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Sample records for project ivy

  1. Poison Ivy

    MedlinePlus

    ... know what causes poison ivy rash? It’s the sap oil that’s made by poison ivy plants that’s ... poison ivy plant; stem, leaves, root, fruit, and sap can cause an allergic reaction or contact dermatitis ...

  2. Poison Ivy

    MedlinePlus

    ... color with the seasons. They may produce whitish flowers or berries. Symptoms of poison ivy The main ... symptoms. They will also examine your rash to make sure it’s not caused by an allergy or ...

  3. Operation Ivy. Project 7. 5. Dispersion of gaseous debris from nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.W.

    1985-09-01

    This project was designed to provide information for the solution of two problems: (1) dispersion of gaseous debris; and (2) initial cloud dimensions. Observations indicated that the major portion of the Mike cloud entered the stratosphere - the cloud top reached 120,000 feet with the mushroom base at about 67,000 feet. The tropopause height at the time of the detonation was about 58,000 feet. The top of the King cloud reached about 74,000 feet with the mushroom base at about 40,000 feet. Samples for the measurement of the world-wide distribution of induced gaseous activity (tritium and carbon-14) were taken at widely separated geographical positions, including both northern and southern hemisphere points. These samples were periodically collected at each location over a period of six months following the detonations.

  4. Look Out! It's Poison Ivy!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darlington, Elizabeth, Day

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on poison ivy and offers suggestions for instructional activities. Includes illustrations of the varieties of poison ivy leaf forms and poison ivy look-alikes. Highlights interesting facts and cases associated with poison ivy and its relatives. (ML)

  5. Look Out! It's Poison Ivy!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darlington, Elizabeth, Day

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on poison ivy and offers suggestions for instructional activities. Includes illustrations of the varieties of poison ivy leaf forms and poison ivy look-alikes. Highlights interesting facts and cases associated with poison ivy and its relatives. (ML)

  6. Poison Ivy Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Page Content Article Body Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac commonly cause skin rashes in ... swampy areas of the Mississippi River region. Poison oak grows as a shrub, and it is seen ...

  7. Poison ivy - oak - sumac

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002886.htm Poison ivy - oak - sumac To use the sharing features ... the plant, if known Amount swallowed (if swallowed) Poison Control Your local poison center can be reached ...

  8. Poison Ivy Rash

    MedlinePlus

    ... to poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac: Farming Forestry Landscaping Gardening Firefighting Construction Camping Fishing from ... Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a ...

  9. Poison ivy - oak - sumac rash

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000027.htm Poison ivy - oak - sumac rash To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Poison ivy, oak, and sumac are plants that commonly ...

  10. Black-spot poison ivy.

    PubMed

    Schram, Sarah E; Willey, Andrea; Lee, Peter K; Bohjanen, Kimberly A; Warshaw, Erin M

    2008-01-01

    In black-spot poison ivy dermatitis, a black lacquerlike substance forms on the skin when poison ivy resin is exposed to air. Although the Toxicodendron group of plants is estimated to be the most common cause of allergic contact dermatitis in the United States, black-spot poison ivy dermatitis is relatively rare.

  11. Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac Print A A A The oil in poison ivy /oak/sumac plants (called urushiol ) can cause ...

  12. Ivy League Trailblazer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Ruth Simmons made a big news splash a decade ago when she was named president of Brown University, making her the first Black president of an Ivy League institution. She made another splash three years later by naming a committee to investigate Brown's role in the slave trade and make recommendations on possible reparations. Reflecting on her…

  13. Ivy League Trailblazer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Ruth Simmons made a big news splash a decade ago when she was named president of Brown University, making her the first Black president of an Ivy League institution. She made another splash three years later by naming a committee to investigate Brown's role in the slave trade and make recommendations on possible reparations. Reflecting on her…

  14. Poison ivy dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Baer, R L

    1986-06-01

    Eruptions caused by poison ivy (see Cover) and related plants are almost always a form of allergic contact dermatitis. Usually they can be readily recognized because of their characteristic streak- or line-like appearance. They usually clear within one to three weeks unless there is continued exposure to the allergen. Local treatment suffices in mild to moderate cases, but in more severe cases systemic corticosteroids can be added.

  15. System description: IVY

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Shumsky, O.

    2000-02-04

    IVY is a verified theorem prover for first-order logic with equality. It is coded in ACL2, and it makes calls to the theorem prover Otter to search for proofs and to the program MACE to search for countermodels. Verifications of Otter and MACE are not practical because they are coded in C. Instead, Otter and MACE give detailed proofs and models that are checked by verified ACL2 programs. In addition, the initial conversion to clause form is done by verified ACL2 code. The verification is done with respect to finite interpretations.

  16. Poison ivy on the leg (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a typical early appearance of a poison ivy rash, located on the leg. These early lesions ... line where the skin has brushed against the poison ivy plant. The rash is caused by skin contact ...

  17. Germination Conditions For Poison Ivy

    Treesearch

    Nathan M. Schiff; Kristina F. Connor; Margaret S. Devall

    2004-01-01

    Several scarification and stratification treatments were tested to optimize germination conditions for poison ivy [Toxicodendron radicans (L.) Kunst]. Fall-collected seeds soaked for 1 hour in water showed increasing germination with increasing stratification. Scarification with concentrated sulphuric acid for 30 minutes resulted in approximately 65...

  18. Operation Ivy: 1952. Technical rept

    SciTech Connect

    Gladeck, F.R.; Hallowell, J.H.; Martin, E.J.; McMullan, F.W.; Miller, R.H.

    1982-12-01

    Ivy was a two-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted during October and November of 1952 at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. One of the two events was designated Mike and was the first thermonuclear or hydrogen bomb. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

  19. Dermoscopy of black-spot poison ivy.

    PubMed

    Rader, Ryan K; Mu, Ruipu; Shi, Honglan; Stoecker, William V; Hinton, Kristen A

    2012-10-15

    Black-spot poison ivy is an uncommon presentation of poison ivy (Toxicodendron) allergic contact dermatitis. A 78-year-old sought evaluation of a black spot present on her right hand amid pruritic vesicles. The presentation of a black spot on the skin in a clinical context suggesting poison ivy is indicative of black-spot poison ivy. Dermoscopy revealed a jagged, centrally homogeneous, dark brown lesion with a red rim. A skin sample was obtained and compared against a poison ivy standard using ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS). This finding confirmed the presence of multiple urushiol congeners in the skin sample. Black-spot poison ivy may be added to the list of diagnoses that show a specific dermoscopic pattern.

  20. Ivy Sign in Moyamoya Disease.

    PubMed

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Saglam, Muzaffer; Yildiz, Bulent; Anagnostakou, Vania; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2016-02-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic disease characterized by the progressive stenosis and collateral development of the distal internal carotid arteries. In this disease, several collateral vascular structures develop following stenosis and occlusion. The ivy sign is a characteristic Magnetic rezonance imaging (MRI) finding frequently encountered in patients with moyamoya. It can be observed both in post contrast T1-weighted images and Fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. While this sign manifests in the form of contrasting on the cortical surfaces due to the formation of leptomeningeal collateral development and increased numbers of pial vascular webs on post contrast images, in FLAIR images it originates from the slow arterial flow in the leptomeningeal collateral vascular structures. In this case, we presented the Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) signs of moyamoya disease and "ivy sign" in MRI and its development mechanism in a 16 years old female patient.

  1. Ivy Sign in Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Saglam, Muzaffer; Yildiz, Bulent; Anagnostakou, Vania; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic disease characterized by the progressive stenosis and collateral development of the distal internal carotid arteries. In this disease, several collateral vascular structures develop following stenosis and occlusion. The ivy sign is a characteristic Magnetic rezonance imaging (MRI) finding frequently encountered in patients with moyamoya. It can be observed both in post contrast T1-weighted images and Fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. While this sign manifests in the form of contrasting on the cortical surfaces due to the formation of leptomeningeal collateral development and increased numbers of pial vascular webs on post contrast images, in FLAIR images it originates from the slow arterial flow in the leptomeningeal collateral vascular structures. In this case, we presented the Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) signs of moyamoya disease and “ivy sign” in MRI and its development mechanism in a 16 years old female patient. PMID:27026766

  2. Identification and treatment of poison ivy dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Briant, D; Brouder, G

    1983-01-01

    Poison ivy dermatitis is an acute self-limiting problem of two or three weeks' duration that can cause significant discomfort. Poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac cause more cases of allergic contact dermatitis than all the other contact allergens combined. Treatment of poison ivy dermatitis depends on the severity of the reaction. The nurse practitioner can manage the majority of poison ivy cases. However, if there is systemic involvement, a physician consultation is necessary. The patient can best be assisted by assessing the severity of the dermatitis, prescribing an appropriate supportive therapy and teaching preventive measures.

  3. Prospects for biological control of Cape-ivy with the Cape-ivy fly and the cape-ivy moth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata, Asteraceae), native to coastal floodplains and mountain riparian zones in eastern South Africa, is an invasive vine in coastal riparian, woodland and scrub habitats in California and southern Oregon. Cape-ivy smothers native vegetation and may impair water flow in coastal...

  4. Occupational poison ivy and oak dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Epstein, W L

    1994-07-01

    Among the growing and diverse groups of outdoor and environmental workers, poison ivy and poison oak continue to be the major cause of occupational contact dermatitis. This article reviews the practical and theoretic means to prevent poison ivy and poison oak dermatitis in workers occupationally exposed to these weeds.

  5. Ivy League Football: Hard-Core Unemployment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iman, Raymond S.

    1971-01-01

    Decries the discrimination accorded to Ivy League football players by Pro Football owners and suggests corrective measures including a Head Start program involving preseason coaching for Ivy Leaguers, formation of a Department of Recreational Studies headed by Ara Parseghian or Darrell Royal, and a remedial course for punters during Christmas…

  6. Interview with Frank Ivy Carroll.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Frank Ivy; Coaker, Hannah

    2013-06-01

    Frank Ivy Carroll received his BS degree in chemistry from Auburn University (AL, USA) in 1957 and was awarded the PhD in chemistry by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (NC, USA) in 1961. He joined the research staff of the Research Triangle Institute (NC, USA) as a Research Chemist and rose steadily to the position of Vice President of the Chemistry and Life Sciences Group, a position he held from 1996-2001. Dr Carroll also served as Director of the Center for Organic and Medicinal Chemistry from 1975-2007. He is presently Distinguished Fellow for Medicinal Chemistry. Dr Carroll has varied research interests, but since 1990, a major thrust of his research efforts has involved development of pharmacotherapies for substance abuse (cocaine, nicotine, methamphetamine, opioids and ethanol) and other CNS disorders. Dr Carroll has published 468 peer-reviewed articles, 33 book chapters and 46 patents and has received numerous awards for his research accomplishments; the most recent are: the 2010 North Carolina Award for Science; the 2010 National Institute on Drug Abuse Public Service Award for Significant Achievement; and the 2012 Alfred Burger Award in Medicinal Chemistry from the American Chemical Society. In 2007, he was inducted into the American Chemical Society Medicinal Chemistry Hall of Fame. Interview conducted by Hannah Coaker, Assistant Commissioning Editor.

  7. Milia after allergic contact dermatitis from poison ivy: two cases.

    PubMed

    Berk, David R; Hurt, Mark A; Reese, Lester T; Wagner, Laura; Bayliss, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    Milia have rarely been reported as a complication of severe allergic contact dermatitis. To our knowledge, milia have not previously been associated with poison ivy dermatitis. We present two cases of milia after allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy.

  8. Poison ivy dermatitis. Nuances in treatment.

    PubMed

    Williford, P M; Sheretz, E F

    1994-02-01

    Acute allergic contact dermatitis due to poison ivy or poison oak is a common presenting complaint in the practices of many primary care physicians. While the clinical features are well described, reported treatment regimens vary in both topical and systemic therapies. We review herein the variability of presenting morphologic features of the disease and common treatment regimens, with attention given to complications of therapy. We also comment on the correct botanical designation, incidence, and immune mechanisms of the disease state and review measures to avoid allergic contact dermatitis due to poison ivy and poison oak.

  9. De novo ivy sign indicates postoperative hyperperfusion in moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Horie, Nobutaka; Morikawa, Minoru; Morofuji, Youichi; Hiu, Takeshi; Izumo, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Kentaro; Nagata, Izumi

    2014-05-01

    The ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI is a specific finding in moyamoya disease (MMD). This sign indicates decreased cerebral perfusion, dilated pial vasculature, and slow leptomeningeal collateral flow. This study aimed to clarify the characteristics of perioperative changes in the ivy sign in relation to cerebral hyperperfusion, which frequently occurs in MMD of unknown pathogenesis. This prospective study included patients with MMD who underwent superior temporal artery-middle cerebral artery single bypass. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI was performed to evaluate the appearance of the ivy sign in the ipsilateral hemisphere preoperatively and on postoperative days 2 and 30. The ivy sign was assessed in combination with perioperative symptoms and cerebral hemodynamics using single-photon emission computed tomography. Of 42 consecutive patients (55 sides) who underwent bypass surgery, 32 (58.2%) showed an increase in the ivy sign (de novo ivy sign) on postoperative day 2; this had disappeared by day 30. Interestingly, these 32 patients had a significantly higher incidence of hyperperfusion on single-photon emission computed tomography and hyperperfusion syndrome, and there was no correlation between the de novo ivy sign and a preoperative ivy sign or the preoperative cerebral hemodynamics. In multivariate analysis, a de novo ivy sign was significantly correlated with postoperative hyperperfusion. In MMD, a de novo ivy sign could indicate postoperative hyperperfusion after bypass, which is not always correlated with preoperative hemodynamic impairment. Additional factors other than preoperative cerebral hemodynamics might be involved in postoperative hyperperfusion in MMD.

  10. [Allergic contact dermatitis to common ivy (Hedera helix L.)].

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, C; Schneider, L A; Hinrichs, R; Staib, G; Weber, L; Weiss, J M; Scharffetter-Kochanek, K

    2003-10-01

    Common ivy (Hedera helix L.) is a ubiquitous plant in Europe whose major allergen falcarinol has moderate allergic potential. It is not related to poison ivy (Toxicodendron spp.). There are no cross reactions between the allergens of common ivy (falcarinol) and poison ivy (urushiol). Contact with common ivy or falcarinol may lead to sensitization and then a delayed hypersensitivity reaction. There are only few cases described in the literature. We report on a male hobby gardener with appropriate clinical history and positive patch test. The pathogenic mechanism is a type IV reaction following a sensitization exposure. Gardeners and landscape architects with frequent exposure to common ivy and thus a high risk of sensitization should wear appropriate protective clothing.

  11. ALGERIAN IVY DERMATITIS—A California Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey, Clete S.

    1959-01-01

    A hitherto unrecognized cause of contact dermatitis in California is the widely cultivated plant known as Algerian ivy. This plant, which grows in California (and its close relative, English ivy) causes a dermatitis which is similar to although milder than that caused by poison oak. Dermatitis from this cause occurs most frequently when persons who have become sensitive to it by previous contact trim the plant back in the spring after its seasonal spurt of growth. For persons whose occupations require repeated contact with the plant, dermatitis from this cause is an occupational hazard. Dermatitis from this plant is easily diagnosed by means of a simple patch test. In a series of 12 cases the only effective treatment was with corticosteroid agents. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:13629356

  12. Nanoparticle biofabrication using English ivy (Hedera helix).

    PubMed

    Burris, Jason N; Lenaghan, Scott C; Zhang, Mingjun; Stewart, C Neal

    2012-10-24

    English ivy (Hedera helix) is well known for its adhesive properties and climbing ability. Essential to its ability to adhere to vertical surfaces is the secretion of a nanocomposite adhesive containing spherical nanoparticles, 60-85 nm in diameter, produced exclusively by root hairs present on adventitious roots. These organic nanoparticles have shown promise in biomedical and cosmetic applications, and represent a safer alternative to metal oxide nanoparticles currently available. It was discovered that the maximum adventitious root production was achieved by a 4 h application of 1 mg/ml indole-3 butyric acid (IBA) to juvenile English ivy shoot segments cultured in custom vessels. After incubation of the shoots under continuous light at 83 μmol/m2 s at 20°C for 2 weeks, the adventitious roots were harvested from the culture system and it was possible to isolate 90 mg of dry weight nanoparticles per 12 g of roots. The nanoparticle morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy, and found to be similar to previous studies. An enhanced system for the production of English ivy adventitious roots and their nanoparticles by modifying GA7 Magenta boxes and identifying the optimal concentration of IBA for adventitious root growth was developed. This system is the first such platform for growing and harvesting organic nanoparticles from plants, and represents an important step in the development of plant-based nanomanufacturing. It is a significant improvement on the exploitation of plant systems for the formation of metallic nanoparticles, and represents a pathway for the generation of bulk ivy nanoparticles for translation into biomedical applications.

  13. Nanoparticle biofabrication using English ivy (Hedera helix)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background English ivy (Hedera helix) is well known for its adhesive properties and climbing ability. Essential to its ability to adhere to vertical surfaces is the secretion of a nanocomposite adhesive containing spherical nanoparticles, 60–85 nm in diameter, produced exclusively by root hairs present on adventitious roots. These organic nanoparticles have shown promise in biomedical and cosmetic applications, and represent a safer alternative to metal oxide nanoparticles currently available. Results It was discovered that the maximum adventitious root production was achieved by a 4 h application of 1 mg/ml indole-3 butyric acid (IBA) to juvenile English ivy shoot segments cultured in custom vessels. After incubation of the shoots under continuous light at 83 μmol/m2 s at 20°C for 2 weeks, the adventitious roots were harvested from the culture system and it was possible to isolate 90 mg of dry weight nanoparticles per 12 g of roots. The nanoparticle morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy, and found to be similar to previous studies. Conclusions An enhanced system for the production of English ivy adventitious roots and their nanoparticles by modifying GA7 Magenta boxes and identifying the optimal concentration of IBA for adventitious root growth was developed. This system is the first such platform for growing and harvesting organic nanoparticles from plants, and represents an important step in the development of plant-based nanomanufacturing. It is a significant improvement on the exploitation of plant systems for the formation of metallic nanoparticles, and represents a pathway for the generation of bulk ivy nanoparticles for translation into biomedical applications. PMID:23095780

  14. Microbiology of infected poison ivy dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Brook, I; Frazier, E H; Yeager, J K

    2000-05-01

    We report the aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of secondarily infected poison ivy dermatitis. The study involved retrospective review of clinical and microbiology laboratory records of patients with secondarily infected poison ivy lesions. Bacterial growth was noted in 33 specimens. Aerobic or facultative anaerobic bacteria only were present in 18 (55%) patients, anaerobic bacteria only in seven (21%), and mixed anaerobic-aerobic bacteria in eight (24%). Forty-five isolates were recovered (1.4 per specimen): 27 aerobic or facultative anaerobic bacteria, and 18 strict anaerobes. The predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus (13 isolates) and group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (six). The predominant anaerobes were Peptostreptococcus spp. (seven isolates), pigmented Prevotella and Porphyromonas spp. (four) and Fusobacterium spp. (two). Single bacterial isolates were recovered in 18 (55%) patients, eight of which were S. aureus. Nineteen of the organisms isolated from 16 (48%) patients produced the enzyme beta-lactamase. Organisms that resided in the mucous membranes close to the lesions predominated in those infections. Enteric gram-negative rods and Bacteroides fragilis group predominated in leg and buttock lesions. Group A beta-haemolytic streptococci, pigmented Prevotella and Porphyromonas and Fusobacterium spp. were most frequently recovered from lesions of the finger, face and neck. The polymicrobial aetiology of secondarily infected poison ivy lesions, and the association of bacterial flora with the anatomical site of the lesions, are demonstrated.

  15. Toxicodendron dermatitis: poison ivy, oak, and sumac.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Aaron C

    2006-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis caused by the Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus) species-poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac-affects millions of North Americans every year. In certain outdoor occupations, for example, agriculture and forestry, as well as among many outdoor enthusiasts, Toxicodendron dermatitis presents a significant hazard. This review considers the epidemiology, identification, immunochemistry, pathophysiology, clinical features, treatment, and prevention of this common dermatologic problem. Recent research in prevention is emphasized, and resources to help in the identification of plants are provided in the bibliography. The literature was searched using a MEDLINE query for "Toxicodendron dermatitis", and the identified article bibliographies were searched as well.

  16. Characterization of physicochemical properties of ivy nanoparticles for cosmetic application.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujian; Lenaghan, Scott C; Xia, Lijin; Burris, Jason N; Stewart, C Neal; Zhang, Mingjun

    2013-02-01

    Naturally occurring nanoparticles isolated from English ivy (Hedera helix) have previously been proposed as an alternative to metallic nanoparticles as sunscreen fillers due to their effective UV extinction property, low toxicity and potential biodegradability. This study focused on analyzing the physicochemical properties of the ivy nanoparticles, specifically, those parameters which are crucial for use as sunscreen fillers, such as pH, temperature, and UV irradiation. The visual transparency and cytotoxicity of ivy nanoparticles were also investigated comparing them with other metal oxide nanoparticles. Results from this study demonstrated that, after treatment at 100°C, there was a clear increase in the UV extinction spectra of the ivy nanoparticles caused by the partial decomposition. In addition, the UVA extinction spectra of the ivy nanoparticles gradually reduced slightly with the decrease of pH values in solvents. Prolonged UV irradiation indicated that the influence of UV light on the stability of the ivy nanoparticle was limited and time-independent. Compared to TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles, ivy nanoparticles showed better visual transparency. Methylthiazol tetrazolium assay demonstrated that ivy nanoparticles exhibited lower cytotoxicity than the other two types of nanoparticles. Results also suggested that protein played an important role in modulating the three-dimensional structure of the ivy nanoparticles. Based on the results from this study it can be concluded that the ivy nanoparticles are able to maintain their UV protective capability at wide range of temperature and pH values, further demonstrating their potential as an alternative to replace currently available metal oxide nanoparticles in sunscreen applications.

  17. Characterization of physicochemical properties of ivy nanoparticles for cosmetic application

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Naturally occurring nanoparticles isolated from English ivy (Hedera helix) have previously been proposed as an alternative to metallic nanoparticles as sunscreen fillers due to their effective UV extinction property, low toxicity and potential biodegradability. Methods This study focused on analyzing the physicochemical properties of the ivy nanoparticles, specifically, those parameters which are crucial for use as sunscreen fillers, such as pH, temperature, and UV irradiation. The visual transparency and cytotoxicity of ivy nanoparticles were also investigated comparing them with other metal oxide nanoparticles. Results Results from this study demonstrated that, after treatment at 100°C, there was a clear increase in the UV extinction spectra of the ivy nanoparticles caused by the partial decomposition. In addition, the UVA extinction spectra of the ivy nanoparticles gradually reduced slightly with the decrease of pH values in solvents. Prolonged UV irradiation indicated that the influence of UV light on the stability of the ivy nanoparticle was limited and time-independent. Compared to TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles, ivy nanoparticles showed better visual transparency. Methylthiazol tetrazolium assay demonstrated that ivy nanoparticles exhibited lower cytotoxicity than the other two types of nanoparticles. Results also suggested that protein played an important role in modulating the three-dimensional structure of the ivy nanoparticles. Conclusions Based on the results from this study it can be concluded that the ivy nanoparticles are able to maintain their UV protective capability at wide range of temperature and pH values, further demonstrating their potential as an alternative to replace currently available metal oxide nanoparticles in sunscreen applications. PMID:23375001

  18. Basophil degranulation induced by oral poison ivy antigen.

    PubMed

    Shelley, W B; Resnik, S S

    1965-08-01

    Seven subjects shown by patch test to be sensitive to poison ivy oleoresin were challenged with graded oral doses of ivy extract. In each instance the circulating basophil leukocytes showed significant degranulation within one hour of challenge. This finding was interpreted as evidence of the presence of immediate-type circulating antibody to ivy antigen in these subjects. No drop in the absolute basophil count was noted, but with higher oral doses the degranulation persisted for several days. Thirteen control subjects showed no change in the basophil morphology or count, indicating that the resin at these levels was not toxic to this cell. All but one of the sensitive subjects showed objective patch test evidence of hyposensitization following the intensive three-week course of oral poison ivy antigen.

  19. Water relations of climbing ivy in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Leuzinger, S; Hartmann, A; Körner, C

    2011-06-01

    Ivy (Hedera helix) is the most important liana in temperate European forests. We studied water relations of adult ivy in a natural, 35 m tall mixed deciduous forest in Switzerland using a construction crane to access the canopy. Predawn leaf water potential at the top of climbing ivy ranged from -0.4 to -0.6 MPa, daily minima ranged from -1.3 to -1.7 MPa. Leaf water potentials as well as relative sap flow were held surprisingly constant throughout different weather conditions, suggesting a tendency to isohydric behaviour. Maximum stomatal conductance was 200 mmol m⁻² s⁻¹. The use of a potometer experiment allowed us to measure absolute transpiration rates integrated over a whole plant of 0.23 mmol m⁻² s⁻¹. Nightly sap flow of ivy during warm, dry nights accounted for up to 20% of the seasonal maximum. Maximum sap flow rates were reached at ca. 0.5 kPa vpd. On the other hand, the host trees showed a less conservative stomatal regulation, maximum sap flow rates were reached at vpd values of ca. 1 kPa. Sap flow rates of ivy decreased by ca. 20% in spring after bud break of trees, suggesting that ivy profits strongly from warm sunny days in early spring before budbreak of the host trees and from mild winter days. This species may benefit from rising winter temperatures in Europe and thus become a stronger competitor against its host trees.

  20. Prevention of poison ivy dermatitis with oral homeopathic Rhus toxicodendron.

    PubMed

    Signore, Robert Joseph

    2017-01-15

    Acute allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy is acommon and miserable dermatosis which affectsmillions of Americans each year. Preventativemeasures, such as avoidance, protective clothing,barrier creams, soaps, and solvents often fail despiteour patients' best attempts. Severe allergic reactionsto poison ivy are a significant source of decreasedemployee productivity owing to inability to work anda major health care expenditure. Patients may haveto leave their jobs and discontinue favorite outdoorrecreational activities as a result of severe urushiolsensitivity. Thus, a simple and effective method ofpreventing poison ivy dermatitis would be of greatbenefit to clinical dermatologists and their patients.Complementary and alternative medical practitionerscommonly prescribe homeopathic poison ivyproducts by mouth for the prevention of poisonivy dermatitis. Yet, conventional dermatologists aremostly unaware of this little known clinical pearl. Theauthor discusses two open studies and anecdotalexperience with administration of homeopathicpoison ivy in the prevention of acute allergic contactdermatitis related to poison ivy exposure. Potentialadvantages could include patient acceptability,ease of administration, affordability, and availability.Randomized clinical trials are needed to furtherevaluate the safety and efficacy of this interesting andpromising clinical tip.

  1. Leadership Styles and Creativity: An Examination of the Four Female Ivy League Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson-Graves, Winifert E.

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, females are taking the helm as president of colleges and universities in the United States, yet men still hold the majority of presidential positions (ACE, 2012). The Ivy League is an exception. In the Ivy League, the presidency is held by an equal number of females and males. For three of four Ivy League institutions where females…

  2. Leadership Styles and Creativity: An Examination of the Four Female Ivy League Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson-Graves, Winifert E.

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, females are taking the helm as president of colleges and universities in the United States, yet men still hold the majority of presidential positions (ACE, 2012). The Ivy League is an exception. In the Ivy League, the presidency is held by an equal number of females and males. For three of four Ivy League institutions where females…

  3. MALDI-MS Imaging of Urushiols in Poison Ivy Stem.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mina; Sturtevant, Drew; Winston, Jordan; Collakova, Eva; Jelesko, John G; Chapman, Kent D

    2017-04-29

    Urushiols are the allergenic components of Toxicodendron radicans (poison ivy) as well as other Toxicodendron species. They are alk-(en)-yl catechol derivatives with a 15- or 17-carbon side chain having different degrees of unsaturation. Although several methods have been developed for analysis of urushiols in plant tissues, the in situ localization of the different urushiol congeners has not been reported. Here, we report on the first analysis of urushiols in poison ivy stems by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Our results show that the urushiol congeners with 15-carbon side chains are mainly localized to the resin ducts, while those with 17-carbon side chains are widely distributed in cortex and vascular tissues. The presence of these urushiols in stem extracts of poison ivy seedlings was confirmed by GC-MS. These novel findings provide new insights into the spatial tissue distribution of urushiols that might be biosynthetically or functionally relevant.

  4. Mechanics of the Adhesive Properties of Ivy Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-21

    of plant adhesive was observed on the adventitious roots of English ivy and the climbing organs of other plants. Charles Darwin made an accurate...a film between the rootlets and the substrates (Fig. 10D). This adhesive film is likely the “cement” mentioned by Charles Darwin . 2.5 Principles

  5. Treatment of toxicodendron dermatitis (poison ivy and poison oak).

    PubMed

    Guin, J D

    2001-04-01

    Toxicodendron dermatitis results from a reaction to an oil soluble oleoresin that is present in many parts of the poison ivy and poison oak plants. Prophylactic measures include avoidance, protective clothing, barrier creams and hyposensitization. Treatments include washing the area immediately with a solvent suitable for lipids and the use of anti-inflammatory agents, especially corticosteroids.

  6. Retrospective: Ivy Lee and the German Dye Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hainsworth, Brad E.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the relationship between public relations trailblazer Ivy Lee and the German Dye Trust, which became an agent for the policies of Adolf Hitler. Discusses how Lee's efforts to use this relationship to persuade his contacts to influence the Nazi leadership failed because of his formal connection with this group. (JD)

  7. Black-spot poison ivy: a rare phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Carmen T; Bean, Ashley S

    2011-06-01

    To provide an overview of the clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and treatment with advanced practice nursing implications of black-spot poison ivy phenomenon. Case presentation and comprehensive literature review on black-spot poison ivy. Black-spot poison ivy is a rare phenomenon and usually poses a diagnostic challenge. It usually presents after exposure to a higher concentration of uroshiol on Toxicodendron plants. Patients present with black-spot deposits on the epidermis with underlying poison ivy dermatitis. The black deposits cannot be washed off the skin and are followed by itchy blisters. They eventually peel off and the skin heals without scarring. An understanding of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, treatment, and management of this rare phenomenon is important for the nurse practitioner (NP) to be able to make an accurate diagnosis and initiate appropriate treatment without delay. The NP's recognition and differentiation of it from other skin disorders including melanoma is paramount. ©2011 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2011 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. Shoot growth and leaf dimorphism in Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)

    Treesearch

    William B. Critchfield

    1970-01-01

    Boston ivy, a common ornamental vine in the grape family, successively produces two kinds of leaves during the growing season. The two "early leaves" at the base of each shoot are preformed in the winter bud, and their expansion in the spring is accompanied by little stem elongation. At maturity they have large three-lobed blades and long petioles. Most short...

  9. Harold and Kumar Go to the Ivy League

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Mark

    2008-01-01

    For having achieved a mild cult status after doing the movie "Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle," lead actors John Cho and Kal Penn deserve their fame, their million-dollar paychecks, and their groupies. Do they deserve Ivy League teaching jobs? This spring Penn (whose real name is Kalpen Modi) taught a large lecture class, "Images of Asian…

  10. Harold and Kumar Go to the Ivy League

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Mark

    2008-01-01

    For having achieved a mild cult status after doing the movie "Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle," lead actors John Cho and Kal Penn deserve their fame, their million-dollar paychecks, and their groupies. Do they deserve Ivy League teaching jobs? This spring Penn (whose real name is Kalpen Modi) taught a large lecture class, "Images of Asian…

  11. Retrospective: Ivy Lee and the German Dye Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hainsworth, Brad E.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the relationship between public relations trailblazer Ivy Lee and the German Dye Trust, which became an agent for the policies of Adolf Hitler. Discusses how Lee's efforts to use this relationship to persuade his contacts to influence the Nazi leadership failed because of his formal connection with this group. (JD)

  12. Structure and evolution of the Ivy protein family, unexpected lysozyme inhibitors in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abergel, Chantal; Monchois, Vincent; Byrne, Deborah; Chenivesse, Sabine; Lembo, Frédérique; Lazzaroni, Jean-Claude; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    Part of an ancestral bactericidal system, vertebrate C-type lysozyme targets the peptidoglycan moiety of bacterial cell walls. We report the crystal structure of a protein inhibitor of C-type lysozyme, the Escherichia coli Ivy protein, alone and in complex with hen egg white lysozyme. Ivy exhibits a novel fold in which a protruding five-residue loop appears essential to its inhibitory effect. This feature guided the identification of Ivy orthologues in other Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of the evolutionary distant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Ivy orthologue was also determined in complex with hen egg white lysozyme, and its antilysozyme activity was confirmed. Ivy expression protects porous cell-wall E. coli mutants from the lytic effect of lysozyme, suggesting that it is a response against the permeabilizing effects of the innate vertebrate immune system. As such, Ivy acts as a virulence factor for a number of Gram-negative bacteria-infecting vertebrates. PMID:17405861

  13. Structure and evolution of the Ivy protein family, unexpected lysozyme inhibitors in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Chantal; Monchois, Vincent; Byrne, Deborah; Chenivesse, Sabine; Lembo, Frédérique; Lazzaroni, Jean-Claude; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2007-04-10

    Part of an ancestral bactericidal system, vertebrate C-type lysozyme targets the peptidoglycan moiety of bacterial cell walls. We report the crystal structure of a protein inhibitor of C-type lysozyme, the Escherichia coli Ivy protein, alone and in complex with hen egg white lysozyme. Ivy exhibits a novel fold in which a protruding five-residue loop appears essential to its inhibitory effect. This feature guided the identification of Ivy orthologues in other Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of the evolutionary distant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Ivy orthologue was also determined in complex with hen egg white lysozyme, and its antilysozyme activity was confirmed. Ivy expression protects porous cell-wall E. coli mutants from the lytic effect of lysozyme, suggesting that it is a response against the permeabilizing effects of the innate vertebrate immune system. As such, Ivy acts as a virulence factor for a number of Gram-negative bacteria-infecting vertebrates.

  14. Recognizing the Toxicodendrons (poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac).

    PubMed

    Guin, J D; Gillis, W T; Beaman, J H

    1981-01-01

    Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac are now classified in the genus Toxicodendron which is readily distinguished from Rhus. In the United States, there are two species of poison oak, Toxicodendron diversilobum (western poison oak) and Toxicodendron toxicarium (eastern poison oak). There are also two species of poison ivy, Toxicodendron rydbergii, a nonclimbing subshrub, and Toxicodendron radicans, which may be either a shrub or a climbing vine. There are nine subspecies of T. radicans, six of which are found in the United States. One species of poison sumac, Toxicodendron vernix, occurs in the United States. Distinguishing features of these plants and characteristics that separate Toxicodendron from Rhus are outlined in the text and illustrated in color plates.

  15. Nonenzymic spectrophotometric determination of potential poison ivy cross-reactors.

    PubMed

    Quattrone, A J

    1977-03-01

    I describe an inexpensive, nonenzymic analytical system for prescreening substances that might cross-react as Rhus toxing (e.g., poison ivy, poison oak, and sumac allergens) on human skin. By spectrophotometric assay after incubation with an oxidizing mixture of Cu(II)ammine complex and ammonium persulfate, I could accurately and reproducibly determine o-quinoidal products of several potential synthetic cross-reactors and native poison ivy allergen, and could distinguish these from catecholamines, resorcinol, p-hydroquinone, and a closely related phenol. A good correlation was obtained between this nonenzymic technique and an enzymic assay. This Cu(II)ammine/persulfate oxidative assay, however, is inexpensive and obviates any spectral interference from enzymic proteins.

  16. Is it, or isn't it? Poison ivy look-a-likes.

    PubMed

    McGovern, T W; LaWarre, S R; Brunette, C

    2000-06-01

    Poison ivy causes more allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) than any other cause. Although physicians rightfully focus on the treatment of the dermatitis, prevention will be aided by recognition of the foreboding plant. Likewise, many other plants can masquerade as poison ivy and cause one to needlessly curtail his or her activities because of fear of a bad reaction. The most common poison ivy pretenders in the United States are discussed, and distinguishing plant characteristics are highlighted.

  17. [Toxic contact dermatitis from poison ivy in a private garden in Germany].

    PubMed

    Schauder, S; Callauch, R; Hausen, B M

    2006-07-01

    A couple suffered for 5 years from recurrent eruptions with vesicles and bullae after contact with an unknown "climbing weed" in their private garden in Germany. After this plant was identified as poison ivy and eradicated, their skin problems were solved. This is the first report of poison ivy in this setting. Urushiols in poison ivy are not only strong allergens but also potent irritants. Negative patch tests in the husband suggest that the bullous dermatitis was a toxic reaction.

  18. [Contact allergy caused by poison ivy (Toxicodendron spp].

    PubMed

    Fölster-Holst, R; Hausen, B M; Brasch, J; Christophers, E

    2001-02-01

    Within 3 days two female patients presented with an eruption featuring erythema, edema, vesicles and bullae. We suspected poison ivy allergy which was subsequently proven by history and positive patch tests. In Germany the risk of specific hypersensitivity to Toxicodendron species is low, since the distribution of such plants is confined to botanical gardens. Other species belonging to the family of Anacardiaceae contain urushiols as well (e.g., mango, cashew) and may cause allergic contact dermatitis.

  19. IViPP: A Tool for Visualization in Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hieu; Skiba, Elizabeth; Baldwin, Doug

    2011-10-01

    Experiments and simulations in physics generate a lot of data; visualization is helpful to prepare that data for analysis. IViPP (Interactive Visualizations in Particle Physics) is an interactive computer program that visualizes results of particle physics simulations or experiments. IViPP can handle data from different simulators, such as SRIM or MCNP. It can display relevant geometry and measured scalar data; it can do simple selection from the visualized data. In order to be an effective visualization tool, IViPP must have a software architecture that can flexibly adapt to new data sources and display styles. It must be able to display complicated geometry and measured data with a high dynamic range. We therefore organize it in a highly modular structure, we develop libraries to describe geometry algorithmically, use rendering algorithms running on the powerful GPU to display 3-D geometry at interactive rates, and we represent scalar values in a visual form of scientific notation that shows both mantissa and exponent. This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), with special thanks to Craig Sangster at LLE.

  20. Whole-Genome Sequence and Classification of 11 Endophytic Bacteria from Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans)

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phuong N.; Tan, Nicholas E. H.; Lee, Yin Peng; Gan, Han Ming; Polter, Steven J.; Dailey, Lucas K.; Hudson, André O.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequences and annotation of 11 endophytic bacteria from poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) vine tissue. Five bacteria belong to the genus Pseudomonas, and six single members from other genera were found present in interior vine tissue of poison ivy. PMID:26586879

  1. [Anaphylaxis Due to Ingestion of Ivy Syrup (Hedera hÈlix). Report of two Cases].

    PubMed

    Morfin-Maciel, Blanca María; Rosas-Alvarado, Alejandro; Velázquez-Sámano, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Common ivy is an ornamental plant, that is ubiquitous in Mexico. Its allergens can cause contact dermatitis, asthma and allergic rhinitis. We describe two cases of anaphylaxis related to common ivy syrup ingestion. We performed skin prick test with Hedera helix syrup, and using a dialized and ultrafiltered of common ivy syrup commercial presentation (dry common ivy extract: 7mg/ml), as well as using Hedera helix pollen extract. We describe two cases of anaphylaxis related to ingestion of Hedera helix syrup. Skin prick test with the commercial presentation and with the pollen extract were positive in both patients. In this study we confirmed the causal relationship of anaphylaxis due to the ingestion of ivy syrup in two patients through skin prick tests with ivy syrup and ivy pollen extract. Common ivy can cause contact dermatitis, asthma and allergic rhinitis, but we do not know the allergens that could be related to systemic and respiratory reactions, then, more studies in this topic are requiered.

  2. Whole-Genome Sequence and Classification of 11 Endophytic Bacteria from Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans).

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong N; Tan, Nicholas E H; Lee, Yin Peng; Gan, Han Ming; Polter, Steven J; Dailey, Lucas K; Hudson, André O; Savka, Michael A

    2015-11-19

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequences and annotation of 11 endophytic bacteria from poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) vine tissue. Five bacteria belong to the genus Pseudomonas, and six single members from other genera were found present in interior vine tissue of poison ivy. Copyright © 2015 Tran et al.

  3. Ivy signs on FLAIR images before and after STA-MCA anastomosis in patients with Moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Reiko; Morikawa, Minoru; Enokizono, Mikako; Ogawa, Yoji; Nagata, Izumi; Uetani, Masataka

    2011-04-01

    Leptomeningeal high signal intensity (ivy sign) on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging is one of the features of Moyamoya disease. However, the correlation between ivy sign and cerebral perfusion status has not been fully evaluated. To characterize ivy sign on FLAIR images in Moyamoya disease and compare this finding with hemodynamic alterations on perfusion single-photon emission CT (SPECT) obtained before and after bypass surgery. Sixteen patients with angiographically confirmed Moyamoya disease who underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis were included in the study. The presence of ivy sign on FLAIR images was classified as 'negative', 'minimal' and 'positive'. We evaluated the relationship between ivy sign and findings of SPECT, including cerebral vascular reserve (CVR) before and after surgery. Minimal or positive ivy sign was seen in 13 (81%) of 16 patients, and 21 (66%) of 32 hemispheres. CVR in the areas with positive or minimal ivy sign was lower than that in the areas with negative ivy sign. After STA-MCA anastomosis, ivy sign disappeared or decreased in all 21 hemispheres demonstrating ivy sign. SPECT demonstrated apparent hemodynamic improvement in areas demonstrating disappearance or decrease of ivy sign. Ivy sign on FLAIR image is seen in areas with decreased cerebral perfusion. The sign is useful for non-invasive assessment of cerebral hemodynamic status before and after surgery.

  4. Hyposensitization to poison ivy after working in a cashew nut shell oil processing factory.

    PubMed

    Reginella, R F; Fairfield, J C; Marks, J G

    1989-04-01

    19 adults were patch tested to urushiol, the allergen in poison ivy/oak, to determine their sensitivity to this allergen after working in a cashew nut shell oil (CNSO) processing plant. The cashew nut tree and poison ivy/oak are in the same botanical family. Anacardiaceae, and they share similar chemicals which cause allergic contact dermatitis. 13 of the 19 workers had a preemployment history of poison ivy sensitivity, with 10 developing CNSO dermatitis. After working in this factory for several months, 9 of the 13 noticed a decreased sensitivity or no sensitivity to poison ivy/oak. When tested to urushiol extract, only 3 reacted positively, 2 minimally. These results imply that hyposensitization to poison ivy/oak occurred in these employees after development of hardening to cashew nut shell oil.

  5. Gas plant (Dictamnus albus) phytophotodermatitis simulating poison ivy.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. A.; DesGroseilliers, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with an itchy rash that resembled superficial burns or cane marks on his left forearm; similar lesions had appeared every summer for 5 years. Poison ivy dermatitis had been the initial diagnosis, but the patient knew that this plant was absent from his well tended garden. A visit to the garden revealed the gas plant Dictamnus albus, and occlusive patch testing with leaf cuttings produced a reaction after the skin was exposed to sunlight. Gas plant phytophotodermatitis was diagnosed. Images p889-a Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6231089

  6. Poison ivy, oak, and sumac dermatitis identification, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Garner, L A

    1999-05-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis from poison ivy, oak, or sumac is common among people who work or exercise outdoors. The plants, classified in the genus Rhus or Toxicodendron, contain allergens that can cause reactions ranging from mild pruritus to severe urticaria or generalized maculopapular eruptions. Initial management includes cleansing, cold compresses, and, possibly, oral antihistamines for symptomatic relief. Topical corticosteroids are given for localized nonfacial eruptions; systemic corticosteroids are used for severe eruptions. Prevention involves avoiding contact with the plants and washing exposed skin within 2 hours.

  7. Ultraviolet Extinction and Visible Transparency by Ivy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quanshui; Xia, Lijin; Zhang, Zhili; Zhang, Mingjun

    2010-09-01

    Though much research has been conducted for nanoparticles, naturally occurring nanoparticles have not yet been well explored for their diverse properties and potential applications. This paper reports the optical absorption and scattering properties of nanoparticles secreted by English ivy. Both experimental and theoretical studies have been conducted. Strong ultraviolet extinction and excellent visible transparency are observed, compared to the inorganic TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles at similar concentrations. The contributions of absorption and scattering to the total extinction are quantified by simulation of the Mie scattering theory.

  8. Exploring naturally occurring ivy nanoparticles as an alternative biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yi-Jun; Wang, Yongzhong; Yi, Sijia; Fan, Zhen; Sun, Leming; Lin, Derrick; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Zhu, Hua; Schmidt, Michael; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-10-01

    Arabinoglactan protein (AGP)-rich nanoparticles obtained from the sticky exudates of Hedera helix (English ivy), have shown promising potential to be used in nanomedicine owing to their excellent aqueous solubility, low intrinsic viscosity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. In this study, the feasibilities of utilizing ivy nanoparticles (INPs) as nano-carriers for delivering chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer therapy and as nano-fillers to develop novel scaffolds for tissue engineering in regenerative medicine are evaluated. Via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, pH-responsive nanoconjugates are formed between the INPs and the doxorubicin (DOX) with an entrapment ratio of 77.9±3.9%. While the INPs show minimal cytotoxicity, the formed INP-DOX conjugates exhibit substantially stronger cytotoxic activity than free DOX against multiple cancer cell lines, suggesting a synergistic effect is established upon conjugation. The anti-cancer effects of the INP-DOX conjugates are further evaluated via in vivo xenograft assays by subcutaneously implanting DOX resistant cell line, SW620/Ad-300, into nude mice. The tumor volumes in mice treated with the INP-DOX conjugates are significantly less than those of the mice treated with free DOX. In addition, the INPs are further exploited as nano-fillers to develop fibrous scaffolds with collagen, via mimicking the porous matrix where the INPs are embedded under natural condition. Enhanced adhesion of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and accelerated proliferation of mouse aortic SMCs are observed in this newly constructed scaffold. Overall, the results obtained from the present study suggest great potential of the INPs to be used as biocompatible nanomaterials in nanomedicine. The AGP-rich INP renders a glycoprotein architecture that is amenable for modification according to the functional designs, capable of being developed as versatile nanomaterials for extensive biomedical applications. Naturally occurring organic

  9. Ultraviolet Extinction and Visible Transparency by Ivy Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Though much research has been conducted for nanoparticles, naturally occurring nanoparticles have not yet been well explored for their diverse properties and potential applications. This paper reports the optical absorption and scattering properties of nanoparticles secreted by English ivy. Both experimental and theoretical studies have been conducted. Strong ultraviolet extinction and excellent visible transparency are observed, compared to the inorganic TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles at similar concentrations. The contributions of absorption and scattering to the total extinction are quantified by simulation of the Mie scattering theory. PMID:20730120

  10. Oral hyposensitization to poison ivy and poison oak.

    PubMed

    Marks, J G; Trautlein, J J; Epstein, W L; Laws, D M; Sicard, G R

    1987-04-01

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a 1:1 mixture of pentadecylcatechol (PDC) and heptadecylcatechol (HDC) diacetate in reducing hypersensitivity to poison ivy and poison oak. The study was double-blind, parallel, randomized, and placebo controlled. The 44 subjects receiving the active drug ingested a cumulative dose of 306.5 mg over a five-week period. Subsequently, 14 patients were continued on a maintenance phase, ingesting an additional 960 mg of drug. The PDC-HDC diacetate was well tolerated, with no significant side effects. Evaluation of efficacy compared poststudy and prestudy reactions to patch tests using urushiol in doses of 0.025, 0.05, 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 micrograms applied to the forearm. The results indicated that the induction phase as well as the maintenance phase did not induce a statistically significant hyposensitivity to urushiol, and we were thus unable to decrease sensitivity to poison ivy and poison oak in humans using orally ingested PDC-HDC diacetate.

  11. Characterization of 42 Microsatellite Markers from Poison Ivy, Toxicodendron radicans (Anacardiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tsai-Wen; Shih, Huei-Chuan; Kuo, Chia-Chi; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh; Chiang, Yu-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Poison ivy, Toxicodendron radicans, and poison oaks, T. diversilobum and T. pubescens, are perennial woody species of the Anacardiaceae and are poisonous, containing strong allergens named urushiols that cause allergic contact dermatitis. Poison ivy is a species distributed from North America to East Asia, while T. diversilobum and T. pubescens are distributed in western and eastern North America, respectively. Phylogreography and population structure of these species remain unclear. Here, we developed microsatellite markers, via constructing a magnetic enriched microsatellite library, from poison ivy. We designed 51 primer pairs, 42 of which successfully yielded products that were subsequently tested for polymorphism in poison oak, and three subspecies of poison ivy. Among the 42 loci, 38 are polymorphic, while 4 are monomorphic. The number of alleles and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 1 to 12 and from 0.10 to 0.87, respectively, in poison ivy, while varied from 2 to 8 and, from 0.26 to 0.83, respectively in poison oak. Genetic analysis revealed distinct differentiation between poison ivy and poison oak, whereas slight genetic differentiation was detected among three subspecies of poison ivy. These highly polymorphic microsatellite fingerprints enable biologists to explore the population genetics, phylogeography, and speciation in Toxicodendron. PMID:24129176

  12. Characterization of 42 microsatellite markers from poison ivy, Toxicodendron radicans (Anacardiaceae).

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsai-Wen; Shih, Huei-Chuan; Kuo, Chia-Chi; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh; Chiang, Yu-Chung

    2013-10-14

    Poison ivy, Toxicodendron radicans, and poison oaks, T. diversilobum and T. pubescens, are perennial woody species of the Anacardiaceae and are poisonous, containing strong allergens named urushiols that cause allergic contact dermatitis. Poison ivy is a species distributed from North America to East Asia, while T. diversilobum and T. pubescens are distributed in western and eastern North America, respectively. Phylogreography and population structure of these species remain unclear. Here, we developed microsatellite markers, via constructing a magnetic enriched microsatellite library, from poison ivy. We designed 51 primer pairs, 42 of which successfully yielded products that were subsequently tested for polymorphism in poison oak, and three subspecies of poison ivy. Among the 42 loci, 38 are polymorphic, while 4 are monomorphic. The number of alleles and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 1 to 12 and from 0.10 to 0.87, respectively, in poison ivy, while varied from 2 to 8 and, from 0.26 to 0.83, respectively in poison oak. Genetic analysis revealed distinct differentiation between poison ivy and poison oak, whereas slight genetic differentiation was detected among three subspecies of poison ivy. These highly polymorphic microsatellite fingerprints enable biologists to explore the population genetics, phylogeography, and speciation in Toxicodendron.

  13. Acute bronchitis therapy with ivy leaves extracts in a two-arm study. A double-blind, randomised study vs. an other ivy leaves extract.

    PubMed

    Cwientzek, Ute; Ottillinger, Bertram; Arenberger, Petr

    2011-10-15

    Ivy leaves extracts are authorised in medicinal products for the treatment of acute bronchitis. Different studies and the long experience on the market show safety and efficacy of this drug. A double-blind, randomised study was conducted to assess the efficacy and tolerability of ivy leaves soft extract with an other ivy leaves extract. 590 patients with acute bronchitis participated in this study. They were treated with test or comparator for 7 days (±1). The Bronchitis Severity Score (BSS) decreased gradually and to a similar extent from Day 1 to Day 7 in both treatment groups. Starting from values of 6.2-6.3±1.2, the BSS decreased by approximately 4.7-4.9 points until Day 7, so that patients left the study with a mean BSS of 1.4-1.6. The BSS subscales cough, sputum, rhales/rhonchi, chest pain during coughing, and dyspnoea improved to a similar extent in both treatment groups. Overall, 2.7% of patients (per group and overall) experienced an adverse event, all of which were non-serious. Fewer patients younger than ten years had adverse events than would have been expected from their share of the study population (p=0.015; Fisher's exact test). As a conclusion, the test product with ivy leaves soft extract proved to be non-inferior to the comparator ivy leaves extract in improving symptoms of acute bronchitis.

  14. Black spot poison ivy: A report of 5 cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kurlan, J G; Lucky, A W

    2001-08-01

    Black-spot poison ivy dermatitis is a rare manifestation of a common condition. It occurs on exposure to the resins of the plants of the Rhus family also known as Toxicodendron. We describe 5 patients with black deposits on their skin and clothing after contact with poison ivy and review the literature reflecting different aspects of this phenomenon including clinical presentation, histologic findings, and historical background.

  15. Perfluorinated analogues of poison ivy allergens. Synthesis and skin tolerogenic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Fraginals, R; Schaeffer, M; Stampf, J L; Benezra, C

    1991-03-01

    3-(Tridecafluoroundecyl)catechol (8) and 3-(nonafluoropentadecyl)catechol (9), perfluorinated analogues of pentadecylcatechol (PDC), a constituent of poison ivy, have been synthesized. These compounds were nonsensitizers in mice. Compounds 8 and 9, however, were elicitors of allergic contact dermatitis in PDC-sensitized animals. Moreover, compound 9 exhibited tolerogenic properties to sensitization by poison ivy allergens, i.e. mice pretreated with perfluorinated compounds could not be sensitized to PDC.

  16. A comparison of two IPv4/IPv6 transition mechanisms - OpenVPN and IVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Cong Tuan; Tran, Quang Anh; Jiang, Frank

    2012-09-01

    This document presents a comparison of two IPv4/IPv6 transition mechanisms. They are OpenVPN and IVI. Meanwhile OpenVPN is based on tunneling technology, IVI is a stateless IPv4/IPv6 translation technique which is developed by China Education and Research Network (CERNET). This research focus on the quantitative and qualitative comparison of these two main mechanisms; how they are applied in practical situation by the Internet Service Providers, as well as their advantages and drawbacks.

  17. Naturally occurring nanoparticles from English ivy: an alternative to metal-based nanoparticles for UV protection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Over the last decade safety concerns have arisen about the use of metal-based nanoparticles in the cosmetics field. Metal-based nanoparticles have been linked to both environmental and animal toxicity in a variety of studies. Perhaps the greatest concern involves the large amounts of TiO2 nanoparticles that are used in commercial sunscreens. As an alternative to using these potentially hazardous metal-based nanoparticles, we have isolated organic nanoparticles from English ivy (Hedera helix). In this study, ivy nanoparticles were evaluated for their potential use in sunscreens based on four criteria: 1) ability to absorb and scatter ultraviolet light, 2) toxicity to mammalian cells, 3) biodegradability, and 4) potential for diffusion through skin. Results Purified ivy nanoparticles were first tested for their UV protective effects using a standard spectrophotometric assay. Next the cell toxicity of the ivy nanoparticles was compared to TiO2 nanoparticles using HeLa cells. The biodegradability of these nanoparticles was also determined through several digestion techniques. Finally, a mathematical model was developed to determine the potential for ivy nanoparticles to penetrate through human skin. The results indicated that the ivy nanoparticles were more efficient in blocking UV light, less toxic to mammalian cells, easily biodegradable, and had a limited potential to penetrate through human skin. When compared to TiO2 nanoparticles, the ivy nanoparticles showed decreased cell toxicity, and were easily degradable, indicating that they provided a safer alternative to these nanoparticles. Conclusions With the data collected from this study, we have demonstrated the great potential of ivy nanoparticles as a sunscreen protective agent, and their increased safety over commonly used metal oxide nanoparticles. PMID:20534157

  18. Naturally occurring nanoparticles from English ivy: an alternative to metal-based nanoparticles for UV protection.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lijin; Lenaghan, Scott C; Zhang, Mingjun; Zhang, Zhili; Li, Quanshui

    2010-06-09

    Over the last decade safety concerns have arisen about the use of metal-based nanoparticles in the cosmetics field. Metal-based nanoparticles have been linked to both environmental and animal toxicity in a variety of studies. Perhaps the greatest concern involves the large amounts of TiO2 nanoparticles that are used in commercial sunscreens. As an alternative to using these potentially hazardous metal-based nanoparticles, we have isolated organic nanoparticles from English ivy (Hedera helix). In this study, ivy nanoparticles were evaluated for their potential use in sunscreens based on four criteria: 1) ability to absorb and scatter ultraviolet light, 2) toxicity to mammalian cells, 3) biodegradability, and 4) potential for diffusion through skin. Purified ivy nanoparticles were first tested for their UV protective effects using a standard spectrophotometric assay. Next the cell toxicity of the ivy nanoparticles was compared to TiO2 nanoparticles using HeLa cells. The biodegradability of these nanoparticles was also determined through several digestion techniques. Finally, a mathematical model was developed to determine the potential for ivy nanoparticles to penetrate through human skin. The results indicated that the ivy nanoparticles were more efficient in blocking UV light, less toxic to mammalian cells, easily biodegradable, and had a limited potential to penetrate through human skin. When compared to TiO2 nanoparticles, the ivy nanoparticles showed decreased cell toxicity, and were easily degradable, indicating that they provided a safer alternative to these nanoparticles. With the data collected from this study, we have demonstrated the great potential of ivy nanoparticles as a sunscreen protective agent, and their increased safety over commonly used metal oxide nanoparticles.

  19. The leptomeningeal ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images in moyamoya disease: positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yasuyuki; Iihara, Koji; Nakajima, Norio; Kataoka, Hiroharu; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Iida, Hidehiro; Hashimoto, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    The ivy sign is sometimes seen on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in moyamoya disease (MMD). In recent studies using single-photon emission computed tomography, ivy sign proliferation correlated with decreases in cerebrovascular reserve. However, a decreased vascular reserve is not concrete. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between ivy sign proliferation and the findings of 15O gas positron emission tomography (PET). In 19 MMD patients (12 women, age 31-69 years) with ischemic symptoms, FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging and 15O gas PET were performed. We classified the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory into 2 regions in each hemisphere, and the degree of the ivy sign (ivy sign score) in each region was classified into 3 grades (0-2), where grade 0 indicated an absence of the ivy sign, grade 1 indicated that the ivy sign was seen on less than half of the cortical surface in each region, and grade 2 indicated that the ivy sign was seen on more than half of the cortical surface. We examined the relationship among the ivy sign score, the severity of ischemic symptoms and PET parameters in 76 MCA regions of 19 patients. Ivy sign scores of the regions were 0 (n = 19), 1 (n = 40), and 2 (n = 17). Total ivy sign score of a hemisphere increased as clinical symptoms became more severe. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) values were lower, cerebral blood volume (CBV) values were higher, and CBF/CBV values were lower than those of controls as symptoms became severe (p < 0.05). CBF and CBF/CBV values decreased and CBV values increased as the ivy sign score increased, and were significantly higher and lower, respectively, than control values (p < 0.05). No significant differences in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen and oxygen extraction fraction were found between the 3 ivy sign scores. A positive correlation was found between ivy sign score and increases in CBV (p < 0.01), and a more obvious negative correlation was found between ivy sign

  20. Isolation and chemical analysis of nanoparticles from English ivy (Hedera helix L.).

    PubMed

    Lenaghan, Scott C; Burris, Jason N; Chourey, Karuna; Huang, Yujian; Xia, Lijin; Lady, Belinda; Sharma, Ritin; Pan, Chongle; LeJeune, Zorabel; Foister, Shane; Hettich, Robert L; Stewart, C Neal; Zhang, Mingjun

    2013-10-06

    Bio-inspiration for novel adhesive development has drawn increasing interest in recent years with the discovery of the nanoscale morphology of the gecko footpad and mussel adhesive proteins. Similar to these animal systems, it was discovered that English ivy (Hedera helix L.) secretes a high strength adhesive containing uniform nanoparticles. Recent studies have demonstrated that the ivy nanoparticles not only contribute to the high strength of this adhesive, but also have ultraviolet (UV) protective abilities, making them ideal for sunscreen and cosmetic fillers, and may be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery. To make these applications a reality, the chemical nature of the ivy nanoparticles must be elucidated. In the current work, a method was developed to harvest bulk ivy nanoparticles from an adventitious root culture system, and the chemical composition of the nanoparticles was analysed. UV/visible spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electrophoresis were used in this study to identify the chemical nature of the ivy nanoparticles. Based on this analysis, we conclude that the ivy nanoparticles are proteinaceous.

  1. The vertebrate lysozyme inhibitor Ivy functions to inhibit the activity of lytic transglycosylase.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Chelsea A; Scheurwater, Edie M; Clarke, Anthony J

    2010-05-14

    The proteinaceous inhibitor of vertebrate lysozymes (Ivy) is produced by a collection of Gram-negative bacteria as a stress response to damage to their essential cell wall component peptidoglycan. A paralog of Ivy, Ivyp2 is produced exclusively by a number of pseudomonads, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but this protein does not inhibit the lysozymes, and its function was unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the production of Ivy (homologs of both Ivyp1 and Ivyp2) correlates with bacteria that do not O-acetylate their peptidoglycan, a modification that controls the activity of the lytic transglycosylases. Furthermore, we show that both Ivy proteins are potent inhibitors of the lytic transglycoslyases, enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and maintenance of peptidoglycan. These data suggest that the true physiological function of the Ivy proteins is to control the autolytic activity of lytic transglycosylases within the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria that do not produce O-acetylated peptidoglycan and that the inhibition of exogenous lysozyme by Ivy is simply a fortuitous coincidence.

  2. Isolation and chemical analysis of nanoparticles from English ivy (Hedera helix L.)

    PubMed Central

    Lenaghan, Scott C.; Burris, Jason N.; Chourey, Karuna; Huang, Yujian; Xia, Lijin; Lady, Belinda; Sharma, Ritin; Pan, Chongle; LeJeune, Zorabel; Foister, Shane; Hettich, Robert L.; Stewart, C. Neal; Zhang, Mingjun

    2013-01-01

    Bio-inspiration for novel adhesive development has drawn increasing interest in recent years with the discovery of the nanoscale morphology of the gecko footpad and mussel adhesive proteins. Similar to these animal systems, it was discovered that English ivy (Hedera helix L.) secretes a high strength adhesive containing uniform nanoparticles. Recent studies have demonstrated that the ivy nanoparticles not only contribute to the high strength of this adhesive, but also have ultraviolet (UV) protective abilities, making them ideal for sunscreen and cosmetic fillers, and may be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery. To make these applications a reality, the chemical nature of the ivy nanoparticles must be elucidated. In the current work, a method was developed to harvest bulk ivy nanoparticles from an adventitious root culture system, and the chemical composition of the nanoparticles was analysed. UV/visible spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electrophoresis were used in this study to identify the chemical nature of the ivy nanoparticles. Based on this analysis, we conclude that the ivy nanoparticles are proteinaceous. PMID:23883948

  3. Dermatitis from common ivy (Hedera helix L. subsp. helix) in Europe: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Evy; Christensen, Lars P; Andersen, Klaus E

    2010-04-01

    Common ivy (Hedera helix subsp. helix) is a well-known native and ornamental plant in Europe. Reports on contact dermatitis from ivy have regularly appeared since 1899. Recently, it has been suggested that allergic contact dermatitis from the plant may be under-diagnosed, partly due to lack of commercial patch test allergens. The objective of the article is to present the results of aimed patch testing with the main common ivy allergen, falcarinol, during a 16-year period and review the newer literature. Consecutive patients tested with falcarinol 0.03% petrolatum from May 1993 to May 2009 were included. Cases published since 1987 were retrieved from the PubMed database. One hundred and twenty-seven Danish patients were tested with falcarinol and 10 (7.9%) tested positive. Seven were occupationally sensitized. Between 1994 and 2009, 28 new cases of contact dermatitis from ivy were reported, 2 of which were occupational. Only 11 of the 28 patients were tested with pure allergens. Falcarinol is not only widely distributed in the ivy family, but also in the closely related Apiaceae. Sensitization may occur in childhood or in adults pruning ivy plants or handling them in an occupational setting. In view of the ubiquity of falcarinol-containing plants and the relatively high prevalence of positive reactions in aimed patch testing, falcarinol should be the next plant allergen to be commercially available and included in the plant series worldwide.

  4. Systematic Review of Clinical Trials Assessing the Effectiveness of Ivy Leaf (Hedera Helix) for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Felix; Chenot, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix) enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was assessed by the Jadad score or the EPHPP tool. Results. 10 eligible studies were identified reporting on 17463 subjects. Studies were heterogeneous in design and conduct; 2 were RCTs. Three studies evaluated a combination of ivy and thyme, 7 studies investigated monopreparations of ivy. Only one RCT (n = 360) investigating an ivy/thyme combination used a placebo control and showed statistically significant superiority in reducing the frequency and duration of cough. All other studies lack a placebo control and show serious methodological flaws. They all conclude that ivy extracts are effective for reducing symptoms of URTI. Conclusion. Although all studies report that ivy extracts are effective to reduce symptoms of URTI, there is no convincing evidence due to serious methodological flaws and lack of placebo controls. The combination of ivy and thyme might be more effective but needs confirmation. PMID:20976077

  5. Systematic review of clinical trials assessing the effectiveness of ivy leaf (hedera helix) for acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Felix; Chenot, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix) enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was assessed by the Jadad score or the EPHPP tool. Results. 10 eligible studies were identified reporting on 17463 subjects. Studies were heterogeneous in design and conduct; 2 were RCTs. Three studies evaluated a combination of ivy and thyme, 7 studies investigated monopreparations of ivy. Only one RCT (n = 360) investigating an ivy/thyme combination used a placebo control and showed statistically significant superiority in reducing the frequency and duration of cough. All other studies lack a placebo control and show serious methodological flaws. They all conclude that ivy extracts are effective for reducing symptoms of URTI. Conclusion. Although all studies report that ivy extracts are effective to reduce symptoms of URTI, there is no convincing evidence due to serious methodological flaws and lack of placebo controls. The combination of ivy and thyme might be more effective but needs confirmation.

  6. Decrease in leptomeningeal ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images after cerebral revascularization in patients with Moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, M; Noguchi, T; Takase, Y; Nakahara, Y; Matsushima, T

    2010-10-01

    The "ivy" sign that is identified on FLAIR images in patients with Moyamoya disease is considered to be leptomeningeal collaterals. The aim of our study was to evaluate the correlation between postoperative decrease in ivy sign and cerebral hemodynamic status in the bypass-established hemisphere. Twenty-two patients with Moyamoya disease were enrolled. Postoperative changes in the ivy sign on FLAIR images were examined in each patient after bypass surgery. The correlation between postoperative changes in the ivy sign and hemodynamic status was examined in 10 patients by using SPECT. Of the 22 preoperative ivy-positive patients, 21 showed decreased ivy signs on the operative side. Average intervals between the operation day and the date when the decreased or vanished ivy sign was first recognized were 157.6 days in patients who underwent direct bypass and 212.2 days in patients who underwent indirect bypass. A postoperative decrease in ivy signs was found to be significantly correlated with an improved hemodynamic status of the surgically treated hemisphere, resulting in a postoperative increase in regional vascular reserve and a decreased proportion of the misery perfusion area (P < .01). Postoperative changes in the ivy sign can be used as a marker for identifying improved hemodynamics and also for testing the effectiveness of cerebral revascularization.

  7. Ivy and neurogliaform interneurons are a major target of μ-opioid receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Luu, Lillian; Lee, Sang-Hun; Varga, Csaba; Soltesz, Ivan

    2011-10-19

    μ-Opioid receptors (μORs) are selectively expressed on interneurons in area CA1 of the hippocampus. Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing, basket cells express μORs, but circumstantial evidence suggests that another major, unidentified, GABAergic cell class must also be modulated by μORs. Here we report that the abundant, dendritically targeting, neurogliaform family of cells (Ivy and neurogliaform cells) is a previously unrecognized target of direct modulation by μORs. Ivy and neurogliaform cells are not only numerous but also have unique properties, including promiscuous gap junctions formed with various interneuronal subtypes, volume transmission, and the ability to produce a postsynaptic GABA(B) response after a single presynaptic spike. Using a mouse line expressing green fluorescent protein under the neuropeptide Y promoter, we find that, across all layers of CA1, activation of μORs hyperpolarizes Ivy and neurogliaform cells. Furthermore, paired recordings between synaptically coupled Ivy and pyramidal cells show that Ivy cell terminals are dramatically inhibited by μOR activation. Effects in Ivy and neurogliaform cells are seen at similar concentrations of agonist as those producing inhibition in fast-spiking parvalbumin basket cells. We also report that Ivy cells display the recently described phenomenon of persistent firing, a state of continued firing in the absence of continued input, and that induction of persistent firing is inhibited by μOR activation. Together, these findings identify a major, previously unrecognized, target of μOR modulation. Given the prominence of this cell type in and beyond CA1, as well as its unique role in microcircuitry, opioid modulation of neurogliaform cells has wide implications.

  8. Plant dermatitis. Possible culprits go far beyond poison ivy.

    PubMed

    Juckett, G

    1996-09-01

    Given the variety of existing plant species in the environment, it is remarkable that people have adjusted as well as they have to the many plants that can cause uncomfortable skin reactions. With a basic understanding of the types of reaction and the common plants that cause each type, physicians can help patients discover the source of the dermatitis and thus prevent reexposure. In immediate contact dermatitis, welts form rapidly after patients brush against an offending plant, but the urticarial rash is short-lived. In irritant contact dermatitis, the skin is traumatized mechanically (eg, with cactus spines) or chemically (eg, with capsaicin from hot peppers), producing a more persistent skin reaction. Phytophotodermatitis occurs when the skin is exposed to sunlight after contact with an offending plant; reactions are erythema, pruritus, vesiculation, and subsequent hyperpigmentation. Allergic contact dermatitis, typified by the rash of poison ivy, is a cell-mediated immune response that occurs in previously sensitized persons. Erythema, vesiculation, and pruritus, which usually heal without causing pigmentary changes, may last for several weeks.

  9. Acupuncture for poison ivy contact dermatitis. A clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Liao, S J

    1988-01-01

    Poison ivy contact dermatitis is fairly common in the suburbia of this country among amateur gardeners and children. It commonly inflicts its poison on the exposed parts of the limbs. The vesicular or bullous skin lesions are quite disturbingly itchy. Scratching the itchy lesions often spreads the condition by transplanting the remanent resinous toxin to other parts of the body. Though they are usually self-limiting, the intense itch is the main motivation for a patient to seek medical care. The conventional treatment is basically ineffective. During the summer of 1987 we treated four such cases of dermatitis with acupuncture upon their request to mollify their unbearable itch. They originally consulted with us for other problems. There were three males and one female. Their ages were between 29 and 63. Three cases were relatively mild and the fourth one was fairly severe. In the milder cases, their itch subsided in a few hours and skin lesions were healed in about two days after one treatment. In the severe case the itch subsided in about two days and most of the skin lesions dried up in four days after the first treatment and were healed almost completely after three sessions of acupuncture treatment. The plausible anti-inflammatory mechanism of acupuncture with the involvement of ACTH and/or cortisol was discussed.

  10. Treatment of poison ivy/oak allergic contact dermatitis with an extract of jewelweed.

    PubMed

    Long, D; Ballentine, N H; Marks, J G

    1997-09-01

    Jewelweed (Impatiens biflora) is a plant which has been used for centuries for the treatment of poison ivy/oak allergic contact dermatitis. Numerous claims for its effectiveness exist in the lay press, and over-the-counter medicaments containing jewelweed are reputed to be an effective remedy for poison ivy/oak dermatitis. Despite these claims, few scientific studies testing the effectiveness of jewelweed have been performed. Our objective in this pilot study was to test the efficacy of an extract of jewelweed in the treatment of experimentally induced allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy/oak. A randomized, double-blinded, paired comparison investigation was performed. Ten adult volunteers were patch tested to urushiol, the allergenic resin in poison ivy/oak. For each volunteer, one patch test site was treated with an extract prepared from the fresh stems of jewelweed; the remaining site was treated with distilled water to serve as a control. Sites were examined on days 2, 3, 7, and 9 with reactions graded on a numerical scale. All subjects developed dermatitis at each patch test site. There was no statistically significant difference in the objective scores at the sites treated with jewelweed extract versus the distilled water control sites. This study demonstrated that an extract of jewelweed was not effective in the treatment of poison ivy/oak allergic contact dermatitis.

  11. Dust particulate absorption by ivy (Hedera helix L) on historic walls in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Troy; Viles, Heather; Cathersides, Alan; Edwards, Mona

    2010-12-01

    The potential bio-protective role of urban greenery and how it interacts with airborne dust and pollutants has been the subject of much recent research. As particulate pollution has been implicated in both the deterioration of building materials and in damaging human health, understanding how it interacts with urban greenery is of great applied interest. Common or English Ivy (Hedera helix L) grows widely on urban walls in many parts of the world, and thus any bio-protective role it might play is of broad relevance. Using Scanning Electron Microscopy ivy leaves collected on roadways were examined to determine if ivy can absorb dust and pollutants that can instigate decay processes on stone walls and impact human health in urban environments. Results showed that ivy acts as a 'particle sink', absorbing particulate matter, particularly in high-traffic areas. It was effective in adhering fine (<2.5μm) and ultra-fine (<1μm) particles at densities of up to 2.9×10(10) per m(2). Our findings suggest that through absorbing pollutant particles ivy can retard bio-deteriorative processes on historic walls and reduce human exposure to respiratory problems caused by vehicle pollutants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of English ivy ( Hedera helix) adhesion force and imaging using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lijin; Lenaghan, Scott C.; Zhang, Mingjun; Wu, Yu; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Burris, Jason N.; Neal Stewart, C.

    2011-03-01

    English ivy ( Hedera helix) is well known for its ability to climb onto and strongly adhere to a variety of solid substrates. It has been discovered that the ivy aerial rootlet secretes an adhesive composed of polysaccharide and spherical nanoparticles. This study aims to characterize the mechanical properties of the nanocomposite adhesive using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The adhesive was first imaged by AFM to visualize the nanocomposite. Mechanical properties were then determined at various time points, from secretion to hardening. The experimental results indicate that the ivy adhesive exhibited strong adhesion strength and high elasticity. There was a decrease in adhesive force over time, from 298 to 202 nN during the 24-h study. Accompanying with it were the limited changes in extension length and Young's modulus. The limited curing process of the ivy adhesive helps fill gaps in the attaching surface, leading to more intimate contact and increased van der Waals interactions with the surface. However, study based on a mechanical model indicated that van der Waals force alone is not significant enough to account for all of the measured force. Other chemical interactions and cross linking likely contribute to the strong adhesion strength of ivy.

  13. Isolation and chemical analysis of nanoparticles from English ivy (Hedera helix L.)

    SciTech Connect

    Lenaghan, Scott C; Burris, Jason N; Chourey, Karuna; Huang, Yujian; Lady, Belinda; Sharma, Ritin; Pan, Chongle; Lejeune, Zorabel M; Foister, Shane; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; StewartJr., C neal; Zhang, Mingjun

    2013-01-01

    It was discovered that adventitious roots of English ivy secreted a high strength adhesive containing uniform nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were hypothesized to be organic in nature. Subsequent studies have revealed several applications for these nanoparticles, but their chemical composition remained unknown. Here, we describe an isolation procedure to obtain gram quantities of ivy nanoparticles from adventitious roots. In addition, ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), elemental analysis, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and gel electrophoresis were conducted to identify the chemical nature of the ivy nanoparticles. Based on this comprehensive analysis, we conclude that the ivy nanoparticles are proteinaceous consisting of 51.77% carbon, 4.72% nitrogen, and 0.32% sulfur, without the presence of metals. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) based protein profiling revealed the presence of at least 6 proteins, including heat shock proteins and other large molecular weight proteins. Identification of these protein candidates will facilitate gene discovery and bioproduction of ivy nanoparticles.

  14. Studies on poison ivy. In vitro lymphocyte transformation by urushiol-protein conjugates.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, G

    1979-12-01

    The isolation and purification of poison ivy urushiol is described. The preparation of urushiol-ski protein and urushiol human serum albumin is also described. Lymphocytes from eleven donor naturally sensitized to poison ivy and from four non-sensitive individuals have been cultured for 5 days in the presence of urushiol-carrier conjugates. Lymphocytes from seven of the eleven sensitive donors responded with a stimulation index greater than 3.0 to urushiol-albumin conjugate. When urushiol-skin protein conjugate was used as a stimulant, lymphocytes from only three of the eleven sensitive donors responded. The results suggest that urushiol-protein conjugates can stimulate sensitive lymphocytes in vitro, although a response is not observed in every individual naturally sensitized to poison ivy.

  15. Prevention of poison ivy and poison oak allergic contact dermatitis by quaternium-18 bentonite.

    PubMed

    Marks, J G; Fowler, J F; Sheretz, E F; Rietschel, R L

    1995-08-01

    Poison ivy and poison oak are the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis in North America. We investigated whether a new topical lotion containing 5% quaternium-18 bentonite prevents experimentally induced poison ivy and poison oak allergic contact dermatitis. A single-blind, paired comparison, randomized, multicenter investigation was used to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of quaternium-18 bentonite lotion in preventing experimentally induced poison ivy and poison oak allergic contact dermatitis in susceptible volunteers. One hour before both forearms were patch tested with urushiol, the allergenic resin from poison ivy and poison oak, 5% quaternium-18 bentonite lotion was applied on one forearm. The test patches were removed after 4 hours and the sites interpreted for reaction 2, 5, and 8 days later. The difference in reactions between treated and untreated patch test sites was statistically analyzed. Two hundred eleven subjects with a history of allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy and poison oak were studied. One hundred forty-four subjects had positive reactions to urushiol. The test sites pretreated with quaternium-18 bentonite lotion had absent or significantly reduced reactions to the urushiol compared with untreated control sites (p < 0.0001) on all test days. When it occurred, the reaction consistently appeared later on treated than on control sites (p < 0.0001). One occurrence of mild, transient erythema at the application site was the only side effect from the quaternium-18 bentonite lotion. Quaternium-18 bentonite lotion was effective in preventing or diminishing experimentally produced poison ivy and poison oak allergic contact dermatitis.

  16. GLC analysis of poison ivy and poison oak urushiol components in vegetable oil preparations.

    PubMed

    Elsohly, M A; Turner, C E

    1980-05-01

    A procedure is described for the analysis of urushiol content of pharmaceutical preparations containing extracts of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) and poison oak (T. diversilobum) in vegetable oils. The procedure involves extraction of the urushiols from the oily solutions using 90% methanol in water followed by GLC analysis of the extracts. Recoveries of both poison ivy and poison oak urushiols from solutions in corn oil, olive oil, sesame seed oil, and cottonseed oil were calculated. Correlation coefficients (r2) ranged from 0.97 to 1.00, and the coefficients of variations ranged from 3.08 to 7.90%.

  17. New GLC analysis of urushiol congeners in different plant parts of poison ivy, Toxicodendron radicans.

    PubMed

    Craig, J C; Waller, C W; Billets, S; Elsohly, M A

    1978-04-01

    Methods are presented for the direct GLC analysis of the catechol C15 alkenyl side-chain congeners contained in the urushiol fraction of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) and the C17 homologs of poison oak (Toxicodendron diversilobum). A number of liquid phases were investigated and demonstrated varying degrees of separation. The methods developed were applied to the analysis of the urushiol fractions obtained from different plant parts of poison ivy. The effects of extraction before and after drying demonstrated tht a larger percentage of urushiol was obtained when the fresh plant material was extracted with ethanol.

  18. Plasmids for C-terminal tagging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that contain improved GFP proteins, Envy and Ivy

    PubMed Central

    Slubowski, Christian J.; Funk, Alyssa D.; Roesner, Joseph M.; Paulissen, Scott M.; Huang, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) has become an invaluable tool in biological research. Many GFP variants have been created that differ in brightness, photostability, and folding robustness. We have created two hybrid GFP variants, Envy and Ivy, which we placed in a vector for the C-terminal tagging of yeast proteins by PCR-mediated recombination. The Envy GFP variant combines mutations found in the robustly folding SuperfolderGFP and GFPγ, while the Ivy GFP variant is a hybrid of GFPγ and the yellow-green GFP variant, Clover. We compared Envy and Ivy to EGFP, SuperfolderGFP, and GFPγ, and found that Envy is brighter than the other GFP variants at both 30°C and 37°C, while Ivy is the most photostable. Envy and Ivy are recognized by a commonly used anti-GFP antibody, and both variants can be immunoprecipitated using the GFP TRAP Camelidae antibody nanotrap technology. Because Envy is brighter than the other GFP variants and is as photostable as GFPγ, we suggest that Envy should be the preferred GFP variant, while Ivy may be used in cases where photostability is of utmost importance. The GenBank accession number for Envy is KM891731, Ivy is KM891732, and the yeast optimized GFPγ described in this paper is KM891733. PMID:25612242

  19. Functional role of an endophytic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in enhancing growth and disease protection of invasive English ivy (Hedera helix L.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soares, Marcos Antonio; Li, Jai-Yan; Bergen, Marshall; da Silva, Joaquim Manoel; Kowalski, Kurt P.; White, James Francis

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundWe hypothesize that invasive English ivy (Hedera helix) harbors endophytic microbes that promote plant growth and survival. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined endophytic bacteria in English ivy and evaluated effects on the host plant.MethodsEndophytic bacteria were isolated from multiple populations of English ivy in New Brunswick, NJ. Bacteria were identified as a single species Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. One strain of B. amyloliquefaciens, strain C6c, was characterized for indoleacetic acid (IAA) production, secretion of hydrolytic enzymes, phosphate solubilization, and antibiosis against pathogens. PCR was used to amplify lipopeptide genes and their secretion into culture media was detected by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Capability to promote growth of English ivy was evaluated in greenhouse experiments. The capacity of C6c to protect plants from disease was evaluated by exposing B+ (bacterium inoculated) and B− (non-inoculated) plants to the necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria tenuissima.ResultsB. amyloliquefaciens C6c systemically colonized leaves, petioles, and seeds of English ivy. C6c synthesized IAA and inhibited plant pathogens. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis revealed secretion of antifungal lipopeptides surfactin, iturin, bacillomycin, and fengycin. C6c promoted the growth of English ivy in low and high soil nitrogen conditions. This endophytic bacterium efficiently controlled disease caused by Alternaria tenuissima.ConclusionsThis study suggests that B. amyloliquefaciens plays an important role in enhancing growth and disease protection of English ivy.

  20. Determination of saponins and flavonoids in ivy leaf extracts using HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Shin, Young June; Kim, Nanyoung; Yoo, Guijae; Park, SeonJu; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the determination of six compounds, chlorogenic acid, rutin, nicotiflorin, hederacoside C, hederasaponin B and α-hederin, in ivy leaf extracts using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector was developed. The chromatographic separation was performed on a YMC Hydrosphere C18 analytical column using a gradient elution of 0.1% phosphoric acid and acetonitrile. The method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity (r(2) > 0.9999), precision [relative standard deviation (RSD) < 0.36%] and accuracy (97.4-103.8%). The limit of detection and limit of quantification were <20.32 and 61.56 ng for all analytes, respectively. The tested compounds were found to be stable in the ivy leaf extract from 0 to 48 h, and the RSD value for each compound was <0.90%. The validated method was successfully applied to quantify all six compounds in a 30% ethanol ivy leaf extract and 13 ivy leaf extract products. The results showed that all the tested products satisfied the minimum requirement for the content of hederacoside C. However, there were some differences between the contents of other constituents.

  1. The $7,376 "Ivies": Value-Designed Models of Undergraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fried, Vance H.

    2008-01-01

    Is it possible to get an "Ivy" education for $7,376 a year? Can a college provide high-quality undergraduate education at a reasonable cost? In this paper, the author explores if cost can be reduced and quality improved through the use of new "value-designed" models of undergraduate education. A value-designed model allows one to appeal to…

  2. Discussing the Issues: A Report on the 2013 Ivies + Access Services Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    As access services emerges as a discrete discipline within the field of librarianship, opportunities for access services librarians to meet and discuss the issues facing today's libraries continue to grow. One annual meeting that has attracted less attention over the years is the Ivies + Access Services Symposium. Held at various member…

  3. Hiding in the Ivy: American Indian Students and Visibility in Elite Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brayboy, Bryan McKinley Jones

    2004-01-01

    In this article, Bryan McKinley Jones Brayboy explores how the experiences of Tom, Debbie, and Heather, three Native American students attending Ivy League universities in the 1990s, reflect larger societal beliefs and statements about the perceived place of Native Americans in higher education and U.S. society. Brayboy posits that Native…

  4. Treatment of Severe Poison Ivy: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Long Versus Short Course Oral Prednisone

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Gabrielle; Lewis, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxidendron (poison ivy, oak, and sumac) contact dermatitis is a common complaint in the outpatient primary care setting with little evidence-based guidance on best treatment duration. Methods This randomized, controlled trial examined the efficacy and side effects of a 5-day regimen of 40 mg oral prednisone daily (short course) compared to the same 5-day regimen followed by a prednisone taper of 30 mg daily for 2 days, 20 mg daily for 2 days, 10 mg daily for 2 days, and 5 mg daily for 4 days over a total of 15 days (long course) in patients with severe poison ivy dermatitis. Results In 49 patients with severe poison ivy, non-adherence rates, rash return, medication side effects, and time to improvement and complete healing of the rash were not significantly different between the two groups. Patients receiving the long course regimen were significantly less likely to utilize other medications (22.7% vs. 55.6%, P = 0.02, number needed to treat 3.05). Conclusions This study suggests that a longer course prescription may save patients’ time and exposure to excess medication in the treatment of severe poison ivy. Application of this information to clinical practice will save return visits and reduce excess non-prescription medication administration to individual patients. PMID:25247016

  5. Exploring the mango-poison ivy connection: the riddle of discriminative plant dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hershko, Klilah; Weinberg, Ido; Ingber, Arieh

    2005-01-01

    A relationship between sensitivity to poison oak or poison ivy and mango dermatitis has been suggested by previous publications. The observation that acute allergic contact dermatitis can arise on first exposure to mango in patients who have been sensitized beforehand by contact with other urushiol-containing plants has been documented previously. We report 17 American patients employed in mango picking at a summer camp in Israel, who developed a rash of varying severity. All patients were either in contact with poison ivy/oak in the past or lived in areas where these plants are endemic. None recalled previous contact with mango. In contrast, none of their Israeli companions who had never been exposed to poison ivy/oak developed mango dermatitis. These observations suggest that individuals with known history of poison ivy/oak allergy, or those residing in area where these plants are common, may develop allergic contact dermatitis from mango on first exposure. We hypothesize that previous oral exposure to urushiol in the local Israeli population might establish immune tolerance to these plants.

  6. Biomass and toxicity responses of poison ivy (toxicodendron radicans) to elevated atmospheric C02: Reply

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is an invited comment that was requested by the Editors of the journal Ecology. The authors of this comment previously published an article showing that poison ivy growth was enhanced in a controlled experiment in response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. In this study the growth of po...

  7. Discussing the Issues: A Report on the 2013 Ivies + Access Services Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    As access services emerges as a discrete discipline within the field of librarianship, opportunities for access services librarians to meet and discuss the issues facing today's libraries continue to grow. One annual meeting that has attracted less attention over the years is the Ivies + Access Services Symposium. Held at various member…

  8. 78 FR 17724 - Ivy Funds Variable Insurance Portfolios, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... relying on rule 12d1-2 under the Act to invest in certain financial instruments. Applicants: Ivy Funds... section 12(d)(1)(G) of the Act, as the Trust and invests in other registered open-end management...; and (iii) is also eligible to invest in securities (as defined in section 2(a)(36) of the Act) in...

  9. Treatment of severe poison ivy: a randomized, controlled trial of long versus short course oral prednisone.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Gabrielle; Lewis, Amy C

    2014-12-01

    Toxidendron (poison ivy, oak, and sumac) contact dermatitis is a common complaint in the outpatient primary care setting with little evidence-based guidance on best treatment duration. This randomized, controlled trial examined the efficacy and side effects of a 5-day regimen of 40 mg oral prednisone daily (short course) compared to the same 5-day regimen followed by a prednisone taper of 30 mg daily for 2 days, 20 mg daily for 2 days, 10 mg daily for 2 days, and 5 mg daily for 4 days over a total of 15 days (long course) in patients with severe poison ivy dermatitis. In 49 patients with severe poison ivy, non-adherence rates, rash return, medication side effects, and time to improvement and complete healing of the rash were not significantly different between the two groups. Patients receiving the long course regimen were significantly less likely to utilize other medications (22.7% vs. 55.6%, P = 0.02, number needed to treat 3.05). This study suggests that a longer course prescription may save patients' time and exposure to excess medication in the treatment of severe poison ivy. Application of this information to clinical practice will save return visits and reduce excess non-prescription medication administration to individual patients.

  10. Bio-synthesis of gold nanoparticles using English ivy (Hedera helix).

    PubMed

    Yi, Sijia; Xia, Lijin; Lenaghan, Scott C; Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Burris, Jason N; Stewart, C Neal; Zhang, Mingjun

    2013-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have drawn significant interest in recent years due to unique properties that make them advantageous in biomedical applications, including drug delivery and tissue engineering. In this paper, we have developed multiple methods for the synthesis of AuNPs using English ivy as the substrate. In the first method, we have used actively growing English ivy shoots to develop a sustainable system for the production of ivy nanoparticles. The second method was developed using the extract from the adventitious roots of English ivy. The nanoparticles formed using both methods were compared to determine the size distribution, morphology, and chemical structure of the nanoparticles. Characterization of the AuNPs was conducted using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In addition to the structural differences between the AuNPs formed from the different methods, details of the methods in terms of yield, duration, and speed of AuNP formation are also discussed. Further, this paper will show that AuNPs formed using both methods demonstrated efficient uptake in mammalian cells, which provides the potential for biomedical applications. The two methods developed through this research for eco-friendly synthesis of AuNPs present an alternative to traditional chemical synthesis methods.

  11. (Re)membering Basic Writing at a Public Ivy: History for Institutional Redesign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tassoni, John Paul

    2006-01-01

    This essay offers a history of a basic writing course that began at a public ivy campus in the 1970s. Relying on principles of universal design and on insights derived from his school's studio program about ways the institution's selective functions can impact curricular matters, the author describes how the basic writing course was merely…

  12. Ivy sign, misery perfusion, and asymptomatic moyamoya disease: FLAIR imaging and (15)O-gas positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Vuignier, Sandra; Ito, Masaki; Kurisu, Kota; Kazumata, Ken; Nakayama, Naoki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Shiga, Tohru; Kiss, Jozsef Zoltan; Tamaki, Nagara; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging in patients with asymptomatic moyamoya disease is unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the incidence of ivy sign in these patients, as well as the correlation between MRI and (15)O gas PET findings. A retrospective analysis including 16 consecutive patients with asymptomatic moyamoya disease enrolled between 2001 and 2010 in a single center. FLAIR imaging at the initial visit was categorized as ivy sign present, negative, or equivocal. Hemodynamic and metabolic parameters were quantified in 11 of 16 patients by (15)O-gas positron emission tomography, and the relationship between ivy sign and (15)O-gas PET parameters was analyzed. Cerebrovascular events within the follow-up period (54 ± 28 months) were also examined. Five of 16 asymptomatic moyamoya patients (31.3 %) had positive ivy sign (6/30 hemispheres, 20 %). In (15)O-gas PET examinations, 18 % of 22 hemispheres had elevated oxygen extraction fraction values that were significantly associated with positive ivy sign. Of these 16 asymptomatic moyamoya patients, six patients (37.5 %) underwent combined surgical revascularization. In this series, no patients experienced ischemic stroke, but one had intraventricular bleeding 1 year after surgery. Ivy sign on FLAIR imaging is still not rare in patients with moyamoya disease, even when asymptomatic. Although optimal management is still under debate, ivy sign may be an indicator of misery perfusion, and patients with asymptomatic moyamoya disease and ivy sign on FLAIR imaging will benefit from more careful follow-up.

  13. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  14. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives. PMID:27217558

  15. Ivy Sign on Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images in Moyamoya Disease: Correlation with Clinical Severity and Old Brain Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kwon-Duk; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Ji Hwa; Ahn, Sung Jun; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leptomeningeal collateral, in moyamoya disease (MMD), appears as an ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. There has been little investigation into the relationship between presentation of ivy signs and old brain lesions. We aimed to evaluate clinical significance of ivy signs and whether they correlate with old brain lesions and the severity of clinical symptoms in patients with MMD. Materials and Methods FLAIR images of 83 patients were reviewed. Each cerebral hemisphere was divided into 4 regions and each region was scored based on the prominence of the ivy sign. Total ivy score (TIS) was defined as the sum of the scores from the eight regions and dominant hemispheric ivy sign (DHI) was determined by comparing the ivy scores from each hemisphere. According to the degree of ischemic symptoms, patients were classified into four subgroups: 1) nonspecific symptoms without motor weakness, 2) single transient ischemic attack (TIA), 3) recurrent TIA, or 4) complete stroke. Results TIS was significantly different as follows: 4.86±2.55 in patients with nonspecific symptoms, 5.89±3.10 in patients with single TIA, 9.60±3.98 in patients with recurrent TIA and 8.37±3.39 in patients with complete stroke (p=0.003). TIS associated with old lesions was significantly higher than those not associated with old lesions (9.35±4.22 vs. 7.49±3.37, p=0.032). We found a significant correlation between DHI and motor symptoms (p=0.001). Conclusion Because TIS has a strong tendency with severity of ischemic motor symptom and the presence of old lesions, the ivy sign may be useful in predicting severity of disease progression. PMID:26256975

  16. Ivy Sign on Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images in Moyamoya Disease: Correlation with Clinical Severity and Old Brain Lesions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kwon-Duk; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Ji Hwa; Ahn, Sung Jun; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2015-09-01

    Leptomeningeal collateral, in moyamoya disease (MMD), appears as an ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. There has been little investigation into the relationship between presentation of ivy signs and old brain lesions. We aimed to evaluate clinical significance of ivy signs and whether they correlate with old brain lesions and the severity of clinical symptoms in patients with MMD. FLAIR images of 83 patients were reviewed. Each cerebral hemisphere was divided into 4 regions and each region was scored based on the prominence of the ivy sign. Total ivy score (TIS) was defined as the sum of the scores from the eight regions and dominant hemispheric ivy sign (DHI) was determined by comparing the ivy scores from each hemisphere. According to the degree of ischemic symptoms, patients were classified into four subgroups: 1) nonspecific symptoms without motor weakness, 2) single transient ischemic attack (TIA), 3) recurrent TIA, or 4) complete stroke. TIS was significantly different as follows: 4.86±2.55 in patients with nonspecific symptoms, 5.89±3.10 in patients with single TIA, 9.60±3.98 in patients with recurrent TIA and 8.37±3.39 in patients with complete stroke (p=0.003). TIS associated with old lesions was significantly higher than those not associated with old lesions (9.35±4.22 vs. 7.49±3.37, p=0.032). We found a significant correlation between DHI and motor symptoms (p=0.001). Because TIS has a strong tendency with severity of ischemic motor symptom and the presence of old lesions, the ivy sign may be useful in predicting severity of disease progression.

  17. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-07

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  18. Laboratory host range of Parafreutreta regalis (Diptera: Tephritidae), a candidate agent for biological control of Cape-ivy.

    PubMed

    Balciunas, Joe; Mehelis, Chris; Van Der Westhuizen, Liamé; Neser, Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata Lamaire) is an ornamental vine that has escaped into natural areas in many countries and become a serious pest. It is native to the eastern part of South Africa, and surveys there located several potential biological control agents for this weed. One of these is Parafreutreta regalis Munro, a tephritid fly that causes large galls to form on the stems of the vine. In a collaborative effort, we began to evaluate, in both California and South Africa, the host range of this fly. Between the two locations, we tested 93 plant species and 2 varieties of Cape-ivy to see if, after being exposed to four pairs of flies for a week, any galls would develop on them. No galls were formed on any of the test species, although an average of six galls developed on each of the Cape-ivy controls. We also tested to see whether P. regalis showed any preference for either of the two varieties of Cape-ivy. There was no significant difference between the numbers of galls forming on the stipulate or astipulate varieties. Our tests indicate that this fly is essentially monospecific. Earlier research had shown that P. regalis galls cause a significant reduction in the height and nongall biomass of Cape-ivy. A petition has been submitted to initiate the process of obtaining permission to release P. regalis in California to control the Cape-ivy infestations there.

  19. Plasmids for C-terminal tagging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that contain improved GFP proteins, Envy and Ivy.

    PubMed

    Slubowski, Christian J; Funk, Alyssa D; Roesner, Joseph M; Paulissen, Scott M; Huang, Linda S

    2015-04-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has become an invaluable tool in biological research. Many GFP variants have been created that differ in brightness, photostability, and folding robustness. We have created two hybrid GFP variants, Envy and Ivy, which we placed in a vector for the C-terminal tagging of yeast proteins by PCR-mediated recombination. The Envy GFP variant combines mutations found in the robustly folding SuperfolderGFP and GFPγ, while the Ivy GFP variant is a hybrid of GFPγ and the yellow-green GFP variant, Clover. We compared Envy and Ivy to EGFP, SuperfolderGFP and GFPγ and found that Envy is brighter than the other GFP variants at both 30°C and 37°C, while Ivy is the most photostable. Envy and Ivy are recognized by a commonly used anti-GFP antibody, and both variants can be immunoprecipitated using the GFP TRAP Camelidae antibody nanotrap technology. Because Envy is brighter than the other GFP variants and is as photostable as GFPγ, we suggest that Envy should be the preferred GFP variant, while Ivy may be used in cases where photostability is of the utmost importance.

  20. Ivy sign in mildly symptomatic β-thalassemia intermedia, with development of moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    El Beltagi, Ahmed H; El-Sheikh, Ahmed; El-Saif, Reem; Norbash, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Cerebrovascular occlusive disease with secondary proliferative angiogenesis can be idiopathic as a standalone disease state, known as moyamoya disease, or it may develop secondary to different disease entities, such as chronic hemoglobinopathies, in which case it is known as moyamoya syndrome. Although moyamoya syndrome has been well described with sickle cell anemia, its association with other hemoglobinopathies is rarely reported. We describe a 16-year-old girl with β-thalassemia intermedia who presented with recurrent headaches and focal seizures non-responsive to medical treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse intrasulcal bright signal intensity on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and leptomeningeal enhancement previously termed the "ivy sign", and her magnetic resonance angiography was consistent with bilateral moyamoya disease. The literature describing and explaining the pathogenesis of the "ivy sign" and its relationship to moyamoya disease was reviewed.

  1. The attachment strategy of English ivy: a complex mechanism acting on several hierarchical levels

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Björn; Steinbrecher, Tina; Seidel, Robin; Kraft, Oliver; Schwaiger, Ruth; Speck, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    English ivy (Hedera helix L.) is able to grow on vertical substrates such as trees, rocks and house plaster, thereby attaching so firmly to the surface that when removed by force typically whole pieces of the climbing substrate are torn off. The structural details of the attachment process are not yet entirely understood. We studied the attachment process of English ivy in detail and suggest a four-phase process to describe the attachment strategy: (i) initial physical contact, (ii) form closure of the root with the substrate, (iii) chemical adhesion, and (iv) shape changes of the root hairs and form-closure with the substrate. These four phases and their variations play an important role in the attachment to differently structured surfaces. We demonstrate that, in English ivy, different mechanisms work together to allow the plant's attachment to various climbing substrates and reveal the importance of micro-fibril orientation in the root hairs for the attachment based on structural changes at the subcellular level. PMID:20462880

  2. Biomass and toxicity responses of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) to elevated atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Jacqueline E; Ziska, Lewis H; Schlesinger, William H; Thomas, Richard B; Sicher, Richard C; George, Kate; Clark, James S

    2006-06-13

    Contact with poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) is one of the most widely reported ailments at poison centers in the United States, and this plant has been introduced throughout the world, where it occurs with other allergenic members of the cashew family (Anacardiaceae). Approximately 80% of humans develop dermatitis upon exposure to the carbon-based active compound, urushiol. It is not known how poison ivy might respond to increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)), but previous work done in controlled growth chambers shows that other vines exhibit large growth enhancement from elevated CO(2). Rising CO(2) is potentially responsible for the increased vine abundance that is inhibiting forest regeneration and increasing tree mortality around the world. In this 6-year study at the Duke University Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment experiment, we show that elevated atmospheric CO(2) in an intact forest ecosystem increases photosynthesis, water use efficiency, growth, and population biomass of poison ivy. The CO(2) growth stimulation exceeds that of most other woody species. Furthermore, high-CO(2) plants produce a more allergenic form of urushiol. Our results indicate that Toxicodendron taxa will become more abundant and more "toxic" in the future, potentially affecting global forest dynamics and human health.

  3. Biomass and toxicity responses of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) to elevated atmospheric CO2

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Jacqueline E.; Ziska, Lewis H.; Schlesinger, William H.; Thomas, Richard B.; Sicher, Richard C.; George, Kate; Clark, James S.

    2006-01-01

    Contact with poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) is one of the most widely reported ailments at poison centers in the United States, and this plant has been introduced throughout the world, where it occurs with other allergenic members of the cashew family (Anacardiaceae). Approximately 80% of humans develop dermatitis upon exposure to the carbon-based active compound, urushiol. It is not known how poison ivy might respond to increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), but previous work done in controlled growth chambers shows that other vines exhibit large growth enhancement from elevated CO2. Rising CO2 is potentially responsible for the increased vine abundance that is inhibiting forest regeneration and increasing tree mortality around the world. In this 6-year study at the Duke University Free-Air CO2 Enrichment experiment, we show that elevated atmospheric CO2 in an intact forest ecosystem increases photosynthesis, water use efficiency, growth, and population biomass of poison ivy. The CO2 growth stimulation exceeds that of most other woody species. Furthermore, high-CO2 plants produce a more allergenic form of urushiol. Our results indicate that Toxicodendron taxa will become more abundant and more “toxic” in the future, potentially affecting global forest dynamics and human health. PMID:16754866

  4. [Contact allergy to Anacardiaceae. A review and case reports of poison ivy allergy in central Europe].

    PubMed

    Ippen, H

    1983-01-01

    In Europe, as opposed to North America, poison-ivy rash is hardly known. For this reason a detailed review of the allergenic members of the Anacardiaceae family is given, and the misleading nomenclature of "poison ivy", "poison oak", and some other species of this family are discussed. An up-to-date representation of the chemical structure of the allergenic substance group (denoted as "Urushiol") from this family is provided as well as botanical information regarding the plants themselves. Prevention of this dangerous sensitization and the therapy of this allergic reaction are discussed. The four cases presented are as follows: a young German woman who became sensitized to poison ivy or poison oak while in the USA and showed a cross reaction to other Rhus species (R. copallina, R. javanica (semialata), R. trichocarpa) as well as to Choerospondias axillaris var. japonica and to mangoes; a landscape gardener with an occupationally acquired allergy to Anacardium occidentale; and two control persons giving positive results to skin tests with Urushiol and Rhus trichocarpa respectively, to which the source of sensitization could not be clarified. Tests with three kinds of pistachio and two native-European Anacardiaceae (Rhus typhina and Cotinus coggygria) yielded negative results in each case. Prophylaxis to sensitization requires familiarity with the numerous Anacardiaceae and derivative products to which one could come in contact. These substances, summarized in a table, include mango, cashew and "sweet pepper".

  5. Single dose parenteral hyposensitization to poison ivy urushiol in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Walker, L A; Watson, E S; elSohly, M A

    1995-08-01

    Studies were carried out in guinea pigs to evaluate the potential for single dose hyposensitization to poison ivy urushiol dermatitis. Sensitization was induced by topical application of 1 mg of poison ivy urushiol to the back of the neck. In the first series of studies, three different analogs of poison ivy urushiol were studied: 1) a mixture of pentadecyl and heptadecyl catechols (PDC/HDC), the saturated side chain analog of the natural urushiol mixture; 2) a mixture of the diacetate esters of PDC and HDC (PDC/HDC Ac), the esterified form of the saturated sidechain analogs; 3) 2-n-pentadecyl hydroquinone diacetate (HQ Ac). Each of these compounds was administered as 5 mg of the free catechol i.m. each week for three weeks. A vehicle group received only corn oil injections. Reactivity to poison ivy urushiol (PIU) challenge was evaluated in skin tests at 1 and 5 weeks post-treatment. PDC/HDC Ac induced a marked reduction in both the incidence and the severity of lesions induced by PIU at both 1 and at 5 weeks post-treatment. Other analogs were ineffective at 5 weeks post-treatment, and were less effective than PDC/HDC Ac at 1 week post-treatment. In a second series of experiments, the efficacy of PDC/HDC Ac was evaluated in both single and multiple dose regiments. One treatment group received 5 mg of PDC/HDC Ac intramuscularly each week for 4 weeks, while another treatment group received a single dose of 20 mg PDC/HDC Ac i.m. Corresponding vehicle control groups were also included. At 1 week post-treatment in the single dose group, the PDC/HDC Ac was only modestly effective, with some reduction of severity of lesions at the higher challenge doses of PIU. However, at 4 and 7 weeks post-treatment, both the incidence and the severity of the lesions at all challenge doses were reduced. In the multiple dose group, the incidence and severity of lesions are reduced at 1 week and 4 weeks post-treatment (4 weeks and 7 weeks after the initial dose) but were not significantly

  6. Unilateral hemispheric proliferation of ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images in moyamoya disease correlates highly with ipsilateral hemispheric decrease of cerebrovascular reserve.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, M; Noguchi, T; Takase, Y; Ootsuka, T; Kido, N; Matsushima, T

    2009-10-01

    An ivy sign is considered to represent diffuse leptomeningeal collaterals found on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images of patients with Moyamoya disease. We evaluated the correlation between unilateral ivy proliferation in a hemisphere and cerebrovascular hemodynamic status to learn the clinical significance of the ivy sign. A total of 35 patients with Moyamoya disease were included. Correlation between ivy dominance on FLAIR images and hemodynamic status with use of iodine 123 N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine ((123)I-IMP) single-photon emission CT (SPECT) was evaluated. Distributional differences of ivy signs between both hemispheres were observed in 22 (64.7%) of 34 patients with a positive ivy sign, all of whom showed decreased vascular reserve/reactivity in the ivy-dominant hemisphere (IDH). The proportion of the stage II (misery perfusion) area to IDH was higher than that in the ivy less-dominant hemisphere (ILDH) in the quantitative analysis. The mean vascular reserve was lower in IDH than ILDH. There were 15 of 22 patients who had bypass surgery on IDH because of transient ischemic attack from ischemia of IDH. Patients with symmetric ivy distributions showed a variety of hemodynamic status. MR angiography (MRA) stage of IDH (2.95 +/- 0.39) was higher compared with ILDH (2.60 +/- 0.50; P < .05). Regional arteriocapillary circulation time ratio in IDH was longer compared with ILDH (P < .05). Ivy proliferation decreased in 10 (55.6%) of 18 patients who underwent bypass surgery during the follow-up period. Unilateral hemispheric ivy proliferation correlated highly with the existence of an ipsilateral decreased vascular reserve associated with the development of leptomeningeal collaterals in patients with Moyamoya disease.

  7. Biology and host range of the moth Digitivalva delaireae as one of two candidate agents for biological control of Cape-ivy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata, Asteraceae), native to coastal floodplains and mountains in eastern South Africa, is an invasive vine in coastal riparian, woodland and scrub habitats in California and southern Oregon, as well as mid-elevation regions on some of the Hawaiian Islands. Cape-ivy smothers na...

  8. "But How Can Those Students Make It Here?": Examining the Institutional Discourse about What It Means to Be "LD" at an Ivy League University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I examine and critique the construction of "learning disabilities" at an Ivy League university in the USA. Drawn from a study of the experiences of learning disabled labelled Ivy undergraduates, this paper focuses on the language practices, assumptions, and power relationships that characterize the University discourse within and…

  9. Black-spot poison ivy dermatitis. An acute irritant contact dermatitis superimposed upon an allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, R M; Rivera, H P; Guin, J D

    1984-08-01

    A black spot in the epidermis over a blister of poison ivy dermatitis is an uncommon finding. Four patients with the phenomenon are described. Histologic and histochemical studies were made on biopsy material and the blackish deposit on the skin surface was compared with black deposits in and on leaves of the species of poison ivy. This examination revealed a yellow, amorphous substance on the stratum corneum of the lesions and a similar substance in and on leaves of the poison ivy plant, Toxicodendron radicans ssp. negundo. Associated with the pigmentary deposits there were distinct changes of acute irritant contact dermatitis superimposed upon allergic contact dermatitis. Our findings support the view that the black material is the oleoresin of the plant, and that this substance behaves both as an irritant and an allergen.

  10. Impact of urban land use on the bacterial phyllosphere of ivy (Hedera sp.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, Wenke; Wuyts, Karen; Oerlemans, Eline; Wuyts, Sander; Denys, Siegfried; Samson, Roeland; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-12-01

    The surface of the aerial parts of the plant, also termed the phyllosphere, is a selective habitat for microbes. The bacterial composition of the phyllosphere depends on host plant species, leaf characteristics, season, climate, and geographic location of the host plant. In this study, we investigated the effect of an urban environment on the bacterial composition of phyllosphere communities. We performed a passive biomonitoring experiment in which leaves were sampled from ivy (Hedera sp.), a common evergreen climber species, in urban and non-urban locations. Exposure to traffic-generated particulate matter was estimated using leaf biomagnetic analyses. The bacterial community composition was determined using 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq. The phyllosphere microbial communities of ivy differed greatly between urban and non-urban locations, as we observed a shift in several of the dominant taxa: Beijerinckia and Methylocystaceae were most abundant in the non-urban phyllosphere, whereas Hymenobacter and Sphingomonadaceae were dominating the urban ivy phyllosphere. The richness, diversity and composition of the communities showed greater variability in the urban than in the non-urban locations, where traffic-generated PM was lower. Interestingly, the relative abundances of eight of the ten most dominant taxa correlated well with leaf magnetism, be it positive or negative. The results of this study indicate that an urban environment can greatly affect the local phyllosphere community composition. Although other urban-related factors cannot be ruled out, the relative abundance of most of the dominant taxa was significantly correlated with exposure to traffic-generated PM.

  11. Structure, attachment properties, and ecological importance of the attachment system of English ivy (Hedera helix)

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Björn; Seidel, Robin; Steinbrecher, Tina; Speck, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Root climbers such as English ivy (Hedera helix) rely on specialized adventitious roots for attachment, enabling the plants to climb on a wide range of natural and artificial substrates. Despite their importance for the climbing habit, the biomechanical properties of these specialized adventitious roots compared with standard roots and their performance in the attachment to different host species or inert substrates have not been studied. Here organs and tissues involved in the attachment are characterized and their significance in regard to a broader functional and ecological aspect is discussed. Depending on the substrate, the root clusters show different types of failure modes at various frequencies, demonstrating the close interaction between the climber and its substrates. With a Young’s Modulus of 109.2 MPa, the attachment roots are relatively stiff for non-woody roots. The central cylinders of the attachment roots show a high tensile strength of 38 MPa and a very high extensibility of 34%. In host trees naturally co-distributed with English ivy, a ‘balanced’ occurrence of failure of the attachment system of the climber and the bark of the host is found, suggesting a co-evolution of climber and host. Maximum loads of root clusters normalized by the number of roots match those of individually tested attachment roots. In comparison with most subterranean roots the properties and structure of the attachment roots of English ivy show distinct differences. There exist similarities to the properties found for roots of Galium aparine, suggesting a trend in not fully self-supporting plants towards a higher extensibility. PMID:21914660

  12. A new vehicle data bus architecture and IVIS evaluation platform for ITS modulus

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Kirson, A.M.; Scott, S.

    1998-12-31

    An increasing number of ITS-related after-market systems present a set of in-vehicle installation and use problems relatively unique in the history of automobile use. Many automobile manufacturers would like to offer these new state of the art devices to customers, but are hampered by the current design cycle of new cars. While auto manufacturers are indeed using multiplex buses (the automotive equivalent of a computer local area network), problems remain because manufacturers are not converging on a single bus standard. This paper presents a new dual-bus architecture to address these problems, with an In-Vehicle Information System (IVIS) research platform on which the principles embodied in the ITS Data Bus architecture can be evaluated. The dual-bus architecture has been embodied in a proposed SAE standard, with a ratification vote in December, 1996. The architecture and a reference model for the interfaces and protocols of the new bus are presented and described. The goals of the ITS Data Bus are to be inexpensive and easy to install, and to provide for safe and secure functioning. These high-level goals are embodied in the proposed standard. The IVIS Development Platform comprises a number of personal computers linked via ethernet LAN, with a high-end PC serving as the IVIS computer. In this LAN, actual devices can be inserted in place of the original PC which emulated them. This platform will serve as the development and test bed for an ITS Data Bus Conformity Test, the SAE standard for which has also been developed.

  13. Saponins of the ivy plant, Hedera helix, and their leishmanicidic activity.

    PubMed

    Majester-Savornin, B; Elias, R; Diaz-Lanza, A M; Balansard, G; Gasquet, M; Delmas, F

    1991-06-01

    Antileishmanial activity is reported for the first time for saponins of ivy, Hedera helix L., in vitro on promastigote and amastigote forms of Leishmania infantum and Leishmania tropica. The compounds tested were an extract containing 60% of saponic complex (CS 60), the bidesmosides hederasaponin B, C, and D (saponin K10), their corresponding monodesmosides alpha-, beta-, and delta-hederin, and hederagenin. CS 60 and bidesmosides have shown no effect. Monodesmosides were found to be as effective on promastigote forms as the reference compound (pentamidine). Against amastigote forms only hederagenin exhibited a significant activity which was equivalent to that of the reference compound (N-methylglucamine antimonate).

  14. Study of the intravaginal insert (IVI): acceptability, side effects, and post-coital spermicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Asch, R H

    1984-01-01

    The authors describe their experience with a group of 49 sexually active, already protected women in order to evaluate the acceptability, side effects and post-coital spermicidal activity of a new vaginal contraceptive. The intravaginal insert (IVI) consists of a polyester resin plug (sponge) containing a 5% solution of nonoxynol-9 bound in a cold formation process, and having a cotton loop attached to the lower end. The results of this study indicate that this new vaginal contraceptive is free of major side effects, is well accepted by users, and has strong spermicidal and mechanical activity. Future clinical testing in order to try its anti-conceptive effectiveness is warranted.

  15. Allergic and irritant contact dermatitis from falcarinol and didehydrofalcarinol in common ivy (Hedera helix L.).

    PubMed

    Hausen, B M; Bröhan, J; König, W A; Faasch, H; Hahn, H; Bruhn, G

    1987-07-01

    Experimental and chemical investigations revealed that common ivy (Hedera helix susp. helix) contains 3 compounds which are powerful irritants and moderate sensitizers. Only 2 of these constituents, falcarinol and didehydrofalcarinol, are present in the plant during the whole year. Besides Panax ginseng and Schefflera arboricola, this is the third species of the Araliaceae in which these polyacetylenic sensitizers have been found. Falcarinol and didehydrofalcarinol also occur in Hedera helix subsp. canariensis. 4 patients have been patch tested. Even in low concentrations (0.03%), the main allergen falcarinol elicited strong reactions in all of them. One of the authors became sensitized during the investigations.

  16. Edwardsiella tarda MliC, a lysozyme inhibitor that participates in pathogenesis in a manner that parallels Ivy.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo-Fei; Wang, Chong; Sun, Li

    2015-02-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a bacterial pathogen to farmed fish as well as humans, possesses the genes of two lysozyme inhibitors, ivy and mliC (ivy(Et) and mliC(Et)). We recently studied IvyEt and found it to be implicated in E. tarda virulence. In the present study, we characterized MliC(Et) in comparison with Ivy(Et) in a turbot model. MliC(Et) contains the FWSKG motif and two cysteines (C33 and C98) that are highly conserved in subgroup 1 MliCs but are of unknown functional importance. To examine the essentialness of these conserved structural features, recombinant MliC(Et) (rMliC) and its mutants bearing C33S and W79A (of the FWSKG motif) substitutions were prepared. Subsequent analysis showed that rMliC (i) inhibited lysozyme-induced lysis of a Gram-positive bacterium, (ii) reduced serum-facilitated lysozyme killing of E. tarda, and (iii) when introduced into turbot, promoted bacterial dissemination in fish tissues. The C33S mutation had no influence on the activity of rMliC, while the W79A mutation slightly but significantly enhanced the activity of rMliC. Knockout strains of either mliC(Et) or ivy(Et) were severely attenuated for the ability of tissue invasion, host lethality, serum survival, and intracellular replication. The lost virulence of the mliC transformant (TXΔmliC) was restored by complementation with an introduced mliC(Et) gene. Compared to the Δivy(Et) or ΔmliC(Et) single-knockout strains, the ΔmliC(Et) Δivy(Et) double-knockout strain was significantly impaired in most of the virulence features. Together, these results provide the first evidence that the conserved cysteine is functionally dispensable to a subgroup 1 MliC and that as a virulence factor, MliC(Et) most likely works in a concerted and parallel manner with Ivy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Acute and chronic antiinflammatory profile of the ivy plant, Hedera helix, in rats.

    PubMed

    Süleyman, H; Mshvildadze, V; Gepdiremen, A; Elias, R

    2003-01-01

    Hedera helix is a plant well-known as ivy or English ivy, and a member of the Araliaceae family. In the present study, we tested the possible antiinflammatory effects of a crude saponin extract (CSE) and a saponin's purified extracts (SPE) of Hedera helix in carrageenan- and cotton-pellet-induced acute and chronic inflammation models in rats. Both the CSE and SPE of Hedera helix were found to have antiinflammatory effects. The most potent drug screened was indomethacin (89.2% acute antiinflammatory effect), while the most potent extract screened was the CSE of Hedera helix at 100 and 200 mg/kg body wt. doses with 77% acute antiinflammatory effects. For testing chronic antiinflammatory (antiproliferative) effects, the cotton-pellet-granuloma test was conducted. Indomethacin was found to be the most potent drug in the chronic phase of inflammation, with 66% effect. The SPE of Hedera helix was more potent than the CSE in its chronic antiinflammatory effect (60% and 49%, respectively).

  18. Analogues of poison ivy urushiol. Synthesis and biological activity of disubstituted n-alkylbenzenes.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, M A; Adawadkar, P D; Benigni, D A; Watson, E S; Little, T L

    1986-05-01

    The total synthesis of different isomers and analogues of poison ivy urushiol is described. These include the positional isomers 1-5 and the nitrogen-containing analogues 6 and 8 and their mesylamino derivatives 7 and 9. 3,4-Dimethoxybenzaldehyde, m-dimethoxybenzene, resorcinol, and p-dimethoxybenzene were used as starting materials for compounds 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Compound 5 is prepared by catalytic hydrogenation of bilobol isolated from Ginkgo biloba. Compounds 6 and 7 were prepared from anacardic acid as the starting material while compounds 8 and 9 were prepared from phenol as the starting material. Compounds 1-9 were tested for their ability to cross-react with poison ivy urushiol in sensitized guinea pigs. Compounds 6 and 8 were reactive at the 10-microgram dose level when applied topically, while compound 1 was a skin irritant at that dose. On the other hand, compounds 2-5, 7, and 9 showed no cross-reactivity up to the 30-micrograms dose level. Structural requirements for cross allergenicity are discussed.

  19. Neurogliaform and Ivy Cells: A Major Family of nNOS Expressing GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Caren; Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Soltesz, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Neurogliaform and Ivy cells are members of an abundant family of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expressing GABAergic interneurons found in diverse brain regions. These cells have a defining dense local axonal plexus, and display unique synaptic properties including a biphasic postsynaptic response with both a slow GABAA component and a GABAB component following even a single action potential. The type of transmission displayed by these cells has been termed “volume transmission,” distinct from both tonic and classical synaptic transmission. Electrical connections are also notable in that, unlike other GABAergic cell types, neurogliaform family cells will form gap junctions not only with other neurogliaform cells, but also with non-neurogliaform family GABAergic cells. In this review, we focus on neurogliaform and Ivy cells throughout the hippocampal formation, where recent studies highlight their role in feedforward inhibition, uncover their ability to display a phenomenon called persistent firing, and reveal their modulation by opioids. The unique properties of this family of cells, their abundance, rich connectivity, and modulation by clinically relevant drugs make them an attractive target for future studies in vivo during different behavioral and pharmacological conditions. PMID:22623913

  20. Effects and mode of action of chitosan and ivy fruit saponins on the microbiome, fermentation and methanogenesis in the rumen simulation technique.

    PubMed

    Belanche, Alejandro; Pinloche, Eric; Preskett, David; Newbold, C Jamie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of supplementing a control diet (CON) with chitosan (CHI) or ivy fruit saponins (IVY) as natural feed additives. Both additives had similar abilities to decrease rumen methanogenesis (-42% and -40%, respectively) using different mechanisms: due to its antimicrobial and nutritional properties CHI promoted a shift in the fermentation pattern towards propionate production which explained about two thirds of the decrease in methanogenesis. This shift was achieved by a simplification of the structure in the bacterial community and a substitution of fibrolytic (Firmicutes and Fibrobacteres) by amylolytic bacteria (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria) which led to greater amylase activity, lactate and microbial protein yield with no detrimental effect on feed digestibility. Contrarily, IVY had negligible nutritional properties promoting minor changes in the fermentation pattern and on the bacterial community. Instead, IVY modified the structure of the methanogen community and decreased its diversity. This specific antimicrobial effect of IVY against methanogens was considered its main antimethanogenic mechanism. IVY had however a negative impact on microbial protein synthesis. Therefore, CHI and IVY should be further investigated in vivo to determine the optimum doses which maintain low methanogenesis but prevent negative effects on the rumen fermentation and animal metabolism.

  1. The leptomeningeal "ivy sign" on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging in Moyamoya disease: a sign of decreased cerebral vascular reserve?

    PubMed

    Mori, N; Mugikura, S; Higano, S; Kaneta, T; Fujimura, M; Umetsu, A; Murata, T; Takahashi, S

    2009-05-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic occlusive cerebrovascular disorder with abnormal microvascular proliferation. We investigated the clinical utility of leptomeningeal high signal intensity (ivy sign) sometimes seen on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images in Moyamoya disease. We examined the relationship between the degree of the ivy sign and the severity of the ischemic symptoms in 96 hemispheres of 48 patients with Moyamoya disease. We classified each cerebral hemisphere into 4 regions from anterior to posterior. In 192 regions of 24 patients, we examined the relationship between the degree of the ivy sign and findings of single-photon emission CT, including the resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral vascular reserve (CVR). The degree of the ivy sign showed a significant positive relationship with the severity of the ischemic symptoms (P < .001). Of the 4 regions, the ivy sign was most frequently and prominently seen in the anterior part of the middle cerebral artery region. The degree of the ivy sign showed a negative relationship with the resting CBF (P < .0034) and a more prominent negative relationship with the CVR (P < .001). The leptomeningeal ivy sign indicates decreased CVR in Moyamoya disease.

  2. The Ivy Sign on Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images Related to Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Cerebral Blood Flow in Moyamoya Disease: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Matano, Fumihiro; Murai, Yasuo; Kubota, Asami; Mizunari, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Shiro; Morita, Akio

    2017-01-17

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic progressive cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disorder characterized by the formation of numerous collaterals called moyamoya vessels. Accurate evaluation of vascular status and CBF is needed for prompt treatment to prevent ischemic and/or hemorrhagic events. The pathogenesis of the ivy sign on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images of moyamoya disease patients is unclear. We report a moyamoya disease case wherein the ivy sign changed in relation to SPECT-measured CBF during progression and following treatment. A 49-year-old female presented with slight aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI diffusion-weighted image revealed cerebral infarction in the left frontal lobe. Cerebral angiography images showed bilateral distal internal carotid artery stenosis and moyamoya vessels. FLAIR images exhibited the ivy sign. We performed superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery(STA-MCA) bypass surgery with encephalogaleosynangiosis(EGS) and encephalomyosynangiosis(EMS) on the left side 6 months after first presentation. After operation, left-side resting CBF gradually improved on SPECT and the ivy sign decreased. On the other hand, right-side CBF gradually deteriorated at rest, and the ivy sign increased. Therefore, we performed STA-MCA bypass with EGS and EMS on the right side 4 years after first presentation. After operation, resting CBF increased and ivy sign decreased. The FLAIR ivy sign may be a useful indicator of both deterioration and improvement of CBF status without the need for CBF imaging using contrast material.

  3. Inheritance of the lysozyme inhibitor Ivy was an important evolutionary step by Yersinia pestis to avoid the host innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Derbise, Anne; Pierre, François; Merchez, Maud; Pradel, Elizabeth; Laouami, Sabrina; Ricard, Isabelle; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Fritz, Jill; Lemaître, Nadine; Akinbi, Henry; Boneca, Ivo G; Sebbane, Florent

    2013-05-15

    Yersinia pestis (the plague bacillus) and its ancestor, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (which causes self-limited bowel disease), encode putative homologues of the periplasmic lysozyme inhibitor Ivy and the membrane-bound lysozyme inhibitor MliC. The involvement of both inhibitors in virulence remains subject to debate. Mutants lacking ivy and/or mliC were generated. We evaluated the mutants' ability to counter lysozyme, grow in serum, and/or counter leukocytes; to produce disease in wild-type, neutropenic, or lysozyme-deficient rodents; and to induce host inflammation. MliC was not required for lysozyme resistance and the development of plague. Deletion of ivy decreased Y. pestis' ability to counter lysozyme and polymorphonuclear neutrophils, but it did not affect the bacterium's ability to grow in serum or resist macrophages. Y. pestis lacking Ivy had attenuated virulence, unless animals were neutropenic or lysozyme deficient. The Ivy mutant induced inflammation to a degree similar to that of the parental strain. Last, Y. pseudotuberculosis did not require Ivy to counter lysozyme and for virulence. Ivy is required to counter lysozyme during infection, but its role as a virulence factor is species dependent. Our study also shows that a gene that is not necessary for the virulence of an ancestral bacterium may become essential in the emergence of a new pathogen.

  4. Indiana Regional Transfer Study: The Student Experience of Transfer Pathways between Ivy Tech Community College and Indiana University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadlec, Alison; Gupta, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    This report details findings from focus groups with college students across Indiana. All of these students were planning to transfer or had transferred from the state community college system, Ivy Tech, to a school in the Indiana University system. We wanted to find out what these students had to say about their experiences preparing for and…

  5. Molecular characterization of a distinct bipartite Begomovirus species infecting ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis L.) in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Nagendran, K; Satya, V K; Mohankumar, S; Karthikeyan, G

    2016-02-01

    A distinct bipartite begomovirus was found to be associated with the mosaic disease on ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis L.) in Tamil Nadu, India. The complete DNA A and DNA B components were cloned by rolling circle amplification. Genome organization of this virus is found to be typical of Old World bipartite begomovirus. The association of betasatellite component with this virus is absent. The closest nucleotide identity of 73.4 % was seen with the Loofa yellow mosaic virus (LYMV-[VN]-AF509739) suggesting that it is a new virus species Coccinia mosaic virus (CoMoV-Ivy gourd [TN TDV Coc1]) and distantly related to the other known begomoviruses. The DNA B component shared a maximum identity of 55 % with that of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). In the phylogenetic analysis, CoMoV-Ivy gourd form cluster separate from other begomoviruses. Recombination analysis showed that there was no recombination event in the genome. This is the distinct begomovirus infecting ivy gourd.

  6. Molecular analysis of ivy cells of the hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum using spectral identification of immunofluorophores.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, Jozsef; Szabo, Andras; Somogyi, Peter; Lamsa, Karri

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-expressing (nNOS+) GABAergic interneurons are common in hippocampal stratum (str.) radiatum. However, these cells are less well characterized than nNOS+ ivy cells in str. pyramidale or neurogliaform cells (NGC) in str. lacunosum-moleculare. Here we have studied the laminar distribution of the axons and dendrites, and the immunoreactivity of these neurons recorded in rat hippocampal slices. We have used spectral analysis of antibody- or streptavidin-conjugated fluorophores to improve recognition of genuine signals in reactions for molecules such as nNOS and neuropeptide-Y (NPY). We found that most nNOS+ cells with soma in the CA1 area str. radiatum exhibit characteristic properties of ivy cells, and were positive for NPY and negative for reelin. However, laminar distributions of their neurites differ from original characterization of ivy cells with the soma in or close to str. pyramidale. Both their dendrites and axon are mainly in str. radiatum and to a lesser extent in str. oriens, and in addition often extend to str. lacunosum-moleculare. We conclude that ivy cells in str. radiatum may predominantly be feedforward inhibitory interneurons in the CA1 area, and their axonal output delivering GABA, NPY, and NO can influence both the entorhinal cortex innervated and the CA3 innervated zones pre- and post-synaptically. Spectral analysis of fluorophores provides an objective algorithm to analyze signals in immunoreactions for neurochemical markers.

  7. Ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis L. Voigt) root suppresses adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis L. Voigt) is a tropical plant widely distributed throughout Asia, Africa, and the Pacific Islands. The anti-obesity property of this plant has been claimed but still remains to be scientifically proven. We therefore investigated the effects of ivy gourd leaf, stem, and root on adipocyte differentiation by employing cell culture model. Methods Dried roots, stems, and leaves of ivy gourd were separately extracted with ethanol. Each extract was then applied to 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes upon induction with a mixture of insulin, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, and dexamethasone, for anti-adipogenesis assay. The active extract was further fractionated by a sequential solvent partitioning method, and the resulting fractions were examined for their abilities to inhibit adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Differences in the expression of adipogenesis-related genes between the treated and untreated cells were determined from their mRNA and protein levels. Results Of the three ivy gourd extracts, the root extract exhibited an anti-adipogenic effect. It significantly reduced intracellular fat accumulation during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. Together with the suppression of differentiation, expression of the genes encoding PPARγ, C/EBPα, adiponectin, and GLUT4 were down-regulated. Hexane-soluble fraction of the root extract also inhibited adipocyte differentiation and decreased the mRNA levels of various adipogenic genes in the differentiating cells. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that ivy gourd root may prevent obesity based mainly on the ability of its active constituent(s) to suppress adipocyte differentiation in vitro. Such an inhibitory effect is mediated by at least down-regulating the expression of PPARγ-the key transcription factor of adipogenesis in pre-adipocytes during their early differentiation processes. PMID:24884680

  8. Ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis L. Voigt) root suppresses adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Bunkrongcheap, Ruthaiwan; Hutadilok-Towatana, Nongporn; Noipha, Kusumarn; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Inafuku, Masashi; Oku, Hirosuke

    2014-05-28

    Ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis L. Voigt) is a tropical plant widely distributed throughout Asia, Africa, and the Pacific Islands. The anti-obesity property of this plant has been claimed but still remains to be scientifically proven. We therefore investigated the effects of ivy gourd leaf, stem, and root on adipocyte differentiation by employing cell culture model. Dried roots, stems, and leaves of ivy gourd were separately extracted with ethanol. Each extract was then applied to 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes upon induction with a mixture of insulin, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, and dexamethasone, for anti-adipogenesis assay. The active extract was further fractionated by a sequential solvent partitioning method, and the resulting fractions were examined for their abilities to inhibit adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Differences in the expression of adipogenesis-related genes between the treated and untreated cells were determined from their mRNA and protein levels. Of the three ivy gourd extracts, the root extract exhibited an anti-adipogenic effect. It significantly reduced intracellular fat accumulation during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. Together with the suppression of differentiation, expression of the genes encoding PPARγ, C/EBPα, adiponectin, and GLUT4 were down-regulated. Hexane-soluble fraction of the root extract also inhibited adipocyte differentiation and decreased the mRNA levels of various adipogenic genes in the differentiating cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that ivy gourd root may prevent obesity based mainly on the ability of its active constituent(s) to suppress adipocyte differentiation in vitro. Such an inhibitory effect is mediated by at least down-regulating the expression of PPARγ-the key transcription factor of adipogenesis in pre-adipocytes during their early differentiation processes.

  9. Poison Ivy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plants These plants can be anywhere — from the woods to your own backyard. The green leaves of ... kind of rash without ever stepping into the woods or directly touching one of the plants. Here's ...

  10. Poison Ivy

    MedlinePlus

    ... leaves of the plants. Look Out for Poison Plants These plants can be anywhere — from the woods ... pill or liquid form. Preventing Rashes From Poison Plants The best approach is to avoid getting the ...

  11. Lessons Learned From a Training Collaboration Between an Ivy League Institution and a Historically Black University

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Nanetta; Simmons, Emma; Hyde, Jennifer; Sly, Kaye; Zlotnick, Caron

    2009-01-01

    The Miriam Hospital, Brown Medical School, and Jackson State University developed a joint training program for predoctoral, Black psychology students under the auspices of a training grant funded by the National Institutes of Health. The students in the program at Jackson State University had unlimited access to the clinical research resources and mentoring expertise at Brown Medical School. This innovative program began in 2001 and addresses the need for Black leaders in clinical research and academia who will focus on HIV and other infections that disproportionately affect the Black community. This collaboration has served as a bridge between an Ivy League institution and a historically Black university for training in clinical research to develop successful minority academicians. PMID:19246675

  12. Fabrication of Microfiber Patterns with Ivy Shoot-Like Geometries Using Improved Electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young Hun; Lee, Jongwan

    2016-04-01

    Fibers and fibrous structures are used extensively in various fields due to their many advantages. Microfibers, as well as nanofibers, are considered to be some of the most valuable forms of advanced materials. Accordingly, various methods for fabricating microfibers have been developed. Electrospinning is a useful fabrication method for continuous polymeric nano- and microfibers with attractive merits. However, this technique has limitations in its ability to control the geometry of fibrous structures. Herein, advanced electrospinning with direct-writing functionality was used to fabricate microfiber patterns with ivy shoot-like geometries after experimentally investigating the effects of the process conditions on the fiber formation. The surface properties of the fibers were also modified by introducing nanoscale pores through the use of higher levels of humidity during the fabrication process.

  13. Assisted reproductive technologies and fertility "tourism": examples from global Dubai and the Ivy League.

    PubMed

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Shrivastav, Pankaj; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    What motivates the global movements of infertile people searching for assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs)? In this article, we attempt to answer this question by exploring infertile patients' practices of so-called "fertility tourism." Based on ethnographic research carried out with nearly 300 infertile travelers in two major ART centers--one in the global hub of the United Arab Emirates and the other at a major East Coast Ivy League university--we examine a diverse set of reasons for reproductive travel. We argue that reproductive "tourism" should be reconceptualized as reproductive "exile" in that infertile couples feel barred from accessing ARTs in their home countries. Listening to reproductive travel stories is key to understanding infertile couples' transnational "quests for conception." Stories of two couples, one from Lebanon and one from Italy, demonstrate the poignancy of these quests and begin to shed light on the complex calculus of factors governing this global movement of reproductive actors.

  14. Immunologic studies of poisonous Anacardiaceae: I. Production of tolerance and desensitization to poison Ivy and oak urushiols using esterified urushiol derivatives in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Watson, E S; Murphy, J C; Wirth, P W; Waller, C W; Elsohly, M A

    1981-03-01

    The development of contact sensitivity to poison ivy urushiol in Hartley guinea pigs was inhibited by i.v. injection of the diacetate esters of poison ivy and oak urushiols into guinea pigs 2 weeks prior to attempted sensitization with homologous antigen. Immune tolerance to urushiols of poison ivy and oak developed in 80% or more of the treated animals and persisted for the duration of the study, 8 weeks. The tolerance was immunologically specific for urushiols since the tolerant animals were sensitizable to the unrelated sensitizer 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene. Guinea pigs already sensitive to urushiol were also desensitized or hyposensitizied by i.v. injection of urushiol acetates in successively increasing doses. After receiving the equivalent of 16 mg of poison ivy and oak urushiols in the acetate form over a period of 12 weeks, 54% of a group of guinea pigs were desensitized to poison ivy. all of the remaining 46% of the guinea pigs still sensitive to poison ivy were substantially hyposensitized (no longer responded to 1.5 or 0.80 microgram test doses of PDC). A control group of guinea pigs was not hyposensitized by injection of vehicle, and remained highly sensitive throughout the 15 week study. The majority of treated animals (less than 80%) were also hyposensitized to poison sumac and cashew nut shell liquid allergens.

  15. Role of the lysozyme inhibitor Ivy in growth or survival of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria in hen egg white and in human saliva and breast milk.

    PubMed

    Deckers, Daphne; Vanlint, Dietrich; Callewaert, Lien; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2008-07-01

    Ivy is a lysozyme inhibitor that protects Escherichia coli against lysozyme-mediated cell wall hydrolysis when the outer membrane is permeabilized by mutation or by chemical or physical stress. In the current work, we have investigated whether Ivy is necessary for the survival or growth of E. coli MG1655 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in hen egg white and in human saliva and breast milk, which are naturally rich in lysozyme and in membrane-permeabilizing components. Wild-type E. coli was able to grow in saliva and breast milk but showed partial inactivation in egg white. The knockout of Ivy did not affect growth in breast milk but slightly increased sensitivity to egg white and caused hypersensitivity to saliva, resulting in the complete inactivation of 10(4) CFU ml(-1) of bacteria within less than 5 hours. The depletion of lysozyme from saliva completely restored the ability of the ivy mutant to grow like the parental strain. P. aeruginosa, in contrast, showed growth in all three substrates, which was not affected by the knockout of Ivy production. These results indicate that lysozyme inhibitors like Ivy promote bacterial survival or growth in particular lysozyme-rich secretions and suggest that they may promote the bacterial colonization of specific niches in the animal host.

  16. Performance Evaluation of an Intel Haswell- and Ivy Bridge-Based Supercomputer Using Scientific and Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Hood, Robert T.; Chang, Johnny; Baron, John

    2016-01-01

    We present a performance evaluation conducted on a production supercomputer of the Intel Xeon Processor E5- 2680v3, a twelve-core implementation of the fourth-generation Haswell architecture, and compare it with Intel Xeon Processor E5-2680v2, an Ivy Bridge implementation of the third-generation Sandy Bridge architecture. Several new architectural features have been incorporated in Haswell including improvements in all levels of the memory hierarchy as well as improvements to vector instructions and power management. We critically evaluate these new features of Haswell and compare with Ivy Bridge using several low-level benchmarks including subset of HPCC, HPCG and four full-scale scientific and engineering applications. We also present a model to predict the performance of HPCG and Cart3D within 5%, and Overflow within 10% accuracy.

  17. Poison ivy/oak dermatitis. Use of polyamine salts of a linoleic acid dimer for topical prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Orchard, S; Fellman, J H; Storrs, F J

    1986-07-01

    Closed patch tests were used to evaluate the ability of 156 different preparations (based on 22 different chemicals) to prevent poison ivy dermatitis. Several polyamine salts of a linoleic acid dimer were identified that were totally able to prevent the usual dermatitis in approximately 70% of subjects. The effectiveness of the preparations improved when the antigen and the protectant were washed off within eight to 12 hours, instead of remaining on the skin for 48 hours. When washed off, and depending on the protectant, concentration, and vehicle used, several of the preparations were totally able to prevent a dermatitis in a range of 56% to 100% of subjects tested. Further work with these compounds may greatly benefit the many people currently plagued by their allergy to poison ivy and poison oak.

  18. Erythema multiforme associated with contact dermatitis to poison ivy: three cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cohen, L M; Cohen, J L

    1998-09-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is a hypersensitivity reaction that occurs mainly after exposure to certain medications or in the setting of infection, most commonly that due to herpes simplex virus. Rare cases of EM have been reported after allergic contact dermatitis due to various substances. There has been one case in the literature of EM following Rhus contact dermatitis. We report three patients who developed EM after allergic contact dermatitis due to poison ivy. In all three patients, targetoid lesions developed primarily on the palms and soles, either after a brief course of prednisone or during its taper. Two of the patients have had more than one episode of EM after poison ivy dermatitis. Although EM has been described after allergic contact dermatitis due to a variety of antigens (nickel being the most common), there is only one report in the literature of EM following Rhus contact dermatitis. Given the prevalence of allergic contact dermatitis due to poison ivy, this may be an under-reported complication.

  19. An empirical study of the nuclear explosion-induced lightning seen on IVY-MIKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, J. D.; Mitchell, C. K.; Greig, J. R.; Murphy, D. P.; Pechacek, R. E.; Raleigh, M.

    1987-05-01

    We report the results of a unique study of the lightninglike phenomena that were seen to accompany the MIKE shot of operation IVY on October 31 1952. MIKE was a thermonuclear surface burst yielding 10.4 MT, which took place on Enewetak Atoll. During the period of approximately 10 ms after detonation, five discrete luminous channels were seen to start from the ground or sea surface at a distance of approximately 1 km from the burst point and to grow up into the clouds. We have reexamined the original photographic records of IVY-MIKE, obtaining effective brightnesses (optical powers per unit length) for the luminous channels at different altitudes as functions of time. The absolute calibration for the MIKE records was deduced by comparison with the photographic records of other events of that era, laboratory measurements of film sensitivity, and use of atmospheric transmission data taken just prior to the MIKE event. Errors in this analysis lead to an uncertainty of a factor of ˜2 in the brightnesses of the luminous channels. In the laboratory we have used laser-guided electric discharges to create long (100 cm), arclike plasma channels to simulate the observed luminous channels and to allow determination of an empirical relation between the brightness of the channel and the electric current flowing in the channel. These laboratory discharges had peak currents up to 100 kA and periods of ˜2 ms. Spectroscopic analysis showed that the luminous channels consisted primarily of normal air plasma with typical ground-level contaminants. Photographic studies showed that these long-duration discharges are unstable to the m = 1 magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability and become severely distorted in less than 1 ms. By direct comparison of the luminous channels seen at MIKE and the laboratory discharges, we deduce: (1) the peak current in the prominent (brightest) channel at MIKE was between 200 and 600 kA. Here the most likely value of the peak current was 250±50 kA, but

  20. IL-33/ST2 signaling excites sensory neurons and mediates itch response in a mouse model of poison ivy contact allergy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boyi; Tai, Yan; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Caceres, Ana I; Shao, Xiaomei; Fang, Jianqiao; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-11-22

    Poison ivy-induced allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the most common environmental allergic condition in the United States. Case numbers of poison ivy ACD are increasing due to growing biomass and geographical expansion of poison ivy and increasing content of the allergen, urushiol, likely attributable to rising atmospheric CO2 Severe and treatment-resistant itch is the major complaint of affected patients. However, because of limited clinical data and poorly characterized models, the pruritic mechanisms in poison ivy ACD remain unknown. Here, we aim to identify the mechanisms of itch in a mouse model of poison ivy ACD by transcriptomics, neuronal imaging, and behavioral analysis. Using transcriptome microarray analysis, we identified IL-33 as a key cytokine up-regulated in the inflamed skin of urushiol-challenged mice. We further found that the IL-33 receptor, ST2, is expressed in small to medium-sized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, including neurons that innervate the skin. IL-33 induces Ca(2+) influx into a subset of DRG neurons through neuronal ST2. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-33 or ST2 reduced scratching behavior and skin inflammation in urushiol-challenged mice. Injection of IL-33 into urushiol-challenged skin rapidly exacerbated itch-related scratching via ST2, in a histamine-independent manner. Targeted silencing of neuronal ST2 expression by intrathecal ST2 siRNA delivery significantly attenuated pruritic responses caused by urushiol-induced ACD. These results indicate that IL-33/ST2 signaling is functionally present in primary sensory neurons and contributes to pruritus in poison ivy ACD. Blocking IL-33/ST2 signaling may represent a therapeutic approach to ameliorate itch and skin inflammation related to poison ivy ACD.

  1. IL-33/ST2 signaling excites sensory neurons and mediates itch response in a mouse model of poison ivy contact allergy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Boyi; Tai, Yan; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Caceres, Ana I.; Shao, Xiaomei; Fang, Jianqiao; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Poison ivy-induced allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the most common environmental allergic condition in the United States. Case numbers of poison ivy ACD are increasing due to growing biomass and geographical expansion of poison ivy and increasing content of the allergen, urushiol, likely attributable to rising atmospheric CO2. Severe and treatment-resistant itch is the major complaint of affected patients. However, because of limited clinical data and poorly characterized models, the pruritic mechanisms in poison ivy ACD remain unknown. Here, we aim to identify the mechanisms of itch in a mouse model of poison ivy ACD by transcriptomics, neuronal imaging, and behavioral analysis. Using transcriptome microarray analysis, we identified IL-33 as a key cytokine up-regulated in the inflamed skin of urushiol-challenged mice. We further found that the IL-33 receptor, ST2, is expressed in small to medium-sized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, including neurons that innervate the skin. IL-33 induces Ca2+ influx into a subset of DRG neurons through neuronal ST2. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-33 or ST2 reduced scratching behavior and skin inflammation in urushiol-challenged mice. Injection of IL-33 into urushiol-challenged skin rapidly exacerbated itch-related scratching via ST2, in a histamine-independent manner. Targeted silencing of neuronal ST2 expression by intrathecal ST2 siRNA delivery significantly attenuated pruritic responses caused by urushiol-induced ACD. These results indicate that IL-33/ST2 signaling is functionally present in primary sensory neurons and contributes to pruritus in poison ivy ACD. Blocking IL-33/ST2 signaling may represent a therapeutic approach to ameliorate itch and skin inflammation related to poison ivy ACD. PMID:27821781

  2. Cost-effective post-exposure prevention of poison ivy dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Stibich, A S; Yagan, M; Sharma, V; Herndon, B; Montgomery, C

    2000-07-01

    Poison ivy (toxicodendron) dermatitis is the most common allergic contact dermatitis in the USA. No studies have shown an effect of washing after a short period of time for the prevention of binding of urushiol to the skin. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of three different modes of postcontact prevention using a surfactant (Dial ultra dishwashing soap), an oil-removing compound (Goop), and chemical inactivation (a commercial product Tecnu). A consented, unsponsored, volunteer experimental study on medical students from the University of Missouri School of Medicine, Kansas City. Each subject served as his/her own control, comparing four 2.5-cm exposed squares on the inner aspect of the forearm, three of which were treated and one untreated. Comparisons between the different agents were nonsignificant with P > 0.05. Each treatment, however, was significantly improved over the untreated control. Our study showed 70%, 61.8%, and 56. 4% protection with Tecnu, Goop, and Dial, respectively, when compared to the positive control, or to the possible maximum response, with a cost per ounce (in a local drug and automotive store) of $1.25, $0.07, and $0.07, respectively, for a decrease in protection that is nonsignificant.

  3. Analysis of radiation exposure for naval personnel at Operation Ivy. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.; Goetz, J.; Stuart, J.; Klemm, J.

    1983-03-15

    The radiological environments are reconstructed for eighteen ships and the residence islands of Enewetak, Kwajalein, and Bikini Atolls that received fallout following Shots MIKE and KING during Operation IVY (November 1952). Secondary (late-time) fallout from Shot MIKE was the primary contributor to the low-level radiation encountered on the majority of the ships and atolls; only the M/V HORIZON received primary (early-time) fallout from this event. Fallout from Shot KING was minimal. From the reconstructed operations and radiological environments, equivalent personnel film badge doses are calculated and compared with available dosimetry data for fourteen of the ships. Calculated doses for the majority of the ships are in good agreement with the film badge data; however, for three of the participating destroyers (DDEs), calculated doses are significantly lower than the dosimetry data indicates. Calculated mean doses for typical shipboard personnel range from a high of 0.062 rem on the HORIZON to a low of 0.001 rem on the SPENCER F. BAIRD; for island-based personnel, calculated mean doses are less than 0.06 rem.

  4. Effects of nozzle type and spray angle on spray deposition in ivy pot plants.

    PubMed

    Foqué, Dieter; Nuyttens, David

    2011-02-01

    Fewer plant protection products are now authorised for use in ornamental growings. Frequent spraying with the same product or a suboptimal technique can lead to resistance in pests and diseases. Better application techniques could improve the sustainable use of the plant protection products still available. Spray boom systems--instead of the still predominantly used spray guns--might improve crop protection management in greenhouses considerably. The effect of nozzle type, spray pressure and spray angle on spray deposition and coverage in ivy pot plants was studied, with a focus on crop penetration and spraying the bottom side of the leaves in this dense crop. The experiments showed a significant and important effect of collector position on deposition and coverage in the plant. Although spray deposition and coverage on the bottom side of the leaves are generally low, they could be improved 3.0-4.9-fold using the appropriate application technique. When using a spray boom in a dense crop, the nozzle choice, spray pressure and spray angle should be well considered. The hollow-cone, the air-inclusion flat-fan and the standard flat-fan nozzle with an inclined spray angle performed best because of the effect of swirling droplets, droplets with a high momentum and droplet direction respectively. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Performance of dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated with extracts from fruits of ivy gourd and flowers of red frangipani as sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, Vinoth; Manoharan, Subbaiah; Anandan, Sambandam; Murugan, Ramaswamy

    2013-03-01

    Natural dyes extracted from fruits of ivy gourd and flowers of red frangipani were used as sensitizers to fabricate dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) studies indicated the presence of β-carotene in the fruits of ivy gourd and anthocyanins in the flowers of red frangipani. The extract of the flowers of red frangipani exhibits higher photosensitized performance compared to the fruits of ivy gourd and this is due to the better charge transfer between the dyes of flowers of red frangipani and the TiO2 photoanode surface.

  6. Performance of dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated with extracts from fruits of ivy gourd and flowers of red frangipani as sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Vinoth; Manoharan, Subbaiah; Anandan, Sambandam; Murugan, Ramaswamy

    2013-03-01

    Natural dyes extracted from fruits of ivy gourd and flowers of red frangipani were used as sensitizers to fabricate dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) studies indicated the presence of β-carotene in the fruits of ivy gourd and anthocyanins in the flowers of red frangipani. The extract of the flowers of red frangipani exhibits higher photosensitized performance compared to the fruits of ivy gourd and this is due to the better charge transfer between the dyes of flowers of red frangipani and the TiO(2) photoanode surface.

  7. A Valuable Option for the Treatment of Respiratory Diseases: Review on the Clinical Evidence of the Ivy Leaves Dry Extract EA 575®.

    PubMed

    Lang, Christopher; Röttger-Lüer, Patricia; Staiger, Christiane

    2015-08-01

    Preparations from ivy leaves (Hederae helicis folium, Hedera helix) dry extracts are well established in the treatment of different respiratory diseases. Until today, the efficacy and safety of ivy leaf preparations has been demonstrated in a variety of controlled clinical studies and non-interventional studies. These results were nearly exclusively obtained using the commercial ivy leaves dry extract EA 575®. This paper will provide information on the clinical data obtained with this special extract, showing the importance of those preparations as a valuable therapeutic option for the treatment of acute and chronic respiratory diseases. Overall, 18 publications covering clinical trials and non-interventional studies of, in total, 65 383 patients suffering from acute as well as chronic respiratory diseases were included. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Plant-Microbe Interactions: Wetting of Ivy (Hedera helix L.) Leaf Surfaces in Relation to Colonization by Epiphytic Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Knoll, D; Schreiber, L

    2000-07-01

    Leaf wettability, cuticular wax composition, and microbial colonization of upper and lower leaf surfaces of ivy (Hedera helix L.) was investigated for young and old leaves sampled in June and September. Contact angles of aqueous buffered solutions measured on young leaf surfaces ranged between 76° and 86° and were not dependent on the pH value of the applied droplets. Contact angles measured on old leaf surfaces were up to 32°, significantly lower than on young leaf surfaces. Furthermore, contact angles were significantly lower using aqueous solutions of pH 9.0 compared to pH 3.0, indicating the influence of ionizable functional groups on leaf surface wetting properties. Observed changes in leaf wetting properties did not correlate with different levels of alkanoic acids in cuticular waxes. However, microscopic examination of the leaf surfaces indicated the influence of epiphytic microorganisms on wetting properties of old leaves, since their surfaces were always colonized by epiphytic microorganisms (filamentous fungi, yeasts, and bacteria), whereas surfaces of young leaves were basically clean. In order to analyze the effect of epiphytic microorganisms on leaf surface wetting, surfaces of young and clean ivy leaves were artificially colonized with Pseudomonas fluorescens. This resulted in a significant increase and a pH dependence of leaf surface wetting in the same way as it was observed on old ivy leaf surfaces. From these results it can be deduced that the native wetting properties of leaf surfaces can be significantly masked by the presence of epiphytic microorganisms. The ecological implications of altered wetting properties for microorganisms using the leaf/atmosphere interface as habitat are discussed.

  9. Urushiol (poison ivy)-triggered suppressor T cell clone generated from peripheral blood.

    PubMed Central

    Kalish, R S; Morimoto, C

    1988-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis to Toxicodendron radicans (poison ivy) is mediated by the hapten urushiol. An urushiol-specific, interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent T cell clone (RLB9-7) was generated from the peripheral blood of a patient with a history of allergic contact dermatitis to T. radicans. This clone proliferated specifically to both leaf extract and pure urushiol. Although the clone had the phenotype CD3+CD4+CD8+, proliferation to antigen was blocked by anti-CD8 and anti-HLA-A, B, C, but not by anti-CD4, suggesting that CD4 was not functionally associated with the T cell receptor. Furthermore, studies with antigen-presenting cells from MHC-typed donors indicated that the clone was MHC class 1 restricted. RLB9-7 was WT31 positive, indicating it bears the alpha beta T cell receptor. The clone lacked significant natural killer cell activity and produced only low levels of IL-2 or gamma-interferon upon antigen stimulation. Addition of RLB9-7 to autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of urushiol inhibited the pokeweed mitogen-driven IgG synthesis. This suppression was resistant to irradiation (2,000 rad) and was not seen when RLB9-7 was added to allogeneic cells, even in the presence of irradiated autologous antigen-presenting cells, suggesting that suppression was MHC restricted and not mediated by nonspecific soluble factors. However, RLB9-7 cells in the presence of urushiol inhibited the synthesis of tetanus toxoid-specific IgG by autologous lymphocytes, indicating that the suppression, although triggered specifically by urushiol, was nonspecific. PMID:2458387

  10. The Impact of Vision Impairment (IVI) Questionnaire; Validation of the Thai-Version and the Implementation on Vision-Related Quality of Life in Thai Rural Community.

    PubMed

    Ratanasukon, Mansing; Tongsomboon, Jongjit; Bhurayanontachai, Patama; Jirarattanasopa, Pichai

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to validate the Thai-version of the impact of vision impairment (IVI) questionnaire and to evaluate its impact on vision-related quality of life (VRQoL) in southern Thailand. The IVI questionnaire was translated into Thai according to WHO translation guidelines. In addition to the routine ophthalmological examinations, a Thai version of the IVI questionnaire was administered to all participants. A total of 120 patients with visual impairment who presented at Songklanagarind hospital, Songkhla province, were enrolled in the study; 30 had age-related macular degeneration (AMD), 30 had cataract, 30 had diabetic retinopathy, 30 had glaucoma, and 30 non-visually impaired individuals comprised the control group. Statistical analysis demonstrated the Thai-version IVI questionnaire is valid and reliable to evaluate the VRQoL of the Thai patients through three subscales: (i) mobility and independence, (ii) reading and accessing information, and (iii) emotional well-being. The results demonstrated high consistency in all subscales with Cronbach's alpha ranging from 0.787 to 0.849. Rasch analysis revealed the validity of the Thai-version IVI to assess VRQoL through all three subscales. Test-retest reliability was also high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.96). The composite score of the IVI was significantly higher in participants with visual impairment compared with healthy participants. Moreover, the subscale scores of reading and accessing information, and emotional well-being were highest in participants with AMD. While the subscale scores of mobility and independence were highest among those with either cataracts or diabetic retinopathy. The symptoms of the common vision impairment diseases are associated with an adverse impact on VRQoL in a clinic-based population as demonstrated in this study.

  11. The Impact of Vision Impairment (IVI) Questionnaire; Validation of the Thai-Version and the Implementation on Vision-Related Quality of Life in Thai Rural Community

    PubMed Central

    Ratanasukon, Mansing; Tongsomboon, Jongjit; Bhurayanontachai, Patama; Jirarattanasopa, Pichai

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to validate the Thai-version of the impact of vision impairment (IVI) questionnaire and to evaluate its impact on vision-related quality of life (VRQoL) in southern Thailand. The IVI questionnaire was translated into Thai according to WHO translation guidelines. In addition to the routine ophthalmological examinations, a Thai version of the IVI questionnaire was administered to all participants. A total of 120 patients with visual impairment who presented at Songklanagarind hospital, Songkhla province, were enrolled in the study; 30 had age-related macular degeneration (AMD), 30 had cataract, 30 had diabetic retinopathy, 30 had glaucoma, and 30 non-visually impaired individuals comprised the control group. Statistical analysis demonstrated the Thai-version IVI questionnaire is valid and reliable to evaluate the VRQoL of the Thai patients through three subscales: (i) mobility and independence, (ii) reading and accessing information, and (iii) emotional well-being. The results demonstrated high consistency in all subscales with Cronbach’s alpha ranging from 0.787 to 0.849. Rasch analysis revealed the validity of the Thai-version IVI to assess VRQoL through all three subscales. Test-retest reliability was also high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.96). The composite score of the IVI was significantly higher in participants with visual impairment compared with healthy participants. Moreover, the subscale scores of reading and accessing information, and emotional well-being were highest in participants with AMD. While the subscale scores of mobility and independence were highest among those with either cataracts or diabetic retinopathy. The symptoms of the common vision impairment diseases are associated with an adverse impact on VRQoL in a clinic-based population as demonstrated in this study. PMID:27191960

  12. Study of iodine, gadolinium and bismuth quantification possibility with micro-CT IVIS spectrumct in vivo imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervova, V. V.; Lipengolts, A. A.; Cherepanov, A. A.; Abakumov, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    The main task of radiotherapy is to create prescribed absorbed dose of irradiation in a tumor with minimal damage of healthy tissues. Contrast Enhanced Radiotherapy allows to achieve that by administration of a special drug into the tumor before irradiation, that increases the absorbed dose within the tumor volume. The concentration of the drug determines the value of the absorbed dose, therefore one of the major tasks in CERT is quantification of the drug concentration in the tumor during irradiation procedure. The present work deals with quantitative determination of iodine, gadolinium and bismuth water solutions by use of micro-CT IVIS Spectrum In Vivo Imaging System.

  13. Phylogenetic and paleobotanical evidence for late Miocene diversification of the Tertiary subtropical lineage of ivies (Hedera L., Araliaceae).

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, V; Guzmán, B; Medina, N G; Vargas, P; Wen, J

    2017-06-22

    Hedera (ivies) is one of the few temperate genera of the primarily tropical Asian Palmate group of the Araliaceae, which extends its range out of Asia to Europe and the Mediterranean basin. Phylogenetic and phylogeographic results suggested Asia as the center of origin and the western Mediterranean region as one of the secondary centers of diversification. The bird-dispersed fleshy fruits of ivies suggest frequent dispersal over long distances (e.g. Macaronesian archipelagos), although reducing the impact of geographic barriers to gene flow in mainland species. Genetic isolation associated with geographic barriers and independent polyploidization events have been postulated as the main driving forces of diversification. In this study we aim to evaluate past and present diversification patterns in Hedera within a geographic and temporal framework to clarify the biogeographic history of the genus. Phylogenetic (biogeographic, time divergence and diversification) and phylogeographic (coalescence) analyses using four DNA regions (nrITS, trnH-psbA, trnT-trnL, rpl32) revealed a complex spatial pattern of lineage divergence. Scarce geographic limitation to gene flow and limited diversification are observed during the early-mid Miocene, followed by a diversification rate increase related to geographic divergence from the Tortonian/Messinian. Genetic and palaeobotanical evidence points the origin of the Hedera clade in Asia, followed by a gradual E-W Asian extinction and the progressive E-W Mediterranean colonization. The temporal framework for the E Asia - W Mediterranean westward colonization herein reported is congruent with the fossil record. Subsequent range expansion in Europe and back colonization to Asia is also inferred. Uneven diversification among geographic areas occurred from the Tortonian/Messinian onwards with limited diversification in the newly colonized European and Asian regions. Eastern and western Mediterranean regions acted as refugia for Miocene and

  14. A Validated RP HPLC-PAD Method for the Determination of Hederacoside C in Ivy-Thyme Cough Syrup

    PubMed Central

    Khdair, Ayman; Mohammad, Mohammad K.; Tawaha, Khaled; Al-Hamarsheh, Eman; AlKhatib, Hatim S.; Al-khalidi, Bashar; Bustanji, Yasser; Najjar, Samer; Hudaib, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    A simple reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method coupled with a photodiode array detector (PAD) has been developed and validated for the analysis of hederacoside C, the marker of ivy plant, in Ivy-Thyme cough syrup. Separation of hederacoside C was achieved using a Phenomenex-Gemini C18 column isothermally at 40°C. A mobile phase system constituted of solvent A (water: acetonitrile: orthophosphoric acid (85%), 860 : 140 : 2 v/v) and solvent B (acetonitrile: orthophosphoric acid (85%), 998 : 2 v/v) was used, at gradient conditions, at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min. Analysis was performed using UV-detection (205 nm). The method was linear over the range (0.03–0.15) mg/mL of hederacoside C (r = 0.9992). Repeatability and intermediate precision were acceptable (RSD <2%). Limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were 0.011 and 0.032 mg/mL, respectively. Percentage recovery was found to lie between 99.69% and 100.90% (RSD <2%). The method was also proved to be specific (peak-purity coefficient = 0.996). PMID:20862201

  15. Biology and host range of Digitivalva delaireae (Lepidoptera: Glyphipterigidae), a candidate agent for biological control of Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata) in California and Oregon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata Lamaire) is an ornamental vine, native to eastern South Africa, that has escaped into natural areas in coastal California and Oregon, as well as in Hawaii and several other countries, displacing native vegetation. Extensive surveys in South Africa led to the discovery of t...

  16. Outdoor Hazards & Preventive Measures: West Nile Virus: A Clinical Commentary for the Camp Health Care Community; Poison Ivy: A Primer for Prevention; Lyme Disease Prevention and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Ellen; Bauer, Holly; Ratner-Connolly, Heidi

    2003-01-01

    Transmitted by mosquitos, West Nile virus may cause serious illness, but the actual likelihood of infection is low. Prevention, implications, and recommendations for camps are discussed. Poison ivy identification, treatment, and complications are presented; a prevention quiz is included. Signs and symptoms of Lyme disease are described, as are…

  17. Preservation of allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy (urushiol) in late HIV disease. The implications and relevance to immunotherapy with contact allergens.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Skelton, H G; Nelson, A; Wagner, K F; Hackley, B E

    1997-01-01

    Delayed hypersensitivity reactions (DTH) are lost with progression of HIV disease. This loss of DTH commonly occurs before the onset of opportunistic infections and is an independent predictor of disease progression. We wanted to determine whether patients in late HIV disease with a history of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to poison ivy continue to react to poison ivy. Twelve HIV+ patients with a past history of ACD to poison ivy were tested with an extract prepared from poison ivy leaves. All but 1 patient had CD4+ T cell counts < 200/microliters, and 5 patients had had an opportunistic infection. All 12 patients showed positive reactions ranging from mild erythema and infiltration to marked erythema with bulla formation. ACD is considered a variant of DTH, and as DTH results in a T helper 1 cytokine pattern. However, the antigen-specific effector cells in ACD may be more diverse than in DTH. This diversity could explain the continued reaction to some contact allergens in late disease and may be important in the use of contact allergens for immunotherapy.

  18. Outdoor Hazards & Preventive Measures: West Nile Virus: A Clinical Commentary for the Camp Health Care Community; Poison Ivy: A Primer for Prevention; Lyme Disease Prevention and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Ellen; Bauer, Holly; Ratner-Connolly, Heidi

    2003-01-01

    Transmitted by mosquitos, West Nile virus may cause serious illness, but the actual likelihood of infection is low. Prevention, implications, and recommendations for camps are discussed. Poison ivy identification, treatment, and complications are presented; a prevention quiz is included. Signs and symptoms of Lyme disease are described, as are…

  19. Ivy Cells: A Population of Nitric-Oxide-Producing, Slow-Spiking GABAergic Neurons and Their Involvement in Hippocampal Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Begum, Rahima; Capogna, Marco; Jinno, Shozo; Márton, László F.; Csicsvari, Jozsef; Thomson, Alex; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In the cerebral cortex, GABAergic interneurons are often regarded as fast-spiking cells. We have identified a type of slow-spiking interneuron that offers distinct contributions to network activity. “Ivy” cells, named after their dense and fine axons innervating mostly basal and oblique pyramidal cell dendrites, are more numerous than the parvalbumin-expressing basket, bistratified, or axo-axonic cells. Ivy cells express nitric oxide synthase, neuropeptide Y, and high levels of GABAA receptor α1 subunit; they discharge at a low frequency with wide spikes in vivo, yet are distinctively phase-locked to behaviorally relevant network rhythms including theta, gamma, and ripple oscillations. Paired recordings in vitro showed that Ivy cells receive depressing EPSPs from pyramidal cells, which in turn receive slowly rising and decaying inhibitory input from Ivy cells. In contrast to fast-spiking interneurons operating with millisecond precision, the highly abundant Ivy cells express presynaptically acting neuromodulators and regulate the excitability of pyramidal cell dendrites through slowly rising and decaying GABAergic inputs. PMID:18367092

  20. The effectiveness of jewelweed, Impatiens capensis, the related cultivar I. balsamina and the component, lawsone in preventing post poison ivy exposure contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Abrams Motz, Vicki; Bowers, Christopher P; Mull Young, Linda; Kinder, David H

    2012-08-30

    Impatiens capensis (jewelweed) is native to the Eastern and Midwestern US and Canada. Many Native American tribes used I. capensis and its close relatives to treat/prevent rash from plant sources particularly Toxicodendron radicans and Urtica dioica. I. balsamina (garden balsam) a native of China was used by the indigenous people of Asia for similar purposes. This study aims to validate ethnopharmacological use of jewelweed in poison ivy (PI) dermatitis prevention and to refute scientific papers denying this efficacy. Additionally, the content of lawsone, the purported effective agent in jewelweed preparations, was measured to see if its concentration correlated with jewelweed preparation efficacy. Poison ivy was brushed onto forearms of volunteers in 6 locations and exposed areas were treated with jewelweed extracts, fresh plant mashes, soaps made of plant extracts, water and Dawn® dish soap. Rash development was scored on a scale of 0-14. Jewelweed mash was effective in reducing poison ivy dermatitis, supporting ethnobotanical use. However, jewelweed extracts were not effective; and soaps made of these extracts were effective but no more so than jewelweed-free soaps. Lawsone content varied with harvest season and did not appear to affect rash development. Jewelweed is an efficacious plant for preventing development of dermatitis following poison ivy contact, but soap is more effective. Lawsone content does not correlate with PI rash prevention. Perhaps saponins, the soapy component of jewelweed are the effective agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biology and Host Range of Digitivalva delaireae (Lepidoptera: Glyphipterigidae), a Candidate Agent for Biological Control of Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata) in California and Oregon.

    PubMed

    Mehelis, Christopher N; Balciunas, Joe K; Reddy, Angelica M; Van Der Westhuizen, Liame; Neser, Stefan; Moran, Patrick J

    2015-04-01

    Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata Lemaire) is an ornamental vine native to South Africa that has escaped into natural areas in coastal California and Oregon, displacing native vegetation. Surveys in South Africa led to the discovery of the leaf- and stem-mining moth Digitivalva delaireae Gaedike and Kruger (Lepidoptera: Glyphipterigidae: Acrolepiinae) as one of several common and damaging native herbivores on Cape-ivy. In greenhouse studies, adult female life span averaged 16 d (46 d maximum). Most (72%) mated females began laying eggs within 72 h of emergence. Females had an average lifetime fecundity of 52 eggs, with >70% laid on leaf laminae, and 89% of eggs were laid by the 15th day postemergence. Lifetime fertility (adult production) averaged three to four offspring per female. At 25 °C, egg hatch required 10 d, pupal formation 26 d, and adult emergence 41 d, while under variable greenhouse and laboratory conditions development to adult required 54-60 d. In four-way choice tests, involving 100 plant species other than Cape-ivy, including 11 genera and 37 species in the Asteraceae, subtribe Senecioninae from both native and invaded ranges, D. delaireae inflicted damage and produced pupae only on Cape-ivy. Leaf mining damage occurred on 30% of leaves of native Senecio hydrophilus in no-choice tests and on 2% of leaves in dual-choice tests, but no pupation occurred. If approved for field release in the continental United States, the moth D. delaireae is expected to produce multiple generations per year on Cape-ivy, and to pose little risk of damage to native plants. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Hyperintense ipsilateral cortical sulci on FLAIR imaging in carotid stenosis: ivy sign equivalent from enlarged leptomeningeal collaterals.

    PubMed

    Hacein-Bey, Lotfi; Mukundan, Govind; Shahi, Kavian; Chan, Hung; Tajlil, Ali T

    2014-01-01

    Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging provides high contrast between hyperintense lesions and normal tissue. Hyperintense structures in convexity sulci are commonly linked to abnormal cerebrospinal fluid composition, whether blood, protein, or infection. A patient with hemispheric transient ischemic attacks from severe carotid stenosis had hyperintense convexity sulci on FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging, interpreted as possible prior hemorrhage, making the patient ineligible for carotid stent reconstruction. Retrospective analysis revealed that hyperintense sulci were dilated leptomeningeal collaterals. In severe arterial disease causing cerebral hypoperfusion, dilated leptomeningeal vessels should be considered a cause for serpiginous hyperintense structures on FLAIR imaging, similar to the "ivy sign" described in moya-moya patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Open trial to assess aspects of safety and efficacy of a combined herbal cough syrup with ivy and thyme.

    PubMed

    Büechi, Samuel; Vögelin, Roger; von Eiff, Mónica Mennet; Ramos, Mac; Melzer, Jörg

    2005-12-01

    Changes in the symptoms of cough after treatment with a combined herbal preparation containing dry ivy leaf extract as main active ingredient, decoction of thyme and aniseed, and mucilage of marshmallow root (Weleda Hustenelixier, new formulation) and its tolerability were investigated in an open clinical trial ('Anwendungsbeleg'). Between January and March 2004, 13 general practitioners recruited and treated 62 patients with a mean age of 50 years (range 16-89). The patients had irritating cough in consequence of common cold (n = 29), bronchitis (n = 20) or respiratory tract diseases with formation of viscous mucus (n = 15). The mean daily intake was 10 ml (range 7.5-15) of syrup, and the mean duration of treatment was 12 days (range 3-23 days). Treatment results were assessed on the basis of changes in the symptom scores for cough and expectoration. Safety was evaluated by means of an analysis of adverse events. In addition, efficacy and tolerability were analyzed from the judgments of the doctors and patients. At the final visit, all symptom scores showed an improvement as compared to baseline. Doctors and patients assessed efficacy as good or very good in 86% and 90% of the cases, respectively. Tolerability was assessed as good or very good by 97% of the doctors and patients. Only one adverse event was reported. However, a relation to the medication was classified to be unlikely. Considering the traditional use of ivy leaves, thyme herb, aniseed and marshmallow root in preparations for cough, the reduction in the symptom score as well as the good tolerability the investigated combined herbal cough syrup seems to alleviate cough in consequence of common cold, bronchitis or respiratory tract diseases with formation of mucus.

  4. The origin of the early differentiation of ivies (Hedera L.) and the radiation of the Asian Palmate group (Araliaceae).

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Virginia; Fiz-Palacios, Omar; Wen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Asian Palmate group is one of the four major clades of the family Araliaceae that is formed by 18 genera, including ivies (Hedera L.). The Mediterranean diversity centre and temperate affinity of ivies contrast with the inferred Asian centre of diversity of the primarily tropical and subtropical Asian Palmate group. We herein investigated the sister-group relationships of Hedera to reconstruct the evolutionary context for its origin and early diversification. Seven nuclear and plastid DNA regions were analyzed in 61 Araliaceae samples including all the 18 Asian Palmate genera. Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference were run together with a battery of topology testing analyses constraining the expected Hedera's sister-group relationships. Additionally, Bayesian polytomy resolvability and divergence time analyses were also conducted. Genome incongruence and hard nuclear and plastid basal polytomies are detected for the Asian Palmate group where the lineage of Hedera is placed. Topology testing analyses do not allow rejecting any of the tentative sisters of Hedera. An early radiation with inter-lineage hybridization and genome doubling is suggested for the Asian Palmate group where all the seven temperate genera, including Hedera, seem to have played an important role. The radiation took placed during the Upper Cretaceous in Asia under a general cooling and the eastern Asian mountain uplift that produced new temperate environments and promoted lineage connections. This allows us to hypothesize that the origin of the Hedera lineage may fit in a temperate niche conservatism scenario where the combination of the radiation with lineage admixtures prevents us from discovering its sister-group.

  5. Operation IVY, Pacific Proving Grounds, November 1952. Project 11.5. Radiobiological Studies at Eniwetok before and after Mike Shot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1953-06-01

    Plants of Portulaca oleracea Growing in the Vicinity of the Atom-bomb Test Sites of Eniwetok Atoll, Report UWFL-31, 1952. UNCLASSIFIED • APPENDIX B...shore in an injured condition. Note absence of skin and scales on right side and back above lateral line . Left side of fish apparently normal...that the radioactivity found in the median portion lined small cavities which are present in the skeleton rather than actually being incorporated in

  6. Status of biological control projects on yellow starthistle, Russian thistle, Scotch thistle, Cape-ivy and French broom

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA-ARS quarantine laboratory in Albany, CA, in cooperation with foreign scientists, is currently developing classical biological control agents for five species of invasive alien terrestrial weeds. Host specificity testing of the yellow starthistle rosette weevil, Ceratapion basicorne, indica...

  7. THE RELATION OF CHEMICAL STRUCTURE IN CATECHOL COMPOUNDS AND DERIVATIVES TO POISON IVY HYPERSENSITIVENESS IN MAN AS SHOWN BY THE PATCH TEST.

    PubMed

    Keil, H; Wasserman, D; Dawson, C R

    1944-10-01

    1. Additional evidence is presented in support of the view which postulates a close chemical and biologic relation between the active ingredients in poison ivy and Japan lac. 2. Biologic evidence, based on the use of the patch test in man, is presented in support of the view that the active ingredient in poison ivy is a catechol derivative with a long, unsaturated side-chain in the 3-position. 3. Of the catechol compounds and derivatives studied, group reactions in patients sensitive to poison ivy leaves or extract were exhibited by the following compounds: 3-pentadecyl catechol (100 per cent of 21 cases), 4-pentadecyl catechol (38 per cent of 21 cases), "urushiol" dimethyl ether (33 per cent of 33 cases), 3-pentadecenyl-1'-veratrole (21 per cent of 14 cases), 3-methyl catechol (14 per cent of 21 cases), and hydrourushiol dimethyl ether (10 per cent of 20 cases). It has been found that 3-geranyl catechol shows a practically constant group reactivity in persons sensitive to poison ivy. 4. The uniformly positive group reaction to 3-pentadecyl catechol is notable since this substance possesses a saturated side-chain, whereas the active ingredient in poison ivy is known to have an unsaturated side-chain. 5. The group reactivity was not restricted to the 3-position, for in some instances 4-pentadecyl catechol also gave group reactions which, however, were less intense and less frequent than those shown by 3-pentadecyl catechol. This indicates that in some cases a long side-chain in the 4 position may be effective in producing group specific reactions. 6. Only an occasional person showed sensitiveness to 3-methyl catechol (short side-chain), and in one instance the group reactivity appeared to be specific for the 3-position. 7. The position of the side-chain in the catechol configuration has some bearing on the degree and incidence of group reactions in persons hypersensitive to poison ivy. 8. Evidence is presented to indicate that the introduction of double bonds in the

  8. THE RELATION OF CHEMICAL STRUCTURE IN CATECHOL COMPOUNDS AND DERIVATIVES TO POISON IVY HYPERSENSITIVENESS IN MAN AS SHOWN BY THE PATCH TEST

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Harry; Wasserman, David; Dawson, Charles R.

    1944-01-01

    1. Additional evidence is presented in support of the view which postulates a close chemical and biologic relation between the active ingredients in poison ivy and Japan lac. 2. Biologic evidence, based on the use of the patch test in man, is presented in support of the view that the active ingredient in poison ivy is a catechol derivative with a long, unsaturated side-chain in the 3-position. 3. Of the catechol compounds and derivatives studied, group reactions in patients sensitive to poison ivy leaves or extract were exhibited by the following compounds: 3-pentadecyl catechol (100 per cent of 21 cases), 4-pentadecyl catechol (38 per cent of 21 cases), "urushiol" dimethyl ether (33 per cent of 33 cases), 3-pentadecenyl-1'-veratrole (21 per cent of 14 cases), 3-methyl catechol (14 per cent of 21 cases), and hydrourushiol dimethyl ether (10 per cent of 20 cases). It has been found that 3-geranyl catechol shows a practically constant group reactivity in persons sensitive to poison ivy. 4. The uniformly positive group reaction to 3-pentadecyl catechol is notable since this substance possesses a saturated side-chain, whereas the active ingredient in poison ivy is known to have an unsaturated side-chain. 5. The group reactivity was not restricted to the 3-position, for in some instances 4-pentadecyl catechol also gave group reactions which, however, were less intense and less frequent than those shown by 3-pentadecyl catechol. This indicates that in some cases a long side-chain in the 4 position may be effective in producing group specific reactions. 6. Only an occasional person showed sensitiveness to 3-methyl catechol (short side-chain), and in one instance the group reactivity appeared to be specific for the 3-position. 7. The position of the side-chain in the catechol configuration has some bearing on the degree and incidence of group reactions in persons hypersensitive to poison ivy. 8. Evidence is presented to indicate that the introduction of double bonds in the

  9. The Crystal Structure of the Ivy delta4-16:0-ACP Desaturase Reveals Structural Details of the Oxidized Active Site and Potential Determinants of Regioselectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Guy,J.; Whittle, E.; Kumaran, D.; Lindqvist, Y.; Shanklin, J.

    2007-01-01

    The multifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase from Hedera helix (English ivy) catalyzes the {Delta}{sup 4} desaturation of 16:0-ACP and the{Delta}{sup 9} desaturation of 18:0-ACP and further desaturates{Delta}{sup 9}-16:1 or {Delta}{sup 9}-18:1 to the corresponding {Delta}{sup 4,9} dienes. The crystal structure of the enzyme has been solved to 1.95{angstrom} resolution, and both the iron-iron distance of 3.2{angstrom} and the presence of a {mu}-oxo bridge reveal this to be the only reported structure of a desaturase in the oxidized FeIII-FeIII form. Significant differences are seen between the oxidized active site and the reduced active site of the Ricinus communis (castor) desaturase; His{sup 227} coordination to Fe2 is lost, and the side chain of Glu{sup 224}, which bridges the two iron ions in the reduced structure, does not interact with either iron. Although carboxylate shifts have been observed on oxidation of other diiron proteins, this is the first example of the residue moving beyond the coordination range of both iron ions. Comparison of the ivy and castor structures reveal surface amino acids close to the annulus of the substrate-binding cavity and others lining the lower portion of the cavity that are potential determinants of their distinct substrate specificities. We propose a hypothesis that differences in side chain packing explains the apparent paradox that several residues lining the lower portion of the cavity in the ivy desaturase are bulkier than their equivalents in the castor enzyme despite the necessity for the ivy enzyme to accommodate three more carbons beyond the diiron site.

  10. Tolerance and effect of an add-on treatment with a cough medicine containing ivy leaves dry extract on lung function in children with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Zeil, S; Schwanebeck, U; Vogelberg, C

    2014-09-15

    Ivy leaves dry extract is registered as an expectorant in patients with respiratory diseases associated with productive cough. Next to its secretolytical properties, bronchospasmolytical effects are described. However only limited data exist about a possible therapeutical effect in asthmatic patients. In this double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over study, 30 children (median age 9.07 years (min-max: 6-11)) suffering from partial or uncontrolled mild persistent allergic asthma despite long-term treatment with 400 μg budesonide equivalent were investigated. After a four week run-in period, patients either received ivy leaves dry extract for four weeks in addition to their inhaled corticosteroid therapy or placebo, followed by a wash-out phase before switching to the other treatment arm. Lung function, FeNO, exhaled breath condensate pH and life quality was analyzed after each treatment period. There was a significant improvement of MEF(75-25), MEF25 and VC after treatment with ivy leaves dry extract (MEF(75-25) change in the mean 0.115 l/s, p=0.044; MEF25 change in the mean 0.086 l/s, p=0.041; VC change in the mean 0.052 l, p=0.044), but not after treatment with placebo. For the primary outcome parameters (relative change of FEV1 and MEF(75-25) before bronchodilation) no treatment effect could be detected in the cross-over analysis (FEV1 p=0.6763 and MEF(75-25) p=0.6953). This proof-of-concept study indicates that children with mild uncontrolled asthma despite regular inhaled corticosteroid therapy might benefit from an additional therapy with ivy leaves dry extract. However, further studies are needed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  11. Induction of tolerance to poison ivy urushiol in the guinea pig by epicutaneous application of the structural analog 5-methyl-3-n-pentadecylcatechol.

    PubMed

    Stampf, J L; Benezra, C; Byers, V; Castagnoli, N

    1986-05-01

    Previous studies have established that epicutaneous application of 5-methyl-3-n-pentadecylcatechol (5-Me-PDC), a synthetic analog of a poison ivy urushiol component, leads to immune tolerance to 3-n-pentadecylcatechol (PDC) in mice. The induction of tolerance by 5-Me-PDC may be mediated by a protein conjugate formed via selective reaction of thiol nucleophiles present on the carrier macromolecule with the corresponding o-quinone derived from the parent catechol. In order to examine further the tolerogenic properties of 5-Me-PDC, we have extended our studies to the guinea pig, the generally accepted experimental species for the study of contact allergy. The results have established that specific immune tolerance to poison ivy urushiol is induced following 2 epicutaneous applications of the PDC analog. Furthermore, we were able to show that the treated animals remained tolerant for at least 6 weeks, a period of time comparable to that observed following the intravenous administration of the O,O-bis-acetyl derivative of PDC. The data point to the possibility of developing a therapeutically effective topical tolerogen for poison ivy contact dermatitis.

  12. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Missouri River Recovery Program Lower Little Sioux Bend Shallow Water Habitat Construction Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    the forested areas are dominated by a mixture of stinging nettles (Urtica dioica), poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicaans), reed canarygrass, bedstraw...mulberry Green Ash American elm Roughleafdogwood Stinging Nettle White snakeroot Poison ivy Ground ivy Virginia creeper Scouring rush Smooth

  13. Processing of urushiol (poison ivy) hapten by both endogenous and exogenous pathways for presentation to T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kalish, R S; Wood, J A; LaPorte, A

    1994-05-01

    The antigen processing requirements for urushiol, the immunogen of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), were tested by presentation of urushiol to cultured human urushiol-responsive T cells. Urushiol was added to antigen-presenting cells (APC) either before or after fixation with paraformaldehyde. Three distinct routes of antigen processing were detected. CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, which were dependent upon processing, proliferated if urushiol was added to APC before fixation, but did not proliferate when urushiol was added to APC after fixation. Processing of urushiol for presentation to CD8+ T cells was inhibited by azide, monensin, and brefeldin A. This suggests that urushiol was processed by the endogenous pathway. In contrast, presentation of urushiol to CD4+ T cells was inhibited by monensin but not by brefeldin A. This was compatible with antigen processing by the endosomal (exogenous) pathway. Finally, certain CD8+ T cells recognized urushiol in the absence of processing. These cells proliferated in response to APC incubated with urushiol after fixation. Classification of contact allergens by antigen processing pathway may predict the relative roles of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in the immunopathogensis of allergic contact dermatitis.

  14. Processing of urushiol (poison ivy) hapten by both endogenous and exogenous pathways for presentation to T cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kalish, R S; Wood, J A; LaPorte, A

    1994-01-01

    The antigen processing requirements for urushiol, the immunogen of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), were tested by presentation of urushiol to cultured human urushiol-responsive T cells. Urushiol was added to antigen-presenting cells (APC) either before or after fixation with paraformaldehyde. Three distinct routes of antigen processing were detected. CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, which were dependent upon processing, proliferated if urushiol was added to APC before fixation, but did not proliferate when urushiol was added to APC after fixation. Processing of urushiol for presentation to CD8+ T cells was inhibited by azide, monensin, and brefeldin A. This suggests that urushiol was processed by the endogenous pathway. In contrast, presentation of urushiol to CD4+ T cells was inhibited by monensin but not by brefeldin A. This was compatible with antigen processing by the endosomal (exogenous) pathway. Finally, certain CD8+ T cells recognized urushiol in the absence of processing. These cells proliferated in response to APC incubated with urushiol after fixation. Classification of contact allergens by antigen processing pathway may predict the relative roles of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in the immunopathogensis of allergic contact dermatitis. Images PMID:7910172

  15. Ivy leaves dry extract EA 575® decreases LPS-induced IL-6 release from murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Michels, J; Runkel, F; Gokorsch, S; Häberlein, H

    2016-03-01

    IL-6 plays a key role in the course of inflammatory processes as well as in the regulation of immune responses by the release of different cytokines. IL-6 is produced e.g. by macrophages recruited to the airways in response to a variety of inflammatory stimuli like allergens and respiratory viruses. Patients with inflammatory airway diseases therefore may benefit from therapies targeting the IL-6 pathway, e.g. reduction of the IL-6 release. Within this context, we tested the influence of the ivy leaves dry extract EA 575® on the LPS-induced release of IL-6 from murine macrophages (J774.2). One point seven µg/ml (5 µM) corticosterone served as positive control and was able to reduce LPS-induced IL-6 release by 46 ± 4%. EA 575® was tested in concentrations between 40 and 400 µg/ml. EA 575® decreased the LPS-induced IL-6 release in a dose-dependent manner and statistically significant by 25 ± 4%, 32 ± 4%, and 40 ± 7% in concentrations of 80, 160, and 400 µg/ml, respectively. The present data suggest an anti-inflammatory effect of EA 575® used in therapy of chronic- and acute inflammatory airway diseases accompanied with cough.

  16. Isolation of a phytotoxic isocoumarin from Diaporthe eres-infected Hedera helix (English Ivy) and synthesis of its phytotoxic analogs.

    PubMed

    Meepagala, Kumudini M; Briscoe, William E; Techen, Natascha; Johnson, Robert D; Clausen, Brandon M; Duke, Stephen O

    2017-08-23

    The fungus Diaporthe eres was isolated from a fungal pathogen-infected leaf of Hedera helix (English Ivy) exhibiting necrosis. It is hypothesized that the causative fungus produces phytotoxins as evidenced by necrotic lesions on the leaves. The fungus was isolated and grown in Czapek Dox broth culture medium and potato dextrose broth culture medium and identified as Diaporthe eres. The ethyl acetate extracts of the culture broths were phytotoxic to lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). 3,4-Dihydro-8-hydroxy-3,5-dimethylisocoumarin (1) and tyrosol (2) were isolated and identified as the phytotoxic constituents. Six analogs of 3,4-dihydro-isocoumarin were synthesized and shown to be phytotoxic. The synthesized 3,4-dihydro-8-hydroxy-3,7-dimethylisocoumarin and 3,4-dihydro-8-hydroxy-3,3,7-trimethylisocoumarin were two- to three-fold more phytotoxic than the naturally occurring 1 in a Lemna paucicostata growth bioassay. Synthesis and herbicidal activities of the several new analogs of 1 are reported for the first time. These promising molecules should be used as templates for synthesis and testing of more analogs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. The alternation between PSII and PSI in ivy (Hedera nepalensis) demonstrated by in vivo chlorophyll a fluorescence and modulated 820 nm reflection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Zhang, Quan Sheng; Yang, Xiao Qi; Sheng, Zi Tong; Nan, Guo Ning

    2016-11-01

    To examine the coordination between photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) in response to varying environmental conditions, both diurnal fluctuations and seasonal variability of photosynthetic electron transport activity in ivy (Hedera nepalensis, Araliaceae) were investigated: by measuring prompt fluorescence, delayed fluorescence (DF) and modulated reflection of 820 nm light (MR). During diurnal fluctuations, the PSII electron donor side was damaged, as evidenced by decreases of the fast amplitude of DF decay kinetics at I1, although there was no significant change in relative variable fluorescence at K-step to amplitude of FJ - Fo. Decreases in the maximum photochemical efficiency (i.e., PSII photoinactivation) were accompanied by an increased maximum decrease in the slope of MR/MRo (i.e., PSI photoactivation). Subsequently, PSII recovery and PSI relaxation occurred in the afternoon. Throughout the season, alternations between PSII and PSI were also suggested by the down-regulation of PSII and the up-regulation of PSI from summer to winter. Significant negative linear correlations between the activity of PSII and PSI across both diurnal fluctuations and seasonal variability were verified by correlation analyses. In addition, PSI was active throughout the year, suggesting PSI is independent from high temperatures. High PSI activity may maintain the functional integrity of the photosynthetic apparatus in overwintering ivy. The alternation between PSII and PSI activity may regulate the distribution of excitation energy between the two photosystems and balance the redox state of the electron transport change, thereby enabling ivy to respond to varying environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The loss of Ivy cells and the hippocampal input modulatory O-LM cells contribute to the emergence of hyperexcitability in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Orbán-Kis, Károly; Szabadi, Tímea; Szilágyi, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a frequent neurological disorder that affects directly 0.5-1.5% of the world's population. Despite advances regarding therapy, about 30% of patients cannot be relieved of seizures, mainly because the pathophysiological mechanisms are still not elucidated completely. Basket, axo-axonic, bistratified, oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) and Ivy cells exert spatially and temporary different inhibition on principal neurons. Our aim was to evaluate the alterations of these interneuron populations during epileptogenesis. We induced status epilepticus in male Wistar rats using intraperitoneal pilocarpine injection, which was followed, after a latency period, by spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Nissl staining was used for the analysis of gross morphological changes, whereas triple immunofluorescent-labeled sections (parvalbumin, somatostatin, neuropeptide-Y) were used for differentiation of the selected interneuron types. Putative interneurons identified by their neurochemical contents were quantified, and the cell density was calculated. Although animals developing SRS showed similar behavior, the degree of hippocampal sclerosis was different. In animals with hippocampal sclerotic cell death pattern the density of perisomatic inhibitory neurons was higher, but not significantly. The dendritic inhibitory bistratified cells were preserved, whereas the number of O-LM cells showed a significant decrease. A substantial loss was observed in the number and density of Ivy cells. We suggest that the loss of hippocampal input modulatory O-LM cells, and overall excitation controlling Ivy cells, has a role in the emergence of hyperexcitability. In the same time, alterations of output controlling interneurons might contribute to the propagation of the pathological synchronization to the cortex.

  19. Induction of hapten-specific tolerance of human CD8+ urushiol (poison ivy)-reactive T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kalish, R S; Wood, J A

    1997-03-01

    The interaction of CD28 with B7 molecules (CD80 or CD86) is an essential second signal for both the activation of CD4+ T cells through the T-cell receptor and the prevention of anergy. We studied the requirement of hapten-specific human CD8+ cells for CD28 co-stimulation in recognition of hapten, and anergy induction. Urushiol, the immunogenic hapten of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), elicits a predominantly CD8+ T-cell response. Autologous PBMC were pre-incubated with urushiol prior to fixation by paraformaldehyde. Fixed antigen-presenting cells were unable to present urushiol to human CD8+ urushiol-specific T cells. Addition of anti-CD28, however, overcame this antigen-presenting defect, enabling CD8+ cells to proliferate. Fixation of antigen-presenting cells prevents upregulation of B7, and addition of anti-CD28 substitutes for this signal. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells in response to urushiol was blocked by CTLA4Ig, a recombinant fusion protein that blocks CD28/B7 interactions. Preincubation of urushiol-specific CD8+ cells with fixed PBMC + urushiol for 7 d induced anergy. Anergic CD8+ cells were viable and able to proliferate in response to IL-2, but not in response to urushiol. Induction of anergy required the presence of urushiol, and pre-incubation with irradiated PBMC + urushiol did not have this effect. It is proposed that anergy was induced by presentation of urushiol by fixed PBMC, in the absence of adequate co-stimulation signals. Induction of anergy by blocking of co-stimulation could potentially induce clinical hyposensitization to haptens.

  20. Bronchipret® syrup containing thyme and ivy extracts suppresses bronchoalveolar inflammation and goblet cell hyperplasia in experimental bronchoalveolitis.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Jan; Pergola, Carlo; Werz, Oliver; Kryshen, Kirill; Wosikowski, Katja; Lehner, Martin D; Haunschild, Jutta

    2015-12-01

    Acute bronchitis (AB) is a common lung condition characterized by inflammation of the large bronchi in response to infection. Bronchipret(®) syrup (BRO), a fixed combination of thyme and ivy extracts has been effectively used for the treatment of AB. Combining in vivo and mechanistic in vitro studies we aimed to provide a better understanding of the therapeutic potential of BRO on key aspects of AB and to identify potential mechanisms of action. Bronchoalveolitis in rats was induced by intratracheal LPS instillation. BRO was administered p.o. once daily at 1- to 10-fold equivalents of the human daily dose. Animals were sacrificed 24-72 h post LPS challenge to analyze leukocyte numbers in lung tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and blood as well as goblet cells in bronchial epithelium. Inhibitory effects of BRO analogue on leukotriene (LT) production were determined in human neutrophils and monocytes as well as on isolated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). BRO significantly reversed the LPS-induced increase in leukocyte numbers in lung tissue, BALF and blood as well as goblet cell numbers in bronchial epithelium. In vitro, BRO analogue suppressed cellular release of LTB4 (IC50 = 36 µg⋅ml(-1)) and cysLT (IC50 = 10 µg⋅ml(-1)) and inhibited the activity of isolated 5-LO (IC50 = 19 µg⋅ml(-1)). BRO exerts significant anti-inflammatory effects and attenuates goblet cell metaplasia in LPS-induced bronchoalveolitis in vivo potentially via interference with 5-LO/LT signaling. These effects may contribute to its observed clinical efficacy in AB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of the whole extract of common ivy (Hedera helix) leaves and selected active substances on the motoric activity of rat isolated stomach strips.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Marta; Chłopecka, Magdalena; Dziekan, Natalia; Wiechetek, Maria

    2011-04-12

    The long tradition of using the dry extract of Hedera helix (common ivy) leaves in traditional and contemporary alternative medicine caused that many biological and pharmacological studies have been aimed at evaluating the effects of ivy. Some of the results suggest that Hedera helix extract possesses bronchodilatatory and antispasmodic activity. On the other hand, the symptoms of ivy intoxication in human and animals, as well as adverse-reactions observed during the therapy with ivy-based pharmaceuticals, indicate rather stimulant effect of the plant on smooth muscle. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two main active substances extracted from the plant (α-hederin and hederacoside C) and the whole dry extract of Hedera helix on the gut motility. The experiments were carried out on isolated stomach corpus and fundus strips. The tissues were isolated from rats. The experiments were performed in isotonic conditions. The results are expressed as the percent of the reaction caused by a reference contractile substance, acetylcholine. The obtained results revealed that α-hederin applied in the concentration ranged from 25 to 320μM significantly changed the spontaneous motoric activity of rat stomach smooth muscle. The observed reaction had always the same character, a contraction, and its force was concentration dependent. The second tested saponin, hederacoside C, did not alter the motility of rat isolated stomach corpus and fundus strips when administered in the concentration up to 100 μM, however, if applied in the concentration of 350 μM it induced a remarkable concentration of smooth muscle. Eventually, the whole extract of Hedera helix in a dose containing 60 μM of hederacoside C produced a strong contraction which strength was comparable with the reaction generated by acetylcholine. According to the results, it is very likely that α-hederin, but not hederacoside C contributes to the contractile response of isolated stomach corpus and

  2. Efficacy and tolerability of a fluid extract combination of thyme herb and ivy leaves and matched placebo in adults suffering from acute bronchitis with productive cough. A prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kemmerich, Bernd; Eberhardt, Reinhild; Stammer, Holger

    2006-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and tolerability of a fixed fluid extract combination of thyme and ivy leaves (thyme-ivy combination) and matched placebo in patients suffering from acute bronchitis with productive cough. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre Phase IV study 361 outpatients with acute bronchitis and > or =10 coughing fits during the day, onset of bronchial mucus production with impaired ability to cough up at a maximum of 2 days prior to recruitment, and a Bronchitis Severity Score (BSS) > or =5 score points were randomly assigned to an 11-day treatment (5.4 ml three times daily) with either thyme-ivy combination syrup (Bronchipret Saft; N=182) or placebo syrup (N=179). After the baseline examination (Visit 1 = Day 0), 2 control examinations were scheduled (Visit 2 = Day 4; Visit 3 = Day 10/end of treatment). The efficacy of study treatment on acute bronchitis was evaluated by the patient's daily counting of coughing fits during the daytime (manual counter), assessment of acute bronchitis related symptoms and by the investigator's assessment of the most important symptoms of acute bronchitis using the BSS. Evaluation of tolerability was based upon adverse event (AE) monitoring, measurement of vital signs as well as the Primary outcome was the change in frequency of coughing fits during daytime on days 7-9 according to patient's accurate daily recording with a manual counter and documentation in the diary. Treatment effects were analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) adjusted for centre effects. Due to significant deviation from the "preconditions" of the ANOVA, the Wilcoxon test (stratified by centre) was carried out additionally. The mean reduction in coughing fits on days 7 to 9 relative to baseline was 68.7% under thyme-ivy combination compared to 47.6 % under placebo (p < 0.0001). In the thyme-ivy combination group, a 50% reduction in coughing fits from baseline was reached 2 days earlier compared to the placebo group. The symptoms of acute

  3. Ad-shWnt2b Vector Therapy Demonstrates Antitumor Activity in Orthotopic Intrapleural Models as Monitored with the In Vitro Imaging System (IVIS).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masashi; Huang, Cheng-Long; Sonobe, Makoto; Kikuchi, Ryutaro; Date, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    We investigated whether Wnt2B-inhibiting therapy has effective antitumor activity against Wnt2B-overexpressing cells in an orthotopic intrapleural model by monitoring with the in vitro imaging system (IVIS). Mice for the orthotopic intrapleural model were randomized into 3 groups (control, Ad-shWnt2B and Ad-scramble; 8 mice per group). The respective vector was injected into the intrapleural cavity of mice in the Ad-shWnt2B and Ad-scramble groups. After 6 weeks of vector treatment, all mice were monitored with the IVIS. Additionally, their body weight was measured until all mice died from the tumor or were sacrificed. A549-Luc-positive cells showed cytotoxicity following exposure to the Ad-shWnt2B vector. The percentage of viable cells was significantly lower in A549-Luc cells treated with Ad-shWnt2B than with Ad-scramble (p<0.01 versus control or Ad-scramble, respectively). Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Regiospecific attack of nitrogen and sulfur nucleophiles on quinones derived from poison oak/ivy catechols (urushiols) and analogues as models for urushiol-protein conjugate formation.

    PubMed

    Liberato, D J; Byers, V S; Dennick, R G; Castagnoli, N

    1981-01-01

    Attempts to characterize potential biologically important covalent interactions between electrophilic quinones derived from catechols present in poison oak/ivy (urushiol) and biomacromolecules have led to the analysis of model reactions involving sulfur and amino nucleophiles with 3-heptadecylbenzoquinone. Characterization of the reaction products indicates that this quinone undergoes regiospecific attack by (S)-N-acetylcysteine at C-6 and by 1-aminopentane at C-5. The red solid obtained with 1-aminopentane proved to be 3-heptadecyl-5-(pentylamino)-1,2-benzoquinone. Analogous aminobenzoquinones were obtained with the quinones derived from the 4- and 6-methyl analogues of 3-pentadecylcatechol. All three adducts absorbed visible light at different wavelengths. When the starting catechols were incubated with human serum albumin almost identical chromophores were formed. These results establish that cathechols responsible for the production of the poison oak/ivy contact dermatitis in humans undergo a sequence of reactions in the presence of human serum albumin that lead to covalent attachment of the catechols to the protein via carbon-nitrogen bonds. Estimations of the extent of this binding indicate that, at least with human serum albumin, the reaction is quantitative.

  5. Pre-release efficacy assessment of the leaf-mining moth Digitivalva delaireae (Lepidoptera: Glyphipterigidae), a potential biological control agent for Cape-ivy, Delairea odorata (Asteraceae), in western North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The leaf-mining moth Digitivalva delaireae Gaedike & Kruger (Lepidoptera: Glyphipterigidae) is a potential biological control agent for the invasive vine Cape-ivy, Delairea odorata Lemaire (Asteraceae), in western North America, where two morphological varieties (stipulate and exstipulate) of Cape-i...

  6. The Evaluation of a Style-Oriented Cognitive Curriculum for Two- and Three-Year-Olds in the I.V.Y. [Involving the Very Young] Program of the Baltimore City Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Roger A.

    This is a report on an experimental study of a cognitive curriculum supplement developed for the I.V.Y. (Involving the Very Young) Program of the Baltimore City School System. The study concerns the development and transmission of a curriculum for two-year-old children, and an evaluation of its effects. The present version of the curriculum is not…

  7. The Usefulness of the Ivy Sign on Fluid-Attenuated Intensity Recovery Images in Improved Brain Hemodynamic Changes after Superficial Temporal Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery Anastomosis in Adult Patients with Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Keun; Yoon, Byul Hee; Park, Moon Sun; Kim, Seong Min; Lee, Do Sung

    2013-01-01

    Objective MR perfusion and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) are well known imaging studies to evaluate hemodynamic change between prior to and following superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis in moyamoya disease. But their side effects and invasiveness make discomfort to patients. We evaluated the ivy sign on MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in adult patients with moyamoya disease and compared it with result of SPECT and MR perfusion images. Methods We enrolled twelve patients (thirteen cases) who were diagnosed with moyamoya disease and underwent STA-MCA anastomosis at our medical institution during a period ranging from September of 2010 to December of 2012. The presence of the ivy sign on MR FLAIR images was classified as Negative (0), Minimal (1), and Positive (2). Regions were classified into four territories: the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), the anterior MCA, the posterior MCA and the posterior cerebral artery. Results Ivy signs on preoperative and postoperative MR FLAIR were improved (8 and 4 in the ACA regions, 13 and 4 in the anterior MCA regions and 19 and 9 in the posterior MCA regions). Like this result, the cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) on SPECT was significantly increased in the sum of CVR in same regions after STA-MCA anastomosis. Conclusion After STA-MCA anastomosis, ivy signs were decreased in the cerebral hemisphere. As compared with conventional diagnostic modalities such as SPECT and MR perfusion images, the ivy sign on MR FLAIR is considered as a useful indicator in detecting brain hemodynamic changes between preoperatively and postoperatively in adult moyamoya patients. PMID:24294453

  8. Quantitative study and modelling of the litter decomposition in a European alluvial forest. Is there an influence of overstorey tree species on the decomposition of ivy litter ( Hedera helix L.)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badre, Bouchra; Nobelis, Photis; Trémolières, Michèle

    1998-12-01

    The influence on the decomposition rate of ivy litter ( Hedera helix L.) of three ligneous overstorey species (oak, Quercus robur L., white poplar, Populus alba and ash, Fraxinus excelsior L.) that support ivy was studied in an alluvial hardwood forest. The ivy provides an abundant litter at the end of spring. The decomposition of ivy litter and the nutrient release rate were analyzed over four months during the growing season of the canopy trees, the hypothesis being that throughfall could slow down the mass loss rate of ivy depending on the support species. Mathematical models for mass loss and nutrient (P, N, K and Mg) release rates were developed. Mass loss rate and the release rate of magnesium, nitrogen and phosphorus show significant differences depending on species whereas no influence of species was observed on the release rate of potassium. The results illustrate the significant effect of oak compared to ash and poplar in slowing down mass loss rate and nitrogen, phosphorus and magnesium release rates. The mass loss rate over time under the three species followed the proposed exponential model, whereas the release rates of phosphorus and magnesium did not follow this model. This model is fitted to the data in two cases out of three for potassium. Magnesium and potassium are released more rapidly when nitrogen accumulates and the phosphorus content does not change significantly. No species × date interaction was observed, except in the case of magnesium. The species effect is interpreted as an effect of composition of throughfalls and presence or absence of inhibitory substances such as phenolic compounds.

  9. The usefulness of the ivy sign on fluid-attenuated intensity recovery images in improved brain hemodynamic changes after superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis in adult patients with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Keun; Yoon, Byul Hee; Chung, Seung Young; Park, Moon Sun; Kim, Seong Min; Lee, Do Sung

    2013-10-01

    MR perfusion and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) are well known imaging studies to evaluate hemodynamic change between prior to and following superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis in moyamoya disease. But their side effects and invasiveness make discomfort to patients. We evaluated the ivy sign on MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in adult patients with moyamoya disease and compared it with result of SPECT and MR perfusion images. We enrolled twelve patients (thirteen cases) who were diagnosed with moyamoya disease and underwent STA-MCA anastomosis at our medical institution during a period ranging from September of 2010 to December of 2012. The presence of the ivy sign on MR FLAIR images was classified as Negative (0), Minimal (1), and Positive (2). Regions were classified into four territories: the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), the anterior MCA, the posterior MCA and the posterior cerebral artery. Ivy signs on preoperative and postoperative MR FLAIR were improved (8 and 4 in the ACA regions, 13 and 4 in the anterior MCA regions and 19 and 9 in the posterior MCA regions). Like this result, the cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) on SPECT was significantly increased in the sum of CVR in same regions after STA-MCA anastomosis. After STA-MCA anastomosis, ivy signs were decreased in the cerebral hemisphere. As compared with conventional diagnostic modalities such as SPECT and MR perfusion images, the ivy sign on MR FLAIR is considered as a useful indicator in detecting brain hemodynamic changes between preoperatively and postoperatively in adult moyamoya patients.

  10. Project: "Project!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    In November 2006, the editors of "Campus Technology" launched their first-ever High-Resolution Projection Study, to find out if the latest in projector technology could really make a significant difference in teaching, learning, and educational innovation on US campuses. The author and her colleagues asked campus educators,…

  11. Project: "Project!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    In November 2006, the editors of "Campus Technology" launched their first-ever High-Resolution Projection Study, to find out if the latest in projector technology could really make a significant difference in teaching, learning, and educational innovation on US campuses. The author and her colleagues asked campus educators,…

  12. Poison Ivy Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteopathic Medicine Disease Database Contributors Doctor Derm App Skin Facts Aging and Sun Damage Beauty Myths Preventing Sun Damage Skin Cancer Detection Skin Disease Links Sun Safety Document ...

  13. Operation IVY: 1952

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    KATE - Mijikadrek - Mujinkarikku NANCY Elle - Yeiri OLIVE Aej- Aitsu OSCAR Drekatimon Par ELMER - Medren PEARL L ujor - Rujiyoru - Rujoru PERCY Taiwel...Bokinwotmne 277 Taiwel PERCY Teiteiripucchi GENE - Dridrilbwij TILDA Bijire Bijile - Biijiri - Bikile TOM Munjor - Anerowij - Munjur Unibor MAOC ". URIAH...MN Portland, OR ATTN: Director ATTN: Director Veterans Administration - RO Veterans Administration - RD Jackson , MS Pittsburgh, PA ATTN: Director ATTN

  14. [Triterpene glycosides from Hedera taurica. XIII. Structure of taurosides St-I1 and St-I2 from Crimean ivy stems].

    PubMed

    Grishkovets, V I; Tsvetkov, O Ia; Shashkov, A S; Chirva, V Ia

    1995-06-01

    The taurosides, St-I1 and St-I2, isolated from the stems of Crimean ivy Hedera taurica Carr. (Araliaceae), were shown to be the known glycoside, 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl]-28- O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-O-bet a-D- glucopyranosyl]hederagenin, and a new glycoside, 3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-28-O-[a lpha -L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-O-beta-D- glucopyranosyl]hederagenin, respectively.

  15. In vitro antileishmanial activity of three saponins isolated from ivy, alpha-hederin, beta-hederin and hederacolchiside A(1), in association with pentamidine and amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Ridoux, O; Di Giorgio, C; Delmas, F; Elias, R; Mshvildadze, V; Dekanosidze, G; Kemertelidze, E; Balansard, G; Timon-David, P

    2001-06-01

    The in vitro antileishmanial activity of three saponins isolated from ivy, alpha-hederin, beta-hederin and hederacolchiside A(1), was investigated on parasites of the species Leishmania mexicana, in their promastigote and amastigote forms compared with their toxicity versus human monocytes. The results showed that saponins exhibited a strong antiproliferative activity on all stages of development of the parasite but demonstrated a strong toxicity versus human cells. Association of subtoxic concentrations of saponins with antileishmanial drugs such as pentamidine and amphotericin B demonstrated that saponins could enhance the efficiency of conventional drugs on both the promastigote and the amastigote stages of development of the parasite. The results demonstrated moreover that the action of saponins on promastigote membrane was cumulative with those of amphotericin B.

  16. [Severe contact-allergy dermatitis due to poison ivy--a plant that is rarely encountered in The Netherlands; a family history].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, R M F M

    2005-07-23

    In successive years, three members of the same family (a man and woman aged 46 years and their son, aged 20) constantly developed severe pruritic, erythematous, vesicular and bullous dermatitis in the spring and summer after working in the garden. Although the findings were consistent with a photophytotoxic dermatitis, the causative plant remained unclear. Oral therapy with high doses ofprednisolone was necessary. When the man travelled to the USA and visited a doctor there, he recognised the symptoms as those of contact dermatitis caused by poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), a plant that is found sporadically in the wild state in Europe. Their grandparents had brought the plant back from a trip to the USA and planted it in the garden because of the beautiful fall colours. The family identified the plant via a search on Internet and eliminated it from the garden completely. Since then, the family has no longer suffered from contact-allergy dermatitis.

  17. Keratinocyte interleukin-10 expression is upregulated in tape-stripped skin, poison ivy dermatitis, and Sezary syndrome, but not in psoriatic plaques.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, B J; Fivenson, D P; Kunkel, S L; Strieter, R M; Turka, L A

    1994-10-01

    Despite the highly diverse reaction patterns of benign and malignant skin diseases involving T lymphocytes, polymerase chain reaction analysis of cytokine mRNAs present in biopsy samples has revealed that many cutaneous responses can be categorized into essentially two discrete groups. One group exemplified by psoriasis is characterized by consistently detectable mRNAs for IL-2, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha, but not IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, thereby closely resembling the murine Th1-type cell-mediated response. The second group exemplified by tape-stripped skin, poison ivy dermatitis, and Sezary syndrome contains predominantly IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 mRNAs resembling the Th2-type cytokine profile. Because of the growing interest in the immunoregulatory role of IL-10, which can suppress IFN-gamma production and inhibit cell-mediated reactions, we produced a rabbit antiserum that was used to immunohistochemically localize IL-10 in a total of 27 biopsies. The results revealed that in Th2-type skin diseases, IL-10 was predominantly identified throughout all levels of epidermis in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes (KCs), with accentuation of their membranes in upper level cells. In Sezary syndrome, T cells were also immunoreactive for IL-10, which was confirmed using the HUT 78 T cell line derived from a Sezary syndrome patient. While normal skin was devoid of IL-10 expression, KCs began expressing it as early as 6 hr following tape stripping or application of poison ivy antigen and became strongly and diffusely positive by 18-24 hr. In contrast, psoriatic plaques contained no IL-10 immunoreactivity in either the parakeratotic scale or the epidermal KCs. These results confirm the earlier IL-10 mRNA analysis using whole skin samples and immunolocalize IL-10 to epidermal KCs in the Th2 diseases.

  18. Protecting Gram-negative bacterial cell envelopes from human lysozyme: Interactions with Ivy inhibitor proteins from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihong; García-Díaz, Beatriz; Catacchio, Bruno; Chiancone, Emilia; Vogel, Hans J

    2015-11-01

    Lysozymes play an important role in host defense by degrading peptidoglycan in the cell envelopes of pathogenic bacteria. Several Gram-negative bacteria can evade this mechanism by producing periplasmic proteins that inhibit the enzymatic activity of lysozyme. The Escherichia coli inhibitor of vertebrate lysozyme, Ivyc and its Pseudomonas aeruginosa homolog, Ivyp1 have been shown to be potent inhibitors of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). Since human lysozyme (HL) plays an important role in the innate immune response, we have examined the binding of HL to Ivyc and Ivyp1. Our results show that Ivyp1 is a weaker inhibitor of HL than Ivyc even though they inhibit HEWL with similar potency. Calorimetry experiments confirm that Ivyp1 interacts more weakly with HL than HEWL. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies revealed that Ivyp1 in solution is a monomer and forms a 30kDa heterodimer with both HL and HEWL, while Ivyc is a homodimer that forms a tetramer with both enzymes. The interaction of Ivyp1 with HL was further characterized by NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments. In addition to the characteristic His-containing Ivy inhibitory loop that binds into the active site of lysozyme, an extended loop (P2) between the final two beta-strands also participates in forming protein-protein interactions. The P2 loop is not conserved in Ivyc and it constitutes a flexible region in Ivyp1 that becomes more rigid in the complex with HL. We conclude that differences in the electrostatic interactions at the binding interface between Ivy inhibitors and distinct lysozymes determine the strength of this interaction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A systematic study on the influence of the main ingredients of an ivy leaves dry extract on the β2-adrenergic responsiveness of human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Greunke, Christian; Hage-Hülsmann, Anne; Sorkalla, Thomas; Keksel, Nelli; Häberlein, Felix; Häberlein, Hanns

    2015-04-01

    The bronchospasmolytic and secretolytic effects of ivy leaves dry extracts can be explained by an increased β2-adrenergic responsiveness of the bronchi. Recently, it was shown that α-hederin inhibits the internalization of β2-adrenergic receptors (ß2AR) under stimulating conditions. α-Hederin pretreated alveolar type II cells and human airway smooth muscle cells revealed an increased ß2AR binding and an elevated intracellular cAMP level, respectively. In order to identify whether additional compounds also mediate an increased β2-adrenergic responsiveness, we examined the ingredients of an ivy leaves dry extract (EA 575) protocatechuic acid, neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, rutin, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, 3,4-, 3,5- and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, hederacoside B, and β-hederin. Within all the tested substances, only β-hederin inhibited the internalization of GFP-tagged ß2AR in stably transfected HEK293 cells. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy β-hederin (1 μM, 24 h) pretreated HASM cells showed a statistically significant increase in the ß2AR binding from 33.0 ± 8.9% to 44.1 ± 11.5% which was distributed with 36.0 ± 9.5% for τbound1 and 8.1 ± 2.6% for τbound2, respectively (n = 8, p < 0.05). The increased binding was selectively found for the receptor-ligand complex with unrestricted lateral mobility (τbound1 of 0.9 ± 0.1 ms, D1 = 9.1 ± 0.2 μm(2)/s, n = 8), whereas the binding of ß2AR with hindered lateral mobility (τbound2 of 64.2 ± 47.6 ms, D2 = 0.15 ± 0.02 μm(2)/s, n = 8) was not affected. Compared to control cells, a statistically significant increase of 17.5 ± 6.4% (n = 4, p < 0.05) and 24.2 ± 5.8% (n = 4, p < 0.001) in the cAMP formation was found for β-hederin pretreated HASM cells after stimulation with 10 μM of terbutaline and simultaneous stimulation with 10 μM terbutaline and 10 μM forskolin, respectively. Within this systematic study

  20. pH-dependent permeation of amino acids through isolated ivy cuticles is affected by cuticular water sorption and hydration shell size of the solute

    PubMed Central

    Arand, Katja; Stock, David; Burghardt, Markus; Riederer, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The permeabilities of amino acids for isolated cuticular membranes of ivy (Hedera helix L.) were measured at different pH. Cuticular permeances were lowest for the zwitterionic form at pH 6, followed by the cationic form at pH 1. Highest permeances were obtained for the anionic form at pH 11. Permeances were not correlated with octanol/water partition coefficients and decreased at a given pH with increasing molar volume of the solute. This finding suggests that permeation takes place in the polar cuticular pathways. The effect of pH on the cuticular transport properties was analysed according to the porous membrane model considering the polyelectrolytic character of the cuticle in terms of porosity, tortuosity, and size selectivity of the aqueous cuticular pathway which is altered by pH. An increase of water content and permeability of the cuticular membrane was caused by the dissociation of weak acidic groups with increasing pH leading to a swelling of the cuticle induced by fixed negative charges. In addition, the pH-dependent size of the hydration shell of the amino acids was identified as a secondary factor explaining the variability of cuticular permeances. PMID:20631051

  1. Down-regulation of poison ivy/oak-induced contact sensitivity by treatment with a class II MHC binding peptide:hapten conjugate.

    PubMed

    Gelber, C; Gemmell, L; McAteer, D; Homola, M; Swain, P; Liu, A; Wilson, K J; Gefter, M

    1997-03-01

    Immune regulation of contact sensitivity to the poison ivy/oak catechol was studied at the level of class II MHC-restricted T cell recognition of hapten:peptide conjugates. In this study we have shown that 1) T cells from C3H/HeN (H-2k) mice, immunized with a synthetic I-Ak binding peptide coupled to 3-pentadecyl-catechol (PDC; a representative catechol in urushiol), recognized peptides derived from syngeneic cells linked to the same catechol; 2) T cells from draining lymph nodes of C3H/HeN mice skin-painted with PDC proliferated in response to a peptide carrier:PDC conjugate only when it was linked at the 7th, but not the 4th or the 10th, position on the peptide carrier; and 3) tolerization studies confirmed down-regulation of PDC-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity following treatment with a single I-Ak binding peptide carrying PDC covalently bound to a lysine residue at the middle (7th) TCR contact position. Tolerization with peptide:PDC conjugate resulted in abrogation of hapten-specific T cell proliferative responses that correlated with diminished IL-2 secretion. On the basis of these data we propose that it may be sufficient to couple the hapten at a single, well-chosen position on a carrier peptide to target a relevant population of T cells involved in contact sensitivity.

  2. Biosynthetis of phytoquinones. Biosynthetic origins of the nuclei and satellite methyl groups of plastoquinone, tocopherols and tocopherolquinones in maize shoots, bean shoots and ivy leaves

    PubMed Central

    Whistance, G. R.; Threlfall, D. R.

    1968-01-01

    1. By using dl-[ring-14C]phenylalanine, dl-[β-14C]phenylalanine, dl-[α-14C]-tyrosine and dl-[β-14C]tyrosine it was shown that in maize shoots (Zea mays) the nucleus and one nuclear methyl group of each of the following compounds, plastoquinone, γ-tocopherol (aromatic nucleus) and α-tocopherolquinone, are formed from the nuclear carbon atoms and β-carbon atom respectively of either exogenous phenylalanine or exogenous tyrosine. With ubiquinone only the aromatic ring of the amino acid is used in the synthesis of the quinone nucleus. Chemical degradation of plastoquinone and γ-tocopherol molecules labelled from l-[U-14C]tyrosine established that a C6–C1 unit directly derived from the amino acid is involved in the synthesis of these compounds. Radioactivity from [β-14C]cinnamic acid is not incorporated into plastoquinone, tocopherols or tocopherolquinones, demonstrating that the C6–C1 unit is not formed from any of the C6–C1 phenolic acids associated with the metabolism of this compound. 2. The incorporation of radioactivity from l-[U-14C]tyrosine, dl-[β-14C]tyrosine and dl-[U-14C]phenylalanine into bean shoots (Phaseolus vulgaris) and dl-[β-14C]tyrosine and l-[Me-14C]methionine into ivy leaves (Hedera helix) was also investigated. Similar results were obtained to those reported for maize, except that in beans phenylalanine is only used for ubiquinone biosynthesis. This is attributed to the absence of phenylalanine hydroxylase from these tissues. In ivy leaves it is found that the β-carbon atom of tyrosine gives rise to the 8-methyl group of δ-tocopherol, and it is suggested that for all other compounds examined it will give rise to the nuclear methyl group meta to the polyprenyl unit. 3. Preliminary investigations with the alga Euglena gracilis showed that in this organism ring-opening of tyrosine occurs to such an extent that the incorporation data from radiochemical experiments are meaningless. 4. The above results, coupled with previous

  3. Biosynthesis of phytoquinones. Biosynthetic origins of the nuclei and satellite methyl groups of plastoquinone, tocopherols and tocopherolquinones in maize shoots, bean shoots and ivy leaves.

    PubMed

    Whistance, G R; Threlfall, D R

    1968-10-01

    1. By using dl-[ring-(14)C]phenylalanine, dl-[beta-(14)C]phenylalanine, dl-[alpha-(14)C]-tyrosine and dl-[beta-(14)C]tyrosine it was shown that in maize shoots (Zea mays) the nucleus and one nuclear methyl group of each of the following compounds, plastoquinone, gamma-tocopherol (aromatic nucleus) and alpha-tocopherolquinone, are formed from the nuclear carbon atoms and beta-carbon atom respectively of either exogenous phenylalanine or exogenous tyrosine. With ubiquinone only the aromatic ring of the amino acid is used in the synthesis of the quinone nucleus. Chemical degradation of plastoquinone and gamma-tocopherol molecules labelled from l-[U-(14)C]tyrosine established that a C(6)-C(1) unit directly derived from the amino acid is involved in the synthesis of these compounds. Radioactivity from [beta-(14)C]cinnamic acid is not incorporated into plastoquinone, tocopherols or tocopherolquinones, demonstrating that the C(6)-C(1) unit is not formed from any of the C(6)-C(1) phenolic acids associated with the metabolism of this compound. 2. The incorporation of radioactivity from l-[U-(14)C]tyrosine, dl-[beta-(14)C]tyrosine and dl-[U-(14)C]phenylalanine into bean shoots (Phaseolus vulgaris) and dl-[beta-(14)C]tyrosine and l-[Me-(14)C]methionine into ivy leaves (Hedera helix) was also investigated. Similar results were obtained to those reported for maize, except that in beans phenylalanine is only used for ubiquinone biosynthesis. This is attributed to the absence of phenylalanine hydroxylase from these tissues. In ivy leaves it is found that the beta-carbon atom of tyrosine gives rise to the 8-methyl group of delta-tocopherol, and it is suggested that for all other compounds examined it will give rise to the nuclear methyl group meta to the polyprenyl unit. 3. Preliminary investigations with the alga Euglena gracilis showed that in this organism ring-opening of tyrosine occurs to such an extent that the incorporation data from radiochemical experiments are

  4. In situ changes in the relative abundance of human epidermal cytokine messenger RNA levels following exposure to the poison ivy/oak contact allergen urushiol.

    PubMed

    Boehm, K D; Yun, J K; Strohl, K P; Trefzer, U; Häffner, A; Elmets, C A

    1996-06-01

    Abstract: Epidermal keratinocytes in culture have been shown to produce many cytokines, and their proteins have been identified in skin tissue samples. It has therefore been assumed that these cytokines are transcribed in vivo by the epidermis in response to contact allergens. In this report, in situ hybridization was used to detect the messenger RNAs for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in samples of human skin prior to and at various times after application of urushiol, the immunogenic component of poison ivy/oak. In sensitive subjects, IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha mRNAs showed a progressive increase in transcript levels that paralleled the clinical and histological features of the inflammatory process. The time-course of the IL-1 beta response differed from that of IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha, in that there was an early (by 6 h after urushiol administration) elevation in IL-1 beta mRNA that occurred before there was evidence of inflammation and had returned to background levels by 72 h when the reaction had reached its peak. In contrast to urushiol-sensitive subjects, urushiol-anergic individuals did not exhibit an increase in IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha mRNA levels. The data provide evidence for an in vivo role for epidermal IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha transcription in the regulation of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha polypeptide levels in the epidermis in response to this common contact allergen.

  5. An unusual case of death: suffocation caused by leaves of common ivy (Hedera helix). Detection of hederacoside C, alpha-hederin, and hederagenin by LC-EI/MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Yvan; Blaise, Pierre; Darré, Alexandre; Barbier, Thierry; Pépin, Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    We report one fatal case of asphyxia caused by leaves of common ivy. Macroscopic examination of the corpse during the autopsy disclosed an incredible quantity of leaves of Hedera helix in the mouth and throat of the decedent. In order to rule out the possibility of poisoning by the toxic saponins contained in the plant, we have developed an efficient LC-EI/MS-MS assay of hederacoside C, alppha-hederin, and hederagenin in biological fluids and plant material. Sample cleanup involved solid-phase extraction of the toxins on C18 cartridges followed by LC analysis under reversed-phase conditions in the gradient elution mode. Solute identification was performed using full scan MS-MS spectrum of the analytes. Oleandrine was used as internal standard. Under these conditions, saponins in powdered dried leaves of Hedera helix were measured at a concentration of 21.83 mg/g for hederacoside C, 0.41 mg/g for alpha-hederin and 0.02 mg/g for hederagenin. No toxin was detected in cardiac blood, femoral blood, or urine of the deceased, but hederacoside C was quantitated at 857 ng/mL in the gastric juice. These findings led us to conclude that the man committed suicide and that the death was caused by suffocation by leaves of common ivy.

  6. Flood-inundation maps for Suwanee Creek from the confluence of Ivy Creek to the Noblin Ridge Drive bridge, Gwinnett County, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.9-mile reach of Suwanee Creek, from the confluence of Ivy Creek to the Noblin Ridge Drive bridge, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Gwinnett County, Georgia. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Suwanee Creek at Suwanee, Georgia (02334885). Current stage at this USGS streamgage may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ and can be used in conjunction with these maps to estimate near real-time areas of inundation. The National Weather Service (NWS) is incorporating results from this study into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that commonly are collocated at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information for the USGS streamgage at Suwanee Creek at Suwanee (02334885), available through the AHPS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. A one-dimensional step-backwater model was developed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC-RAS software for Suwanee Creek and was used to compute flood profiles for a 6.9-mile reach of the creek. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Suwanee Creek at Suwanee streamgage (02334885). The hydraulic model was then used to determine 19 water-surface profiles for flood stages at the Suwanee Creek streamgage at 0.5-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage. The profiles ranged from just above bankfull stage (7.0 feet) to approximately 1.7 feet above the highest recorded water level at the streamgage (16.0 feet). The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined

  7. Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do Remove any clothing that has touched the plant or rash and wash all recently worn clothing. Gently wash skin and scrub under fingernails right away with soap and water. Cut fingernails short to keep your ...

  8. Up against the Ivy Wall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bovilsky, Deborah

    1982-01-01

    Because boarding schools resemble "total institutions," offering no escape from failure or low self-esteem, private school students feel great stress. Both good and bad students feel stress, as do new, minority, or emotionally troubled students, especially from lack of privacy, lack of control over life, and demanding schedules. (RW)

  9. Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Media contacts Advertising contacts AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal notice Copyright © 2017 American Academy ... prohibited without prior written permission. AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal notice Copyright © 2017 American Academy ...

  10. Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac

    MedlinePlus

    ... on your skin, it causes a blistering skin rash. The rash can range from mild to severe, depending on ... respiratory system. The best way to avoid the rash is to learn what the plants look like ...

  11. General synthetic approach to heterostructured nanocrystals based on noble metals and I-VI, II-VI, and I-III-VI metal chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minghui; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2014-08-19

    Solid metal precursors (alloys or monometals) can serve both as a starting template and as a source material for chemical transformation to metal chalcogenides. Herein, we develop a simple solution-based strategy to obtain highly monodisperse noble-metal-based heterostructured nanocrystals from such precursor seeds. By utilizing chemical and structural inhomogeneity of these metal seeds, in this work, we have synthesized a total of five I-VI (Ag2S, Ag2Se, Ag3AuS2, Ag3AuSe2, and Cu9S5), three II-VI (CdS, CdSe, and CuSe), and four I-III-VI (AgInS2, AgInSe2, CuInS2, and CuInSe2) chalcogenides, together with their fifteen associated heterodimers (Au-Ag2S, Au-Ag2Se, Au-Ag3AuS2, Au-Ag3AuSe2, Au-AgInS2, Au-AgInSe2, Au-CdS, Au-CdSe, Ag-Ag2S, Ag-AgInS2, Au-Cu9S5, Au-CuInS2, Au-CuSe, Au-CuInSe2, and Pt-AgInS2) to affirm the process generality. Briefly, by adding elemental sulfur or selenium to AuAg alloy seeds and tuning the reaction conditions, we can readily obtain phase-pure Au-Ag2S, Au-Ag2Se, Au-Ag3AuS2, and Au-Ag3AuSe2 heterostructures. Similarly, we can also fabricate Au-AgInS2 and Au-AgInSe2 heterostructures from the AuAg seeds by adding sulfur/selenium and indium precursors. Furthermore, by partial or full conversion of Ag seeds, we can prepare both single-phase Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals and Ag-based heterostructures. To demonstrate wide applicability of this strategy, we have also synthesized Au-based binary and ternary Cu chalcogenide (Au-Cu9S5, Au-CuSe, Au-CuInS2, and Au-CuInSe2) heterostructures from alloy seeds of AuCu and Pt chalcogenides (e.g., Pt-AgInS2) from alloy seeds of PtAg. The structure and composition of the above products have been confirmed with X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods. A kinetic investigation of the formation mechanism of these heterostructures is brought forward using Au-AgInS2 and Ag-CuInS2 as model examples.

  12. Antileishmanial activity of three saponins isolated from ivy, alpha-hederin, beta-hederin and hederacolchiside A1, as compared to their action on mammalian cells cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Delmas, F; Di Giorgio, C; Elias, R; Gasquet, M; Azas, N; Mshvildadze, V; Dekanosidze, G; Kemertelidze, E; Timon-David, P

    2000-05-01

    The in vitro antileishmanial activity of three saponins isolated from ivy, alpha-hederin, beta-hederin and hederacolchiside A1, was investigated on Leishmania infantum. The assessment of possible targets (membrane integrity, membrane potential, DNA synthesis and protein content) was performed in both Leishmania promastigotes and human monocytes (THP1 cells). Results observed in Leishmania showed that the saponins exhibited a strong antiproliferative activity on all stages of development of the parasite by altering membrane integrity and potential: hederacolchiside A1 appeared to be the most active compound against both promastigotes and amastigotes. Results observed in THP1 cells demonstrated that the saponins exerted also a potent antiproliferative activity against human monocytes, by producing a significant DNA synthesis inhibition. The ratio between antileishmanial activity on amastigotes and toxicity to human cells suggested that the saponins could be considered as possible antileishmanial drugs.

  13. Project PRISM: Project Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunnion, Maryellen; And Others

    The first of three volumes of Project PRISM, a program designed to help classroom teachers (grades 6 through 8) provide for the needs of their gifted and talented students without removing those students from the mainstream of education, outlines the project's background and achievements. Sections review the following project aspects (sample…

  14. Project Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents sixteen project notes developed by pupils of Chipping Norton School and Bristol Grammar School, in the United Kingdom. These Projects include eight biology A-level projects and eight Chemistry A-level projects. (HM)

  15. Revised generic placement of Brachypelma embrithes (Chamberlin & Ivie, 1936) and Brachypelma angustum Valerio, 1980, with definition of the taxonomic features for identification of female Sericopelma Ausserer, 1875 (Araneae, Theraphosidae)

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Ray; Longhorn, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The tarantula genus Sericopelma was originally defined based on male specimens, most notably lacking tibial spurs on leg I. Early female specimens were unrecognised as Sericopelma, and typically placed in Eurypelma – a dumping ground for problem specimens. The first females were only later recognised, but authors failed to adequately define female Sericopelma. Here, the holotypes of the southern-most alleged Brachypelma species, Brachypelma embrithes (Chamberlin & Ivie, 1936) and Brachypelma angustum Valerio, 1980 were examined, and finding both to possess defining characteristics of Sericopelma were transferred. The taxonomic attributes to define Sericopelma relative to Brachypelma and select other Neotropical genera are discussed, especially for females. As important diagnostic characters for Sericopelma, the single (unilobar) spermathecae swollen at the apex forming a P-shaped cross-section, metatarsus IV with trace scopula, femur IV with a dense retrolateral pad of plumose hair, plus other attributes. Some past confusion in these characters are clarified and Sericopelma relative to Brachypelma and Megaphobema mesomelas are discussed. Finally recommendations are given about these taxonomic changes for CITES regulations. PMID:26487826

  16. Projects Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  17. Project Wild (Project Tame).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenthaler, David

    For 37 states in the United States, Project Wild has become an officially sanctioned, distributed and funded "environemtnal and conservation education program." For those who are striving to implement focused, sequential, learning programs, as well as those who wish to promote harmony through a non-anthropocentric world view, Project…

  18. Project Wild (Project Tame).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenthaler, David

    For 37 states in the United States, Project Wild has become an officially sanctioned, distributed and funded "environemtnal and conservation education program." For those who are striving to implement focused, sequential, learning programs, as well as those who wish to promote harmony through a non-anthropocentric world view, Project…

  19. Shop Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Bob

    Vocational agriculture teachers in Oklahoma prepared the shop project drawings which comprise the document. Seventy-one projects, with lists of required materials, diagrams, and measurements, are included. Construction projects fall into six categories (number of projects in parentheses): Trailers (5), racks (3), livestock production projects…

  20. Science project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-23

    DRIFTER sensor devices were designed by the Applied Science and Technology Project Office as inexpensive tools that can be used for science projects in local schools. The devices transmit information about water temperature and conductivity for use by Gulf Coast researchers. The DRIFTER project began as an effort to help Gulf Coast oyster fishermen dealing with the effects of fresh water intrusion.

  1. Map projections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1993-01-01

    A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface. This cannot be done without some distortion. Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection. The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important features. Mapmakers and mathematicians have devised almost limitless ways to project the image of the globe onto paper. Scientists at the U. S. Geological Survey have designed projections for their specific needs—such as the Space Oblique Mercator, which allows mapping from satellites with little or no distortion. This document gives the key properties, characteristics, and preferred uses of many historically important projections and of those frequently used by mapmakers today.

  2. Project SEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Reports on Project SEED (Summer Educational Experience for the Disadvantaged) a project in which high school students from low-income families work in summer jobs in a variety of academic, industrial, and government research labs. The program introduces the students to career possibilities in chemistry and to the advantages of higher education.…

  3. Project FAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essexville-Hampton Public Schools, MI.

    Described are components of Project FAST (Functional Analysis Systems Training) a nationally validated project to provide more effective educational and support services to learning disordered children and their regular elementary classroom teachers. The program is seen to be based on a series of modules of delivery systems ranging from mainstream…

  4. Project HIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, Vera C.

    Project HIRE is a special program conducted by Middlesex Community College since October 1978 to help people 55 years of age and older find paid employment. The specific goals of the project, as it was originally conceived, were to: (1) open three intake centers; (2) register clients at the centers; (3) provide career counseling; (4) offer…

  5. Project Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meredith, Larry D.

    Project Success consists of after-school, weekend, and summer educational programs geared toward minority and disadvantaged students to increase their numbers seeking postsecondary education from the Meadville, Pennsylvania area. The project is funded primarily through the Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, whose administration is committed to…

  6. Project CHILD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Helen F.; And Others

    This document described Project CHILD, a program of educational change and curriculum development for disadvantaged prekindergarten and kindergarten children. The historical part of this report indicates that the project began in 1966 with a small-scale study of teacher behavior and children's responses in a few classrooms in a Harlem school…

  7. Project REM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Carol Hahn

    1983-01-01

    Project REM (Resources, Energy, Mankind) incorporates energy, ecology, and environmental topics into a sixth-grade science curriculum. Various activities of this year-long project are discussed, including those related to Mr. REM (a student-built "robot") and an all day exploration of energy held near the end of the school year. (JN)

  8. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-04-27

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper, Jr., one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-9 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Atlas launch vehicle, was the last flight of the Mercury Project. The Faith 7 spacecraft orbited the Earth 22 times in 1-1/2 days.

  9. Project Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meredith, Larry D.

    Project Success consists of after-school, weekend, and summer educational programs geared toward minority and disadvantaged students to increase their numbers seeking postsecondary education from the Meadville, Pennsylvania area. The project is funded primarily through the Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, whose administration is committed to…

  10. UNESCO Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goutard, Madeleine

    1990-01-01

    Details of a UNESCO project concerning the young child and the family environment are presented. The three major aspects of child development addressed by the project are nutrition for the child, children's handicaps, and interaction between the child and its family. (BG)

  11. Project EASIER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvord, David J.; Tack, Leland R.; Dallam, Jerald W.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of Project EASIER, a collaborative electronic-data interchange for networking Iowa local school districts, education agencies, community colleges, universities, and the Department of Education. The primary goal of this project is to develop and implement a system for collection of student information for state and federal…

  12. Projects Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Members of the Projects Board and associated committees of the American Society for Engineering Education are listed along with the by-laws of the board. Active projects described include a study of engineering technological education, faculty interchange with black engineering colleges, and the visiting engineer program. (TS)

  13. Watchdog Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rhett; Campbell, Jack; Hadley, Mark

    2016-12-30

    The Watchdog Project completed 100% of the project Statement of Project Objective (SOPO). The Watchdog project was a very aggressive project looking to accomplish commercialization of technology that had never been commercialized, as a result it took six years to complete not the original three that were planned. No additional federal funds were requested from the original proposal and SEL contributed the additional cost share required to complete the project. The result of the Watchdog Project is the world’s first industrial rated Software Defined Network (SDN) switch commercially available. This technology achieved the SOPOO and DOE Roadmap goals to have strong network access control, improve reliability and network performance, and give the asset owner the ability to minimize attack surface before and during an attack. The Watchdog project is an alliance between CenterPoint Energy Houston Electric, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL), and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. (SEL). SEL is the world’s leader in microprocessor-based electronic equipment for protecting electric power systems. PNNL performs basic and applied research to deliver energy, environmental, and national security for our nation. CenterPoint Energy is the third largest publicly traded natural gas delivery company in the U.S and third largest combined electricity and natural gas delivery company. The Watchdog Project efforts were combined with the SDN Project efforts to produce the entire SDN system solution for the critical infrastructure. The Watchdog project addresses Topic Area of Interest 5: Secure Communications, for the DEFOA- 0000359 by protecting the control system local area network itself and the communications coming from and going to the electronic devices on the local network. Local area networks usually are not routed and have little or no filtering capabilities. Combine this with the fact control system protocols are designed with inherent trust the control

  14. Outsmarting Poison Ivy and Other Poisonous Plants

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Pacific Coast. Fuzzy green leaves in clusters of three are lobed or deeply toothed with ... and parts of the Southeast. Each leaf has clusters of seven to 13 smooth-edged leaflets. Leaves ...

  15. Fighting Discrimination: Up Against the Ivied Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Jane K.

    1976-01-01

    The author describes the sex discrimination lawsuit she brought against Brown University, where she was employed as a psychiatric social worker. The legal, financial, and personal aspects of the action are discussed, as well as the general issue of sexism in the profession of social work. (Author)

  16. Poison in the Halls of Ivy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses a California case involving a tenured professor's controversial teaching style, which focused on "obscene" topics and assignments that allegedly humiliated female students. The professor eventually prevailed in a Ninth Circuit appeal. The lesson: when attempting to eradicate sexual harassment, we cannot abandon important First…

  17. The Agenda-Setting of Ivy Lee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olasky, Marvin N.

    Journalism historians in recent years have made good use of agenda-setting theory in research, but there has been one drawback: in concentrating on the political and economic views of publishers, editors, and reporters, the agendas of those working behind the scenes, the public relations men and women have been overlooked. The public relations…

  18. Measuring the Value of an Ivy Degree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Ben

    2000-01-01

    Study examining the earnings of students accepted by elite colleges but who chose to attend less-selective institutions finds that students do not enhance earnings by graduating from colleges with high average Scholastic Assessment Test scores, suggesting that admissions decisions fail to account for intangibles such as students' ambition,…

  19. Ivy-Covered Malls and Creeping Commercialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Alex

    2005-01-01

    The Simon Property Group, United States' largest mall developer, since 1998 has partnered with local public school systems to open 19 alternative public schools in malls in 11 states through its nonprofit Simon Youth Foundation. Lafayette Square's school, with a 200-student capacity is the newest and largest, which according to a watchdog group,…

  20. Operation IVY. Joint Task Force 132, 1952

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    reef corfiguration but information necessary for possible model studies of the atoll az an aid iJ interpretatiz• o srot-tfe -.eas-zec~ents. b. ’ Method...PAGE COUNT I FROM TO 5301W 9 141 𔄀 SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION This report has had sensitive military Information removed in order to Brovide an...Classified material has been removed in order to make the information available on an unclassified, open publication basis, to any interested parties. The

  1. Project LEAF

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project LEAF has a goal of educating farmworkers about how to reduce pesticide exposure to their families from pesticide residues they may be inadvertently taking home on their clothing, etc. Find outreach materials.

  2. Geodynamics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Charles L.

    1977-01-01

    Describes activities of Geodynamics Project of the Federal Council on Science and Technology, such as the application of multichannel seismic-reflection techniques to study the nature of the deep crust and upper mantle. (MLH)

  3. Geodynamics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Charles L.

    1977-01-01

    Describes activities of Geodynamics Project of the Federal Council on Science and Technology, such as the application of multichannel seismic-reflection techniques to study the nature of the deep crust and upper mantle. (MLH)

  4. Project Reptile!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diffily, Deborah

    2001-01-01

    Integrating curriculum is important in helping children make connections within and among areas. Presents a class project for kindergarten children which came out of the students' interests and desire to build a reptile exhibit. (ASK)

  5. Science project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-23

    Once tethered in place in Gulf Coast waters, a DRIFTER sensor device is able to transmit valuable information about water temperature and conductivity. The Applied Science and Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center designed the DRIFTER as an inexpensive device that can be used for science projects in local schools. Two of the devices, deployed in coastal waters, survived Hurricane Isaac, continuing to transmit valuable data regarding the storm.

  6. Swedish Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    development, evaluate training regimes and design of new systems with complex man- machine interface problems. The project uses advanced statistical...physiological measures to provide input to adaptive man- machine interfaces . The goal of the projects is to further develop measurement methods with...dinteraction Homme -Système Intuitive)., The original document contains color images. 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  7. Maximum Capital Project Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Matt

    2002-01-01

    Describes the stages of capital project planning and development: (1) individual capital project submission; (2) capital project proposal assessment; (3) executive committee; and (4) capital project execution. (EV)

  8. Maximum Capital Project Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Matt

    2002-01-01

    Describes the stages of capital project planning and development: (1) individual capital project submission; (2) capital project proposal assessment; (3) executive committee; and (4) capital project execution. (EV)

  9. Projection displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, George L.; Yang, Kei H.

    1998-08-01

    Projection display in today's market is dominated by cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Further progress in this mature CRT projector technology will be slow and evolutionary. Liquid crystal based projection displays have gained rapid acceptance in the business market. New technologies are being developed on several fronts: (1) active matrix built from polysilicon or single crystal silicon; (2) electro- optic materials using ferroelectric liquid crystal, polymer dispersed liquid crystals or other liquid crystal modes, (3) micromechanical-based transducers such as digital micromirror devices, and grating light valves, (4) high resolution displays to SXGA and beyond, and (5) high brightness. This article reviews the projection displays from a transducer technology perspective along with a discussion of markets and trends.

  10. Project Artemis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Shawn; Kato, Denise; Kennedy, Fred; Akin, David

    1990-01-01

    The goals of Project Artemis are designed to meet the challege of President Bush to return to the Moon, this time to stay. The first goal of the project is to establish a permanent manned base on the Moon for the purposes of scientific research and technological development. The knowledge gained from the establishment and operations of the lunar base will then be used to achieve the second goal of Project Artemis, the establishment of a manned base on the Martian surface. Throughout both phases of the program, crew safety will be the number one priority. There are four main issues that have governed the entire program: crew safety and mission success, commonality, growth potential, and costing and scheduling. These issues are discussed in more detail.

  11. Cloudnet Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hogan, Robin

    2008-01-15

    Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

  12. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Langley personnel at Cape Canaveral during preliminary checkout of Project FIRE velocity package before launch. Project FIRE (Flight Investigation Reentry Environment) studied the effects of reentry heating on spacecraft materials. It involved both wind tunnel and flight tests, although the majority were tests with Atlas rockets and recoverable reentry packages. These flight tests took place at Cape Canaveral in Florida. Wind tunnel tests were made in several Langley tunnels including the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, the 8-foot High-Temperature Tunnel and the 9- x 6-Foot Thermal Structures Tunnel.

  13. LLAMA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, E. M.; Abraham, Z.; Giménez de Castro, G.; de Gouveia dal Pino, E. M.; Larrarte, J. J.; Lepine, J.; Morras, R.; Viramonte, J.

    2014-10-01

    The project LLAMA, acronym of Long Latin American Millimetre Array is very briefly described in this paper. This project is a joint scientific and technological undertaking of Argentina and Brazil on the basis of an equal investment share, whose mail goal is both to install and to operate an observing facility capable of exploring the Universe at millimetre and sub/millimetre wavelengths. This facility will be erected in the argentinean province of Salta, in a site located at 4830m above sea level.

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-10-25

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  15. Project Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Listed are 32 biology A-level projects, categorized by organisms studied as follows: algae (1), bryophytes (1), angiosperms (14), fungi (1), flatworms (1), annelids (2), molluscs (1), crustaceans (2), insects (4), fish (2), mammals (1), humans (1); and one synecological study. (CS)

  16. Limnological Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambler, David J.; Dixon, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    Describes collection of quantitative samples of microorganisms and accumulation of physical data from a pond over a year. Provides examples of how final-year degree students have used materials and data for ecological projects (involving mainly algae), including their results/conclusions. Also describes apparatus and reagents used in the student…

  17. Project Reconstruct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helisek, Harriet; Pratt, Donald

    1994-01-01

    Presents a project in which students monitor their use of trash, input and analyze information via a database and computerized graphs, and "reconstruct" extinct or endangered animals from recyclable materials. The activity was done with second-grade students over a period of three to four weeks. (PR)

  18. Project Narrative

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Mary C.

    2012-07-12

    The Project Narrative describes how the funds from the DOE grant were used to purchase equipment for the biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics departments. The Narrative also describes how the equipment is being used. There is also a list of the positive outcomes as a result of having the equipment that was purchased with the DOE grant.

  19. Project Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Listed and described are student A-level biology projects in the following areas: Angiosperm studies (e.g., factors affecting growth of various plants), 7; Bacterial studies, 1; Insect studies, 2; Fish studies, 1; Mammal studies, 1; Human studies, 1; Synecology studies, 2; Environmental studies, 2; and Enzyme studies, 1. (CS)

  20. Project Reconstruct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helisek, Harriet; Pratt, Donald

    1994-01-01

    Presents a project in which students monitor their use of trash, input and analyze information via a database and computerized graphs, and "reconstruct" extinct or endangered animals from recyclable materials. The activity was done with second-grade students over a period of three to four weeks. (PR)

  1. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  2. Project Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    Project Choice was begun with the goal of increasing the number of inner-city students who graduate on time. Ewing M. Kauffman and his business and foundation associates designed and elected to test a model that used the promise of postsecondary education or training as the incentive to stay in school. This report details the evolution of Project…

  3. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-09-01

    An Atlas launch vehicle carrying the Big Joe capsule leaves its launching pad on a 2,000-mile ballistic flight to the altitude of 100 miles. The Big Joe capsule is a boilerplate model of the marned orbital capsule under NASA's Project Mercury. The capsule was recovered and studied for the effect of re-entry heat and other flight stresses.

  4. Thanksgiving Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilden, Pauline

    1976-01-01

    A teacher describes a Thanksgiving project in which 40 educable mentally retarded students (6-13 years old) made and served their own dinner of stew, butter, bread, ice cream, and pie, and in the process learned about social studies, cooking, and proper meal behavior. (CL)

  5. Limnological Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambler, David J.; Dixon, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    Describes collection of quantitative samples of microorganisms and accumulation of physical data from a pond over a year. Provides examples of how final-year degree students have used materials and data for ecological projects (involving mainly algae), including their results/conclusions. Also describes apparatus and reagents used in the student…

  6. Project Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Listed are 32 biology A-level projects, categorized by organisms studied as follows: algae (1), bryophytes (1), angiosperms (14), fungi (1), flatworms (1), annelids (2), molluscs (1), crustaceans (2), insects (4), fish (2), mammals (1), humans (1); and one synecological study. (CS)

  7. Hydrosphere Project.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This final report summarizes the seven foot Hydrosphere Project. During the course of this program, three Interim Reports were submitted. Interim...to the final assembly of the seven foot Hydrosphere . This final report includes a brief outline of each of the above noted Interim Reports, as well as

  8. Project Boomerang

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Allen L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experimental project on boomerangs designed for an undergraduate course in classical mechanics. The students designed and made their own boomerangs, devised their own procedures, and carried out suitable measurements. Presents some of their data and a simple analysis for the two-bladed boomerang. (Author/MLH)

  9. Project Schoolflight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Ben

    1975-01-01

    Describes "Project School Flight" which is an idea originated by the Experimental Aircraft Association to provide the opportunity for young people to construct a light aircraft in the schools as part of a normal class. Address included of Experimental Aircraft Association for interested persons. (BR)

  10. Thanksgiving Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilden, Pauline

    1976-01-01

    A teacher describes a Thanksgiving project in which 40 educable mentally retarded students (6-13 years old) made and served their own dinner of stew, butter, bread, ice cream, and pie, and in the process learned about social studies, cooking, and proper meal behavior. (CL)

  11. Project CLASS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Susan L.; And Others

    Project CLASS (Competency-Based Live-Ability Skills) uses a series of 60 modules to teach life survival skills to adults with low-level reading ability--especially Adult Basic Education/English as a Second Language students. Two versions of the modules have been developed: one for use with teacher-directed instruction and another for independent…

  12. Project Succeed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, John

    Project Succeed is a program for helping failure- and dropout-oriented pupils to improve their school achievement. Attendance and assignment completion are the key behaviors for enhancing achievement. Behavior modification and communications procedures are used to bring about the desired changes. Treatment procedures include current assessment…

  13. Project ENRICH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwaley, Elizabeth; And Others

    Project ENRICH was conceived in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, to: (1) identify preschool children with learning disabilities, and (2) to develop a program geared to the remediation of the learning disabilities within a school year, while allowing the child to be enrolled in a regular class situation for the following school year. Through…

  14. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-04-27

    The group portrait of the original seven astronauts for the Mercury Project. NASA selected its first seven astronauts on April 27, 1959. Left to right at front: Walter M. Wally Schirra, Donald K. Deke Slayton, John H. Glenn, Jr., and Scott Carpenter. Left to right at rear: Alan B. Shepard, Virgil I. Gus Grissom, and L. Gordon Cooper, Jr.

  15. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-16

    The recovery operation of the Faith 7 spacecraft after the completion of the 1-1/2 day orbital flight (MA-9 mission) with Astronaut Gordon Cooper. Navy frogmen attach the flotation collar to the spacecraft. The MA-9 mission was the last flight of the Mercury Project and launched on May 15, 1963 boosted by The Mercury-Atlas launch vehicle.

  16. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-09-09

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The Freedom 7 spacecraft boosted by Mercury-Redstone vehicle for the MR-3 mission made the first marned suborbital flight and Astronaut Shepard became the first American in space.

  17. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-16

    Astronaut Gordon Cooper leaves the Faith 7 (MA-9) spacecraft after a successful recovery operation. The MA-9 mission, the last flight of the Mercury Project, was launched on May 15, 1963, orbited the Earth 22 times, and lasted for 1-1/2 days.

  18. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-15

    Astronaut Gordon Cooper leaves the Faith 7 (MA-9) spacecraft after a successful recovery operation. The MA-9 mission, the last flight of the Mercury Project, was launched on May 15, 1963, orbited the Earth 22 times, and lasted for 1-1/2 days.

  19. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-04-27

    Astronaut Walter M. "Wally" Schirra, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-8 (Mercury-Atlas) mission with Sigma 7 spacecraft was the third marned orbital flight by the United States, and made the six orbits in 9-1/4 hours.

  20. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-04-27

    Astronaut Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MR-4 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Redstone vehicle, made the second marned suborbital flight. The capsule, Liberty Bell 7, sank into the sea after the splashdown.

  1. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-04-27

    Astronaut John H. Glenn, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-6 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, was the first manned orbital launch by the United States, and carried Astronaut Glenn aboard the Friendship 7 spacecraft to orbit the Earth.

  2. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The original seven astronauts for the Mercury Project pose in front of an Air Force Jet. From left to right: Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper, John H. Glenn, Virgil I. Gus Grissom, Walter M. Wally Schirra, Alan B. Shepard, and Donald K. Deke Slayton.

  3. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  4. Project Documerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 1972

    1972-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has started a project to actually picture the environmental movement in the United States. This is an attempt to make the public aware of the air pollution in their area or state and to acquaint them with the effects of air cleaning efforts. (PS)

  5. Project Paiute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearmin, Evalyn Titus

    1977-01-01

    Working with the Humboldt County School District, the Fort McDermitt Indian Education Committee, and four Paiute Teacher aides, the University of Nevada developed a three-component project: a bilingual/bicultural reading text for K-4 Paiutes; an in-service training program in Native American education; and a pilot bilingual curriculum. (JC)

  6. Projection methods

    Treesearch

    Michael E. Goerndt; W. Keith Moser; Patrick D. Miles; Dave Wear; Ryan D. DeSantis; Robert J. Huggett; Stephen R. Shifley; Francisco X. Aguilar; Kenneth E. Skog

    2016-01-01

    One purpose of the Northern Forest Futures Project is to predict change in future forest attributes across the 20 States in the U.S. North for the period that extends from 2010 to 2060. The forest attributes of primary interest are the 54 indicators of forest sustainability identified in the Montreal Process Criteria and Indicators (Montreal Process Working Group, n.d...

  7. Passport Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthey, Glen; Bourgoin, Stella, Ed.

    This project introduces second-grade students to international studies by having them create a passport. Once the students have their passports, the teacher can then present lessons to small groups, discussing one foreign country per session. The teacher should begin with a traditional lecture giving pertinent facts about a country followed by…

  8. Project Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Listed and described are student A-level biology projects in the following areas: Angiosperm studies (e.g., factors affecting growth of various plants), 7; Bacterial studies, 1; Insect studies, 2; Fish studies, 1; Mammal studies, 1; Human studies, 1; Synecology studies, 2; Environmental studies, 2; and Enzyme studies, 1. (CS)

  9. SDN Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rhett

    2016-12-23

    The SDN Project completed on time and on budget and successfully accomplished 100% of the scope of work outlined in the original Statement of Project Objective (SOPO). The SDN Project formed an alliance between Ameren Corporation, University of Illinois Urbana- Champaign (UIUC), Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL), and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. (SEL). The objective of the SDN Project is to address Topic Area of Interest 2: Sustain critical energy delivery functions while responding to a cyber-intrusion under Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0000797. The goal of the project is to design and commercially release technology that provides a method to sustain critical energy delivery functions during a cyber intrusion and to do this control system operators need the ability to quickly identify and isolate the affected network areas, and re-route critical information and control flows around. The objective of the SDN Project is to develop a Flow Controller that monitors, configures, and maintains the safe, reliable network traffic flows of all the local area networks (LANs) on a control system in the Energy sector. The SDN team identified the core attributes of a control system and produced an SDN flow controller that has the same core attributes enabling networks to be designed, configured and deployed that maximize the whitelisted, deny-bydefault and purpose built networks. This project researched, developed and commercially released technology that: Enables all field networks be to configured and monitored as if they are a single asset to be protected; Enables greatly improved and even precalculated response actions to reliability and cyber events; Supports pre-configured localized response actions tailored to provide resilience against failures and centralized response to cyber-attacks that improve network reliability and availability; Architecturally enables the right subject matter experts, who are usually the information

  10. Cognitive Education Project. Summary Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Robert; And Others

    The Cognitive Education Project conducted a 3-year longitudinal evaluation of two cognitive education programs that were aimed at teaching thinking skills. The critical difference between the two experimental programs was that one, Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment (IE) method, was taught out of curricular content, while the other, the…

  11. Project Prometheus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Project Prometheus will enable a new paradigm in the scientific exploration of the Solar System. The proposed JIMO mission will start a new generation of missions characterized by more maneuverability, flexibility, power and lifetime. Project Prometheus organization is established at NASA Headquarters: 1.Organization established to carry out development of JIMO, nuclear power (radioisotope), and nuclear propulsion research. 2.Completed broad technology and national capacity assessments to inform decision making on planning and technology development. 3.Awarded five NRA s for nuclear propulsion research. 4.Radioisotope power systems in development, and Plutonium-238 being purchased from Russia. 5.Formulated science driven near-term and long-term plan for the safe utilization of nuclear propulsion based missions. 6.Completed preliminary studies (Pre-Phase A) of JIMO and other missions. 7.Initiated JIMO Phase A studies by Contractors and NASA.

  12. Hydropower Projects

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-02

    The Water Power Program helps industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Through support for public, private, and nonprofit efforts, the Water Power Program promotes the development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced hydropower devices and pumped storage hydropower applications. These technologies help capture energy stored by diversionary structures, increase the efficiency of hydroelectric generation, and use excess grid energy to replenish storage reserves for use during periods of peak electricity demand. In addition, the Water Power Program works to assess the potential extractable energy from domestic water resources to assist industry and government in planning for our nation’s energy future. From FY 2008 to FY 2014, DOE’s Water Power Program announced awards totaling approximately $62.5 million to 33 projects focused on hydropower. Table 1 provides a brief description of these projects.

  13. Project summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Lunar base projects, including a reconfigurable lunar cargo launcher, a thermal and micrometeorite protection system, a versatile lifting machine with robotic capabilities, a cargo transport system, the design of a road construction system for a lunar base, and the design of a device for removing lunar dust from material surfaces, are discussed. The emphasis on the Gulf of Mexico project was on the development of a computer simulation model for predicting vessel station keeping requirements. An existing code, used in predicting station keeping requirements for oil drilling platforms operating in North Shore (Alaska) waters was used as a basis for the computer simulation. Modifications were made to the existing code. The input into the model consists of satellite altimeter readings and water velocity readings from buoys stationed in the Gulf of Mexico. The satellite data consists of altimeter readings (wave height) taken during the spring of 1989. The simulation model predicts water velocity and direction, and wind velocity.

  14. SIMBIOS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; McClain, Charles R.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide current documentation of the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project activities, NASA Research Announcement (NRAI) research status, satellite data processing, data product validation, and field calibration. This documentation is necessary to ensure that critical information is related to the scientific community and NASA management. This critical information includes the technical difficulties and challenges of validating and combining ocean color data from an array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. This technical report is not meant as a substitute for scientific literature. Instead, it will provide a ready and responsive vehicle for the multitude of technical reports issued by an operational project.

  15. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, poses with the original Mercury astronauts in ABMA's Fabrication Laboratory during a 1959 visit. Inspecting Mercury-Redstone hardware are from left to right, Alan Shepard, Donald Deke Slayton, Virgil Gus Grissom, von Braun, Gordon Cooper, Wally Schirra, John Glenn, and Scott Carpenter. Project Mercury officially began October 7, 1958 as the United States' first manned space program.

  16. Project MEDSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    During the winter term of 1991, two design courses at the University of Michigan worked on a joint project, MEDSAT. The two design teams consisted of the Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Spacite System Design and Aerospace Engineering 483 (Aero 483) Aerospace System Design. In collaboration, they worked to produce MEDSAT, a satellite and scientific payload whose purpose was to monitor environmental conditions over Chiapas, Mexico. Information gained from the sensing, combined with regional data, would be used to determine the potential for malaria occurrence in that area. The responsibilities of AOSS 605 consisted of determining the remote sensing techniques, the data processing, and the method to translate the information into a usable output. Aero 483 developed the satellite configuration and the subsystems required for the satellite to accomplish its task. The MEDSAT project is an outgrowth of work already being accomplished by NASA's Biospheric and Disease Monitoring Program and Ames Research Center. NASA's work has been to develop remote sensing techniques to determine the abundance of disease carriers and now this project will place the techniques aboard a satellite. MEDSAT will be unique in its use of both a Synthetic Aperture Radar and visual/IR sensor to obtain comprehensive monitoring of the site. In order to create a highly feasible system, low cost was a high priority. To obtain this goal, a light satellite configuration launched by the Pegasus launch vehicle was used.

  17. Project MEDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    During the winter term of 1991, two design courses at the University of Michigan worked on a joint project, MEDSAT. The two design teams consisted of the Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Spacite System Design and Aerospace Engineering 483 (Aero 483) Aerospace System Design. In collaboration, they worked to produce MEDSAT, a satellite and scientific payload whose purpose was to monitor environmental conditions over Chiapas, Mexico. Information gained from the sensing, combined with regional data, would be used to determine the potential for malaria occurrence in that area. The responsibilities of AOSS 605 consisted of determining the remote sensing techniques, the data processing, and the method to translate the information into a usable output. Aero 483 developed the satellite configuration and the subsystems required for the satellite to accomplish its task. The MEDSAT project is an outgrowth of work already being accomplished by NASA's Biospheric and Disease Monitoring Program and Ames Research Center. NASA's work has been to develop remote sensing techniques to determine the abundance of disease carriers and now this project will place the techniques aboard a satellite. MEDSAT will be unique in its use of both a Synthetic Aperture Radar and visual/IR sensor to obtain comprehensive monitoring of the site. In order to create a highly feasible system, low cost was a high priority. To obtain this goal, a light satellite configuration launched by the Pegasus launch vehicle was used.

  18. Project Exodus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Project Exodus is an in-depth study to identify and address the basic problems of a manned mission to Mars. The most important problems concern propulsion, life support, structure, trajectory, and finance. Exodus will employ a passenger ship, cargo ship, and landing craft for the journey to Mars. These three major components of the mission design are discussed separately. Within each component the design characteristics of structures, trajectory, and propulsion are addressed. The design characteristics of life support are mentioned only in those sections requiring it.

  19. Project Exodus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Rodney (Compiler); Dillon, Jennifer (Compiler); Grewe, George (Compiler); Mcmorrow, Jim (Compiler); Melton, Craig (Compiler); Rainey, Gerald (Compiler); Rinko, John (Compiler); Singh, David (Compiler); Yen, Tzu-Liang (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    A design for a manned Mars mission, PROJECT EXODUS is presented. PROJECT EXODUS incorporates the design of a hypersonic waverider, cargo ship and NIMF (nuclear rocket using indigenous Martian fuel) shuttle lander to safely carry out a three to five month mission on the surface of Mars. The cargo ship transports return fuel, return engine, surface life support, NIMF shuttle, and the Mars base to low Mars orbit (LMO). The cargo ship is powered by a nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) system which allows the cargo ship to execute a spiral trajectory to Mars. The waverider transports ten astronauts to Mars and back. It is launched from the Space Station with propulsion provided by a chemical engine and a delta velocity of 9 km/sec. The waverider performs an aero-gravity assist maneuver through the atmosphere of Venus to obtain a deflection angle and increase in delta velocity. Once the waverider and cargo ship have docked the astronauts will detach the landing cargo capsules and nuclear electric power plant and remotely pilot them to the surface. They will then descend to the surface aboard the NIMF shuttle. A dome base will be quickly constructed on the surface and the astronauts will conduct an exploratory mission for three to five months. They will return to Earth and dock with the Space Station using the waverider.

  20. Project Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, K. K.; Henderson, A.; Lee, J.; Smith, G.; Stluka, E.

    1984-01-01

    PROJECT EXPLORER is a program that will fly student-developed experiments onboard the Space Shuttle in NASA's Get-Away Special (GAS) containers. The program is co-sponsored by the Alabama Space and Rocket Center, the Alabama-Mississippi Section of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Alabama A&M University and requires extensive support by the University of Alabama in Huntsville. A unique feature of this project will demonstrate transmissions to ground stations on amateur radio frequencies in English language. Experiments Nos. 1, 2, and 3 use the microgravity of space flight to study the solidification of lead-antimony and aluminum-copper alloys, the growth of potassium-tetracyanoplatinate hydrate crystals in an aqueous solution, and the germination of radish seeds. Flight results will be compared with Earth-based data. Experiment No. 4 features radio transmission and will also provide timing for the start of all other experiments. A microprocessor will obtain real-time data from all experiments as well as temperature and pressure measurements taken inside the canister. These data will be transmitted on previously announced amateur radio frequencies after they have been converted into the English language by a digitalker for general reception.

  1. Project Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, K. K.; Henderson, A.; Lee, J.; Smith, G.; Stluka, E.

    1984-01-01

    PROJECT EXPLORER is a program that will fly student-developed experiments onboard the Space Shuttle in NASA's Get-Away Special (GAS) containers. The program is co-sponsored by the Alabama Space and Rocket Center, the Alabama-Mississippi Section of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Alabama A&M University and requires extensive support by the University of Alabama in Huntsville. A unique feature of this project will demonstrate transmissions to ground stations on amateur radio frequencies in English language. Experiments Nos. 1, 2, and 3 use the microgravity of space flight to study the solidification of lead-antimony and aluminum-copper alloys, the growth of potassium-tetracyanoplatinate hydrate crystals in an aqueous solution, and the germination of radish seeds. Flight results will be compared with Earth-based data. Experiment No. 4 features radio transmission and will also provide timing for the start of all other experiments. A microprocessor will obtain real-time data from all experiments as well as temperature and pressure measurements taken inside the canister. These data will be transmitted on previously announced amateur radio frequencies after they have been converted into the English language by a digitalker for general reception.

  2. SIMBIOS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide current documentation of the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project activities, NASA Research Announcement (NRA) research status, satellite data processing, data product validation, and field calibration. This documentation is necessary to ensure that critical information is related to the scientific community and NASA management. This critical information includes the technical difficulties and challenges of validating and combining ocean color data from an array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. This technical report is not meant as a substitute for scientific literature. Instead, it will provide a ready and responsive vehicle for the multitude of technical reports issued by an operational project. The SIMBIOS Science Team Principal Investigators' (PIs) original contributions to this report are in chapters four and above. The purpose of these contributions is to describe the current research status of the SIMBIOS-NRA-96 funded research. The contributions are published as submitted, with the exception of minor edits to correct obvious grammatical or clerical errors.

  3. PORTNUS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Loyal, Rebecca E.

    2015-07-14

    The objective of the Portunus Project is to create large, automated offshore ports that will the pace and scale of international trade. Additionally, these ports would increase the number of U.S. domestic trade vessels needed, as the imported goods would need to be transported from these offshore platforms to land-based ports such as Boston, Los Angeles, and Newark. Currently, domestic trade in the United States can only be conducted by vessels that abide by the Merchant Marine Act of 1920 – also referred to as the Jones Act. The Jones Act stipulates that vessels involved in domestic trade must be U.S. owned, U.S. built, and manned by a crew made up of U.S. citizens. The Portunus Project would increase the number of Jones Act vessels needed, which raises an interesting economic concern. Are Jones Act ships more expensive to operate than foreign vessels? Would it be more economically efficient to modify the Jones Act and allow vessels manned by foreign crews to engage in U.S. domestic trade? While opposition to altering the Jones Act is strong, it is important to consider the possibility that ship-owners who employ foreign crews will lobby for the chance to enter a growing domestic trade market. Their success would mean potential job loss for thousands of Americans currently employed in maritime trade.

  4. SISCAL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santer, Richard P.; Fell, Frank

    2003-05-01

    The first "ocean colour" sensor, Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS), was launched in 1978. Oceanographers learnt a lot from CZCS but it remained a purely scientific sensor. In recent years, a new generation of satellite-borne earth observation (EO) instruments has been brought into space. These instruments combine high spectral and spatial resolution with revisiting rates of the order of one per day. More instruments with further increased spatial, spectral and temporal resolution will be available within the next years. In the meantime, evaluation procedures taking advantage of the capabilities of the new instruments were derived, allowing the retrieval of ecologically important parameters with higher accuracy than before. Space agencies are now able to collect and to process satellite data in real time and to disseminate them via the Internet. It is therefore meanwhile possible to envisage using EO operationally. In principle, a significant demand for EO data products on terrestrial or marine ecosystems exists both with public authorities (environmental protection, emergency management, natural resources management, national parks, regional planning, etc) and private companies (tourist industry, insurance companies, water suppliers, etc). However, for a number of reasons, many data products that can be derived from the new instruments and methods have not yet left the scientific community towards public or private end users. It is the intention of the proposed SISCAL (Satellite-based Information System on Coastal Areas and Lakes) project to contribute to the closure of the existing gap between space agencies and research institutions on one side and end users on the other side. To do so, we intend to create a data processor that automatically derives and subsequently delivers over the Internet, in Near-Real-Time (NRT), a number of data products tailored to individual end user needs. The data products will be generated using a Geographical Information System (GIS

  5. Past Project Expo Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides information for Project Expo sites that were featured at the LMOP Conferences in 2013 and 2014. Project Expo sites were featured as being interested in identifying project partners for the development of an LFG energy project.

  6. Project Grandmaster

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-16

    The purpose of the Project Grandmaster Application is to allow individuals to opt-in and give the application access to data sources about their activities on social media sites. The application will cross-reference these data sources to build up a picture of each individual activities they discuss, either at present or in the past, and place this picture in reference to groups of all participants. The goal is to allow an individual to place themselves in the collective and to understand how their behavior patterns fit with the group and potentially find changes to make, such as activities they weren’t already aware of or different groups of interest they might want to follow.

  7. VIPER project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershaw, John

    1990-01-01

    The VIPER project has so far produced a formal specification of a 32 bit RISC microprocessor, an implementation of that chip in radiation-hard SOS technology, a partial proof of correctness of the implementation which is still being extended, and a large body of supporting software. The time has now come to consider what has been achieved and what directions should be pursued in the future. The most obvious lesson from the VIPER project was the time and effort needed to use formal methods properly. Most of the problems arose in the interfaces between different formalisms, e.g., between the (informal) English description and the HOL spec, between the block-level spec in HOL and the equivalent in ELLA needed by the low-level CAD tools. These interfaces need to be made rigorous or (better) eliminated. VIPER 1A (the latest chip) is designed to operate in pairs, to give protection against breakdowns in service as well as design faults. We have come to regard redundancy and formal design methods as complementary, the one to guard against normal component failures and the other to provide insurance against the risk of the common-cause failures which bedevil reliability predictions. Any future VIPER chips will certainly need improved performance to keep up with increasingly demanding applications. We have a prototype design (not yet specified formally) which includes 32 and 64 bit multiply, instruction pre-fetch, more efficient interface timing, and a new instruction to allow a quick response to peripheral requests. Work is under way to specify this device in MIRANDA, and then to refine the spec into a block-level design by top-down transformations. When the refinement is complete, a relatively simple proof checker should be able to demonstrate its correctness. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  8. Project Success in Agile Development Software Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farlik, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Project success has multiple definitions in the scholarly literature. Research has shown that some scholars and practitioners define project success as the completion of a project within schedule and within budget. Others consider a successful project as one in which the customer is satisfied with the product. This quantitative study was conducted…

  9. Ace Project as a Project Management Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Melinda; Guynes, Carl S.; Simard, Karine

    2010-01-01

    The primary challenge of project management is to achieve the project goals and objectives while adhering to project constraints--usually scope, quality, time and budget. The secondary challenge is to optimize the allocation and integration of resources necessary to meet pre-defined objectives. Project management software provides an active…

  10. Project Success in Agile Development Software Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farlik, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Project success has multiple definitions in the scholarly literature. Research has shown that some scholars and practitioners define project success as the completion of a project within schedule and within budget. Others consider a successful project as one in which the customer is satisfied with the product. This quantitative study was conducted…

  11. Project Information Packages Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RMC Research Corp., Mountain View, CA.

    Presented are an overview booklet, a project selection guide, and six Project Information Packages (PIPs) for six exemplary projects serving underachieving students in grades k through 9. The overview booklet outlines the PIP projects and includes a chart of major project features. A project selection guide reviews the PIP history, PIP contents,…

  12. Project LASER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA formally launched Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering and Research) in March 1990, a program designed to help teachers improve science and mathematics education and to provide 'hands on' experiences. It featured the first LASER Mobile Teacher Resource Center (MTRC), is designed to reach educators all over the nation. NASA hopes to operate several MTRCs with funds provided by private industry. The mobile unit is a 22-ton tractor-trailer stocked with NASA educational publications and outfitted with six work stations. Each work station, which can accommodate two teachers at a time, has a computer providing access to NASA Spacelink. Each also has video recorders and photocopy/photographic equipment for the teacher's use. MTRC is only one of the five major elements within LASER. The others are: a Space Technology Course, to promote integration of space science studies with traditional courses; the Volunteer Databank, in which NASA employees are encouraged to volunteer as tutors, instructors, etc; Mobile Discovery Laboratories that will carry simple laboratory equipment and computers to provide hands-on activities for students and demonstrations of classroom activities for teachers; and the Public Library Science Program which will present library based science and math programs.

  13. RESOLVE Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ray; Coan, Mary; Cryderman, Kate; Captain, Janine

    2013-01-01

    The RESOLVE project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph - mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize component and integrated system performance. Testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments was done. Test procedures were developed to guide experimental tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, knowledge and experience was gained with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer, WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. This testing will provide hands-on exposure to a flight forward spaceflight subsystem, the processes associated with testing equipment in a vacuum chamber, and experience working in a laboratory setting. Examples of specific analysis conducted include: pneumatic analysis to calculate the WDD's efficiency at extracting water vapor from the gas stream to form condensation; thermal analysis of the conduction and radiation along a line connecting two thermal masses; and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) heater control analysis. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, the near-infrared spectrometer and GC-MS instruments will be tested during the ETU testing phase.

  14. Project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    California Polytechnic State University's design project for the 1990-91 school year was the design of a close air support aircraft. There were eight design groups that participated and were given requests for proposals. These proposals contained mission specifications, particular performance and payload requirements, as well as the main design drivers. The mission specifications called for a single pilot weighing 225 lb with equipment. The design mission profile consisted of the following: (1) warm-up, taxi, take off, and accelerate to cruise speed; (2) dash at sea level at 500 knots to a point 250 nmi from take off; (3) combat phase, requiring two combat passes at 450 knots that each consist of a 360 deg turn and an energy increase of 4000 ft. - at each pass, half of air-to-surface ordnance is released; (4) dash at sea level at 500 knots 250 nmi back to base; and (5) land with 20 min of reserve fuel. The request for proposal also specified the following performance requirements with 50 percent internal fuel and standard stores: (1) the aircraft must be able to accelerate from Mach 0.3 to 0.5 at sea level in less than 20 sec; (2) required turn rates are 4.5 sustained g at 450 knots at sea level; (3) the aircraft must have a reattack time of 25 sec or less (reattack time was defined as the time between the first and second weapon drops); (4) the aircraft is allowed a maximum take off and landing ground roll of 2000 ft. The payload requirements were 20 Mk 82 general-purpose free-fall bombs and racks; 1 GAU-8A 30-mm cannon with 1350 rounds; and 2 AIM-9L Sidewinder missiles and racks. The main design drivers expressed in the request for proposal were that the aircraft should be survivable and maintainable. It must be able to operate in remote areas with little or no maintenance. Simplicity was considered the most important factor in achieving the former goal. In addition, the aircraft must be low cost both in acquisition and operation. The summaries of the aircraft

  15. RESOLVE Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ray O.

    2012-01-01

    The RESOLVE project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph- mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize C!Jmponent and integrated system performance. Ray will be assisting with component testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments. He will be developing procedures to guide these tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, he will gain experience with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer, WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. This testing will provide hands-on exposure to a flight forward spaceflight subsystem, the processes associated with testing equipment in a vacuum chamber, and experience working in a laboratory setting. Examples of specific analysis Ray will conduct include: pneumatic analysis to calculate the WOO's efficiency at extracting water vapor from the gas stream to form condensation; thermal analysis of the conduction and radiation along a line connecting two thermal masses; and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) heater control analysis. In this Research and Technology environment, Ray will be asked to problem solve real-time as issues arise. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, Ray will be utilizing his chemical engineering background to

  16. The Clinical Schools Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Francisco State Univ., CA. Dept. of Elementary Education.

    This description of the Clinical Schools Project (a partnership which includes San Francisco State University, San Francisco Unified School District, and United Educators of San Francisco, California) contains a project description, three papers, and a proposal for establishing the project. The project description outlines the project, defines a…

  17. Managing Projects for Change: Contextualised Project Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynan, Belinda; Adlington, Rachael; Stewart, Cherry; Vale, Deborah; Sims, Rod; Shanahan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper will detail three projects which focussed on enhancing online learning at a large Australian distance education University within a School of Business, School of Health and School of Education. Each project had special funding and took quite distinctive project management approaches, which reflect the desire to embed innovation and…

  18. Project Panama: An International Service Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydlett, Lydia; Randolph, Mickey; Wells, Gayle

    2010-01-01

    Participation in service learning projects is a growing phenomenon at universities and colleges. Research indicates service projects are beneficial for college students and adults. There is little data investigating developmental differences in how younger versus older participants perceive the service learning process. In this project, older…

  19. Elementary School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Highlights elementary school construction projects that have won the Learning By Design Awards for 2001. Projects covered involve new school construction; and renovation, additions, and restoration. (GR)

  20. Project Lodestar Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The Association of American Colleges' (AAC) Project Lodestar is addressed in an article and descriptions of the pilot phase of the project at 13 institutions. In "Project Lodestar: Realistically Assessing the Future," Peggy Brown provides an overview of the project, which is designed to help colleges and universities in assessment of…

  1. Earth System Science Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed…

  2. eProject Builder

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-01

    eProject Builder enables Energy Services Companies (ESCOs) and their contracting agencies to: 1. upload and track project-level Information 2. generate basic project reports required by local, state, and/or federal agencies 3. benchmark new Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) projects against historical data

  3. Project Lodestar Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The Association of American Colleges' (AAC) Project Lodestar is addressed in an article and descriptions of the pilot phase of the project at 13 institutions. In "Project Lodestar: Realistically Assessing the Future," Peggy Brown provides an overview of the project, which is designed to help colleges and universities in assessment of…

  4. NCMS ESS 2000 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbel, Mark; Bellamy, Marvin; DeSantis, Charlie; Hess, John; Pattok, Tracy; Quintero, Andrew; Silver, R.

    1996-01-01

    ESS 2000 has the vision of enhancing the knowledge necessary to implement cost-effective, leading-edge ESS technologies and procedures in order to increase U.S. electronics industry competitiveness. This paper defines EES and discusses the factors driving the project, the objectives of the project, its participants, the three phases of the project, the technologies involved, and project deliverables.

  5. Earth System Science Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed…

  6. Determinants of project success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. C.; Baker, B. N.; Fisher, D.

    1974-01-01

    The interactions of numerous project characteristics, with particular reference to project performance, were studied. Determinants of success are identified along with the accompanying implications for client organization, parent organization, project organization, and future research. Variables are selected which are found to have the greatest impact on project outcome, and the methodology and analytic techniques to be employed in identification of those variables are discussed.

  7. eProject Builder

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-01

    eProject Builder enables Energy Services Companies (ESCOs) and their contracting agencies to: 1. upload and track project-level Information 2. generate basic project reports required by local, state, and/or federal agencies 3. benchmark new Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) projects against historical data

  8. Project Follow Through.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Springfield. Dept. for Exceptional Children.

    The four Follow Through projects in Illinois are described and evaluated. These projects involve approximately 1,450 children in K-3 in Mounds, East Saint Louis, Waukegan, and Chicago. The Chicago project is subdivided into three individual projects and is trying three experimental programs. Emphasis is given to the nature of the environmental…

  9. Korea's School Grounds Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joohun

    2003-01-01

    This article describes two projects which Korea has undertaken to improve its school grounds: (1) the Green School Project; and (2) the School Forest Pilot Project. The Korean Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development (MOE&HRI) recently launched the Green School Project centred on existing urban schools with poor outdoor…

  10. Project Follow Through.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Springfield. Dept. for Exceptional Children.

    The four Follow Through projects in Illinois are described and evaluated. These projects involve approximately 1,450 children in K-3 in Mounds, East Saint Louis, Waukegan, and Chicago. The Chicago project is subdivided into three individual projects and is trying three experimental programs. Emphasis is given to the nature of the environmental…

  11. NCMS ESS 2000 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbel, Mark; Bellamy, Marvin; DeSantis, Charlie; Hess, John; Pattok, Tracy; Quintero, Andrew; Silver, R.

    1996-01-01

    ESS 2000 has the vision of enhancing the knowledge necessary to implement cost-effective, leading-edge ESS technologies and procedures in order to increase U.S. electronics industry competitiveness. This paper defines EES and discusses the factors driving the project, the objectives of the project, its participants, the three phases of the project, the technologies involved, and project deliverables.

  12. Korea's School Grounds Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joohun

    2003-01-01

    This article describes two projects which Korea has undertaken to improve its school grounds: (1) the Green School Project; and (2) the School Forest Pilot Project. The Korean Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development (MOE&HRI) recently launched the Green School Project centred on existing urban schools with poor outdoor…

  13. Guidelines for Project Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Arieh, David

    2001-01-01

    Project management is an important part of the professional activities at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Project management is the means by which many of the operations at KSC take shape. Moreover, projects at KSC are implemented in a variety of ways in different organizations. The official guidelines for project management are provided by NASA headquarters and are quite general. The project reported herein deals with developing practical and detailed project management guidelines in support of the project managers. This report summarizes the current project management effort in the Process Management Division and presents a new modeling approach of project management developed by the author. The report also presents the Project Management Guidelines developed during the summer.

  14. Status of biological control projects on terrestrial invasive alien weeds in California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In cooperation with foreign scientists, we are currently developing new classical biological control agents for five species of invasive alien terrestrial weeds. Cape-Ivy. A gall-forming fly, Parafreutreta regalis, and a stem-boring moth, Digitivalva delaireae, have been favorably reviewed by TAG...

  15. CHP Project Development

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information and tools to support the CHP project development process, including identifying if your facility is a good fit for CHP, the steps involved with CHP project development, and policies and incentives supportive of CHP.

  16. Elective Program Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Christelle

    1976-01-01

    Outlined is an interdisciplinary program in Ecology and Oceanography for grades six through eight. Numerous student projects are suggested in the outline and the course requirements and the project system are explained. (MA)

  17. Venezuela's Bolivarian Schools Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Maria Magnolia Santamaria

    2002-01-01

    Discusses efforts by the Venezuelan government to improve the nation's school infrastructure through the Bolivarian Schools Project administered by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport. The project set educational principles which are guiding current school building efforts. (EV)

  18. FIFRA Project Officers Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The FIFRA Project Officers Manual provides guidance to new as well as experienced project officers in the management of grants and cooperative agreements under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act.

  19. Project Weather and Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pal J. Kirkeby

    2000-01-01

    Introduces Project Weather and Water with the goal of developing and testing ideas of how to implement weather topics and water physics in an integrated way. Discusses teacher preparation, implementation, and evaluation of this project. (ASK)

  20. Project Matching Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Green Power Partnership's Project Matching initiative works to connect green power users with new, not-yet-built renewable energy projects that may align with their energy, environmental, and financial objectives.

  1. Visible Human Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... videos - requires RealPlayer. A sampler of images and animations from the Project. Belarusian translation of The Visible ... Applications for viewing images Sources of images and animations Products Mirror Sites Tools Media Productions Related Projects ...

  2. The Alzheimer's Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Alzheimer's Project Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of Contents ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The Alzheimer's Project A 4-Part Documentary Series Starting May ...

  3. Breuner Marsh Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the San Francisco Bay Water Quality Project (SFBWQP) Breuner Marsh Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  4. The "Old Dogs" Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Robert; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a low cost, easily emulated project designed to improve classroom teaching methods. Discusses the benefits of peer evaluation and lists the criteria used for selecting participants. Highlights lessons learned from the project. (JRH)

  5. Venezuela's Bolivarian Schools Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Maria Magnolia Santamaria

    2002-01-01

    Discusses efforts by the Venezuelan government to improve the nation's school infrastructure through the Bolivarian Schools Project administered by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport. The project set educational principles which are guiding current school building efforts. (EV)

  6. Labor Mobilization Project (1980).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-15

    input and work with the project. Only eleven counties and cities included the project in their program papers . The project consistently worked with...the project as a part of their program papers around the state: city of Spokane, city of Tacoma, Spokane, Pierce, Clark, Kitsap, Benton, Mason, Cowlitz...national and international unions, the AFL-CIO has state and city central bodies and trade and industrial departments. There are state central bodies in

  7. GHPsRUS Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Battocletti, Liz

    2013-07-09

    The GHPsRUS Project's full name is "Measuring the Costs and Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump Deployment." The dataset contains employment and installation price data collected by four economic surveys: (1)GHPsRUS Project Manufacturer & OEM Survey, (2) GHPsRUS Project Geothermal Loop Survey, (3) GHPsRUS Project Mechanical Equipment Installation Survey, and (4) GHPsRUS Geothermal Heat Pump Industry Survey

  8. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  9. The Proposal Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The proposal project stretches over a significant portion of the semester-long sophomore course Professional Communication (ENG 250) at Monroe Community College. While developing their proposal project, students need to use time management skills to successfully complete a quality project on time. In addition, excellent oral and written…

  10. Projects in History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harben, Cedric Y.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses two types of historical projects conducted by O-level pupils at Clifton College: studies of famous chemists and projects on the development of industrial chemicals. Indicates that a project in the history of chemistry is characterized by its practical and philosophical approach to chemistry study. (CC)

  11. The Sidewalk Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, William

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author features "the sidewalk project" in Littleton High School. The sidewalk project is a collaboration of more than 40 high school physics students, 10 local mentors, and a few regional and national organizations who worked together to invent a way to heat a sidewalk with an alternative energy source. The project, which…

  12. THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites project is the first of two Supersites projects to be established during Phase I of EPA's Supersites Program; Phase 11 is being established through a Request for Assistance. The other initial project is in Fresno, California. The Supersites Program is par...

  13. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  14. Project Pride Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennewein, Marilyn; And Others

    Project PRIDE (Probe, Research, Inquire, Discover, and Evaluate) is evaluated in this report to provide data to be used as a learning tool for project staff and student participants. Major objectives of the project are to provide an inter-disciplinary, objective approach to the study of the American heritage, and to incorporate methods and…

  15. Projection: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freud and his associates did much clinical work with the dynamic of projection, especially with regard to paranoid symptoms and syndromes. Much experimental work has also been done with projection. Sears evaluated the results of some of those studies. Murstein and Pryer sub-classified projection and reviewed typical studies. The…

  16. Projection: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freud and his associates did much clinical work with the dynamic of projection, especially with regard to paranoid symptoms and syndromes. Much experimental work has also been done with projection. Sears evaluated the results of some of those studies. Murstein and Pryer sub-classified projection and reviewed typical studies. The…

  17. Projects in History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harben, Cedric Y.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses two types of historical projects conducted by O-level pupils at Clifton College: studies of famous chemists and projects on the development of industrial chemicals. Indicates that a project in the history of chemistry is characterized by its practical and philosophical approach to chemistry study. (CC)

  18. The Eggen Card Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvis, G.

    2014-06-01

    (Abstract only) Olin Eggen, noted astronomer (1919-1998), left to us all his raw observation records recorded on 3x5 cards. This project is to make all this data available as an online resource. History and progress of the project will be presented. Project details available at: https://sites.google.com/site/eggencards/home.

  19. System Alternatives Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrait, James A.

    1977-01-01

    The Systems Alternatives Project is an attempt to develop open classroom alternatives within a modular scheduling system. Biology students are given both action and test objectives that emphasize individualization. Structure of the project is detailed and an attempt to analyze the project evaluation data statistically is included. (MA)

  20. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  1. The Sidewalk Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, William

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author features "the sidewalk project" in Littleton High School. The sidewalk project is a collaboration of more than 40 high school physics students, 10 local mentors, and a few regional and national organizations who worked together to invent a way to heat a sidewalk with an alternative energy source. The project, which…

  2. THE ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atlanta Supersites project is the first of two Supersites projects to be established during Phase I of EPA's Supersites Program; Phase 11 is being established through a Request for Assistance. The other initial project is in Fresno, California. The Supersites Program is par...

  3. Ideas for Science Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showalter, Victor; Slesnick, Irwin

    This booklet was written for students as a source of ideas for research type science projects. Part One shows how three high school students developed individual projects a s a result of asking questions about the same natural phenomena. Part Two contains project suggestions and sample questions designed to stimulate student thinking along…

  4. Forest Residues Bundling Project

    Treesearch

    U.S. Forest Service

    2007-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, the U.S. Forest Service conducted an evaluation of biomass bundling for forest residue extraction. This CD provides a report of the project results, a video documentary project record, and a collection of images from the project. Additional information is available at:

  5. Little River Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naisbitt, Ian

    1995-01-01

    Describes the adoption of an old riverside landfill by an elementary school as a Habitat 2000 community project. Contains a "how-to" checklist for such a project, information on building school-community community partnerships, and promotional ideas for stewardship projects. (LZ)

  6. Little River Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naisbitt, Ian

    1995-01-01

    Describes the adoption of an old riverside landfill by an elementary school as a Habitat 2000 community project. Contains a "how-to" checklist for such a project, information on building school-community community partnerships, and promotional ideas for stewardship projects. (LZ)

  7. The Llama Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganzel, Candy; Stuglik, Jan

    2003-01-01

    At a suburban Indiana elementary school, the Project Approach serves as the basis of the curriculum in all Kindergarten classrooms. The four classes of 5- and 6-year-old children at this school chose to study llamas. This article discusses how the project evolved, describes the three phases of the project, and provides teachers' reflections on the…

  8. IX Disposition Project - project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, I.G.

    1994-12-08

    This report presents plans for resolving saving and disposal concerns for ion exchange modules, cartridge filters and columns. This plan also documents the project baselines for schedules, cost, and technical information.

  9. Underestimation of Project Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    Large projects almost always exceed their budgets. Estimating cost is difficult and estimated costs are usually too low. Three different reasons are suggested: bad luck, overoptimism, and deliberate underestimation. Project management can usually point to project difficulty and complexity, technical uncertainty, stakeholder conflicts, scope changes, unforeseen events, and other not really unpredictable bad luck. Project planning is usually over-optimistic, so the likelihood and impact of bad luck is systematically underestimated. Project plans reflect optimism and hope for success in a supposedly unique new effort rather than rational expectations based on historical data. Past project problems are claimed to be irrelevant because "This time it's different." Some bad luck is inevitable and reasonable optimism is understandable, but deliberate deception must be condemned. In a competitive environment, project planners and advocates often deliberately underestimate costs to help gain project approval and funding. Project benefits, cost savings, and probability of success are exaggerated and key risks ignored. Project advocates have incentives to distort information and conceal difficulties from project approvers. One naively suggested cure is more openness, honesty, and group adherence to shared overall goals. A more realistic alternative is threatening overrun projects with cancellation. Neither approach seems to solve the problem. A better method to avoid the delusions of over-optimism and the deceptions of biased advocacy is to base the project cost estimate on the actual costs of a large group of similar projects. Over optimism and deception can continue beyond the planning phase and into project execution. Hard milestones based on verified tests and demonstrations can provide a reality check.

  10. Managing Projects with KPRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, Barry M.

    2004-01-01

    How does a Project Management Office provide: Consistent, familiar, easily used scheduling tools to Project Managers and project team members? Provide a complete list of organization resources available for use on the project? Facilitate resource tracking and visibility? Provide the myriad reports that the organization requires? Facilitate consistent budget planning and cost performance information? Provide all of this to the entire organization? Provide for the unique requirement of the organization? and get people to use it? Answer: Implementation of the Kennedy space Center Projects and Resources Online (KPRO), a modified COTS solution.

  11. Comparing project investments

    SciTech Connect

    Wirasinghe, E.

    1988-06-01

    HPI managers are often faced with the nightmare of deciding on which projects to invest their limited capital. There usually are more potential projects than money available for investment. A typical strategy is in two parts: select a method to rank the projects; consider corporate policy to make a choice. This discussion highlights various ways to rank projects. After a discussion of some ranking methods, three cases are presented where it appears the wrong project was selected - either because of incorrect advice or because data were intentionally manipulated.

  12. Positive projective identification.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, N G

    1986-01-01

    This paper suggests that literature concerning projective identification has excessively focused on the projection of unwanted aspects of the self without giving adequate consideration to projective identification involving good qualities. It is proposed that clinical advantages may derive from dividing projective identification into positive and negative components. This division allows a more ready emphasis on the capacity for beneficial object relations which even psychotic individuals retain despite their obvious hostility. Case vignettes are provided to demonstrate positive projective identification and to emphasize the clinical usefulness of this concept.

  13. Adaptive Composite Map Projections.

    PubMed

    Jenny, B

    2012-12-01

    All major web mapping services use the web Mercator projection. This is a poor choice for maps of the entire globe or areas of the size of continents or larger countries because the Mercator projection shows medium and higher latitudes with extreme areal distortion and provides an erroneous impression of distances and relative areas. The web Mercator projection is also not able to show the entire globe, as polar latitudes cannot be mapped. When selecting an alternative projection for information visualization, rivaling factors have to be taken into account, such as map scale, the geographic area shown, the map's height-to-width ratio, and the type of cartographic visualization. It is impossible for a single map projection to meet the requirements for all these factors. The proposed composite map projection combines several projections that are recommended in cartographic literature and seamlessly morphs map space as the user changes map scale or the geographic region displayed. The composite projection adapts the map's geometry to scale, to the map's height-to-width ratio, and to the central latitude of the displayed area by replacing projections and adjusting their parameters. The composite projection shows the entire globe including poles; it portrays continents or larger countries with less distortion (optionally without areal distortion); and it can morph to the web Mercator projection for maps showing small regions.

  14. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Citizen Science Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Quality Assurance Project Plan is necessary for every project that collects or uses environmental data. It documents the project planning process and serves as a blueprint for how your project will run.

  15. Environmental Science: 49 Science Fair Projects. Science Fair Projects Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Robert L.; Keen, G. Daniel

    This book contains 49 science fair projects designed for 6th to 9th grade students. Projects are organized by the topics of soil, ecology (projects in habitat and life cycles), pests and controls (projects in weeds and insects), recycling (projects in resources and conservation), waste products (projects in decomposition), microscopic organisms,…

  16. Environmental Science: 49 Science Fair Projects. Science Fair Projects Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Robert L.; Keen, G. Daniel

    This book contains 49 science fair projects designed for 6th to 9th grade students. Projects are organized by the topics of soil, ecology (projects in habitat and life cycles), pests and controls (projects in weeds and insects), recycling (projects in resources and conservation), waste products (projects in decomposition), microscopic organisms,…

  17. Project Surveillance and Maintenance Plan. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The Project Surveillance and Maintenance Plan (PSMP) describes the procedures that will be used by the US Department of Energy (DOE), or other agency as designated by the President to verify that inactive uranium tailings disposal facilities remain in compliance with licensing requirements and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for remedial actions. The PSMP will be used as a guide for the development of individual Site Surveillance and Maintenance Plans (part of a license application) for each of the UMTRA Project sites. The PSMP is not intended to provide minimum requirements but rather to provide guidance in the selection of surveillance measures. For example, the plan acknowledges that ground-water monitoring may or may not be required and provides the (guidance) to make this decision. The Site Surveillance and Maintenance Plans (SSMPs) will form the basis for the licensing of the long-term surveillance and maintenance of each UMTRA Project site by the NRC. Therefore, the PSMP is a key milestone in the licensing process of all UMTRA Project sites. The Project Licensing Plan (DOE, 1984a) describes the licensing process. 11 refs., 22 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. The CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the CHPRC Columbia River Protection Project (hereafter referred to as the Columbia River Project). This is a follow-on project, funded by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC), to the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Columbia River Protection Project. The work scope consists of a number of CHPRC funded, related projects that are managed under a master project (project number 55109). All contract releases associated with the Fluor Hanford Columbia River Project (Fluor Hanford, Inc. Contract 27647) and the CHPRC Columbia River Project (Contract 36402) will be collected under this master project. Each project within the master project is authorized by a CHPRC contract release that contains the project-specific statement of work. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Columbia River Project staff.

  19. River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    SEEMAN, S.E.

    2000-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in accordance with the Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999, established the Office of River Protection (ORP) to successfully execute and manage the River Protection Project (RPP), formerly known as the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The mission of the RPP is to store, retrieve, treat, and dispose of the highly radioactive Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The team shown in Figure 1-1 is accomplishing the project. The ORP is providing the management and integration of the project; the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) is responsible for providing tank waste storage, retrieval, and disposal; and the Privatization Contractor (PC) is responsible for providing tank waste treatment.

  20. Battleground Energy Recovery Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, Daniel

    2011-12-31

    In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

  1. Affine projective Osserman structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, P.; Nikčević, S.

    2013-08-01

    By considering the projectivized spectrum of the Jacobi operator, we introduce the concept of projective Osserman manifold in both the affine and in the pseudo-Riemannian settings. If M is an affine projective Osserman manifold, then the deformed Riemannian extension metric on the cotangent bundle is both spacelike and timelike projective Osserman. Since any rank-1-symmetric space is affine projective Osserman, this provides additional information concerning the cotangent bundle of a rank-1 Riemannian symmetric space with the deformed Riemannian extension metric. We construct other examples of affine projective Osserman manifolds where the Ricci tensor is not symmetric and thus the connection in question is not the Levi-Civita connection of any metric. If the dimension is odd, we use methods of algebraic topology to show the Jacobi operator of an affine projective Osserman manifold has only one non-zero eigenvalue and that eigenvalue is real.

  2. Project GlobWave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busswell, Geoff; Ash, Ellis; Piolle, Jean-Francois; Poulter, David J. S.; Snaith, Helen; Collard, Fabrice; Sheera, Harjit; Pinnock, Simon

    2010-12-01

    The ESA GlobWave project is a three year initiative, funded by ESA and CNES, to service the needs of satellite wave product users across the globe. Led by Logica UK, with support from CLS, IFREMER, SatOC and NOCS, the project will provide free access to satellite wave data and products in a common format, both historical and in near real time, from various European and American SAR and altimeter missions. Building on the successes of similar projects for Sea Surface Temperature and ocean colour, the project aims to stimulate increased use and analysis of satellite wave products. In addition to common-format satellite data the project will provide comparisons with in situ measurements, interactive data analysis tools and a pilot spatial wave forecast verification scheme for operational forecast production centres. The project will begin operations in January 2010, with direction from regular structured user consultation.

  3. Pine Hollow Watershed Project : FY 2000 Projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District

    2001-06-01

    The Pine Hollow Project (1999-010-00) is an on-going watershed restoration effort administered by Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District and spearheaded by Pine Hollow/Jackknife Watershed Council. The headwaters are located near Shaniko in Wasco County, and the mouth is in Sherman County on the John Day River. Pine Hollow provides more than 20 miles of potential summer steelhead spawning and rearing habitat. The watershed is 92,000 acres. Land use is mostly range, with some dryland grain. There are no water rights on Pine Hollow. Due to shallow soils, the watershed is prone to rapid runoff events which scour out the streambed and the riparian vegetation. This project seeks to improve the quality of upland, riparian and in-stream habitat by restoring the natural hydrologic function of the entire watershed. Project implementation to date has consisted of construction of water/sediment control basins, gradient terraces on croplands, pasture cross-fences, upland water sources, and grass seeding on degraded sites, many of which were crop fields in the early part of the century. The project is expected to continue through about 2007. From March 2000 to June 2001, the Pine Hollow Project built 6 sediment basins, 1 cross-fence, 2 spring developments, 1 well development, 1 solar pump, 50 acres of native range seeding and 1 livestock waterline. FY2000 projects were funded by BPA, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, US Fish and Wildlife Service and landowners. In-kind services were provided by Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, USDI Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pine Hollow/Jackknife Watershed Council, landowners and Wasco County Soil and Water Conservation District.

  4. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  5. KSC History Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snaples, Lee

    2001-01-01

    The project is a joint endeavor between Dr. Henry Dethloff and myself and is producing a number of products related to KSC history. This report is a summary of those projects. First, there is an overview monograph covering KSC history. Second, there is a chapter outline for an eventual book-length history. Third, there is monograph on safety at KSC. Finally, there is a web page and database dedicated to the KSC oral history project.

  6. Datacomputer Project Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-28

    34IM " "■ mmmam DATACOMPUTER PROJECT TECHNICAL REPORT Computer Corporation of America AD/A-002 083 Prepared for: Army Research Office...021 Computer Corporation of America 575 Technology Square Cambridge, Massachusetts Ü2139 0 DATACOMPUTER PROJECT TECHNICAL REPORT August 1...applications and user programs. The present document is the final technical report under Contract No. DAHC04-71-C-0Q11. The project is continuing

  7. Operational waste volume projection

    SciTech Connect

    Koreski, G.M.; Strode, J.N.

    1995-06-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the tri-party agreement. Assumptions are current as of June 1995.

  8. Computer Assets Recovery Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    CortesPena, Aida Yoguely

    2010-01-01

    This document reports on the project that was performed during the internship of the author. The project involved locating and recovering machines in various locations that Boeing has no need for, and therefore requires that they be transferred to another user or transferred to a non-profit organization. Other projects that the author performed was an inventory of toner and printers, loading new computers and connecting them to the network.

  9. Frequency Comb Cooling Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...Aug-2011 18-May-2012 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final report on frequency comb cooling project The views, opinions and/or... frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected average powers above 10 kW. We

  10. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect

    STRODE, J.N.

    1999-08-24

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2018 are projected based on assumption as of July 1999. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement.

  11. Medical Entomology Project.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Gorgas Memorial Laboratory, Panama), Dr. Richard F. Darsie (Guatemala, Guatemala), Dr. Joel Margalit (Dept. of Biology, Ben Gurion University, Israel), Dr...Regional Malaria Directors, Khon Kaen and Songkla, Thailand). ___ __ 18 Dr. Richard Darsie visited the project for a few days to check the larvae of...certain North American mosquitoes for use in the project on keys to the mosquitoes of North America, north of Mexico which is a joint project of Drs. Darsie

  12. Project management controls

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, D.S. ); Carnes, W.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Project management controls are utilized to enhance the probability that a project will be successful. The control system used by a project manager can take many forms and can be applied at different times to varying degrees on a given project depending upon its complexity. The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is one project of many at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The United States Department of Energy Order 4700.1 is a project management system that is applied on a site-wide basis, thus including the CIF. The control system required by this order is proceduralized to ensure that it is applied in a consistent manner and will produce reliable results. These results provide the project manager with a correlation of both costs and schedule within the defined scope to adequately asses the status of the project. This is an iterative process and can be simply stated: plan, actual, variance, corrective action, prediction, and revision. This paper presents the basis for the project management controls applied at the Savannah River Site.

  13. Project management controls

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, D.S.; Carnes, W.S.

    1990-12-31

    Project management controls are utilized to enhance the probability that a project will be successful. The control system used by a project manager can take many forms and can be applied at different times to varying degrees on a given project depending upon its complexity. The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is one project of many at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The United States Department of Energy Order 4700.1 is a project management system that is applied on a site-wide basis, thus including the CIF. The control system required by this order is proceduralized to ensure that it is applied in a consistent manner and will produce reliable results. These results provide the project manager with a correlation of both costs and schedule within the defined scope to adequately asses the status of the project. This is an iterative process and can be simply stated: plan, actual, variance, corrective action, prediction, and revision. This paper presents the basis for the project management controls applied at the Savannah River Site.

  14. Project Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jr., R. F. Miles

    1995-01-01

    Project risk management is primarily concerned with performance, reliability, cost, and schedule. Environmental risk management is primarily concerned with human health and ecological hazards and likelihoods. This paper discusses project risk management and compares it to environmental risk management, both with respect to goals and implementation. The approach of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to risk management is presented as an example of a project risk management approach that is an extension to NASA NHB 7120.5: Management of Major System Programs and Projects.

  15. FLEXI Project Management Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohunen, Anna; Krzanik, Lech; Kuvaja, Pasi; Similä, Jouni; Rodriguez, Pilar; Hyysalo, Jarkko; Linna, Tommi

    FLEXI Project Management Survey (FLEXI PMS) has been established to gain detailed knowledge on how the software industry - in particular successful companies - manages agile software development. FLEXI PMS investigates the actual agile values, principles, practices and contexts. The survey is supported by a careful literature review and analysis of existing studies. Special attention is attached to large, multi-site, multi-company and distributed projects - the target area of FLEXI project. The survey is intended to provide solid data for further knowledge acquisition and project/company positioning with regard to feasible agile management practices.

  16. The Global Supernova Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Global Supernova Project

    2017-06-01

    The Global Supernova Project is worldwide collaboration to study 600 supernovae of all types between May 2017 and July 2020. It is a Key Project at Las Cumbres Observatory, whose global robotic telescope network will provide lightcurves and spectra. Follow-up observations will be obtained on many other facilities, including Swift, VLA, K2, the NTT, IRTF, Keck, and Gemini. Observations are managed by the Supernova Exchange, a combination observatin database and telescope control system run by LCO. Here we report on results from the previous Supernova Key Project, and first results from the Global Supernova Project.

  17. Project Worm Bin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Daniel C.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a project centering around earthworm activity in a compost bin. Includes suggestions for exercises involving biological and conservation concepts, gardening skills, and dramatical presentations. (ML)

  18. Manpower and project planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to study how manpower and projects are planned at the Facilities Engineering Division (FENGD) within the Systems Engineering and Operations Directorate of the LaRC and to make recommendations for improving the effectiveness and productivity ot the tools that are used. The existing manpower and project planning processes (including the management plan for the FENGD, existing manpower planning reports, project reporting to LaRC and NASA Headquarters, employee time reporting, financial reporting, and coordination/tracking reports for procurement) were discussed with several people, and project planning software was evaluated.

  19. Other School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Highlights selected construction projects for learning centers, early childhood and development schools, and special purpose educational facilities that have won the Learning By Design Awards for 2001.(GR)

  20. Project Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jr., R. F. Miles

    1995-01-01

    Project risk management is primarily concerned with performance, reliability, cost, and schedule. Environmental risk management is primarily concerned with human health and ecological hazards and likelihoods. This paper discusses project risk management and compares it to environmental risk management, both with respect to goals and implementation. The approach of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to risk management is presented as an example of a project risk management approach that is an extension to NASA NHB 7120.5: Management of Major System Programs and Projects.

  1. KSC History Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dethloff, Henry C.

    2001-01-01

    The KSC History Project focuses on archival research and oral history interviews on the history of Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Related projects include the preparation of a precis and chapter outline for a proposed book-length narrative history, a bibliography of key primary and secondary resources, a brief monograph overview of the history of KSC, and a monograph on the history of safety at the Center. Finally, there is work on the development of a web page and a personal history data base associated with the oral history project. The KSC History Project has been a joint endeavor between Henry C. Dethloff and Dr. Noble Lee Snaples, Jr.

  2. Project Worm Bin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Daniel C.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a project centering around earthworm activity in a compost bin. Includes suggestions for exercises involving biological and conservation concepts, gardening skills, and dramatical presentations. (ML)

  3. Basalt Waste Isolation Project Reclamation Support Project:

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1992-06-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Reclamation Support Project began in the spring of 1988 by categorizing sites distributed during operations of the BWIP into those requiring revegetation and those to be abandoned or transferred to other programs. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory's role in this project was to develop plans for reestablishing native vegetation on the first category of sites, to monitor the implementation of these plans, to evaluate the effectiveness of these efforts, and to identify remediation methods where necessary. The Reclamation Support Project focused on three major areas: geologic hydrologic boreholes, the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF), and the Near-Surface Test Facility (NSTF). A number of BWIP reclamation sites seeded between 1989 and 1990 were found to be far below reclamation objectives. These sites were remediated in 1991 using various seedbed treatments designed to rectify problems with water-holding capacity, herbicide activity, surficial crust formation, and nutrient imbalances. Remediation was conducted during November and early December 1991. Sites were examined on a monthly basis thereafter to evaluate plant growth responses to these treatments. At all remediation sites early plant growth responses to these treatments. At all remediation sites, early plant growth far exceeded any previously obtained using other methods and seedbed treatments. Seeded plants did best where amendments consisted of soil-plus-compost or fertilizer-only. Vegetation growth on Gable Mountain was less than that found on other areas nearby, but this difference is attributed primarily to the site's altitude and north-facing orientation.

  4. The Wedding Project: Introducing the Project Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorrels, Barbara; Norris, Deborah; Sheeran, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Constructivist education, based on the theories of Piaget and Vygotsky, advocates an approach to curriculum and teaching that is student centered, inquiry based, integrated and intellectually engaging. One teaching strategy that provides such an experience is the Project Approach, reflective of the pedagogy of John Dewey and introduced as a model…

  5. River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    NAVARRO, J.E.

    2001-03-07

    The Office of River Protection (ORP) Project Management Plan (PMP) for the River Protection Project (RPP) describes the process for developing and operating a Waste Treatment Complex (WTC) to clean up Hanford Site tank waste. The Plan describes the scope of the project, the institutional setting within which the project must be completed, and the management processes and structure planned for implementation. The Plan is written from the perspective of the ORP as the taxpayers' representative. The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has one of the largest concentrations of radioactive waste in the world, as a result of producing plutonium for national defense for more than 40 years. Approximately 53 million gallons of waste stored in 177 aging underground tanks represent major environmental, social, and political challenges for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These challenges require numerous interfaces with state and federal environmental officials, Tribal Nations, stakeholders, Congress, and the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ). The cleanup of the Site's tank waste is a national issue with the potential for environmental and economic impacts to the region and the nation.

  6. The Wedding Project: Introducing the Project Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorrels, Barbara; Norris, Deborah; Sheeran, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Constructivist education, based on the theories of Piaget and Vygotsky, advocates an approach to curriculum and teaching that is student centered, inquiry based, integrated and intellectually engaging. One teaching strategy that provides such an experience is the Project Approach, reflective of the pedagogy of John Dewey and introduced as a model…

  7. The Moon Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Willmore, Sandra; Smith, Walter S.

    2006-01-01

    What Australia, Alaska, Qatar, Indiana, and Ohio have in common is the authentic writing More Observations Of Nature (MOON) project. In this unique project, teachers from these disparate geographic locations teamed up to instruct children in grades four through eight via the internet on a nearly universally challenging subject for teachers in the…

  8. Project BEST Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankratz, David; Friedenberg, Joan

    Project BEST (Building Energy Systems Technology), a bilingual vocational training program, operated at Oakton Community College between March 1986 and September 1987. The purpose of the project was to provide 60 limited English proficient (LEP) Hispanic and Polish adults with sufficient vocational skills, English language skills, and appropriate…

  9. The Physics Plus Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Physics Plus Project is producing a series of pamphlets designed to supplement existing curricula with physics application topics (such as physics of sports, motor cars, weather, medical physics, energy). Discusses rationale for the projects, pamphlet production, distribution to schools, and use of pamphlet material on examinations. (JM)

  10. The ANTARES Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amram, Ph.; Anvar, S.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J. J.; Azoulay, R.; Basa, S.; Benhammou, Y.; Bernard, F.; Berthier, R.; Bertin, V.; Billault, M.; Biller, S.; Blanc, F.; Blanc, P. E.; Bland, R. W.; Blondeau, F.; de Botton, N.; Bottu, N.; Boulesteix, J.; Brooks, B.; Brunner, J.; Calzas, A.; Carloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Carton, P. H.; Cartwright, S.; Cases, R.; Cassol, F.; Charles, F.; Charles, J.; Desages, F.; Destelle, J. J.; Dispau, G.; Duval, P. Y.; Engelen, J.; Feinstein, F.; Flores, E. C.; Fopma, J.; Fuda, J. L.; Goret, P.; Gosset, L.; Gournay, J. F.; Hernandez, J. J.; Hubaut, F.; Hubbard, R.; Huss, D.; Jaquet, M.; Jelley, N.; Kajfasz, E.; Kouchner, A.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Lachartre, D.; Lafoux, H.; Lamare, P.; Languillat, J. C.; Laugier, J. P.; Le Provost, H.; Loiseau, D.; Loucatos, S.; Magnier, P.; Marc, K.; Marcelin, M.; Martin, L.; Mazeau, B.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J.; Meessen, C.; Millot, C.; Mols, P.; Montanet, F.; Moorhead, M.; Moscoso, L.; Navas, S.; Nooren, Van; Olivetto, C.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Pallares, A.; Payre, P.; Perrin, P.; Poinsignon, J.; Potheau, R.; Qian, Z.; Raymond, M.; Roberts, J.; Sacquin, Y.; Schuller, J. P.; Schuster, W.; Spooner, N.; Stolarczyk, T.; Tabary, A.; Talby, M.; Tao, C.; Thompson, L.; Triay, R.; Valdy, M.; Velasco, J.; Vigeolas, E.; Vignaud, D.; Vilanova, D.; Wark, D.; Zuniga, J.

    1999-03-01

    The ANTARES project is an international collaboration with the aim of building a deep-sea large area neutrino telescope within the next decade. The achievements and status of the project as at the time of the conference are briefly discussed, and short term steps as well as longer term plans are described.

  11. Beacon College Project Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Lynn, Ed.

    The American Association of Community Colleges' Beacon College Project (BCP) uses funds from the Kellogg Foundation to award two-year grants to "Beacon" community colleges to form consortia with at least five associate colleges, designed to improve a specific aspect of institutional life. A total of 26 projects, many involving community…

  12. Projecting technological change

    Treesearch

    Kenneth E. Skog

    2007-01-01

    Improving efficiency in the use of both wood and nonwood inputs has characterized the US forest sector over the last 50 years. This chapter explores methods used to reflect this pattern of technological change and others in the Timber Assessment Projection System models. The development and use of three types of technology projection methods are explained: (1)...

  13. Interactive Genetics Tutorial Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The Interactive Genetics Tutorial (IGT) project and the Intelligent Tutoring System for the IGT project named MENDEL supplement genetics instruction in biology courses by providing students with experience in designing, conducting, and evaluating genetics experiments. The MENDEL software is designed to: (1) simulate genetics experiments that…

  14. The Billboard Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    Since 1997, the author coordinated a large-scale billboard project. Coordinated to coincide with the National Art Education Association's celebration of Youth Art Month, strong commitments from faculty, students, administrators, public-relations liaisons, local press, radio, TV, and community businesses have made this project a success. The first…

  15. BI Project Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Graham; Riha, James

    2009-01-01

    Managing business intelligence (BI) projects in higher education is a formidable responsibility that challenges even the most experienced technical project managers. Data source dependencies, uncertain data quality, changing information requirements, and urgency for actionable information are but a few examples among the multitude of challenges.…

  16. Climate projections FAQ

    Treesearch

    A.E. Daniels; J.F. Morrison; L.A. Joyce; N.L. Crookston; S.C. Chen; S.G. McNulty

    2012-01-01

    Climate scenarios offer one way to identify and examine the land management challenges posed by climate change. Selecting projections, however, requires careful consideration of the natural resources under study, and where and how they are sensitive to climate. Selection also depends on the robustness of different projections for the resources and geographic area of...

  17. Plant Biology Science Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    This book contains science projects about seed plants that deal with plant physiology, plant ecology, and plant agriculture. Each of the projects includes a step-by-step experiment followed by suggestions for further investigations. Chapters include: (1) "Bean Seed Imbibition"; (2) "Germination Percentages of Different Types of Seeds"; (3)…

  18. Prison Literacy Project Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kops, Joan, Ed.

    This handbook records the creation, development and growth, and stumbling blocks and successes of the Prison Literacy Project (PLP). It is intended to serve as a model for other community groups that are developing their own literacy projects. The handbook provides a history and philosophy of PLP, states PLP's vision and purpose, discusses need,…

  19. Life Skills Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalazo, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author, Program Administrator of the Pinellas County Sheriff's Office (PCSO) Project New Attitudes in Clearwater, Florida, describes the project. The PCSO is the country's largest law enforcement agency, providing law enforcement services to over 400,000 of its residents who reside in the unincorporated areas of the county and…

  20. Science Explorers Translation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Dolores

    This paper describes a pilot project of Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) to translate a science education curriculum for junior and senior high school students into Navajo. The project consisted of translating a video, a teacher's guide, and an interactive multimedia product on the 1993 hantavirus outbreak in the Four Corners area…

  1. SDM Virtualness Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Christopher Yit-Seong; Klein, Janice

    2004-01-01

    In the summer of 2001, NASA and Ford Motor Company co-sponsored a research project aimed at improving the education process and application of lessons learned through distant education. The System Design & Management Program (SDM) was used as a laboratory for improving distance learning capabilities. The research project was a follow up to previous research on globally dispersed teams.

  2. Avoiding Project Creep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennerknecht, Norbert J.; Scarnati, James T.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how to keep school district capital-improvement projects within budget. Examines areas where runaway costs creep into a project and ways of cutting or lessening these costs, such as using standard agreements, controlling architect's expense reimbursements, developing a quality-control process, and reducing document duplication. (GR)

  3. A Holiday Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kofod, Maudrey Taranto

    1996-01-01

    Describes a classroom project involving the construction of a holiday mobile. Necessary supplies include a lightweight hanger, construction paper, string, scissors, protractors, compasses, and rulers. Concepts involved in the construction of the project include illustrating a chord, radius, diameter, shapes, metric measuring, circumference, area,…

  4. BI Project Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Graham; Riha, James

    2009-01-01

    Managing business intelligence (BI) projects in higher education is a formidable responsibility that challenges even the most experienced technical project managers. Data source dependencies, uncertain data quality, changing information requirements, and urgency for actionable information are but a few examples among the multitude of challenges.…

  5. Fundred Dollar Bill Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the Fundred Dollar Bill Project which is an innovative artwork made of millions of drawings. This creative collective action is intended to support Operation Paydirt, an extraordinary art/science project uniting three million children with educators, scientists, healthcare professionals, designers, urban planners, engineers,…

  6. Oak Tree Planting Project

    Treesearch

    Sherryl L. Nives; William D. Tietje; William H. Weitkamp

    1991-01-01

    An Oak Tree Planting Project was conducted during 1989/90 in San Luis Obispo County by the Integrated Hardwood Range Management Program (IHRMP)/Central Coast. The local media and an IHRMP workshop were used to publicize the Planting Project and give information on the status of oaks (Quercus spp.) in California and oak planting techniques. Outreach...

  7. Distortion in Perspective Projection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelso, Robert P., Sr.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a unique approach in associating perspective projection with the image beheld by the eye and demonstrates that all graphical and photographic perspective projections must contain distortion when compared to the image beheld by the eye. (Contains 8 figures.)

  8. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, T.D.; Zewert, T.E.; Hood, L.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a coordinated worldwide effort to precisely map the human genome and the genomes of selected model organisms. The first explicit proposal for this project dates from 1985 although its foundations (both conceptual and technological) can be traced back many years in genetics, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The HGP has matured rapidly and is producing results of great significance.

  9. Project Planning and Reporting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Project Planning Analysis and Reporting System (PPARS) is automated aid in monitoring and scheduling of activities within project. PPARS system consists of PPARS Batch Program, five preprocessor programs, and two post-processor programs. PPARS Batch program is full CPM (Critical Path Method) scheduling program with resource capabilities. Can process networks with up to 10,000 activities.

  10. Projecting Personnel Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Philip T.

    Increased reliance on personnel services is placing school districts' business operations in a no-win situation. This report evaluates methods of student population projection in relation to teacher costs. Educational costs reflect personnel costs in light of a decrease in the number of pupils being served. Increased enrollment projections create…

  11. Proficiency Sample Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apodaca, Mary

    The instrument for Colorado's Foreign Language Proficiency Sample Project and directions for its administration are provided in this document. The project is a voluntary, teacher-designed and -administered effort to standardize high school student language proficiency assessment techniques. The materials are used in teacher workshops. The…

  12. The Mars Millennium Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The countdown to a new century provides a unique opportunity to engage America's youth in charting a course for the future. The Mars Millennium Project challenges students across the nation to design a community yet to be imagined for the planet Mars. This interdisciplinary learning project aims to encourage K-12 students in classrooms and youth…

  13. Award Winning Science Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showalter, Victor M.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    This is a collection of reports of student award winning science projects that have appeared in "The Science Teacher." Grade levels 7-12 are represented with projects categorized as follows: biology, chemistry and physics, earth-space science, and miscellaneous. In each section the abstracts are arranged in order of increasing complexity…

  14. Winter Art Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokela, Timo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how the Department of Art Education at the University of Lapland in Finland has developed winter art as a method of environmental and community-based art education. I will focus on the Snow Show Winter Art Education Project, a training project funded by the European Union and the State Provincial Office…

  15. The Plate Tectonics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Plate Tectonics Project is a multiday, inquiry-based unit that facilitates students as self-motivated learners. Reliable Web sites are offered to assist with lessons, and a summative rubric is used to facilitate the holistic nature of the project. After each topic (parts of the Earth, continental drift, etc.) is covered, the students will…

  16. The Ribosomal Database Project

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Gary J.; Overbeek, Ross; Larsen, Niels; Marsh, Terry L.; McCaughey, Michael J.; Maciukenas, Michael A.; Kuan, Wen-Min; Macke, Thomas J.; Xing, Yuqing; Woese, Carl R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) compiles ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development. PMID:1598241

  17. The Ribosomal Database Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; Larsen, N.; Marsh, T. L.; McCaughey, M. J.; Maciukenas, M. A.; Kuan, W. M.; Macke, T. J.; Xing, Y.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  18. Plant Biology Science Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    This book contains science projects about seed plants that deal with plant physiology, plant ecology, and plant agriculture. Each of the projects includes a step-by-step experiment followed by suggestions for further investigations. Chapters include: (1) "Bean Seed Imbibition"; (2) "Germination Percentages of Different Types of Seeds"; (3)…

  19. Arizona's Florence Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallam, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Florence Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project (Florence, Arizona) in which lawyers help individuals who are being detained in Florence. Explains that the project offers service to individuals at the detention center, helps children without guardians, and provides information to immigrant communities on their rights when arrested.…

  20. The Baby Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Darby L.; Verdeyen, Tasha B.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a project about babies undertaken by a class of children ranging in age from 2.9 years to 3.9 years old in a small Illinois town. Throughout this project, the children studied equipment and supplies needed to care for babies. They made dolls for the classroom, constructed a cradle, made observational drawings, created topic…

  1. The Billboard Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    Since 1997, the author coordinated a large-scale billboard project. Coordinated to coincide with the National Art Education Association's celebration of Youth Art Month, strong commitments from faculty, students, administrators, public-relations liaisons, local press, radio, TV, and community businesses have made this project a success. The first…

  2. Conservation Science Fair Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    Included are ideas, suggestions, and examples for selecting and designing conservation science projects. Over 70 possible conservation subject areas are presented with suggested projects. References are cited with each of these subject areas, and a separate list of annotated references is included. The references pertain to general subject…

  3. The Physics Plus Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Physics Plus Project is producing a series of pamphlets designed to supplement existing curricula with physics application topics (such as physics of sports, motor cars, weather, medical physics, energy). Discusses rationale for the projects, pamphlet production, distribution to schools, and use of pamphlet material on examinations. (JM)

  4. The HALI Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Brad

    2011-01-01

    This article features The HALI Project and shares experiences that led to the first part of the project--Empowered Parents. This program taught parents how to first come to grips with the reality of their situation, then dream new, appropriate dreams for their children. From there it addressed understanding the ongoing emotional journey and how it…

  5. Winnipeg Centre Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    The Winnipeg Centre Project is a field-based, work-study program that attempts to create more appropriate education for the inner-city child. Sponsored by the Planning and Research Branch of the Department of Colleges and Universities Affairs and administered by Brandon University in consultation with the Winnipeg School Division, the project is…

  6. The TULIP Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusack, Nancy, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Contains 11 articles that describe different university access systems designed and built to provide access to journals via The University Licensing Program (TULIP), a science journal access project, involving Elsevier Science Publishing and major universities. The project produced insights to help with future electronic information delivery…

  7. Project CAPABLE: Model Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madawaska School District, ME.

    Project CAPABLE (Classroom Action Program: Aim: Basic Learning Effectiveness) is a classroom approach which integrates the basic learning skills with content. The goal of the project is to use basic learning skills to enhance the learning of content and at the same time use the content to teach basic learning skills. This manual illustrates how…

  8. Winter Art Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokela, Timo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how the Department of Art Education at the University of Lapland in Finland has developed winter art as a method of environmental and community-based art education. I will focus on the Snow Show Winter Art Education Project, a training project funded by the European Union and the State Provincial Office…

  9. The TULIP Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusack, Nancy, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Contains 11 articles that describe different university access systems designed and built to provide access to journals via The University Licensing Program (TULIP), a science journal access project, involving Elsevier Science Publishing and major universities. The project produced insights to help with future electronic information delivery…

  10. The CLASS Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    The CLASS project is a series of investigations and projects designed by the National Wildlife Federation as supplementary materials for existing junior high school environmental curricula. This notebook contains nine different sections: an introduction, six content areas, a series of case studies, and a resource bibliography. The six content…

  11. SAMBA Project Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrhop, Christian; Vaidya, Raju; Mayora, Oscar; Furtado, Elizabeth

    The purpose of the SAMBA project, running from January 2007 to February 2009, was to create a framework for allowing local communities and citizens (including low income population) to access community-oriented content and services by means of iDTV channels, specifically MHP over DVB-T. This paper summarises the project and the experiences gained from it.

  12. The HALI Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Brad

    2011-01-01

    This article features The HALI Project and shares experiences that led to the first part of the project--Empowered Parents. This program taught parents how to first come to grips with the reality of their situation, then dream new, appropriate dreams for their children. From there it addressed understanding the ongoing emotional journey and how it…

  13. The Nordwrite Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evensen, Lars, Sigfred

    A planned 3-year joint project of the Nordic research council for the humanities that focuses on writing development in school-age children is described. Four Nordic countries are involved in the project: Finland, Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. In the study, discourse-level performance analyses of student writing in English as a Second Language are…

  14. The Comic Book Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitz, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Comic Book Project (CBP) celebrates its eighth anniversary this year. The project, which just originated with one school in New York City, had grown to encompass thousands of students nationwide. The goal of the CBP is not to create comics the "Marvel way" or to develop the next Stan Lee. Rather, the goal is to give students the opportunity to…

  15. Educational Project with MIND.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruddock, Helen; Worrall, Paul

    A project in creative writing and literacy was developed and implemented for people experiencing mental health difficulties. The project was a jointly organized activity between Dearne Valley College and Doncaster MIND in England. (MIND is a network of mental health associations in England and Wales.) The college counselor acted as the supervisor…

  16. Project Information Packages: Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RMC Research Corp., Mountain View, CA.

    This brochure describes a new series of Project Information Packages, a U.S. Office of Education response to the need for a systematic approach to disseminating exemplary projects. The packages describe procedures for developing the necessary administrative support and management framework, as well as instructional methods and techniques. The six…

  17. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed

    Olsen, G J; Overbeek, R; Larsen, N; Marsh, T L; McCaughey, M J; Maciukenas, M A; Kuan, W M; Macke, T J; Xing, Y; Woese, C R

    1992-05-11

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  18. Project New Pride: Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.

    The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Law Enforcement Assistance Administration, is establishing a new discretionary grant program entitled Replication of Project New Pride: A Serious Offender Youth Treatment Program. Project New Pride was chosen for replication because of its demonstrated effectiveness in Denver, Colorado,…

  19. Pakistan: Lifelong Literacy Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Work, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The article reports on progress towards lifelong literacy education in Pakistan, covering the project's introduction in 1972 and reviewing current activities in brief but concrete sketches of such topics as materials, operation of projects, and student drop-outs. Appendixes include a map and occupational breakdowns of teachers and students. (AJ)

  20. Projecting Personnel Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Philip T.

    Increased reliance on personnel services is placing school districts' business operations in a no-win situation. This report evaluates methods of student population projection in relation to teacher costs. Educational costs reflect personnel costs in light of a decrease in the number of pupils being served. Increased enrollment projections create…

  1. Designing job enrichment projects.

    PubMed

    Clakeley, G L

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a management strategy for a job satisfaction program utilized in a large occupational therapy department. The goal of the program is to retain satisfied, productive employees and reduce attrition of therapists and assistants. The use of job enrichment projects for occupational therapy assistants will be presented with brief descriptions of two projects.

  2. Intergenerational Projects: Idea Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Rebecca; Ventura-Merkel, Cathy; Eades-Goudy, Dianne; Dubich, Teresa

    This book profiles 74 intergenerational programs in the United States. The programs range from basic tutoring projects to a sophisticated corporate-based day care center. Project selection was based on replicatable programs involving mutually beneficial exchanges. Grouped by subjects, profiles include programs targeting both young and old. Most…

  3. Project Right Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Barbara B.

    The University-Urban Interface Program (UUIP) is a federally-funded project to study an urban university's community relations efforts and innovations, their successes and failures. This is a study of one of the UUIP areas of priority, Project Right Start, a plan for creating a facility for the detection and treatment of psychological problems in…

  4. Mathematics Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Adrien L.

    This handbook is designed as a guide for teachers and students in choosing and developing mathematics projects, from simple demonstrations of mathematical problems or principles that the teacher has assigned as classroom learning experiences to complex, sophisticated exhibits, intended for entrance in fairs and competitions. The use of projects to…

  5. Milford Visual Communications Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milford Exempted Village Schools, OH.

    This study discusses a visual communications project designed to develop activities to promote visual literacy at the elementary and secondary school levels. The project has four phases: (1) perception of basic forms in the environment, what these forms represent, and how they inter-relate; (2) discovery and communication of more complex…

  6. The Comic Book Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitz, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Comic Book Project (CBP) celebrates its eighth anniversary this year. The project, which just originated with one school in New York City, had grown to encompass thousands of students nationwide. The goal of the CBP is not to create comics the "Marvel way" or to develop the next Stan Lee. Rather, the goal is to give students the opportunity to…

  7. The Plate Tectonics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Plate Tectonics Project is a multiday, inquiry-based unit that facilitates students as self-motivated learners. Reliable Web sites are offered to assist with lessons, and a summative rubric is used to facilitate the holistic nature of the project. After each topic (parts of the Earth, continental drift, etc.) is covered, the students will…

  8. Understanding Population Projections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haub, Carl

    1987-01-01

    Population projections are "what if" computational exercises. Given selected assumptions about future trends in fertility, mortality, and migration, population trends can be projected. Government and business planners need this information, and they also require enough time to put facilities in place to meet future needs. Everyone benefits from a…

  9. Spray combustion stability project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes research activity on the Spray Combustion Stability Project, characterizes accomplishments and current status, and discusses projected future work. The purpose is to provide a concise conceptual overview of the research effort to date so the reader can quickly assimilate the gist of the research results and place them within the context of their potential impact on liquid rocket engine design technology.

  10. Small Projects First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shang-Kuei, Chen

    1975-01-01

    For thousands of years China has been troubled by droughts and floods. In the past 25 years, the country has worked to alleviate these problems. Numerous water conservation projects requiring the communal efforts of the people have been carried out. Record grain crops have resulted from these projects. (MA)

  11. Fundred Dollar Bill Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the Fundred Dollar Bill Project which is an innovative artwork made of millions of drawings. This creative collective action is intended to support Operation Paydirt, an extraordinary art/science project uniting three million children with educators, scientists, healthcare professionals, designers, urban planners, engineers,…

  12. Project Oriented Materials Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles V.

    The laboratory phase of a materials course at the General Motors Institute is described. In the first six weeks of the laboratory, each student works individually to learn laboratory techniques; in the last six weeks the students work in teams of two on a project. The students are responsible for writing a project proposal and a project…

  13. Project MAPP Management Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Lynne; And Others

    This guide provides materials related to the management of the Maryland Adult Performance Program (Project MAPP). The Project MAPP model is comprised of assessment, instruction, management/guidance, and staff development components. Section I provides the rationale for this competency-based educational delivery system for adult learners enrolled…

  14. Schoolyard Habitat Project Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Rich

    This project aims to provide basic steps for students to restore and create wildlife habitats on school grounds. Four chapters are included in this guide, and each chapter is divided into teacher and student sections. Chapter 1 provides necessary information for starting a habitat project. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 discuss the details for the Forest…

  15. The CLASS Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    The CLASS project is a series of investigations and projects designed by the National Wildlife Federation as supplementary materials for existing junior high school environmental curricula. This notebook contains nine different sections: an introduction, six content areas, a series of case studies, and a resource bibliography. The six content…

  16. Mathematics Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Adrien L.

    This handbook is designed as a guide for teachers and students in choosing and developing mathematics projects, from simple demonstrations of mathematical problems or principles that the teacher has assigned as classroom learning experiences to complex, sophisticated exhibits, intended for entrance in fairs and competitions. The use of projects to…

  17. The Moon Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Willmore, Sandra; Smith, Walter S.

    2006-01-01

    What Australia, Alaska, Qatar, Indiana, and Ohio have in common is the authentic writing More Observations Of Nature (MOON) project. In this unique project, teachers from these disparate geographic locations teamed up to instruct children in grades four through eight via the internet on a nearly universally challenging subject for teachers in the…

  18. Small Projects First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shang-Kuei, Chen

    1975-01-01

    For thousands of years China has been troubled by droughts and floods. In the past 25 years, the country has worked to alleviate these problems. Numerous water conservation projects requiring the communal efforts of the people have been carried out. Record grain crops have resulted from these projects. (MA)

  19. The Home Microbiome Project

    ScienceCinema

    Gilbert, Jack

    2016-07-12

    The Home Microbiome Project is an initiative aimed at uncovering the dynamic co-associations between people's bacteria and the bacteria found in their homes.The hope is that the data and project will show that routine monitoring of the microbial diversity of your body and of the environment in which you live is possible.

  20. The Home Microbiome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Jack

    2014-08-25

    The Home Microbiome Project is an initiative aimed at uncovering the dynamic co-associations between people's bacteria and the bacteria found in their homes.The hope is that the data and project will show that routine monitoring of the microbial diversity of your body and of the environment in which you live is possible.