the catch (MTC), that is calculated from the average inferred temperature preference of exploited species weighted by their annual catch. Our results show that, after accounting for the effects of fishing and large-scale oceanographic variability, global MTC increased at a rate of 0.19 degrees Celsius per decade between 1970 and 2006, and non-tropical MTC increased at a rate of 0.23 degrees Celsius per decade. In tropical areas, MTC increased initially because of the reduction in the proportion of subtropical species catches, but subsequently stabilized as scope for further tropicalization of communities became limited. Changes in MTC in 52 large marine ecosystems, covering the majority of the world's coastal and shelf areas, are significantly and positively related to regional changes in sea surface temperature. This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global fisheries in the past four decades, highlighting the immediate need to develop adaptation plans to minimize the effect of such warming on the economy and food security of coastal communities, particularly in tropical regions.

  18. Effects of Drake Passage on a strongly eddying global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viebahn, Jan; von der Heydt, Anna S.; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    2015-04-01

    During the past 65 Million (Ma) years, Earth's climate has undergone a major change from warm 'greenhouse' to colder 'icehouse' conditions with extensive ice sheets in the polar regions of both hemispheres. The Eocene-Oligocene (~34 Ma) and Oligocene-Miocene (~23 Ma) boundaries reflect major transitions in Cenozoic global climate change. Proposed mechanisms of these transitions include reorganization of ocean circulation due to critical gateway opening/deepening, changes in atmospheric CO2-concentration, and feedback mechanisms related to land-ice formation. Drake Passage (DP) is an intensively studied gateway because it plays a central role in closing the transport pathways of heat and chemicals in the ocean. The climate response to a closed DP has been explored with a variety of general circulation models, however, all of these models employ low model-grid resolutions such that the effects of subgrid-scale fluctuations ('eddies') are parameterized. We present results of the first high-resolution (0.1° horizontally) realistic global ocean model simulation with a closed DP in which the eddy field is largely resolved. The simulation extends over more than 200 years such that the strong transient adjustment process is passed and a near-equilibrium ocean state is reached. The effects of DP are diagnosed by comparing with both an open DP high-resolution control simulation (of same length) and corresponding low-resolution simulations. By focussing on the heat/tracer transports we demonstrate that the results are twofold: Considering spatially integrated transports the overall response to a closed DP is well captured by low-resolution simulations. However, looking at the actual spatial distributions drastic differences appear between far-scattered high-resolution and laminar-uniform low-resolution fields. We conclude that sparse and highly localized tracer proxy observations have to be interpreted carefully with the help of high-resolution model simulations.

  19. The global land and ocean mean energy balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Folini, Doris

    2016-04-01

    land, and 16 and 100 Wm-2 over oceans, for sensible and latent heat fluxes, respectively. Estimated uncertainties are on the order of 10 and 5 Wm-2 for most surface and TOA fluxes, respectively. Combining these surface budgets with satellite-determined TOA budgets (CERES-EBAF) results in an atmospheric solar absorption of 77 and 82 Wm-2 and a net atmospheric thermal emission of -165 and -190 Wm-2 over land and oceans, respectively. We further revisit the global mean energy balance by combining the area weighed land and ocean mean budgets. This study is published in: Wild, M., Folini, D., Hakuba, M., Schär, C., Seneviratne, S.I., Kato, S., Rutan, D., Ammann, C., Wood, E.F., and König-Langlo, G., 2015: The energy balance over land and oceans: An assessment based on direct observations and CMIP5 climate models. Clim. Dyn., Dyn., 44, 3393-3429, doi: 10.1007/s00382-014-2430-z.

  20. Trace Metals in the Oceans: Evolution, Biology and Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baar, H.; La Roche, J.

    2003-04-01

    During evolution of prokaryotes and later on eukaryotes several metals became incorporated as essential factors in many biochemical functions in accordance with the abundance of these metals on the planet. The biological role of first row metals can be ranked Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Co, Ni. Second row metals Ag and Cd or third row metals like Hg and Pb appear to have no biological function, except possibly for Cd. Iron (Fe) being the fourth most abundant element of the planet has also played a role to temper the evolution of biogenic oxygen in the atmosphere and oceans. Yet eventually O2 has taken over the biosphere where now both atmosphere and ocean are strongly oxidizing. Inside every cell the primordial reducing conditions have remained however. Therefore enzyme systems based on metal couples Fe-Mn and Cu-Zn are required to protect the cell interior from damage by reactive oxygen species. The key role of metals in these and many other enzymes as well as in protein folding is one of the major vectors in biological diversity at both the molecular and the species level. Plankton ecosystems are governed by colimitation of several metals. Co-limitation of plankton growth is consistent also with observed interactions between metals. The supply of Fe to ocean waters is one of the major controls of plankton ecosystems and ocean element cycling (C, Si, N, P) over time scales ranging from weeks to the 100,000 year periodicity of glaciations. Understanding the role of metals in the oceans is crucial for understanding global change of past, present and future.

  1. Decoupling of iron and phosphate in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, P.; Follows, M. J.; Boyle, E. A.

    2005-06-01

    We formulate a mechanistic model of the coupled oceanic iron and phosphorus cycles. The iron parameterization includes scavenging onto sinking particles, complexation with an organic ligand, and a prescribed aeolian source. Export production is limited by the availability of light, phosphate, and iron. We implement this biogeochemical scheme in a coarse resolution ocean general circulation model using scavenging rates and conditional stability constants guided by laboratory studies and a suite of box model sensitivity studies. The model is able to reproduce the broad regional patterns of iron and phosphorus. In particular, the high macronutrient concentrations of the Southern Ocean, tropical Pacific, and subarctic Pacific emerge from the explicit iron limitation of the model. In addition, the model also qualitatively reproduces the observed interbasin gradients of deep, dissolved iron with the lowest values in the Southern Ocean. The ubiquitous presence of significant amounts of free ligand is also explicitly captured. We define a tracer, Fe* which quantifies the degree to which a water mass is iron limited, relative to phosphorus. Surface waters in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions have negative Fe* values, indicating Fe limitation. The extent of the decoupling of iron and phosphorus is determined by the availability and binding strength of the ligand relative to the scavenging by particulate. Global iron concentrations are sensitive to changes in scavenging rate and physical forcing. Decreasing the scavenging rate 40% results in ˜0.1 nM increase in dissolved iron in deep waters. Forcing the model with weaker wind stresses leads to a decrease in surface [PO4] and [Fe] in the Southern Ocean due to a reduction in the upwelling strength.

  2. Nonlinear Dependence of Global Warming Prediction on Ocean State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Lin, L.; Tung, K. K.; Yung, Y. L.; Sun, S.

    2010-12-01

    Global temperature has increased by 0.8 C since the pre-industrial era, and is likely to increase further if greenhouse gas emission continues unchecked. Various mitigation efforts are being negotiated among nations to keep the increase under 2 C, beyond which the outcome is believed to be catastrophic. Such policy efforts are currently based on predictions by the state-of-the-art coupled atmosphere ocean models (AOGCM). Caution is advised for their use for the purpose of short-term (less than a century) climate prediction as the predicted warming and spatial patterns vary depending on the initial state of the ocean, even in an ensemble mean. The range of uncertainty in such predictions by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) models may be underreported when models were run with their oceans at various stages of adjustment with their atmospheres. By comparing a very long run (> 1000 years) of the coupled Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) model with what was reported to IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4), we show that the fully adjusted model transient climate sensitivity should be 30% higher for the same model, and the 2 C warming should occur sooner than previously predicted. Using model archives we further argue that this may be a common problem for the IPCC AR4 models, since few, if any, of the models has a fully adjusted ocean. For all models, multi-decadal climate predictions to 2050 are highly dependent on the initial ocean state (and so are unreliable). Such dependence cannot be removed simply by subtracting the climate drift from control runs.

  3. U. S. GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    This is a very good comparison in relation to the present state of the art (Bryan et al., 2007; Chassignet and Marshall, 2008), with the model...profiles computed from the Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System ( MODAS ). These profiles are only created where the satellite based SSH anomalies with... MODAS approach yielded much smaller bias and RMSE than the CH approach (Fig. 4). Thus MODAS synthetics were chosen for the downward projection

  4. Estimates of Gelatinous Zooplankton Carbon Flux in the Global Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J. Y.; Condon, R.; Cowen, R. K.

    2016-02-01

    Gelatinous zooplankton (GZ), which include the cnidarians, ctenophores, and pelagic tunicates, are a common feature of marine ecosystems worldwide, but their contribution to global biogeochemical fluxes has never been assessed. We constructed a carbon-cycle model with a single, annual time-step and resolved to a 5° spatial grid for the three major GZ groups in order to evaluate the GZ-mediated carbon fluxes and export to depth. Biomass inputs (totaling 0.149 Pg C) were based off of Lucas et al. (2014) and updated using the JeDI database (Condon et al. 2015). From the upper ocean, biomass export flux from cnidarians, ctenophores, and tunicates totaled 2.96 ± 2.82 Pg C y-1, though only 0.199 ± 0.023 Pg C y-1 of GZ carbon were transferred to upper trophic levels, roughly amounting to one-quarter of all mesozooplankton production flux. In contrast, GZ fluxes to DOC only comprised ca. 2% of labile DOC flux. Egestion flux from the upper ocean totaled 2.56 ± 3.35 Pg C y-1, with over 80% being fast-sinking tunicate fecal pellets. Due to fast sinking rates of carcasses and fecal pellets, 26% of all C export from the upper ocean reached the seafloor, such that GZ fecal matter is estimated to comprise between 20-30% of global POC surface export and 11-30% of POC seafloor deposition. Finally, results from sensitivity analyses showed no increase in cnidarian and ctenophore export fluxes with increased temperature and jelly biomass, though tunicate export fluxes showed some increase with both temperature and biomass. These results suggest that current estimates of global POC flux from the surface oceans, which range between 8.6 - 12.9 Pg C y-1, may be underestimated by as much as 20 - 25%, implying a definite need to incorporate GZ mediated flux in estimating the biological pump transfer efficiency. Our study represents the first effort to quantify the role of gelatinous zooplankton in the global marine carbon cycle.

  5. Global warming-induced upper-ocean freshening and the intensification of super typhoons

    SciTech Connect

    Balaguru, Karthik; Foltz, Gregory R.; Leung, Ruby L.; Emanuel, Kerry

    2016-11-25

    The northwestern tropical Pacific Ocean receives a substantial amount of rainfall and, consequently, has some of the freshest surface waters in the global tropics (Cravatte et al.,2009). With the hydrological cycle projected to strengthen in a warming world (Held and Soden, 2006), a corresponding amplification of the near-surface salinity stratification is expected (Cravatte et al. (2009), Durack et al. (2012)}. These changes have the potential to affect the intensity of `super typhoons', violent storms with deep upper-ocean mixing, strong sea surface cooling, and enhanced sensitivity to ocean stratification effects (Vincent et al., 2013). In this study, observations and coupled climate model simulations are used to examine the impacts of a changing hydrological cycle on the near-surface salinity stratification and the intensity of super typhoons in the northwestern Pacific. Analysis of 30 years of observations over the post-satellite period of 1979-2008 shows that the surface ocean freshened considerably at an average rate of about 0.06 psu/decade, causing a strengthening of upper-ocean salinity stratification and a reduction in the magnitude of super typhoon cold wakes. These changes increased the `Dynamic Potential Intensity (DPI)' (Balaguru et al., 2015), a variant of potential intensity that accounts for ocean stratification, for super typhoons. Averaged over the typhoon season and over the region 130E-150E and 5N-25N, the DPI increased at a rate of 0.13 m/s/decade, which is about 23% of the increasing trend due to changes in the upper-ocean thermal structure alone. Further, examination of the 100-year changes from a suite of coupled climate simulations under the RCP 8.5 scenario reveals a continued freshening of the upper ocean. These salinity changes act to reduce the magnitudes of cold wakes and increase the DPI for super typhoons by 0.14 m/s/decade throughout the 21st century.

  6. Impact of Parameterized Internal Wave Drag on the Semidiurnal Energy Balancein a Global Ocean Circulation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-12

    Impact of Parameterized Internal Wave Drag on the Semidiurnal Energy Balance in a Global Ocean Circulation Model* MAARTENC. BUIJSMAN,1 JOSEPHK...of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space Center, Mississippi #University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan @Center for Ocean -Atmospheric Prediction...parameterized linear internal wave drag on the semidiurnal barotropic and baroclinic energetics of a realistically forced, three-dimensional global ocean

  7. Assessing the Impact of Data Assimilation on Acoustic Predictions in Operational Global Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, C. N.; Townsend, T. L.; Smedstad, L. F.; Helber, R. W.; Dastugue, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Since accurate representation of sound speed is a major objective for operational naval ocean models, metrics focusing on acoustically relevant properties are used to evaluate potential changes to the systems. In particular, planned upgrades to the U.S. navy's operational Global Ocean Forecast System (GOFS) addressed aspects of the water column significant for predictions of acoustic propagation: mixed-layer depth (MLD), sonic-layer depth (SLD), and below-layer gradient. These properties were only indirectly considered in prior approaches focused on minimizing expected errors in temperature and salinity. The latest global capability, GOFS 2.6, introduces use of MLD-modified synthetic profiles based on vertical projection of satellite sea surface height and temperature as a background for Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (NCODA) analyses of in-situ data. Evaluation relative to unassimilated in situ observations reveals the continuing progress of successive operational systems. Because of these demonstrated improvements over prior capabilities, forecasts from the Navy Coastal Ocean Model in GOFS 2.6 and higher resolution regional NCOM implementations were announced as the new standard for U.S. Navy Operational Sound Speed Prediction (NOSSP) on 21 Aug. 2008.

  8. Multiple stressors of ocean ecosystems in the 21st century: projections with CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopp, L.; Resplandy, L.; Orr, J. C.; Doney, S. C.; Dunne, J. P.; Gehlen, M.; Halloran, P.; Heinze, C.; Ilyina, T.; Séférian, R.; Tjiputra, J.; Vichi, M.

    2013-02-01

    Ocean ecosystems are increasingly stressed by human-induced changes of their physical, chemical and biological environment. Among these changes, warming, acidification, deoxygenation and changes in primary productivity by marine phytoplankton can be considered as four of the major stressors of open ocean ecosystems. Due to rising atmospheric CO2 in the coming decades, these changes will be amplified. Here, we use the most recent simulations performed in the framework of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 to assess how these stressors may evolve over the course of the 21st century. The 10 Earth System Models used here project similar trends in ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation and reduced primary productivity for each of the IPCC's representative concentration parthways (RCP) over the 21st century. For the "business-as-usual" scenario RCP8.5, the model-mean changes in 2090s (compared to 1990s) for sea surface temperature, sea surface pH, global O2 content and integrated primary productivity amount to +2.73 °C, -0.33 pH unit, -3.45% and -8.6%, respectively. For the high mitigation scenario RCP2.6, corresponding changes are +0.71 °C, -0.07 pH unit, -1.81% and -2.0% respectively, illustrating the effectiveness of extreme mitigation strategies. Although these stressors operate globally, they display distinct regional patterns. Large decreases in O2 and in pH are simulated in global ocean intermediate and mode waters, whereas large reductions in primary production are simulated in the tropics and in the North Atlantic. Although temperature and pH projections are robust across models, the same does not hold for projections of sub-surface O2 concentrations in the tropics and global and regional changes in net primary productivity.

  9. Global ocean circulation and equator-pole heat transport as a function of ocean GCM resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C.

    1994-06-01

    To determine whether resolution of smaller scales is necessary to simulate large-scale ocean climate correctly, I examine results from a global ocean GCM run with horizontal grid spacings spanning a range from coarse resolutions traditionally used in climate modeling to nearly the highest resolution attained with today`s computers. The experiments include four cases employing 4{degrees}, 2{degrees}, 1{degrees} and 1/2{degrees} spacing in latitude and longitude, which were run with minimal differences among them, i.e., in a controlled experiment. Two additional cases-1/2{degrees} spacing with a more scale-selective sub-gridscale mixing of heat and momentum, and approximate 1/4{degrees} spacing-are also included. The 1/4{degrees} run resolves most of the observed mesoscale eddy energy in the ocean. Several artificial constraints on the model tend to minimize differences among the different resolution cases. Nevertheless, for quantities of interest to global climate studies,the simulations show significant changes as resolution increases.

  10. A Global, Multi-Resolution Approach to Regional Ocean Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Qiang

    2013-11-08

    In this collaborative research project between Pennsylvania State University, Colorado State University and Florida State University, we mainly focused on developing multi-resolution algorithms which are suitable to regional ocean modeling. We developed hybrid implicit and explicit adaptive multirate time integration method to solve systems of time-dependent equations that present two signi cantly di erent scales. We studied the e ects of spatial simplicial meshes on the stability and the conditioning of fully discrete approximations. We also studies adaptive nite element method (AFEM) based upon the Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (CVT) and superconvergent gradient recovery. Some of these techniques are now being used by geoscientists(such as those at LANL).

  11. Multidecadal Variability of Global Ocean and its Relationship to Recent Global Warming Slowdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Tung, K. K.

    2016-02-01

    When the global-mean surface temperature did not warm as expected in the presence of ever increasing atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases that enhance the long-wave radiation to space, there can be only two possible reasons, both involving the energy budget of the earth: (1) the radiative heating was not appreciably reaching the surface-most of it presumably was reflected back to space by, for example, increasing aerosols from volcanoes and anthropogenic pollution, or (2) that the heating was reaching the surface and below, but was sequestered in the oceans. From an energy perspective, while more heat was moved into deeper oceans in the 21st century, surface warming slowed. The main sites of ocean heat uptake below 300m are found in the Atlantic and the Southern Oceans, and not in the Pacific. The longer record of intermediate layer ocean measurements in the North Atlantic suggests that the interval between ocean regime shifts is about three decades, is density/salinity initiated, and involves a negative feedback that produces the acceleration and deceleration regimes of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation on the multidecadal time scales.

  12. Accuracy Assessment of Recent Global Ocean Tide Models around Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, J.; Li, F.; Zhang, S.; Ke, H.; Zhang, Q.; Li, W.

    2017-09-01

    Due to the coverage limitation of T/P-series altimeters, the lack of bathymetric data under large ice shelves, and the inaccurate definitions of coastlines and grounding lines, the accuracy of ocean tide models around Antarctica is poorer than those in deep oceans. Using tidal measurements from tide gauges, gravimetric data and GPS records, the accuracy of seven state-of-the-art global ocean tide models (DTU10, EOT11a, GOT4.8, FES2012, FES2014, HAMTIDE12, TPXO8) is assessed, as well as the most widely-used conventional model FES2004. Four regions (Antarctic Peninsula region, Amery ice shelf region, Filchner-Ronne ice shelf region and Ross ice shelf region) are separately reported. The standard deviations of eight main constituents between the selected models are large in polar regions, especially under the big ice shelves, suggesting that the uncertainty in these regions remain large. Comparisons with in situ tidal measurements show that the most accurate model is TPXO8, and all models show worst performance in Weddell sea and Filchner-Ronne ice shelf regions. The accuracy of tidal predictions around Antarctica is gradually improving.

  13. Global ocean particulate organic carbon flux merged with satellite parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouw, Colleen B.; Barnett, Audrey; McKinley, Galen A.; Gloege, Lucas; Pilcher, Darren

    2016-10-01

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) flux estimated from POC concentration observations from sediment traps and 234Th are compiled across the global ocean. The compilation includes six time series locations: CARIACO, K2, OSP, BATS, OFP, and HOT. Efficiency of the biological pump of carbon to the deep ocean depends largely on biologically mediated export of carbon from the surface ocean and its remineralization with depth; thus biologically related parameters able to be estimated from satellite observations were merged at the POC observation sites. Satellite parameters include net primary production, percent microplankton, sea surface temperature, photosynthetically active radiation, diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490 nm, euphotic zone depth, and climatological mixed layer depth. Of the observations across the globe, 85 % are concentrated in the Northern Hemisphere with 44 % of the data record overlapping the satellite record. Time series sites accounted for 36 % of the data, while 71 % of the data are measured at ≥ 500 m with the most common deployment depths between 1000 and 1500 m. This data set is valuable for investigations of CO2 drawdown, carbon export, remineralization, and sequestration. The compiled data can be freely accessed at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.855600.

  14. Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Alex

    2015-09-16

    The Aquantis 2.5 MW Ocean Current Generation Device technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) is a derivation of wind power generating technology (a means of harnessing a slow moving fluid) adapted to the ocean environment. The Aquantis Project provides an opportunity for accelerated technological development and early commercialization, since it involves the joining of two mature disciplines: ocean engineering and wind turbine design. The Aquantis Current Plane (C-Plane) technology is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from a current flow. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced, continuous, base-load, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  15. Response of the tropical Pacific Ocean to El Niño versus global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fukai; Luo, Yiyong; Lu, Jian; Wan, Xiuquan

    2016-04-15

    Climate models project an El Niño-like SST response in the tropical Pacific Ocean to global warming (GW). By employing the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and applying an overriding technique to its ocean component, Parallel Ocean Program version 2 (POP2), this study investigates the similarity and difference of formation mechanism for the changes in the tropical Pacific Ocean under El Niño and GW. Results show that, despite sharing some similarities between the two scenarios, there are many significant distinctions between GW and El Niño: 1) the phase locking of the seasonal cycle reduction is more notable under GW compared with El Niño, implying more extreme El Niño events in the future; 2) in contrast to the penetration of the equatorial subsurface temperature anomaly that appears to propagate in the form of an oceanic equatorial upwelling Kelvin wave during El Niño, the GW-induced subsurface temperature anomaly manifest in the form of off-equatorial upwelling Rossby waves; 3) while significant across-equator northward heat transport (NHT) is induced by the wind stress anomalies associated with El Niño, little NHT is found at the equator due to a symmetric change in the shallow meridional overturning circulation that appears to be weakened in both North and South Pacific under GW; and 4) the maintaining mechanisms for the eastern equatorial Pacific warming are also substantially different.

  16. Response of the tropical Pacific Ocean to El Niño versus global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fukai; Luo, Yiyong; Lu, Jian; Wan, Xiuquan

    2017-02-01

    Climate models project an El Niño-like SST response in the tropical Pacific Ocean to global warming (GW). By employing the Community Earth System Model and applying an overriding technique to its ocean component, Parallel Ocean Program version 2, this study investigates the similarity and difference of formation mechanism for the changes in the tropical Pacific Ocean under El Niño and GW. Results show that, despite sharing some similarities between the two scenarios, there are many significant distinctions between GW and El Niño: (1) the phase locking of the seasonal cycle reduction is more notable under GW compared with El Niño, implying more extreme El Niño events in the future; (2) in contrast to the penetration of the equatorial subsurface temperature anomaly that appears to propagate in the form of an oceanic equatorial upwelling Kelvin wave during El Niño, the GW-induced subsurface temperature anomaly manifest in the form of off-equatorial upwelling Rossby waves; (3) while significant across-equator northward heat transport (NHT) is induced by the wind stress anomalies associated with El Niño, little NHT is found at the equator due to a symmetric change in the shallow meridional overturning circulation that appears to be weakened in both North and South Pacific under GW; and (4) heat budget analysis shows that the maintaining mechanisms for the eastern equatorial Pacific warming are also substantially different.

  17. Modeling Abrupt Change in Global Sea Level Arising from Ocean - Ice-Sheet Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, David M

    2011-09-24

    It is proposed to develop, validate, and apply a coupled ocean ice-sheet model to simulate possible, abrupt future change in global sea level. This research is to be carried out collaboratively between an academic institute and a Department of Energy Laboratory (DOE), namely, the PI and a graduate student at New York University (NYU) and climate model researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The NYU contribution is mainly in the area of incorporating new physical processes into the model, while the LANL efforts are focused on improved numerics and overall model development. NYU and LANL will work together on applying the model to a variety of modeling scenarios of recent past and possible near-future abrupt change to the configuration of the periphery of the major ice sheets. The project's ultimate goal is to provide a robust, accurate prediction of future global sea level change, a feat that no fully-coupled climate model is currently capable of producing. This proposal seeks to advance that ultimate goal by developing, validating, and applying a regional model that can simulate the detailed processes involved in sea-level change due to ocean ice-sheet interaction. Directly modeling ocean ice-sheet processes in a fully-coupled global climate model is not a feasible activity at present given the near-complete absence of development of any such causal mechanism in these models to date.

  18. Sinking of North Atlantic waters in a global ocean model: location and controlling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsman, Caroline; Drijfhout, Sybren; Dijkstra, Henk; Spall, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) plays an important role in climate. The classical view of an ocean conveyor belt with northward surface currents and southward return currents transporting convectively-formed waters from the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean to other ocean basins suggests a tight relation between convection and sinking. However, convection regions feature very little vertical mass transport. Instead, it has been argued that the sinking of waters must take place near boundaries where ageostrophic processes affect the flow. So far, this has been confirmed in highly idealized regional model studies and in laboratory experiments. It is, however, unclear how well the sinking of dense waters is represented in the current generation of global ocean models and climate models, and whether the factors driving and controlling the sinking in these models are in accordance with the developed theory. This is of crucial importance for our confidence in projections of the future behavior of the AMOC, which are based on this type of model. In this study, we analyze the characteristics of the vertical transport in two global ocean models: an eddy-permitting model at 0.25 degree resolution and its coarser 1.0 degree resolution counterpart. We show that the sinking indeed predominantly occurs in a narrow region close to the boundary in both model simulations, and not in deep convection regions. Notably, the amount of vertical transport that is found along the edges of the North Atlantic Ocean is highly variable in space, and large differences exist between the two model versions. In the eddy-permitting model, the magnitude of the local sinking appears to be governed by alongshore variations in density near the boundary, in line with theory.

  19. Future habitat suitability for coral reef ecosystems under global warming and ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Couce, Elena; Ridgwell, Andy; Hendy, Erica J

    2013-12-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations are placing spatially divergent stresses on the world's tropical coral reefs through increasing ocean surface temperatures and ocean acidification. We show how these two stressors combine to alter the global habitat suitability for shallow coral reef ecosystems, using statistical Bioclimatic Envelope Models rather than basing projections on any a priori assumptions of physiological tolerances or fixed thresholds. We apply two different modeling approaches (Maximum Entropy and Boosted Regression Trees) with two levels of complexity (one a simplified and reduced environmental variable version of the other). Our models project a marked temperature-driven decline in habitat suitability for many of the most significant and bio-diverse tropical coral regions, particularly in the central Indo-Pacific. This is accompanied by a temperature-driven poleward range expansion of favorable conditions accelerating up to 40-70 km per decade by 2070. We find that ocean acidification is less influential for determining future habitat suitability than warming, and its deleterious effects are centered evenly in both hemispheres between 5° and 20° latitude. Contrary to expectations, the combined impact of ocean surface temperature rise and acidification leads to little, if any, degradation in future habitat suitability across much of the Atlantic and areas currently considered 'marginal' for tropical corals, such as the eastern Equatorial Pacific. These results are consistent with fossil evidence of range expansions during past warm periods. In addition, the simplified models are particularly sensitive to short-term temperature variations and their projections correlate well with reported locations of bleaching events. Our approach offers new insights into the relative impact of two global environmental pressures associated with rising atmospheric CO2 on potential future habitats, but greater understanding of past and current controls on coral

  20. Future habitat suitability for coral reef ecosystems under global warming and ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Couce, Elena; Ridgwell, Andy; Hendy, Erica J

    2013-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations are placing spatially divergent stresses on the world's tropical coral reefs through increasing ocean surface temperatures and ocean acidification. We show how these two stressors combine to alter the global habitat suitability for shallow coral reef ecosystems, using statistical Bioclimatic Envelope Models rather than basing projections on any a priori assumptions of physiological tolerances or fixed thresholds. We apply two different modeling approaches (Maximum Entropy and Boosted Regression Trees) with two levels of complexity (one a simplified and reduced environmental variable version of the other). Our models project a marked temperature-driven decline in habitat suitability for many of the most significant and bio-diverse tropical coral regions, particularly in the central Indo-Pacific. This is accompanied by a temperature-driven poleward range expansion of favorable conditions accelerating up to 40–70 km per decade by 2070. We find that ocean acidification is less influential for determining future habitat suitability than warming, and its deleterious effects are centered evenly in both hemispheres between 5° and 20° latitude. Contrary to expectations, the combined impact of ocean surface temperature rise and acidification leads to little, if any, degradation in future habitat suitability across much of the Atlantic and areas currently considered ‘marginal’ for tropical corals, such as the eastern Equatorial Pacific. These results are consistent with fossil evidence of range expansions during past warm periods. In addition, the simplified models are particularly sensitive to short-term temperature variations and their projections correlate well with reported locations of bleaching events. Our approach offers new insights into the relative impact of two global environmental pressures associated with rising atmospheric CO2 on potential future habitats, but greater understanding of past and current controls on

  1. Global abundance of planktonic heterotrophic protists in the deep ocean

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, Massimo C; Forn, Irene; Gomes, Ana; Lara, Elena; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Arrieta, Jesus M; del Carmen Garcia, Francisca; Hernando-Morales, Victor; MacKenzie, Roy; Mestre, Mireia; Sintes, Eva; Teira, Eva; Valencia, Joaquin; Varela, Marta M; Vaqué, Dolors; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The dark ocean is one of the largest biomes on Earth, with critical roles in organic matter remineralization and global carbon sequestration. Despite its recognized importance, little is known about some key microbial players, such as the community of heterotrophic protists (HP), which are likely the main consumers of prokaryotic biomass. To investigate this microbial component at a global scale, we determined their abundance and biomass in deepwater column samples from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation using a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. HP were ubiquitously found at all depths investigated down to 4000 m. HP abundances decreased with depth, from an average of 72±19 cells ml−1 in mesopelagic waters down to 11±1 cells ml−1 in bathypelagic waters, whereas their total biomass decreased from 280±46 to 50±14 pg C ml−1. The parameters that better explained the variance of HP abundance were depth and prokaryote abundance, and to lesser extent oxygen concentration. The generally good correlation with prokaryotic abundance suggested active grazing of HP on prokaryotes. On a finer scale, the prokaryote:HP abundance ratio varied at a regional scale, and sites with the highest ratios exhibited a larger contribution of fungi molecular signal. Our study is a step forward towards determining the relationship between HP and their environment, unveiling their importance as players in the dark ocean's microbial food web. PMID:25290506

  2. Global abundance of planktonic heterotrophic protists in the deep ocean.

    PubMed

    Pernice, Massimo C; Forn, Irene; Gomes, Ana; Lara, Elena; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Arrieta, Jesus M; del Carmen Garcia, Francisca; Hernando-Morales, Victor; MacKenzie, Roy; Mestre, Mireia; Sintes, Eva; Teira, Eva; Valencia, Joaquin; Varela, Marta M; Vaqué, Dolors; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon

    2015-03-01

    The dark ocean is one of the largest biomes on Earth, with critical roles in organic matter remineralization and global carbon sequestration. Despite its recognized importance, little is known about some key microbial players, such as the community of heterotrophic protists (HP), which are likely the main consumers of prokaryotic biomass. To investigate this microbial component at a global scale, we determined their abundance and biomass in deepwater column samples from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation using a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. HP were ubiquitously found at all depths investigated down to 4000 m. HP abundances decreased with depth, from an average of 72±19 cells ml(-1) in mesopelagic waters down to 11±1 cells ml(-1) in bathypelagic waters, whereas their total biomass decreased from 280±46 to 50±14 pg C ml(-1). The parameters that better explained the variance of HP abundance were depth and prokaryote abundance, and to lesser extent oxygen concentration. The generally good correlation with prokaryotic abundance suggested active grazing of HP on prokaryotes. On a finer scale, the prokaryote:HP abundance ratio varied at a regional scale, and sites with the highest ratios exhibited a larger contribution of fungi molecular signal. Our study is a step forward towards determining the relationship between HP and their environment, unveiling their importance as players in the dark ocean's microbial food web.

  3. Phytoplankton size impact on export flux in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouw, Colleen B.; Barnett, Audrey; McKinley, Galen A.; Gloege, Lucas; Pilcher, Darren

    2016-10-01

    Efficiency of the biological pump of carbon to the deep ocean depends largely on biologically mediated export of carbon from the surface ocean and its remineralization with depth. Global satellite studies have primarily focused on chlorophyll concentration and net primary production (NPP) to understand the role of phytoplankton in these processes. Recent satellite retrievals of phytoplankton composition now allow for the size of phytoplankton cells to be considered. Here we improve understanding of phytoplankton size structure impacts on particle export, remineralization, and transfer. A global compilation of particulate organic carbon (POC) flux estimated from sediment traps and 234Th are utilized. Annual climatologies of NPP, percent microplankton, and POC flux at four time series locations and within biogeochemical provinces are constructed. Parameters that characterize POC flux versus depth (export flux ratio, labile fraction, and remineralization length scale) are fit for time series locations, biogeochemical provinces, and times of the year dominated by small and large phytoplankton cells where phytoplankton cell size show enough dynamic range over the annual cycle. Considering all data together, our findings support the idea of high export flux but low transfer efficiency in productive regions and vice versa for oligotrophic regions. However, when parsing by dominant size class, we find periods dominated by small cells to have both greater export flux efficiency and lower transfer efficiency than periods when large cells comprise a greater proportion of the phytoplankton community.

  4. Flavours of Baroclinic Instability in the Global Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, S. R.; Smith, K. S.

    2016-02-01

    The transfer of energy from the global ocean circulation to mesoscale eddies is primarily mediated by baroclinic instability, which releases the superabundant available potential energy stored in sloping isopycnals by basin-scale wind and buoyancy forcing. However, the details of the local shear and stratification can give rise to qualitatively distinct flavours of baroclinic instability. In particular, the presence of outcropping isopycnals (or, equivalent, a thermal wind shear at the upper surface) can have a strong impact on the necessary conditions for baroclinic instability and the resulting nonlinear cascade to submesoscales. In this article, a simple framework is described for categorizing baroclinic instability in terms of two non-dimensional parameters, the Charney-Green number and the Phillips supercriticality. We analyze the influence of a non-zonal mean flow on growth rates and the baroclinic conversion of available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy. Finally, hydrographic profiles are used to form a global atlas of baroclinic instability in the ocean, and regional patterns are discussed.

  5. Madden Julian Oscillation impacts on global ocean surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Andrew G.; Hendon, Harry H.; Durrant, Tom H.; Hemer, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    We assess the impact of the tropical Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) on global ocean wind waves using 30 years of wave data from a wave model hindcast that is forced with high resolution surface winds from the NCEP-CFSR reanalysis. We concentrate on the boreal winter season when the MJO has its greatest amplitude and is potentially a source of predictable wave impacts at intra-seasonal lead times. Statistically significant anomalies in significant wave height (Hs), peak wave period (Tp) and zonal wave energy flux (CgE) are found to covary with the intra-seasonal variation of surface zonal wind induced by the MJO as it traverses eastward from the western tropical Indian Ocean to the eastern tropical Pacific. Tp varies generally out of phase with Hs over the life cycle of the MJO, indicating that these MJO-wave anomalies are locally wind-generated rather than remotely generated by ocean swell. Pronounced Hs anomalies develop on the northwest shelf of Australia, where the MJO is known to influence sea level and surface temperatures, and in the western Caribbean Sea and Guatemalan-Panama Seas with enhanced wave anomalies apparent in the vicinity of the Tehuantepec and Papagayo gaps. Significant wave anomalies are also detected in the North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans in connection with the MJO teleconnection to the extratropics via atmospheric wave propagation. The impact in the north Atlantic stems from induction of the high phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) about 1 week after MJO convection traverses the Indian Ocean, and the low phase of the NAO about one week after suppressed convection traverses the Indian Ocean. Strong positive Hs anomalies maximize on the Northern European coast in the positive NAO phase and vice versa for the negative NAO phase. The MJO also influences the occurrence of daily low (below the 5th percentile) and high (above the 95th percentile) wave conditions across the tropics and in the North Pacific and North Atlantic

  6. Global Estimate of Seasonality in Scales of Oceanic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Abernathey, R. P.

    2016-02-01

    Wavenumber spectral analysis is a powerful method for characterizing the properties of ocean turbulence. Here we calculate seasonally and regionally resolved wavenumber power spectra of sea-surface temperature (SST), sea-surface height (SSH), and surface eddy kinetic energy (EKE) from the high resolution ocean component of a CESM global climate model. Until now there has not been a comprehensive analysis of ocean mesoscale turbulence in this new category of model. Furthermore, this study provides a test bed for future work on infrared satellite observations. The ocean component model (POP) has 0.1° degree resolution, mesoscale resolving at most latitudes. We have found seasonality in the spectra, which indicates the possibility of different turbulent schemes for each season. Although the spatial resolution of the model is not considered submesoscale resolving, we see that the seasonality originates in the submesoscale range (below 50km) in the power level of the spectra. On the other hand, it is difficult to extract physical meanings from the actual values of spectral slopes since the slopes depend on the wavelength range we fit the spectra due to numerical viscosity. Thus, we propose the possibility of mixed-layer instability (e.g. Callies et al. (2014)) playing an important role in the seasonality of submeso/mesoscale turbulence, and power levels are a more robust criteria in detecting seasonality than spectral slopes. We also compare the spectral analysis with structure function analysis. The strength of structure functions is that they can characterize scaling properties of turbulence even when the data has gaps or missing data as in infrared satellite observations of SST.

  7. Ocean Circulation and Mixing: New Insights From the Global Distribution of 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, P.; Newton, R.; Winckler, G.

    2007-05-01

    Since the discovery of mantle 3He in the ocean in the 1960's by Clarke and others this isotope has been used in numerous studies of ocean circulation and mixing. Recently, a global helium isotope data set has been collected during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). We combined the WOCE helium isotope data with similar, but smaller, data sets from previous global and regional studies such as GEOCSECS or TTO to study features of the global ocean circulation, as well as ventilation and mixing. In this contribution we describe the global data set and discuss the first results obtained on global ocean ventilation and deep ocean mixing. A simple model is used to estimate vertical turbulent exchange coefficients for the deep ocean in the South Pacific and the results are compared to mixing coefficients obtained from fine structure measurements and tracer release experiments.

  8. The global Mercator Ocean analysis and forecasting high resolution system and its main future updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lellouche, Jean-Michel; Legalloudec, Olivier; Bourdallé-Badie, Romain; Garric, Gilles; Greiner, Eric; Drévillon, Marie; Regnier, Charly; Testut, Charles-Emmanuel; Benkiran, Mounir; Drillet, Yann

    2015-04-01

    In April 2013, Mercator Ocean has performed a major upgrade of the global 1/12° high resolution system. This system currently delivers daily services, and includes numerous improvements related to the ocean/sea-ice model and the assimilation scheme. Observations are assimilated by means of a reduced-order Kalman filter with a 3D multivariate modal decomposition of the forecast error. It includes an adaptive-error estimate and a localization algorithm. Altimeter data, satellite Sea Surface Temperature and in situ temperature and salinity vertical profiles are jointly assimilated to estimate the initial conditions for numerical ocean forecasting. A 3D-Var scheme provides a correction for the slowly-evolving large-scale biases in temperature and salinity. In April 2015, Mercator Ocean will open the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service and will be in charge of the global ocean at eddy resolving resolution. In this context, R&D activities conducted during the end of the MyOcean2 and MyOcean follow-on projects to deliver an improved version of the global system will continue throughout 2015. The main new updates we plan to integrate in the next version of the global system concern: 1) A new vertical mixing scheme k-epsilon: vertical physics has been explored with a special focus on the turbulent closure problem to improve the representation of temperature and salinity in the Mixed Layer Depth. 2) An adaptive tuning of observations errors: as the prescription of observation errors in the assimilation systems is often too approximate, some diagnostics have been developed. These diagnostics consist in the computation of the Desroziers ratio which is a function of observation errors, innovations and residuals. It helps to identify inconsistency on the specified observation errors and to tune an adaptive weight coefficient acting on the error of each assimilated observation. 3) The assimilation of sea-ice concentration observations: it is introduced in the

  9. Five years of the Normal Oceanic Mantle (NOMan) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Hisashi; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Shiobara, Hajime; Baba, Kiyoshi; Isse, Takehi; Suetsugu, Daisuke; NOMan Project Team

    2016-04-01

    conducted in 2014, we have recovered instruments from all sites except only one site (NM03) where a few EM instruments were left and are to be retrieved in September, 2015. The seafloor age difference between study areas A and B is only about 10 Ma, which was thought small enough for the temperature difference between two areas to be ignored at the first order approximation. So we originally expected that corresponding results in area B show close similarity to those in are A. However, a result of 1-D array analysis of the surface waves indicated substantial difference in the lithosphere-asthenosphere structure between areas A and B. 1-D inversion results of multi-station seafloor magnetotelluric (MT) data also show a certain difference between these two areas. Furthermore, MT results in surrounding areas obtained by previous projects imply the presence of further significant heterogeneity in the old oceanic mantle in the northwestern Pacific toward the subduction zone. For the moment, we are trying to invert each of NOMan geophysical dataset as accurately as possible so as to characterize the mantle structure and its lateral variation. Later we try to clarify the cause for these lateral variabilities, as it can be one of the key issues to understand the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the old oceanic mantle. For the key question (b), high-quality data obtained by the long-term seafloor observations are used to investigate the MTZ structure. In particular, electric field data obtained by EFOS (with 2 km electrode separation) provide longer period MT responses sensitive to the MTZ. Resulting MT and GDS (Geomagnetic Deep sounding) responses are almost consistent with the NW Pacific semi-global 1-D model (Shimizu et al., 2010). This indicates that the MTZ conductivity below the study region has weak lateral variation (well approximated by a 1-D model) and is also consistent with the conductivity of MTZ minerals containing at most 0.1-0.5 wt.% water.

  10. The Southern Ocean in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5.

    PubMed

    Meijers, A J S

    2014-07-13

    The Southern Ocean is an important part of the global climate system, but its complex coupled nature makes both its present state and its response to projected future climate forcing difficult to model. Clear trends in wind, sea-ice extent and ocean properties emerged from multi-model intercomparison in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3). Here, we review recent analyses of the historical and projected wind, sea ice, circulation and bulk properties of the Southern Ocean in the updated Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) ensemble. Improvements to the models include higher resolutions, more complex and better-tuned parametrizations of ocean mixing, and improved biogeochemical cycles and atmospheric chemistry. CMIP5 largely reproduces the findings of CMIP3, but with smaller inter-model spreads and biases. By the end of the twenty-first century, mid-latitude wind stresses increase and shift polewards. All water masses warm, and intermediate waters freshen, while bottom waters increase in salinity. Surface mixed layers shallow, warm and freshen, whereas sea ice decreases. The upper overturning circulation intensifies, whereas bottom water formation is reduced. Significant disagreement exists between models for the response of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current strength, for reasons that are as yet unclear.

  11. Global Oceanic Precipitation: A Joint View by TOPEX and the TOPEX Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ge; Chapron, Bertrand; Tournadre, Jean; Katsaros, Kristina; Vandemark, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON mission offers the first opportunity to observe rain cells over the ocean by a dual-frequency radar altimeter (TOPEX) and simultaneously observe their natural radiative properties by a three-frequency radiometer (TOPEX microwave radiometer (TMR)). This work is a feasibility study aimed at understanding the capability and potential of the active/passive TOPEX/TMR system for oceanic rainfall detection. On the basis of past experiences in rain flagging, a joint TOPEX/TMR rain probability index is proposed. This index integrates several advantages of the two sensors and provides a more reliable rain estimate than the radiometer alone. One year's TOPEX/TMR data are used to test the performance of the index. The resulting rain frequency statistics show quantitative agreement with those obtained from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), while qualitative agreement is found for other regions of the world ocean. A recent finding that the latitudinal frequency of precipitation over the Southern Ocean increases steadily toward the Antarctic continent is confirmed by our result. Annual and seasonal precipitation maps are derived from the index. Notable features revealed include an overall similarity in rainfall pattern from the Pacific, the Atlantic, and the Indian Oceans and a general phase reversal between the two hemispheres, as well as a number of regional anomalies in terms of rain intensity. Comparisons with simultaneous Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) multisatellite precipitation rate and COADS rain climatology suggest that systematic differences also exist. One example is that the maximum rainfall in the ITCZ of the Indian Ocean appears to be more intensive and concentrated in our result compared to that of the GPCP. Another example is that the annual precipitation produced by TOPEX/TMR is constantly higher than those from GPCP and COADS in the extratropical regions of the

  12. Global Oceanic Precipitation: A Joint View by TOPEX and the TOPEX Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ge; Chapron, Bertrand; Tournadre, Jean; Katsaros, Kristina; Vandemark, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON mission offers the first opportunity to observe rain cells over the ocean by a dual-frequency radar altimeter (TOPEX) and simultaneously observe their natural radiative properties by a three-frequency radiometer (TOPEX microwave radiometer (TMR)). This work is a feasibility study aimed at understanding the capability and potential of the active/passive TOPEX/TMR system for oceanic rainfall detection. On the basis of past experiences in rain flagging, a joint TOPEX/TMR rain probability index is proposed. This index integrates several advantages of the two sensors and provides a more reliable rain estimate than the radiometer alone. One year's TOPEX/TMR data are used to test the performance of the index. The resulting rain frequency statistics show quantitative agreement with those obtained from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), while qualitative agreement is found for other regions of the world ocean. A recent finding that the latitudinal frequency of precipitation over the Southern Ocean increases steadily toward the Antarctic continent is confirmed by our result. Annual and seasonal precipitation maps are derived from the index. Notable features revealed include an overall similarity in rainfall pattern from the Pacific, the Atlantic, and the Indian Oceans and a general phase reversal between the two hemispheres, as well as a number of regional anomalies in terms of rain intensity. Comparisons with simultaneous Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) multisatellite precipitation rate and COADS rain climatology suggest that systematic differences also exist. One example is that the maximum rainfall in the ITCZ of the Indian Ocean appears to be more intensive and concentrated in our result compared to that of the GPCP. Another example is that the annual precipitation produced by TOPEX/TMR is constantly higher than those from GPCP and COADS in the extratropical regions of the

  13. Seasonal Cycle of Ocean Heat Transport and its Projected Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Saenko, O.

    2011-12-01

    Seasonal cycle of ocean heat transport (OHT) and its projected changes are analyzed using the second-generation Canadian Earth System Model (CanESM2). The future anthropogenic forcing is assessed using two newly-developed representative concentration pathways (RCPs) of greenhouse gases and aerosols (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). Consistent with some previous results based on eddy-permitting models, it is found that much of the seasonal variability of meridional circulation in the CanESM2 ocean is captured by the seasonal cycle of meridional Ekman fluxes, compensated by deep-reaching barotropic return flows. Since the seasonal cycle of zonal wind stress is projected to change at some latitudes, both in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, the projected seasonal variability of OHT essentially follows these changes in the wind.

  14. Designing Scatterometer Constellations for Sampling Global Ocean Vector Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Chelton, D. B.; Stoffelen, A.; Schlax, M.

    2012-12-01

    The rapid temporal variations in ocean vector winds make it impossible to obtain synoptic global snapshots of winds and wind stress from a single spaceborne sensor. Even when multiple sensors are present, the peculiarities of the resulting space-time sampling pattern require that significant smoothing in space and time be performed to limit spatially and temporally inhomogeneous error characteristics in the merged data. Based on the collected common experience in its member states, the World Meteorological Organization collects requirements for spatio-temporal sampling in meteorological applications such as global and regional Numerical Weather Prediction, nowcasting, and climate. An additional concern, when constructing data sets from sun-synchronous missions, is that undersampling of diurnal and sub-diurnal variability may result in aliasing of the climate data record. Indeed, examination of climatologies constructed from different satellite missions, such as NASA's QuikSCAT and EUMETSAT's ASCAT scatterometers, show systematic differences that cannot be explained as being due solely to unresolved incoherent diurnal and sub-diurnal variability. Some of these differences, especially in the tropics, are probably explained by systematic diurnal and sub-diurnal variations. Other differences may be due to the difficulty of cross-calibrating sun-synchronous satellites with different local times. Forthcoming satellite missions may offer the possibility of overcoming or mitigating the space-time sampling and calibration challenges using multiple coordinated platforms. In the next decade, there is an expectation that ocean vector winds will be measured simultaneously by multiple satellites from the European community, India, China, and the United States. The coordination and suitable merging of the data from these satellites to produce a climate data record will be a challenge to the ocean vector winds community. In this presentation, we use climatologies constructed from

  15. Assimilation of SeaWiFS Ocean Chlorophyll Data into a Three-Dimensional Global Ocean Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.

    2005-01-01

    Assimilation of satellite ocean color data is a relatively new phenomenon in ocean sciences. However, with routine observations from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), launched in late 1997, and now with new data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradometer (MODIS) Aqua, there is increasing interest in ocean color data assimilation. Here SeaWiFS chlorophyll data were assimilated with an established thre-dimentional global ocean model. The assimilation improved estimates of hlorophyll and primary production relative to a free-run (no assimilation) model. This represents the first attempt at ocean color data assimilation using NASA satellites in a global model. The results suggest the potential of assimilation of satellite ocean chlorophyll data for improving models.

  16. Global Software Development Patterns for Project Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Välimäki, Antti; Kääriäinen, Jukka; Koskimies, Kai

    Global software development with the agile or waterfall development process has been taken into use in many companies. GSD offers benefits but also new challenges without known, documented solutions. The goal of this research is to present current best practices for GSD in the form of process patterns for project management, evaluated by using a scenario-based assessment method. The best practices have been collected from a large company operating in process automation. It is expected that the resulting pattern language helps other companies to improve their GSD processes by incorporating the patterns in the processes.

  17. Modeling selective pressures on phytoplankton in the global ocean.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Jason G; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Jahn, Oliver; Follows, Michael J; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2010-03-10

    Our view of marine microbes is transforming, as culture-independent methods facilitate rapid characterization of microbial diversity. It is difficult to assimilate this information into our understanding of marine microbe ecology and evolution, because their distributions, traits, and genomes are shaped by forces that are complex and dynamic. Here we incorporate diverse forces--physical, biogeochemical, ecological, and mutational--into a global ocean model to study selective pressures on a simple trait in a widely distributed lineage of picophytoplankton: the nitrogen use abilities of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus cyanobacteria. Some Prochlorococcus ecotypes have lost the ability to use nitrate, whereas their close relatives, marine Synechococcus, typically retain it. We impose mutations for the loss of nitrogen use abilities in modeled picophytoplankton, and ask: in which parts of the ocean are mutants most disadvantaged by losing the ability to use nitrate, and in which parts are they least disadvantaged? Our model predicts that this selective disadvantage is smallest for picophytoplankton that live in tropical regions where Prochlorococcus are abundant in the real ocean. Conversely, the selective disadvantage of losing the ability to use nitrate is larger for modeled picophytoplankton that live at higher latitudes, where Synechococcus are abundant. In regions where we expect Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus populations to cycle seasonally in the real ocean, we find that model ecotypes with seasonal population dynamics similar to Prochlorococcus are less disadvantaged by losing the ability to use nitrate than model ecotypes with seasonal population dynamics similar to Synechococcus. The model predictions for the selective advantage associated with nitrate use are broadly consistent with the distribution of this ability among marine picocyanobacteria, and at finer scales, can provide insights into interactions between temporally varying ocean processes and

  18. Assessment of the hindcast, nowcast and forecast capabilities of the Mercator-Ocean high resolution ocean forecasting system in the Global and Atlantic and Mediterranean basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lellouche, Jean-Michel; Tranchant, Benoît.; Bourdallé-Badie, Romain; Le Galloudec, Olivier; Greiner, Eric; Benkiran, Mounir; Derval, Corine; Testut, Charles-Emmanuel

    2010-05-01

    In the framework of the European project GMES/MyOcean, Mercator-Ocean has been designing a hierarchy of ocean analysis and forecasting systems based on numerical models of the ocean and data assimilation methods. Since April 2008, Mercator-Ocean runs an Atlantic and Mediterranean system at 1/12° between 20°S and 80°N. Since a few months, a global system, with the same horizontal and vertical resolution (50 levels on the vertical with a surface refinement), runs also in an operational mode. These two systems are eddy resolving. The ocean and sea ice models are based on the NEMO code. The data assimilation algorithm is a reduced order Kalman filter using 3D multivariate modal decomposition of the forecast error covariance. The system assimilates conjointly altimeter data, SST and in situ observations (temperature and salinity profiles, including ARGO data) in order to provide the initial conditions required for numerical ocean prediction. The main characteristics of the assimilation system are (i) the background error covariances calculated from a free oceanic simulation, (ii) the adaptive error variance, (iii) the use of the localization technique and (iv) the use of the IAU (Incremental Analysis Update) procedure where analysis increments are inserted at every time step over the same period as the data assimilation window. The real time operation of these systems produce each week realistic 3-dimensional oceanic conditions (temperature, salinity, currents,…) two weeks back in time (hindcast and nowcast) and a one or two weeks forecast, driven at the surface by atmospheric conditions from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). Moreover, the Atlantic and Mediterranean system is operated daily to produce 7 days ocean forecasts with daily updates of the ECMWF atmospheric forcing. A new version of the regional system is planned to replace soon the actual one with many improvements concerning the ocean model and the assimilation scheme

  19. Global oceanic thermo-haline warming trend in an eddy-permitting reanalysis context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricaud, Clement; Garric, Gilles; Ferry, Nicolas; Parent, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    Mercator Ocean, the French ocean forecasting center (www.mercator-ocean.fr), has been developing several operational forecasting systems and reanalysis of the physical and biogeochemical 3D-Ocean. In the framework of the European MyOcean project (www.myocean.eu.org), Mercator has produced global eddy-permitting reanalysis over the altimetry years (1992-2012). They are driven by the ECMWF atmospheric re-analyses ERAinterim at the surface via the CORE bulk formulae without any relaxation. In order to better capture high frequency variability, the atmospheric forcing is sampled to 3H conjointly with a diurnal cycle applied to the downwelling shortwave radiative atmospheric forcing. Those global ¼° reanalysis are based on the NEMO OGCM platform with 75 vertical z-levels. NEMO sea-ice model LIM2 is used with EVP rheology. The assimilation method is a reduced order Kalman filter based on SEEK formulation with bias correction scheme for temperature and salinity and an Incremental Analysis Update. Data assimilated are in situ profiles (CORIOLIS GDAC), REYNOLDS 0.25° AVHRR-only SST, AVISO along track SLA, and Mean Dynamic Topography (CNES-CLS09). Distribution of the 3D thermo-haline content in different layers is evaluated in terms of linear trend and compared favorably to estimations issued from in-situ data base (ARGO network). The 2-dimensional trend of the steric signal, in general agreement with in-situ estimation, is particularly emphasized. A similar experiment performed without assimilation also allowed us to qualify the model and the assimilation components of the reanalysis system.

  20. Does Ocean Color Data Assimilation Improve Estimates of Global Ocean Inorganic Carbon?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2012-01-01

    Ocean color data assimilation has been shown to dramatically improve chlorophyll abundances and distributions globally and regionally in the oceans. Chlorophyll is a proxy for phytoplankton biomass (which is explicitly defined in a model), and is related to the inorganic carbon cycle through the interactions of the organic carbon (particulate and dissolved) and through primary production where inorganic carbon is directly taken out of the system. Does ocean color data assimilation, whose effects on estimates of chlorophyll are demonstrable, trickle through the simulated ocean carbon system to produce improved estimates of inorganic carbon? Our emphasis here is dissolved inorganic carbon, pC02, and the air-sea flux. We use a sequential data assimilation method that assimilates chlorophyll directly and indirectly changes nutrient concentrations in a multi-variate approach. The results are decidedly mixed. Dissolved organic carbon estimates from the assimilation model are not meaningfully different from free-run, or unassimilated results, and comparisons with in situ data are similar. pC02 estimates are generally worse after data assimilation, with global estimates diverging 6.4% from in situ data, while free-run estimates are only 4.7% higher. Basin correlations are, however, slightly improved: r increase from 0.78 to 0.79, and slope closer to unity at 0.94 compared to 0.86. In contrast, air-sea flux of C02 is noticeably improved after data assimilation. Global differences decline from -0.635 mol/m2/y (stronger model sink from the atmosphere) to -0.202 mol/m2/y. Basin correlations are slightly improved from r=O.77 to r=0.78, with slope closer to unity (from 0.93 to 0.99). The Equatorial Atlantic appears as a slight sink in the free-run, but is correctly represented as a moderate source in the assimilation model. However, the assimilation model shows the Antarctic to be a source, rather than a modest sink and the North Indian basin is represented incorrectly as a sink

  1. Using ocean tracers to reduce uncertainties about ocean diapycnal mixing and model projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, M. P.; Urban, N.; Keller, K.; Schmittner, A.; Tonkonojenkov, R.; Haran, M.

    2010-12-01

    Current projections of the oceanic response to anthropogenic climate forcings are uncertain. Two key sources of these uncertainties are (i) structural errors in current Earth system models and (ii) imperfect knowledge of model parameters. Ocean tracers observations have the potential to reduce these uncertainties. Previous studies typically consider each tracer separately, neglect potentially important statistical properties of the system, or use methods that impose rather daunting computational demands. Here we extend and improve upon a recently developed approach using horizontally averaged vertical profiles of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-11), radiocarbon (DC14), and temperature (T) observations to reduce model parametric and structural uncertainties. Our method estimates a joint probability density function, which considers cross-tracer correlations and spatial autocorrelations of the errors. We illustrate this method by estimating two model parameters related to the vertical diffusivity, the background vertical diffusivity and the upper Southern Ocean mixing. We show that enhancing the upper Southern Ocean mixing in the model improves the representations of ocean tracers, as well as improves hindcasts of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and Ocean Carbon uptake. The most probable value of the background vertical diffusivity in the pelagic pycnocline is between 0.1-0.2 cm2/s. According to the statistical method, observations of DC14 reduce the uncertainty about the background vertical diffusivity the most followed by CFC-11 and T. Using all three tracers jointly reduces the model uncertainty by 40%, more than each tracer individually. Given several important caveats, we illustrate how the reduced model parametric uncertainty improves probabilistic projections of the AMOC and Ocean Carbon uptake.

  2. Rapid global ocean-atmosphere response to Southern Ocean freshening during the last glacial.

    PubMed

    Turney, Chris S M; Jones, Richard T; Phipps, Steven J; Thomas, Zoë; Hogg, Alan; Kershaw, A Peter; Fogwill, Christopher J; Palmer, Jonathan; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Adolphi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Hughen, Konrad A; Staff, Richard A; Grosvenor, Mark; Golledge, Nicholas R; Rasmussen, Sune Olander; Hutchinson, David K; Haberle, Simon; Lorrey, Andrew; Boswijk, Gretel; Cooper, Alan

    2017-09-12

    Contrasting Greenland and Antarctic temperatures during the last glacial period (115,000 to 11,650 years ago) are thought to have been driven by imbalances in the rates of formation of North Atlantic and Antarctic Deep Water (the 'bipolar seesaw'). Here we exploit a bidecadally resolved (14)C data set obtained from New Zealand kauri (Agathis australis) to undertake high-precision alignment of key climate data sets spanning iceberg-rafted debris event Heinrich 3 and Greenland Interstadial (GI) 5.1 in the North Atlantic (~30,400 to 28,400 years ago). We observe no divergence between the kauri and Atlantic marine sediment (14)C data sets, implying limited changes in deep water formation. However, a Southern Ocean (Atlantic-sector) iceberg rafted debris event appears to have occurred synchronously with GI-5.1 warming and decreased precipitation over the western equatorial Pacific and Atlantic. An ensemble of transient meltwater simulations shows that Antarctic-sourced salinity anomalies can generate climate changes that are propagated globally via an atmospheric Rossby wave train.A challenge for testing mechanisms of past climate change is the precise correlation of palaeoclimate records. Here, through climate modelling and the alignment of terrestrial, ice and marine (14)C and (10)Be records, the authors show that Southern Ocean freshwater hosing can trigger global change.

  3. Regional Sea Level Changes Projected by the NASA/GISS Atmosphere-Ocean Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Gary L.; Gornitz, Vivien; Miller, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Sea level has been rising for the past century, and inhabitants of the Earth's coastal regions will want to understand and predict future sea level changes. In this study we present results from new simulations of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) global atmosphere-ocean model from 1950 to 2099. Model results are compared with observed sea level changes during the past 40 years at 17 coastal stations around the world. Using observed levels of greenhouse gases between 1950 and 1990 and a compounded 0.5% annual increase in Co2 after 1990, model projections show that global sea level measured from 1950 will rise by 61 mm in the year 2000, by 212 mm in 2050, and by 408 mm in 2089. By 2089, two thirds of the global sea level rise will be due to thermal expansion and one third will be due to ocean mass changes. The spatial distribution of sea level rise is different than that projected by rigid lid ocean models.

  4. Assimilating ocean tide determined data into global tidal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahel, W.

    1995-01-01

    A data assimilation procedure, which has successfully been applied to fictive and realistic scenarios, is applied to a 1 °-model making use of an effective iterative method for the solution of the minimization problem. Two sets of ocean tide determined data are used for the purpose of assimilation, the more extensive one mainly comprising pelagic together with some coastal sea surface elevation data, and the other one consisting of loading gravity data. The computed O1 and M2 global tidal oscillation systems, namely the fields of tidal elevation and loading gravity, are compared with numerous additional pelagic and coastal elevation data and with a selected number of proper gravity data, respectively. The assimilation of the two sets of data leads to an enormous reduction of the errors of the model results in all oceans. Assimilating this altogether still restricted number of data, allows studying the generation of realistic tidal oscillation phenomena by individual data and comparing these data effects with those having been obtained by previous data assimilation experiments using a model with coarser grid spacing. The field of dynamical residuals resulting from data assimilation reflects the far reaching influence of the data, and it is shown that the spatially integrated work done by the residuals contributes to the in all reduced rate of dissipation in the tidal power balance.

  5. Effects of Drake Passage on a strongly eddying global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viebahn, Jan P.; Heydt, Anna S.; Le Bars, Dewi; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    2016-05-01

    The climate impact of ocean gateway openings during the Eocene-Oligocene transition is still under debate. Previous model studies employed grid resolutions at which the impact of mesoscale eddies has to be parameterized. We present results of a state-of-the-art eddy-resolving global ocean model with a closed Drake Passage and compare with results of the same model at noneddying resolution. An analysis of the pathways of heat by decomposing the meridional heat transport into eddy, horizontal, and overturning circulation components indicates that the model behavior on the large scale is qualitatively similar at both resolutions. Closing Drake Passage induces (i) sea surface warming around Antarctica due to equatorward expansion of the subpolar gyres, (ii) the collapse of the overturning circulation related to North Atlantic Deep Water formation leading to surface cooling in the North Atlantic, and (iii) significant equatorward eddy heat transport near Antarctica. However, quantitative details significantly depend on the chosen resolution. The warming around Antarctica is substantially larger for the noneddying configuration (˜5.5°C) than for the eddying configuration (˜2.5°C). This is a consequence of the subpolar mean flow which partitions differently into gyres and circumpolar current at different resolutions. We conclude that for a deciphering of the different mechanisms active in Eocene-Oligocene climate change detailed analyses of the pathways of heat in the different climate subsystems are crucial in order to clearly identify the physical processes actually at work.

  6. General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) - Mapping the Global Seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherall, P.; Jakobsson, M.; Marks, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    For over one hundred years GEBCO (www.gebco.net) has been at the forefront of producing maps and digital data sets showing the shape of the global seafloor in the deep oceans with the first GEBCO chart series initiated in 1903 by Prince Albert I of Monaco. Today the GEBCO community consists of an international group of experts in seafloor mapping who develop a range of data sets and data products with the aim of providing the most authoritative publicly-available bathymetric data sets for the world's oceans. We are also training a new generation of seafloor mappers through the Nippon Foundation/GEBCO Training Programme. GEBCO operates under the joint auspices of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO and the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO). Our range of products includes: A global Digital Terrain Model (DTM) - modelling the shape of the seafloor in the form of a periodically-updated 30 arc-second interval grid A gazetteer of undersea feature names GEBCO Cook Book - information on topics related to building bathymetric grids Web services GEBCO world map GEBCO Digital Atlas - a collection of GEBCO's data sets and viewing software Recognising the importance of local expertise when building a bathymetric grid, GEBCO's latest 30 arc-second interval DTM, GEBCO_2014, (due for release in Fall 2014) has benefited from contributions from many regional mapping projects such as the International Bathymetric Charts of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO) and Southern Ocean (IBCSO); the Baltic Sea Bathymetry Database and EMODnet for European waters. Through the Sub-Committee on Regional Undersea Mapping, GEBCO is aiming to build on and extend its collaboration with regional mapping groups to continually improve its global bathymetric model.

  7. Multidecadal climate variability of global lands and oceans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Palecki, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) and singular value decomposition (SVD) are used to identify the primary modes of decadal and multidecadal variability in annual global Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) values and sea-surface temperature (SSTs). The PDSI and SST data for 1925-2003 were detrended and smoothed (with a 10-year moving average) to isolate the decadal and multidecadal variability. The first two principal components (PCs) of the PDSI PCA explained almost 38% of the decadal and multidecadal variance in the detrended and smoothed global annual PDSI data. The first two PCs of detrended and smoothed global annual SSTs explained nearly 56% of the decadal variability in global SSTs. The PDSI PCs and the SST PCs are directly correlated in a pairwise fashion. The first PDSI and SST PCs reflect variability of the detrended and smoothed annual Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), as well as detrended and smoothed annual Indian Ocean SSTs. The second set of PCs is strongly associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). The SVD analysis of the cross-covariance of the PDSI and SST data confirmed the close link between the PDSI and SST modes of decadal and multidecadal variation and provided a verification of the PCA results. These findings indicate that the major modes of multidecadal variations in SSTs and land-surface climate conditions are highly interrelated through a small number of spatially complex but slowly varying teleconnections. Therefore, these relations may be adaptable to providing improved baseline conditions for seasonal climate forecasting. Published in 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. GLOBEC: Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics: A component of the US Global Change Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    GLOBEC (GLOBal ocean ECosystems dynamics) is a research initiative proposed by the oceanographic and fisheries communities to address the question of how changes in global environment are expected to affect the abundance and production of animals in the sea. The approach to this problem is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that determine both the abundance of key marine animal populations and their variances in space and time. The assumption is that the physical environment is a major contributor to patterns of abundance and production of marine animals, in large part because the planktonic life stages typical of most marine animals are intrinsically at the mercy of the fluid motions of the medium in which they live. Consequently, the authors reason that a logical approach to predicting the potential impact of a globally changing environment is to understand how the physical environment, both directly and indirectly, contributes to animal abundance and its variability in marine ecosystems. The plans for this coordinated study of of the potential impact of global change on ocean ecosystems dynamics are discussed.

  9. Global Climate Change Pilot Course Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuenemann, K. C.; Wagner, R.

    2011-12-01

    In fall 2011 a pilot course on "Global Climate Change" is being offered, which has been proposed to educate urban, diverse, undergraduate students about climate change at the introductory level. The course has been approved to fulfill two general college requirements, a natural sciences requirement that focuses on the scientific method, as well as a global diversity requirement. This course presents the science behind global climate change from an Earth systems and atmospheric science perspective. These concepts then provide the basis to explore the effect of global warming on regions throughout the world. Climate change has been taught as a sub-topic in other courses in the past solely using scientific concepts, with little success in altering the climate change misconceptions of the students. This pilot course will see if new, innovative projects described below can make more of an impact on the students' views of climate change. Results of the successes or failures of these projects will be reported, as well as results of a pre- and post-course questionnaire on climate change given to students taking the course. Students in the class will pair off and choose a global region or country that they will research, write papers on, and then represent in four class discussions spaced throughout the semester. The first report will include details on the current climate of their region and how the climate shapes that region's society and culture. The second report will discuss how that region is contributing to climate change and/or sequestering greenhouse gases. Thirdly, students will discuss observed and predicted changes in that region's climate and what impact it has had, and could have, on their society. Lastly, students will report on what role their region has played in mitigating climate change, any policies their region may have implemented, and how their region can or cannot adapt to future climate changes. They will also try to get a feel for the region

  10. Global Reactive Gases in the MACC project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    In preparation for the planned atmospheric service component of the European Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative, the EU FP7 project Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) developed a preoperational data assimilation and modelling system for monitoring and forecasting of reactive gases, greenhouse gases and aerosols. The project is coordinated by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and the system is built on ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) which has been coupled to the chemistry transport models MOZART-3 and TM5. In order to provide daily forecasts of up to 96 hours for global reactive gases, various satellite retrieval products for ozone (total column and profile data), CO, NO2, CH2O and SO2 are either actively assimilated or passively monitored. The MACC system is routinely evaluated with in-situ data from ground-based stations, ozone sondes and aircraft measurements, and with independent satellite retrievals. Global MACC reactive gases forecasts are used in the planning and analysis of large international field campaigns and to provide dynamical chemical boundary conditions to regional air quality models worldwide. Several case studies of outstanding air pollution events have been performed, and they demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of chemical data assimilation based on current satellite data products. Besides the regular analyses and forecasts of the tropospheric chemical composition, the MACC system is also used to monitor the evolution of stratospheric ozone. A comprehensive reanalysis simulation from 2003 to 2010 provides new insights into the interannual variability of the atmospheric chemical composition.

  11. Stochastic Modeling and Global Warming Trend Extraction For Ocean Acoustic Travel Times.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-06

    consideration and that these models can not currently be relied upon by themselves to predict global warming . Experimental data is most certainly needed, not...only to measure global warming itself, but to help improve the ocean model themselves. (AN)

  12. An Eddy-Resolving Ocean Reanalysis using the 1/12 degree Global HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) and the Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (NCODA) Scheme

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    research opportunities 2 HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model 3 Tri-pole latitudinal grid resolution (km) Mercator projection : 66°S to 47°N Curvi...Data Assimilation (NCODA) scheme 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...capable of fully resolving oceanic mesoscale features (eddies and current meanders) across the globe • This project addresses the need for a long

  13. Open Ocean Assessments for Management in the GEF Transboundary Waters Assessment Project (TWAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, A. S.; Alverson, K. D.

    2010-12-01

    A methodology for a thematic and scientifically-credible assessment of Open Ocean waters as a part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Transboundary Waters Assessment Project (TWAP) has been developed in the last 18 months by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, and is presented for feedback and comment. While developed to help the GEF International Waters focal area target investment to manage looming environmental threats in interlinked freshwater and marine systems (a very focused decision support system), the assessment methodology could contribute to other assessment and management efforts in the UN system and elsewhere. Building on a conceptual framework that describes the relationships between human systems and open ocean natural systems, and on mapping of the human impact on the marine environment, the assessment will evaluate and make projections on a thematic basis, identifying key metrics, indices, and indicators. These themes will include the threats on key ecosystem services of climate change through sea level rise, changed stratification, warming, and ocean acidification; vulnerabilities of ecosystems, habitats, and living marine resources; the impact and sustainability of fisheries; and pollution. Global-level governance arrangements will also be evaluated, with an eye to identifying scope for improved global-level management. The assessment will build on sustained ocean observing systems, model projections, and an assessment of scientific literature, as well as tools for combining knowledge to support identification of priority concerns and in developing scenarios for management. It will include an assessment of key research and observing needs as one way to deal with the scientific uncertainty inherent in such an exercise, and to better link policy and science agendas.

  14. Risk maps for Antarctic krill under projected Southern Ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, S.; Ishida, A.; King, R.; Raymond, B.; Waller, N.; Constable, A.; Nicol, S.; Wakita, M.; Ishimatsu, A.

    2013-09-01

    Marine ecosystems of the Southern Ocean are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification. Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba; hereafter krill) is the key pelagic species of the region and its largest fishery resource. There is therefore concern about the combined effects of climate change, ocean acidification and an expanding fishery on krill and ultimately, their dependent predators--whales, seals and penguins. However, little is known about the sensitivity of krill to ocean acidification. Juvenile and adult krill are already exposed to variable seawater carbonate chemistry because they occupy a range of habitats and migrate both vertically and horizontally on a daily and seasonal basis. Moreover, krill eggs sink from the surface to hatch at 700-1,000m (ref. ), where the carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in sea water is already greater than it is in the atmosphere. Krill eggs sink passively and so cannot avoid these conditions. Here we describe the sensitivity of krill egg hatch rates to increased CO2, and present a circumpolar risk map of krill hatching success under projected pCO2 levels. We find that important krill habitats of the Weddell Sea and the Haakon VII Sea to the east are likely to become high-risk areas for krill recruitment within a century. Furthermore, unless CO2 emissions are mitigated, the Southern Ocean krill population could collapse by 2300 with dire consequences for the entire ecosystem.

  15. Subseabed Disposal Project annual report: Ocean modeling studies, October 1983 through September 1984. [From subseabed disposal in ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Marietta, M.G.; Simmons, W.F.

    1986-05-01

    The Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP), managed at and in part conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the US Department of Energy, is designed to evaluate the scientific, technical, environmental and economic feasibility of depositing high-level nuclear wastes (HLW) within the sediments at the bottom of the deep ocean. The work is in part to assist US planners in devising and assessing global disposal options, and in part to assist other nations in assessing the feasibility and consequences of oceanic nuclear waste disposal. At the schematic level, there appear to be many advantages to ocean disposal. First, the sites under consideration are some of the most stable geological formations on the face of the earth, far from the active edges of tectonic plates and generally composed of thick sedimentary layers many millions of years old and many thousands of square kilometers in area. They are generally near the centers of the main oceanic circulation gyres and are therefore remote from the principal oceanic current systems. The deep sediments can be penetrated to 30 m or more meters at burial, and form thereafter an effective first barrier. Most of the radioactive nuclides which would eventually leak from the burial containers are permanently trapped in the sediments by chemical adsorption. As the deep sediments are anomalously poor in biological and mineral resources, radioactive decomposition of the sorbed nuclides promises to be relatively innocuous. Low deep-water temperatures (approx.1/sup 0/C) and high pressures (approx.500 atms.) provide an excellent environment for heat dissipation. Lastly, the sites are geographically remote and are rarely visited by seafarers of any kind. 55 refs.

  16. The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

  17. Toward an internal gravity wave spectrum in global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Malte; Arbic, Brian K.; Richman, James G.; Shriver, Jay F.; Kunze, Eric L.; Scott, Robert B.; Wallcraft, Alan J.; Zamudio, Luis

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution global ocean models forced by atmospheric fields and tides are beginning to display realistic internal gravity wave spectra, especially as model resolution increases. This paper examines internal waves in global simulations with 0.08° and 0.04° (~8 and 4 km) horizontal resolutions, respectively. Frequency spectra of internal wave horizontal kinetic energy in the North Pacific lie closer to observations in the 0.04° simulation than in the 0.08° simulation. The horizontal wave number and frequency (K-ω) kinetic energy spectra contain peaks in the semidiurnal tidal band and near-inertial band, along with a broadband frequency continuum aligned along the linear dispersion relations of low-vertical-mode internal waves. Spectral kinetic energy transfers describe the rate at which nonlinear mechanisms remove or supply kinetic energy in specific K-ω ranges. Energy is transferred out of low-mode inertial and semidiurnal internal waves into a broad continuum of higher-frequency and higher-wave number internal waves.

  18. Ocean topography mapping, improvement of the marine geoid, and global permanent ocean circulation studies from TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, James G.; Lerch, F. J.; Koblinsky, C. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Klosko, S. M.; Williamson, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements will be the first global observations of the sea surface with accuracy sufficient to make quantitative determinations of the ocean's general circulation and its variations. These measurements are an important step to understanding global change in the ocean and its impact on the climate. Our investigation will focus on the examination of features in the sea surface elevation at the largest spatial and temporal scales. TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements will be used in conjunction with observations from past satellite-altimeter missions, such as NASA's GEOS-3 and Seasat, the U.S. Navy's Geosat and SALT, and the European Remote Sensing satellite in order to address the following issues: (1) Improve models of the marine geoid, especially at wavelengths needed to understand the basin-scale ocean dynamic topograpy. (2) Measure directly from the altimeter data the expression of the mean global ocean circulation in the sea surface at the largest scales through a simultaneous solution for gravity, orbital, and oceanographic parameters. (3) Examine the sea surface measurements for changes in global ocean mass or volume, interannual variations in the basin-scale ocean circulation, and annual changes in the heating and cooling of the upper ocean.

  19. Ocean topography mapping, improvement of the marine geoid, and global permanent ocean circulation studies from TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, James G.; Lerch, F. J.; Koblinsky, C. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Klosko, S. M.; Williamson, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements will be the first global observations of the sea surface with accuracy sufficient to make quantitative determinations of the ocean's general circulation and its variations. These measurements are an important step to understanding global change in the ocean and its impact on the climate. Our investigation will focus on the examination of features in the sea surface elevation at the largest spatial and temporal scales. TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements will be used in conjunction with observations from past satellite-altimeter missions, such as NASA's GEOS-3 and Seasat, the U.S. Navy's Geosat and SALT, and the European Remote Sensing satellite in order to address the following issues: (1) Improve models of the marine geoid, especially at wavelengths needed to understand the basin-scale ocean dynamic topograpy. (2) Measure directly from the altimeter data the expression of the mean global ocean circulation in the sea surface at the largest scales through a simultaneous solution for gravity, orbital, and oceanographic parameters. (3) Examine the sea surface measurements for changes in global ocean mass or volume, interannual variations in the basin-scale ocean circulation, and annual changes in the heating and cooling of the upper ocean.

  20. Comparison of retrospective analyses of the global ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurin, Gennady A.; Carton, James A.

    1999-07-01

    In this study, we compare seven retrospective analyses of basin- to global-scale upper ocean temperature. The analyses span a minimum of 10 years during the 50-year period since World War II. Three of the analyses (WOA-94, WHITE, BMRC) are based on objective analysis and thus, do not rely on a numerical forecast model. The remaining four (NCEP, WAJSOWICZ, ROSATI, SODA) are based on data assimilation in which the numerical forecast is provided by some form of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Modular Ocean Model driven by historical winds. The comparison presented here is limited to heat content in the upper 250 m, information that is available for all analyses. The results are presented in three frequency bands: seasonal, interannual (periods of 1-5 years), and decadal (periods of 5-25 years). At seasonal frequencies, all of the analyses are quite similar. Otherwise, the differences among analyses are limited to the regions of the western boundary currents, and some regions in the Southern Hemisphere. At interannual frequencies, significant differences appear between the objective analyses and the data assimilation analyses. Along the equator in the Pacific, where variability is dominated by El Niño, the objective analyses have somewhat noisier fields, as well as reduced variance prior to 1980 due to lack of observations. Still, the correlation among analyses generally exceeds 80% in this region. Along the equator in the Atlantic, the correlation is lower (30-60%) although inspection of the time series shows that the same biennial progression of warm and cool events appears in all analyses since 1980. In the midlatitude Pacific agreement among objective analyses and data assimilation analyses is good. The analysis of Rosati et al. [Rosati, A., Gudgel, R., Miyakoda, K., 1995. Decadal analysis produced from an ocean assimilation system. Mon. Weather Rev., 123, 2, 206.] differs somewhat from the others apparently because in this analysis, the forecast model

  1. Global forestry emission projections and abatement costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, H.; Gusti, M.; Mosnier, A.; Havlik, P.; Obersteiner, M.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we present forestry emission projections and associated Marginal Abatement Cost Curves (MACCs) for individual countries, based on economic, social and policy drivers. The activities cover deforestation, afforestation, and forestry management. The global model tools G4M and GLOBIOM, developed at IIASA, are applied. GLOBIOM uses global scenarios of population, diet, GDP and energy demand to inform G4M about future land and commodity prices and demand for bioenergy and timber. G4M projects emissions from afforestation, deforestation and management of existing forests. Mitigation measures are simulated by introducing a carbon tax. Mitigation activities like reducing deforestation or enhancing afforestation are not independent of each other. In contrast to existing forestry mitigation cost curves the presented MACCs are not developed for individual activities but total forest land management which makes the estimated potentials more realistic. In the assumed baseline gross deforestation drops globally from about 12 Mha in 2005 to below 10 Mha after 2015 and reach 0.5 Mha in 2050. Afforestation rates remain fairly constant at about 7 Mha annually. Although we observe a net area increase of global forest area after 2015 net emissions from deforestation and afforestation are positive until 2045 as the newly afforested areas accumulate carbon rather slowly. About 200 Mt CO2 per year in 2030 in Annex1 countries could be mitigated at a carbon price of 50 USD. The potential for forest management improvement is very similar. Above 200 USD the potential is clearly constrained for both options. In Non-Annex1 countries avoided deforestation can achieve about 1200 Mt CO2 per year at a price of 50 USD. The potential is less constrained compared to the potential in Annex1 countries, achieving a potential of 1800 Mt CO2 annually in 2030 at a price of 1000 USD. The potential from additional afforestation is rather limited due to high baseline afforestation rates assumed

  2. Observing the Arctic Ocean under melting ice - the UNDER-ICE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagen, Hanne; Ullgren, Jenny; Geyer, Florian; Bergh, Jon; Hamre, Torill; Sandven, Stein; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Falck, Eva; Gammelsrød, Tor; Worcester, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean is gradually diminishing in area and thickness. The variability of the ice cover is determined by heat exchange with both the atmosphere and the ocean. A cold water layer with a strong salinity gradient insulates the sea ice from below, preventing direct contact with the underlying warm Atlantic water. Changes in water column stratification might therefore lead to faster erosion of the ice. As the ice recedes, larger areas of surface water are open to wind mixing; the effect this might have on the water column structure is not yet clear. The heat content in the Arctic strongly depends on heat transport from other oceans. The Fram Strait is a crucial pathway for the exchange between the Arctic and the Atlantic Ocean. Two processes of importance for the Arctic heat and freshwater budget and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation take place here: poleward heat transport by the West Spitzbergen Current and freshwater export by the East Greenland Current. A new project, Arctic Ocean under Melting Ice (UNDER-ICE), aims to improve our understanding of the ocean circulation, water mass distribution, fluxes, and mixing processes, sea ice processes, and net community primary production in ice-covered areas and the marginal ice zone in the Fram Strait and northward towards the Gakkel Ridge. The interdisciplinary project brings together ocean acoustics, physical oceanography, marine biology, and sea ice research. A new programme of observations, integrated with satellite data and state-of-the-art numerical models, will be started in order to improve the estimates of heat, mass, and freshwater transport between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. On this poster we present the UNDER-ICE project, funded by the Research Council of Norway and GDF Suez E&P Norge AS for the years 2014-2017, and place it in context of the legacy of earlier projects in the area, such as ACOBAR. A mooring array for acoustic tomography combined with

  3. Bioavailable atmospheric phosphorous supply to the global ocean: a 3-D global modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Nenes, Athanasios; Baker, Alex R.; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Kanakidou, Maria

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric cycle of phosphorus (P) is parameterized here in a state-of-the-art global 3-D chemistry transport model, taking into account primary emissions of total P (TP) and soluble P (DP) associated with mineral dust, combustion particles from natural and anthropogenic sources, bioaerosols, sea spray and volcanic aerosols. For the present day, global TP emissions are calculated to be roughly 1.33 Tg-P yr-1, with the mineral sources contributing more than 80 % to these emissions. The P solubilization from mineral dust under acidic atmospheric conditions is also parameterized in the model and is calculated to contribute about one-third (0.14 Tg-P yr-1) of the global DP atmospheric source. To our knowledge, a unique aspect of our global study is the explicit modeling of the evolution of phosphorus speciation in the atmosphere. The simulated present-day global annual DP deposition flux is 0.45 Tg-P yr-1 (about 40 % over oceans), showing a strong spatial and temporal variability. Present-day simulations of atmospheric P aerosol concentrations and deposition fluxes are satisfactory compared with available observations, indicating however an underestimate of about 70 % on current knowledge of the sources that drive the P atmospheric cycle. Sensitivity simulations using preindustrial (year 1850) anthropogenic and biomass burning emission scenarios showed a present-day increase of 75 % in the P solubilization flux from mineral dust, i.e., the rate at which P is converted into soluble forms, compared to preindustrial times, due to increasing atmospheric acidity over the last 150 years. Future reductions in air pollutants due to the implementation of air-quality regulations are expected to decrease the P solubilization flux from mineral dust by about 30 % in the year 2100 compared to the present day. Considering, however, that all the P contained in bioaerosols is readily available for uptake by marine organisms, and also accounting for all other DP sources, a total

  4. OMIP contribution to CMIP6: experimental and diagnostic protocol for the physical component of the Ocean Model Intercomparison Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffies, Stephen M.; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Durack, Paul J.; Adcroft, Alistair J.; Balaji, V.; Böning, Claus W.; Chassignet, Eric P.; Curchitser, Enrique; Deshayes, Julie; Drange, Helge; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Gleckler, Peter J.; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Haak, Helmuth; Hallberg, Robert W.; Heimbach, Patrick; Hewitt, Helene T.; Holland, David M.; Ilyina, Tatiana; Jungclaus, Johann H.; Komuro, Yoshiki; Krasting, John P.; Large, William G.; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; McDougall, Trevor J.; Nurser, A. J. George; Orr, James C.; Pirani, Anna; Qiao, Fangli; Stouffer, Ronald J.; Taylor, Karl E.; Treguier, Anne Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valdivieso, Maria; Wang, Qiang; Winton, Michael; Yeager, Stephen G.

    2016-09-01

    The Ocean Model Intercomparison Project (OMIP) is an endorsed project in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6). OMIP addresses CMIP6 science questions, investigating the origins and consequences of systematic model biases. It does so by providing a framework for evaluating (including assessment of systematic biases), understanding, and improving ocean, sea-ice, tracer, and biogeochemical components of climate and earth system models contributing to CMIP6. Among the WCRP Grand Challenges in climate science (GCs), OMIP primarily contributes to the regional sea level change and near-term (climate/decadal) prediction GCs.OMIP provides (a) an experimental protocol for global ocean/sea-ice models run with a prescribed atmospheric forcing; and (b) a protocol for ocean diagnostics to be saved as part of CMIP6. We focus here on the physical component of OMIP, with a companion paper (Orr et al., 2016) detailing methods for the inert chemistry and interactive biogeochemistry. The physical portion of the OMIP experimental protocol follows the interannual Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). Since 2009, CORE-I (Normal Year Forcing) and CORE-II (Interannual Forcing) have become the standard methods to evaluate global ocean/sea-ice simulations and to examine mechanisms for forced ocean climate variability. The OMIP diagnostic protocol is relevant for any ocean model component of CMIP6, including the DECK (Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima experiments), historical simulations, FAFMIP (Flux Anomaly Forced MIP), C4MIP (Coupled Carbon Cycle Climate MIP), DAMIP (Detection and Attribution MIP), DCPP (Decadal Climate Prediction Project), ScenarioMIP, HighResMIP (High Resolution MIP), as well as the ocean/sea-ice OMIP simulations.

  5. The G4Foam Experiment: Global climate impacts of regional ocean albedo modification

    DOE PAGES

    Gabriel, Corey J.; Robock, Alan; Xia, Lili; ...

    2017-01-12

    Reducing insolation has been proposed as a geoengineering response to global warming. Here we present the results of climate model simulations of a unique Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Testbed experiment to investigate the benefits and risks of a scheme that would brighten certain oceanic regions. The National Center for Atmospheric Research CESM CAM4-Chem global climate model was modified to simulate a scheme in which the albedo of the ocean surface is increased over the subtropical ocean gyres in the Southern Hemisphere. In theory, this could be accomplished using a stable, nondispersive foam, comprised of tiny, highly reflective microbubbles. Such amore » foam has been developed under idealized conditions, although deployment at a large scale is presently infeasible. We conducted three ensemble members of a simulation (G4Foam) from 2020 through to 2069 in which the albedo of the ocean surface is set to 0.15 (an increase of 150%) over the three subtropical ocean gyres in the Southern Hemisphere, against a background of the RCP6.0 (representative concentration pathway resulting in +6Wm-2 radiative forcing by 2100) scenario. After 2069, geoengineering is ceased, and the simulation is run for an additional 20 years. Global mean surface temperature in G4Foam is 0.6 K lower than RCP6.0, with statistically significant cooling relative to RCP6.0 south of 30°N. There is an increase in rainfall over land, most pronouncedly in the tropics during the June–July–August season, relative to both G4SSA (specified stratospheric aerosols) and RCP6.0. Heavily populated and highly cultivated regions throughout the tropics, including the Sahel, southern Asia, the Maritime Continent, Central America, and much of the Amazon experience a statistically significant increase in precipitation minus evaporation. The temperature response to the relatively modest global average forcing of -1.5 W m-2 is amplified through a series of positive cloud feedbacks, in which more

  6. The G4Foam Experiment: global climate impacts of regional ocean albedo modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Corey J.; Robock, Alan; Xia, Lili; Zambri, Brian; Kravitz, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Reducing insolation has been proposed as a geoengineering response to global warming. Here we present the results of climate model simulations of a unique Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project Testbed experiment to investigate the benefits and risks of a scheme that would brighten certain oceanic regions. The National Center for Atmospheric Research CESM CAM4-Chem global climate model was modified to simulate a scheme in which the albedo of the ocean surface is increased over the subtropical ocean gyres in the Southern Hemisphere. In theory, this could be accomplished using a stable, nondispersive foam, comprised of tiny, highly reflective microbubbles. Such a foam has been developed under idealized conditions, although deployment at a large scale is presently infeasible. We conducted three ensemble members of a simulation (G4Foam) from 2020 through to 2069 in which the albedo of the ocean surface is set to 0.15 (an increase of 150 %) over the three subtropical ocean gyres in the Southern Hemisphere, against a background of the RCP6.0 (representative concentration pathway resulting in +6 W m-2 radiative forcing by 2100) scenario. After 2069, geoengineering is ceased, and the simulation is run for an additional 20 years. Global mean surface temperature in G4Foam is 0.6 K lower than RCP6.0, with statistically significant cooling relative to RCP6.0 south of 30° N. There is an increase in rainfall over land, most pronouncedly in the tropics during the June-July-August season, relative to both G4SSA (specified stratospheric aerosols) and RCP6.0. Heavily populated and highly cultivated regions throughout the tropics, including the Sahel, southern Asia, the Maritime Continent, Central America, and much of the Amazon experience a statistically significant increase in precipitation minus evaporation. The temperature response to the relatively modest global average forcing of -1.5 W m-2 is amplified through a series of positive cloud feedbacks, in which more

  7. Projections of global mercury emissions in 2050

    SciTech Connect

    David G. Streets; Qiang Zhang; Ye Wu

    2009-04-15

    Global Hg emissions are presented for the year 2050 under a variety of assumptions about socioeconomic and technology development. We find it likely that Hg emissions will increase in the future. The range of 2050 global Hg emissions is projected to be 2390-4860 Mg, compared to 2006 levels of 2480 Mg, reflecting a change of -4% to +96%. The main driving force for increased emissions is the expansion of coal-fired electricity generation in the developing world, particularly Asia. Our ability to arrest the growth in Hg emissions is limited by the relatively low Hg removal efficiency of the current generation of emission control technologies for coal-fired power plants (flue-gas desulfurization). Large-scale deployment of advanced Hg sorbent technologies, such as activated carbon injection, offers the promise of lowering the 2050 emissions range to 1670-3480 Mg, but these technologies are not yet in commercial use. The share of elemental Hg in total emissions will decline from today's levels of about 65% to about 50-55% by 2050, while the share of divalent Hg will increase. This signals a shift from long-range transport of elemental Hg to local deposition of Hg compounds though emissions of both species could increase under the worst case. 33 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Projections of global mercury emissions in 2050.

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D. G.; Zhang, Q.; Wu, Y.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2009-04-15

    Global Hg emissions are presented for the year 2050 under a variety of assumptions about socioeconomic and technology development. We find it likely that Hg emissions will increase in the future. The range of 2050 global Hg emissions is projected to be 2390-4860 Mg, compared to 2006 levels of 2480 Mg, reflecting a change of -4% to +96%. The main driving force for increased emissions is the expansion of coal-fired electricity generation in the developing world, particularly Asia. Our ability to arrest the growth in Hg emissions is limited by the relatively low Hg removal efficiency of the current generation of emission control technologies for coal-fired power plants (flue-gas desulfurization). Large-scale deployment of advanced Hg sorbent technologies, such as Activated Carbon Injection, offers the promise of lowering the 2050 emissions range to 1670-3480 Mg, but these technologies are not yet in commercial use. The share of elemental Hg in total emissions will decline from today's levels of {approx}65% to {approx}50-55% by 2050, while the share of divalent Hg will increase. This signals a shift from long-range transport of elemental Hg to local deposition of Hg compounds though emissions of both species could increase under the worst case.

  9. Interdisciplinary Coordinated Experiment of the Southern Ocean Carbon Cycle (ICESOCC) - A Field Campaign Scoping Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate estimates in time and space of organic carbon export to the ocean interior via plankton net community production (NCP) for the global oceans (the biological pump) are essential for understanding the feedback between NCP, atmospheric CO2 and climate. Since integrated, multi-sensor satellite and in situ observations of many ocean variables are required to estimate NCP from space, this is a complex, interdisciplinary challenge. Satellite ocean color sensors are a fundamental component in estimating spatial and temporal variations in NCP. Therefore, NASA's PACE mission (NASA-PACE 2012), a mission included in NASA's Climate Architecture Plan (NASA-CAP, 2010), specifies a need for field programs to improve satellite algorithms and models to reduce uncertainties in estimates of NCP. Diverse data from sediment and glacial cores, and climate models, indicate that the Southern Ocean plays a large role in the glacial-interglacial variations in the biological pump, with considerable implications for variations in atmospheric CO2. The "Interdisciplinary Coordinated Experiment of the Southern Ocean Carbon Cycle (ICESOCC)" project is a NASA-funded field campaign scoping (planning) effort. Over 18 months and many public meetings and workshops, the ICESOCC team of 13 interdisciplinary scientists has integrated the input from scientific experts in ocean, atmosphere, ice physics, biogeochemistry, advanced observational tools (ship, autonomous, atmospheric gases and dust, cryosphere dynamics, winds), and models, to create a draft recommendation to NASA for field observations required to constrain uncertainty of NCP for the Southern Ocean. The ICESOCC team requests and encourages careful review and comments of the draft to ensure the most robust final recommendations are submitted in early 2016 for NASA consideration.

  10. Ocean in peril: reforming the management of global ocean living resources in areas beyond national jurisdiction.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Kristina M; Currie, Duncan; Wowk, Kateryna; Sack, Karen

    2013-09-30

    This article presents the outcome of research aimed at assisting governments in meeting their commitments and legal obligations for sustainable fisheries, based on increasing evidence that global fisheries are in crisis. The article assesses the effectiveness of the existing legal and institutional framework for high seas living resources. It focuses on: (1) the role of regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs); (2) tools for compliance and enforcement to stem illegal fishing; and (3) mechanisms for habitat protection. The article further highlights a variety of options for addressing key weaknesses and gaps in current ocean governance, including United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) resolutions, reforms at the regional level, as well as a possible new legal instrument, with a view to informing international discussions on ways to ensure the sustainable use of high seas resources without compromising the health of the marine environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ocean deoxygenation, the global phosphorus cycle and the possibility of human-caused large-scale ocean anoxia.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew J; Lenton, Timothy M; Mills, Benjamin J W

    2017-09-13

    The major biogeochemical cycles that keep the present-day Earth habitable are linked by a network of feedbacks, which has led to a broadly stable chemical composition of the oceans and atmosphere over hundreds of millions of years. This includes the processes that control both the atmospheric and oceanic concentrations of oxygen. However, one notable exception to the generally well-behaved dynamics of this system is the propensity for episodes of ocean anoxia to occur and to persist for 10(5)-10(6) years, these ocean anoxic events (OAEs) being particularly associated with warm 'greenhouse' climates. A powerful mechanism responsible for past OAEs was an increase in phosphorus supply to the oceans, leading to higher ocean productivity and oxygen demand in subsurface water. This can be amplified by positive feedbacks on the nutrient content of the ocean, with low oxygen promoting further release of phosphorus from ocean sediments, leading to a potentially self-sustaining condition of deoxygenation. We use a simple model for phosphorus in the ocean to explore this feedback, and to evaluate the potential for humans to bring on global-scale anoxia by enhancing P supply to the oceans. While this is not an immediate global change concern, it is a future possibility on millennial and longer time scales, when considering both phosphate rock mining and increased chemical weathering due to climate change. Ocean deoxygenation, once begun, may be self-sustaining and eventually could result in long-lasting and unpleasant consequences for the Earth's biosphere.This article is part of the themed issue 'Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world'. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Ocean deoxygenation, the global phosphorus cycle and the possibility of human-caused large-scale ocean anoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lenton, Timothy M.; Mills, Benjamin J. W.

    2017-01-01

    The major biogeochemical cycles that keep the present-day Earth habitable are linked by a network of feedbacks, which has led to a broadly stable chemical composition of the oceans and atmosphere over hundreds of millions of years. This includes the processes that control both the atmospheric and oceanic concentrations of oxygen. However, one notable exception to the generally well-behaved dynamics of this system is the propensity for episodes of ocean anoxia to occur and to persist for 105–106 years, these ocean anoxic events (OAEs) being particularly associated with warm ‘greenhouse’ climates. A powerful mechanism responsible for past OAEs was an increase in phosphorus supply to the oceans, leading to higher ocean productivity and oxygen demand in subsurface water. This can be amplified by positive feedbacks on the nutrient content of the ocean, with low oxygen promoting further release of phosphorus from ocean sediments, leading to a potentially self-sustaining condition of deoxygenation. We use a simple model for phosphorus in the ocean to explore this feedback, and to evaluate the potential for humans to bring on global-scale anoxia by enhancing P supply to the oceans. While this is not an immediate global change concern, it is a future possibility on millennial and longer time scales, when considering both phosphate rock mining and increased chemical weathering due to climate change. Ocean deoxygenation, once begun, may be self-sustaining and eventually could result in long-lasting and unpleasant consequences for the Earth's biosphere. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world’. PMID:28784709

  13. Ecmwf Global Reanalysis Project, Era-40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppala, S.; Kållberg, P.; Simmons, A.; Fiorino, M.; Hernandez, A.; Li, Xu; Onogi, K.; Saarinen, S.; Sokka, N.

    ECMWF is currently performing the ERA-40 reanalysis of the global atmosphere for the period 1957-2001, with support from the European Union and several other or- ganizations. The ERA-40 analyses will complement the existing reanalysis datasets from NCEP (1947-2000) and ECMWF (ERA-15, 1979-1993). Reanalyses in general seek to achieve as great a time consistency as possible within the limitations of the data-assimilation scheme and the available observing systems. The historical ground- based WWW observations and observations from special experiments such as GATE, FGGE and ALPEX have been made available to the project, mainly by NCAR/NCEP, ECMWF, JMA and USNAVY. In addition, and to a much larger extent than in ERA- 15, ERA-40 makes use of multichannel satellite radiances through a T159L60/ 3D- variational assimilation starting with data from the first VTPR sounding instrument in 1972 and continuing up to the present SSM/I, TOVS and ATOVS instruments. Cloud Motion Winds are used from 1979 onwards and EUMETSAT has undertaken to repro- cess Meteosat winds for 1983-1988. The length of the period allows studies relating to climate change, long term trends and fluctuations such as El Nino and the QBO. The presentation will describe the project, including its status, the assimilation system and the characteristics of the observing systems through the period, with indications of their performance and impact on medium-range weather forecasts.

  14. Analysis of 50-y record of surface (137)Cs concentrations in the global ocean using the HAM-global database.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Yayoi; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi

    2009-01-01

    We investigated spatial and temporal variations in (137)Cs concentrations in the surface waters of the global ocean for the period from 1957 to 2005 using the "HAM database - a global version". Based on the 0.5-y average value of (137)Cs concentrations in the surface water in each sea area, we classified the temporal variations into four types. (1) In the North Pacific Ocean where there was high fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, the rates of decrease in the (137)Cs concentrations changed over the five decades: the rate of decrease from the 1950s to the 1970s was much faster than that after the 1970s, and the (137)Cs concentrations were almost constant after the 1990s. Latitudinal differences in (137)Cs concentrations in the North Pacific Ocean became small with time. (2) In the equatorial Pacific and Indian Oceans, the (137)Cs concentrations varied within a constant range in the 1970s and 1980s, suggesting the advection of (137)Cs from areas of high global fallout in the mid-latitudes of the North Pacific Ocean. (3) In the eastern South Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (south of 40 degrees S), the concentrations decreased exponentially over the five decades. (4) In the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans, including marginal seas, (137)Cs concentrations were strongly controlled by discharge from nuclear reprocessing plants after the late 1970s. The apparent half-residence times of (137)Cs in the surface waters of the global ocean from 1970 to 2005 ranged from 4.5 to 36.8 years. The apparent half-residence times were longer in the equatorial region and shorter in the higher latitudes. There was no notable difference between the latitudinal distributions of the apparent half-residence times in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. These results suggest that (137)Cs in the North Pacific Ocean is transported to the equatorial, South Pacific, and Indian Oceans by the oceanic circulation.

  15. The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land system model, Spectral Version 2: FGOALS-s2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Qing; Lin, Pengfei; Zhou, Tianjun; Liu, Yimin; Yu, Yongqiang; Wu, Guoxiong; He, Bian; He, Jie; Li, Lijuan; Li, Jiandong; Li, Yangchun; Liu, Hailong; Qiao, Fangli; Song, Zhenya; Wang, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaocong; Wang, Zaizhi; Wu, Bo; Wu, Tongwen; Xu, Yongfu; Yu, Haiyang; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Weipeng; Zhou, Linjiong

    2013-05-01

    The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System model, Spectral Version 2 (FGOALS-s2) was used to simulate realistic climates and to study anthropogenic influences on climate change. Specifically, the FGOALS-s2 was integrated with Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) to conduct coordinated experiments that will provide valuable scientific information to climate research communities. The performances of FGOALS-s2 were assessed in simulating major climate phenomena, and documented both the strengths and weaknesses of the model. The results indicate that FGOALS-s2 successfully overcomes climate drift, and realistically models global and regional climate characteristics, including SST, precipitation, and atmospheric circulation. In particular, the model accurately captures annual and semi-annual SST cycles in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, and the main characteristic features of the Asian summer monsoon, which include a low-level southwestern jet and five monsoon rainfall centers. The simulated climate variability was further examined in terms of teleconnections, leading modes of global SST (namely, ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillations (PDO), and changes in 19th-20th century climate. The analysis demonstrates that FGOALS-s2 realistically simulates extra-tropical teleconnection patterns of large-scale climate, and irregular ENSO periods. The model gives fairly reasonable reconstructions of spatial patterns of PDO and global monsoon changes in the 20th century. However, because the indirect effects of aerosols are not included in the model, the simulated global temperature change during the period 1850-2005 is greater than the observed warming, by 0.6°C. Some other shortcomings of the model are also noted.

  16. Decadal Ocean Heat Content Westward Shift in the Indian Ocean during the Global Surface Warming and Hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Yan, X. H.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the ocean's role in Earth's energy budget is fundamental to evaluate climate variability and change, including the rate of global warming and the recent 18-years' so-called Global Surface Warming Hiatus (GSWH). Previous studies have shown that basin-wide warming in the Atlantic Ocean triggers the intensification of trade wind and wind-driven circulation since late 1990s, resulting in Global Surface Warming Hiatus (GSWH). A recent work revealed that missing heat in the Pacific during the GSWH was transported to the Indian Ocean by the Indonesia throughflow. It brings the Indian Ocean to the platform of the GSWH study and suggests that the global ocean is at play in the GSWH and in the ocean heat content (OHC) westwards shifting. The westwards shifting of the OHC was detected from in-situ data and model/in-situ reanalysis data. The shifting has a period of about 30 years, and takes about 60 years to travel from the eastern Pacific to the western Atlantic. Heat was distributed to deeper layers after the warm OHC passed the southern tip of the Africa continent. This may shed light on the understanding of the physical mechanisms for the multi-decadal climate variability.

  17. A Compilation of Global Bio-Optical in Situ Data for Ocean-Colour Satellite Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valente, Andre; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Brotus, Vanda; Groom, Steve; Grant, Michael; Taberner, Malcolm; Antoine, David; Arnone, Robert; Balch, William M.; Barker, Kathryn; hide

    2016-01-01

    A compiled set of in situ data is important to evaluate the quality of ocean-colour satellite-data records. Here we describe the data compiled for the validation of the ocean-colour products from the ESA Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative (OC-CCI). The data were acquired from several sources (MOBY, BOUSSOLE, AERONET-OC, SeaBASS, NOMAD, MERMAID, AMT, ICES, HOT, GePCO), span between 1997 and 2012, and have a global distribution. Observations of the following variables were compiled: spectral remote-sensing reflectances, concentrations of chlorophyll a, spectral inherent optical properties and spectral diffuse attenuation coefficients. The data were from multi-project archives acquired via the open internet services or from individual projects, acquired directly from data providers. Methodologies were implemented for homogenisation, quality control and merging of all data. No changes were made to the original data, other than averaging of observations that were close in time and space, elimination of some points after quality control and conversion to a standard format. The final result is a merged table designed for validation of satellite-derived ocean-colour products and available in text format. Metadata of each in situ measurement (original source, cruise or experiment, principal investigator) were preserved throughout the work and made available in the final table. Using all the data in a validation exercise increases the number of matchups and enhances the representativeness of different marine regimes. By making available the metadata, it is also possible to analyse each set of data separately. The compiled data are available at doi:10.1594PANGAEA.854832 (Valente et al., 2015).

  18. A compilation of global bio-optical in situ data for ocean-colour satellite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, André; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Brotas, Vanda; Groom, Steve; Grant, Michael; Taberner, Malcolm; Antoine, David; Arnone, Robert; Balch, William M.; Barker, Kathryn; Barlow, Ray; Bélanger, Simon; Berthon, Jean-François; Beşiktepe, Şükrü; Brando, Vittorio; Canuti, Elisabetta; Chavez, Francisco; Claustre, Hervé; Crout, Richard; Frouin, Robert; García-Soto, Carlos; Gibb, Stuart W.; Gould, Richard; Hooker, Stanford; Kahru, Mati; Klein, Holger; Kratzer, Susanne; Loisel, Hubert; McKee, David; Mitchell, Brian G.; Moisan, Tiffany; Muller-Karger, Frank; O'Dowd, Leonie; Ondrusek, Michael; Poulton, Alex J.; Repecaud, Michel; Smyth, Timothy; Sosik, Heidi M.; Twardowski, Michael; Voss, Kenneth; Werdell, Jeremy; Wernand, Marcel; Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    A compiled set of in situ data is important to evaluate the quality of ocean-colour satellite-data records. Here we describe the data compiled for the validation of the ocean-colour products from the ESA Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative (OC-CCI). The data were acquired from several sources (MOBY, BOUSSOLE, AERONET-OC, SeaBASS, NOMAD, MERMAID, AMT, ICES, HOT, GeP&CO), span between 1997 and 2012, and have a global distribution. Observations of the following variables were compiled: spectral remote-sensing reflectances, concentrations of chlorophyll a, spectral inherent optical properties and spectral diffuse attenuation coefficients. The data were from multi-project archives acquired via the open internet services or from individual projects, acquired directly from data providers. Methodologies were implemented for homogenisation, quality control and merging of all data. No changes were made to the original data, other than averaging of observations that were close in time and space, elimination of some points after quality control and conversion to a standard format. The final result is a merged table designed for validation of satellite-derived ocean-colour products and available in text format. Metadata of each in situ measurement (original source, cruise or experiment, principal investigator) were preserved throughout the work and made available in the final table. Using all the data in a validation exercise increases the number of matchups and enhances the representativeness of different marine regimes. By making available the metadata, it is also possible to analyse each set of data separately. The compiled data are available at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.854832 (Valente et al., 2015).

  19. Differentiating the role of land surface variability and cloudiness variability on global energy transport within the atmosphere and oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.

    1993-01-01

    The following provides the final report on NASA IDP Project NAGW-1840 'Differentiating the Role of Land Surface Variability on Global Energy Transport within the Atmosphere and Oceans'. The project was designed to investigate the role of regional perturbations in the earth radiation budget on atmospheric and oceanic energy transports on an interannual basis. We proposed a modeling strategy based on an entropy extremum principle that could be used to separate the transports into oceanic and atmospheric components so as to better understand the effects of regional perturbations at the distinct atmospheric and oceanic time scales. The original focus was to consider the maintenance and year-to-year modulation of a large-scale, low-latitude North African-West Pacific Ocean net radiation dipole, which we had detected in the Nimbus 6 and 7 record of earth radiation budget measurements, and which necessitated significant cross-meridional energy transports to maintain global equilibrium. In addition, perturbations in the radiation balance term were to be partitioned into cloud-induced and surface-induced components to better understand the feedbacks between clouds and surface boundary conditions on interannual variability of the radiation balance.

  20. The oceanic geochemistry of artificial radionuclides: The SEEP Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Radionuclides have been and continue to be introduced to the marine environment in various ways. The atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons in the 1960s resulting in global fallout has been the major contributor of artificial radionuclides to the environment. Nuclear power plants have produced a large quantity of radioactive wastes which are presently being stored on land. The United States, amongst other countries (e.g., England, France, Japan), was seriously investigating the possibility of disposing of these radioactive wastes in the ocean. Clearly it is important to study and to understand the oceanographic behavior of radioactive substances. The DOE sponsored SEEP (Shelf Edge Exchange Processes) research; discussed here, is a detailed study into the biogeochemistry of radionuclides in the shelf and slope environment. The questions asked by this research (see below) pertain directly to problems arising from the introduction of radionuclides into the oceans from energy-related industries (e.g. nuclear power plants, waste disposal).

  1. Provenance Usage in the OceanLink Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narock, T.; Arko, R. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Chandler, C. L.; Cheatham, M.; Fils, D.; Finin, T.; Hitzler, P.; Janowicz, K.; Jones, M.; Krisnadhi, A.; Lehnert, K. A.; Mickle, A.; Raymond, L. M.; Schildhauer, M.; Shepherd, A.; Wiebe, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    A wide spectrum of maturing methods and tools, collectively characterized as the Semantic Web, is helping to vastly improve thedissemination of scientific research. The OceanLink project, an NSF EarthCube Building Block, is utilizing semantic technologies tointegrate geoscience data repositories, library holdings, conference abstracts, and funded research awards. Provenance is a vital componentin meeting both the scientific and engineering requirements of OceanLink. Provenance plays a key role in justification and understanding when presenting users with results aggregated from multiple sources. In the engineering sense, provenance enables the identification of new data and the ability to determine which data sources to query. Additionally, OceanLink will leverage human and machine computation for crowdsourcing, text mining, and co-reference resolution. The results of these computations, and their associated provenance, will be folded back into the constituent systems to continually enhance precision and utility. We will touch on the various roles provenance is playing in OceanLink as well as present our use of the PROV Ontology and associated Ontology Design Patterns.

  2. Multiple stressors of ocean ecosystems in the 21st century: projections with CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopp, L.; Resplandy, L.; Orr, J. C.; Doney, S. C.; Dunne, J. P.; Gehlen, M.; Halloran, P.; Heinze, C.; Ilyina, T.; Séférian, R.; Tjiputra, J.; Vichi, M.

    2013-10-01

    Ocean ecosystems are increasingly stressed by human-induced changes of their physical, chemical and biological environment. Among these changes, warming, acidification, deoxygenation and changes in primary productivity by marine phytoplankton can be considered as four of the major stressors of open ocean ecosystems. Due to rising atmospheric CO2 in the coming decades, these changes will be amplified. Here, we use the most recent simulations performed in the framework of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 to assess how these stressors may evolve over the course of the 21st century. The 10 Earth system models used here project similar trends in ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation and reduced primary productivity for each of the IPCC's representative concentration pathways (RCPs) over the 21st century. For the "business-as-usual" scenario RCP8.5, the model-mean changes in the 2090s (compared to the 1990s) for sea surface temperature, sea surface pH, global O2 content and integrated primary productivity amount to +2.73 (±0.72) °C, -0.33 (±0.003) pH unit, -3.45 (±0.44)% and -8.6 (±7.9)%, respectively. For the high mitigation scenario RCP2.6, corresponding changes are +0.71 (±0.45) °C, -0.07 (±0.001) pH unit, -1.81 (±0.31)% and -2.0 (±4.1)%, respectively, illustrating the effectiveness of extreme mitigation strategies. Although these stressors operate globally, they display distinct regional patterns and thus do not change coincidentally. Large decreases in O2 and in pH are simulated in global ocean intermediate and mode waters, whereas large reductions in primary production are simulated in the tropics and in the North Atlantic. Although temperature and pH projections are robust across models, the same does not hold for projections of subsurface O2 concentrations in the tropics and global and regional changes in net primary productivity. These high uncertainties in projections of primary productivity and subsurface oxygen prompt us to

  3. Increasing Climate Literacy in Introductory Oceanography Classes Using Ocean Observation Data from Project Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hams, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    This session will present educational activities developed for an introductory Oceanography lecture and laboratory class by NOAA Teacher-at-Sea Jacquelyn Hams following participation in Leg 3 of Project DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) in November-December 2011. The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is an important tropical weather phenomenon with origins in the Indian Ocean that impacts many other global climate patterns such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Northern Hemisphere monsoons, tropical storm development, and pineapple express events. The educational activities presented include a series of lessons based on the observational data collected during Project DYNAMO which include atmospheric conditions, wind speeds and direction, surface energy flux, and upper ocean turbulence and mixing. The lessons can be incorporated into any introductory Oceanography class discussion on ocean properties such as conductivity, temperature, and density, ocean circulation, and layers of the atmosphere. A variety of hands-on lessons will be presented ranging from short activities used to complement a lecture to complete laboratory exercises.

  4. A global probabilistic study of the ocean heat content low-frequency variability: Atmospheric forcing versus oceanic chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sérazin, Guillaume; Jaymond, Alexandre; Leroux, Stéphanie; Penduff, Thierry; Bessières, Laurent; Llovel, William; Barnier, Bernard; Molines, Jean-Marc; Terray, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    A global 1/4° ocean/sea ice 50-member ensemble simulation is used to disentangle the low-frequency imprints of the atmospherically forced oceanic variability and of the chaotic intrinsic oceanic variability (IOV) on the large-scale (10° × 10°) ocean heat content (OHC) between 1980 and 2010. The IOV explains most of the interannual-to-decadal large-scale OHC variance over substantial fractions of the global ocean area that increase with depth: 9%, 22%, and 31% in the 0-700 m, 700-2000 m and 2000 m bottom layers, respectively. Such areas concern principally eddy-active regions, mostly found in the Southern Ocean and in western boundary current extensions, and also concern the subtropical gyres at intermediate and deep levels. The oceanic chaos may also induce random multidecadal fluctuations so that large-scale regional OHC trends computed on the 1980-2010 period cannot be unambiguously attributed to the atmospheric forcing in several oceanic basins at various depths. These results are likely to raise detection and attribution issues from real observations.

  5. Development and Evaluation of a Global Version of the Miami Isopycnic-Coordinate Ocean Model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bleck, Rainer; Rooth, Claes G.H.; Okeefe, Sawdey

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this project was to test the ability of the Miami Isopycnic-Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM) to simulate the global ocean circulation, setting the stage for the model's incorporation into coupled global climate models. An existing basin-scale model will be expanded to global domain; suitable atmospheric forcing fields, including precipitation and river runoff, will be selected; the modeling of ayssal flow will be improved by incorporating compressibility and particularly thermobaric effects; a sea-ice model will be added; parameterization options will be explored for subgrid-scale deep convection; parallel coarse- and fine-mesh simulations will be carried out to investigate the impact of grid resolution; the sensitivity of the model's solution to magnitude of vertical (diapycnal) exchange coefficient will be studied; and long-term trends in meridional heat transport and water-mass properties in model solutions will be documented and interpreted.

  6. How Well Has Global Ocean Heat Content Variability Been Measured?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A.; Weiss, J.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Fabienne, G.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a new strategy that uses synthetic observations of an ensemble of model simulations to test the fidelity of an observational strategy, quantifying how well it captures the statistics of variability. We apply this test to the 0-700m global ocean heat content anomaly (OHCA) as observed with in-situ measurements by the Coriolis Dataset for Reanalysis (CORA), using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) version 3.5. One-year running mean OHCAs for the years 2005 onward are found to faithfully capture the variability. During these years, synthetic observations of the model are strongly correlated at 0.94±0.06 with the actual state of the model. Overall, sub-annual variability and data before 2005 are signi cantly a ffected by the variability of the observing system. In contrast, the sometimes-used weighted integral of observations is not a good indicator of OHCA as variability in the observing system contaminates dynamical variability.

  7. A Multiyear Dataset of SSM/I-Derived Global Ocean Surface Turbulent Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Shie, Chung-Lin; Atlas, Robert M.; Ardizzone, Joe; Nelkin, Eric; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, latent heat, and sensible heat over global oceans are essential to weather, climate and ocean problems. Evaporation is a key component of the hydrological cycle and the surface heat budget, while the wind stress is the major forcing for driving the oceanic circulation. The global air-sea fluxes of momentum, latent and sensible heat, radiation, and freshwater (precipitation-evaporation) are the forcing for driving oceanic circulation and, hence, are essential for understanding the general circulation of global oceans. The global air-sea fluxes are required for driving ocean models and validating coupled ocean-atmosphere global models. We have produced a 7.5-year (July 1987-December 1994) dataset of daily surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans from the Special Sensor microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. Daily turbulent fluxes were derived from daily data of SSM/I surface winds and specific humidity, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) sea surface temperatures, and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) air-sea temperature differences, using a stability-dependent bulk scheme. The retrieved instantaneous surface air humidity (with a 25-km resolution) validated well with that of the collocated radiosonde observations over the global oceans. Furthermore, the retrieved daily wind stresses and latent heat fluxes were found to agree well with that of the in situ measurements (IMET buoy, RV Moana Wave, and RV Wecoma) in the western Pacific warm pool during the TOGA COARE intensive observing period (November 1992-February 1993). The global distributions of 1988-94 seasonal-mean turbulent fluxes will be presented. In addition, the global distributions of 1990-93 annual-means turbulent fluxes and input variables will be compared with those of UWM/COADS covering the same period. The latter is based on the COADS (comprehensive ocean-atmosphere data set) and is recognized to be one of the best

  8. Global rates of mantle serpentinization and H2 release at oceanic transform faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruepke, Lars; Hasenclever, Joerg

    2017-04-01

    The cycling of seawater through the ocean floor is the dominant mechanism of biogeochemical exchange between the solid earth and the global ocean. Crustal fluid flow appears to be typically associated with major seafloor structures, and oceanic transform faults (OTF) are one of the most striking yet poorly understood features of the global mid-ocean ridge systems. Fracture zones and transform faults have long been hypothesized to be sites of substantial biogeochemical exchange between the solid Earth and the global ocean. This is particularly interesting with regard to the ocean biome. Deep ocean ecosystems constitute 60% of it but their role in global ocean biogeochemical cycles is much overlooked. There is growing evidence that life is supported by chemosynthesis at hydrothermal vents but also in the crust, and therefore this may be a more abundant process than previously thought. In this context, the serpentine forming interaction between seawater and cold lithospheric mantle rocks is particularly interesting as it is also a mechanism of abiotic hydrogen and methane formation. Interestingly, a quantitative global assessment of mantle serpentinization at oceanic transform faults in the context of the biogeochemical exchange between the seafloor and the global ocean is still largely missing. Here we present the results of a set of 3-D thermo-mechanical model calculations that investigate mantle serpentinization at OTFs for the entire range of globally observed slip rates and fault lengths. These visco-plastic models predict the OTF thermal structure and the location of crustal-scale brittle deformation, which is a prerequisite for mantle serpentinization to occur. The results of these simulations are integrated with information on the global distribution of OTF lengths and slip rates yielding global estimates on mantle serpentinization and associated H2 release. We find that OTFs are potentially sites of intense crustal fluid flow and are in terms of H2 release

  9. A Multiyear Dataset of SSM/I-Derived Global Ocean Surface Turbulent Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Shie, Chung-Lin; Atlas, Robert M.; Ardizzone, Joe; Nelkin, Eric; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, latent heat, and sensible heat over global oceans are essential to weather, climate and ocean problems. Evaporation is a key component of the hydrological cycle and the surface heat budget, while the wind stress is the major forcing for driving the oceanic circulation. The global air-sea fluxes of momentum, latent and sensible heat, radiation, and freshwater (precipitation-evaporation) are the forcing for driving oceanic circulation and, hence, are essential for understanding the general circulation of global oceans. The global air-sea fluxes are required for driving ocean models and validating coupled ocean-atmosphere global models. We have produced a 7.5-year (July 1987-December 1994) dataset of daily surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans from the Special Sensor microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. Daily turbulent fluxes were derived from daily data of SSM/I surface winds and specific humidity, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) sea surface temperatures, and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) air-sea temperature differences, using a stability-dependent bulk scheme. The retrieved instantaneous surface air humidity (with a 25-km resolution) validated well with that of the collocated radiosonde observations over the global oceans. Furthermore, the retrieved daily wind stresses and latent heat fluxes were found to agree well with that of the in situ measurements (IMET buoy, RV Moana Wave, and RV Wecoma) in the western Pacific warm pool during the TOGA COARE intensive observing period (November 1992-February 1993). The global distributions of 1988-94 seasonal-mean turbulent fluxes will be presented. In addition, the global distributions of 1990-93 annual-means turbulent fluxes and input variables will be compared with those of UWM/COADS covering the same period. The latter is based on the COADS (comprehensive ocean-atmosphere data set) and is recognized to be one of the best

  10. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): developing a common framework for marine data management on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, D.

    2015-12-01

    Europe, the USA, and Australia are making significant progress in facilitating the discovery, access and long term stewardship of ocean and marine data through the development, implementation, population and operation of national, regional or international distributed ocean and marine observing and data management infrastructures such as SeaDataNet, EMODnet, IOOS, R2R, and IMOS. All of these developments are resulting in the development of standards and services implemented and used by their regional communities. The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) project is supported by the EU FP7 Research Infrastructures programme, National Science Foundation (USA) and Australian government and has been initiated 1st October 2012. Recently the project has been continued as ODIP 2 for another 3 years with EU HORIZON 2020 funding. ODIP includes all the major organisations engaged in ocean data management in EU, US, and Australia. ODIP is also supported by the IOC-IODE, closely linking this activity with its Ocean Data Portal (ODP) and Ocean Data Standards Best Practices (ODSBP) projects. The ODIP platform aims to ease interoperability between the regional marine data management infrastructures. Therefore it facilitates an organised dialogue between the key infrastructure representatives by means of publishing best practice, organising a series of international workshops and fostering the development of common standards and interoperability solutions. These are evaluated and tested by means of prototype projects. The presentation will give further background on the ODIP projects and the latest information on the progress of three prototype projects addressing: establishing interoperability between the regional EU, USA and Australia data discovery and access services (SeaDataNet CDI, US NODC, and IMOS MCP) and contributing to the global GEOSS and IODE-ODP portals; establishing interoperability between cruise summary reporting systems in Europe, the USA and Australia for

  11. Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP): developing a common framework for marine data management on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.; Glaves, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Europe, the USA, and Australia are making significant progress in facilitating the discovery, access and long term stewardship of ocean and marine data through the development, implementation, population and operation of national, regional or international distributed ocean and marine observing and data management infrastructures such as SeaDataNet, EMODnet, IOOS, R2R, and IMOS. All of these developments are resulting in the development of standards and services implemented and used by their regional communities. The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) project is supported by the EU FP7 Research Infrastructures programme, National Science Foundation (USA) and Australian government and has been initiated 1st October 2012. Recently the project has been continued as ODIP II for another 3 years with EU HORIZON 2020 funding. ODIP includes all the major organisations engaged in ocean data management in EU, US, and Australia. ODIP is also supported by the IOC-IODE, closely linking this activity with its Ocean Data Portal (ODP) and Ocean Data Standards Best Practices (ODSBP) projects. The ODIP platform aims to ease interoperability between the regional marine data management infrastructures. Therefore it facilitates an organised dialogue between the key infrastructure representatives by means of publishing best practice, organising a series of international workshops and fostering the development of common standards and interoperability solutions. These are evaluated and tested by means of prototype projects. The presentation will give further background on the ODIP projects and the latest information on the progress of three prototype projects addressing: 1. establishing interoperability between the regional EU, USA and Australia data discovery and access services (SeaDataNet CDI, US NODC, and IMOS MCP) and contributing to the global GEOSS and IODE-ODP portals; 2. establishing interoperability between cruise summary reporting systems in Europe, the USA and

  12. An estimate of the global distribution of radon emissions from the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schery, S. D.; Huang, S.

    2004-10-01

    There is a need for improved estimates of the radon (222Rn) flux density from the ocean for use in the modeling and interpretation of atmospheric radon in global climate and air pollution studies. We use a modification of a frequently used model of gas transfer to generate global predictions of ocean radon flux density for each month of the year (climate averaged) on a 192 by 94 global grid. Compared with the often-used approximation of a constant radon flux from the ocean, the model's predictions indicate large variations over regions of the ocean (a factor of ten is not uncommon). For example, latitude bands near the equator and Southern Ocean are predicted to emit relatively high average radon flux compared with other latitude bands. The predicted annually-averaged flux density from the ocean is 0.0382 mBq m-2 s-1 (0.00182 atoms cm-2 s-1), smaller than some commonly-used estimates.

  13. Global oceanic emission of ammonia: Constraints from seawater and atmospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Jacob, D. J.; Johnson, M. T.; Bell, T. G.; Baker, A. R.; Keene, W. C.; Lima, I. D.; Doney, S. C.; Stock, C. A.

    2015-08-01

    Current global inventories of ammonia emissions identify the ocean as the largest natural source. This source depends on seawater pH, temperature, and the concentration of total seawater ammonia (NHx(sw)), which reflects a balance between remineralization of organic matter, uptake by plankton, and nitrification. Here we compare [NHx(sw)] from two global ocean biogeochemical models (BEC and COBALT) against extensive ocean observations. Simulated [NHx(sw)] are generally biased high. Improved simulation can be achieved in COBALT by increasing the plankton affinity for NHx within observed ranges. The resulting global ocean emissions is 2.5 TgN a-1, much lower than current literature values (7-23 TgN a-1), including the widely used Global Emissions InitiAtive (GEIA) inventory (8 TgN a-1). Such a weak ocean source implies that continental sources contribute more than half of atmospheric NHx over most of the ocean in the Northern Hemisphere. Ammonia emitted from oceanic sources is insufficient to neutralize sulfate aerosol acidity, consistent with observations. There is evidence over the Equatorial Pacific for a missing source of atmospheric ammonia that could be due to photolysis of marine organic nitrogen at the ocean surface or in the atmosphere. Accommodating this possible missing source yields a global ocean emission of ammonia in the range 2-5 TgN a-1, comparable in magnitude to other natural sources from open fires and soils.

  14. Assimilation of TOPEX/POSEIDON Altimeter Data into a Global Ocean Circulation Model: Are the Results Any Good?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumori, I.; Fu, L. L.; Chao, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The feasibility of assimilating satellite altimetry data into a global ocean general ocean general circulation model is studied. Three years of TOPEX/POSEIDON data is analyzed using a global, three-dimensional, nonlinear primitive equation model.

  15. Assimilation of TOPEX/POSEIDON Altimeter Data into a Global Ocean Circulation Model: Are the Results Any Good?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumori, I.; Fu, L. L.; Chao, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The feasibility of assimilating satellite altimetry data into a global ocean general ocean general circulation model is studied. Three years of TOPEX/POSEIDON data is analyzed using a global, three-dimensional, nonlinear primitive equation model.

  16. Ocean color: Availability of the global data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Gene; Kuring, Norman; Ng, Carolyn; Esaias, Wayne; McClain, Chuck; Elrod, Jane; Maynard, Nancy; Endres, Dan; Evans, Robert; Brown, Jim; Walsh, Sue; Carle, Mark; Podesta, Guillermo

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration/ Goddard Space Flight Center's Nimbus Project Office, in collaboration with the NASA/GSFC Space Data and Computing Division, the NASA/GSFC Laboratory for Oceans and the University of Miami/Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, have undertaken to process all data acquired by the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) to Earth-gridded geophysical values and to provide ready access to data products [Esaias et al., 1986].An end-to-end data system utilizing recent advances in data base management and both digital and analog optical disc storage technologies has been developed to handle the processing, analysis, quality control, archiving and distribution of this data set. A more complete description of this system, which has been fully operational for the past 2 years, is in preparation. The entire Level-1 data set (see Tables 1, 2) has been copied from magnetic tape to digital optical disc, and all data from the first 32 months (50% of the total scenes acquired, and covering the period November 1978 through June 1981) have been processed to Levels 2 and 3 and are now available for distribution. The remainder of the data set should be completed and released by fall 1989.

  17. Decline in global oceanic oxygen content during the past five decades.

    PubMed

    Schmidtko, Sunke; Stramma, Lothar; Visbeck, Martin

    2017-02-15

    Ocean models predict a decline in the dissolved oxygen inventory of the global ocean of one to seven per cent by the year 2100, caused by a combination of a warming-induced decline in oxygen solubility and reduced ventilation of the deep ocean. It is thought that such a decline in the oceanic oxygen content could affect ocean nutrient cycles and the marine habitat, with potentially detrimental consequences for fisheries and coastal economies. Regional observational data indicate a continuous decrease in oceanic dissolved oxygen concentrations in most regions of the global ocean, with an increase reported in a few limited areas, varying by study. Prior work attempting to resolve variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations at the global scale reported a global oxygen loss of 550 ± 130 teramoles (10(12) mol) per decade between 100 and 1,000 metres depth based on a comparison of data from the 1970s and 1990s. Here we provide a quantitative assessment of the entire ocean oxygen inventory by analysing dissolved oxygen and supporting data for the complete oceanic water column over the past 50 years. We find that the global oceanic oxygen content of 227.4 ± 1.1 petamoles (10(15) mol) has decreased by more than two per cent (4.8 ± 2.1 petamoles) since 1960, with large variations in oxygen loss in different ocean basins and at different depths. We suggest that changes in the upper water column are mostly due to a warming-induced decrease in solubility and biological consumption. Changes in the deeper ocean may have their origin in basin-scale multi-decadal variability, oceanic overturning slow-down and a potential increase in biological consumption.

  18. Decline in global oceanic oxygen content during the past five decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtko, Sunke; Stramma, Lothar; Visbeck, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Ocean models predict a decline in the dissolved oxygen inventory of the global ocean of one to seven per cent by the year 2100, caused by a combination of a warming-induced decline in oxygen solubility and reduced ventilation of the deep ocean. It is thought that such a decline in the oceanic oxygen content could affect ocean nutrient cycles and the marine habitat, with potentially detrimental consequences for fisheries and coastal economies. Regional observational data indicate a continuous decrease in oceanic dissolved oxygen concentrations in most regions of the global ocean, with an increase reported in a few limited areas, varying by study. Prior work attempting to resolve variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations at the global scale reported a global oxygen loss of 550 ± 130 teramoles (1012 mol) per decade between 100 and 1,000 metres depth based on a comparison of data from the 1970s and 1990s. Here we provide a quantitative assessment of the entire ocean oxygen inventory by analysing dissolved oxygen and supporting data for the complete oceanic water column over the past 50 years. We find that the global oceanic oxygen content of 227.4 ± 1.1 petamoles (1015 mol) has decreased by more than two per cent (4.8 ± 2.1 petamoles) since 1960, with large variations in oxygen loss in different ocean basins and at different depths. We suggest that changes in the upper water column are mostly due to a warming-induced decrease in solubility and biological consumption. Changes in the deeper ocean may have their origin in basin-scale multi-decadal variability, oceanic overturning slow-down and a potential increase in biological consumption.

  19. On Verifying Currents and Other Features in the Hawaiian Islands Region Using Fully Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System Compared to Global Ocean Model and Ocean Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, P. G.; Chen, S.

    2014-12-01

    This poster introduces and evaluates features concerning the Hawaii, USA region using the U.S. Navy's fully Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS-OS™) coupled to the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM). It also outlines some challenges in verifying ocean currents in the open ocean. The system is evaluated using in situ ocean data and initial forcing fields from the operational global Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Verification shows difficulties in modelling downstream currents off the Hawaiian islands (Hawaii's wake). Comparing HYCOM to NCOM current fields show some displacement of small features such as eddies. Generally, there is fair agreement from HYCOM to NCOM in salinity and temperature fields. There is good agreement in SSH fields.

  20. Invigorating ocean boundary current systems around Australia during 1979-2014: As simulated in a near-global eddy-resolving ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ming; Zhang, Xuebin; Oke, Peter; Monselesan, Didier; Chamberlain, Matthew; Matear, Richard; Schiller, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Ocean boundary currents, transporting water masses and marine biota along the coastlines, are important for regional climate and marine ecosystem functions. In this study, we review the dominant multi-decadal trends of ocean boundary currents around Australia. Using an eddy-resolving global ocean circulation model, this study has revealed that the major ocean boundary current systems around Australia, the East Australian Current (EAC), the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), the Leeuwin Current, the South Australian Current and the Flinders Current, have strengthened during 1979-2014, consistent with existing observations. Eddy energetics in the EAC, the ITF/South Equatorial Current in the southeast Indian Ocean, and the Leeuwin Current have also enhanced during the same period. The multi-decadal strengthening of the ocean boundary current systems are primarily driven by large scale wind patterns associated with the dominant modes of climate variability and change - the phase shift of the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation/Pacific Decadal Oscillation strengthens the ITF and the Leeuwin Current/South Australian Current; and the poleward shift and strengthening of surface winds in the subtropical gyres reinforce the EAC and the Flinders Current. The invigorating ocean boundary current systems have induced extreme oceanographic conditions along the Australian coastlines in recent years, including the poleward shift of marine ecosystems off the east coast of Australia and the consecutive Ningaloo Niño - marine heatwave events off the west coast during 2011-2013. Understanding long-term trends and decadal variations of the ocean boundary currents is crucial to project future changes of the coastal marine systems under the influence of human-induced greenhouse gas forcing.

  1. Emergent constraints on projections of declining primary production in the tropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Bopp, Laurent; Aumont, Olivier; Ciais, Philippe; Cox, Peter M.; Laufkötter, Charlotte; Li, Yue; Séférian, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Marine primary production is a fundamental component of the Earth system, providing the main source of food and energy to the marine food web, and influencing the concentration of atmospheric CO 2 (refs ,). Earth system model (ESM) projections of global marine primary production are highly uncertain with models projecting both increases and declines of up to 20% by 2100. This uncertainty is predominantly driven by the sensitivity of tropical ocean primary production to climate change, with the latest ESMs suggesting twenty-first-century tropical declines of between 1 and 30% (refs ,). Here we identify an emergent relationship between the long-term sensitivity of tropical ocean primary production to rising equatorial zone sea surface temperature (SST) and the interannual sensitivity of primary production to El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-driven SST anomalies. Satellite-based observations of the ENSO sensitivity of tropical primary production are then used to constrain projections of the long-term climate impact on primary production. We estimate that tropical primary production will decline by 3 +/- 1% per kelvin increase in equatorial zone SST. Under a business-as-usual emissions scenario this results in an 11 +/- 6% decline in tropical marine primary production and a 6 +/- 3% decline in global marine primary production by 2100.

  2. The Global Drifter Program Currents, Sea Surface Temperature, Atmospheric Pressure and Waves in the World's OceanThe Global Drifter Program Currents, Sea Surface Temperature, Atmospheric Pressure and Waves in the World's Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centurioni, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The Global Drifter Program is the principal component of the Global Surface Drifting Buoy Array, a branch of NOAA's Global Ocean Observing System and a scientific project of the Data Buoy Cooperation Panel (DBCP). The DBCP is an international program coordinating the use of autonomous data buoys to observe atmospheric and oceanographic conditions over ocean areas where few other measurements are taken. The Global Drifter Program maintains an array of over 1,250 Lagrangian drifters, reporting in near real-time and designed measure 15 m depth Lagrangian currents, sea surface temperature (SST) and sea level atmospheric pressure (SLP), among others, to fulfill the needs to observe the air-sea interface at temporal and spatial scales adequate to support short to medium-range weather forecasting, ocean state estimates and climate science. This overview talk will discuss the main achievements of the program, the main impacts for satellite SST calibration and validation, for numerical weather prediction, and it will review the main scientific findings based on the use of Lagrangian currents. Finally, we will present new developments in Lagrangian drifter technology, which include special drifters designed to measure sea surface salinity, wind and directional wave spectra. New opportunities for expanding the scope of the Global Drifter Program will be discussed.

  3. Impact of an upgraded model in the NCEP Global Ocean Data Assimilation System: The tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Hasibur; Behringer, David W.; Penny, Stephen G.; Ravichandran, M.

    2016-11-01

    The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services (INCOIS) produces global ocean analysis based on the Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (GODAS). This study shows how upgrades to the forward model simulations from MOM4p0d to MOM4p1 impact ocean analyses over the tropical Indian Ocean in GODAS. Three experiments were performed with same atmospheric forcing fields: (i) using MOM4p0d (GODAS_p0), (ii) using MOM4p1 (GODAS_p1), both using observed temperature and synthetic salinity, and (iii) using MOM4p1 (GODAS_p1S) assimilating both observed temperature and observed salinity. Validation with independent observations shows significant improvement of subsurface temperature and salinity in the new analysis using MOM4p1 versus MOM4p0d. There is also improvement in the upper ocean current of the equatorial Indian Ocean. The impact of observed salinity on the upper ocean surface current is marginal, but there is significant improvement in the subsurface current. The seasonal and inter-annual variability of the Wyrtki jet and the equatorial undercurrent is improved in GODAS_p1 versus GODAS_p0. All analyses reproduced the Indian Ocean dipole, with the GODAS_p1S simulated sea surface temperature (SST) the most accurate. The temperature inversion over the north Bay of Bengal (BoB) is reproduced only in GODAS_p1S. The mean sea level over BoB and equatorial Indian Ocean improved in GODAS_p1S as compared with AVISO observation. The combined model upgrade and assimilation of observed salinity led to reduced root-mean-square deviation and higher correlation coefficient values in the sea level anomaly (SLA) when compared with satellite observations.

  4. MERCATOR-Ocean monitoring and forecasting : a 4D vision of the global ocean. Data policy and applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumazou, V.; Nouel, L.; Sureau, J.; Greiner, E.; Landes, V.; Dombrowsky, E.; Charon, I.

    2003-12-01

    Mercator Ocean is a public interest grouping formed in Toulouse in early 2002 by six major players in the French oceanography community: the space agency CNES, the scientific research centre CNRS, IFREMER (the institute of marine research and exploration), the development research institute IRD, the Météo France weather service, and SHOM (the French Navy's hydrography & oceanography department). In 1995, these same organizations gave themselves seven years to achieve a challenging objective: to conceive, develop and implement France's first operational oceanography system. The unique system would be capable of describing, analysing and predicting conditions at the ocean surface and subsurface in real time, anytime, anywhere in the world, even in the most inhospitable seas. That objective was met on 17 January 2001 with the release of the first Mercator ocean bulletin, providing a two-week forecast for the entire North Atlantic. Two thousands new forecast charts are now added to the MERCATOR bulletin every week. Building on these successes, a dedicated operational oceanography team, Mercator Ocean, was set up in 2002. Mercator Ocean's mission is to deliver incremental improvements in the service provided by this new operational oceanography capability by increasing the resolution and the geographic coverage of the models used. The new high-resolution model that is now on line offers 6 km grid resolution, and the first models offering global ocean coverage will be implemented late 2003. Over the next four years, Mercator Ocean also plans to establish a European Operational Oceanography Centre in Toulouse. Objective 1. Develop an operational oceanography system using three-dimensional simulation and a high-resolution primitive-equation model capable of assimilating satellite data (from the Jason altimetry satellite in particular) and in-situ ocean observation data (particularly those gathered by the CORIOLIS centre). 2. Support applications for commercial shipping

  5. Statistical multi-model climate projections of surface ocean waves in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jorge; Menendez, Melisa; Camus, Paula; Mendez, Fernando J.; Losada, Inigo J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the impact of climate change on sea surface waves has received increasingly more attention by the climate community. Indeed, ocean waves reaching the coast play an important role in several processes concerning coastal communities, such as inundation and erosion. However, regional downscaling at the high spatial resolution necessary for coastal studies has received less attention. Here, we present a novel framework for regional wave climate projections and its application in the European region. Changes in the wave dynamics under different scenarios in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean are analyzed. The multi-model projection methodology is based on a statistical downscaling approach. The statistical relation between the predictor (atmospheric conditions) and the predictand (multivariate wave climate) is based on a weather type (WT) classification. This atmospheric classification is developed by applying the k-means clustering technique over historical offshore sea level pressure (SLP) fields. Each WT is linked to sea wave conditions from a wave hindcast. This link is developed by associating atmospheric conditions from reanalysis with multivariate local waves. This predictor-predictand relationship is applied to the daily SLP fields from global climate models (GCMs) in order to project future changes in regional wave conditions. The GCMs used in the multi-model projection are selected according to skill criteria. The application of this framework uses CMIP5-based wave climate projections in Europe. The low computational requirements of the statistical approach allow a large number of GCMs and climate change scenarios to be studied. Consistent with previous works on global wave climate projections, the estimated changes from the regional wave climate projections show a general decrease in wave heights and periods in the Atlantic Europe for the late twenty-first century. The regional projections, however, allow a more detailed

  6. Opposite latitudinal gradients in projected ocean acidification and bleaching impacts on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    van Hooidonk, Ruben; Maynard, Jeffrey Allen; Manzello, Derek; Planes, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs and the services they provide are seriously threatened by ocean acidification and climate change impacts like coral bleaching. Here, we present updated global projections for these key threats to coral reefs based on ensembles of IPCC AR5 climate models using the new Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) experiments. For all tropical reef locations, we project absolute and percentage changes in aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) for the period between 2006 and the onset of annual severe bleaching (thermal stress >8 degree heating weeks); a point at which it is difficult to believe reefs can persist as we know them. Severe annual bleaching is projected to start 10-15 years later at high-latitude reefs than for reefs in low latitudes under RCP8.5. In these 10-15 years, Ωarag keeps declining and thus any benefits for high-latitude reefs of later onset of annual bleaching may be negated by the effects of acidification. There are no long-term refugia from the effects of both acidification and bleaching. Of all reef locations, 90% are projected to experience severe bleaching annually by 2055. Furthermore, 5% declines in calcification are projected for all reef locations by 2034 under RCP8.5, assuming a 15% decline in calcification per unit of Ωarag. Drastic emissions cuts, such as those represented by RCP6.0, result in an average year for the onset of annual severe bleaching that is ~20 years later (2062 vs. 2044). However, global emissions are tracking above the current worst-case scenario devised by the scientific community, as has happened in previous generations of emission scenarios. The projections here for conditions on coral reefs are dire, but provide the most up-to-date assessment of what the changing climate and ocean acidification mean for the persistence of coral reefs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Detection and projection of carbonate dissolution in the water column and deep-sea sediments due to ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyina, Tatiana; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2012-03-01

    Dissolution of fossil fuel CO2 in seawater results in decreasing carbonate ion concentration and lowering of seawater pH with likely negative impacts for many marine organisms. We project detectable changes in carbonate dissolution and evaluate their potential to mitigate atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification with a global biogeochemistry model HAMOCC forced by different CO2 emission scenarios. Our results suggest that as the anthropogenic CO2 signal penetrates into ocean interior, the saturation state of carbonate minerals will drop drastically - with undersaturation extending from the ocean floor up to 100-150 m depth in the next century. This will induce massive dissolution of CaCO3 in the water column as well as the sediment, increasing the Total Alkalinity (TA) by up to 180 μmol kg-1 at the surface and in the ocean interior over the next 2500 years. Model results indicate an inhomogeneous response among different ocean basins: Atlantic carbonate chemistry responds faster and starts recovering two millennia after CO2 emissions cease, which is not the case in the Pacific. CaCO3 rain stops in the Pacific Ocean around 2230. Using an observation-derived detection threshold for TA, we project detectable dissolution-driven changes only by the year 2070 in the surface ocean and after 2230 and 2500 in the deep Atlantic and Pacific respectively. We show that different model assumptions regarding dissolution and calcification rates have little impact on future projections. Instead, anthropogenic CO2 emissions overwhelmingly control the degree of perturbation in ocean chemistry. In conclusion, ocean carbonate dissolution has insignificant potential in mitigating atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification in the next millennia.

  8. Using Green's Functions to initialize and adjust a global, eddying ocean biogeochemistry general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brix, H.; Menemenlis, D.; Hill, C.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Jahn, O.; Wang, D.; Bowman, K.; Zhang, H.

    2015-11-01

    The NASA Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) Flux Project aims to attribute changes in the atmospheric accumulation of carbon dioxide to spatially resolved fluxes by utilizing the full suite of NASA data, models, and assimilation capabilities. For the oceanic part of this project, we introduce ECCO2-Darwin, a new ocean biogeochemistry general circulation model based on combining the following pre-existing components: (i) a full-depth, eddying, global-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm), (ii) an adjoint-method-based estimate of ocean circulation from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II (ECCO2) project, (iii) the MIT ecosystem model "Darwin", and (iv) a marine carbon chemistry model. Air-sea gas exchange coefficients and initial conditions of dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, and oxygen are adjusted using a Green's Functions approach in order to optimize modeled air-sea CO2 fluxes. Data constraints include observations of carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) for 2009-2010, global air-sea CO2 flux estimates, and the seasonal cycle of the Takahashi et al. (2009) Atlas. The model sensitivity experiments (or Green's Functions) include simulations that start from different initial conditions as well as experiments that perturb air-sea gas exchange parameters and the ratio of particulate inorganic to organic carbon. The Green's Functions approach yields a linear combination of these sensitivity experiments that minimizes model-data differences. The resulting initial conditions and gas exchange coefficients are then used to integrate the ECCO2-Darwin model forward. Despite the small number (six) of control parameters, the adjusted simulation is significantly closer to the data constraints (37% cost function reduction, i.e., reduction in the model-data difference, relative to the baseline simulation) and to independent observations (e.g., alkalinity). The adjusted air-sea gas

  9. Towards Grid-Enabling the Global Geodynamics Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, I.; Aldridge, K. D.

    2004-05-01

    The Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) allows Earth scientists to access a network of globally distributed superconducting gravimeters (SGs). By establishing standards around SG instrumentation and data, in concert with various bilateral agreements, the GGP ensures scientific and organizational integrity. Now in its second phase, the GGP is proactively engaging non-traditional disciplines - i.e., those outside the tidal gravimetry community. Although GGP has generated interest with geodynamicists, seismologists, and others, there are practicalities which inhibit engangement by these `non-specialists'. For example, to geodynamicists and seismologists, tidal, atmospheric, hydrologic and oceanic signals are all unwanted. This means that the processed GGP Data must undergo further, non-trivial reductions before it is useful for geodynamic and seismic purposes. The requirement to correlate data in time and space presents another example. Currently this is a manually intensive process that requires geodynamicists and seismologists to specify temporal (e.g., a period of time, an event in time) and/or spatial (e.g., global, regional, specific instruments) specifics to allow for further analysis. These and other examples suggest infrastructural opportunities for further enabling GGP scientists. With decided emphasis on Virtual Organizations, open standards and qualities of experience, Grid Computing has the potential to facilitate deeper degrees of collaboration within the context of the GGP. Through use cases which seek to identify core resonance effects at semi-diurnal periods (e.g., Lumb et al., AGU Monograph 72, 51-68, 1993) and earthquake activity, various opportunities for Grid-enabling the GGP are identified and prioritized. Because the High Energy Physics community has figured so significantly in the development of the World Wide Web and The Grid, a Grid-enabled GGP also has the potential to play a role in shaping the ongoing evolution of Grid Computing.

  10. A Global Information Exchange (GIE) Project in a Graduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thirunarayanan, M. O.; Coccaro-Pons, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Graduate students who were enrolled in an introductory educational technology course that met face-to-face completed a Global Information Exchange (GIE) project. The goal of the project was to promote global awareness among the graduate students who were also classroom teachers, and by extension their K-12 students. The graduate students, who also…

  11. WPI Projects Globalize Engineering Education in the Pacific Rim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Y. H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Global Perspective Program of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) which addresses the problem of preparing engineers for global careers through a project program. Discusses developing the project programs in Asia, working with Bangkok's recycling needs, and chemical process safety in Taiwan. (JRH)

  12. A Global Information Exchange (GIE) Project in a Graduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thirunarayanan, M. O.; Coccaro-Pons, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Graduate students who were enrolled in an introductory educational technology course that met face-to-face completed a Global Information Exchange (GIE) project. The goal of the project was to promote global awareness among the graduate students who were also classroom teachers, and by extension their K-12 students. The graduate students, who also…

  13. Ubiquitous cyanobacterial podoviruses in the global oceans unveiled through viral DNA polymerase gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sijun; Wilhelm, Steven W; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2010-10-01

    As a major cyanophage group, cyanobacterial podoviruses are important in regulating the biomass and population structure of picocyanobacteria in the ocean. However, little is known about their biogeography in the open ocean. This study represents the first survey of the biodiversity of cyanopodoviruses in the global oceans based on the viral encoded DNA polymerase (pol) gene. A total of 303 DNA pol sequences were amplified by PCR from 10 virus communities collected in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and the South China Sea. At least five subclusters of cyanopodoviruses were identified in these samples, and one subcluster (subcluster VIII) was found in all sampling sites and comprised approximately 50% of total sequences. The diversity index based on the DNA pol gene sequences recovered through PCR suggests that cyanopodoviruses are less diverse in these oceanic samples than in a previously studied estuarine environment. Although diverse podoviruses were present in the global ocean, each sample was dominated by one major group of cyanopodoviruses. No clear biogeographic patterns were observed using statistical analysis. A metagenomic analysis based on the Global Ocean Sampling database indicates that other types of cyanopodovirus-like DNA pol sequences were present in the global ocean. Together, our study results suggest that cyanopodoviruses are widely distributed in the ocean but their community composition varies with local environments.

  14. Sea ice Forecast Verification in the Canadian Global Ice Ocean Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. C.; Lemieux, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Recent increases in marine traffic in the Arctic have amplified the demand for reliable ice and marine environmental predictions. Here we present the verification of ice forecast skill from a system recently implemented operationally at the Canadian Meteorological Centre called the Global Ice Ocean Prediction System (GIOPS). GIOPS provides daily global ice and ocean analyses and 10-day forecasts on a 1/4°-resolution grid. GIOPS includes a multivariate ocean data assimilation system that combines satellite observations of sea level anomaly and sea surface temperature (SST) together with in situ observations of temperature and salinity. Ice analyses are produced using a 3DVar method that assimilates satellite observations from SSM/I and SSMIS together with manual analyses from the Canadian Ice Service. Analyses of total ice concentration are projected onto the partial thickness categories used in the ice model using spatially and temporally varying weighting functions derived from ice model tendencies. This method is found to reduce deleterious impacts on the ice thickness distribution when assimilating ice concentration, as it can directly modulate (and reverse) nonlinear processes such as ice deformation. An objective verification of sea ice forecasts is made using two methods: analysis-based error assessment focusing on the marginal ice zone and a contingency table approach to evaluate ice extent as compared to an independent analysis. Together the methods demonstrate a consistent picture of skilful medium-range forecasts in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres as compared to persistence. Smaller biases are found in both hemispheres during melt periods, whereas larger biases are present during the period of rapid ice formation in fall. Ice forecast skill is found to be highly sensitive to the assimilation of sea surface temperature near the ice edge. Improved observational coverage in these areas (including salinity) would be extremely valuable for further

  15. Global Land Survey Impervious Mapping Project Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeColstoun, Eric Brown; Phillips, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The Global Land Survey Impervious Mapping Project (GLS-IMP) aims to produce the first global maps of impervious cover at the 30m spatial resolution of Landsat. The project uses Global Land Survey (GLS) Landsat data as its base but incorporates training data generated from very high resolution commercial satellite data and using a Hierarchical segmentation program called Hseg. The web site contains general project information, a high level description of the science, examples of input and output data, as well as links to other relevant projects.

  16. TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Karsenti, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Eric Karsenti of EMBL delivers the closing keynote on "TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  17. Keeping the lights on for global ocean salinity observation

    SciTech Connect

    Durack, Paul J.; Lee, Tong; Vinogradova, Nadya T.; Stammer, Detlef

    2016-02-24

    Here, insights about climate are being uncovered thanks to improved capacities to observe ocean salinity, an essential climate variable. However, cracks are beginning to appear in the ocean observing system that require prompt attention if we are to maintain the existing, hard-won capacity into the near future.

  18. Spacebased Observation of Global Ocean Surface Wind Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polito, P. S.; Liu, W. T.

    1997-01-01

    The ocean and the atmosphere are dynamically coupled by the transport of momentum which is driven by the wind shear at the sea surface. However, in situ wind measurements are relatively sparse over most of the world's ocean and are largely limited to the locations of shipping routes.

  19. Ocean color - Availability of the global data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Gene; Kuring, Norman; Ng, Carolyn; Esaias, Wayne; Mcclain, Chuck; Elrod, Jane; Maynard, Nancy; Endres, Dan

    1989-01-01

    The use of satellite observations of ocean color to provide reliable estimates of marine phytoplankton biomass on synoptic scales is examined. An overview is given of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner data processing system. The archiving and distribution of ocean color data are discussed, and NASA-sponsored archive sites are listed.

  20. Euro-Argo: The European contribution to the global Argo ocean observations network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourcuff, Claire

    2017-04-01

    The international Argo programme is a major element of the global in-situ ocean observing system. More than 3900 floats are now globally measuring temperature and salinity throughout the global oceans, down to 2,000 meters depth and delivering data both in real time for operational users and after careful scientific quality control for climate change research and monitoring. Argo is the single most important in-situ observing system for the Copernicus Marine Service. The Euro-Argo research infrastructure organizes and federates European contribution to Argo. A legal and governance framework (Euro-Argo ERIC) was set up in May 2014; it allows European countries to consolidate and improve their contribution to Argo international. We will provide an overview of the development of Euro-Argo over the past years and present the now agreed Euro-Argo long term organization. The capability of the Euro-Argo infrastructure to organize Argo floats procurement, deployment and processing at European level and to conduct R&D driven by Copernicus needs will be highlighted. During the recent years, within the H2020 E-AIMS project, Euro-Argo carried R&D activities on new Argo floats, equipped with biogeochemical sensors or able to dive up to 4000m, from the floats design up to the analysis of their measurements. European Argo data centers were adapted so that they can handle the new data. Observing System Evaluations and Simulation Experiments were also conducted to provide robust recommendations for the next phase of Argo. One of the main challenges for Euro-Argo is now to implement the next phase of Argo with an extension towards biogeochemistry (e.g. oxygen, biology), the polar oceans, the marginal seas and the deep ocean. Meeting such challenges is essential for the long term sustainability and evolution of the Copernicus Marine Service. We will present Euro-Argo strategy and provide some highlights on the implementation-plan for the years to come and the Argo extensions for the

  1. Global Pattern of Dissection on Mars and the Northern Ocean Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Luo, W.

    2010-03-01

    Global distribution of valley networks on Mars is accounted for by a weather pattern that follows from the existence of a northern ocean; precipitation is restricted to the regions located directly south of the dichotomy boundary.

  2. The post-2002 global surface warming slowdown caused by the subtropical Southern Ocean heating acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, A.; Watanabe, M.

    2017-04-01

    The warming rate of global mean surface temperature slowed down during 1998-2012. Previous studies pointed out role of increasing ocean heat uptake during this global warming slowdown, but its mechanism remains under discussion. Our numerical simulations, in which wind stress anomaly in the equatorial Pacific is imposed from reanalysis data, suggest that subsurface warming in the equatorial Pacific took place during initial phase of the global warming slowdown (1998-2002), as previously reported. It is newly clarified that the Ekman transport from tropics to subtropics is enhanced during the later phase of the slowdown (after 2002) and enhanced subtropical Ekman downwelling causes accelerated heat storage below depth of 700 m in the subtropical Southern Ocean, leading to the post-2002 global warming slowdown. Observational data of ocean temperature also support this scenario. This study provides clear evidence that deeper parts of the Southern Ocean play a critical role in the post-2002 warming slowdown.

  3. Warming up, turning sour, losing breath: ocean biogeochemistry under global change.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Nicolas

    2011-05-28

    In the coming decades and centuries, the ocean's biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems will become increasingly stressed by at least three independent factors. Rising temperatures, ocean acidification and ocean deoxygenation will cause substantial changes in the physical, chemical and biological environment, which will then affect the ocean's biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems in ways that we are only beginning to fathom. Ocean warming will not only affect organisms and biogeochemical cycles directly, but will also increase upper ocean stratification. The changes in the ocean's carbonate chemistry induced by the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO(2)) (i.e. ocean acidification) will probably affect many organisms and processes, although in ways that are currently not well understood. Ocean deoxygenation, i.e. the loss of dissolved oxygen (O(2)) from the ocean, is bound to occur in a warming and more stratified ocean, causing stress to macro-organisms that critically depend on sufficient levels of oxygen. These three stressors-warming, acidification and deoxygenation-will tend to operate globally, although with distinct regional differences. The impacts of ocean acidification tend to be strongest in the high latitudes, whereas the low-oxygen regions of the low latitudes are most vulnerable to ocean deoxygenation. Specific regions, such as the eastern boundary upwelling systems, will be strongly affected by all three stressors, making them potential hotspots for change. Of additional concern are synergistic effects, such as ocean acidification-induced changes in the type and magnitude of the organic matter exported to the ocean's interior, which then might cause substantial changes in the oxygen concentration there. Ocean warming, acidification and deoxygenation are essentially irreversible on centennial time scales, i.e. once these changes have occurred, it will take centuries for the ocean to recover. With the emission of CO(2) being the primary driver

  4. Strong coupling among Antarctic ice shelves, ocean circulation and sea ice in a global sea-ice - ocean circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2016-04-01

    The thermodynamic effects of Antarctic ice shelf interaction with ocean circulation are investigated using a global, high-resolution, isopycnal ocean-circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. The model uses NASA MERRA Reanalysis from 1992 to 2011 as atmospheric forcing. The simulated long-period variability of ice-shelf melting/freezing rates differ across geographic locations. The ice shelves in Antarctic Peninsula, Amundsen and Bellingshausen sea embayments and the Amery Ice Shelf experience an increase in melting starting from 2005. This increase in melting is due to an increase in the subsurface (100-500 m) ocean heat content in the embayments of these ice shelves, which is caused by an increase in sea-ice concentration after 2005, and consequent reduction of the heat loss to the atmosphere. Our simulations provide a strong evidence for a coupling between ocean circulation, sea ice and ice shelves.

  5. Role of Indian Ocean SST variability on the recent global warming hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Anika; Rao, Suryachandra A.; Chattopadhyay, R.; Goswami, Tanmoy; George, Gibies; Sabeerali, C. T.

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown a slowdown in the warming rate of the annual mean global surface temperature in the recent decade and it is referred to as the hiatus in global warming. Some recent studies have suggested that the hiatus in global warming is possibly due to strong cooling in the tropical Pacific. This study investigates the possible role of the Indian Ocean warming on the tropical Pacific cooling. Despite the continued rise in sea surface temperature (SST) over the tropical Indian Ocean, SST over the tropical Pacific has shown a cooling trend in the recent decade (2002 - 2012). It is well known fact that the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean are strongly coupled to each other and the Indian Ocean basin wide warming is triggered by El Niño on interannual time scale. However, in the recent decade, this relationship is weakening. The recent Indian Ocean warming is triggering a Matsuno-Gill type response in the atmosphere by generating anomalous cyclonic circulations on either side of equator over the tropical Indian Ocean and anomalous easterlies along the tropical Pacific Ocean. These anomalous easterlies result in Ekman divergence in the equatorial Pacific and produce upwelling Kelvin waves, cools the tropical Pacific and therefore indirectly contributes to the hiatus in global warming.

  6. Trends and drivers in global surface ocean pH over the past three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, S. K.; Gruber, N.; Landschützer, P.; Olsen, A.; Tjiputra, J.

    2014-11-01

    We report global long-term trends in surface ocean pH using a new pH data set computed by combining fCO2 observations from the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) version 2 with surface alkalinity estimates based on temperature and salinity. Trends were determined over the periods 1981-2011 and 1991-2011 for a set of 17 biomes using a weighted linear least squares method. We observe significant decreases in surface ocean pH in ~70% of all biomes and a global mean rate of decrease of -0.0018 ± 0.0004 yr-1 for 1991-2011. We are not able to calculate a global trend for 1981-2011 because too few biomes have enough data for this. In two-thirds of the biomes, the rate of change is commensurate with the trends expected based on the assumption that the surface ocean pH change is only driven by the surface ocean carbon chemistry remaining in a transient equilibrium with the increase in atmospheric CO2. In the remaining biomes deviations from such equilibrium may reflect changes in the trend of surface ocean fCO2, most notably in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, or changes in the oceanic buffer (Revelle) factor. We conclude that well-planned and long-term sustained observational networks are key to reliably document the ongoing and future changes in ocean carbon chemistry due to anthropogenic forcing.

  7. Global warming: Growing feedback from ocean carbon to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Fortunat

    2015-06-01

    The finding that feedbacks between the ocean's carbon cycle and climate may become larger than terrestrial carbon-climate feedbacks has implications for the socio-economic effects of today's fossil-fuel emissions.

  8. Visualization and analysis of eddies in a global ocean simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sean J; Hecht, Matthew W; Petersen, Mark; Strelitz, Richard; Maltrud, Mathew E; Ahrens, James P; Hlawitschka, Mario; Hamann, Bernd

    2010-10-15

    Eddies at a scale of approximately one hundred kilometers have been shown to be surprisingly important to understanding large-scale transport of heat and nutrients in the ocean. Due to difficulties in observing the ocean directly, the behavior of eddies below the surface is not very well understood. To fill this gap, we employ a high-resolution simulation of the ocean developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using large-scale parallel visualization and analysis tools, we produce three-dimensional images of ocean eddies, and also generate a census of eddy distribution and shape averaged over multiple simulation time steps, resulting in a world map of eddy characteristics. As expected from observational studies, our census reveals a higher concentration of eddies at the mid-latitudes than the equator. Our analysis further shows that mid-latitude eddies are thicker, within a range of 1000-2000m, while equatorial eddies are less than 100m thick.

  9. Global variability of the wavenumber spectrum of oceanic mesoscale turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Fu, L.

    2010-12-01

    The wavenumber spectra of sea surface height from the Jason-1 satellite observations have revealed complex spatial variability and significant departure from the predictions of existing theories over many parts of the world oceans. Near the edge of the core regions of high eddy energy, agreement is observed with the prediction of the surface quasi-geostrophic (SQG) turbulence theory which has fundamental differences from that of the traditional quasi-geostrophic (QG) turbulence theory. In the core regions of high eddy energy, the spectra are consistent with frontogenesis that is not fully accounted for by the SQG theory. However, the observations in the vast ocean interior of low eddy energy exhibit substantial differences from the predictions of existing theories of oceanic mesoscale turbulence. The observations presented in this work serve as a test bed for new theories and ocean general circulation models.

  10. Ocean Circulation and its Role in Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallis, Geoffrey

    2013-03-01

    The surface of the planet is warming because of increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. To predict the rate of increase we need to understand how much heat and carbon dioxide are taken up by the ocean. This in turn requires an understanding of both turbulent processes in the upper ocean and the deep, quasi-laminar, overturning circulation. The timescale for the ocean to fully equilibrate to increased greenhouse gases is likely much longer than the timescale on which fossil fuels will still be readily available, and this has important ramifications for what we mean by climate sensitivity. I will discuss these issues with an emphasis on the physical processes of the ocean.

  11. Sensitivity of global ocean heat content from reanalyses to the atmospheric reanalysis forcing: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storto, Andrea; Yang, Chunxue; Masina, Simona

    2016-05-01

    The global ocean heat content evolution is a key component of the Earth's energy budget and can be consistently determined by ocean reanalyses that assimilate hydrographic profiles. This work investigates the impact of the atmospheric reanalysis forcing through a multiforcing ensemble ocean reanalysis, where the ensemble members are forced by five state-of-the-art atmospheric reanalyses during the meteorological satellite era (1979-2013). Data assimilation leads the ensemble to converge toward robust estimates of ocean warming rates and significantly reduces the spread (1.48 ± 0.18 W/m2, per unit area of the World Ocean); hence, the impact of the atmospheric forcing appears only marginal for the global heat content estimates in both upper and deeper oceans. A sensitivity assessment performed through realistic perturbation of the main sources of uncertainty in ocean reanalyses highlights that bias correction and preprocessing of in situ observations represent the most crucial component of the reanalysis, whose perturbation accounts for up to 60% of the ocean heat content anomaly variability in the pre-Argo period. Although these results may depend on the single reanalysis system used, they reveal useful information for the ocean observation community and for the optimal generation of perturbations in ocean ensemble systems.

  12. Energetics of a Global Ocean Circulation Model Compared to Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-09

    in the dynamics of the ocean circulation with instabilities of the strong mean currents generating eddies in the upper ocean. Interactions between...obser- vations from surface drifters, geostrophic currents from satellite altimetry, subsurface floats and deep current meter moorings. HYCOM...rings of the boundary currents [Stammer, 1997; Ferrari and Wunsch, 2009, 2010], is generated by instabilities of the mean flow and direct wind forcing

  13. Global Bathymetric Prediction For Ocean Modeling and Marine Geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Smith, Walter H. F.; Sichoix, Lydie; Frey, Herbert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We proposed to construct a complete bathymetric map of the oceans at a 3-10 km resolution by combining all of the available depth soundings collected over the past 30 years with high resolution marine gravity information provided by the Geosat, ERS-1/2, and Topex/Poseidon altimeters. Detailed bathymetry is essential for understanding physical oceanography and marine geophysics. Currents and tides are controlled by the overall shapes of the ocean basins as well as the smaller sharp ocean ridges and seamounts. Because erosion rates are low in the deep oceans, detailed bathymetry reveals the mantle convection patterns, the plate boundaries, the cooling/subsidence of the oceanic lithosphere, the oceanic plateaus, and the distribution of off-ridge volcanoes. We proposed to: (1) Accumulate all available depth soundings collected over the past 30 years; (2) Use the short wavelength (< 160 km) satellite gravity information to interpolate between sparse ship soundings; (3) Improve the resolution of the marine gravity field using enhanced estimates along repeat altimeter profiles together with the dense altimeter measurements; (4) Refine/improve bathymetric predictions using the improved resolution gravity field and also by investigating computer-intensive methods for bathymetric prediction such as inverse theory; and (5) Produce a 'Globe of the Earth' similar to the globe of Venus prepared by the NASA Magellan investigation. This will also include the best available digital land data.

  14. Baroclinic stabilization effect of the Atlantic-Arctic water exchange simulated by the eddy-permitting ocean model and global atmosphere-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshonkin, Sergey; Bagno, Alexey; Gritsun, Andrey; Gusev, Anatoly

    2017-04-01

    Numerical experiments were performed with the global atmosphere-ocean model INMCM5 (for version of the international project CMIP6, resolution for atmosphere is 2°x1.5°, 21 level) and with the three-dimensional, free surface, sigma coordinate eddy-permitting ocean circulation model for Atlantic (from 30°S) - Arctic and Bering sea domain (0.25 degrees resolution, Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model or INMOM). Spatial resolution of the INMCM5 oceanic component is 0.5°x0.25°. Both models have 40 s-levels in ocean. Previously, the simulations were carried out for INMCM5 to generate climatic system stable state. Then model was run for 180 years. In the experiment with INMOM, CORE-II data for 1948-2009 were used. As the goal for comparing results of two these numerical models, we selected evolution of the density and velocity anomalies in the 0-300m active ocean layer near Fram Strait in the Greenland Sea, where oceanic cyclonic circulation influences Atlantic-Arctic water exchange. Anomalies were count without climatic seasonal cycle for time scales smaller than 30 years. We use Singular Value Decomposition analysis (SVD) for density-velocity anomalies with time lag from minus one to six months. Both models perform identical stable physical result. They reveal that changes of heat and salt transports by West Spitsbergen and East Greenland currents, caused by atmospheric forcing, produce the baroclinic modes of velocity anomalies in 0-300m layer, thereby stabilizing ocean response on the atmospheric forcing, which stimulates keeping water exchange between the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean at the certain climatological level. The first SVD-mode of density-velocity anomalies is responsible for the cyclonic circulation variability. The second and third SVD-modes stabilize existing ocean circulation by the anticyclonic vorticity generation. The second and third SVD-modes give 35% of the input to the total dispersion of density anomalies and 16-18% of the

  15. Perfluorinated acids as novel chemical tracers of global circulation of ocean waters.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Petrick, Gert; Wei, Si; Gamo, Toshitaka; Lam, Paul K S; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2008-01-01

    Perfluorinated acids (PFAs) such as perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are global environmental contaminants. The physicochemical properties of PFAs are unique in that they have high water solubilities despite the low reactivity of carbon-fluorine bond, which also imparts high stability in the environment. Because of the high water solubilities, the open-ocean water column is suggested to be the final sink for PFOS and PFOA. However, little is known on the distribution of PFAs in the oceans around the world. Here we describe the horizontal (spatial) and vertical distribution of PFAs in ocean waters worldwide. PFOS and PFOA concentrations in the North Atlantic Ocean ranged from 8.6 to 36pg l(-1) and from 52 to 338pg l(-1), respectively, whereas the corresponding concentrations in the Mid Atlantic Ocean were 13-73pg l(-1) and 67-439pg l(-1). These were completely different from the surface waters of the South Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean (overall range of <5-11pg l(-1) for PFOS and PFOA). Vertical profiles of PFAs in the marine water column were associated with the global ocean circulation theory. Vertical profiles of PFAs in water columns from the Labrador Sea reflected the influx of the North Atlantic Current in surface waters, the Labrador Current in subsurface waters, and the Denmark Strait Overflow Water in deep layers below 2000m. Striking differences in the vertical and spatial distribution of PFAs, depending on the oceans, suggest that these persistent acids can serve as useful chemical tracers to allow us to study oceanic transportation by major water currents. The results provide evidence that PFA concentrations and profiles in the oceans adhere to a pattern consistent with the global "Broecker's Conveyor Belt" theory of open ocean water circulation.

  16. Assessing the role and consistency of satellite observation products in global physical-biogeochemical ocean reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, David

    2017-04-01

    As part of the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative programme, new sets of satellite observation products, intended to act as Climate Data Records, have been produced for Essential Climate Variables including ocean colour, sea surface temperature, sea level and sea ice. Climate Data Records are required to be sufficiently stable and consistent to be used to detect and monitor climate variability and change, in order to benefit climate studies including reanalyses. These new products have been assimilated into a global coupled physical-biogeochemical ocean model, to create a set of 13-year reanalyses at 1° resolution and 3-year reanalyses at 1/4° resolution. In a series of experiments the variables have been assimilated individually and in combination, in order to assess their consistency in terms of physical-biogeochemical relationships, including the positioning of spatial features and temporal variability. The impact of the assimilation on the carbon cycle and other climate-relevant variables has also been assessed, and the quality and utility of biogeochemical reanalyses explored. This includes the study of inter-annual variability and phenology, and the potential for reanalyses to provide information about biases in climate models and projections.

  17. Planning the global ocean flux program. Final report, January 1989--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, H.D.

    1998-04-01

    The goals of this project were to understand the processes controlling the ocean carbon cycle and atmospheric, sea floor, and boundary exchanges. In addition, prediction of the ocean response to anthropogenic perturbations is a major goal, especially in regard to climate change.

  18. Topex/Poseidon satellite - Enabling a joint U.S.-French mission for global ocean study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Ralph L.

    1990-01-01

    A joint U.S./French mission, which represents a merging of the prior NASA Topex and CNES Poseidon progams, is described. The Topex/Poseidon satellite will contribute to two of the World Climate Research Program's phases: the World Ocean Circulation Experiment and the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere experiment. The satellite's instruments will measure the ocean currents and their variability on the global basis via satellite altimetry and precision orbit determinations. The paper describes the satellite configuration and characteristics and the mission instruments and system elements. The Topex/Poseidon's design diagrams and block diagrams are included.

  19. Ocean Front Detection from MERIS and OLCI Ocean Colour Data Applied to Marine Conservation and Global Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Peter I.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean front detection and aggregation techniques were recently applied to 300m resolution Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) satellite ocean colour data for the first time, to describe frequently occurring shelf-sea fronts near to the Scottish coast (Miller et al., in press). This resolution enabled the location of smaller frontal zones and those in close proximity to a convoluted coastline, and was used to identify zones of ecological importance that could assist the process of defining marine protected areas. Frequent front zones are associated with higher abundance of plankton, certain pelagic fish and megafauna. This paper anticipates the improved insights into submesoscale sediment and plankton dynamics that will result from application of these techniques to the Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) on Sentinel-3a and 3b. Looking to the global scale, we show global chlorophyll-a fronts, eddies and other structures detected from the ESA Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative daily 4 km resolution merged dataset derived from MERIS, SeaWiFS and MODIS data. This emphasises the importance of the Sentinel missions to improving study of both physical and biological ocean processes.

  20. Can we detect long-term, global change from sparse, 135-year-old ocean data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, W. R.; Willis, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Since almost all the climate system's heat capacity resides in the global ocean, observed long-term changes in ocean heat content (OHC) are invaluable for estimating the planet's radiative imbalance. Several studies produce such estimates from in situ observations, but generally these estimates are restricted to the late 20th century onwards, prior to which there was little global observation. Recent studies have compared modern Argo-based estimates of global ocean temperature with estimates from the 1873-1876 HMS Challenger expedition, the first global-scale survey of the subsurface oceans, and report a significant temperature difference between the Challenger and Argo periods. In this work, using simulations from the CMIP5 suite of earth system model's, we ask firstly whether this temperature difference between two relatively short time periods can be attributed to an anthropogenic warming over the entire global ocean, and secondly how well this difference represents a truly global change. We demonstrate that it is extremely unlikely that the temperature difference along the Challenger cruise track could be caused by natural variability alone. Furthermore, the Challenger data provides a reasonable proxy for the true 135-year global temperature difference.

  1. Including high-frequency variability in coastal ocean acidification projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Y.; Frieder, C. A.; Martz, T. R.; Ballard, J. R.; Feely, R. A.; Kram, S.; Nam, S.; Navarro, M. O.; Price, N. N.; Smith, J. E.

    2015-10-01

    Assessing the impacts of anthropogenic ocean acidification requires knowledge of present-day and future environmental conditions. Here, we present a simple model for upwelling margins that projects anthropogenic acidification trajectories by combining high-temporal-resolution sensor data, hydrographic surveys for source water characterization, empirical relationships of the CO2 system, and the atmospheric CO2 record. This model characterizes CO2 variability on timescales ranging from hours (e.g., tidal) to months (e.g., seasonal), bridging a critical knowledge gap in ocean acidification research. The amount of anthropogenic carbon in a given water mass is dependent on the age; therefore a density-age relationship was derived for the study region and then combined with the 2013 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change CO2 emission scenarios to add density-dependent anthropogenic carbon to the sensor time series. The model was applied to time series from autonomous pH sensors deployed in the surf zone, kelp forest, submarine canyon edge, and shelf break in the upper 100 m of the Southern California Bight. All habitats were within 5 km of one another, and exhibited unique, habitat-specific CO2 variability signatures and acidification trajectories, demonstrating the importance of making projections in the context of habitat-specific CO2 signatures. In general, both the mean and range of pCO2 increase in the future, with the greatest increase in both magnitude and range occurring in the deeper habitats due to reduced buffering capacity. On the other hand, the saturation state of aragonite (ΩAr) decreased in both magnitude and range. This approach can be applied to the entire California Current System, and upwelling margins in general, where sensor and complementary hydrographic data are available.

  2. New features of global climatology revealed by satellite-derived oceanic rainfall maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. S. V.; Theon, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative rainfall maps over the oceanic areas of the globe were derived from the Nimbus 5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) data. Analysis of satellite derived oceanic rainfall maps reveal certain distinctive characteristics of global patterns for the years 1973-74. The main ones are (1) the forking of the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the Pacific, (2) a previously unrecognized rain area in the South Atlantic, (3) the bimodal behavior of rainbelts in the Indian Ocean and (4) the large interannual variability in oceanic rainfall. These features are discussed.

  3. The polar oceans and their role in shaping the global environment

    SciTech Connect

    Johannessen, O.M.; Muench, R.D.; Overland, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of major advances made in the past decade in understanding of the interactions between polar oceans and the local atmosphere and ocean system. Included are 38 papers discussing the circulation, dynamics and convective processes occurring in the polar oceans; its carbon cycle chemistry and biology; the paleooceanography and paleoclimate of the polar regions; the interaction between the polar ocean and the global climate, and a variety of strategies for detection of climate change in polar regions, predominantly Arctic.

  4. Oceanic Carbon Dioxide Uptake in a Model of Century-Scale Global Warming

    PubMed

    Sarmiento; Le Quéré C

    1996-11-22

    In a model of ocean-atmosphere interaction that excluded biological processes, the oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) was substantially reduced in scenarios involving global warming relative to control scenarios. The primary reason for the reduced uptake was the weakening or collapse of the ocean thermohaline circulation. Such a large reduction in this ocean uptake would have a major impact on the future growth rate of atmospheric CO2. Model simulations that include a simple representation of biological processes show a potentially large offsetting effect resulting from the downward flux of biogenic carbon. However, the magnitude of the offset is difficult to quantify with present knowledge.

  5. Checklists for Doing Cooperative Global Issues Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, George M.

    2008-01-01

    Projects are not new in education (for example, see Kilpatrick, 1918), but in the last 20 years, they seem to have become more popular in second language education, as projects fit with emphases on communication, tasks, cooperation among students, learner autonomy, curricular integration, alternative assessment, links between the classroom and the…

  6. New developments in the global ocean observing system Argo and its European component EuroArgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Birgit

    2017-04-01

    Since about 2005 Argo is the largest source of in situ ocean data, with the number of Argo-profiles exceeding that of all ship-born profiles ever made. Having a dense and near-homogeneous global and temporal coverage, Argo data are essential to derive ocean-state estimates to initialize seasonal and decadal climate model forecasts and to validate climate model output. For instance, Argo data made it possible to accurately determine ocean heat content and show that it kept increasing during the so-called hiatus period (2000-2014), during which atmospheric near-surface temperature stayed almost constant. Climate models ought to be able to reproduce such events. Currently Argo is entering new realms. New floats types are capable of measuring down to 4 km (instead of 2 km until now), and new sensors have been developed that can measure a variety of biogeochemical variables like oxygen, nitrate, or chlorophyll. These new data will be very important to validate and improve Earth System Models. First, about 40% of the ocean volume is in the depth-range 2-4 km, but observations are currently limited to a few sections in space and time. Deep Argo data will make a thorough validation of ocean models in this depth range possible for the first time. Secondly, the large amount of new biogeochemical data becoming available will allow process studies that will lead to improved parameterizations of biogenic and chemical processes in the ocean, improvements that can be implemented in the models to increase their realism. Third, the data form the first-ever set of biogeochemical data that is consistent and homogeneous over a large spatial and temporal extent will make it possible to validate the models to a degree that was hitherto impossible, simply because of the lack of data. The Argo data system is composed of national Data Assembly Centers (DAC) that supply data to two mirrored Global Data Assembly Centers (GDAC). GDAC data exchanges are based on File Transfer Protocol (FTP

  7. The role of clouds and oceans in global greenhouse warming. Part 1, Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffert, M.I.

    1992-12-01

    During the past three years we have conducted several studies using models and a combination of satellite data, in situ meteorological and oceanic data, and paleoclimate reconstructions, under the DoE program, ``Quantifying the Link Between Change in Radiative Balance and Atmospheric Temperature``. Our goals were to investigate effects of global cloudiness variations on global climate and their implications for cloud feedback and continue development and application of NYU transient climate/ocean models, with emphasis on coupled effects of greenhouse warming and feedbacks by both the clouds and oceans. Our original research plan emphasized the use of cloud, surface temperature and ocean data sets interpreted by focused climate/ocean models to develop a cloud radiative forcing scenario for the past 100 years and to assess the transient climate response; to narrow key uncertainties in the system; and to identify those aspects of the climate system most likely to be affected by greenhouse warming over short, medium and long time scales.

  8. Global Observations and Understanding of the General Circulation of the Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The workshop was organized to: (1) assess the ability to obtain ocean data on a global scale that could profoundly change our understanding of the circulation; (2) identify the primary and secondary elements needed to conduct a World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE); (3) if the ability is achievable, to determine what the U.S. role in such an experiment should be; and (4) outline the steps necessary to assure that an appropriate program is conducted. The consensus of the workshop was that a World Ocean Circulation Experiment appears feasible, worthwhile, and timely. Participants did agree that such a program should have the overall goal of understanding the general circulation of the global ocean well enough to be able to predict ocean response and feedback to long-term changes in the atmosphere. The overall goal, specific objectives, and recommendations for next steps in planning such an experiment are included.

  9. How well-connected is the surface of the global ocean?

    PubMed

    Froyland, Gary; Stuart, Robyn M; van Sebille, Erik

    2014-09-01

    The Ekman dynamics of the ocean surface circulation is known to contain attracting regions such as the great oceanic gyres and the associated garbage patches. Less well-known are the extents of the basins of attractions of these regions and how strongly attracting they are. Understanding the shape and extent of the basins of attraction sheds light on the question of the strength of connectivity of different regions of the ocean, which helps in understanding the flow of buoyant material like plastic litter. Using short flow time trajectory data from a global ocean model, we create a Markov chain model of the surface ocean dynamics. The surface ocean is not a conservative dynamical system as water in the ocean follows three-dimensional pathways, with upwelling and downwelling in certain regions. Using our Markov chain model, we easily compute net surface upwelling and downwelling, and verify that it matches observed patterns of upwelling and downwelling in the real ocean. We analyze the Markov chain to determine multiple attracting regions. Finally, using an eigenvector approach, we (i) identify the five major ocean garbage patches, (ii) partition the ocean into basins of attraction for each of the garbage patches, and (iii) partition the ocean into regions that demonstrate transient dynamics modulo the attracting garbage patches.

  10. Risks of ocean acidification in the California Current food web and fisheries: ecosystem model projections.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kristin N; Kaplan, Isaac C; Hodgson, Emma E; Hermann, Albert; Busch, D Shallin; McElhany, Paul; Essington, Timothy E; Harvey, Chris J; Fulton, Elizabeth A

    2017-04-01

    The benefits and ecosystem services that humans derive from the oceans are threatened by numerous global change stressors, one of which is ocean acidification. Here, we describe the effects of ocean acidification on an upwelling system that already experiences inherently low pH conditions, the California Current. We used an end-to-end ecosystem model (Atlantis), forced by downscaled global climate models and informed by a meta-analysis of the pH sensitivities of local taxa, to investigate the direct and indirect effects of future pH on biomass and fisheries revenues. Our model projects a 0.2-unit drop in pH during the summer upwelling season from 2013 to 2063, which results in wide-ranging magnitudes of effects across guilds and functional groups. The most dramatic direct effects of future pH may be expected on epibenthic invertebrates (crabs, shrimps, benthic grazers, benthic detritivores, bivalves), and strong indirect effects expected on some demersal fish, sharks, and epibenthic invertebrates (Dungeness crab) because they consume species known to be sensitive to changing pH. The model's pelagic community, including marine mammals and seabirds, was much less influenced by future pH. Some functional groups were less affected to changing pH in the model than might be expected from experimental studies in the empirical literature due to high population productivity (e.g., copepods, pteropods). Model results suggest strong effects of reduced pH on nearshore state-managed invertebrate fisheries, but modest effects on the groundfish fishery because individual groundfish species exhibited diverse responses to changing pH. Our results provide a set of projections that generally support and build upon previous findings and set the stage for hypotheses to guide future modeling and experimental analysis on the effects of OA on marine ecosystems and fisheries. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Progress Report on the GROWTH (GNSS Reflectometry for Ocean Waves, Tides, and Height) Research Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Y.; Ichikawa, K.; Akiyama, H.; Ebinuma, T.; Isoguchi, O.; Kimura, N.; Konda, M.; Kouguchi, N.; Tamura, H.; Tomita, H.; Yoshikawa, Y.; Waseda, T.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), such as GPS is a system of satellites that provide autonomous geo-spatial positioning with global coverage. It allows small electronic receivers to determine their location to high precision using radio signals transmitted from satellites, GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) involves making measurements from the reflections from the Earth of navigation signals from GNSS satellites. Reflected signals from sea surface are considered that those are useful to observe sea state and sea surface height. We have started a research program for GNSS-R applications on oceanographic observations under the contract with MEXT (Ministry of Education Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, JAPAN) and launched a Japanese research consortium, GROWTH (GNSS Reflectometry for Ocean Waves, Tides, and Height). It is aiming to evaluate the capabilities of GNSS-R observations for oceanographic phenomena with different time scales, such as ocean waves (1/10 to tens of seconds), tides (one or half days), and sea surface dynamic height (a few days to years). In situ observations of ocean wave spectrum, wind speed vertical profile, and sea surface height will be quantitatively compared with equivalent estimates from simultaneous GNSS-R measurements. The GROWTH project will utilize different types of observation platforms; marine observation towers (about 20 m height), multi-copters (about 100 to 150 m height), and much higher-altitude CYGNSS data. Cross-platform data, together with in situ oceanographic observations, will be compared after adequate temporal averaging that accounts differences of the footprint sizes and temporal and spatial scales of oceanographic phenomena. This paper will provide overview of the GROWTH project, preliminary test results, obtained by the multi-sensor platform at observation towers, suggest actual footprint sizes and identification of swell. Preparation status of a ground station which will be supplied to receive CYGNSS data

  12. Concentrations and ratios of particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in the global ocean.

    PubMed

    Martiny, Adam C; Vrugt, Jasper A; Lomas, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of concentrations and elemental ratios of suspended particles are important for understanding many biogeochemical processes in the ocean. These include patterns of phytoplankton nutrient limitation as well as linkages between the cycles of carbon and nitrogen or phosphorus. To further enable studies of ocean biogeochemistry, we here present a global dataset consisting of 100,605 total measurements of particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, or phosphorus analyzed as part of 70 cruises or time-series. The data are globally distributed and represent all major ocean regions as well as different depths in the water column. The global median C:P, N:P, and C:N ratios are 163, 22, and 6.6, respectively, but the data also includes extensive variation between samples from different regions. Thus, this compilation will hopefully assist in a wide range of future studies of ocean elemental ratios.

  13. Concentrations and ratios of particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in the global ocean

    PubMed Central

    Martiny, Adam C; Vrugt, Jasper A; Lomas, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of concentrations and elemental ratios of suspended particles are important for understanding many biogeochemical processes in the ocean. These include patterns of phytoplankton nutrient limitation as well as linkages between the cycles of carbon and nitrogen or phosphorus. To further enable studies of ocean biogeochemistry, we here present a global dataset consisting of 100,605 total measurements of particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, or phosphorus analyzed as part of 70 cruises or time-series. The data are globally distributed and represent all major ocean regions as well as different depths in the water column. The global median C:P, N:P, and C:N ratios are 163, 22, and 6.6, respectively, but the data also includes extensive variation between samples from different regions. Thus, this compilation will hopefully assist in a wide range of future studies of ocean elemental ratios. PMID:25977799

  14. Local and Global Views of Systematic Errors of Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechoso, C. Roberto; Wang, Chunzai; Lee, Sang-Ki; Zhang, Liping; Wu, Lixin

    2014-05-01

    Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (CGCMs) have serious systematic errors that challenge the reliability of climate predictions. One major reason for such biases is the misrepresentations of physical processes, which can be amplified by feedbacks among climate components especially in the tropics. Much effort, therefore, is dedicated to the better representation of physical processes in coordination with intense process studies. The present paper starts with a presentation of these systematic CGCM errors with an emphasis on the sea surface temperature (SST) in simulations by 22 participants in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). Different regions are considered for discussion of model errors, including the one around the equator, the one covered by the stratocumulus decks off Peru and Namibia, and the confluence between the Angola and Benguela currents. Hypotheses on the reasons for the errors are reviewed, with particular attention on the parameterization of low-level marine clouds, model difficulties in the simulation of the ocean heat budget under the stratocumulus decks, and location of strong SST gradients. Next the presentation turns to a global perspective of the errors and their causes. It is shown that a simulated weak Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) tends to be associated with cold biases in the entire Northern Hemisphere with an atmospheric pattern that resembles the Northern Hemisphere annular mode. The AMOC weakening is also associated with a strengthening of Antarctic bottom water formation and warm SST biases in the Southern Ocean. It is also shown that cold biases in the tropical North Atlantic and West African/Indian monsoon regions during the warm season in the Northern Hemisphere have interhemispheric links with warm SST biases in the tropical southeastern Pacific and Atlantic, respectively. The results suggest that improving the simulation of regional processes may not suffice for a more

  15. Century-long trend of global ocean warming identified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-01-01

    One of the largest sources of uncertainty in reconstructing the warming of the past century stems from problems with historical ocean temperature records. Inconsistencies in method or technology or gaps in observation caused by two world wars mean that long-term records of sea temperature need to be interpreted with care. Drawing on two historical sets of ocean temperature observations—one of the sea surface and the other of the upper 20 meters—Gouretski et al. found that the twentieth century saw a long-term trend of ocean warming. The two data sets were mostly collected independently, using different tools and techniques, and were subjected to different processing. The authors suggest that, owing to the distinct ways in which the data were gathered, the presence of a similar trend could mean that it is not a spurious finding.

  16. Trends and drivers in global surface ocean pH over the past 3 decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, S. K.; Gruber, N.; Landschützer, P.; Olsen, A.; Tjiputra, J.

    2015-03-01

    We report global long-term trends in surface ocean pH using a new pH data set computed by combining fCO2 observations from the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) version 2 with surface alkalinity estimates based on temperature and salinity. Trends were determined over the periods 1981-2011 and 1991-2011 for a set of 17 biomes using a weighted linear least squares method. We observe significant decreases in surface ocean pH in ~70% of all biomes and a mean rate of decrease of 0.0018 ± 0.0004 yr-1 for 1991-2011. We are not able to calculate a global trend for 1981-2011 because too few biomes have enough data for this. In half the biomes, the rate of change is commensurate with the trends expected based on the assumption that the surface ocean pH change is only driven by the surface ocean CO2 chemistry remaining in a transient equilibrium with the increase in atmospheric CO2. In the remaining biomes, deviations from such equilibrium may reflect that the trend of surface ocean fCO2 is not equal to that of the atmosphere, most notably in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, or may reflect changes in the oceanic buffer (Revelle) factor. We conclude that well-planned and long-term sustained observational networks are key to reliably document the ongoing and future changes in ocean carbon chemistry due to anthropogenic forcing.

  17. Novel lineages of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in the global oceans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sijun; Wilhelm, Steven W; Harvey, H Rodger; Taylor, Karen; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Picocyanobacteria represented by Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus have an important role in oceanic carbon fixation and nutrient cycling. In this study, we compared the community composition of picocyanobacteria from diverse marine ecosystems ranging from estuary to open oceans, tropical to polar oceans and surface to deep water, based on the sequences of 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS). A total of 1339 ITS sequences recovered from 20 samples unveiled diverse and several previously unknown clades of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Six high-light (HL)-adapted Prochlorococcus clades were identified, among which clade HLVI had not been described previously. Prochlorococcus clades HLIII, HLIV and HLV, detected in the Equatorial Pacific samples, could be related to the HNLC clades recently found in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC), iron-depleted tropical oceans. At least four novel Synechococcus clades (out of six clades in total) in subcluster 5.3 were found in subtropical open oceans and the South China Sea. A niche partitioning with depth was observed in the Synechococcus subcluster 5.3. Members of Synechococcus subcluster 5.2 were dominant in the high-latitude waters (northern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea), suggesting a possible cold-adaptation of some marine Synechococcus in this subcluster. A distinct shift of the picocyanobacterial community was observed from the Bering Sea to the Chukchi Sea, which reflected the change of water temperature. Our study demonstrates that oceanic systems contain a large pool of diverse picocyanobacteria, and further suggest that new genotypes or ecotypes of picocyanobacteria will continue to emerge, as microbial consortia are explored with advanced sequencing technology.

  18. Global Shallow-Water Bathymetry from Satellite Ocean Color Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-16

    muiine powei plant planning understanding HI censsstem connect ivm coustul management and change analyses Because ocean .ire.is are enormousl) Lute and...spectral data, satellite altimetry, ocean bathymetry 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF a REPORT I nclassified b ABSTRACT Unclassified c THIS...tiv.’rtinK.’llirisiiiliimultl • •.sill M . till’ |MII ’i »rilli itil |i - «r •’•’ I llu N.is|tlr.-tt II. .... iutta "" HUB; HHMH s-| -tr.n

  19. SETAC launches global horizon scanning/research prioritization project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SETAC World Council is pleased to announce the initiation of a Global Horizon Scanning and Prioritization Project aimed at identifying geographically specific research needs to address stressor impacts on environmental quality. In recent years, horizon scanning and research ...

  20. SETAC launches global horizon scanning/research prioritization project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SETAC World Council is pleased to announce the initiation of a Global Horizon Scanning and Prioritization Project aimed at identifying geographically specific research needs to address stressor impacts on environmental quality. In recent years, horizon scanning and research ...

  1. A global survey of ocean-atmosphere interaction and climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunzai; Xie, Shang-Ping; Carton, James A.

    The interaction of the ocean and atmosphere plays an important role in shaping the climate and its variations. This chapter reviews the current state of knowledge of air-sea interaction and climate variations over the global ocean. The largest source of climate variability in the instrumental record is El Niño—Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which extends its reach globally through the ability of the atmosphere to bridge ocean basins. The growth of ENSO owes its existence to a positive ocean—atmosphere feedback mechanism (originally envisioned by J. Bjerknes) that involves the interaction of ocean dynamics, atmospheric convection, and winds in the equatorial Pacific. The Bjerknes feedback and the resultant equatorial zonal mode of climate variability are a common feature to all three tropical oceans despite differences in dimension, geometry and mean climate. In addition to this zonal mode, the tropics also support a meridional mode, whose growth is due to a thermodynamic feedback mechanism involving the interaction of the cross—equatorial gradient of properties such as sea surface temperature and displacements of the seasonal intertropical convergence zone. This meridional mode is observed in the tropical Atlantic, with some evidence of its existence in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. In the extratropics, in contrast, the sources of climate variability are more distributed. Much of climate variability may be explained by the presence of white noise due to synoptic weather disturbances whose impact on climate at longer timescales is due to the integrating effect of the ocean's ability to store and release heat. Still, there is some evidence of a more active role for the mid—latitude ocean in climate variability, especially near major ocean currents/fronts. Finally, various atmospheric and oceanic bridges that link different ocean basins are discussed, along with their implications for paleoclimate changes and the current global warming.

  2. Predicting global oceanic net primary productivity with reduced-dimension, linear dynamical spatiotemporal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, F.; Barton, A.; Stock, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    Oceanic net primary production (NPP) accounts for roughly half of biological carbon fixation at the global scale, determining upper bounds for fisheries and export production. Assessing our ability to predict changes in NPP has thus major implications for the analysis of climate change impacts and for the management of living marine resources. Here, we fitted a series of reduced-dimension, linear dynamical spatiotemporal models to estimates of NPP derived from 18 years of remote sensing data and from simulations of a fully coupled, ocean-atmosphere Earth System Model (ESM). The method projects the evolution of NPP anomalies at the global scale from the time decay and interactions among a reduced set of major NPP modes of variability. This approach allowed us to assess potential limits to the predictability of NPP at the seasonal scale, and to assess the agreement in regional patterns of predictability based on remote sensing and ESM NPP estimates at large scales. The models are able to anticipate changes in NPP at lead times up to 24 months, especially in subtropical latitudes. Predictability was dominated by the decay of major modes at short time scales, with a prevalence of slow moving modes related to El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. This decay dominated short-term predictions in both remote sensing and ESM NPP, although the modes prevailed for a longer time in ESM simulations. The dominance of short time persistence declined gradually at longer lead times as interactions between modes became more important for predicting NPP changes. These interactions were related to the propagation of major climate modes. Our approach provides a novel set of diagnostics to assess the performance of ESMs, and allowed us to identify potential regions where the prediction of NPP might lead to an improved management of living marine resources.

  3. Global Average Upper Ocean Temperature Response To Changing Solar Irradiance: Exciting The Internal Decadal Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, W. B.; Dettinger, M. D.; Cayan, D. R.; White, Warren B.; Dettinger, Michael D.; Cayan, Daniel R.

    Global average upper ocean temperatures anomalies of +/-0.05°K fluctuate in fixed phase with decadal signals in the Sun's irradiance of +/-0.5 Watts m-2 over the past 100 years (White et al., 1997), but its amplitude is 2 to 3 times that expected from the transient Stefan-Boltzmann radiation balance (White et al., 1988). Examining global patterns of upper ocean temperature and lower troposphere winds, we find the internal interannual mode of variability in Earth's ocean-atmosphere-terrestrial system with global-average upper ocean temperature anomalies of +/-0.05°K occurring naturally, independent of changing solar irradiance (White et al., 2000). Yet coherence and phase statistics indicate that the observed internal decadal mode in Earth's ocean -atmosphere terrestrial system is excited by the decadal signal in the Sun's irradiance. To understand the thermodynamics of this association we conduct a global-average upper ocean heat budget utilizing upper ocean temperatures from the SIO reanalysis and air-sea heat and momentum fluxe