Science.gov

Sample records for projection x-ray microscopy

  1. Recent trends of projection X-ray microscopy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yada, K.

    2009-08-01

    Recent activities of projection X-ray microscopy in Japan are reviewed. 1) By employing high brightness Schottky electron gun, resolution of 0.1 µm is realized by Tohken CO. group and some application examples are shown. 2) Deblurring of Fresnel diffracted image formed by synchrotron orbital radiation (SOR) X-rays is successfully tried by Chiba University group. Remarkable Fresnel fringes appearing at HeLa cell are mostly reconstructed by an iteration method. 3) Element analysis is carried out by Meiji University group utilizing absorption-edge characteristics between two kinds of X-ray targets without X-ray spectrometer. Actually, Cu and Ni targets are used with an inter-changeable system for elemental analysis of Fe 2O 3 particles and iron component in a mosquito larva.

  2. Fresnel diffraction correction by phase-considered iteration procedure in soft X-ray projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Honda, Toshio; Ito, Atsushi; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Yoshimura, Hideyuki; Yada, Keiji; Shinohara, Kunio

    2009-09-01

    In soft X-ray projection microscopy, it is easy to alter the magnification by changing the distance between the pinhole and the specimen, while the image is blurred because the soft X-rays are diffracted through the propagation from specimen to CCD detector. We corrected the blurred image by the iteration procedure of Fresnel to inverse Fresnel transformation taking phase distribution of the specimen into account. The experiments were conducted at the BL-11A of the Photon Factory, KEK, Japan for the specimens such as glass-capillaries, latex-particles, dried mammalian cells and human chromosomes. Many of those blurred images were corrected adequately by the iteration procedure, though some images such as those which have high-contrast or are overlapped by small cells still remain to be improved.

  3. Projection phase contrast microscopy with a hard x-ray nanofocused beam: Defocus and contrast transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Salditt, T.; Giewekemeyer, K.; Fuhse, C.; Krueger, S. P.; Tucoulou, R.; Cloetens, P.

    2009-05-01

    We report a projection phase contrast microscopy experiment using hard x-ray pink beam undulator radiation focused by an adaptive mirror system to 100-200 nm spot size. This source is used to illuminate a lithographic test pattern with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function with source-to-sample distance in this holographic imaging scheme is quantified and the validity of the weak phase object approximation is confirmed for the experimental conditions.

  4. Evaluation of noise limits to improve image processing in soft X-ray projection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jamsranjav, Erdenetogtokh; Kuge, Kenichi; Ito, Atsushi; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shiina, Tatsuo

    2017-03-03

    Soft X-ray microscopy has been developed for high resolution imaging of hydrated biological specimens due to the availability of water window region. In particular, a projection type microscopy has advantages in wide viewing area, easy zooming function and easy extensibility to computed tomography (CT). The blur of projection image due to the Fresnel diffraction of X-rays, which eventually reduces spatial resolution, could be corrected by an iteration procedure, i.e., repetition of Fresnel and inverse Fresnel transformations. However, it was found that the correction is not enough to be effective for all images, especially for images with low contrast. In order to improve the effectiveness of image correction by computer processing, we in this study evaluated the influence of background noise in the iteration procedure through a simulation study. In the study, images of model specimen with known morphology were used as a substitute for the chromosome images, one of the targets of our microscope. Under the condition that artificial noise was distributed on the images randomly, we introduced two different parameters to evaluate noise effects according to each situation where the iteration procedure was not successful, and proposed an upper limit of the noise within which the effective iteration procedure for the chromosome images was possible. The study indicated that applying the new simulation and noise evaluation method was useful for image processing where background noises cannot be ignored compared with specimen images.

  5. Micro-CT of Porous Apatite Fiber Scaffolds Studied by Projection X-ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, J.; Aizawa, M.; Yoshimura, H.

    2011-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been widely used as a scaffold for repairing fractured bone. For bone regeneration, the crystal structure, crystal orientation, and composition of HAp as well as the morphology of apatite scaffold are considered to be important. The apatite scaffold constructed by single-crystal fibers with pores showed good results for cellular response. Especially, apatite fiber scaffold (AFS) with large pores, 100 to 250 μm, was found to enhance cell activities such as cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of apatite scaffolds was investigated by means of x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT) using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) modified projection x-ray microscope. The 3-D structures of apatite fiber scaffolds (AFS) were reconstructed from a series of 180 x-ray projection images taken around a single rotation axis using the Feldkamp-based cone-beam reconstruction method. Extracted cross sections from CT data revealed a network-structure of apatite fibers. The distribution of pores inside the AFS in different preparations was compared.

  6. X-ray omni microscopy.

    PubMed

    Paganin, D; Gureyev, T E; Mayo, S C; Stevenson, A W; Nesterets, Ya I; Wilkins, S W

    2004-06-01

    The science of wave-field phase retrieval and phase measurement is sufficiently mature to permit the routine reconstruction, over a given plane, of the complex wave-function associated with certain coherent forward-propagating scalar wave-fields. This reconstruction gives total knowledge of the information that has been encoded in the complex wave-field by passage through a sample of interest. Such total knowledge is powerful, because it permits the emulation in software of the subsequent action of an infinite variety of coherent imaging systems. Such 'virtual optics', in which software forms a natural extension of the 'hardware optics' in an imaging system, may be useful in contexts such as quantitative atom and X-ray imaging, in which optical elements such as beam-splitters and lenses can be realized in software rather than optical hardware. Here, we develop the requisite theory to describe such hybrid virtual-physical imaging systems, which we term 'omni optics' because of their infinite flexibility. We then give an experimental demonstration of these ideas by showing that a lensless X-ray point projection microscope can, when equipped with the appropriate software, emulate an infinite variety of optical imaging systems including those which yield interferograms, Zernike phase contrast, Schlieren imaging and diffraction-enhanced imaging.

  7. Effect of contrast enhancement prior to iteration procedure on image correction for soft x-ray projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamsranjav, Erdenetogtokh; Shiina, Tatsuo; Kuge, Kenichi; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Nakamura, Yuichi; Shinohara, Kunio; Ito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Soft X-ray microscopy is well recognized as a powerful tool of high-resolution imaging for hydrated biological specimens. Projection type of it has characteristics of easy zooming function, simple optical layout and so on. However the image is blurred by the diffraction of X-rays, leading the spatial resolution to be worse. In this study, the blurred images have been corrected by an iteration procedure, i.e., Fresnel and inverse Fresnel transformations repeated. This method was confirmed by earlier studies to be effective. Nevertheless it was not enough to some images showing too low contrast, especially at high magnification. In the present study, we tried a contrast enhancement method to make the diffraction fringes clearer prior to the iteration procedure. The method was effective to improve the images which were not successful by iteration procedure only.

  8. Effect of contrast enhancement prior to iteration procedure on image correction for soft x-ray projection microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jamsranjav, Erdenetogtokh Shiina, Tatsuo Kuge, Kenichi; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Nakamura, Yuichi; Shinohara, Kunio; Ito, Atsushi

    2016-01-28

    Soft X-ray microscopy is well recognized as a powerful tool of high-resolution imaging for hydrated biological specimens. Projection type of it has characteristics of easy zooming function, simple optical layout and so on. However the image is blurred by the diffraction of X-rays, leading the spatial resolution to be worse. In this study, the blurred images have been corrected by an iteration procedure, i.e., Fresnel and inverse Fresnel transformations repeated. This method was confirmed by earlier studies to be effective. Nevertheless it was not enough to some images showing too low contrast, especially at high magnification. In the present study, we tried a contrast enhancement method to make the diffraction fringes clearer prior to the iteration procedure. The method was effective to improve the images which were not successful by iteration procedure only.

  9. Four-dimensional in vivo X-ray microscopy with projection-guided gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokso, Rajmund; Schwyn, Daniel A.; Walker, Simon M.; Doube, Michael; Wicklein, Martina; Müller, Tonya; Stampanoni, Marco; Taylor, Graham K.; Krapp, Holger G.

    2015-03-01

    Visualizing fast micrometer scale internal movements of small animals is a key challenge for functional anatomy, physiology and biomechanics. We combine phase contrast tomographic microscopy (down to 3.3 μm voxel size) with retrospective, projection-based gating (in the order of hundreds of microseconds) to improve the spatiotemporal resolution by an order of magnitude over previous studies. We demonstrate our method by visualizing 20 three-dimensional snapshots through the 150 Hz oscillations of the blowfly flight motor.

  10. Four-dimensional in vivo X-ray microscopy with projection-guided gating

    PubMed Central

    Mokso, Rajmund; Schwyn, Daniel A.; Walker, Simon M.; Doube, Michael; Wicklein, Martina; Müller, Tonya; Stampanoni, Marco; Taylor, Graham K.; Krapp, Holger G.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing fast micrometer scale internal movements of small animals is a key challenge for functional anatomy, physiology and biomechanics. We combine phase contrast tomographic microscopy (down to 3.3 μm voxel size) with retrospective, projection-based gating (in the order of hundreds of microseconds) to improve the spatiotemporal resolution by an order of magnitude over previous studies. We demonstrate our method by visualizing 20 three-dimensional snapshots through the 150 Hz oscillations of the blowfly flight motor. PMID:25762080

  11. X-ray deconvolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ehn, Sebastian; Epple, Franz Michael; Fehringer, Andreas; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in single-photon-counting detectors are enabling the development of novel approaches to reach micrometer-scale resolution in x-ray imaging. One example of such a technology are the MEDIPIX3RX-based detectors, such as the LAMBDA which can be operated with a small pixel size in combination with real-time on-chip charge-sharing correction. This characteristic results in a close to ideal, box-like point spread function which we made use of in this study. The proposed method is based on raster-scanning the sample with sub-pixel sized steps in front of the detector. Subsequently, a deconvolution algorithm is employed to compensate for blurring introduced by the overlap of pixels with a well defined point spread function during the raster-scanning. The presented approach utilizes standard laboratory x-ray equipment while we report resolutions close to 10 μm. The achieved resolution is shown to follow the relationship [Formula: see text] with the pixel-size p of the detector and the number of raster-scanning steps n.

  12. X-ray deconvolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ehn, Sebastian; Epple, Franz Michael; Fehringer, Andreas; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in single-photon-counting detectors are enabling the development of novel approaches to reach micrometer-scale resolution in x-ray imaging. One example of such a technology are the MEDIPIX3RX-based detectors, such as the LAMBDA which can be operated with a small pixel size in combination with real-time on-chip charge-sharing correction. This characteristic results in a close to ideal, box-like point spread function which we made use of in this study. The proposed method is based on raster-scanning the sample with sub-pixel sized steps in front of the detector. Subsequently, a deconvolution algorithm is employed to compensate for blurring introduced by the overlap of pixels with a well defined point spread function during the raster-scanning. The presented approach utilizes standard laboratory x-ray equipment while we report resolutions close to 10 μm. The achieved resolution is shown to follow the relationship pn with the pixel-size p of the detector and the number of raster-scanning steps n. PMID:27446649

  13. Soft x-ray holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stickler, Daniel; Froemter, Robert; Stillrich, Holger; Menk, Christian; Oepen, Hans Peter; Tieg, Carsten; Streit-Nierobisch, Simone; Sprung, Michael; Gutt, Christian; Stadler, Lorenz-M.; Leupold, Olaf; Gruebel, Gerhard

    2010-01-25

    We present a new x-ray microscopy technique based on Fourier transform holography (FTH), where the sample is separate from the optics part of the setup. The sample can be shifted with respect to the holography optics, thus large-scale or randomly distributed objects become accessible. As this extends FTH into a true microscopy technique, we call it x-ray holographic microscopy (XHM). FTH allows nanoscale imaging without the need for nanometer-size beams. Simple Fourier transform yields an unambiguous image reconstruction. We demonstrate XHM by studying the magnetic domain evolution of a Co/Pt multilayer film as function of locally varied iron overlayer thickness.

  14. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    SciTech Connect

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease.

  15. Contact x-ray microscopy using Asterix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Aldo; Batani, Dimitri; Botto, Cesare; Masini, Alessandra; Bernardinello, A.; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Moret, M.; Poletti, G.; Piccoli, S.; Cotelli, F.; Lora Lamia Donin, C.; Stead, Anthony D.; Marranca, A.; Eidmann, Klaus; Flora, Francesco; Palladino, Libero; Reale, Lucia

    1997-10-01

    The use of a high energy laser source for soft x-ray contact microscopy is discussed. Several different targets were used and their emission spectra compared. The x-ray emission, inside and outside the Water Window, was characterized in detail by means of many diagnostics, including pin hole and streak cameras. Up to 12 samples holders per shot were exposed thanks to the large x-ray flux and the geometry of the interaction chamber. Images of several biological samples were obtained, including Chlamydomonas and Crethidia green algae, fish and boar sperms and Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells. A 50 nm resolution was reached on the images of boar sperm. Original information concerning the density of inner structures of Crethidia green algae were obtained.

  16. Laboratory cryo soft X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hertz, H M; von Hofsten, O; Bertilson, M; Vogt, U; Holmberg, A; Reinspach, J; Martz, D; Selin, M; Christakou, A E; Jerlström-Hultqvist, J; Svärd, S

    2012-02-01

    Lens-based water-window X-ray microscopy allows two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) imaging of intact unstained cells in their near-native state with unprecedented contrast and resolution. Cryofixation is essential to avoid radiation damage to the sample. Present cryo X-ray microscopes rely on synchrotron radiation sources, thereby limiting the accessibility for a wider community of biologists. In the present paper we demonstrate water-window cryo X-ray microscopy with a laboratory-source-based arrangement. The microscope relies on a λ=2.48-nm liquid-jet high-brightness laser-plasma source, normal-incidence multilayer condenser optics, 30-nm zone-plate optics, and a cryo sample chamber. We demonstrate 2D imaging of test patterns, and intact unstained yeast, protozoan parasites and mammalian cells. Overview 3D information is obtained by stereo imaging while complete 3D microscopy is provided by full tomographic reconstruction. The laboratory microscope image quality approaches that of the synchrotron microscopes, but with longer exposure times. The experimental image quality is analyzed from a numerical wave-propagation model of the imaging system and a path to reach synchrotron-like exposure times in laboratory microscopy is outlined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Soft x-ray laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D.; Meixler, L.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.; Hirschberg, J.; Kohen, E.

    1987-12-31

    Microscopes based on soft X-ray lasers possess unique advantages in bridging the gap between high resolution electron microscopy of dehydrated, stained cells and light microscopy at comparatively low resolution of unaltered live cells. The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft X-ray lasers make them ideal for flash imaging of live specimens. The Princeton soft X-ray laser is based on a magnetically confined laser produced carbon plasma. Radiation cooling after the laser pulse produces rapid recombination which produces a population inversion and high gain. A full account is given in a companion paper in this volume. The important characteristics of the laser beam produced by this device are 1 to 3 mJ of 18.2 nm radiation in a 10 to 30 nsec pulse with a divergence of 5 mrad. The 18.2 nm wavelength, while outside the water window, does provide a factor of 3 difference in absorption coefficients between oxygen and carbon.

  18. Soft x-ray laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D. ); Meixler, L.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Hirschberg, J.; Kohen, E. . Dept. of Physics)

    1987-01-01

    Microscopes based on soft X-ray lasers possess unique advantages in bridging the gap between high resolution electron microscopy of dehydrated, stained cells and light microscopy at comparatively low resolution of unaltered live cells. The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft X-ray lasers make them ideal for flash imaging of live specimens. The Princeton soft X-ray laser is based on a magnetically confined laser produced carbon plasma. Radiation cooling after the laser pulse produces rapid recombination which produces a population inversion and high gain. A full account is given in a companion paper in this volume. The important characteristics of the laser beam produced by this device are 1 to 3 mJ of 18.2 nm radiation in a 10 to 30 nsec pulse with a divergence of 5 mrad. The 18.2 nm wavelength, while outside the water window, does provide a factor of 3 difference in absorption coefficients between oxygen and carbon.

  19. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  20. X-ray/EUV optics for astronomy, microscopy, polarimetry, and projection lithography; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 9-13, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Editor); Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Topics discussed in this issue include the fabrication of multilayer X-ray/EUV coatings; the design, characterization, and test of multilayer X-ray/EUV coatings; multilayer X-ray/EUV monochromators and imaging microscopes; X-ray/EUV telescopes; the test and calibration performance of X-ray/EUV instruments; XUV/soft X-ray projection lithography; X-ray/EUV space observatories and missions; X-ray/EUV telescopes for solar research; X-ray/EUV polarimetry; X-ray/EUV spectrographs; and X-ray/EUV filters and gratings. Papers are presented on the deposition-controlled uniformity of multilayer mirrors, interfaces in Mo/Si multilayers, the design and analysis of an aspherical multilayer imaging X-ray microscope, recent developments in the production of thin X-ray reflecting foils, and the ultraprecise scanning technology. Consideration is also given to an active sun telescope array, the fabrication and performance at 1.33 nm of a 0.24-micron-period multilayer grating, a cylindrical proportional counter for X-ray polarimetry, and the design and analysis of the reflection grating arrays for the X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission.

  1. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    SciTech Connect

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  2. X-ray microscopy of live biological micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja Al-Ani, Ma'an Nassar

    Real-time, compact x-ray microscopy has the potential to benefit many scientific fields, including microbiology, pharmacology, organic chemistry, and physics. Single frame x-ray micro-radiography, produced by a compact, solid-state laser plasma source, allows scientists to use x-ray emission for elemental analysis, and to observe biological specimens in their natural state. In this study, x-ray images of mouse kidney tissue, live bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia, and the bacteria's interaction with the antibiotic gentamicin, are examined using x-ray microscopy. For the purposes of comparing between confocal microscopy and x-ray microscopy, we introduced to our work the technique of gold labeling. Indirect immunofluorescence staining and immuno-gold labeling were applied on human lymphocytes and human tumor cells. Differential interference contrast microscopy (DIC) showed the lymphocyte body and nucleus, as did x-ray microscopy. However, the high resolution of x-ray microscopy allows us to differentiate between the gold particles bound to the antibodies and the free gold. A compact, tabletop Nd: glass laser is used in this study to produce x-rays from an Yttrium target. An atomic force microscope is used to scan the x-ray images from the developed photo-resist. The use of compact, tabletop laser plasma sources, in conjunction with x-ray microscopy, is a new technique that has great potential as a flexible, user-friendly scientific research tool.

  3. X-ray microscopy for neural circuit reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Haruo; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Momose, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2009-09-01

    Neural circuits in the central nervous system build our various higher brain functions. However, little is known about mechanisms underlying neuronal information processing in the brain. Anatomical graph structures of real neural networks will provide us with fundamental views to elucidate them. We aim at developing a three-dimensional atlas of neural circuits using high resolution hard X-ray microscopy by synchrotron radiation. We stained neurons of a complete brain from a mouse by the Golgi-Cox method. The heavy metals used in our procedure enhanced X-ray absorption and phase contrast. 3D images of fibriform axons and dendrites of various neurons were reconstructed by back projection. X-ray microscopy with a Talbot interferometer demonstrated finer histological structures of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex. This observation probably serves as a foundation for achieving a mammalian Connectome Project (identifying complete wiring diagrams of the brain) with X-ray nano-tomography in the near future.

  4. X-ray holographic microscopy: Improved images of zymogen granules

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, C.; Howells, M.; Kirz, J.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.

    1988-10-01

    Soft x-ray holography has long been considered as a technique for x-ray microscopy. It has been only recently, however, that sub-micron resolution has been obtained in x-ray holography. This paper will concentrate on recent progress we have made in obtaining reconstructed images of improved quality. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  5. HERMES: a soft X-ray beamline dedicated to X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Belkhou, Rachid; Stanescu, Stefan; Swaraj, Sufal; Besson, Adrien; Ledoux, Milena; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Dalle, Didier

    2015-07-01

    The HERMES beamline (High Efficiency and Resolution beamline dedicated to X-ray Microscopy and Electron Spectroscopy), built at Synchrotron SOLEIL (Saint-Auban, France), is dedicated to soft X-ray microscopy. The beamline combines two complementary microscopy methods: XPEEM (X-ray Photo Emitted Electron Microscopy) and STXM (Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy) with an aim to reach spatial resolution below 20 nm and to fully exploit the local spectroscopic capabilities of the two microscopes. The availability of the two methods within the same beamline enables the users to select the appropriate approach to study their specific case in terms of sample environment, spectroscopy methods, probing depth etc. In this paper a general description of the beamline and its design are presented. The performance and specifications of the beamline will be reviewed in detail. Moreover, the article is aiming to demonstrate how the beamline performances have been specifically optimized to fulfill the specific requirements of a soft X-ray microscopy beamline in terms of flux, resolution, beam size etc. Special attention has been dedicated to overcome some limiting and hindering problems that are usually encountered on soft X-ray beamlines such as carbon contamination, thermal stability and spectral purity.

  6. Hard x-ray Zernike microscopy reaches 30 nm resolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chen, T.; Yi, J.; Chu, Y.; Lee, W.-K.; Wang, C.; Kempson, I.; Hwu, Y.; Gajdosik, V.; Margaritondo, G.

    2011-03-30

    Since its invention in 1930, Zernike phase contrast has been a pillar in optical microscopy and more recently in x-ray microscopy, in particular for low-absorption-contrast biological specimens. We experimentally demonstrate that hard-x-ray Zernike microscopy now reaches a lateral resolution below 30?nm while strongly enhancing the contrast, thus opening many new research opportunities in biomedicine and materials science.

  7. Hard x-ray Zernike Microscopy Reaches 30 nm Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.T.; Chu, Y.; Chen, T-Y.; Yi, J.; Lee, W-K.; Wang, C-L.; Kempson, I. M.; Hwu, Y.; Gajdosik, V.; Margaritondo, G.

    2011-03-30

    Since its invention in 1930, Zernike phase contrast has been a pillar in optical microscopy and more recently in x-ray microscopy, in particular for low-absorption-contrast biological specimens. We experimentally demonstrate that hard-x-ray Zernike microscopy now reaches a lateral resolution below 30 nm while strongly enhancing the contrast, thus opening many new research opportunities in biomedicine and materials science.

  8. The Scanning X-Ray Microprobe at the Esrf ``X-Ray Microscopy'' Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susini, J.; Salomé, M.; Fayard, B.; Ortega, R.; Kaulich, B.

    The development of high brilliance X-ray sources coupled with advances in manufacturing technologies of focusing optics has led to significant improvements in submicrometer probes for spectroscopy, diffraction and imaging applications. For instance, X-ray microscopy in the 1-10 keV energy range is better-suited for analyzing trace elements in fluorescence yield. This article will be biased towards submicron fluorescence microscopy developed on the ID21 beamline at the ESRF. The main technical developments, involving new focusing lenses or novel phase contrast method, are presented. Strengths and weaknesses of X-ray microscopy and spectromicroscopy techniques are discussed and illustrated by examples in biology, materials science and geology.

  9. X-ray laser microscopy of rat sperm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B. ); Trebes, J.E.; Balhorn, R.; Mrowka, S.; Barbee, T.W.Jr.; Brase, J.; Corzett, M.; Koch, J.A.; Lee, C.; London, R.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Stone, G. ); Anderson, E.; Attwood, D.T. ); Gray, J. ); Kern, D. )

    1992-10-09

    The development of high brightness and short pulse width x-ray lasers now offers biologists the possibility of high-resolution imaging of specimens in an aqueous environment without the blurring effects associated with natural motions and chemical erosion. As a step toward developing the capabilities of this type of x-ray microscopy, a tantalum x-ray laser at 44.83 angstrom wavelength was used together with an x-ray zone plate lens to image both unlabeled and selectively gold-labeled dried rat sperm nuclei. The observed images show {approximately}500 angstrom features, illustrate the importance of x-ray microscopy in determining chemical composition, and provide information about the uniformity of sperm chromatin organization and the extent of sperm chromatin hydration.

  10. X-ray laser microscopy of rat sperm nuclei.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, L B; Trebes, J E; Balhorn, R; Mrowka, S; Anderson, E; Attwood, D T; Barbee, T W; Brase, J; Corzett, M; Gray, J

    1992-10-09

    The development of high brightness and short pulse width (< 200 picoseconds) x-ray lasers now offers biologists the possibility of high-resolution imaging of specimens in an aqueous environment without the blurring effects associated with natural motions and chemical erosion. As a step toward developing the capabilities of this type of x-ray microscopy, a tantalum x-ray laser at 44.83 angstrom wavelength was used together with an x-ray zone plate lens to image both unlabeled and selectively gold-labeled dried rat sperm nuclei. The observed images show approximately 500 angstrom features, illustrate the importance of x-ray microscopy in determining chemical composition, and provide information about the uniformity of sperm chromatin organization and the extent of sperm chromatin hydration.

  11. Development of Cell Staining Technique for X-Ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, P. Y.; Shih, Y. T.; Liu, C. J.; Hsu, T.; Chien, C. C.; Leng, W. H.; Liang, K. S.; Yin, G. C.; Chen, F. R.; Je, J. H.; Margaritondo, G.; Hwu, Y.

    2007-01-19

    We report a technique for detection of sub-cellular organelles and proteins with hard x-ray microscopy. Several metals were used for enhancing contrast for x-ray microscopy. Osmium tetroxide provides an excellent stain for lipid and can delineate cell membrane. Uranyl acetate has high affinity for nucleotide and can stain nucleus. Immunolocalization of specific proteins and sub-cellular organelles was achieved by 3'3 diaminobenzidine (DAB) with nickel enhancement and nanogold-conjugated secondary antibody with silver enhancement. The x-rays emitted from synchrotron source was monochromatized by double crystal monochromator, the photon energy was fixed at 8 keV to optimize the focusing efficiency of the zone plates. The estimated resolution is about 60 nm. When compared with visible light and conventional confocal microscopy, the X-ray microscopy provides a superior resolution to both conventional optical microscopes.

  12. Refractive Optics for Hard X-ray Transmission Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Last, A.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Reznikova, E.; Ahrens, G.; Voigt, A.

    2011-09-09

    For hard x-ray transmission microscopy at photon energies higher than 15 keV we design refractive condenser and imaging elements to be used with synchrotron light sources as well as with x-ray tube sources. The condenser lenses are optimized for low x-ray attenuation--resulting in apertures greater than 1 mm--and homogeneous intensity distribution on the detector plane, whereas the imaging enables high-resolution (<100 nm) full-field imaging. To obtain high image quality at reasonable exposure times, custom-tailored matched pairs of condenser and imaging lenses are being developed. The imaging lenses (compound refractive lenses, CRLs) are made of SU-8 negative resist by deep x-ray lithography. SU-8 shows high radiation stability. The fabrication technique enables high-quality lens structures regarding surface roughness and arrangement precision with arbitrary 2D geometry. To provide point foci, crossed pairs of lenses are used. Condenser lenses have been made utilizing deep x-ray lithographic patterning of thick SU-8 layers, too, whereas in this case, the aperture is limited due to process restrictions. Thus, in terms of large apertures, condenser lenses made of structured and rolled polyimide film are more attractive. Both condenser types, x-ray mosaic lenses and rolled x-ray prism lenses (RXPLs), are considered to be implemented into a microscope setup. The x-ray optical elements mentioned above are characterized with synchrotron radiation and x-ray laboratory sources, respectively.

  13. X-ray and electron microscopy of actinide materials.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kevin T

    2010-06-01

    Actinide materials demonstrate a wide variety of interesting physical properties in both bulk and nanoscale form. To better understand these materials, a broad array of microscopy techniques have been employed, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), high-angle annular dark-field imaging (HAADF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDXS), electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Here these techniques will be reviewed, highlighting advances made in the physics, materials science, chemistry, and biology of actinide materials through microscopy. Construction of a spin-polarized TEM will be discussed, considering its potential for examining the nanoscale magnetic structure of actinides as well as broader materials and devices, such as those for computational magnetic memory. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.; Lima, E.; Huang, X.; Krupin, O.; Seu, K.; Parks, D.; Kevan, S.; Kisslinger, K.; McNulty, I.; Gambino, R.; Mangin, S.; Roy, S. and Fischer, P.

    2011-07-14

    We report the first proof-of-principle experiment of iterative phase retrieval from magnetic x-ray diffraction. By using the resonant x-ray excitation process and coherent x-ray scattering, we show that linearly polarized soft x rays can be used to image both the amplitude and the phase of magnetic domain structures. We recovered the magnetic structure of an amorphous terbium-cobalt thin film with a spatial resolution of about 75 nm at the Co L{sub 3} edge at 778 eV. In comparison with soft x-ray microscopy images recorded with Fresnel zone plate optics at better than 25 nm spatial resolution, we find qualitative agreement in the observed magnetic structure.

  15. A hard X-ray nanoprobe beamline for nanoscale microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winarski, Robert P.; Holt, Martin V.; Rose, Volker; Fuesz, Peter; Carbaugh, Dean; Benson, Christa; Shu, Deming; Kline, David; Stephenson, G. Brian; McNulty, Ian; Maser, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline (or Nanoprobe Beamline) is an X-ray microscopy facility incorporating diffraction, fluorescence and full-field imaging capabilities designed and operated by the Center for Nanoscale Materials and the Advanced Photon Source at Sector 26 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility was constructed to probe the nanoscale structure of biological, environmental and material sciences samples. The beamline provides intense focused X-rays to the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (or Nanoprobe) which incorporates Fresnel zone plate optics and a precision laser sensing and control system. The beamline operates over X-ray energies from 3 to 30 keV, enabling studies of most elements in the periodic table, with a particular emphasis on imaging transition metals. PMID:23093770

  16. Sixth International Conference on X-ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1999-08-23

    More than 180 participants from around the world crowded the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California, Berkeley, from August 1-6, 1999 for the Sixth International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy (XRM99). Held every three years since 1983, the XRM conferences have become the primary international forum for the presentation and discussion of advances in high-spatial-resolution x-ray imaging and applications (including the use of x-ray spectroscopic and analytical techniques) in biological and medical sciences, environmental and soil sciences, and materials and surface sciences.

  17. Cryogenic X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy for Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Enju; Wiegart, Lutz; Pernot, Petra; Howells, Malcolm; Timmins, Joanna; Zontone, Federico; Madsen, Anders

    2009-11-06

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is well suited for nondestructive, high-resolution biological imaging, especially for thick samples, with the high penetration power of x rays and without limitations imposed by a lens. We developed nonvacuum, cryogenic (cryo-) XDM with hard x rays at 8 keV and report the first frozen-hydrated imaging by XDM. By preserving samples in amorphous ice, the risk of artifacts associated with dehydration or chemical fixation is avoided, ensuring the imaging condition closest to their natural state. The reconstruction shows internal structures of intact D. radiodurans bacteria in their natural contrast.

  18. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Towards high-resolution ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2011-06-01

    Ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy is a lensless imaging technique with a large field of view and high spatial resolution, which is also useful for characterizing the wavefront of an x-ray probe. The performance of this technique is degraded by positioning errors due to the drift between the sample and illumination optics. We propose an experimental approach for correcting the positioning errors and demonstrate success by two-dimensionally reconstructing both the wavefront of the focused x-ray beam and the complex transmissivity of the weakly scattering objects at the pixel resolution of better than 10 nm in the field of view larger than 5 {mu}m. This method is applicable to not only the observation of organelles inside cells or nano-mesoscale structures buried within bulk materials but also the characterization of probe for single-shot imaging with x-ray free electron lasers.

  20. Combining scanning probe microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A new versatile tool, combining Shear Force Microscopy and X-Ray Spectroscopy was designed and constructed to obtain simultaneously surface topography and chemical mapping. Using a sharp optical fiber as microscope probe, it is possible to collect locally the visible luminescence of the sample. Results of tests on ZnO and on ZnWO4 thin layers are in perfect agreement with that obtained with other conventional techniques. Twin images obtained by simultaneous acquisition in near field of surface topography and of local visible light emitted by the sample under X-Ray irradiation in synchrotron environment are shown. Replacing the optical fibre by an X-ray capillary, it is possible to collect local X-ray fluorescence of the sample. Preliminary results on Co-Ti sample analysis are presented. PMID:21711848

  1. Hard X-ray Microscopy with Multilayer Laue Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyon Chol

    2011-03-01

    The possibility of imaging at near-atomic resolution using x-rays has been a dream ever since the short-wavelength nature of x-rays was demonstrated by von Laue and coworkers nearly a century ago. Even today the scientific impact of atomic-scale focusing of electromagnetic radiation would be deep and broad, because x-ray microscopy provides capabilities (ability to penetrate, sensitive and accurate elemental and structural information) that are complementary to other high-resolution microscopies. Although hard x-rays can in principle be focused to spot sizes on the order of their wavelength (0.1 nm), this limit has never been approached because of the difficulty in fabricating the optics. Multilayer Laue lens(MLL) is a novel diffractive optic for hard x-ray nano-focusing, which can be fabricated by sputter deposition of zone plate structure on flat substrate. According to the theoretical results, MLL is capable of focusing x-rays to well below 1 nm. We have demonstrated 2-dimensional focusing of hard x-rays with MLLs to a spot size of 25 nm x 27 nm with an efficiency of 2% at a photon energy of 12 keV, while 1-dimensional focus of 16 nm has been achieved. In this talk, we will present an overview of MLL microscopy and recent accomplishments for the determination of chemical composition in nanoscale systems. Lastly, we will give the capabilities of MLL microscopy that have the potential to significantly advance materials science, nanoscience, bio-medical science and environmental science.

  2. Broadband X-ray full field microscopy at a superbend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Mikuljan, G.; Jefimovs, K.; Trtik, P.; Vila-Comamala, J.; David, C.; Abela, R.

    2009-09-01

    Over the last decade, synchrotron-radiation based X-ray Tomographic Microscopy (SRXTM) has established itself as a fundamental tool for non-invasive, quantitative investigations of a broad variety of samples, with application ranging from space research and materials science to biology and medicine. The beamline for TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs (TOMCAT) has been recently equipped with a full field, hard X-ray microscope with a theoretical pixel size down to 30 nm and a field of view of 50 microns. The nanoscope performs well at X-ray energies between 8 and 12 keV: here we illustrate the experimental setup and the performance of the instrument in both microscopy and tomography mode.

  3. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A. M.; Sayre, D.

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  4. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; ...

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffractionmore » microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.« less

  5. Exploring nanomagnetism with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.; Kim, D.-H.; Mesler, B.L.; Chao, W.; Sakdinawat,A.E.; Anderson, E.H.

    2006-10-30

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy images magnetism in nanoscale systems with a spatial resolution down to 15nm provided by state-of-the-art Fresnel zone plate optics. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) is used as element-specific magnetic contrast mechanism similar to photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), however, with volume sensitivity and the ability to record the images in varying applied magnetic fields which allows to study magnetization reversal processes at fundamental length scales. Utilizing a stroboscopic pump-probe scheme one can investigate fast spin dynamics with a time resolution down to 70 ps which gives access to precessional and relaxation phenomena as well as spin torque driven domain wall dynamics in nanoscale systems. Current developments in zone plate optics aim for a spatial resolution towards 10nm and at next generation X-ray sources a time resolution in the fsec regime can be envisioned.

  6. Applications of Hard X-ray Full-Field Transmission X-ray Microscopy at SSRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Andrews, J. C.; Meirer, F.; Mehta, A.; Gil, S. Carrasco; Sciau, P.; Mester, Z.; Pianetta, P.

    2011-09-01

    State-of-the-art hard x-ray full-field transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) at beamline 6-2C of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource has been applied to various research fields including biological, environmental, and material studies. With the capability of imaging a 32-micron field-of-view at 30-nm resolution using both absorption mode and Zernike phase contrast, the 3D morphology of yeast cells grown in gold-rich media was investigated. Quantitative evaluation of the absorption coefficient was performed for mercury nanoparticles in alfalfa roots exposed to mercury. Combining XANES and TXM, we also performed XANES-imaging on an ancient pottery sample from the Roman pottery workshop at LaGraufesenque (Aveyron).

  7. In Operando X-ray diffraction and transmission X-ray microscopy of lithium sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Johanna; Misra, Sumohan; Yang, Yuan; Jackson, Ariel; Liu, Yijin; Wang, Hailiang; Dai, Hongjie; Andrews, Joy C; Cui, Yi; Toney, Michael F

    2012-04-11

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high-performance energy storage systems because they have a high theoretical specific energy, low cost, and are eco-friendly. However, the structural and morphological changes during electrochemical reactions are still not well understood. In this Article, these changes in Li-S batteries are studied in operando by X-ray diffraction and transmission X-ray microscopy. We show recrystallization of sulfur by the end of the charge cycle is dependent on the preparation technique of the sulfur cathode. On the other hand, it was found that crystalline Li(2)S does not form at the end of discharge for all sulfur cathodes studied. Furthermore, during cycling the bulk of soluble polysulfides remains trapped within the cathode matrix. Our results differ from previous ex situ results. This highlights the importance of in operando studies and suggests possible strategies to improve cycle life.

  8. Applications of Hard X-ray Full-Field Transmission X-ray Microscopy at SSRL

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Andrews, J. C.; Mehta, A.; Pianetta, P.; Meirer, F.; Gil, S. Carrasco; Sciau, P.; Mester, Z.

    2011-09-09

    State-of-the-art hard x-ray full-field transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) at beamline 6-2C of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource has been applied to various research fields including biological, environmental, and material studies. With the capability of imaging a 32-micron field-of-view at 30-nm resolution using both absorption mode and Zernike phase contrast, the 3D morphology of yeast cells grown in gold-rich media was investigated. Quantitative evaluation of the absorption coefficient was performed for mercury nanoparticles in alfalfa roots exposed to mercury. Combining XANES and TXM, we also performed XANES-imaging on an ancient pottery sample from the Roman pottery workshop at LaGraufesenque (Aveyron).

  9. Zernike phase contrast in scanning microscopy with X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Holzner, Christian; Feser, Michael; Vogt, Stefan; Hornberger, Benjamin; Baines, Stephen B.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Scanning X-ray microscopy focuses radiation to a small spot and probes the sample by raster scanning. It allows information to be obtained from secondary signals such as X-ray fluorescence, which yields an elemental mapping of the sample not available in full-field imaging. The analysis and interpretation from these secondary signals can be considerably enhanced if these data are coupled with structural information from transmission imaging. However, absorption often is negligible and phase contrast has not been easily available. Originally introduced with visible light, Zernike phase contrast1 is a well-established technique in full-field X-ray microscopes for visualization of weakly absorbing samples2–7. On the basis of reciprocity, we demonstrate the implementation of Zernike phase contrast in scanning X-ray microscopy, revealing structural detail simultaneously with hard-X-ray trace-element measurements. The method is straightforward to implement without significant influence on the resolution of the fluorescence images and delivers complementary information. We show images of biological specimens that clearly demonstrate the advantage of correlating morphology with elemental information. PMID:21544232

  10. Zernike phase contrast in scanning microscopy with X-rays.

    PubMed

    Holzner, Christian; Feser, Michael; Vogt, Stefan; Hornberger, Benjamin; Baines, Stephen B; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-11-01

    Scanning X-ray microscopy focuses radiation to a small spot and probes the sample by raster scanning. It allows information to be obtained from secondary signals such as X-ray fluorescence, which yields an elemental mapping of the sample not available in full-field imaging. The analysis and interpretation from these secondary signals can be considerably enhanced if these data are coupled with structural information from transmission imaging. However, absorption often is negligible and phase contrast has not been easily available. Originally introduced with visible light, Zernike phase contrast(1) is a well-established technique in full-field X-ray microscopes for visualization of weakly absorbing samples(2-7). On the basis of reciprocity, we demonstrate the implementation of Zernike phase contrast in scanning X-ray microscopy, revealing structural detail simultaneously with hard-X-ray trace-element measurements. The method is straightforward to implement without significant influence on the resolution of the fluorescence images and delivers complementary information. We show images of biological specimens that clearly demonstrate the advantage of correlating morphology with elemental information.

  11. Compact water-window transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Berglund, M; Rymell, L; Peuker, M; Wilhein, T; Hertz, H M

    2000-03-01

    We demonstrate sub-100 nm resolution water-window soft X-ray full-field transmission microscopy with a compact system. The microscope operates at lambda = 3.37 nm and is based on a 100 Hz table-top regenerative debris-free droplet-target laser-plasma X-ray source in combination with normal-incidence multilayer condenser optics for sample illumination. High-spatial-resolution imaging is performed with a 7.3% efficiency nickel zone plate and a 1024 x 1024 pixel CCD detector. Images of dry test samples are recorded with exposure times of a few minutes and show features smaller than 60 nm.

  12. Near-edge X-ray refraction fine structure microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Farmand, Maryam; Celestre, Richard; Denes, Peter; ...

    2017-02-06

    We demonstrate a method for obtaining increased spatial resolution and specificity in nanoscale chemical composition maps through the use of full refractive reference spectra in soft x-ray spectro-microscopy. Using soft x-ray ptychography, we measure both the absorption and refraction of x-rays through pristine reference materials as a function of photon energy and use these reference spectra as the basis for decomposing spatially resolved spectra from a heterogeneous sample, thereby quantifying the composition at high resolution. While conventional instruments are limited to absorption contrast, our novel refraction based method takes advantage of the strongly energy dependent scattering cross-section and can seemore » nearly five-fold improved spatial resolution on resonance.« less

  13. Hard x-ray scanning microscopy with coherent radiation: Beyond the resolution of conventional x-ray microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Schropp, A.; Hoppe, R.; Patommel, J.; Samberg, D.; Seiboth, F.; Stephan, S.; Schroer, C. G.; Wellenreuther, G.; Falkenberg, G.

    2012-06-18

    We demonstrate x-ray scanning coherent diffraction microscopy (ptychography) with 10 nm spatial resolution, clearly exceeding the resolution limits of conventional hard x-ray microscopy. The spatial resolution in a ptychogram is shown to depend on the shape (structure factor) of a feature and can vary for different features in the object. In addition, the resolution and contrast are shown to increase with increasing coherent fluence. For an optimal ptychographic x-ray microscope, this implies a source with highest possible brilliance and an x-ray optic with a large numerical aperture to generate the optimal probe beam.

  14. REVIEW: Projection x-ray lithography implemented using point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukov, I. A.; Balakireva, L. L.; Bijkerk, F.; Vinogradov, Aleksandr V.; Zorev, N. N.; Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Kondratenko, V. V.; Ogurtsov, O. F.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Fedorenko, A. I.

    1992-02-01

    An analysis is made of the state of the art of x-ray lithography and x-ray optics. The principles of design and configurations of projection x-ray lithographic systems are considered. An analysis is made of the main trends of research on these topics proceeding in the laboratories in the Soviet Union, USA, Japan, and Great Britain. The problems encountered in the development of multilayer normal-incidence x-ray mirrors are described.

  15. PREFACE: 9th International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quitmann, Christoph; David, Christian; Nolting, Frithjof; Pfeiffer, Franz; Stampanoni, Marco

    2009-09-01

    Conference logo This volume compiles the contributions to the International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy (XRM2008) held on 20-25 July 2008 in Zurich, Switzerland. The conference was the ninth in a series which started in Göttingen in 1984. Over the years the XRM conference series has served as a forum bringing together all relevant players working on the development of methods, building instrumentation, and applying x-ray microscopy to challenging issues in materials science, condensed matter research, environmental science and biology. XRM2008 was attended by about 300 participants who followed 44 oral presentations and presented 220 posters. Conference photograph Figure 1: Participants of the XRM2008 conference gathered in front of the main building of the ETH-Zurich. The conference showed that x-ray microscopy has become a mature field resting on three pillars. The first are workhorse instruments available even to non-specialist users. These exist at synchrotron sources world-wide as well as in laboratories. They allow the application of established microscopy methods to solve scientific projects in areas as diverse as soil science, the investigation of cometary dust particles, magnetic materials, and the analysis of ancient parchments. Examples of all of these projects can be found in this volume. These instruments have become so well understood that now they are also commercially available. The second pillar is the continued development of methods. Methods like stroboscopic imaging, wet cells or high and low temperature environments add versatility to the experiments. Methods like phase retrieval and ptychographic imaging allow the retrieval of information which hitero was thought to be inaccessible. The third pillar is the extension of such instruments and methods to new photon sources. With x-ray free electron lasers on the horizon the XRM community is working to transfer their know-how to these novel sources which will offer unprecedented brightness and

  16. Phase contrast hard x-ray microscopy with submicron resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, S.; Cedola, A.; Cloetens, P.; Di Fonzo, S.; Jark, W.; Soullie, G.; Riekel, C.

    1997-11-01

    In this letter we present a hard x-ray phase contrast microscope based on the divergent and coherent beam exiting an x-ray waveguide. It uses lensless geometrical projection to magnify spatial variations in optical path length more than 700 times. Images of a nylon fiber and a gold test pattern were obtained with a resolution of 0.14 {mu}m in one direction. Exposure times as short as 0.1 s gave already visible contrast, opening the way to high resolution, real time studies. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Soft x-ray holography and microscopy of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwen; Gao, Hongyi; Xie, Honglan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2003-10-01

    Some experimental results on soft X-ray microscopy and holography imaging of biological specimens are presented in the paper. As we know, due to diffraction effects, there exists a resolution limit determined by wavelength λ and numerical aperture NA in conventional optical microscopy. In order to improve resolution, the num erical aperture should be made as large as possible and the wavelength as short as possible. Owing to the shorter wavelength, X-rays provide the potential of higher resolution in X-ray microscopy, holography image and allow for exam ination the interior structures of thicker specimens. In the experiments, we used synchrotron radiation source in Hefei as light source. Soft X-rays come from a bending magnet in 800 M eV electron storage ring with characteristic wavelength of 2.4 nm. The continuous X-ray spectrums are monochromatized by a zone-plate and a pinhole with 300 m diameter. The experimental set-up is typical contact microscopic system, its main advantage is simplicity and no special optical element is needed. The specimens used in the experiments of microscopic imaging are the colibacillus, the gingko vascular hundle and the fritillaries ovary karyon. The specimen for holographic imaging is the spider filam ents. The basic structures of plant cells such as the cell walls, the cytoplasm and the karyon especially the joint structures between the cells are observed clearly. An experimental study on a thick biological specimen that is a whole sporule w ith the thickness of about 30 μm is performed. In the holographic experiments, the experimental setup is typical Gabor in-line holography. The specimen is placed in line with X-ray source, which provides both the reference w aves and specimen illum ination. The specimen is some spider filament, which adhere to a Si3N4 film. The recording medium is PM M A, which is placed at recording distance of about 400 μm from the specimen. The hologram s were reconstructed by digital method with 300 nm

  18. Elemental imaging of cartilage by scanning x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, C.J.; Foster, G.F.; Burge, R.E. ); Ali, S.Y.; Scotchford, C.A. , Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex ); Kirz, J. ); Rivers, M.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Elemental imaging via scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) and scanning fluorescence x-ray microscopy (SFXM) has been used to image calcium deposits in cartilage. In the case of STXM, 0.1 {mu}m thick sections were imaged to investigate the proximity of calcium deposits in relation to chondrocyte cells. The resolution available was 0.5 {mu}m, and field widths of up to 25 {mu}m were used at this resolution. The resolution available in SFXM was 10 {mu}m, and field widths of up to 2 mm were used at this resolution on 5-{mu}m thick specimens. Together these techniques were used to map calcium deposits at the cellular level, and at the full tissue size level.

  19. X-ray fluorescence microscopy of olfactory receptor neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dučić, T.; Breunig, E.; Schild, D.; Herbst, J.; Nováková, E.; Susini, J.; Tucoulu, R.; Salditt, T.

    2009-09-01

    We report a x-ray fluorescence microscopy study of cells and tissues from the olfactory system of Xenopus laevis. In this experiment we focus on sample preparation and experimental issues, and present first results of fluorescence maps of the elemental distribution of Cl, K, Ca, P, S and Na both in individual isolated neural cells and in cross-sections of the same tissue.

  20. Calcified-tissue investigations using synchrotron x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Schidlovsky, G.; Dejun, X. ); Bockman, R.S. . Medical Coll.); Rabinowitz, M.B. ); Hammond, P.B.; Bornschein, R.L. ); Hoeltzel, D.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Synchrotron x-ray microscopy (SXRM) in both emission and absorption modes has been used to examine elemental distributions in specimens of rat tibia, human deciduous teeth, and an orthopedic implant phantom. The work was performed with a spatial resolution of 8 {mu}m for the emission work and 25 {mu}m for the absorption work. The results illustrate the usefulness of SXRM for measurements of different types of calcified tissue. 3 figs.

  1. Characterizing automotive fuel cell materials by soft x-ray scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, A. P.; Lee, V.; Wu, J.; West, M. M.; Cooper, G.; Berejnov, V.; Soboleva, T.; Susac, D.; Stumper, J.

    2016-01-01

    Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEM-FC) based engines are being developed rapidly for near-term implementation in hydrogen fueled, mass production, personal automobiles. Research is focused on understanding and controlling various degradation processes (carbon corrosion, Pt migration, cold start), and reducing cost by reducing or eliminating Pt catalyst. We are using soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the S 2p, C 1s, O 1s and F 1s edges to study a variety of issues related to optimization of PEM-FC materials for automotive applications. A method to efficiently and accurately measure perfluorosulfonic acid distributions was developed and is being used to better understand how different loadings and preparation methods affect the ionomer distribution in the cathode. Progress towards an environmental cell capable of controlling the temperature and humidity of a PEM-FC sample in the STXM is described. Methods for studying the 3D chemical structure of PEM-FC are outlined.

  2. Characterizing automotive fuel cell materials by soft x-ray scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, A. P. Lee, V.; Wu, J.; Cooper, G.; West, M. M.; Berejnov, V.; Soboleva, T.; Susac, D.; Stumper, J.

    2016-01-28

    Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEM-FC) based engines are being developed rapidly for near-term implementation in hydrogen fueled, mass production, personal automobiles. Research is focused on understanding and controlling various degradation processes (carbon corrosion, Pt migration, cold start), and reducing cost by reducing or eliminating Pt catalyst. We are using soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the S 2p, C 1s, O 1s and F 1s edges to study a variety of issues related to optimization of PEM-FC materials for automotive applications. A method to efficiently and accurately measure perfluorosulfonic acid distributions was developed and is being used to better understand how different loadings and preparation methods affect the ionomer distribution in the cathode. Progress towards an environmental cell capable of controlling the temperature and humidity of a PEM-FC sample in the STXM is described. Methods for studying the 3D chemical structure of PEM-FC are outlined.

  3. Simultaneous X-ray fluorescence and scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron XFM beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Michael W. M.; Phillips, Nicholas W.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Vine, David J.; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Mudie, Stephen T.; Afshar, Nader; Kirkham, Robin; Chen, Bo; Balaur, Eugeniu; de Jonge, Martin D.

    2016-08-11

    Owing to its extreme sensitivity, quantitative mapping of elemental distributionsviaX-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has become a key microanalytical technique. The recent realisation of scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXDM) meanwhile provides an avenue for quantitative super-resolved ultra-structural visualization. The similarity of their experimental geometries indicates excellent prospects for simultaneous acquisition. Here, in both step- and fly-scanning modes, robust, simultaneous XFM-SXDM is demonstrated.

  4. Imaging bacterial spores by soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Judge, J.

    1997-04-01

    Bacterial spores are able to survive dehydration, but neither the physiological nor structural basis of this have been fully elucidated. Furthermore, once hydrated, spores often require activation before they will germinate. Several treatments can be used to activate spores, but in the case of Bacillus subtlis the most effective is heat treatment. The physiological mechanism associated with activation is also not understood, but some workers suggest that the loss of calcium from the spores may be critical. However, just prior to germination, the spores change from being phase bright to phase dark when viewed by light microscopy. Imaging spores by soft x-ray microscopy is possible without fixation. Thus, in contrast to electron microscopy, it is possible to compare the structure of dehydrated and hydrated spores in a manner not possible previously. A further advantage is that it is possible to monitor individual spores by phase contrast light microscopy immediately prior to imaging with soft x-rays; whereas, with both electron microscopy and biochemical studies, it is a population of spores being studied without knowledge of the phase characteristics of individual spores. This study has therefore tried to compare dehydrated and hydrated spores and to determine if there is a mass loss from individual spores as they pass the transition from being phase bright to phase dark.

  5. X-ray absorption measurement by scanning capacitance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Masashi; Uchihashi, Takayuki

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes a demonstration of scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) as a technique for measuring X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) in what is called the SCM-XAFS method. This method achieves the simultaneous analysis of the electrical and chemical characteristics of surface-trapping centers. In obtaining the XAFS spectrum of trapping centers, the method takes advantage of the fact that the X-ray-induced photoemission of a localized electron leads to a change in capacitance. When the Fermi level corresponds to the trapping level, the photoemission process is sensitively detected. Therefore, a specific trapping center may be selectively observed by controlling the bias. From SCM-XAFS measurements of a GaAs surface, we found that gallium oxide trapping centers capture electrons in the positive bias voltage region. Moreover, experimental findings that resonant intra-transition and resonant scattering of emitted photoelectrons enhance the SCM-XAFS signal at particular X-ray photon energy reveal the local density of states of the gallium oxide and the complex structure of the trapping centers.

  6. JEUMICO: Czech-Bavarian astronomical X-ray optics project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Döhring, T.

    2017-07-01

    Within the project JEUMICO, an acronym for "Joint European Mirror Competence", the Aschaffenburg University of Applied Sciences and the Czech Technical University in Prague started a collaboration to develop mirrors for X-ray telescopes. Corresponding mirror segments use substrates of flat silicon wafers which are coated with thin iridium films, as this material is promising high reflectivity in the X-ray range of interest. The sputtering parameters are optimized in the context of the expected reflectivity of the coated X-ray mirrors. In near future measurements of the assembled mirror modules optical performances are planned at an X-ray test facility.

  7. Soft X-ray Microscopy of Green Cements

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, P. J. M.; Mancio, M.; Chae, R.; Ha, J.; Kirchheim, A. P.; Fischer, P.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2011-09-09

    The present status of the cement and concrete industry is not sustainable. The production of Portland cement is responsible for 7% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the world and existing reinforced concrete infrastructure is deteriorating at a fast pace. The change in the existing technology requires new developments in our understanding of the nanostructure of hydration products and the complex deterioration reactions. We have been developing an elaborate research program to advance the existing cement and concrete science by characterizing its nanostructure by synchrotron radiation. A new generation of green cements is being studied using high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy at the nano-level.

  8. X-ray microscopy of soft and hard human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Bert Schulz, Georg Deyhle, Hans Stalder, Anja K. Ilgenstein, Bernd Holme, Margaret N. Hieber, Simone E.; Beckmann, Felix

    2016-01-28

    The simultaneous post mortem visualization of soft and hard tissues using absorption-based CT remains a challenge. If the photon energy is optimized for the visualization of hard tissue, the surrounding soft tissue components are almost X-ray transparent. Therefore, the combination with other modalities such as phase-contrast CT, magnetic resonance microscopy, and histology is essential to detect the anatomical features. The combination of the 2D and 3D data sets using sophisticated segmentation and registration tools allows for conclusions about otherwise inaccessible anatomical features essential for improved patient treatments.

  9. X-ray microscopy of soft and hard human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Stalder, Anja K.; Ilgenstein, Bernd; Holme, Margaret N.; Weitkamp, Timm; Beckmann, Felix; Hieber, Simone E.

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous post mortem visualization of soft and hard tissues using absorption-based CT remains a challenge. If the photon energy is optimized for the visualization of hard tissue, the surrounding soft tissue components are almost X-ray transparent. Therefore, the combination with other modalities such as phase-contrast CT, magnetic resonance microscopy, and histology is essential to detect the anatomical features. The combination of the 2D and 3D data sets using sophisticated segmentation and registration tools allows for conclusions about otherwise inaccessible anatomical features essential for improved patient treatments.

  10. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflections optics

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.H.

    1983-06-30

    The role of Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices is discussed. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

  11. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflection optics

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.H.

    1981-08-06

    The Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes are described along with their role as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

  12. Scanning Transmission X-ray microscopy Imaging of Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles, M. K.; Kilcoyne, A.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D. K.; Fakra, S.; Robinson, M.; Chase, K.

    2003-12-01

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopes (STXM) are used to image a diversity of carbon and metal containing items such as biofilms in soils, magnetic materials, polymers and meteorites. Studies on particles collected on SiO2 filters from biomass burns in Flagstaff, Arizona and individual aerosols collected in South Africa on TEM grids are underway at beamlines 5.3.2 and 11.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Sub micron particles are imaged in the transmission mode over the energy range of 280 - 1900 eV. Spectromicroscopic studies on individual particles using near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) probe multiple species within or on the same particle. In (STXM) an X-ray beam is focused with a zone plate onto a sample and the transmitted radiation is detected. Since the signal is obtained in the transmission mode, optically thin samples are required. Hence, atmospheric aerosols with submicron thickness and diameter are well suited for this method. Near edge spectra of various elements were scanned in step sizes from 0.1-0.5 eV around characteristic absorption edges, creating 2 dimensional images at each energy. While STXM images are taken with a lower spatial resolution (currently 40 nm) than microscopies such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, detailed chemical information with spatial distributions, and oxidation states is obtained. A particular focus of this work is to obtain more detailed information on the type of carbons, multiply, or singly bonded and whether or not carbon is bonded to oxygen. The ultimate goal is discrimination between organic and black carbon within individual aerosol particles and determining if organic carbon, black carbon, and metal species are distributed homogeneously throughout aerosol particles. Initial scans of the samples from Flagstaff show spectral evidence of aromatic carbon, without distinct C=O signatures. NEXAFS

  13. Glass Monocapillary X-ray Optics And Their Applications In X-ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Feser, M.; Huang, E.; Lyon, A.; Yun, W.

    2010-04-01

    Elliptical, parabolic and Wolter type glass monocapillaries were fabricated for use as x-ray condensers in the energy range of 250 eV to 20 keV. On a routine basis a diameter error of +/-0.4 μm and straightness error of 0.8 μm (peak to valley) can be reached. The final test of condensers was performed at-wavelength by imaging the far field x-ray reflection intensity distribution using a laboratory microfocus x-ray source. For medium length condensers with a total length <80 mm, a total slope error of 40 μrad rms was obtained. The applications in full-field x-ray microscopes and the future effort in developing capillary Wolter mirrors based on this technology are reported.

  14. Development of X-ray Microscopy at IPOE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Mu, B.; Huang, Q.; Huang, C.; Yi, S.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, F.; Wang, Z.; Chen, L.

    2011-09-09

    In order to meet the different requirements of applications in synchrotron radiation and plasma diagnosis in China, focusing and imaging optics based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors, compound refractive lenses (CRLs), and multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs) were studied in our lab. A one-dimensional KB microscope using mirrors with a dual-periodic multilayer coating was developed. The multilayer mirror can reflect both 4.75 keV (Ti K-line) and 8.05 keV (Cu K-line) simultaneously, which makes alignment easier. For hard x-ray microscopy, CRL was studied. Using a SU-8 resist planar parabolic CRL, a focal line of 28.8-{mu}m width was obtained. To focus hard x-rays to nanometer levels efficiently, an MLL was fabricated using a WSi{sub 2}/Si multilayer. The MLL consists of 324 alternating WSi{sub 2} and Si layers with a total thickness of 7.9 {mu}m. (Recently, a much thicker multilayer has been deposited with a layer number of n = 1582 and a total thickness of 27 {mu}m.) After deposition, the sample was sliced and polished into an approximate ideal aspect ratio (depth of the zone plate to outmost layer thickness); the measured results show an intact structure remains, and the surface roughness of the cross section is about 0.4 nm after grinding and polishing processes.

  15. Synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy of fossil embryos.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, Philip C J; Bengtson, Stefan; Dong, Xi-ping; Gostling, Neil J; Huldtgren, Therese; Cunningham, John A; Yin, Chongyu; Yue, Zhao; Peng, Fan; Stampanoni, Marco

    2006-08-10

    Fossilized embryos from the late Neoproterozoic and earliest Phanerozoic have caused much excitement because they preserve the earliest stages of embryology of animals that represent the initial diversification of metazoans. However, the potential of this material has not been fully realized because of reliance on traditional, non-destructive methods that allow analysis of exposed surfaces only, and destructive methods that preserve only a single two-dimensional view of the interior of the specimen. Here, we have applied synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM), obtaining complete three-dimensional recordings at submicrometre resolution. The embryos are preserved by early diagenetic impregnation and encrustation with calcium phosphate, and differences in X-ray attenuation provide information about the distribution of these two diagenetic phases. Three-dimensional visualization of blastomere arrangement and diagenetic cement in cleavage embryos resolves outstanding questions about their nature, including the identity of the columnar blastomeres. The anterior and posterior anatomy of embryos of the bilaterian worm-like Markuelia confirms its position as a scalidophoran, providing new insights into body-plan assembly among constituent phyla. The structure of the developing germ band in another bilaterian, Pseudooides, indicates a unique mode of germ-band development. SRXTM provides a method of non-invasive analysis that rivals the resolution achieved even by destructive methods, probing the very limits of fossilization and providing insight into embryology during the emergence of metazoan phyla.

  16. Development of X-ray Microscopy at IPOE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Mu, B.; Huang, Q.; Huang, C.; Yi, S.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, F.; Wang, Z.; Chen, L.

    2011-09-01

    In order to meet the different requirements of applications in synchrotron radiation and plasma diagnosis in China, focusing and imaging optics based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors, compound refractive lenses (CRLs), and multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs) were studied in our lab. A one-dimensional KB microscope using mirrors with a dual-periodic multilayer coating was developed. The multilayer mirror can reflect both 4.75 keV (Ti K-line) and 8.05 keV (Cu K-line) simultaneously, which makes alignment easier. For hard x-ray microscopy, CRL was studied. Using a SU-8 resist planar parabolic CRL, a focal line of 28.8-μm width was obtained. To focus hard x-rays to nanometer levels efficiently, an MLL was fabricated using a WSi2/Si multilayer. The MLL consists of 324 alternating WSi2 and Si layers with a total thickness of 7.9 μm. (Recently, a much thicker multilayer has been deposited with a layer number of n = 1582 and a total thickness of 27 μm.) After deposition, the sample was sliced and polished into an approximate ideal aspect ratio (depth of the zone plate to outmost layer thickness); the measured results show an intact structure remains, and the surface roughness of the cross section is about 0.4 nm after grinding and polishing processes.

  17. Advancement of X-Ray Microscopy Technology and its Application to Metal Solidification Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1996-01-01

    The technique of x-ray projection microscopy is being used to view, in real time, the structures and dynamics of the solid-liquid interface during solidification. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of 2 micrometers can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions need to be optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. It turns out that no single imaging technology offers the best solution and traditional methods like radiographic film cannot be used due to specimen motion (solidification). In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast.

  18. Calibration of High-Resolution X-Ray Tomography With Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalukin, Andrew R.; Winn, Barry; Wang, Yuxin; Jacobsen, Chris; Levine, Zachary H.; Fu, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    For two-dimensional x-ray imaging of thin films, the technique of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) has achieved images with feature sizes as small as 40 nm in recent years. However, calibration of three-dimensional tomographic images that are produced with STXM data at this scale has not yet been described in the scientific literature, and the calibration procedure has novel problems that have not been encountered by x-ray tomography carried out at a larger scale. In x-ray microtomography, for example, one always has the option of using optical imaging on a section of the object to verify the x-ray projection measurements; with STXM, on the other hand, the sample features are too small to be resolved by light at optical wavelengths. This fact implies that one must rely on procedures with higher resolution, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), for the calibration. Such procedures, however, generally depend on a highly destructive sectioning of the sample, and are difficult to interpret because they give surface information rather than depth information. In this article, a procedure for calibration is described that overcomes these limitations and achieves a calibration of an STXM tomography image with an AFM image and a scanning electron microscopy image of the same object. A Ge star-shaped pattern was imaged at a synchrotron with a scanning transmission x-ray microscope. Nineteen high-resolution projection images of 200 × 200 pixels were tomographically reconstructed into a three-dimensional image. Features in two-dimensional images as small as 40 nm and features as small as 80 nm in the three-dimensional reconstruction were resolved. Transverse length scales based on atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray transmission and tomographic reconstruction agreed to within 10 nm. Toward the center of the sample, the pattern thickness calculated from projection images was (51 ± 15) nm vs (80 ± 52) nm for tomographic reconstruction

  19. X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy for Investigation of Archival Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Paunesku, T.; Wanzer, M. B.; Kirillova, E. N.; Muksinova, K. N.; Revina, V. S.; Romanov, S. A.; Lyubchansky, E. R.; Grosche, B.; Birschwilks, M.; Vogt, S.; Finney, L.; Woloschak, G. E.

    2013-01-01

    Several recent efforts in radiation biology community worldwide have amassed records and archival tissues from animals exposed to different radionuclides and external beam irradiation. In most cases, these samples come from life-long studies on large animal populations conducted in national laboratories and equivalent institutions throughout Europe, North America, and Japan. While many of these tissues were used for histopathological analyses, much more information may still be obtained from these samples. A new technique suitable for imaging of these tissues is X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy (XFM). Following development of third generation synchrotrons, XFM has emerged as an ideal technique for study of metal content, speciation, and localization in cells, tissues and organs. Here we review some of the recent XFM literature pertinent to tissue sample studies and present examples of XFM data obtained from tissue sections of beagle dog samples which show that the quality of archival tissues allows XFM investigation. PMID:22951477

  20. High-resolution compact X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takman, P A C; Stollberg, H; Johansson, G A; Holmberg, A; Lindblom, M; Hertz, H M

    2007-05-01

    We demonstrate compact full-field soft X-ray transmission microscopy with sub 60-nm resolution operating at lambda= 2.48 nm. The microscope is based on a 100-Hz regenerative liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma source in combination with a condenser zone plate and a micro-zone plate objective for high-resolution imaging onto a 2048 x 2048 pixel CCD detector. The sample holder is mounted in a helium atmosphere and allows imaging of both dry and wet specimens. The microscope design enables fast sample switching and the sample can be pre-aligned using a visible-light microscope. High-quality images can be acquired with exposure times of less than 5 min. We demonstrate the performance of the microscope using both dry and wet samples.

  1. X-ray tomography as a complementary technique to nuclear microscopy for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Morilla, Inmaculada; Pinheiro, Teresa; Odenbach, Stefan; Alcala, Maria Dolores Ynsa

    2009-06-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography is an excellent tool to examine the morphology of a sample in a non-destructive way, making its inner structure visible. Nuclear microscopy provides quantitative information about the elemental distribution and concentration. Both can be used as complementary techniques in order to get more information about the samples. Osteoporosis is a disease that deteriorates the bone due to, among other things, a failure in the normal hormonal function. In this project, bones from rats under osteoporosis treatments based on hormonal supplementation, as well as healthy bones and osteoporotic ones without treatment, have been analyzed by both nuclear microscopy and X-ray micro-tomography. Following the results achieved by nuclear microscopy, quantitative concentration and distribution of elements such as Ca and P suggested a change in bone density. In order to image this change of density, the same samples have been analyzed by micro-tomography.

  2. Soft X-ray contact microscopy and transmission electron microscopy: Comparative study of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limongi, T.; Palladino, L.; Bernieri, E.; Tomassetti, G.; Reale, L.; Flora, F.; Cesare, P.; Ercole, C.; Aimola, P.; Ragnelli, A. M.

    2003-03-01

    Isolated cellular organelles (mitochondria, chloroplasts) and cultured bacteria were analysed both by soft X-ray contact microscopy (SXCM), and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after negative staining. For each sample, a comparison was performed between images obtained with either technique, with the aim of facilitating the interpretation of SXCM images. The validity and the limits of this comparative approach are discussed.

  3. The X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, D.; Jonge, M. D. de; Howard, D. L.; Lewis, W.; McKinlay, J.; Starritt, A.; Kusel, M.; Ryan, C. G.; Kirkham, R.; Moorhead, G.; Siddons, D. P.

    2011-09-09

    A hard x-ray micro-nanoprobe has commenced operation at the Australian Synchrotron providing versatile x-ray fluorescence microscopy across an incident energy range from 4 to 25 keV. Two x-ray probes are used to collect {mu}-XRF and {mu}-XANES for elemental and chemical microanalysis: a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror microprobe for micron resolution studies and a Fresnel zone plate nanoprobe capable of 60-nm resolution. Some unique aspects of the beamline design and operation are discussed. An advanced energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence detection scheme named Maia has been developed for the beamline, which enables ultrafast x-ray fluorescence microscopy.

  4. The prospects for soft x-ray contact microscopy using laser plasmas as an x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Stead, A.D.; Page, A.M.; Ford, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    Since its invention, a major concern of those using a microscope has been to improve the resolution without the introduction of artifacts. While light microscopy carries little risk of the introduction of artifacts, because the preparative techniques are often minimal, the resolution is somewhat limited. The advent of the electron microscope offered greatly improved resolution but since biological specimens require extensive preparation, the possibility of causing structural damage to the specimen is also increased. The ideal technique for structural studies of biological specimens would enable hydrated material to be examined without any preparation and with a resolution equal to that of electron microscopy. Soft x-ray microscopy certainly enables living material to be examined and whilst the resolution does not equal that of electron microscopy it exceeds that attainable by light microscopy. This paper briefly reviews the limitations of light and electron microscopy for the biologist and considers the various ways that soft x-rays might be used to image hydrated biological material. Consideration is given to the different sources that have been used for soft x-ray microscopy and the relative merits of laser-plasma sources are discussed.

  5. Microbial biofilm study by synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennafirme, S.; Lima, I.; Bitencourt, J. A.; Crapez, M. A. C.; Lopes, R. T.

    2015-11-01

    Microbial biofilm has already being used to remove metals and other pollutants from wastewater. In this sense, our proposal was to isolate and cultivate bacteria consortia from mangrove's sediment resistant to Zn (II) and Cu (II) at 50 mg L-1 and to observe, through synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (microXRF), whether the biofilm sequestered the metal. The biofilm area analyzed was 1 mm2 and a 2D map was generated (pixel size 20×20 μm2, counting time 5 s/point). The biofilm formation and retention followed the sequence Zn>Cu. Bacterial consortium zinc resistant formed dense biofilm and retained 63.83% of zinc, while the bacterial consortium copper resistant retained 3.21% of copper, with lower biofilm formation. Dehydrogenase activity of Zn resistant bacterial consortium was not negatively affect by 50 mg ml-1 zinc input, whereas copper resistant bacterial consortium showed a significant decrease on dehydrogenase activity (50 mg mL-1 of Cu input). In conclusion, biofilm may protect bacterial cells, acting as barrier against metal toxicity. The bacterial consortia Zn resistant, composed by Nitratireductor spp. and Pseudomonas spp formed dense biofilm and sequestered metal from water, decreasing the metal bioavailability. These bacterial consortia can be used in bioreactors and in bioremediation programs.

  6. Low dose hard x-ray contact microscopy assisted by a photoelectric conversion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gomella, Andrew; Martin, Eric W.; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wen, Han; Morgan, Nicole Y.

    2013-04-15

    Hard x-ray contact microscopy provides images of dense samples at resolutions of tens of nanometers. However, the required beam intensity can only be delivered by synchrotron sources. We report on the use of a gold photoelectric conversion layer to lower the exposure dose by a factor of 40 to 50, allowing hard x-ray contact microscopy to be performed with a compact x-ray tube. We demonstrate the method in imaging the transmission pattern of a type of hard x-ray grating that cannot be fitted into conventional x-ray microscopes due to its size and shape. Generally the method is easy to implement and can record images of samples in the hard x-ray region over a large area in a single exposure, without some of the geometric constraints associated with x-ray microscopes based on zone-plate or other magnifying optics.

  7. Low dose hard x-ray contact microscopy assisted by a photoelectric conversion layer

    PubMed Central

    Gomella, Andrew; Martin, Eric W.; Lynch, Susanna K.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Wen, Han

    2013-01-01

    Hard x-ray contact microscopy provides images of dense samples at resolutions of tens of nanometers. However, the required beam intensity can only be delivered by synchrotron sources. We report on the use of a gold photoelectric conversion layer to lower the exposure dose by a factor of 40 to 50, allowing hard x-ray contact microscopy to be performed with a compact x-ray tube. We demonstrate the method in imaging the transmission pattern of a type of hard x-ray grating that cannot be fitted into conventional x-ray microscopes due to its size and shape. Generally the method is easy to implement and can record images of samples in the hard x-ray region over a large area in a single exposure, without some of the geometric constraints associated with x-ray microscopes based on zone-plate or other magnifying optics. PMID:23837131

  8. X-ray induced chemical reaction revealed by in-situ X-ray diffraction and scanning X-ray microscopy in 15 nm resolution (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Mingyuan; Liu, Wenjun; Bock, David; De Andrade, Vincent; Yan, Hanfei; Huang, Xiaojing; Marschilok, Amy; Takeuchi, Esther; Xin, Huolin; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-09-01

    The detection sensitivity of synchrotron-based X-ray techniques has been largely improved due to the ever increasing source brightness, which have significantly advanced ex-situ and in-situ research for energy materials, such as lithium-ion batteries. However, the strong beam-matter interaction arisen from the high beam flux can significantly modify the material structure. The parasitic beam-induced effect inevitably interferes with the intrinsic material property, which brings difficulties in interpreting experimental results, and therefore requires comprehensive evaluation. Here we present a quantitative in-situ study of the beam-effect on one electrode material Ag2VO2PO4 using four different X-ray probes with different radiation dose rate. The material system we reported exhibits interesting and reversible radiation-induced thermal and chemical reactions, which was further evaluated under electron microscopy to illustrate the underlying mechanism. The work we presented here will provide a guideline in using synchrotron X-rays to distinguish the materials' intrinsic behavior from extrinsic structure changed induced by X-rays, especially in the case of in-situ and operando study where the materials are under external field of either temperature or electric field.

  9. Soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) of actinide particles.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Hans J; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Wilson, Richard E; Werme, Lars; Shuh, David K

    2005-09-01

    A descriptive account is given of our most recent research on the actinide dioxides with the Advanced Light Source Molecular Environmental Science (ALS-MES) Beamline 11.0.2 soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The ALS-MES STXM permits near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and imaging with 30-nm spatial resolution. The first STXM spectromicroscopy NEXAFS spectra at the actinide 4d5/2 edges of the imaged transuranic particles, NpO2 and PuO2, have been obtained. Radiation damage induced by the STXM was observed in the investigation of a mixed oxidation state particle (Np(V,VI)) and was minimized during collection of the actual spectra at the 4d5/2 edge of the Np(V,VI) solid. A plutonium elemental map was obtained from an irregular PuO2 particle with the dimensions of 650 x 650 nm. The Pu 4d5/2 NEXAFS spectra were collected at several different locations from the PuO2 particle and were identical. A representative oxygen K-edge spectrum from UO2 was collected and resembles the oxygen K-edge from the bulk material. The unique and current performance of the ALS-MES STXM at extremely low energies (ca. 100 eV) that may permit the successful measurement of the actinide 5d edge is documented. Finally, the potential of STXM as a tool for actinide investigations is briefly discussed.

  10. Streaked x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.; Auerbach, J.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Whitlock, R.R.; Obenshain, S.P.; McLean, E.A.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-08-01

    An ultrafast soft x-ray streak camera has been coupled to a Wolter axisymmetric x-ray microscope. This system was used to observe the dynamics of laser fusion targets both in self emission and backlit by laser produced x-ray sources. Spatial resolution was 7 ..mu..m and temporal resolution was 20 ps. Data is presented showing the ablative acceleration of foils to velocities near 10/sup 7/ cm/sec and the collision of an accelerated foil with a second foil, observed using 3 keV streaked x-ray backlighting. Good agreement was found between hydrocode simulations, simple models of the ablative acceleration and the observed velocities of the carbon foils.

  11. Contact microscopy with a soft x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D.S.; Kim, D.; Rosser, R.J.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.; Gupta, A.P.; Hirschberg, J.G.

    1989-03-01

    A soft x-ray laser of output energy 1-3 mJ at 19.2 nm has been used to record high resolution images of biological specimens. The contact images were recorded on photoresist which was later viewed in a scanning electron microscope. We also present a Composite Optical X- ray Laser Microscope ''COXRALM'' of novel design. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Final Report on Small Particle Speciation for Forensics Analysis by Soft X-ray Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pacold, J. I.; Altman, A. B.; Donald, S B; Dai, Z.; Davisson, M. L.; Holliday, K S; Knight, K. B.; Kristo, M. J.; Minasian, S. G.; Nelson, A J; Tyliszczak, T; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.

    2016-09-30

    Materials of interest for nuclear forensic science are often highly heterogeneous, containing complex mixtures of actinide compounds in a wide variety of matrices. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) is ideally suited to study such materials, as it can be used to chemically image specimens by acquiring X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) data with 25 nm spatial resolution. In particular, STXM in the soft X-ray synchrotron radiation regime (approximately 120 – 2000 eV) can collect spectroscopic information from the actinides and light elements in a single experiment. Thus, STXM combines the chemical sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectroscopy with high spatial resolution in a single non-destructive characterization method. This report describes the application of STXM to a broad range of nuclear materials. Where possible, the spectroscopic images obtained by STXM are compared with information derived from other analytical methods, and used to make inferences about the process history of each material. STXM measurements can yield information including the morphology of a sample, “elemental maps” showing the spatial distribution of major chemical constituents, and XANES spectra from localized regions of a sample, which may show spatial variations in chemical composition.

  13. Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and dipolar energy terms. As a result the energetically favored ground state of a ferromagnetic system is a rather complex spin configuration, the magnetic domain structure. Magnetism is one of the eldest scientific phenomena, yet it is one of the most powerful and versatile utilized physical effects in modern technologies, such as in magnetic storage and sensor devices. To achieve highest storage density, the relevant length scales, such as the bit size in disk drives is now approaching the nanoscale and as such further developments have to deal with nanoscience phenomena. Advanced characterization tools are required to fully understand the underlying physical principles. Magnetic microscopes using polarized soft X-rays offer a close-up view into magnetism with unique features, these include elemental sensitivity due to X-ray magnetic dichroism effects as contrast mechanism, high spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the inherent time structure of current X-ray sources, which will be overcome with the introduction of ultrafast and high brilliant X-ray sources.

  14. Combined X-ray Microfluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Mg Distribution in Whole Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, S.; Farruggia, G.; Trapani, V.; Mastrototaro, L.; Wolf, F.; Cedola, A.; Fratini, M.; Notargiacomo, A.; Bukreeva, I.; McNulty, I.; Vogt, S.; Kim, S.; Legnini, D.; Maier, J. A. M.

    2011-09-09

    We present in this paper a novel methodology that combines scanning x-ray fluorescencee microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The combination of these two techniques allows the determination of a concentration map of Mg in whole (not sectioned) cells.

  15. Synchrotron Radiation and X-ray FEL Projects in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, M. H.

    2012-03-01

    There are two on-going major projects in Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), the PLS-II light source upgrade and the construction of PAL-XFEL facility. PLS-II is a new light source upgraded from PLS(Pohang Light Source) which had been operated for 16 years from 1995 and shut down in Dec. 2010. The performance will be improved from ``18.9 nm-rad, 2.5 GeV, and 200 mA'' to ``5.8 nm-rad, 3 GeV, and 400 mA'' using three superconducting RF cavities. The old storage ring has been completely dismantled and new DBA ring has been re-installed in the same tunnel within 6 months, and is under commissioning now. The unique feature of PLS-II is the compact employment of 20 insertion-devices including 14 in-vacuum undulators. The PALXFEL is a 0.1-nm hard X-ray FEL construction project started in 2011 and to compete in 2014 with a total budget of 400 M. The PAL-XFEL is designed to have hard X-ray undulator lines at the end of 10-GeV linac, and a dog-leg branch line at 2.65 GeV point for a soft X-ray undulator line simultaneously and independently from hard X-ray FEL undulator line. The overview of two projects with current status is presented.

  16. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy-imaging fast spin dynamics inmagnetic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Peter; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Mesler, Brooke L.; Chao, Weilun; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy combines 15nm spatial resolution with 70ps time resolution and elemental sensitivity. Fresnel zone plates are used as X-ray optics and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism serves as magnetic contrast mechanism. Thus scientifically interesting and technologically relevant low dimensional nanomagnetic systems can be imaged at fundamental length and ultrafast time scales in a unique way. Studies include magnetization reversal in magnetic multilayers, nanopatterned systems, vortex dynamics in nanoelements and spin current induced phenomena.

  17. Quantitative x-ray differential-interference-contrast microscopy with independently adjustable bias and shear

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Takashi; Chang Chang

    2011-04-15

    We present a quantitative x-ray phase imaging method that can be readily implemented on existing x-ray microscopy facilities. This technique utilizes Fresnel zone plates both as imaging optical elements for magnification and as second-order grating structures for phase-shifting interferometry. By making high-resolution quantitative x-ray phase information widely available, we expect this work to have significant impact on nanoscale biological and material studies.

  18. Grid-enhanced X-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, Katarzyna M.; Last, Arndt; Korecki, Paweł

    2017-03-01

    Polycapillary devices focus X-rays by means of multiple reflections of X-rays in arrays of bent glass capillaries. The size of the focal spot (typically 10-100 μm) limits the resolution of scanning, absorption and phase-contrast X-ray imaging using these devices. At the expense of a moderate resolution, polycapillary elements provide high intensity and are frequently used for X-ray micro-imaging with both synchrotrons and X-ray tubes. Recent studies have shown that the internal microstructure of such an optics can be used as a coded aperture that encodes high-resolution information about objects located inside the focal spot. However, further improvements to this variant of X-ray microscopy will require the challenging fabrication of tailored devices with a well-defined capillary microstructure. Here, we show that submicron coded aperture microscopy can be realized using a periodic grid that is placed at the output surface of a polycapillary optics. Grid-enhanced X-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics does not rely on the specific microstructure of the optics but rather takes advantage only of its focusing properties. Hence, submicron X-ray imaging can be realized with standard polycapillary devices and existing set-ups for micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

  19. Grid-enhanced X-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Katarzyna M; Last, Arndt; Korecki, Paweł

    2017-03-21

    Polycapillary devices focus X-rays by means of multiple reflections of X-rays in arrays of bent glass capillaries. The size of the focal spot (typically 10-100 μm) limits the resolution of scanning, absorption and phase-contrast X-ray imaging using these devices. At the expense of a moderate resolution, polycapillary elements provide high intensity and are frequently used for X-ray micro-imaging with both synchrotrons and X-ray tubes. Recent studies have shown that the internal microstructure of such an optics can be used as a coded aperture that encodes high-resolution information about objects located inside the focal spot. However, further improvements to this variant of X-ray microscopy will require the challenging fabrication of tailored devices with a well-defined capillary microstructure. Here, we show that submicron coded aperture microscopy can be realized using a periodic grid that is placed at the output surface of a polycapillary optics. Grid-enhanced X-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics does not rely on the specific microstructure of the optics but rather takes advantage only of its focusing properties. Hence, submicron X-ray imaging can be realized with standard polycapillary devices and existing set-ups for micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

  20. Grid-enhanced X-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Katarzyna M.; Last, Arndt; Korecki, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Polycapillary devices focus X-rays by means of multiple reflections of X-rays in arrays of bent glass capillaries. The size of the focal spot (typically 10–100 μm) limits the resolution of scanning, absorption and phase-contrast X-ray imaging using these devices. At the expense of a moderate resolution, polycapillary elements provide high intensity and are frequently used for X-ray micro-imaging with both synchrotrons and X-ray tubes. Recent studies have shown that the internal microstructure of such an optics can be used as a coded aperture that encodes high-resolution information about objects located inside the focal spot. However, further improvements to this variant of X-ray microscopy will require the challenging fabrication of tailored devices with a well-defined capillary microstructure. Here, we show that submicron coded aperture microscopy can be realized using a periodic grid that is placed at the output surface of a polycapillary optics. Grid-enhanced X-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics does not rely on the specific microstructure of the optics but rather takes advantage only of its focusing properties. Hence, submicron X-ray imaging can be realized with standard polycapillary devices and existing set-ups for micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:28322316

  1. Progress and prospects in soft x-ray holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.S.

    1987-12-01

    We report some of the latest developments in x-ray holography experiments and make some speculations about the limits of performance of the approaches currently in use. We also make some suggestions about where the technique can (and cannot) go in the future. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A Novel Integrating Solid State Detector With Segmentation For Scanning Transmission Soft X-ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feser, Michael; Jacobsen, Chris; Degeronimo, Gianluigi; Rehak, Pavel; Holl, Peter; Strueder, Lothar

    2003-03-01

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) with soft x-rays has unique detector requirements, which are not readily met by commercially available detectors. For implementation of dark-field and phase contrast imaging modes a segmented detector is needed with the high signal to noise ratio of a counting detector and a high detective quantum efficiency. Since the market for STXM is very small, the development of specialized detector systems relies on the collaboration with detector specialists at research facilities. We report on the successful development of a segmented silicon detector for STXM, which has been carried out in collaboration between the x-ray microscopy research group at SUNY Stony Brook, the instrumentation division at Brookhaven National Laboratory and silicon x-ray detector specialists in Germany. This project illustrates the effectiveness of such arrangements and justifies the support of future efforts in developing dedicated detectors for synchrotron radiation experiments bringing together detector experts and experimenters. The developed detector features eight separate circular segments matched to the STXM geometry. Fast charge integrating electronics have been developed to match the short pixel dwell times in a synchrotron based scanning microscope (in the ms range for the NSLS). The noise level of 5 photons RMS per integration per channel (at 520 eV photon energy) and a 1500 photon capacity (corresponding to the well depth in a CCD detector) is well matched to the characteristics of the experiment. Combining the detector signals in an appropriate way, different imaging modes (i.e. bright field, dark field or phase contrast) can be selected. We discuss recent developments on simultaneous quantitative phase and amplitude contrast imaging using this segmented detector in conjunction with a Fourier filter reconstruction technique.

  3. Microscale reconstruction of biogeochemical substrates using multimode X-ray tomography and scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M.; Miller, E.; Liu, J.; Lund, R. M.; McKinley, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EMP), and computational image analysis are mature technologies used in many disciplines. Cross-discipline combination of these imaging and image-analysis technologies is the focus of this research, which uses laboratory and light-source resources in an iterative approach. The objective is to produce images across length scales, taking advantage of instrumentation that is optimized for each scale, and to unify them into a single compositional reconstruction. Initially, CT images will be collected using both x-ray absorption and differential phase contrast modes. The imaged sample will then be physically sectioned and the exposed surfaces imaged and characterized via SEM/EMP. The voxel slice corresponding to the physical sample surface will be isolated computationally, and the volumetric data will be combined with two-dimensional SEM images along CT image planes. This registration step will take advantage of the similarity between the X-ray absorption (CT) and backscattered electron (SEM) coefficients (both proportional to average atomic number in the interrogated volume) as well as the images' mutual information. Elemental and solid-phase distributions on the exposed surfaces, co-registered with SEM images, will be mapped using EMP. The solid-phase distribution will be propagated into three-dimensional space using computational methods relying on the estimation of compositional distributions derived from the CT data. If necessary, solid-phase and pore-space boundaries will be resolved using X-ray differential phase contrast tomography, x-ray fluorescence tomography, and absorption-edge microtomography at a light-source facility. Computational methods will be developed to register and model images collected over varying scales and data types. Image resolution, physically and dynamically, is qualitatively different for the electron microscopy and CT methodologies. Routine

  4. Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Kirz, Janos; ...

    2009-11-01

    We report the first image of an intact, frozen hydrated eukaryotic cell using x-ray diffraction microscopy, or coherent x-ray diffraction imaging. By plunge freezing the specimen in liquid ethane and maintaining it below -170 °C, artifacts due to dehydration, ice crystallization, and radiation damage are greatly reduced. In this example, coherent diffraction data using 520 eV x rays were recorded and reconstructed to reveal a budding yeast cell at a resolution better than 25 nm. This demonstration represents an important step towards high resolution imaging of cells in their natural, hydrated state, without limitations imposed by x-ray optics.

  5. X-ray stereo microscopy for investigation of dynamics in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Gleber, S.-C.; Sedlmair, J.; Bertilson, M.; von Hofsten, O.; Heim,S.; Guttmann, P.; Hertz, H.; Fischer, P.; Thieme, J.

    2008-09-16

    The presented combination of stereo imaging and elemental mapping with soft X-ray microscopy reveals the spatial arrangement of naturally aqueous colloidal systems, e.g. iron oxides in soil colloid clusters. Changes in the spatial arrangement can be induced by manipulating the sample mounted to the X-ray microscope and thus be investigated directly.

  6. Generation of apodized X-ray illumination and its application to scanning and diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Khakurel, Krishna P; Kimura, Takashi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Sasaki, Tomoya; Takei, Masashi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2017-01-01

    X-ray science has greatly benefited from the progress in X-ray optics. Advances in the design and the manufacturing techniques of X-ray optics are key to the success of various microscopic and spectroscopic techniques practiced today. Here the generation of apodized X-ray illumination using a two-stage deformable Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system is presented. Such apodized illumination is marked by the suppression of the side-lobe intensities of the focused beam. Thus generated apodized illumination was employed to improve the image quality in scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Imaging of a non-isolated object by coherent X-ray diffractive imaging with apodized illumination in a non-scanning mode is also presented.

  7. Transmission X-ray microscopy for full-field nano-imaging of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    ANDREWS, JOY C; MEIRER, FLORIAN; LIU, YIJIN; MESTER, ZOLTAN; PIANETTA, PIERO

    2010-01-01

    Imaging of cellular structure and extended tissue in biological materials requires nanometer resolution and good sample penetration, which can be provided by current full-field transmission X-ray microscopic techniques in the soft and hard X-ray regions. The various capabilities of full-field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) include 3D tomography, Zernike phase contrast, quantification of absorption, and chemical identification via X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) imaging. These techniques are discussed and compared in light of results from imaging of biological materials including microorganisms, bone and mineralized tissue and plants, with a focus on hard X-ray TXM at ≤ 40 nm resolution. PMID:20734414

  8. Projection x-ray topography system at 1-BM x-ray optics test beamline at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Stoupin, Stanislav Liu, Zunping; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Lang, Keenan; Goetze, Kurt; Sullivan, Joseph; Macrander, Albert; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael

    2016-07-27

    Projection X-ray topography of single crystals is a classic technique for the evaluation of intrinsic crystal quality of large crystals. In this technique a crystal sample and an area detector (e.g., X-ray film) collecting intensity of a chosen crystallographic reflection are translated simultaneously across an X-ray beam collimated in the diffraction scattering plane (e.g., [1, 2]). A bending magnet beamline of a third-generation synchrotron source delivering x-ray beam with a large horizontal divergence, and therefore, a large horizontal beam size at a crystal sample position offers an opportunity to obtain X-ray topographs of large crystalline samples (e.g., 6-inch wafers) in just a few exposures. Here we report projection X-ray topography system implemented recently at 1-BM beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. A selected X-ray topograph of a 6-inch wafer of 4H-SiC illustrates capabilities and limitations of the technique.

  9. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; ...

    2011-05-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  10. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens. PMID:21547016

  11. Application of X-ray synchrotron microscopy instrumentation in biology

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperini, F. M.; Pereira, G. R.; Granjeiro, J. M.; Calasans-Maia, M. D.; Rossi, A. M.; Perez, C. A.; Lopes, R. T.; Lima, I.

    2011-07-01

    X-ray micro-fluorescence imaging technique has been used as a significant tool in order to investigate minerals contents in some kinds of materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the elemental distribution of calcium and zinc in bone substitute materials (nano-hydroxyapatite spheres) and cortical bones through X-Ray Micro-fluorescence analysis with the increment of Synchrotron Radiation in order to evaluate the characteristics of the newly formed bone and its interface, the preexisting bone and biomaterials by the arrangement of collagen fibers and its birefringence. The elemental mapping was carried out at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas - Sao Paulo, Brazil working at D09-XRF beam line. Based on this study, the results suggest that hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are biocompatible, promote osteo-conduction and favored bone repair. (authors)

  12. Bulk sensitive hard x-ray photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, M. Wiemann, C.; Weber, N.; Escher, M.; Merkel, M.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Schneider, C. M.

    2014-11-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) has now matured into a well-established technique as a bulk sensitive probe of the electronic structure due to the larger escape depth of the highly energetic electrons. In order to enable HAXPES studies with high lateral resolution, we have set up a dedicated energy-filtered hard x-ray photoemission electron microscope (HAXPEEM) working with electron kinetic energies up to 10 keV. It is based on the NanoESCA design and also preserves the performance of the instrument in the low and medium energy range. In this way, spectromicroscopy can be performed from threshold to hard x-ray photoemission. The high potential of the HAXPEEM approach for the investigation of buried layers and structures has been shown already on a layered and structured SrTiO{sub 3} sample. Here, we present results of experiments with test structures to elaborate the imaging and spectroscopic performance of the instrument and show the capabilities of the method to image bulk properties. Additionally, we introduce a method to determine the effective attenuation length of photoelectrons in a direct photoemission experiment.

  13. Hard X-ray Sources for the Mexican Synchrotron Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Herrera, Juan

    2016-10-01

    One of the principal tasks for the design of the Mexican synchrotron was to define the storage ring energy. The main criteria for choosing the energy come from studying the electromagnetic spectrum that can be obtained from the synchrotron, because the energy range of the spectrum that can be obtained will determine the applications available to the users of the future light source. Since there is a public demand of hard X-rays for the experiments in the synchrotron community users from Mexico, in this work we studied the emission spectra from some hard X-ray sources which could be the best options for the parameters of the present Mexican synchrotron design. The calculations of the flux and the brightness for one Bending Magnet and four Insertion Devices are presented; specifically, for a Superconducting Bending Magnet (SBM), a Superconducting Wiggler (SCW), an In Vacuum Short Period Undulator (IV-SPU), a Superconducting Undulator (SCU) and for a Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU). Two commonly available synchrotron radiation programs were used for the computation (XOP and SRW). From the results, it can be concluded that the particle beam energy from the current design is enough to have one or more sources of hard X-rays. Furthermore, a wide range of hard X-ray region can be covered by the analyzed sources, and the choice of each type should be based on the specific characteristics of the X-ray beam to perform the experiments at the involved beamline. This work was done within the project Fomix Conacyt-Morelos ”Plan Estrategico para la construccion y operación de un Sincrotron en Morelos” (224392).

  14. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  15. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; ...

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  16. Retrieving spin textures on curved magnetic thin films with full-field soft X-ray microscopies

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Robert; Kronast, Florian; Fischer, Peter; Parkinson, Dula; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2015-01-01

    X-ray tomography is a well-established technique to characterize 3D structures in material sciences and biology; its magnetic analogue—magnetic X-ray tomography—is yet to be developed. Here we demonstrate the visualization and reconstruction of magnetic domain structures in a 3D curved magnetic thin films with tubular shape by means of full-field soft X-ray microscopies. The 3D arrangement of the magnetization is retrieved from a set of 2D projections by analysing the evolution of the magnetic contrast with varying projection angle. Using reconstruction algorithms to analyse the angular evolution of 2D projections provides quantitative information about domain patterns and magnetic coupling phenomena between windings of azimuthally and radially magnetized tubular objects. The present approach represents a first milestone towards visualizing magnetization textures of 3D curved thin films with virtually arbitrary shape. PMID:26139445

  17. Retrieving spin textures on curved magnetic thin films with full-field soft X-ray microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Robert; Kronast, Florian; Fischer, Peter; Parkinson, Dula; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2015-07-03

    X-ray tomography is a well-established technique to characterize 3D structures in material sciences and biology; its magnetic analogue—magnetic X-ray tomography—is yet to be developed. We demonstrate the visualization and reconstruction of magnetic domain structures in a 3D curved magnetic thin films with tubular shape by means of full-field soft X-ray microscopies. In the 3D arrangement of the magnetization is retrieved from a set of 2D projections by analysing the evolution of the magnetic contrast with varying projection angle. By using reconstruction algorithms to analyse the angular evolution of 2D projections provides quantitative information about domain patterns and magnetic coupling phenomena between windings of azimuthally and radially magnetized tubular objects. In conclusion, the present approach represents a first milestone towards visualizing magnetization textures of 3D curved thin films with virtually arbitrary shape.

  18. Retrieving spin textures on curved magnetic thin films with full-field soft X-ray microscopies.

    PubMed

    Streubel, Robert; Kronast, Florian; Fischer, Peter; Parkinson, Dula; Schmidt, Oliver G; Makarov, Denys

    2015-07-03

    X-ray tomography is a well-established technique to characterize 3D structures in material sciences and biology; its magnetic analogue--magnetic X-ray tomography--is yet to be developed. Here we demonstrate the visualization and reconstruction of magnetic domain structures in a 3D curved magnetic thin films with tubular shape by means of full-field soft X-ray microscopies. The 3D arrangement of the magnetization is retrieved from a set of 2D projections by analysing the evolution of the magnetic contrast with varying projection angle. Using reconstruction algorithms to analyse the angular evolution of 2D projections provides quantitative information about domain patterns and magnetic coupling phenomena between windings of azimuthally and radially magnetized tubular objects. The present approach represents a first milestone towards visualizing magnetization textures of 3D curved thin films with virtually arbitrary shape.

  19. Retrieving spin textures on curved magnetic thin films with full-field soft X-ray microscopies

    DOE PAGES

    Streubel, Robert; Kronast, Florian; Fischer, Peter; ...

    2015-07-03

    X-ray tomography is a well-established technique to characterize 3D structures in material sciences and biology; its magnetic analogue—magnetic X-ray tomography—is yet to be developed. We demonstrate the visualization and reconstruction of magnetic domain structures in a 3D curved magnetic thin films with tubular shape by means of full-field soft X-ray microscopies. In the 3D arrangement of the magnetization is retrieved from a set of 2D projections by analysing the evolution of the magnetic contrast with varying projection angle. By using reconstruction algorithms to analyse the angular evolution of 2D projections provides quantitative information about domain patterns and magnetic coupling phenomenamore » between windings of azimuthally and radially magnetized tubular objects. In conclusion, the present approach represents a first milestone towards visualizing magnetization textures of 3D curved thin films with virtually arbitrary shape.« less

  20. Studying Nanoscale Magnetism and its Dynamics with Soft X-ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mccall, Monnikue M; Fischer, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy allows for imaging magnetic structures at a spatial resolution down to 15nm and a time resolution in the sub-100ps regime. Inherent elemental specificity can be used to image the magnetic response of individual components such as layers in multilayered systems. This review highlights current achievements and discusses the future potential of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy at fsec X-ray sources where snapshot images of ultrafast spin dynamics with a spatial resolution below 10nm will become feasible.

  1. Imaging translocation and transformation of bioavailable selenium by Stanleya pinnata with X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Amos, Wren; Webb, Samuel; Liu, Yijin; Andrews, Joy C; LeDuc, Danika L

    2012-09-01

    Selenium hyperaccumulator Stanleya pinnata, Colorado ecotype, was supplied with water-soluble and biologically available selenate or selenite. Selenium distribution and tissue speciation were established using X-ray microscopy (micro-X-ray fluorescence and transmission X-ray microscopy) in two dimensions and three dimensions. The results indicate that S. pinnata tolerates, accumulates, and volatilizes significant concentrations of selenium when the inorganic form supplied is selenite and may possess novel metabolic capacity to differentiate, metabolize, and detoxify selenite concentrations surpassing field concentrations. The results also indicate that S. pinnata is a feasible candidate to detoxify selenium-polluted soil sites, especially locations with topsoil polluted with soluble and biologically available selenite.

  2. Correcting lateral chromatic aberrations in non-monochromatic X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falch, Ken Vidar; Detlefs, Carsten; Di Michiel, Marco; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly; Mathiesen, Ragnvald H.

    2016-08-01

    Lateral chromatic aberration in microscopy based on refractive optics may be reduced significantly by adjustments to the illumination scheme. By taking advantage of a broadened bandwidth illumination, the proposed scheme could open for x-ray microscopy with spatial resolution in the range 150-200 nm at millisecond frame rates. The scheme is readily implemented and is achievable using only standard refractive x-ray lenses, which has the advantage of high efficiency. It also maximizes the transmission and removes the spatial filtering effects associated with absorption in x-ray lenses.

  3. Microscale reconstruction of biogeochemical substrates using combined X-ray tomography and scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M.; McKinley, J. P.; Miller, E. A.; Liu, J.

    2011-12-01

    X-ray tomography (CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EMP), and computational image analysis are mature technologies used in many disciplines. Cross-discipline combination of these imaging and image-analysis technologies is the focus of this research, which uses laboratory and light-source resources in an iterative approach. The objective is to produce images across length scales, taking advantage of instrumentation that is optimized for each scale, and to unify them into a single compositional reconstruction. Initially, a nominal CT image will be collected. The imaged sample will then be physically sectioned and the exposed surfaces imaged and characterized via SEM/EMP. The voxel slice corresponding to the physical sample surface will be isolated computationally, and the volumetric data will be combined with two-dimensional SEM images along CT image planes. This registration step will take advantage of the similarity between the X-ray absorption (CT) and backscattered electron (SEM) coefficients (both proportional to average atomic number in the interrogated volume). Elemental and solid-phase distributions on the exposed surfaces, pre-registered with SEM images, will be mapped using EMP. The solid-phase distribution will be propagated into three-dimensional space using computational methods relying on the estimation of compositional distributions derived from CT data. If necessary, solid-phase and pore-space boundaries will be resolved using X-ray phase-contrast imaging, x-ray fluorescence tomography, and absorption-edge microtomography at a light-source facility. Computational methods will be developed to register and model images collected over varying scales and data types. Image resolution, physically and dynamically, is qualitatively different for the electron microscopy and CT methodologies. Routine CT images are resolved at 10-20 μm, while SEM images are resolved at 10-20 nm; grayscale values vary according to collection

  4. Evaluation of bent-crystal x-ray backlighting and microscopy techniques for the Sandia Z machine.

    PubMed

    Sinars, Daniel B; Bennett, Guy R; Wenger, David F; Cuneo, Michael E; Porter, John L

    2003-07-01

    X-ray backlighting and microscopy systems for the 1-10-keV range based on spherically or toroidally bent crystals are discussed. These systems are ideal for use on the Sandia Z machine, a megajoule-class x-ray facility. Near-normal-incidence crystal microscopy systems have been shown to be more efficient than pinhole cameras with the same spatial resolution and magnification [Appl. Opt. 37, 1784 (1998)]. We show that high-resolution (< or = 10 microm) x-ray backlighting systems using bent crystals can be more efficient than analogous point-projection imaging systems. Examples of bent-crystal-backlighting results that demonstrate 10-microm resolution over a 20-mm field of view are presented.

  5. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy of unaltered biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, N.

    1987-05-01

    A scanning transmission x-ray microscope at the National Synchrotron Light Source was used to image fresh, wet biological specimens at 32 Angstroms, with resolution better than 750 Angstroms. A gold Fresnel zone plate (outer zone width 500 Angstroms) was used to focus the undulator radiation, and the sample was scanned through the spot. Absorption data was recorded digitally as a gridded array. The major accomplishment of the experiment was the demonstration of the ability to image biological samples in their natural state with high resolution and natural elemental contrast mechanisms. This was achieved through the design of a sample holder that maintains an aqueous environment for the sample, yet is transparent to x-rays at 32 Angstroms. The specimens used were isolated zymogen granules (approximately 1 micron diameter) from the pancreatic acinar cells of rats. The absorption data were correlated to protein concentration, and estimates of the protein concentrations within the granules were obtained. The data also yields some information about the spatial organization of the protein in the granules, and our data is compared to models for the internal structure. The success of this experiment points toward future opportunities for dynamical studies on living systems. 6 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Flash imaging of fine structures of cellular organelles by contact x-ray microscopy with a high intensity laser plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Maki; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Kunio

    2011-09-01

    X-ray flash imaging by contact microscopy with a highly intense laser-plasma x-ray source was achieved for the observation of wet biological cells. The exposure time to obtain a single x-ray image was about 600 ps as determined by the pulse duration of the driving laser pulse. The x-ray flash imaging makes it possible to capture an x-ray image of living biological cells without any artificial treatment such as staining, fixation, freezing, and so on. The biological cells were cultivated directly on the surface of the silicon nitride membranes, which are used for the x-ray microscope. Before exposing the cells to x-rays they were observed by a conventional fluorescent microscope as reference, since the fluorescent microscopes can visualize specific organelles stained with fluorescent dye. Comparing the x-ray images with the fluorescent images of the exact same cells, each cellular organelle observed in the x-ray images was identified one by one and actin filaments and mitochondria were clearly identified in the x-ray images.

  7. Soft X-Ray Microscopy Radiation Damage On Fixed Cells Investigated With Synchrotron Radiation FTIR Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gianoncelli, A; Vaccari, L; Kourousias, G; Cassese, D; Bedolla, D E; Kenig, S; Storici, P; Lazzarino, M; Kiskinova, M

    2015-05-14

    Radiation damage of biological samples remains a limiting factor in high resolution X-ray microscopy (XRM). Several studies have attempted to evaluate the extent and the effects of radiation damage, proposing strategies to minimise or prevent it. The present work aims to assess the impact of soft X-rays on formalin fixed cells on a systematic manner. The novelty of this approach resides on investigating the radiation damage not only with XRM, as often reported in relevant literature on the topic, but by coupling it with two additional independent non-destructive microscopy methods: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and FTIR Microscopy (FTIRM). Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells were exposed to different radiation doses at 1 keV. In order to reveal possible morphological and biochemical changes, the irradiated cells were systematically analysed with AFM and FTIRM before and after. Results reveal that while cell morphology is not substantially affected, cellular biochemical profile changes significantly and progressively when increasing dose, resulting in a severe breakdown of the covalent bonding network. This information impacts most soft XRM studies on fixed cells and adds an in-depth understanding of the radiation damage for developing better prevention strategies.

  8. Ultra-high vacuum compatible optical chopper system for synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hao; Cummings, Marvin; Shirato, Nozomi; Stripe, Benjamin; Preissner, Curt; Freeland, John W.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Kersell, Heath; Hla, Saw-Wai; Rose, Volker

    2016-01-28

    High-speed beam choppers are a crucial part of time-resolved x-ray studies as well as a necessary component to enable elemental contrast in synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM). However, many chopper systems are not capable of operation in vacuum, which restricts their application to x-ray studies with high photon energies, where air absorption does not present a significant problem. To overcome this limitation, we present a fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible chopper system capable of operating at variable chopping frequencies up to 4 kHz. The lightweight aluminum chopper disk is coated with Ti and Au films to provide the required beam attenuation for soft and hard x-rays with photon energies up to about 12 keV. The chopper is used for lock-in detection of x-ray enhanced signals in SX-STM.

  9. X-ray absorption in pillar shaped transmission electron microscopy specimens.

    PubMed

    Bender, H; Seidel, F; Favia, P; Richard, O; Vandervorst, W

    2017-03-07

    The dependence of the X-ray absorption on the position in a pillar shaped transmission electron microscopy specimen is modeled for X-ray analysis with single and multiple detector configurations and for different pillar orientations relative to the detectors. Universal curves, applicable to any pillar diameter, are derived for the relative intensities between weak and medium or strongly absorbed X-ray emission. For the configuration as used in 360° X-ray tomography, the absorption correction for weak and medium absorbed X-rays is shown to be nearly constant along the pillar diameter. Absorption effects in pillars are about a factor 3 less important than in planar specimens with thickness equal to the pillar diameter. A practical approach for the absorption correction in pillar shaped samples is proposed and its limitations discussed. The modeled absorption dependences are verified experimentally for pillars with HfO2 and SiGe stacks.

  10. Phase-contrast microscopy at high x-ray energy with a laboratory setup.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, Marco; Vittoria, Fabio A; Diemoz, Paul C; Lorenzo, Rodolfo; Speller, Robert D; Wagner, Ulrich H; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K; Olivo, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    We report on the design and realization of an x-ray imaging system for quantitative phase-contrast microscopy at high x-ray energy with laboratory-scale instrumentation. Phase and amplitude were separated quantitatively at x-ray energies up to 80 keV with micrometric spatial resolution. The accuracy of the results was tested against numerical simulations, and the spatial resolution was experimentally quantified by measuring a Siemens star phase object. This simple setup should find broad application in those areas of x-ray imaging where high energy and spatial resolution are simultaneously required and in those difficult cases where the sample contains materials with similar x-ray absorption.

  11. Combining operando synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy and scanning X-ray diffraction to study lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Patrick; Hess, Michael; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eller, Jens; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    We present an operando study of a lithium ion battery combining scanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) simultaneously for the first time. This combination of techniques facilitates the investigation of dynamic processes in lithium ion batteries containing amorphous and/or weakly attenuating active materials. While amorphous materials pose a challenge for diffraction techniques, weakly attenuating material systems pose a challenge for attenuation-contrast tomography. Furthermore, combining SXRD and SRXTM can be used to correlate processes occurring at the atomic level in the crystal lattices of the active materials with those at the scale of electrode microstructure. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we investigate a silicon powder electrode in lithium metal half-cell configuration. Combining SXRD and SRXTM, we are able to (i) quantify the dissolution of the metallic lithium electrode and the expansion of the silicon electrode, (ii) better understand the formation of the Li15Si4 phase, and (iii) non-invasively probe kinetic limitations within the silicon electrode. A simple model based on the 1D diffusion equation allows us to qualitatively understand the observed kinetics and demonstrates why high-capacity electrodes are more prone to inhomogeneous lithiation reactions. PMID:27324109

  12. X-ray dense cellular inclusions in the cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as seen by soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Page, A.M.; Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-rays, having a greater ability to penetrate biological material than electrons, have the potential for producing images of intact, living cells. In addition, by using the so-called {open_quotes}water window{close_quotes} area of the soft x-ray spectrum, a degree of natural contrast is introduced into the image due to differential absorption of the wavelengths by compounds with a high carbon content compared to those with a greater oxygen content. The variation in carbon concentration throughout a cell therefore generates an image which is dependent upon the carbon density within the specimen. Using soft x-ray contact microscopy the authors have previously examined the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the most prominent feature of the cells are the numerous x-ray absorbing spheres, But they were not seen by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Similar structures have also been reported by the Goettingen group using their cryo transmission x-ray microscope at BESSY. Despite the fact that these spheres appear to occupy up to 20% or more of the cell volume when seen by x-ray microscopy, they are not visible by transmission electron microscopy. Given the difficulties and criticisms associated with soft x-ray contact microscopy, the present study was aimed at confirming the existence of these cellular inclusions and learning more of their possible chemical composition.

  13. Quantitative x-ray magnetic circular dichroism mapping with high spatial resolution full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray spectro-microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, MacCallum J.; Agostino, Christopher J.; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Chen, Gong; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The spectroscopic analysis of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), which serves as strong and element-specific magnetic contrast in full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy, is shown to provide information on the local distribution of spin (S) and orbital (L) magnetic moments down to a spatial resolution of 25 nm limited by the x-ray optics used in the x-ray microscope. The spatially resolved L/S ratio observed in a multilayered (Co 0.3 nm/Pt 0.5 nm) × 30 thin film exhibiting a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decreases significantly in the vicinity of domain walls, indicating a non-uniform spin configuration in the vertical profile of a domain wall across the thin film. Quantitative XMCD mapping with x-ray spectro-microscopy will become an important characterization tool for systems with topological or engineered magnetization inhomogeneities.

  14. Quantitative x-ray magnetic circular dichroism mapping with high spatial resolution full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray spectro-microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, MacCallum J.; Agostino, Christopher J.; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Chen, Gong; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter

    2015-05-07

    The spectroscopic analysis of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), which serves as strong and element-specific magnetic contrast in full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy, is shown to provide information on the local distribution of spin (S) and orbital (L) magnetic moments down to a spatial resolution of 25 nm limited by the x-ray optics used in the x-ray microscope. The spatially resolved L/S ratio observed in a multilayered (Co 0.3 nm/Pt 0.5 nm) × 30 thin film exhibiting a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decreases significantly in the vicinity of domain walls, indicating a non-uniform spin configuration in the vertical profile of a domain wall across the thin film. Quantitative XMCD mapping with x-ray spectro-microscopy will become an important characterization tool for systems with topological or engineered magnetization inhomogeneities.

  15. Transmission and emission x-ray microscopy: operation modes, contrast mechanisms and applications.

    PubMed

    Kaulich, Burkhard; Thibault, Pierre; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Kiskinova, Maya

    2011-03-02

    Advances in microscopy techniques based on x-rays have opened unprecedented opportunities in terms of spatial resolution, combined with chemical and morphology sensitivity, to analyze solid, soft and liquid matter. The advent of ultrabright third and fourth generation photon sources and the continuous development of x-ray optics and detectors has pushed the limits of imaging and spectroscopic analysis to structures as small as a few tens of nanometers. Specific interactions of x-rays with matter provide elemental and chemical sensitivity that have made x-ray spectromicroscopy techniques a very attractive tool, complementary to other microscopies, for characterization in all actual research fields. The x-ray penetration power meets the demand to examine samples too thick for electron microscopes implementing 3D imaging and recently also 4D imaging which adds time resolution as well. Implementation of a variety of phase contrast techniques enhances the structural sensitivity, especially for the hard x-ray regime. Implementation of lensless or diffraction imaging helps to enhance the lateral resolution of x-ray imaging to the wavelength dependent diffraction limit.

  16. Imaging of lateral spin valves with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mosendz, O.; Mihajlovic, G.; Pearson, J. E.; Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Bader, S. D.; Hoffmann, A.

    2009-05-01

    We investigated Co/Cu lateral spin valves by means of high-resolution transmission soft x-ray microscopy with magnetic contrast that utilizes x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). No magnetic XMCD contrast was observed at the Cu L{sub 3} absorption edge, which should directly image the spin accumulation in Cu. Although electrical transport measurements in a non-local geometry clearly detected the spin accumulation in Cu, which remained unchanged during illumination with circular polarized x-rays at the Co and Cu L{sub 3} absorption edges.

  17. Compact laser produced plasma soft x-ray source for contact microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayele, Mesfin G.; Czwartos, Joanna; Adjei, Daniel; Wachulak, Przemysław; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Szczurek, Mirosław; Jarocki, Roman; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-05-01

    The detail characteristics of a compact laser-plasma X-ray source, dedicated for application in soft X-ray contact microscopy is presented in the paper. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses from a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The use of the gas puff target makes possible to produce soft X-ray radiation in the "water window" region without target debris production. Details of the characterization measurements and optimization of the source are presented and discussed.

  18. X-ray holographic microscopy experiments at the Brookhaven synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Kirz, J.; Rarback, H.

    1983-01-01

    Soft x-ray holographic microscopy is discussed from an experimental point of view. Three series of measurements have been carried out using the Brookhaven 750 MeV storage ring as an x-ray source. Young slits fringes, Gabor (in line) holograms and various data pertaining to the soft x-ray performance of photographic plates are reported. The measurements are discussed in terms of the technique for recording them and the experimental limitations in effect. Some discussion is also given of the issues involved in reconstruction using visible light.

  19. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yoshio Takeuchi, Akihisa

    2016-01-28

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown.

  20. Three-dimensional readout of flash x-ray images of living sperm in water by atomic-force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tomie, T; Shimizu, H; Majima, T; Yamada, M; Kanayama, T; Kondo, H; Yano, M; Ono, M

    1991-05-03

    The imaging of living specimens in water by x-ray microscopy can be greatly enhanced with the use of an intense flash x-ray source and sophisticated technologies for reading x-ray images. A subnanosecond [corrected] x-ray pulse from a laser-produced plasma was used to record the x-ray image of living sea urchin sperm in an x-ray resist. The resist relief was visualized at high resolution by atomic-force microscopy. Internal structure of the sperm head was evident, and the carbon density in a flagellum was estimated from the relief height.

  1. Ptychography: Pushing the limits of X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, Cayla

    2015-08-23

    Ptychography is an advanced diffraction based imaging technique that can achieve resolution of 5 nm, and below. It is done by scanning a sample through a beam of focused x-rays using discrete yet overlapping scan steps. Scattering data is collected on a CCD camera, and the phase of the scattered light is reconstructed with sophisticated iterative algorithms. Because the experimental setup is similar, ptychography setups can be created by retrofitting existing STXM beam lines with new hardware. The other challenge comes in the reconstruction of the collected scattering images. Scattering data must be adjusted and packaged with experimental parameters to calibrate the reconstruction software. The necessary pre-processing of data prior to reconstruction is unique to each beamline setup, and even the optical alignments used on that particular day. Pre-processing software must be developed to be flexible and efficient in order to allow experimenters appropriate control and freedom in the analysis of their hard-won data. This paper will describe the implementation of pre-processing software which successfully connects data collection steps to reconstruction steps, letting the user accomplish accurate and reliable ptychography.

  2. Electro-deposition of Cu studied with in situ electrochemical scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, A. P.; Qin, Z.; Rosendahl, S. M.; Lee, V.; Reynolds, M.; Hosseinkhannazer, H.

    2016-01-01

    Soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to investigate Cu deposition onto, and stripping from a Au surface. Cu 2p spectromicroscopy was used to analyze initial and final states (ex situ processing) and follow the processes in situ. The in situ experiments were carried out using a static electrochemical cell with an electrolyte layer thickness of ˜1 μm. A new apparatus for in situ electrochemical STXM is described.

  3. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy: A new ``looking glass`` into coal chemical structure

    SciTech Connect

    Botto, R.E.; Cody, G.D.

    1994-02-01

    This paper reports the use of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy to spatially map the chemistry of aromatic and aliphatic carbon functionalities in coal to a resolution of less than 0.1 {mu}m. Localized x-ray absorption spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K absorption edge was also used to facilitate analysis of variations in fundamental chemistry at maceral interfaces and within maceral boundaries.

  4. 3D X-ray ultra-microscopy of bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Langer, M; Peyrin, F

    2016-02-01

    We review the current X-ray techniques with 3D imaging capability at the nano-scale: transmission X-ray microscopy, ptychography and in-line phase nano-tomography. We further review the different ultra-structural features that have so far been resolved: the lacuno-canalicular network, collagen orientation, nano-scale mineralization and their use as basis for mechanical simulations. X-ray computed tomography at the micro-metric scale is increasingly considered as the reference technique in imaging of bone micro-structure. The trend has been to push towards increasingly higher resolution. Due to the difficulty of realizing optics in the hard X-ray regime, the magnification has mainly been due to the use of visible light optics and indirect detection of the X-rays, which limits the attainable resolution with respect to the wavelength of the visible light used in detection. Recent developments in X-ray optics and instrumentation have allowed to implement several types of methods that achieve imaging that is limited in resolution by the X-ray wavelength, thus enabling computed tomography at the nano-scale. We review here the X-ray techniques with 3D imaging capability at the nano-scale: transmission X-ray microscopy, ptychography and in-line phase nano-tomography. Further, we review the different ultra-structural features that have so far been resolved and the applications that have been reported: imaging of the lacuno-canalicular network, direct analysis of collagen orientation, analysis of mineralization on the nano-scale and use of 3D images at the nano-scale to drive mechanical simulations. Finally, we discuss the issue of going beyond qualitative description to quantification of ultra-structural features.

  5. X-ray microscopy of plant cells by using LiF crystal as a detector.

    PubMed

    Reale, Lucia; Bonfigli, Francesca; Lai, Antonia; Flora, Francesco; Poma, Anna; Albertano, Patrizia; Bellezza, Simona; Montereali, Rosa Maria; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tania; Almaviva, Salvatore; Vincenti, Maria Aurora; Francucci, Massimo; Gaudio, Pasqualino; Martellucci, Sergio; Richetta, Maria

    2008-12-01

    A lithium fluoride (LiF) crystal has been utilized as a new soft X-ray detector to image different biological samples at a high spatial resolution. This new type of image detector for X-ray microscopy has many interesting properties: high resolution (nanometer scale), permanent storage of images, the ability to clear the image and reuse the LiF crystal, and high contrast with greater dynamic range. Cells of the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas dysosmos and Chlorella sorokiniana, and pollen grains of Olea europea have been used as biological materials for imaging. The biological samples were imaged on LiF crystals by using the soft X-ray contact microscopy and contact micro-radiography techniques. The laser plasma soft X-ray source was generated using a Nd:YAG/Glass laser focused on a solid target. The X-ray energy range for image acquisition was in the water-window spectral range for single shot contact microscopy of very thin biological samples (single cells) and around 1 keV for multishots microradiography. The main aim of this article is to highlight the possibility of using a LiF crystal as a detector for the biological imaging using soft X-ray radiation and to demonstrate its ability to visualize the microstructure within living cells. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. In situ X-ray Microscopy Studies of Electromigration in Copper Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, G.; Meyer, M.-A.; Zschech, E.; Denbeaux, G.; Neuhäusler, U.; Guttmann, P.

    2003-09-01

    Real-time X-ray microscopy is applied for degradation studies to understand electromigration-induced transport processes in on-chip copper interconnects. The material transport in inlaid Cu line/via structures is observed with about 40 nm lateral resolution. The image sequences show void formation, migration and nucleation processes. Correlation of the real-time X-ray images with post-mortem SEM micrographs is used to discuss degradation mechanisms in inlaid copper interconnects. Due to the high penetration power of X-rays through matter and its high spatial resolution, X-ray microscopy (XRM) overcomes several limitations of conventional microscopic techniques. It utilizes the natural absorption contrast between the structures of interest, i.e. for on-chip copper interconnects embedded in dielectrics. Due to their different X-ray absorption characteristics at 0.52 keV, even different silicon compounds like Si, SiO2, and Si3N4 can be distinguished in X-ray images of thinned layers as demonstrated. For failure analysis of thicker layers, phase contrast microscopy in the multi-keV photon energy range is proposed.

  7. Ultrastructural and elemental imaging of biological specimens by soft x-ray contact microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa, B.J.; Hoffman, P. . Dept. of Orthopedics); Warren, J.B. ); Feder, R.; Sayre, D. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1980-01-01

    Soft X-ray contact microscopy offers a means of visualizing unstained as well as stained biological materials at better than 6 nm resolution. Soft X-ray imaging depends on differential absorption of incident soft (1--10nm wavelength) X-rays by the endogenous elements within a specimen. The advantages of using soft X-rays for imaging are: (1) reduced specimen damage during exposure; (2) ability to image hydrated specimens at atmospheric pressure; (3) ability to image specimens ranging in thickness from less than 40 nm to as much as 10{mu}m; and (4) ability to map the elemental composition of the specimen through observation of the differential absorption of properly chosen incident x-ray wavelengths. This paper explains the principles of image formation and demonstrates the use of soft X-ray contact microscopy with biological samples which could not readily be imaged in their natural form using conventional electron microscopy methods. Data are also presented on the recognition of compositional features in histochemically treated articular joint tissues. 30 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Laboratory source based full-field x-ray microscopy at 9 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Fella, C.; Balles, A.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-28

    In the past decade, hard x-ray transmission microscopy experienced tremendous developments. With the avail-ability of efficient Fresnel zone plates, even set-ups utilizing laboratory sources were developed [1]. In order to improve the performance of these x-ray microscopes, novel approaches to fabricate optical elements [2] and brighter x-ray tubes [3] are promising candidates. We are currently building a laboratory transmission x-ray microscope for 9.25 keV, using an electron impact liquid-metal-jet anode source. Up to now, the further elements of our setup are: a polycapillary condenser, a tungsten zone plate, and a scintillator which is optically coupled to a CMOS camera. However, further variations in terms of optical elements are intended. Here we present the current status of our work, as well as first experimental results.

  9. Calibration Of A KrF Laser-Plasma Source For X-Ray Microscopy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcu, I. C. E.; O'Neill, F.; Zammit, U.; Al-Hadithi, Y.; Eason, R. W.; Rogayski, A. M.; Hills, C. P. B.; Michette, A. G.

    1988-02-01

    Plasma X-ray sources for biological microscopy in the water-window have been produced by focusing tige 200 3, 50 ns Sprit q KrF laser onto carbon targets at irradiance between 2.2 x 10" W/cm4 and 3.7 x 10i3W/cm. Absolute measurements of X-ray production have been made using a calibrated, vacuum X-ray diode detector. A peak conversion efficiency . 10% is measured from KrF laseri)Tight tcto wate-window X-rays at 280 eV < hv < 530 eV for a target irradiance . 1 x x 10 W/cm'. Some measurements with gold and tungsten targets give conversion efficiencies 2$25% at a similar laser irradiance.

  10. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; ...

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore » resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  11. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of galvannealed coatings on steel.

    PubMed

    Schmid, P; Uran, K; Macherey, F; Ebert, M; Ullrich, H-J; Sommer, D; Friedel, F

    2009-04-01

    The formation of Fe-Zn intermetallic compounds, as relevant in the commercial product galvannealed steel sheet, was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and different methods of X-ray diffraction. A scanning electron microscope with high resolution was applied to investigate the layers of the galvannealed coating and its topography. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID) was preferred over conventional Bragg-Brentano geometry for analysing thin crystalline layers because of its lower incidence angle alpha and its lower depth of information. Furthermore, in situ experiments at an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with an internal heating plate and at an X-ray diffractometer equipped with a high-temperature chamber were carried out. Thus, it was possible to investigate the phase evolution during heat treatment by X-ray diffraction and to display the growth of the zeta crystals in the ESEM.

  12. Synchrotron X-ray microscopy and spectroscopy analysis of iron in hemochromatosis liver and intestines

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, J .Y. Peter; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Adams, Paul C.

    2009-12-01

    Hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder that causes body to store excess iron in organs such as heart or liver. Distribution of iron, as well as copper, zinc and calcium, and chemical identity of iron in hemochromatosis liver and intestine were investigated by X-ray microprobe experiments, which consist of X-ray microscopy and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure. Our results show that iron concentration in hemochromatosis liver tissue is high, while much less Fe is found in intestinal tissue. Moreover, chemical identity of Fe in hemochromatosis liver can be identified. X-ray microprobe experiments allows for examining elemental distribution at an excellent spatial resolution. Moreover, chemical identity of element of interest can be obtained.

  13. Synchrotron X-ray microscopy and spectroscopy analysis of iron in hemochromatosis liver and intestines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J. Y. Peter; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Adams, Paul C.

    2009-11-01

    Hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder that causes body to store excess iron in organs such as heart or liver. Distribution of iron, as well as copper, zinc and calcium, and chemical identity of iron in hemochromatosis liver and intestine were investigated by X-ray microprobe experiments, which consist of X-ray microscopy and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure. Our results show that iron concentration in hemochromatosis liver tissue is high, while much less Fe is found in intestinal tissue. Moreover, chemical identity of Fe in hemochromatosis liver can be identified. X-ray microprobe experiments allows for examining elemental distribution at an excellent spatial resolution. Moreover, chemical identity of element of interest can be obtained.

  14. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  15. Simultaneous scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron X-ray measurements in a gas environment.

    PubMed

    Mom, Rik V; Onderwaater, Willem G; Rost, Marcel J; Jankowski, Maciej; Wenzel, Sabine; Jacobse, Leon; Alkemade, Paul F A; Vandalon, Vincent; van Spronsen, Matthijs A; van Weeren, Matthijs; Crama, Bert; van der Tuijn, Peter; Felici, Roberto; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Carlà, Francesco; Frenken, Joost W M; Groot, Irene M N

    2017-11-01

    A combined X-ray and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) instrument is presented that enables the local detection of X-ray absorption on surfaces in a gas environment. To suppress the collection of ion currents generated in the gas phase, coaxially shielded STM tips were used. The conductive outer shield of the coaxial tips can be biased to deflect ions away from the tip core. When tunneling, the X-ray-induced current is separated from the regular, 'topographic' tunneling current using a novel high-speed separation scheme. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by measuring the local X-ray-induced current on Au(1 1 1) in 800 mbar Ar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  17. Current status of X-ray spectrometer development in SELENE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Okada, T.; Shiraishi, H.; Shirai, K.; Arai, T.; Ogawa, K.; Hosono, K.; Arakawa, M.; Kato, M.

    X-ray spectroscopy for lunar surface will be performed in SELENE project The main architecture of the X-ray spectrometer onboard SELENE spacecraft SELENE XRS is based on HAYABUSA X-ray spectrometer that used X-ray CCDs as X-ray detector and observed X-rays from both an asteroid and the standard sample on HAYABUSA for comparative analysis SELENE XRS is composed of three sensors XRF-A SOL-B and SOL-C XRF-A is main sensor with 16 X-ray CCDs to the X-ray detection from the lunar surface The total detection area of XRF-A is about 100 cm 2 and field of view is 12 degree Be foil of 5 mu m in thickness is attached to avoid from visible light detection SOL-B is solar X-ray monitor and the sensor is not X-ray CCD but PIN photo-diode SOL-B observes X-rays from the Sun directory and does not require the wide effective area as X-ray CCD SOL-C observes X-rays from the standard sample on SELENE The elemental composition of the standard sample is determined to perform comparative X-ray fluorescence analysis SELENE XRS has been developed and examined for several years and the development is in final stage ready for the launch on 2007 We will report the current status of each component of SELENE XRS

  18. X-ray microscopy and imaging of Escherichia coli, LPS and DNA.

    PubMed

    Rajyaguru, J M; Kado, M; Torres, D; Richardson, M; Muszynski, M J

    1997-11-01

    Ultrastructural examination by transmission and scanning electron microscopy involves a series of specialized preparation steps which may introduce artefacts in the micrographs. X-ray microscopy can take instant images of specimens but is mostly restricted to a few synchrotron X-ray sources. We have utilized a bench-top nanosecond laser-plasma to produce a single-shot source of nanosecond X-rays tuned for maximum contrast with carbon-rich material. To examine the ultrastructure by absorption profiles, we utilized a laser-produced plasma generated by a single-shot laser (1.06 microns wavelength, 5 x 10(12) W cm-2 intensity) focused on to a silicon target as an X-ray source for high-resolution X-ray microscopy. This approach eliminates the specimen preparation steps. Whole hydrated cells of Escherichia coli and purified preparations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and chromosomal DNA (cDNA) were streaked onto poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-coated grids (resist). This resist was exposed to X-rays under vacuum at a distance of 2.5 cm from the target disc. The silicon plasma produced by a 10-ns burst of laser energy (at 20J) radiates strong emission lines in the region of 300 eV. The X-rays penetrate the sample and their absorption profile is transferred on to the resist where PMMA acts as a negative to generate an image. By atomic force microscopy imaging of this photoresist we have visualized layers around cells of E.coli, darker areas inside the cell probably corresponding to cDNA, and preliminary images of LPS and DNA molecules. This technique has resolution at the 100 A level, produces images similar to the space-filling models of macromolecules and may be of great value in the study of the ultrastructure of hydrated live biological specimens.

  19. X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of frozen-hydrated cells using continuous scanning.

    PubMed

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J; Chen, Si; Jin, Qiaoling; Nashed, Youssef S G; Peterka, Tom; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris

    2017-03-27

    X-ray microscopy can be used to image whole, unsectioned cells in their native hydrated state. It complements the higher resolution of electron microscopy for submicrometer thick specimens, and the molecule-specific imaging capabilites of fluorescence light microscopy. We describe here the first use of fast, continuous x-ray scanning of frozen hydrated cells for simultaneous sub-20 nm resolution ptychographic transmission imaging with high contrast, and sub-100 nm resolution deconvolved x-ray fluorescence imaging of diffusible and bound ions at native concentrations, without the need to add specific labels. By working with cells that have been rapidly frozen without the use of chemical fixatives, and imaging them under cryogenic conditions, we are able to obtain images with well preserved structural and chemical composition, and sufficient stability against radiation damage to allow for multiple images to be obtained with no observable change.

  20. X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of frozen-hydrated cells using continuous scanning

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; ...

    2017-03-27

    X-ray microscopy can be used to image whole, unsectioned cells in their native hydrated state. It complements the higher resolution of electron microscopy for submicrometer thick specimens, and the molecule-specific imaging capabilites of fluorescence light microscopy. We describe here the first use of fast, continuous x-ray scanning of frozen hydrated cells for simultaneous sub-20 nm resolution ptychographic transmission imaging with high contrast, and sub-100 nm resolution deconvolved x-ray fluorescence imaging of diffusible and bound ions at native concentrations, without the need to add specific labels. Here, by working with cells that have been rapidly frozen without the use of chemicalmore » fixatives, and imaging them under cryogenic conditions, we are able to obtain images with well preserved structural and chemical composition, and sufficient stability against radiation damage to allow for multiple images to be obtained with no observable change.« less

  1. Coherent x-ray zoom condenser lens for diffractive and scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takashi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2013-04-22

    We propose a coherent x-ray zoom condenser lens composed of two-stage deformable Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The lens delivers coherent x-rays with a controllable beam size, from one micrometer to a few tens of nanometers, at a fixed focal position. The lens is suitable for diffractive and scanning microscopy. We also propose non-scanning coherent diffraction microscopy for extended objects by using an apodized focused beam produced by the lens with a spatial filter. The proposed apodized-illumination method will be useful in highly efficient imaging with ultimate storage ring sources, and will also open the way to single-shot coherent diffraction microscopy of extended objects with x-ray free-electron lasers.

  2. X-ray nanoprobe project at Taiwan Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Gung-Chian Chang, Shih-Hung; Chen, Bo-Yi; Chen, Huang-Yeh; Lin, Bi-Hsuan; Tseng, Shao-Chin; Lee, Chien-Yu; Wu, Jian-Xing; Tang, Mau-Tsu; Wu, Shao-Yun

    2016-07-27

    The hard X-ray nanoprobe facility at Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) provides versatile X-ray analysis techniques, with tens of nanometer resolution, including XRF, XAS, XEOL, projection microscope, CDI, etc. Resulting from the large numerical aperture obtained by utilizing Montel KB mirrors, the beamline with a moderate length 75 meters can conduct similar performance with those beamlines longer than 100 meters. The two silica-made Montel mirrors are 45 degree cut and placed in a V-shape to eliminate the gap loss and the deformation caused by gravity. The slope error of the KB mirror pair is less than 0.04 µrad accomplished by elastic emission machining (EEM) method. For the beamline, a horizontal DCM and two-stage focusing in horizontal direction is applied. For the endstation, a combination of SEM for quickly positioning the sample, a fly scanning system with laser interferometers, a precise temperature control system, and a load lock transfer system will be implemented. In this presentation, the design and construction progress of the beamline and endstation is reported. The endstation is scheduled to be in commissioning phase in 2016.

  3. X-ray microscopy using reflection targets based on SEM with tungsten filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junbiao; Ma, Yutian; Zhao, Weixia; Niu, Geng; Chu, Mingzhang; Yin, Bohua; Han, Li; Liu, Baodong

    2016-10-01

    X-ray MicroandNano imaging is developed based on the conventional x-ray tomography, it can not only provide nondestructive testing with higher resolution measurement, but also be used to examine the material or the structure with low atomic number and low density. The source with micro-focal spot size is one of the key components of x-ray MicroandNano imaging. The focused electron beam from SEM bombarding the metal target can generate x-ray with ultra-small size. It is convenient to set up x-ray microscopy based on SEM for laboratory use. This paper describes a new x-ray microscopy using reflection targets based on FEI Quanta600 SEM with tungsten filament. The flat panel detector is placed outside of the vacuum chamber with 300μm thickness Be-window to isolate vacuum from the air. A stage with 3 DOFs is added to adjust the positions of the target, the SEM's sample stage is used to move sample. And the shape of target is designed as cone with 60° half cone angle to get the maximum x-ray dosage. The attenuation coefficient of Bewindow for x-ray is about 25%. Finally, the line pair card is used to evaluate the resolution and the result shows that the resolution of the system can receive less than 750nm, when the acceleration voltage is 30keV, the beam current is 160nA, the SEM working distance is 5mm and the acquisition time of the detector is 60s.

  4. X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy using a Fresnel Zone Plate and a Transmission Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-06-23

    We report on a hard X-ray phase imaging microscopy (a phase-difference microscopy) that consists of an objective and a transmission grating. The simple optical system provides a quantitative phase image, and does not need a wave field mostly coherent on the objective. Our method has a spatial resolution almost same as that of the absorption contrast microscope image obtained by removing the grating. We demonstrate how our approach provides a phase image from experimentally obtained images. Our approach is attractive for easily appending a quantitative phase-sensitive mode to normal X-ray microscopes, and has potentially broad applications in biology and material sciences.

  5. Nanostructure characterization by a combined x-ray absorption/scanning force microscopy system.

    PubMed

    Pilet, Nicolas; Raabe, Joerg; Stevenson, Stephanie E; Romer, Sara; Bernard, Laetitia; McNeill, Christopher R; Fink, Rainer H; Hug, Hans J; Quitmann, Christoph

    2012-11-30

    A combined x-ray transmission and scanning force microscope setup (NanoXAS) recently installed at a dedicated beamline of the Swiss Light Source combines complementary experimental techniques to access chemical and physical sample properties with nanometer scale resolution. While scanning force microscopy probes physical properties such as sample topography, local mechanical properties, adhesion, electric and magnetic properties on lateral scales even down to atomic resolution, scanning transmission x-ray microscopy offers direct access to the local chemical composition, electronic structure and magnetization. Here we present three studies which underline the advantages of complementary access to nanoscale properties in prototype thin film samples.

  6. Compact soft x-ray transmission microscopy with sub-50 nm spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyong Woo; Kwon, Youngman; Nam, Ki-Yong; Lim, Jong-Hyeok; Kim, Kyu-Gyum; Chon, Kwon Su; Kim, Byoung Hoon; Kim, Dong Eon; Kim, JinGon; Ahn, Byoung Nam; Shin, Hyun Joon; Rah, Seungyu; Kim, Ki-Ho; Chae, Jin Seok; Gweon, Dae Gab; Kang, Dong Woo; Kang, Sung Hoon; Min, Jin Young; Choi, Kyu-Sil; Yoon, Seong Eon; Kim, Eun-A; Namba, Yoshiharu; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2006-03-21

    In this paper, the development of compact transmission soft x-ray microscopy (XM) with sub-50 nm spatial resolution for biomedical applications is described. The compact transmission soft x-ray microscope operates at lambda = 2.88 nm (430 eV) and is based on a tabletop regenerative x-ray source in combination with a tandem ellipsoidal condenser mirror for sample illumination, an objective micro zone plate and a thinned back-illuminated charge coupled device to record an x-ray image. The new, compact x-ray microscope system requires the fabrication of proper x-ray optical devices in order to obtain high-quality images. For an application-oriented microscope, the alignment procedure is fully automated via computer control through a graphic user interface. In imaging studies using our compact XM system, a gold mesh image was obtained with 45 nm resolution at x580 magnification and 1 min exposure. Images of a biological sample (Coscinodiscus oculoides) were recorded.

  7. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M

    2016-09-16

    We present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional data cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. We demonstrate this 'big data' approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.

  8. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional data cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. We demonstrate this ‘big data’ approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.

  9. Structural states of myelin observed by x-ray diffraction and freeze- fracture electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Coordinated freeze-fracture electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to visualize the morphological relation between compacted and native period membrane arrays in myelinated nerves treated with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Comparison of x-ray diffraction at room temperature and at low temperature was used as a critical measure of the extent of structural preservation. Our x-ray diffraction patterns show that in the presence of cryoprotective agents, it is possible to preserve with only small changes the myelin structure which exists at room temperature. These changes include a slight increase in packing disorder of the membrane, a small, negative thermal expansion of the membrane unit, and some reorganization in the cytoplasmic half of the bilayer. The freeze-fracture electron microscopy clearly demonstrates continuity of compact and native period phases in DMSO-treated myelin. Finally, the use of freezing to trap the transient, intermediate structure during a structural transition in glycerol is demonstrated. PMID:479295

  10. Correlative electron and X-ray microscopy: probing chemistry and bonding with high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Goode, Angela E; Porter, Alexandra E; Ryan, Mary P; McComb, David W

    2015-02-07

    Two powerful and complementary techniques for chemical characterisation of nanoscale systems are electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the scanning transmission X-ray microscope. A correlative approach to spectro-microscopy may not only bridge the gaps in spatial and spectral resolution which exist between the two instruments, but also offer unique opportunities for nanoscale characterisation. This review will discuss the similarities of the two spectroscopy techniques and the state of the art for each microscope. Case studies have been selected to illustrate the benefits and limitations of correlative electron and X-ray microscopy techniques. In situ techniques and radiation damage are also discussed.

  11. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    SciTech Connect

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2011-01-20

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

  12. X-ray holographic microscopy by means of photoresist recording and atomic-force microscope readout

    SciTech Connect

    Lindaas, S.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kalinovsky, A.

    1996-09-01

    We have reconstructed in-line (or Gabor) x-ray holograms at 40{endash}50-nm resolution from a complex biological specimen. The holograms were recorded as a relief pattern on photoresist with use of 1.89-nm, soft x rays from the X1A undulator beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We have improved the resolution and the fidelity and simplified the experiment compared with earlier work by employing a special atomic-force microscope to examine and digitize the holograms. Following digitization the holograms were reconstructed numerically, allowing both the absorptive and phase-shifting properties of the reconstructed object to be mapped. A comparison of the reconstructed images with images obtained from visible light and transmission electron microscopes has been made to confirm the validity of the x-ray holographic technique. The method offers promise as a technique for soft-x-ray microscopy and diffraction tomography of dry and frozen hydrated specimens and for microscopy with pulsed x-ray sources. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  13. Hard X-ray-induced damage on carbon-binder matrix for in situ synchrotron transmission X-ray microscopy tomography of Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lim, Cheolwoong; Kang, Huixiao; De Andrade, Vincent; De Carlo, Francesco; Zhu, Likun

    2017-05-01

    The electrode of Li-ion batteries is required to be chemically and mechanically stable in the electrolyte environment for in situ monitoring by transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM). Evidence has shown that continuous irradiation has an impact on the microstructure and the electrochemical performance of the electrode. To identify the root cause of the radiation damage, a wire-shaped electrode is soaked in an electrolyte in a quartz capillary and monitored using TXM under hard X-ray illumination. The results show that expansion of the carbon-binder matrix by the accumulated X-ray dose is the key factor of radiation damage. For in situ TXM tomography, intermittent X-ray exposure during image capturing can be used to avoid the morphology change caused by radiation damage on the carbon-binder matrix.

  14. High numerical aperture tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscopy with 70-nm resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Richard L.; Song, Changyong; Wachulak, Przemyslaw W.; Raymondson, Daisy A.; Paul, Ariel; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Lee, Edwin; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Marconi, Mario C.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Miao, Jianwei

    2008-01-01

    Light microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of nature. The achievable resolution, however, is limited by optical wavelengths to ≈200 nm. By using imaging and labeling technologies, resolutions beyond the diffraction limit can be achieved for specialized specimens with techniques such as near-field scanning optical microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, and photoactivated localization microscopy. Here, we report a versatile soft x-ray diffraction microscope with 70- to 90-nm resolution by using two different tabletop coherent soft x-ray sources—a soft x-ray laser and a high-harmonic source. We also use field curvature correction that allows high numerical aperture imaging and near-diffraction-limited resolution of 1.5λ. A tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscope should find broad applications in biology, nanoscience, and materials science because of its simple optical design, high resolution, large depth of field, 3D imaging capability, scalability to shorter wavelengths, and ultrafast temporal resolution. PMID:18162534

  15. Phase contrast x-ray microscopy study of rabbit primo vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.-S.; Oh, S.-W.; Lim, J.-H.; Han, S.-W.

    2010-11-01

    The microstructural properties of the primo-vascular systems of rabbits were examined by phase contrast x-ray microscopy. The primo-vascular systems with an average diameter of 32 μm were extracted from the surfaces of the rabbit internal organs. Phase contrast x-ray imaging showed that the primo-vascular systems were tubules with random holes on their lateral surfaces. The size of the holes on the vascular surface was 2-5 μm. The holes might act as size selective channels for microcells coming in and out and assist in the unidirectional flow of the primo-vascular systems.

  16. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Alexander; Kronast, Florian; Papp, Christian; Yang, See-Hun; Cramm, Stefan; Krug, Ingo P.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Hilken, Dawn L.; Anderson, Erik H.; Fischer, Peter; Durr, Hermann A.; Schneider, Claus M.; Fadley, Charles S.

    2010-10-29

    We demonstrate the addition of depth resolution to the usual two-dimensional images in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), with application to a square array of circular magnetic Co microdots. The method is based on excitation with soft x-ray standing-waves generated by Bragg reflection from a multilayer mirror substrate. Standing wave is moved vertically through sample simply by varying the photon energy around the Bragg condition. Depth-resolved PEEM images were obtained for all of the observed elements. Photoemission intensities as functions of photon energy were compared to x-ray optical calculations in order to quantitatively derive the depth-resolved film structure of the sample.

  17. Aplanatic Three-Mirror Objective for High-Magnification Soft X-Ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, M.; Jinno, T.; Yanagihara, M.

    2011-09-09

    An innovative solution for high-magnification microscopy, based on attaching afocal optics for focal length reduction, is proposed. The solution, consisting of three spherical mirrors, allows one to enhance a magnification of a laboratory based soft x-ray microscope over 1000x, where movies with diffraction-limited resolution can be observed with an x-ray CCD. The design example, having a numerical aperture of 0.25, was successfully demonstrated both a high magnification and a large field of view.

  18. Full-field hard x-ray microscopy below 30 nm : a challenging nanofabrication achievement.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Lo, T.; Chu, Y.; Yi, J.; Liu, C.; Wang, J.; Wang, C.; Chiu, C.; Hua, T.; Hwu, Y.; Shen, Q.; Yin, G.; Liang, K.; Lin, H.; Je, J.; Margaritondo, G.; X-Ray Science Division; Academia Sinica; Tatung Univ.; National Tsing Hua Univ.; National Taiwan Ocean Univ.; National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology; Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of devices to focus hard x-rays is one of the most difficult--and important--challenges in nanotechnology. Here we show that Fresnel zone plates combining 30 nm external zones and a high aspect ratio finally bring hard x-ray microscopy beyond the 30 nm Rayleigh spatial resolution level and measurable spatial frequencies down to 20-23 nm feature size. After presenting the overall nanofabrication process and the characterization test results, we discuss the potential research impact of these resolution levels.

  19. Application of X-ray microscopy in food science investigation of high pressure affected bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönch, Susanne; Heinz, Volker; Guttmann, Peter; Knorr, Dietrich

    2000-05-01

    Using the Göttingen transmission X-ray microscope at BESSY the effect of different pressure and temperature levels during the high hydrostatic pressure (HP) treatment was investigated. At 150 MPa and temperatures up to 50 °C the triggering of germination was observed by standard microbiological methods with Bacillus subtilis spores. Increasing the temperature to 70 °C at the same pressure level killed the spores without any indication of germination. By X-ray microscopy images it could be shown that the typical disintegration of the protoplast is inhibited. This suggests that the enzymic reaction pathway is possibly affected under specific pressure temperature conditions.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EPMA) of pink teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, N.; Watanabe, G.; Harada, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1988-11-01

    Samples of postmortem pink teeth were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Fracture surfaces of the dentin in pink teeth were noticeably rough and revealed many more smaller dentinal tubules than those of the control white teeth. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis showed that the pink teeth contained iron which seemed to be derived from blood hemoglobin. The present study confirms that under the same circumstance red coloration of teeth may occur more easily in the teeth in which the dentin is less compact and contains more dentinal tubules.

  1. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, W.; Kim, J.; Rekawa, S.; Fischer, P.; Anderson, E. H.

    2009-06-05

    To extend soft x-ray microscopy to a resolution of order 10 nm or better, we developed a new nanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. The new process, based on the double patterning technique, has enabled us to fabricate high quality gold zone plates with 12 nm outer zones. Testing of the zone plate with the full-field transmission x-ray microscope, XM-1, in Berkeley, showed that the lens clearly resolved 12 nm lines and spaces. This result represents a significant step towards 10 nm resolution and beyond.

  2. Imaging at high spatial resolution: Soft x-ray microscopy to 15nm

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.; Liddle, J.A.; Harteneck, B.; Fischer, P.; Schneider, G.; Le Gros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2006-04-05

    Soft x-ray microscopy has now achieved 15 nm spatial resolution with new zone plates and bending magnet radiation. Combined with elemental sensitivity and flexible sample environment (applied magnetic or electric fields, wet samples, windows, overcoatings) this emerges as a valuable tool for nanoscience and nanotechnology, complimenting common electron and scanning tip microscopies. In this presentation we describe recent advances in spatial resolution, expectations for the near future, and applications to magnetic materials, bio-tomography, etc.

  3. 3-D Cellular Ultrastructure Can Be Resolved by X-ray Microscopy | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    X-ray microscopy (XRM) is more rapid than cryoelectron tomography or super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and could fill an important gap in current technologies used to investigate in situ three-dimensional structure of cells. New XRM methods developed by first author Gerd Schneider, Ph.D., working with James McNally. Ph.D., and a team of colleagues, is capable of revealing full cellular ultrastructure without requiring fixation, staining, or sectioning.

  4. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  5. Combining X-ray and electron-microscopy data to solve crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Navaza, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Overview and examples of combined use of X-ray and electron-microscopy data. Low-resolution electron-microscopy reconstructions can be used as search models in molecular replacement or may be combined with existing monomeric structures in order to produce multimeric models suitable for molecular replacement. The technique is described in the case of viral and subviral particles as well as in the case of oligomeric proteins.

  6. Biomedical elemental analysis and imaging using synchrotron x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Dejun, Xue ); Bockman, R.S. ); Saubermann, A.J. . Health Science Center)

    1990-01-01

    The application of synchrotron x-ray microscopy to biomedical research is currently in progress at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The current status of the x-ray microscope (XRM) is reviewed from a technical standpoint. Some of the items considered are photon flux, spatial resolution, quantitation, minimum detection limits, and beam-induced specimen damage. Images can be produced by measurement of fluorescent x rays or of the attenuation of the incident beam by the specimen. Maps of the elemental distributions or linear attenuation of the incident beam by the specimen. Maps of the elemental distributions or linear attenuation coefficients can be made by scanning the specimen past the beam. Computed microtomography (CMT) can be used for non- destructive images through the specimen in either the emission or absorption mode. Examples of measurements made with the XRM are given.

  7. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; ...

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore » using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  8. Numerical model for tomographic image formation in transmission x-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bertilson, Michael; von Hofsten, Olov; Hertz, Hans M; Vogt, Ulrich

    2011-06-06

    We present a numerical image-formation model for investigating the influence of partial coherence, sample thickness and depth-of-focus on the accuracy of tomographic reconstructions in transmission x-ray microscopes. The model combines wave propagation through the object by finite difference techniques with Fourier methods. We include a ray-tracing model to analyse the origin of detrimental stray light in zone plate-based x-ray microscopes. These models allow optimization of x-ray microscopy systems for quantitative tomographic imaging of thick objects. Results show that both the depth-of-focus and the reconstructed local absorption coefficient are highly dependent on the degree of coherence of the optical system.

  9. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with a fast framing pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Menzel, A; Kewish, C M; Kraft, P; Henrich, B; Jefimovs, K; Vila-Comamala, J; David, C; Dierolf, M; Thibault, P; Pfeiffer, F; Bunk, O

    2010-08-01

    Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) is a powerful imaging technique, in which a small X-ray probe is raster scanned across a specimen. Complete knowledge of the complex-valued transmission function of the specimen can be gained using detection schemes whose every-day use, however, is often hindered by the need of specialized configured detectors or by slow or noisy readout of area detectors. We report on sub-50 nm-resolution STXM studies in the hard X-ray regime using the PILATUS, a fully pixelated fast framing detector operated in single-photon counting mode. We demonstrate a range of imaging modes, including phase contrast and dark-field imaging. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Simple load frame for in situ computed tomography and x-ray tomographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Breunig, T.M. ); Stock, S.R.; Brown, R.C. )

    1993-05-01

    In many instances, the response of a sample to external stimuli must be observed repeatedly during the course of an experiment. The sequence in which features are formed is often critical to proper identification of the mechanisms operating, for example, in fatigue and fracture. Merely observing what is visible at the surface of the sample can be misleading or can provide inadequate information about what governs fatigue crack growth or about what controls the fracture process. X-ray imaging allows one to observe the interior of samples and is an attractive technique to use with in situ stressing of test specimens. Here, a simple compact, inexpensive load frame is described for in situ x-ray computed tomography and for very high resolution computed tomography, termed x-ray tomographic microscopy. The load frame is evaluated, and its use is illustrated by observations of crack closure as a function of load in a notched tensile sample of Al-Li-2090.

  11. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-08-03

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

  12. Cryogenic x-ray diffraction microscopy utilizing high-pressure cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Lima, Enju; Chushkin, Yuriy; van der Linden, Peter; Kim, Chae Un; Zontone, Federico; Carpentier, Philippe; Gruner, Sol M; Pernot, Petra

    2014-10-01

    We present cryo x-ray diffraction microscopy of high-pressure-cryofixed bacteria and report high-convergence imaging with multiple image reconstructions. Hydrated D. radiodurans cells were cryofixed at 200 MPa pressure into ∼10-μm-thick water layers and their unstained, hydrated cellular environments were imaged by phasing diffraction patterns, reaching sub-30-nm resolutions with hard x-rays. Comparisons were made with conventional ambient-pressure-cryofixed samples, with respect to both coherent small-angle x-ray scattering and the image reconstruction. The results show a correlation between the level of background ice signal and phasing convergence, suggesting that phasing difficulties with frozen-hydrated specimens may be caused by high-background ice scattering.

  13. 3D elemental sensitive imaging using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Wang, Junyue; Requena, Guillermo; Williams, Phillip; Nelson, Johanna; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-09-01

    Determination of the heterogeneous distribution of metals in alloy/battery/catalyst and biological materials is critical to fully characterize and/or evaluate the functionality of the materials. Using synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM), it is now feasible to perform nanoscale-resolution imaging over a wide X-ray energy range covering the absorption edges of many elements; combining elemental sensitive imaging with determination of sample morphology. We present an efficient and reliable methodology to perform 3D elemental sensitive imaging with excellent sample penetration (tens of microns) using hard X-ray TXM. A sample of an Al-Si piston alloy is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method.

  14. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens. PMID:19654762

  15. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

  16. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Withers, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored. PMID:25624521

  17. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Withers, P J

    2015-03-06

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored.

  18. X-ray optics for scanning fluorescence microscopy and other applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ryon, R.W.; Warburton, W.K.

    1992-05-01

    Scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy is analogous to scanning electron microscopy. Maps of chemical element distribution are produced by scanning with a very small x-ray beam. Goal is to perform such scanning microscopy with resolution in the range of <1 to 10 {mu}m, using standard laboratory x-ray tubes. We are investigating mirror optics in the Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) configuration. K-B optics uses two curved mirrors mounted orthogonally along the optical axis. The first mirror provides vertical focus, the second mirror provides horizontal focus. We have used two types of mirrors: synthetic multilayers and crystals. Multilayer mirrors are used with lower energy radiation such as Cu K{alpha}. At higher energies such as Ag K{alpha}, silicon wafers are used in order to increase the incidence angles and thereby the photon collection efficiency. In order to increase the surface area of multilayers which reflects x-rays at the Bragg angle, we have designed mirrors with the spacing between layers graded along the optic axis in order to compensate for the changing angle of incidence. Likewise, to achieve a large reflecting surface with silicon, the wafers are placed on a specially designed lever arm which is bent into a log spiral by applying force at one end. In this way, the same diffracting angle is maintained over the entire surface of the wafer, providing a large solid angle for photon collection.

  19. X-ray structure determination using low-resolution electron microscopy maps for molecular replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ryan N.; McCoy, Airlie J.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Read, Randy J.; Wiedenheft, Blake

    2015-07-30

    Structures of multi-subunit macromolecular machines are primarily determined by either electron microscopy (EM) or X-ray crystallography. In many cases, a structure for a complex can be obtained at low resolution (at a coarse level of detail) with EM and at higher resolution (with finer detail) by X-ray crystallography. The integration of these two structural techniques is becoming increasingly important for generating atomic models of macromolecular complexes. A low-resolution EM image can be a powerful tool for obtaining the "phase" information that is missing from an X-ray crystallography experiment, however integration of EM and X-ray diffraction data has been technically challenging. Here we show a step-by-step protocol that explains how low-resolution EM maps can be placed in the crystallographic unit cell by molecular replacement, and how initial phases computed from the placed EM density are extended to high resolution by averaging maps over non-crystallographic symmetry. As the resolution gap between EM and Xray crystallography continues to narrow, the use of EM maps to help with X-ray crystal structure determination, as described in this protocol, will become increasingly effective.

  20. X-ray structure determination using low-resolution electron microscopy maps for molecular replacement

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, Ryan N.; McCoy, Airlie J.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; ...

    2015-07-30

    Structures of multi-subunit macromolecular machines are primarily determined by either electron microscopy (EM) or X-ray crystallography. In many cases, a structure for a complex can be obtained at low resolution (at a coarse level of detail) with EM and at higher resolution (with finer detail) by X-ray crystallography. The integration of these two structural techniques is becoming increasingly important for generating atomic models of macromolecular complexes. A low-resolution EM image can be a powerful tool for obtaining the "phase" information that is missing from an X-ray crystallography experiment, however integration of EM and X-ray diffraction data has been technically challenging.more » Here we show a step-by-step protocol that explains how low-resolution EM maps can be placed in the crystallographic unit cell by molecular replacement, and how initial phases computed from the placed EM density are extended to high resolution by averaging maps over non-crystallographic symmetry. As the resolution gap between EM and Xray crystallography continues to narrow, the use of EM maps to help with X-ray crystal structure determination, as described in this protocol, will become increasingly effective.« less

  1. An improved phase shift reconstruction algorithm of fringe scanning technique for X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, S.; Yang, H.; Kudo, H.; Momose, A.; Yashiro, W.

    2015-02-15

    The X-ray phase imaging method has been applied to observe soft biological tissues, and it is possible to image the soft tissues by using the benefit of the so-called “Talbot effect” by an X-ray grating. One type of the X-ray phase imaging method was reported by combining an X-ray imaging microscope equipped by a Fresnel zone plate with a phase grating. Using the fringe scanning technique, a high-precision phase shift image could be obtained by displacing the grating step by step and measuring dozens of sample images. The number of the images was selected to reduce the error caused by the non-sinusoidal component of the Talbot self-image at the imaging plane. A larger number suppressed the error more but increased radiation exposure and required higher mechanical stability of equipment. In this paper, we analyze the approximation error of fringe scanning technique for the X-ray microscopy which uses just one grating and proposes an improved algorithm. We compute the approximation error by iteration and substitute that into the process of reconstruction of phase shift. This procedure will suppress the error even with few sample images. The results of simulation experiments show that the precision of phase shift image reconstructed by the proposed algorithm with 4 sample images is almost the same as that reconstructed by the conventional algorithm with 40 sample images. We also have succeeded in the experiment with real data.

  2. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  3. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography.

    PubMed

    Umetani, K; Fukushima, K

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  4. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  5. Artifact characterization and reduction in scanning X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Holzner, Christian; Mohacsi, Istvan; Karvinen, Petri; Diaz, Ana; Pigino, Gaia; David, Christian

    2015-05-18

    Zernike phase contrast microscopy is a well-established method for imaging specimens with low absorption contrast. It has been successfully implemented in full-field microscopy using visible light and X-rays. In microscopy Cowley's reciprocity principle connects scanning and full-field imaging. Even though the reciprocity in Zernike phase contrast has been discussed by several authors over the past thirty years, only recently it was experimentally verified using scanning X-ray microscopy. In this paper, we investigate the image and contrast formation in scanning Zernike phase contrast microscopy with a particular and detailed focus on the origin of imaging artifacts that are typically associated with Zernike phase contrast. We demonstrate experimentally with X-rays the effect of the phase mask design on the contrast and halo artifacts and present an optimized design of the phase mask with respect to photon efficiency and artifact reduction. Similarly, due to the principle of reciprocity the observations and conclusions of this work have direct applicability to Zernike phase contrast in full-field microscopy as well.

  6. Investigation of nanoparticulate silicon as printed layers using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Unuigbe, David M.; Harting, Margit; Jonah, Emmanuel O.; ...

    2017-08-21

    The presence of native oxide on the surface of silicon nanoparticles is known to inhibit charge transport on the surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveal that the particles in the printed silicon network have a wide range of sizes and shapes. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the particle surfaces have mainly the (111)- and (100)-oriented planes which stabilizes against further oxidation of the particles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements at the O 1s-edge have been utilized to study the oxidation and local atomic structure of printed layers of silicon nanoparticles which were milledmore » for different times. XANES results reveal the presence of the +4 (SiO2) oxidation state which tends towards the +2 (SiO) state for higher milling times. Si 2pXPS results indicate that the surfaces of the silicon nanoparticles in the printed layers are only partially oxidized and that all three sub-oxide, +1 (Si2O), +2 (SiO) and +3 (Si2O3), states are present. The analysis of the change in the sub-oxide peaks of the silicon nanoparticles shows the dominance of the +4 state only for lower milling times.« less

  7. Multimodal imaging of human cerebellum - merging X-ray phase microtomography, magnetic resonance microscopy and histology

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Georg; Waschkies, Conny; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; David, Christian; Müller, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging and X-ray computed tomography are established methods in daily clinical diagnosis of human brain. Clinical equipment does not provide sufficient spatial resolution to obtain morphological information on the cellular level, essential for applying minimally or non-invasive surgical interventions. Therefore, generic data with lateral sub-micrometer resolution have been generated from histological slices post mortem. Sub-cellular spatial resolution, lost in the third dimension as a result of sectioning, is obtained using magnetic resonance microscopy and micro computed tomography. We demonstrate that for human cerebellum grating-based X-ray phase tomography shows complementary contrast to magnetic resonance microscopy and histology. In this study, the contrast-to-noise values of magnetic resonance microscopy and phase tomography were comparable whereas the spatial resolution in phase tomography is an order of magnitude better. The registered data with their complementary information permit the distinct segmentation of tissues within the human cerebellum. PMID:23145319

  8. Multimodal imaging of human cerebellum - merging X-ray phase microtomography, magnetic resonance microscopy and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Waschkies, Conny; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; David, Christian; Müller, Bert

    2012-11-01

    Imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging and X-ray computed tomography are established methods in daily clinical diagnosis of human brain. Clinical equipment does not provide sufficient spatial resolution to obtain morphological information on the cellular level, essential for applying minimally or non-invasive surgical interventions. Therefore, generic data with lateral sub-micrometer resolution have been generated from histological slices post mortem. Sub-cellular spatial resolution, lost in the third dimension as a result of sectioning, is obtained using magnetic resonance microscopy and micro computed tomography. We demonstrate that for human cerebellum grating-based X-ray phase tomography shows complementary contrast to magnetic resonance microscopy and histology. In this study, the contrast-to-noise values of magnetic resonance microscopy and phase tomography were comparable whereas the spatial resolution in phase tomography is an order of magnitude better. The registered data with their complementary information permit the distinct segmentation of tissues within the human cerebellum.

  9. Fluctuation x-ray microscopy for measuring medium-range order.

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; McNulty, I.; Paterson, D.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Gibson, J. M.; Arizona State Univ.

    2005-01-01

    Many x-ray techniques exist to probe long- and short-range order in matter, in real space by imaging and in reciprocal space by diffraction and scattering. However, measuring medium-range order (MRO) in disordered materials is a long-standing problem. Based on fluctuation electron microscopy, which was applied successfully to the understanding of MRO in amorphous materials, we have developed fluctuation x-ray microscopy (FXM). This novel approach offers quantitative insight into medium-range correlations in materials at nanometer and larger length scales. It examines spatially resolved fluctuations in the intensity of a series of x-ray speckle patterns. The speckle variance depends on higher order correlations that are more sensitive to MRO. Systematically measuring the speckle variance as function of the momentum transfer and x-ray illumination size produces a fluctuation map that contains information about the degree of MRO and the correlation length. This approach can be used for the exploration of MRO and subtle spatial structural changes in a wide range of disordered materials from soft condensed matter to nanowire arrays, semiconductor quantum dot arrays and magnetic materials. It will also help us to understand the mechanisms of order-disorder transitions and may lead to control of ordering, which is important in developing ordered structures tailored for particular applications. A theory for FXM and preliminary experimental results from polystyrene latex spheres are discussed in this paper.

  10. Pinch plasma source for x-ray microscopy with nanosecond exposure time.

    PubMed

    Lebert, R; Neff, W; Rothweiler, D

    1996-01-01

    The strong demand for bright, compact, and inexpensive sources for x-ray microscopy has stimulated the development of flash x-ray sources. In this paper, the requirements for such a source are analyzed under boundary conditions given by the concept of an imaging x-ray microscope using mirror condenser and Fresnel zone plates for high-resolution imaging. It is found that the Lyman-α (1s-2p) line of hydrogen-like nitrogen (N VII) at λ = 2.48 nm emitted from a nonequilibrium plasma of about 200 eV temperature and 1020 cm-3 electron density is best suited. These conditions are achieved in medium-current pinch-plasma devices. Using detailed numerical simulation of the physical processes of such a device, optimization criteria for the integrated spectral brightness (ISB) are found. Measurements of the ISB confirm these optimization criteria. The results show that the spectral emission characteristics of an optimized pinch plasma souce are compatible with the demands of the mentioned x-ray microscopy concept. These emission characteristics are compared with laser-produced plasma sources. Using the optimized source with an ISB exceeding 0.6 μJ/(μm2 sr) in a 10-20 ns pulse, wet biological samples are imaged with about 0.1 μm lateral resolution.

  11. Single grating phase contrast imaging for x-ray microscopy and microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyndonckx, P.; Sasov, A.; Pauwels, B.

    2014-09-01

    The grating based approach to phase contrast imaging is rather inefficient in the use of the available x-ray flux due to the presence of two absorption gratings and it requires longer scan times compared to conventional CT because multiple images are needed at each projection angle. To avoid these drawbacks, a proof-of-principle experiment was developed to obtain absorption, phase contrast (DPC) and dark field images (DCI) in a single exposure using only a non-absorbing phase grating, a micro-focus source in cone-beam geometry and a highresolution x-ray detector.

  12. X-ray microscopy using two phase contrast imaging techniques: two dimensional grating interferometry and speckle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Pape, Ian; Sawhney, Kawal

    2013-10-01

    Two phase contrast imaging techniques, namely two dimensional grating interferometry and X-ray speckle tracking (XST), have been combined with the use of a Fresnel Zone Plate (FZP) for application to X-ray microscopy. Both techniques allows the phase shift introduced by a sample on a hard X-ray beam in two dimensions, to be recovered with a high sensitivity and low requirements on transverse and longitudinal coherence. Sub-micron phase imaging of carbon fibres was achieved using the two methods thanks to the high magnification ratio of the FZP. Advantages, drawbacks and differences between these two techniques for X-ray microscopy are discussed.

  13. Phase retrieval in x-ray coherent Fresnel projection-geometry diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, Liberato; Giannini, Cinzia; Cedola, Alessia; Pelliccia, Daniele; Lagomarsino, Stefano; Jark, Werner

    2007-01-22

    Coherent x-ray diffraction experiments were performed in Fresnel regime, within a line-projection geometry. A planar x-ray waveguide was used to focus coherent cylindrical waves onto a 7.2 {mu}m Kevlar fiber, which acts as a phase object for hard x rays. The phase was retrieved, by using a Fourier-based iterative phasing algorithm, consistent with measured diffraction data and known constraints in real space, with a submicrometer spatial resolution.

  14. Imaging interfacial micro- and nano-bubbles by scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhao, Binyu; Xue, Lian; Guo, Zhi; Dong, Yaming; Fang, Haiping; Tai, Renzhong; Hu, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Synchrotron-based scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy (STXM) with nanometer resolution was used to investigate the existence and behavior of interfacial gas nanobubbles confined between two silicon nitride windows. The observed nanobubbles of SF6 and Ne with diameters smaller than 2.5 µm were quite stable. However, larger bubbles became unstable and grew during the soft X-ray imaging, indicating that stable nanobubbles may have a length scale, which is consistent with a previous report using atomic force microscopy [Zhang et al. (2010), Soft Matter, 6, 4515-4519]. Here, it is shown that STXM is a promising technique for studying the aggregation of gases near the solid/water interfaces at the nanometer scale.

  15. Apparatus for X-ray diffraction microscopy and tomography of cryo specimens

    DOE PAGES

    Beetz, T.; Howells, M. R.; Jacobsen, C.; ...

    2005-03-14

    An apparatus for diffraction microscopy of biological and materials science specimens is described. In this system, a coherent soft X-ray beam is selected with a pinhole, and the illuminated specimen is followed by an adjustable beamstop and CCD camera to record diffraction data from non-crystalline specimens. In addition, a Fresnel zone plate can be inserted to allow for direct imaging. The system makes use of a cryogenic specimen holder with cryotransfer capabilities to allow frozen hydrated specimens to be loaded. The specimen can be tilted over a range of ± 80 ° degrees for three-dimensional imaging; this is done bymore » computer-controlled motors, enabling automated alignment of the specimen through a tilt series. The system is now in use for experiments in soft X-ray diffraction microscopy.« less

  16. Apparatus for X-ray diffraction microscopy and tomography of cryo specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Beetz, T.; Howells, M. R.; Jacobsen, C.; Kao, C. -C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Mentes, T. O.; Miao, H.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D.

    2005-03-14

    An apparatus for diffraction microscopy of biological and materials science specimens is described. In this system, a coherent soft X-ray beam is selected with a pinhole, and the illuminated specimen is followed by an adjustable beamstop and CCD camera to record diffraction data from non-crystalline specimens. In addition, a Fresnel zone plate can be inserted to allow for direct imaging. The system makes use of a cryogenic specimen holder with cryotransfer capabilities to allow frozen hydrated specimens to be loaded. The specimen can be tilted over a range of ± 80 ° degrees for three-dimensional imaging; this is done by computer-controlled motors, enabling automated alignment of the specimen through a tilt series. The system is now in use for experiments in soft X-ray diffraction microscopy.

  17. Imaging fully hydrated whole cells by coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Daewoong; Park, Jaehyun; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Naitow, Hisashi; Kunishima, Naoki; Yoshida, Takashi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale imaging of biological specimens in their native condition is of long-standing interest, in particular with direct, high resolution views of internal structures of intact specimens, though as yet progress has been limited. Here we introduce wet coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy capable of imaging fully hydrated and unstained biological specimens. Whole cell morphologies and internal structures better than 25 nm can be clearly visualized without contrast degradation.

  18. A scheme for lensless X-ray microscopy combining coherent diffraction imaging and differential corner holography.

    PubMed

    Capotondi, F; Pedersoli, E; Kiskinova, M; Martin, A V; Barthelmess, M; Chapman, H N

    2012-10-22

    We successfully use the corners of a common silicon nitride supporting window in lensless X-ray microscopy as extended references in differential holography to obtain a real space hologram of the illuminated object. Moreover, we combine this method with the iterative phasing techniques of coherent diffraction imaging to enhance the spatial resolution on the reconstructed object, and overcome the problem of missing areas in the collected data due to the presence of a beam stop, achieving a resolution close to 85 nm.

  19. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S G; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolution beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub-30-nm resolution structural images and ∼90-nm-resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.

  20. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-01-01

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolution beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ∼90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context. PMID:25675478

  1. Hard x-ray holographic microscopy using refractive prism and Fresnel zone plate objective

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa

    2005-09-15

    An optics for hard x-ray holographic microscopy has been developed and preliminary experiments have been done at SPring-8 undulator beamline 20XU. The optical system consists of an x-ray objective lens (Fresnel zone plate) and a wave front-division-type interferometer with prism optics. The illuminating x-ray beam is coherent with parallel radiation, and the spatially coherent area is much larger than the aperture of the objective lens. The refractive prism is placed behind the back focal plane of the objective lens in order to configure the wavefront-dividing interferometer. Half of the illuminating radiation is used for illuminating an object, and the other half is used for forming a reference wave. The magnified image of the object is generated at an image plane, and the reference wave is superimposed on the magnified image of the object. The recorded interferogram includes both amplitude and phase information of the object. The spatial resolution is determined by the numerical aperture of the objective lens. Therefore, in principle, this method enables holographic imaging at nanometer scale to be carried out in the hard x-ray region.

  2. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; ...

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolutionmore » beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub-30-nm resolution structural images and ~90-nm-resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. Finally, this combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.« less

  3. X-Ray Diffraction Project Final Report, Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Dane V. Morgan

    2006-10-01

    An x-ray diffraction diagnostic system was developed for determining real-time shock-driven lattice parameter shifts in single crystals at the gas gun at TA-IV at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The signal-to-noise ratio and resolution of the system were measured using imaging plates as the detector and by varying the slit width. This report includes tests of the x-ray diffraction system using a phosphor coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera by a coherent fiber-optic bundle. The system timing delay was measured with a newly installed transistor-transistor logic (TTL) bypass designed to reduce the x-ray delay time. The axial misalignment of the Bragg planes was determined with respect to the optical axis for a set of eight LiF [lithium fluoride] crystals provided by SNL to determine their suitability for gas gun experiments.

  4. Investigation of Fatigue Crack Initiation from a Non Metallic Inclusion via High Energy X Ray Diffraction Microscopy (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-14

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0320 INVESTIGATION OF FATIGUE CRACK INITIATION FROM A NON-METALLIC INCLUSION VIA HIGH ENERGY X-RAY DIFFRACTION...CRACK INITIATION FROM A NON-METALLIC INCLUSION VIA HIGH ENERGY X-RAY DIFFRACTION MICROSCOPY (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b...microstructure, leading to crack nucleation. In this study, fully 3-D characterization methods using high energy synchrotron x-rays are combined with in

  5. Quantitative Imaging of Single Unstained Magnetotactic Bacteria by Coherent X-ray Diffraction Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiadong; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Qingjie; Yao, Shengkun; Zong, Yunbing; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Huaidong

    2015-06-16

    Novel coherent diffraction microscopy provides a powerful lensless imaging method to obtain a better understanding of the microorganism at the nanoscale. Here we demonstrated quantitative imaging of intact unstained magnetotactic bacteria using coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy combined with an iterative phase retrieval algorithm. Although the signal-to-noise ratio of the X-ray diffraction pattern from single magnetotactic bacterium is weak due to low-scattering ability of biomaterials, an 18.6 nm half-period resolution of reconstructed image was achieved by using a hybrid input-output phase retrieval algorithm. On the basis of the quantitative reconstructed images, the morphology and some intracellular structures, such as nucleoid, polyβ-hydroxybutyrate granules, and magnetosomes, were identified, which were also confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. With the benefit from the quantifiability of coherent diffraction imaging, for the first time to our knowledge, an average density of magnetotactic bacteria was calculated to be ∼1.19 g/cm(3). This technique has a wide range of applications, especially in quantitative imaging of low-scattering biomaterials and multicomponent materials at nanoscale resolution. Combined with the cryogenic technique or X-ray free electron lasers, the method could image cells in a hydrated condition, which helps to maintain their natural structure.

  6. Correlative VIS-fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Guttmann, Peter; Klupp, Barbara; Werner, Stephan; Rehbein, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of vitreous samples is becoming a valuable tool in structural cell biology. Within the ‘water-window’ wavelength region (2.34–4.37 nm), it provides absorption contrast images with high signal to noise ratio and resolution of a few tens of nanometer. Soft X-rays with wavelengths close to the K-absorption edge of oxygen penetrate biological samples with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Here, we report on the application of a recently established extension of the transmission soft X-ray cryo-microscope (HZB TXM) at the beamline U41-XM of the BESSY II electron storage ring by an in-column epi-fluorescence and reflected light cryo-microscope. We demonstrate the new capability for correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of this instrument along a typical life science experimental approach – the correlation of a fluorophore-tagged protein (pUL34-GFP of pseudorabies virus, PrV, the nuclear membrane-anchored component of the nuclear egress complex of the Herpesviridae which interacts with viral pUL31) in PrV pUL34-GFP/pUL31 coexpressing mammalian cells, with virus-induced vesicular structures in the nucleus, expanding the nucleoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, our results demonstrate new possibilities to study the role of specific proteins in substructures of adherent cells, especially of the nucleus in toto, accessible to electron microscopy in thinned samples only. PMID:22210307

  7. Study of Interactions Between Microbes and Minerals by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy (STXM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerara, K.; Tyliszczak, T.; Brown, G. E.

    2007-02-01

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were combined to characterize various samples of geomicrobiological interest down to the nanometer scale. An approach based on energy-filtered imaging was used to examine microbe-mineral interactions and the resulting biominerals, as well as biosignatures in simplified laboratory samples. This approach was then applied to natural samples, including natural biofilms entombed in calcium carbonate precipitates and bioweathered silicates and facilitated location of bacterial cells and provided unique insights about their biogeochemical interactions with minerals at the 30-40 nm scale.

  8. Characterisation of internal morphologies in electrospun fibers by X-ray tomographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygaard, Jens Vinge; Uyar, Tamer; Chen, Menglin; Cloetens, Peter; Kingshott, Peter; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2011-09-01

    Electrospun fabrics for use in, for example, tissue engineering, wound dressings, textiles, filters and membranes have attracted a lot of attention due to their morphological nanoscale architectures which enhance their physical properties. A thorough detailed internal morphological study has been performed on electrospun polystyrene (PS) fibers produced from dimethylformamide (DMF) solutions. Investigations by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thorough studies for the first time by synchrotron based X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) revealed that the individual electrospun PS fibers and beads have a graded density and in some cases even an internal porous structure.

  9. Study of Interactions Between Microbes and Minerals by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy (STXM)

    SciTech Connect

    Benzerara, K.; Tyliszczak, T.; Brown, G.E., Jr.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-03

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were combined to characterize various samples of geomicrobiological interest down to the nanometer scale. An approach based on energy-filtered imaging was used to examine microbe-mineral interactions and the resulting biominerals, as well as biosignatures in simplified laboratory samples. This approach was then applied to natural samples, including natural biofilms entombed in calcium carbonate precipitates and bioweathered silicates and facilitated location of bacterial cells and provided unique insights about their biogeochemical interactions with minerals at the 30-40 nm scale.

  10. Element-specific hysteresis loop measurements on Individual 35 nm islands with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Feng; Eimüller, Thomas; Amaladass, Edward; Lee, Ming Sang; Heyderman, Laura J; Solak, Harun H; Tyliszczak, Tolek

    2012-03-01

    Using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy combined with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, element-specific hysteresis loops with a 25 nm X-ray probe are obtained on 35 nm Fe/Gd multilayer nanoislands fabricated by extreme ultra-violet interference lithography. Local hysteresis loops measured for the individual islands and the antidot film between the islands display similar behavior resulting from the lateral confinement. Line scan measurements confirm ferrimagnetic coupling between Fe and Gd in the patterned region. The ability to measure magnetization reversal with X-rays at high spatial resolution will provide an important tool for future characterization of sub-50 nm nanostructures.

  11. Real-Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy of Solidifying Al-In Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.

    1997-01-01

    Real-time observations of transparent analog materials have provided insight, yet the results of these observations are not necessarily representative of opaque metallic systems. In order to study the detailed dynamics of the solidification process, we develop the technologies needed for real-time X ray microscopy of solidifying metallic systems, which has not previously been feasible with the necessary resolution, speed, and contrast. In initial studies of Al-In monotectic alloys unidirectionally solidified in an X-ray transparent furnace, in situ records of the evolution of interface morphologies, interfacial solute accumulation, and formation of the monotectic droplets were obtained for the first time: A radiomicrograph of Al-30In grown during aircraft parabolic maneuvers is presented, showing the volumetric phase distribution in this specimen. The benefits of using X-ray microscopy for postsolidification metallography include ease of specimen preparation, increased sensitivity, and three-dimensional analysis of phase distribution. Imaging of the solute boundary layer revealed that the isoconcentration lines are not parallel (as is often assumed) to the growth interface. Striations in the solidified crystal did not accurately decorate the interface position and shape. The monotectic composition alloy under some conditions grew in an uncoupled manner.

  12. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    SciTech Connect

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    2016-08-09

    In this paper, we present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional data cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. Finally, we demonstrate this 'big data' approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.

  13. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    DOE PAGES

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    2016-08-09

    In this paper, we present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional datamore » cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. Finally, we demonstrate this 'big data' approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.« less

  14. Polarization dependent soft x-ray spectro-microscopy of local spin structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Maccallum; Agostino, Christopher; Im, Mi-Young; Montoya, Sergio; Fullerton, Eric; Fischer, Peter

    Quantitative information about element-specific contributions to local magnetic spin and orbital moments is readily available by XMCD spectroscopy and images of magnetic domain patterns with a few tens of nanometer spatial resolution. We show that the x-ray spectroscopic analysis of x-ray microscopy images provides quantitative information about local spin structures. We have investigated two prototypical multilayered PMA film systems prepared by sputtering, specifically (Co 0.3 nm/Pt 0.5 nm)x30 and (Fe 0.7nm/Gd 0.4nm)x100 systems. A spectroscopic sequence of full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy (MTXM) images covering about 8mm field-of-views with a spatial resolution of about 20nm were recorded across the Co and Fe L edges, resp. To modulate the magnetic contrast, two sets of images were obtained with left and right circular polarization. Standard XMCD spectroscopy analysis procedures were applied to retrieve the local spectroscopic behavior. We observe a decrease of the L3/L2 ratio when approaching the domain walls, indicating a non-uniform spin configuration along the vertical profile of a domain, which we will discuss in view of both systems' magnetic anisotropies. U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05-CH11231.

  15. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    SciTech Connect

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    2016-08-09

    In this paper, we present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional data cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. Finally, we demonstrate this 'big data' approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.

  16. Study of radiation effects on the cell structure and evaluation of the dose delivered by x-ray and {alpha}-particles microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kosior, Ewelina; Cloetens, Peter; Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard; Bohic, Sylvain

    2012-12-24

    Hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy and magnified phase contrast imaging are combined to study radiation effects on cells. Experiments were performed on freeze-dried cells at the nano-imaging station ID22NI of the European synchrotron radiation facility. Quantitative phase contrast imaging provides maps of the projected mass and is used to evaluate the structural changes due to irradiation during X-ray fluorescence experiments. Complementary to phase contrast imaging, scanning transmission ion microscopy is performed and doses of all the experiments are compared. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the proposed approach to study radiation-induced damage at the sub-cellular level.

  17. Elemental and magnetic sensitive imaging using x-ray excited luminescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, R A; Zohar, S; Keavney, D; Divan, R; Rosenmann, D; Mascarenhas, A; Steiner, M A

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate the potential of x-ray excited luminescence microscopy for full-field elemental and magnetic sensitive imaging using a commercially available optical microscope, mounted on preexisting synchrotron radiation (SR) beamline end stations. The principal components of the instrument will be described. Bench top measurements indicate that a resolution of 1 μm or better is possible; this value was degraded in practice due to vibrations and/or drift in the end station and associated manipulator. X-ray energy dependent measurements performed on model solar cell materials and lithographically patterned magnetic thin film structures reveal clear elemental and magnetic signatures. The merits of the apparatus will be discussed in terms of conventional SR imaging techniques.

  18. Elemental and magnetic sensitive imaging using x-ray excited luminescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R. A.; Zohar, S.; Keavney, D.; Divan, R.; Rosenmann, D.; Mascarenhas, A.; Steiner, M. A.

    2012-07-15

    We demonstrate the potential of x-ray excited luminescence microscopy for full-field elemental and magnetic sensitive imaging using a commercially available optical microscope, mounted on preexisting synchrotron radiation (SR) beamline end stations. The principal components of the instrument will be described. Bench top measurements indicate that a resolution of 1 {mu}m or better is possible; this value was degraded in practice due to vibrations and/or drift in the end station and associated manipulator. X-ray energy dependent measurements performed on model solar cell materials and lithographically patterned magnetic thin film structures reveal clear elemental and magnetic signatures. The merits of the apparatus will be discussed in terms of conventional SR imaging techniques.

  19. Observation of Interface between Resin and Carbon Fiber by Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harano, T.; Murao, R.; Takeichi, Y.; Kimura, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Sub-micron spatial distribution of chemical states of carbon fiber (CF) and the interface between CF and resin should affect physical properties (e.g. tensile strength and elastic modulus) of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). In order to evaluate scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) techniques for application to the chemical state analysis of CFRP, we performed STXM measurements near C K-edge energies. Results of the spectral deconvolution analysis suggested the presence of another phase at the interface of CF and resin, which may be a coating layer. In addition, preferred orientation of the graphene sheets to the fiber axis direction of CF was observed by using linear polarized X-ray beams.

  20. Observation of the Interface between Resin and Carbon Fiber by Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harano, T.; Murao, R.; Takeichi, Y.; Kimura, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The sub-micron spatial distribution of chemical states of carbon fiber (CF) and the interface between CF and resin must affect physical properties of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP). In order to evaluate scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) techniques for application to the chemical-state analysis of CFRP, we performed STXM measurements near C K-edge energies. The results of the spectral deconvolution analysis suggest the presence of another phase at the interface of CF and resin, which may be a coating layer. In addition, the preferred orientation of the stuck of graphene sheets to the fiber axis direction of CF was observed by using linear polarized X-ray beams.

  1. Soft X-ray Tomography and Cryogenic Light Microscopy: The Cool Combination in Cellular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Gerry; Le Gros, Mark A.; Knoechel, Christian G.; Uchida, Maho; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Soft x-ray tomography (SXT) is ideally suited to imaging sub-cellular architecture and organization, particularly in eukaryotic cells. SXT is similar in concept to the well-established medical diagnostic technique computed axial tomography (CAT), except SXT is capable of imaging with a spatial resolution of 50 nm, or better. In soft x-ray tomography (SXT) cells are imaged using photons from a region of the spectrum known as the ‘water window’. This results in quantitative, high-contrast images of intact, fully hydrated cells without the need to use contrast-enhancing agents. Cells are therefore visualized very close to their native, fully functional state. The utility of SXT has recently been enhanced by the development of high numerical aperture cryogenic light microscopy for correlated imaging. Taking this multi-modal approach now allows labeled molecules to be localized in the context of a high-resolution 3-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of the cell. PMID:19818625

  2. A New Method for Investigation of the Hair Shaft: Hard X-Ray Microscopy with a 90-nm Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Soo-Young; Goo, Ja Woong; Hong, Seung Phil; Oh, Tak Heon; Youn, Hwa Shik

    2008-01-01

    Various methods have been used to investigate the hair shaft. In the ultrastructural hair field, scanning and transmission electron microscopies are widely used investigative methods, but they have some technical limitations. Recently, X-ray microscopes with sub-micron spatial resolution have emerged as useful instruments because they offer a unique opportunity to observe the interior of an undamaged sample in greater detail. In this report, we examined damaged hair shaft tips using hard X-ray microscopy with a 90 nm spatial resolution. The results of this study suggest that hard X-ray microscopy is an alternative investigative method for hair morphology studies. PMID:18452275

  3. Synthesis Of Arbitrary X-Ray Projections From A Finite Number Of Existing Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, R. L.; Ruttimann, U. E.; Groenhuis, R. A.; Edholm, P.

    1985-06-01

    By relating an arbitrary x-ray projection to several projections of the same object produced from a small array of source positions bearing a known circular geometric relationship to each other, it is possible to synthesize approximately an arbitrary projection not contained in the known data set. This investigation explores the underlying theory and applies it to radiographic images of diagnostic interest in dentistry.

  4. Transmission x-ray microscopy at Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline

    SciTech Connect

    Vila-Comamala, Joan Wagner, Ulrich; Bodey, Andrew J.; Garcia-Fernandez, Miryam; Rau, Christoph; Bosgra, Jeroen; David, Christian; Eastwood, David S.

    2016-01-28

    Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) has been shown to be a powerful method for obtaining quantitative internal structural and chemical information from materials at the nanoscale. The installation of a Full-field TXM station will extend the current microtomographic capabilities of the Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline at Diamond Light Source (UK) into the sub-100 nm spatial resolution range using photon energies from 8 to 14 keV. The dedicated Full-field TXM station will be built in-house with contributions of Diamond Light Source support divisions and via collaboration with the X-ray Optics Group of Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland) which will develop state-of-the-art diffractive X-ray optical elements. Preliminary results of the I13 Full-field TXM station are shown. The Full-field TXM will become an important Diamond Light Source direct imaging asset for material science, energy science and biology at the nanoscale.

  5. Correlative organelle fluorescence microscopy and synchrotron X-ray chemical element imaging in single cells.

    PubMed

    Roudeau, Stéphane; Carmona, Asuncion; Perrin, Laura; Ortega, Richard

    2014-11-01

    X-ray chemical element imaging has the potential to enable fundamental breakthroughs in the understanding of biological systems because chemical element interactions with organelles can be studied at the sub-cellular level. What is the distribution of trace metals in cells? Do some elements accumulate within sub-cellular organelles? What are the chemical species of the elements in these organelles? These are some of the fundamental questions that can be addressed by use of X-ray chemical element imaging with synchrotron radiation beams. For precise location of the distribution of the elements, identification of cellular organelles is required; this can be achieved, after appropriate labelling, by use of fluorescence microscopy. As will be discussed, this approach imposes some limitations on sample preparation. For example, standard immunolabelling procedures strongly modify the distribution of the elements in cells as a result of the chemical fixation and permeabilization steps. Organelle location can, however, be performed, by use of a variety of specific fluorescent dyes or fluorescent proteins, on living cells before cryogenic fixation, enabling preservation of element distribution. This article reviews the methods used for fluorescent organelle labelling and X-ray chemical element imaging and speciation of single cells. Selected cases from our work and from other research groups are presented to illustrate the potential of the combination of the two techniques.

  6. Transmission x-ray microscopy at Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Bosgra, Jeroen; Eastwood, David S.; Wagner, Ulrich; Bodey, Andrew J.; Garcia-Fernandez, Miryam; David, Christian; Rau, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) has been shown to be a powerful method for obtaining quantitative internal structural and chemical information from materials at the nanoscale. The installation of a Full-field TXM station will extend the current microtomographic capabilities of the Diamond-Manchester I13 Imaging Branchline at Diamond Light Source (UK) into the sub-100 nm spatial resolution range using photon energies from 8 to 14 keV. The dedicated Full-field TXM station will be built in-house with contributions of Diamond Light Source support divisions and via collaboration with the X-ray Optics Group of Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland) which will develop state-of-the-art diffractive X-ray optical elements. Preliminary results of the I13 Full-field TXM station are shown. The Full-field TXM will become an important Diamond Light Source direct imaging asset for material science, energy science and biology at the nanoscale.

  7. Simulation of image formation in x-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics.

    PubMed

    Korecki, P; Roszczynialski, T P; Sowa, K M

    2015-04-06

    In x-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics (XCAMPO), the microstructure of focusing polycapillary optics is used as a coded aperture and enables depth-resolved x-ray imaging at a resolution better than the focal spot dimensions. Improvements in the resolution and development of 3D encoding procedures require a simulation model that can predict the outcome of XCAMPO experiments. In this work we introduce a model of image formation in XCAMPO which enables calculation of XCAMPO datasets for arbitrary positions of the object relative to the focal plane as well as to incorporate optics imperfections. In the model, the exit surface of the optics is treated as a micro-structured x-ray source that illuminates a periodic object. This makes it possible to express the intensity of XCAMPO images as a convolution series and to perform simulations by means of fast Fourier transforms. For non-periodic objects, the model can be applied by enforcing artificial periodicity and setting the spatial period larger then the field-of-view. Simulations are verified by comparison with experimental data.

  8. Visualization of Electrochemical Reactions in Battery Materials with X-ray Microscopy and Mapping

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, Mark; May, Brian M.; Cabana, Jordi

    2017-03-21

    By unlocking the full performance capabilities of battery materials we require a thorough understanding of the underlying electrochemical mechanisms at a variety of length scales. A broad arsenal of X-ray microscopy and mapping techniques is now available to probe these processes down to the nanoscale. The tunable nature of X-ray sources allows for the extraction of chemical states through spectromicroscopy. The addition of phase contrast imaging can retrieve the complex-valued refraction of the material, giving an even more nuanced chemical picture. Tomography and coherent Bragg diffraction imaging provide a reconstructed three-dimensional volume of the specimen, as well as internal strainmore » information from the latter. There have been many insights into battery materials achieved through the creative use of these, and similar, methods. Experiments performed while the battery is being actively cycled reveal behavior that differs significantly from what is observed at equilibrium and metastable conditions. Furthermore, there are planned improvements to X-ray source brightness and coherence will extend these techniques by alleviating the current trade-off in time, chemical, and spatial resolution.« less

  9. Three-dimensional full-field X-ray orientation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Viganò, Nicola; Tanguy, Alexandre; Hallais, Simon; Dimanov, Alexandre; Bornert, Michel; Batenburg, Kees Joost; Ludwig, Wolfgang

    2016-02-12

    A previously introduced mathematical framework for full-field X-ray orientation microscopy is for the first time applied to experimental near-field diffraction data acquired from a polycrystalline sample. Grain by grain tomographic reconstructions using convex optimization and prior knowledge are carried out in a six-dimensional representation of position-orientation space, used for modelling the inverse problem of X-ray orientation imaging. From the 6D reconstruction output we derive 3D orientation maps, which are then assembled into a common sample volume. The obtained 3D orientation map is compared to an EBSD surface map and local misorientations, as well as remaining discrepancies in grain boundary positions are quantified. The new approach replaces the single orientation reconstruction scheme behind X-ray diffraction contrast tomography and extends the applicability of this diffraction imaging technique to material micro-structures exhibiting sub-grains and/or intra-granular orientation spreads of up to a few degrees. As demonstrated on textured sub-regions of the sample, the new framework can be extended to operate on experimental raw data, thereby bypassing the concept of orientation indexation based on diffraction spot peak positions. This new method enables fast, three-dimensional characterization with isotropic spatial resolution, suitable for time-lapse observations of grain microstructures evolving as a function of applied strain or temperature.

  10. Three-dimensional full-field X-ray orientation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Viganò, Nicola; Tanguy, Alexandre; Hallais, Simon; Dimanov, Alexandre; Bornert, Michel; Batenburg, Kees Joost; Ludwig, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    A previously introduced mathematical framework for full-field X-ray orientation microscopy is for the first time applied to experimental near-field diffraction data acquired from a polycrystalline sample. Grain by grain tomographic reconstructions using convex optimization and prior knowledge are carried out in a six-dimensional representation of position-orientation space, used for modelling the inverse problem of X-ray orientation imaging. From the 6D reconstruction output we derive 3D orientation maps, which are then assembled into a common sample volume. The obtained 3D orientation map is compared to an EBSD surface map and local misorientations, as well as remaining discrepancies in grain boundary positions are quantified. The new approach replaces the single orientation reconstruction scheme behind X-ray diffraction contrast tomography and extends the applicability of this diffraction imaging technique to material micro-structures exhibiting sub-grains and/or intra-granular orientation spreads of up to a few degrees. As demonstrated on textured sub-regions of the sample, the new framework can be extended to operate on experimental raw data, thereby bypassing the concept of orientation indexation based on diffraction spot peak positions. This new method enables fast, three-dimensional characterization with isotropic spatial resolution, suitable for time-lapse observations of grain microstructures evolving as a function of applied strain or temperature. PMID:26868303

  11. X-ray holographic microscopy using the atomic-force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Jacobsen, C.J.; Lindaas, S.

    1993-09-01

    The present authors have been seeking for some time to improve the resolution of holographic microscopy and have engaged in a continuing series of experiments using the X1A soft x-ray undulator beam line at Brookhaven. The principle strategy for pushing the resolution lower in these experiments has been the use of polymer resists as x-ray detectors and the primary goal has been to develop the technique to become useful for examining wet biological material. In the present paper the authors report on progress in the use of resist for high-spatial-resolution x-ray detection. This is the key step in in-line holography and the one which sets the ultimate limit to the image resolution. The actual recording has always been quite easy, given a high-brightness undulator source, but the difficult step was the readout of the recorded pattern. The authors describe in what follows how they have built a special instrument: an atomic force microscope (AFM) to read holograms recorded in resist. They report the technical reasons for building, rather than buying, such an instrument and they give details of the design and performance of the device. The authors also describe the first attempts to use the system for real holography and the authors show results of both recorded holograms and the corresponding reconstructed images. Finally, the authors try to analyze the effect that these advances are likely to have on the future prospects for success in applications of x-ray holography and the degree to which the other technical systems that are needed for such success are available or within reach.

  12. An application of active optics to x-ray imaging: X-mas (x-ray milli arc-second) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Kitamoto, Shunji; Ohkubo, Yohsuke; Sato, Jun'ichi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sudoh, Keisuke; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Suga, Kazuharu; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2006-06-01

    We report the current status of the "X-mas" (X-ray milli-arcsecond) project. X-mas is an application of the AO technology to the X-ray optics, aiming to obtain high-resolution defraction-limited X-ray images. Our X-ray telescope employs the Newton optics with a paraboloid primary and a 31-element deformable secondary mirrors. The aperture of the primary mirror is 80 millimeters with the focal length of 2 meters. Multi-layer coating of the mirrors by silicon and molybdenum realizes a large reflectivity of ~60% for the primary and 30-50% for the secondary mirror at 13.5 nm, which enables us to construct a normal incidence optics at this wavelength. We use a laser guide source and a wave front sensor to optimize the form of the secondary deformable mirror for the purpose of offsetting the large-scale figure errors in the X-ray optics. A back-side illumination X-ray CCD detector manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics is used for X-ray detections. We have assembled all these elements and started to accumulate data. Closed-loop AO is in operation for the laser guide source. Likely X-ray images are obtained through the telescope. The results in 2005-2006 are presented.

  13. Development of grating-based x-ray phase tomography under the ERATO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Atsushi; Takano, Hidekazu; Hoshino, Masato; Yashiro, Wataru; Wu, Yanlin

    2016-10-01

    We have launched a project to promote grating-based X-ray phase imaging/tomography extensively. Here, two main activities are presented for enabling dynamic, or four-dimensional, X-ray phase tomography and nanoscopic X-ray phase tomography by grating interferometry. For the former, while some demonstrations in this direction were performed with white synchrotron radiation, improvement in image quality by spectrum tuning is described. A preliminary result by a total reflection mirror is presented, and as a next step, preparation of a 10% bandpass filter by a multilayer mirror is reported. For the latter, X-ray microscopes available both at synchrotron radiation facilities and laboratories equipped with a Fresnel zone plate are combined with grating interferometry. Here, a preliminary result with a combination of a Lau interferometer and a laboratory-based X-ray microscope is presented.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the detonation soot of high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashkarov, A. O.; Pruuel, E. R.; Ten, K. A.; Rubtsov, I. A.; Gerasimov, E. Yu; Zubkov, P. I.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the recovered carbonaceous residue (soot) from the detonation of some high explosives: TNT, a mixture of TNT and RDX (50/50), benzotrifuroxane, and triaminotrinitrobenzene. The use of the same experimental setup allowed a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the detonation products formed under similar conditions. The results clearly show differences in the morphology of graphite-like and diamond inclusions and in the quantitative content of nanodiamonds for the explosives used in this study.

  15. Hard-x-ray microscopy with Fresnel zone plates reaches 40 nm Rayleigh resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y. S.; Yi, J. M.; De Carlo, F.; Shen, Q.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Wu, H. J.; Wang, C. L.; Wang, J. Y.; Liu, C. J.; Wang, C. H.; Wu, S. R.; Chien, C. C.; Hwu, Y.; Tkachuk, A.; Yun, W.; Feser, M.; Liang, K. S.; Yang, C. S.; Je, J. H.; Margaritondo, G.

    2008-03-10

    Substantial improvements in the nanofabrication and characteristics of gold Fresnel zone plates yielded unprecedented resolution levels in hard-x-ray microscopy. Tests performed on a variety of specimens with 8-10 keV photons demonstrated a first-order lateral resolution below 40 nm based on the Rayleigh criterion. Combined with the use of a phase contrast technique, this makes it possible to view features in the 30 nm range; good-quality images can be obtained at video rate, down to 50 ms/frame. The important repercussions on materials science, nanotechnology, and the life sciences are discussed.

  16. Sub-micron mapping of GHz magnetic susceptibility using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Bailey, William E.

    2012-10-01

    We report submicron imaging (˜0.75 μm resolution) of complex magnetic susceptibility in a micron-size ferromagnetic heterostructure using time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. The real and imaginary parts of the susceptibility are extracted from the phase and amplitude of the small-angle (<20°) rotational response of the local magnetization under microwave excitation. Frequency-dependent response patterns were observed in an incompletely saturated bilayer element. The technique is extensible to higher frequencies (to ˜10 GHz), better spatial resolution, and layer-specific measurement.

  17. Application of soft X-ray microscopy to environmental microbiology of hydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, K.; Yoshimura, M.; Ohigashi, T.; Inagaki, Y.; Namba, H.; Kihara, H.

    2017-06-01

    Microstructures of unprocessed filamentous cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena foetida sp., producing a musty smell were observed using soft X-ray microscopy. Carbon-enriched structures and granules as well as oxygen-enriched granules which have been already reported were observed. Except for early log growth phase, the oxygen-enriched granules were observed. However, the carbon-enriched structures were observed throughout log growth phase. The result suggests there is a relationship between the oxygen-enriched granules and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) productivity, since the 2-MIB productivity of each cell is increased depending on the culture period in log growth phase.

  18. Sample handler for x-ray tomographic microscopy and image-guided failure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, Peter; Thurner, Philipp; Broennimann, Rolf; Sennhauser, Urs; Stampanoni, Marco; Abela, Rafael; Mueller, Ralph

    2005-07-15

    X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) yields a three-dimensional data model of an investigated specimen. XTM providing micrometer resolution requires synchrotron light, high resolution area detectors, and a precise sample handler. The sample handler has a height of 270 mm only, is usable for 1 {mu}m resolution, and is able to carry loading machines with a weight of up to 20 kg. This allows exposing samples to load between scans for image-guided failure assessment. This system has been used in the XTM end station of the materials science beamline of the Swiss Light Source at the Paul Scherrer Institut.

  19. Microscopy and elemental analysis in tissue samples using computed microtomography with synchrotron x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The initial development shows that CMT using synchrotron x-rays can be developed to ..mu..m spatial resolution and perhaps even better. This creates a new microscopy technique which is of special interest in morphological studies of tissues, since no chemical preparation or slicing of the sample is necessary. The combination of CMT with spatial resolution in the ..mu..m range and elemental mapping with sensitivity in the ppM range results in a new tool for elemental mapping at the cellular level. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Sialolith characterization by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giray, C Bahadir; Dogan, Meral; Akalin, Ayse; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Chan, Daniel C N; Skinner, H Catherine W; Dogan, A Umran

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to characterize sialolith, a calcium phosphate deposit that develops in the human oral cavity, by high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphological and chemical data obtained helped in the determination of their formation mechanism in salivary glands. Sialoliths in the submandibular salivary glands may arise secondary to sialodenitis, but not via a luminal organic nidus. We believe this is the first study that characterizes a sialolith by XPS.

  1. Silica granuloma: scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Chun, S I; Cho, S W

    1991-02-01

    A 46-year-old woman had 1-month-old erythematous papules on the left elbow and both knees where acupuncture with gold needles had been performed twenty years earlier. She also had a 2-month-old pruritic scar lesion on the nape. Histopathologic findings showed sarcoidal granulomas. The presence of silica components in the granulomas was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the lesion on the nape and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXA) of the lesions on the nape and the left elbow. We suggest that acupuncture with gold needles may be one cause of silica granuloma.

  2. Correlative Light and Scanning X-Ray Scattering Microscopy of Healthy and Pathologic Human Bone Sections

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, C.; Siliqi, D.; Bunk, O.; Beraudi, A.; Ladisa, M.; Altamura, D.; Stea, S.; Baruffaldi, F.

    2012-01-01

    Scanning small and wide angle X-ray scattering (scanning SWAXS) experiments were performed on healthy and pathologic human bone sections. Via crystallographic tools the data were transformed into quantitative images and as such compared with circularly polarized light (CPL) microscopy images. SWAXS and CPL images allowed extracting information of the mineral nanocrystalline phase embedded, with and without preferred orientation, in the collagen fibrils, mapping local changes at sub-osteon resolution. This favorable combination has been applied for the first time to biopsies of dwarfism syndrome and Paget's disease to shed light onto the cortical structure of natural bone in healthy and pathologic sections. PMID:22666538

  3. Quantitative study of mammalian cells by scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, K.; Ohigashi, T.; Toné, S.; Kado, M.; Ito, A.

    2017-06-01

    Molecular distribution in mammalian cells was studied by soft X-ray scanning transmission microscopy with respect to the quantitative aspect of analysis. NEXAFS profiles at the C, N and O K-absorption edges were combined and used for the analysis. For the estimation of quantity for nucleic acids and proteins, NEXAFS profiles of DNA and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the N K-absorption edge were applied assuming that those were their representatives. The method has a potential to explore the other molecular components than nucleic acids and proteins.

  4. Dark-field X-ray microscopy for multiscale structural characterization

    PubMed Central

    Simons, H.; King, A.; Ludwig, W.; Detlefs, C.; Pantleon, W.; Schmidt, S.; Snigireva, I.; Snigirev, A.; Poulsen, H. F.

    2015-01-01

    Many physical and mechanical properties of crystalline materials depend strongly on their internal structure, which is typically organized into grains and domains on several length scales. Here we present dark-field X-ray microscopy; a non-destructive microscopy technique for the three-dimensional mapping of orientations and stresses on lengths scales from 100 nm to 1 mm within embedded sampling volumes. The technique, which allows ‘zooming’ in and out in both direct and angular space, is demonstrated by an annealing study of plastically deformed aluminium. Facilitating the direct study of the interactions between crystalline elements is a key step towards the formulation and validation of multiscale models that account for the entire heterogeneity of a material. Furthermore, dark-field X-ray microscopy is well suited to applied topics, where the structural evolution of internal nanoscale elements (for example, positioned at interfaces) is crucial to the performance and lifetime of macro-scale devices and components thereof. PMID:25586429

  5. The SPARX Project: R & D Activity Towards X-Rays FEL Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Migliorati, M.; /Frascati /ENEA, Frascati /INFN, Milan /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome2 /Milan Polytechnic /UCLA /SLAC

    2005-08-05

    SPARX is an evolutionary project proposed by a collaboration among ENEA-INFN-CNR-Universita di Roma Tor Vergata aiming at the construction of a FELSASE X-ray source in the Tor Vergata Campus. The first phase of the SPARX project, funded by Government Agencies, will be focused on R&D activity on critical components and techniques for future X-ray facilities as described in this paper.

  6. Multispecies Biofilms Transform Selenium Oxyanions into Elemental Selenium Particles: Studies Using Combined Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Imaging and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Soo In; George, Graham N.; Lawrence, John R.; Kaminskyj, Susan G. W.; Dynes, James J.; Lai, Barry; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2016-10-04

    Selenium (Se) is an element of growing environmental concern, because low aqueous concentrations can lead to biomagnification through the aquatic food web. Biofilms, naturally occurring microbial consortia, play numerous important roles in the environment, especially in biogeochemical cycling of toxic elements in aquatic systems. The complexity of naturally forming multispecies biofilms presents challenges for characterization because conventional microscopic techniques require chemical and physical modifications of the sample. Here, multispecies biofilms biotransforming selenium oxyanions were characterized using X-ray fluorescence imaging (XFI) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These complementary synchrotron techniques required minimal sample preparation and were applied correlatively to the same biofilm areas. Sub-micrometer XFI showed distributions of Se and endogenous metals, while Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated the presence of elemental Se (Se0). Nanoscale carbon K-edge STXM revealed the distributions of microbial cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and lipids using the protein, saccharide, and lipid signatures, respectively, together with highly localized Se0 using the Se LIII edge. Transmission electron microscopy showed the electron-dense particle diameter to be 50–700 nm, suggesting Se0 nanoparticles. The intimate association of Se0 particles with protein and polysaccharide biofilm components has implications for the bioavailability of selenium in the environment.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy by full-field X-ray microscopy of a thin graphite flake: Imaging and electronic structure via the carbon K-edge

    PubMed Central

    Hitchock, Adam P; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ewels, Chris P; Guttmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate that near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure spectra combined with full-field transmission X-ray microscopy can be used to study the electronic structure of graphite flakes consisting of a few graphene layers. The flake was produced by exfoliation using sodium cholate and then isolated by means of density-gradient ultracentrifugation. An image sequence around the carbon K-edge, analyzed by using reference spectra for the in-plane and out-of-plane regions of the sample, is used to map and spectrally characterize the flat and folded regions of the flake. Additional spectral features in both π and σ regions are observed, which may be related to the presence of topological defects. Doping by metal impurities that were present in the original exfoliated graphite is indicated by the presence of a pre-edge signal at 284.2 eV. PMID:23016137

  8. Analyzer-based x-ray phase-contrast microscopy combining channel-cut and asymmetrically cut crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoennicke, M. G.; Cusatis, C.

    2007-11-15

    An analyzer-based x-ray phase-contrast microscopy (ABM) setup combining a standard analyzer-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging (ABI) setup [nondispersive 4-crystal setup (Bonse-Hart setup)] and diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals is presented here. An attenuation-contrast microscopy setup with conventional x-ray source and asymmetrically cut crystals is first analyzed. Edge-enhanced effects attributed to phase jumps or refraction/total external reflection on the fiber borders were detected. However, the long exposure times and the possibility to achieve high contrast microscopies by using extremely low attenuation-contrast samples motivated us to assemble the ABM setup using a synchrotron source. This setup was found to be useful for low contrast attenuation samples due to the low exposure time, high contrast, and spatial resolution found. Moreover, thanks to the combination with the nondispersive ABI setup, the diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging algorithm could be applied.

  9. Visualization of the Cassie-Wenzel transition with X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Su Jin; Kim, Yeseul; Jeong, Suyeon; Pang, Changhyun; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-11-01

    Water droplets on hydrophobic surfaces with micropillar usually exhibit two wetting states: (i) the Cassie state when air is trapped between water and micropillars and (ii) the Wenzel state when air is completely replaced by water. A transition from the Cassie to the Wenzel states is essential in designing stable hydrophobic surfaces. Directly visualizing the Cassie-Wenzel (C-W) transition is difficult with conventional microscopies because of no transparency from micropillars. Here we suggest a powerful technique based on high-resolution high-penetration X-ray microscopy for clearly visualizing the C-W transition. Thanks to the X-ray penetrating into the opaque micropillars, we were able to directly explore the intermediate state during the C-W transition. We study on the transition dynamics regarding how air replacement by water was gradually propagated with position and time. We believe that the replacement dynamics would be explained as a kind of phase transition kinetics. This research was supported by Global Ph.D Fellowship Program and Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2015H1A2A1034133) (NRF-2016R1D1A1B01007133).

  10. Imaging of intracellular fatty acids by scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Mari; Shindou, Hideo; Szyrwiel, Lukasz; Tokuoka, Suzumi M.; Hamano, Fumie; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Okamoto, Mayumi; Matsunaga, Akihiro; Kita, Yoshihiro; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Lobinski, Ryszard; Shimizu, Isao; Shimizu, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids are taken up by cells and incorporated into complex lipids such as neutral lipids and glycerophospholipids. Glycerophospholipids are major constituents of cellular membranes. More than 1000 molecular species of glycerophospholipids differ in their polar head groups and fatty acid compositions. They are related to cellular functions and diseases and have been well analyzed by mass spectrometry. However, intracellular imaging of fatty acids and glycerophospholipids has not been successful due to insufficient resolution using conventional methods. Here, we developed a method for labeling fatty acids with bromine (Br) and applied scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) to obtain intracellular Br mapping data with submicrometer resolution. Mass spectrometry showed that cells took up Br-labeled fatty acids and metabolized them mainly into glycerophospholipids in CHO cells. Most Br signals observed by SXFM were in the perinuclear region. Higher resolution revealed a spot-like distribution of Br in the cytoplasm. The current method enabled successful visualization of intracellular Br-labeled fatty acids. Single-element labeling combined with SXFM technology facilitates the intracellular imaging of fatty acids, which provides a new tool to determine dynamic changes in fatty acids and their derivatives at the single-cell level.—Shimura, M., Shindou, H., Szyrwiel, L., Tokuoka, S. M., Hamano, F., Matsuyama, S., Okamoto, M., Matsunaga, A., Kita, Y., Ishizaka, Y., Yamauchi, K., Kohmura, Y., Lobinski, R., Shimizu, I., Shimizu, T. Imaging of intracellular fatty acids by scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27601443

  11. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  12. Nanoscale imaging of buried topological defects with quantitative X-ray magnetic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Roldán, C.; Quirós, C.; Sorrentino, A.; Hierro-Rodríguez, A.; Álvarez-Prado, L. M.; Valcárcel, R.; Duch, M.; Torras, N.; Esteve, J.; Martín, J. I.; Vélez, M.; Alameda, J. M.; Pereiro, E.; Ferrer, S.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in nanoscale magnetism increasingly require characterization tools providing detailed descriptions of magnetic configurations. Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy produces element specific magnetic domain images with nanometric lateral resolution in films up to ∼100 nm thick. Here we present an imaging method using the angular dependence of magnetic contrast in a series of high resolution transmission X-ray microscopy images to obtain quantitative descriptions of the magnetization (canting angles relative to surface normal and sense). This method is applied to 55–120 nm thick ferromagnetic NdCo5 layers (canting angles between 65° and 22°), and to a NdCo5 film covered with permalloy. Interestingly, permalloy induces a 43° rotation of Co magnetization towards surface normal. Our method allows identifying complex topological defects (merons or ½ skyrmions) in a NdCo5 film that are only partially replicated by the permalloy overlayer. These results open possibilities for the characterization of deeply buried magnetic topological defects, nanostructures and devices. PMID:26337838

  13. Nanoscale imaging of buried topological defects with quantitative X-ray magnetic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Roldán, C; Quirós, C; Sorrentino, A; Hierro-Rodríguez, A; Álvarez-Prado, L M; Valcárcel, R; Duch, M; Torras, N; Esteve, J; Martín, J I; Vélez, M; Alameda, J M; Pereiro, E; Ferrer, S

    2015-09-04

    Advances in nanoscale magnetism increasingly require characterization tools providing detailed descriptions of magnetic configurations. Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy produces element specific magnetic domain images with nanometric lateral resolution in films up to ∼100 nm thick. Here we present an imaging method using the angular dependence of magnetic contrast in a series of high resolution transmission X-ray microscopy images to obtain quantitative descriptions of the magnetization (canting angles relative to surface normal and sense). This method is applied to 55-120 nm thick ferromagnetic NdCo5 layers (canting angles between 65° and 22°), and to a NdCo5 film covered with permalloy. Interestingly, permalloy induces a 43° rotation of Co magnetization towards surface normal. Our method allows identifying complex topological defects (merons or ½ skyrmions) in a NdCo5 film that are only partially replicated by the permalloy overlayer. These results open possibilities for the characterization of deeply buried magnetic topological defects, nanostructures and devices.

  14. Imaging of intracellular fatty acids by scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Mari; Shindou, Hideo; Szyrwiel, Lukasz; Tokuoka, Suzumi M; Hamano, Fumie; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Okamoto, Mayumi; Matsunaga, Akihiro; Kita, Yoshihiro; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Lobinski, Ryszard; Shimizu, Isao; Shimizu, Takao

    2016-12-01

    Fatty acids are taken up by cells and incorporated into complex lipids such as neutral lipids and glycerophospholipids. Glycerophospholipids are major constituents of cellular membranes. More than 1000 molecular species of glycerophospholipids differ in their polar head groups and fatty acid compositions. They are related to cellular functions and diseases and have been well analyzed by mass spectrometry. However, intracellular imaging of fatty acids and glycerophospholipids has not been successful due to insufficient resolution using conventional methods. Here, we developed a method for labeling fatty acids with bromine (Br) and applied scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) to obtain intracellular Br mapping data with submicrometer resolution. Mass spectrometry showed that cells took up Br-labeled fatty acids and metabolized them mainly into glycerophospholipids in CHO cells. Most Br signals observed by SXFM were in the perinuclear region. Higher resolution revealed a spot-like distribution of Br in the cytoplasm. The current method enabled successful visualization of intracellular Br-labeled fatty acids. Single-element labeling combined with SXFM technology facilitates the intracellular imaging of fatty acids, which provides a new tool to determine dynamic changes in fatty acids and their derivatives at the single-cell level.-Shimura, M., Shindou, H., Szyrwiel, L., Tokuoka, S. M., Hamano, F., Matsuyama, S., Okamoto, M., Matsunaga, A., Kita, Y., Ishizaka, Y., Yamauchi, K., Kohmura, Y., Lobinski, R., Shimizu, I., Shimizu, T. Imaging of intracellular fatty acids by scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy. © The Author(s).

  15. Ultrastructural imaging and molecular modeling of live bacteria using soft x-ray contact microscopy with nanoseconds laser plasma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kado, M.; Richardson, M.C.; Gabel, K.; Torres, D.; Rajyaguru, J.; Muszynski, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Detection for clinical diagnosis and study of microbial cell is performed by a combination of low magnification optical microscopy and direct and indirect labeling techniques. Visual ultrastructural studies on subcellular organelles are possible with variations of electron microscopy (thin section, scanning and freeze fracture), although specimen preparation steps such as fixation, dehydration, resin embedding, ultra-thin sectioning, coating and staining are very specialized, extensive and may introduce artifacts in the original sample. The development of high resolution x-ray microscopy is a new technique well suited to observe the intact structure of a biological specimen at high resolution without any artifacts. Here, x ray images of the various live bacteria, such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, and micromolecule such as chromosomal DNA from Escherichia coli, and Lipopolysaccharide from Burkholderia cepacia, are obtained with soft x-ray contact microscopy. A compact tabletop type glass laser system is used to produce x rays from Al, Si, and Au targets. The PMMA photoresists are used to record x-ray images. An AFM (atomic force microscope) is used to reproduce the x-ray images from the developed photoresists. The performance of the 50 nm spatial resolutions are achieved and images are able to be discussed on the biological view.

  16. Refractive optical elements and optical system for high energy x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Altapova, V.; Baumbach, T.; Kluge, M.; Last, A.; Marschall, F.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Vogt, H.

    2012-05-17

    In material science, X-ray radiation with photon energies above 25 keV is used because of its penetration into high density materials. Research of the inner structure of novel materials, such as electrodes in high power batteries for engines, require X-ray microscopes operating in the hard X-ray energy range. A flexible X-ray microscope for hard X-rays with photon energies higher than 25 keV will be realized at the synchrotron source ANKA in Karlsruhe, Germany. The device will use refractive X-ray lenses as condenser as well as objective lenses.

  17. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on X-ray Microscopy (XRM2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongjie; Wu, Ziyu; Tai, Renzhong

    2013-10-01

    The Eleventh International Conference on X-ray Microscopy (XRM2012) was held on 5-10 August 2012 at the Hope hotel in Shanghai. Historically, for the first time the XRM conference took place in China. The conference was jointly hosted by the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) and the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The series of XRM conferences dates back to 1983 in Göttingen, Germany. Since the Zürich conference, XRM2008, it has been held every two years, showing its increasing popularity among the x-ray microscopy communities around the world. Research in the area of x-ray microscopy is advancing very fast with the development of synchrotron radiation techniques, especially the emergence of third generation light sources with low natural emittance which has significantly pushed forward the development of technologies and applications in this area. This has been fully demonstrated in presentations from this and previous XRM conferences. XRM2012 was attended by 295 people including 21 invited speakers, 53 contributing speakers, 55 students, and 13 industry exhibitors. Over 232 abstracts were submitted for oral or poster presentation and 56 original, peer-reviewed papers are published in these proceedings. The conference was sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11210301016/A0802), and three gold sponsors active in industrial and technological fields related to x-ray microscopy. An exhibition booth was offered free to Australia synchrotron, the host for XRM2014, to promote the next conference which will be held in Melbourne, Australia in 2014. An unforgettable memory for most conference participants might be the charming night cruise along Pujiang river which was part of the welcome reception on the first evening. The Werner Meyer-Ilse Award (WMIA) prize this year was awarded to Irene Zanette (TU-München) and Stephan Werner (HZB-Berlin), the former for her pioneering

  18. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoß, S. Stahl, C.; Weigand, M.; Schütz, G.; Albrecht, J.

    2015-01-12

    The penetration of magnetic flux into high-temperature superconductors has been observed using a high-resolution technique based on x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Superconductors coated with thin soft-magnetic layers are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electric currents in the superconductor create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor and lead to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. Measuring the local magnetization of the ferromagnet by x-ray absorption microscopy with circular-polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor with a spatial resolution on the nanoscale.

  19. Recent progress of hard x-ray imaging microscopy and microtomography at BL37XU of SPring-8

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yoshio Takeuchi, Akihisa; Terada, Yasuko; Uesugi, Kentaro; Mizutani, Ryuta

    2016-01-28

    A hard x-ray imaging microscopy and microtomography system is now being developed at the beamline 37XU of SPring-8. In the latest improvement, a spatial resolution of about 50 nm is achieved in two-dimensional imaging at 6 keV x-ray energy using a Fresnel zone plate objective with an outermost zone width of 35 nm. In the tomographic measurement, a spatial resolution of about 100 nm is achieved at 8 keV using an x-ray guide tube condenser optic and a Fresnel zone plate objective with an outermost zone width of 50 nm.

  20. High resolution projection X-ray microscope equipped with fluorescent X-ray analyzer and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, K.; Saito, Y.; Kai, H.; Shirota, K.; Yada, K.

    2009-09-01

    We have newly developed an open type fine-focus X-ray tube "TX-510" to realize a spatial resolution of 50nm and to radiate low energy characteristic X-rays for giving high absorption contrast to images of microscopic organisms. The "TX-510" employs a ZrO/W(100) Schottky emitter and an "In-Lens Field Emission Gun". The key points of the improvements are (1) reduced spherical aberration coefficient of magnetic objective lens, (2) easy and accurate focusing, (3) newly designed astigmatism compensator, (4) segmented thin film target for interchanging the target materials by electron beam shift and (5) fluorescent X-ray analysis system.

  1. Nondestructive single-shot soft x-ray lithography and contact microscopy using a laser-produced plasma source.

    PubMed

    Rosser, R J; Feder, R; Ng, A; Adams, F; Celliers, P; Speer, R J

    1987-10-01

    A toroidal relay optic has been used to overcome the problem of damage caused by debris that has limited previous attempts at soft x-ray lithography and contact microscopy using laser-produced plasma sources. Not only is the specimen preserved, but it is now possible to have a vacuum retaining soft x-ray transparent Si(3)N(4) window as a permanent part of the apparatus, greatly simplifying specimen handling. The exposure times are ~2 ns.

  2. Objective for EUV microscopy, EUV lithography, and x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth W.; Efthimion, Philip

    2016-05-03

    Disclosed is an imaging apparatus for EUV spectroscopy, EUV microscopy, EUV lithography, and x-ray imaging. This new imaging apparatus could, in particular, make significant contributions to EUV lithography at wavelengths in the range from 10 to 15 nm, which is presently being developed for the manufacturing of the next-generation integrated circuits. The disclosure provides a novel adjustable imaging apparatus that allows for the production of stigmatic images in x-ray imaging, EUV imaging, and EUVL. The imaging apparatus of the present invention incorporates additional properties compared to previously described objectives. The use of a pair of spherical reflectors containing a concave and convex arrangement has been applied to a EUV imaging system to allow for the image and optics to all be placed on the same side of a vacuum chamber. Additionally, the two spherical reflector segments previously described have been replaced by two full spheres or, more precisely, two spherical annuli, so that the total photon throughput is largely increased. Finally, the range of permissible Bragg angles and possible magnifications of the objective has been largely increased.

  3. EUV microscopy using a lab-scale x-ray laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleiner, Davide; Staub, Felix; Balmer, Juerg E.

    2011-09-01

    High brightness extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light sources for laboratory operation are needed in nano-fabrication and actinic ("at-wavelength") mask inspection. Mask inspection in next generation lithography is crucial for high volume manufacturing. Plasma-based EUV sources have the required compactness. However, their incoherent emission lacks the brightness for fast and high contrast imaging. The X-ray laser is instead characterized by a remarkable brightness in a compact footprint facility. We evaluated a simple two-mirror optical setup for EUV microscopy illuminated with the BeAGLE X-ray laser system at the University of Berne. Single-shot acquisitions were sufficient to obtain high-contrast images of a Siemens star sample at diffraction-limit. Single-shot operation makes the overall acquisition speed limited by the laser repetition rate only. A reference calculation shows how-fast could be actinic inspection. The contrast was enhanced one order of magnitude by means of image processing. For a modest magnification (12x) no significant third-order aberrations were observed, even when tilting the spherical mirror-pair. For high magnification a Schwarzschild design is considered. The latter compensates astigmatism and coma with a mirror-pair per each element (condenser/magnifier), but introduces twice as many reflections as in the evaluated two-concave setup. Hence a compromise between aberration correction and enhancement of illumination must be found case by case.

  4. Ultrasensitive Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Pushing the Limits of Time Resolution and Magnetic Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohldag, Hendrik

    Understanding magnetic properties at ultrafast timescales is crucial for the development of new magnetic devices. Samples of interest are often thin film magnetic multilayers with thicknesses in the range of a few atomic layers. This fact alone presents a sensitivity challenge in STXM microscopy, which is more suited toward studying thicker samples. In addition the relevant time scale is of the order of 10 ps, which is well below the typical x-ray pulse length of 50 - 100 ps. The SSRL STXM is equipped with a single photon counting electronics that effectively allows using a double lock-in detection at 476MHz (the x-ray pulse frequency) and 1.28MHz (the synchrotron revelation frequency) to provide the required sensitivity. In the first year of operation the excellent spatial resolution, temporal stability and sensitivity of the detection electronics of this microscope has enabled researchers to acquire time resolved images of standing as well as traveling spin waves in a spin torque oscillator in real space as well as detect the real time spin accumulation in non magnetic Copper once a spin polarized current is injected into this material. The total magnetic moment is comparable to that of a single nanocube of magnetic Fe buried under a micron of non-magnetic material.

  5. An x-ray diffraction and TEM (transmission electron microscopy) study of subsurface recovery during abrasion

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, C.M.; Kosel, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    The subsurface dislocation structures and the extent of dynamic recovery and recrystallization in pure metals subjected to low-stress abrasion have been examined. Pure copper and aluminum were chosen to provide a range of melting and therefore recrystallization temperatures. The materials were strain annealed before abrasion in order to produce extremely large initial grain sizes. Back-reflection x-ray pinhole photographs of the original specimens produced single crystal Laue patterns, whereas the abraded specimens produced Debye rings. In the case of aluminum the Debye rings contained distinct individual spots, whereas the copper produced smooth, continuous rings. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine subsurface sections parallel to the war tracks to provide more direct evidence of the subsurface microstructural changes. In all cases, at greater depths below the worn surface, the materials showed dislocation cells typical of a high degree of room temperature deformation, with the degree of deformation decreasing with depth. Closer to the surface, the copper exhibited a fine, high-misorientations subgrain structure which is believed to be responsible for the continuous Debye rings seen in the x-ray pattern. In the case of aluminum, there appeared to be a mixture of fine subgrains and larger dynamically recrystallized grains which are believed to have produced the spotty Debye rings. 29 refs., 14 figs.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis and immunohistochemistry on worn soft contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Versura, P.; Maltarello, M.C.; Roomans, G.M.; Caramazza, R.; Laschi, R.

    1988-03-01

    The deposits accumulated on the surfaces of soft contact lenses are a cause of problems for the wearer of these lenses, as the deposits are never completely removed by the available washing solutions. Therefore it appears of interest to investigate the composition of these deposits. In this paper we review the major findings in the literature and, in addition, present our personal experience. We have studied new, continuously and daily worn soft contact lenses by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray microanalysis and immunohistochemistry. We have carefully evaluated preparative methods, and we can conclude that SEM and X-ray microanalysis are best carried out on unfixed, air-dried lenses. The deposits present consist mainly of mucus, especially on the tarsal side of the lenses. Chloride and potassium, coming from the tear fluid, as well as sulfur, derived from proteins, were found. Calcium was very rarely detected. IgG, IgA, IgE and C3c complement fractions were found only on the outer surfaces and not within the lens. We believe that the best characterization of the deposits is achieved by means of correlative techniques on the same lens. In fact, this approach integrates morphology and composition.

  7. Magnetic x-ray microscopy at low temperatures – Visualization of flux distributions in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, Claudia Ruoß, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Bechtel, Michael; Schütz, Gisela; Albrecht, Joachim

    2016-01-28

    X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) microscopy at liquid nitrogen temperature has been performed on bilayers of high-T{sub c} superconducting YBCO (YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-δ}) and soft-magnetic Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}. This should allow us to map the magnetic flux density distribution in the current-carrying state of the superconductor with high spatial resolution. For that purpose the UHV scanning X-ray microscope MAXYMUS has been upgraded by a MMR Micro Miniature Joule-Thompson cryostat capable of temperatures between 75 K and 580 K. Resulting XMCD images of the magnetic flux density in the superconductor with a field of view ranging from millimeters to micrometers are presented. The microscope’s unique combination of total electron yield (TEY) measurements together with low temperatures offers novel possibilities concerning the current transport in superconductors on small length scales.

  8. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy for the study of semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T.; Padmore, H.; Terminello, L.J.; Jankowski, A.F.; Stohr, J.; Diaz, J.; Cossy-Gantner, A.

    1998-03-01

    Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) using X-rays is a novel combination of two established materials analysis techniques--PEEM using UV light, and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination allows the study of elemental composition and bonding structure of the sample by NEXAFS spectroscopy with a high spatial resolution given by the microscope. A simple, two lens, 10 kV operation voltage PEEM has been used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley to study various problems including materials of interest for the semiconductor industry. In the present paper the authors give a short overview over the method and the instrument which was used, and describe in detail a number of applications. These applications include the study of the different phases of titanium disilicide, various phases of boron nitride, and the analysis of small particles. A brief outlook is given on possible new fields of application of the PEEM technique, and the development of new PEEM instruments.

  9. X-ray microscopy for in situ characterization of 3D nanostructural evolution in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornberger, Benjamin; Bale, Hrishikesh; Merkle, Arno; Feser, Michael; Harris, William; Etchin, Sergey; Leibowitz, Marty; Qiu, Wei; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gu, Allen; Bradley, Robert S.; Lu, Xuekun; Withers, Philip J.; Clarke, Amy; Henderson, Kevin; Cordes, Nikolaus; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray microscopy (XRM) has emerged as a powerful technique that reveals 3D images and quantitative information of interior structures. XRM executed both in the laboratory and at the synchrotron have demonstrated critical analysis and materials characterization on meso-, micro-, and nanoscales, with spatial resolution down to 50 nm in laboratory systems. The non-destructive nature of X-rays has made the technique widely appealing, with potential for "4D" characterization, delivering 3D micro- and nanostructural information on the same sample as a function of sequential processing or experimental conditions. Understanding volumetric and nanostructural changes, such as solid deformation, pore evolution, and crack propagation are fundamental to understanding how materials form, deform, and perform. We will present recent instrumentation developments in laboratory based XRM including a novel in situ nanomechanical testing stage. These developments bridge the gap between existing in situ stages for micro scale XRM, and SEM/TEM techniques that offer nanometer resolution but are limited to analysis of surfaces or extremely thin samples whose behavior is strongly influenced by surface effects. Several applications will be presented including 3D-characterization and in situ mechanical testing of polymers, metal alloys, composites and biomaterials. They span multiple length scales from the micro- to the nanoscale and different mechanical testing modes such as compression, indentation and tension.

  10. Biomedical and agricultural applications of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, Elżbieta; Suski, Szymon; Miller, Karolina; Bartosiewicz, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in electron microscopy has been widely used in many research areas since it provides precise information on the chemical composition of subcellular structures that may be correlated with their high resolution images. In EDS the characteristic X-rays typical of each element are analyzed and the new detectors - an example of which we describe - allow for setting precisely the area of measurements and acquiring signals as a point analysis, as a linescan or in the image format of the desired area. Mapping of the elements requires stringent methods of sample preparation to prevent redistribution/loss of the elements as well as elimination of the risk of overlapping spectra. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses may be performed at a low probe current suitable for thin biological samples. Descriptions of preparation techniques, drawbacks and precautions necessary to obtain reliable results are provided, including data on standards, effects of specimen roughness and quantification. Data on EPMA application in different fields of biomedical and agricultural studies are reviewed. In this review we refer to recent EDS/EPMA applications in medical diagnostics, studies on air pollution and agrochemicals as well as on plant models used to monitor the environment.

  11. Processing and failure studies of advanced composites using x-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM)

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.H.; Saroyan, R.A.; Celeste, J. ); Nichols, M.C. ); Stock, S.R.; Breunig, T.M.; Guviniler, A. )

    1991-02-01

    The traditional role of Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) has been to identify critical flaws in components after they have been fabricated. Recently, efforts have been made to introduce NDT techniques earlier in the engineering cycle, and some progress has been made in applying NDT inspection during component processing. Improvements that have been made in the spatial resolution and sensitivity of x-ray computed tomography (CT), however, indicate that it is now possible to introduce NDT concepts and methods to the earliest stage of component manufacture, namely, in the development of new materials -- where the characterization and analysis of microscopic features are important. X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) is a high resolution, three-dimensional variant of CT with a spatial resolution better than 0.005 mm. These studies have demonstrated that XTM is a powerful NDT technique which is capable of imaging microstructural features in even the most complicated advanced composite materials. Work is in progress to use XTM for dynamic studies of chemical vapor infiltration in continuous fiber ceramic composites. Furthermore, an in-situ tensile load frame is now being used in conjunction with XTM to study fatigue crack growth and tensile failure in metal matrix composites. The application of NDT imaging methods to materials studies will greatly enhance our understanding of time-dependent behavior in complex engineering materials. 3 refs.

  12. Soft X-ray Zone Plate Microscopy to 10 nm Resolution with XM-1 at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Chao Weilun; Attwood, David T.; Anderson, Erik H.; Harteneck, Bruce D.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2007-01-19

    Soft x-ray zone plate microscopy provides a unique combination of capabilities that complement those of electron and scanning probe microscopies. Tremendous efforts are taken worldwide to achieve sub-10 nm resolution, which will permit extension of x-ray microscopy to a broader range of nanosciences and nanotechnologies. In this paper, the overlay nanofabrication technique is described, which permits zone width of 15 nm and below to be fabricated. The fabrication results of 12 nm zone plates, and the stacking of identical zone patterns for higher aspect ratio, are discussed.

  13. Investigations of Silk Fibers Using X-Ray Scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lance D.; Putthanarat, Sirina; Eby, Ronald K.; Adams, W. W.; Liu, G. F.

    1998-03-01

    Silk fibers from the cocoon of Bombyx mori and the dragline of Nephila clavipes have been investigated by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The large scale morphology of these silks have minimum scattering dimensions, and correlation length on the order of 150-300 nm. Several types of AFM measurements on peeled and abraided silk samples have revealed dimensions in agreement with SAXS results. Further agreemeent has been found through the incorporation of discrete Fourier transform theory on AFM topographic information as compared to SAXS patterns. This incorporation allows the materials scientist a way of visualizing the relationship between a material and its resulting scattering function. All of these studies yield a more complete view of the silk morphology and give a new method of model building from scattering experiments.

  14. X-Ray Diffraction and Electron Microscopy Study of Cr/Sb Multilayered Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnomae, Hitoshi

    1994-03-01

    Structures of [Cr(2 Å)/Sb(50 Å)] n multilayered films have been investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of cross sections. When the substrate temperature (T s) was 90° C, an epitaxial structure with a coherent stacking of Sb and compound (CrSb) layers was formed by the interfacial reaction. On the other hand, at T s=-50° C, a non-epitaxial structure composed of crystalline Sb layers and amorphous Cr metal layers was obtained. Interfaces of multilayers observed by TEM are very flat for both samples. The structures of very thin Cr layers depend on the reactivity of interfaces and greatly affect on the orientations of Sb layers.

  15. Adenovirus Structure as Revealed by X-Ray Crystallography, Electron Microscopy, and Difference Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Phoebe L.; Burnett, Roger M.

    1993-03-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human type 2 adenovirus was studied by combining X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy in a novel way. The 2.9 Å crystal structure of the major capsid protein, hexon, was positioned into a three-dimensional image reconstruction of the intact virus that was derived from cryo-electron micrographs. A three-dimensional difference map was generated by subtracting 240 copies of the crystallographic hexon from the density of the intact virus. This map revealed several minor structural proteins acting as “cement” to stabilize the assembly. The current state of structural knowledge concerning the location of the polypeptide components and the viral DNA is presented.

  16. Applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in inner ear pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Anniko, M.; Lim, D.J.; Sobin, A.; Wroblewski, R.

    1985-01-01

    Surface pathology of inner ear structures so far described in detail concern cochlear and vestibular hair cells and the stria vascularis. In man, surgical intervention into the inner ear is very uncommon and when performed is in general with the primary objective of destroying the diseased peripheral end organs. The vast majority of inner ear tissue available for use with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is therefore obtained from animals. The present paper reviews the progression of surface pathology caused by aminoglycoside antibiotics, acoustic overstimulation and in a guinea pig strain with genetic inner ear disease. The primary site of onset of surface pathology differs, depending on the underlying cause. Advanced surface pathology shows a similar type of morphological degeneration independent of cause. The combination of SEM and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (XRMA) of inner ear pathology has as yet been reported in only three studies, all concerning inner ear fluids or otoconia.

  17. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    SciTech Connect

    Forslind, B.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is frequently applied to dermatological problems, as is evident from a review of the recent literature. In this paper, preparation methods and new techniques allowing experimental studies on the integumentary system are emphasized. Quantitative analysis in the electron microscope by use of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) has become an important accessory technique. EDX can, for instance, be used to study problems involving physiological changes induced in skin by agents causing contact reactions. Recently, it has been shown that treatment with DNCB, chromate and nickel causes changes in elemental distribution in guinea-pig skin. In addition, elemental uptake in the integumentary system and in pathological inclusions in skin can be analyzed.

  18. Data preparation and evaluation techniques for x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Marchesini, Stefano; Shapiro, David; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The post-experiment processing of X-ray Diffraction Microscopy data is often time-consuming and difficult. This is mostly due to the fact that even if a preliminary result has been reconstructed, there is no definitive answer as to whether or not a better result with more consistently retrieved phases can still be obtained. In addition, we show here that the first step in data analysis, the assembly of two-dimensional diffraction patterns from a large set of raw diffraction data, is crucial to obtaining reconstructions of highest possible consistency. We have developed software that automates this process and results in consistently accurate diffraction patterns. We have furthermore derived some criteria of validity for a tool commonly used to assess the consistency of reconstructions, the phase retrieval transfer function, and suggest a modified version that has improved utility for judging reconstruction quality.

  19. Data preparation and evaluation techniques for x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; ...

    2010-01-01

    The post-experiment processing of X-ray Diffraction Microscopy data is often time-consuming and difficult. This is mostly due to the fact that even if a preliminary result has been reconstructed, there is no definitive answer as to whether or not a better result with more consistently retrieved phases can still be obtained. In addition, we show here that the first step in data analysis, the assembly of two-dimensional diffraction patterns from a large set of raw diffraction data, is crucial to obtaining reconstructions of highest possible consistency. We have developed software that automates this process and results in consistently accurate diffractionmore » patterns. We have furthermore derived some criteria of validity for a tool commonly used to assess the consistency of reconstructions, the phase retrieval transfer function, and suggest a modified version that has improved utility for judging reconstruction quality.« less

  20. Nondestructive imaging of materials microstructure using x-ray tomographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.H.; Saroyan, R.A. ); Nichols, M.C. ); Bonse, U. . Fachbereich Physik); Stock, S.R.; Breunig, T.M.; Guvenilir, A. . School of Material Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    A technique for nondestructively imaging microstructures of materials in situ, especially a technique capable of delineating the time evolution of chemical changes or damage, will greatly benefit studies of materials processing and failure. X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) is a high resolution, three-dimensional inspection method which is capable of imaging composite materials microstructures with a resolution of a few micrometers. Because XTM is nondestructive, it will be possible to examine materials under load or during processing, and obtain three-dimensional images of fiber positions, microcracks, and pores. This will allow direct imaging of microstructural evolution, and will provide time-dependent data for comparison to fracture mechanics and processing models. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Small angle x-ray scattering and electron microscopy of nanoparticles formed in an electrical arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvou, E.; Garrec, J. L. Le; Pérez, J.; Praquin, J.; Djeddi, M.; Mitchell, J. B. A.

    2013-03-01

    Small Angle X-ray Scattering has been used to characterize nanoparticles generated by electrical arcing between metallic (AgSnO2) electrodes. The particles are found to have diameters between 30 and 40 nm and display smooth surfaces suggesting that they are either in liquid form or have solidified from the liquid state. Particles collected around the electrodes were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscopy and were seen to be much larger than those seen in the SAXS measurement, to be spherical in form and composed of silver metal with irregular tin oxide particles deposited on their surface. Mixed metal nanoparticles can have important practical applications and the use of mixed sintered electrodes may be a direct method for their production.

  2. Structural characterization of colloidal crystals and inverse opals using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo-Han; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Liao, Chen-Hong; Wu, Pu-Wei; Song, Yen-Fang

    2014-07-15

    A nondestructive tomographic technique was used to determine the crystallographic information of colloidal crystals comprising of polystyrene (PS) microspheres, as well as their silver inverse opals. The properties of the colloidal crystals, such as defects, grain size, grain boundaries, stacking sequence, and grain orientation, were determined using the full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) with a spatial resolution of 50 nm. The PS microspheres (500-750 nm) which underwent a vertical electrophoresis process to form a face-centered cubic (fcc) close-packed structure with an ABCABC packing sequence. In addition, the colloidal crystal exhibited multiple grains, and an orientation variation of 6.1° in the stacking direction between two neighboring grains.

  3. Orthoclase surface structure dissolution measured in situ by x-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N. C.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Teng, H.

    2000-11-28

    Orthoclase (001) surface topography and interface structure were measured during dissolution by using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and synchrotrons X-ray reflectivity at pH 1.1-12.9 and T = 25-84 C. Terrace roughening at low pH and step motion at high pH were the main phenomena observed, and dissolution rates were measured precisely. Contrasting dissolution mechanisms are inferred for low- and high-pH conditions. These observations clarify differences in alkali feldspar dissolution mechanisms as a function of pH, demonstrate a new in situ method for measuring face-specific dissolution rates on single crystals, and improve the fundamental basis for understanding alkali feldspar weathering processes.

  4. High-resolution and large-volume tomography reconstruction for x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chang-Chieh; Hwu, Yeukuang; Ching, Yu-Tai

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a method of X-ray image acquisition for the high-resolution tomography reconstruction that uses a light source of synchrotron radiation to reconstruct a three-dimensional tomographic volume dataset for a nanoscale object. For large objects, because of the limited field-of-view, a projection image of an object should to be taken by several shots from different locations, and using an image stitching method to combine these image blocks together. In this study, the overlap of image blocks should be small because our light source is the synchrotron radiation and the X-ray dosage should be minimized as possible. We use the properties of synchrotron radiation to enable the image stitching and alignment success when the overlaps between adjacent image blocks are small. In this study, the size of overlaps can reach to 15% of the size of each image block. During the reconstruction, the mechanical stability should be considered because it leads the misalignment problem in tomography. We adopt the feature-based alignment

  5. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ion Beam - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, George J.; Harris, William H.; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Izzo, Jr., John R.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Tanasini, Pietro; Cantoni, Marco; Van herle, Jan; Comninellis, Christos; Andrews, Joy C.; Liu, Yijin; Pianetta, Piero; Chu, Yong

    2011-03-24

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB–SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB–SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  6. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ioni Beam-scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    G Nelson; W Harris; J Lombardo; J Izzo Jr.; W Chiu; P Tanasini; M Cantoni; J Van herle; C Comninellis; et al.

    2011-12-31

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB-SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB-SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  7. Characterization of X-ray polycapillary optics by LiF crystal radiation detectors through confocal fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfigli, Francesca; Hampai, Dariush; Dabagov, Sultan B.; Montereali, Rosa Maria

    2016-08-01

    Solid-state radiation imaging detectors based on photoluminescent colour centres in lithium fluoride (LiF) crystals have been successfully tested for both advanced 2D and 3D characterizations of X-ray polycapillary optics by a table-top laboratory system. Polycapillary optics can control X-ray beams propagation and allows obtaining quasi-parallel beam (half-lens) or focused beams (full-lens). The combination of a fine-focused micro X-ray tube and a polycapillary lens can provide the high intensity radiation fluxes that are necessary for high resolution X-ray imaging. In this paper we present novel results about advanced characterization of these complex optics by 2D as well as 3D confocal laser fluorescence microscopy of X-ray irradiated LiF crystal detectors. Two dimensional high spatial resolution images on a wide field of view of transmitted X-rays through a semi-lens and 3D direct inspection of the coloured volumes produced in LiF crystals by both focused and parallel X-ray beam transmitted by a full and a semi-lens, respectively, as well as their 3D reconstructions were obtained. The results show that the photoluminescent colour centres volume in LiF crystals combined with an optical sectioning reading system provide information about tomography of transmitted X-ray beams by policapillary optics in a single exposure process. For the first time, the use of LiF crystal plates as versatile radiation imaging luminescent detectors have been used to characterize the operation of polycapillary optics as X-ray lens, in focusing and parallel mode.

  8. Projection x-ray imaging with photon energy weighting: experimental evaluation with a prototype detector.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2009-08-21

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in x-ray imaging can be increased using a photon counting detector which could allow for rejecting electronics noise and for weighting x-ray photons according to their energies. This approach, however, was not feasible for a long time because photon counting x-ray detectors with very high count rates, good energy resolution and a large number of small pixels were required. These problems have been addressed with the advent of new detector materials, fast readout electronics and powerful computers. In this work, we report on the experimental evaluation of projection x-ray imaging with a photon counting cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector with energy resolving capabilities. The detector included two rows of pixels with 128 pixels per row with 0.9 x 0.9 mm(2) pixel size, and a 2 Mcount pixel(-1) s(-1) count rate. The x-ray tube operated at 120 kVp tube voltage with 2 mm Al-equivalent inherent filtration. The x-ray spectrum was split into five regions, and five independent x-ray images were acquired at a time. These five quasi-monochromatic x-ray images were used for x-ray energy weighting and material decomposition. A tissue-equivalent phantom was used including contrast elements simulating adipose, calcifications, iodine and air. X-ray energy weighting improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine by a factor of 1.32 and 1.36, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. Material decomposition was performed by dual energy subtraction. The low- and high-energy images were generated in the energy ranges of 25-60 keV and 60-120 keV, respectively, by combining five monochromatic image data into two. X-ray energy weighting was applied to low- and high-energy images prior to subtraction, and this improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine in dual energy subtracted images by a factor of 1.34 and 1.25, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. The detector energy resolution, spatial resolution, linearity, count rate, noise and

  9. Projection x-ray imaging with photon energy weighting: experimental evaluation with a prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2009-08-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in x-ray imaging can be increased using a photon counting detector which could allow for rejecting electronics noise and for weighting x-ray photons according to their energies. This approach, however, was not feasible for a long time because photon counting x-ray detectors with very high count rates, good energy resolution and a large number of small pixels were required. These problems have been addressed with the advent of new detector materials, fast readout electronics and powerful computers. In this work, we report on the experimental evaluation of projection x-ray imaging with a photon counting cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector with energy resolving capabilities. The detector included two rows of pixels with 128 pixels per row with 0.9 × 0.9 mm2 pixel size, and a 2 Mcount pixel-1 s-1 count rate. The x-ray tube operated at 120 kVp tube voltage with 2 mm Al-equivalent inherent filtration. The x-ray spectrum was split into five regions, and five independent x-ray images were acquired at a time. These five quasi-monochromatic x-ray images were used for x-ray energy weighting and material decomposition. A tissue-equivalent phantom was used including contrast elements simulating adipose, calcifications, iodine and air. X-ray energy weighting improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine by a factor of 1.32 and 1.36, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. Material decomposition was performed by dual energy subtraction. The low- and high-energy images were generated in the energy ranges of 25-60 keV and 60-120 keV, respectively, by combining five monochromatic image data into two. X-ray energy weighting was applied to low- and high-energy images prior to subtraction, and this improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine in dual energy subtracted images by a factor of 1.34 and 1.25, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. The detector energy resolution, spatial resolution, linearity, count rate, noise and image

  10. Analytic 3D Imaging of Mammalian Nucleus at Nanoscale Using Coherent X-Rays and Optical Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Changyong; Takagi, Masatoshi; Park, Jaehyun; Xu, Rui; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Imamoto, Naoko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Despite the notable progress that has been made with nano-bio imaging probes, quantitative nanoscale imaging of multistructured specimens such as mammalian cells remains challenging due to their inherent structural complexity. Here, we successfully performed three-dimensional (3D) imaging of mammalian nuclei by combining coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy, explicitly visualizing nuclear substructures at several tens of nanometer resolution, and optical fluorescence microscopy, cross confirming the substructures with immunostaining. This demonstrates the successful application of coherent x-rays to obtain the 3D ultrastructure of mammalian nuclei and establishes a solid route to nanoscale imaging of complex specimens. PMID:25185543

  11. Recent investigations of silk fibers utilizing x-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lance D.

    1998-12-01

    Silks from the mulberry silkworm, Bombyx mori, and the golden-orb spider, Nephila clavipes, are materials that possess respectable properties. Even pitted against the high performance fibers of Kevlar, polyethylene, and carbon, the advantages of some of nature's fibers are clear. The tensile strength of the golden-orb spider dragline is of the same order of magnitude as many synthetic fibers, yet the dragline's compressive strength as a percentage of its tensile strength is greater. The spider's ampullate glands, responsible for the manufacture of the dragline, also excel. The spider spins its fiber from a liquid crystalline solution that is water based versus the solutions at high temperatures containing volatile solvents that are required for current synthetic fibers. Understanding the morphology of silks will provide the basis for improved manufacturing and better performing synthetic fibers. The studies presented here have centered on the use of small-angle x-ray scattering, SAXS, to describe the large-scale morphology of silk fibers. We have determined minimum scattering dimensions on the order of 150-300 nm. A detailed analysis of the Porod scattering region has revealed correlation lengths of the same magnitude. Both of these dimensions are similar to with direct atomic force microscopy, AFM, measurements of nanofibers found in samples of abraded or peeled silk. The incorporation of discrete Fourier transform theory and AFM topographic information has yielded results in general agreement with measured SAXS patterns. This incorporation allows the materials scientist a way of visualizing the relationship between a material and its resulting scattering function. We have also found that x-ray scattering gives insight to new periodic distances of the morphology of golden-orb dragline. All of these studies yield a more complete view of the silk morphology and give a new method of model building from scattering experiments.

  12. Development of in-line furnace for in-situ nanoscale resolution x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Christopher; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen K.; Wang, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Full field transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) is a newly developed x-ray imaging technique to provide quantitative and non-destructive 3D characterization of the complex microstructure of materials at nanometer resolution. A key missing component is an in situ apparatus enabling the imaging of the complex structural evolution of the materials and to correlate the structural change with a material's functionality under real operating conditions. This work describes the design of an environmental cell which satisfies the requirements for in situ TXM studies. The limited space within the TXM presents a spatial constraint which prohibits the use of conventional heaters, as well as requiring consideration in designing for safe and controlled operation of the system and alignment of the cell with the beam. A gravity drip-fed water cooling jacket was installed in place around the heating module to maintain critical components of the microscope at safe operating temperatures. A motion control system consisting of pulse width modulated DC motor driven XYZ translation stages was developed to facilitate fine alignment of the cell. Temperature of the sample can be controlled remotely and accurately through a controller to temperatures as high as 1200 K. Heating zone measurement was carried out and shows a 500 x 500 x 500 μm3 homogeneous zone volume for sample area, which is a critical parameter to ensure accurate observation of structural evolution at nanometer scale with a sample in size of tens of microns. Application on Ni particles for in situ oxidation experiment and dehydrogenation of aluminum hydride is also discussed.

  13. Unraveling heme detoxification in the malaria parasite by in situ correlative X-ray fluorescence microscopy and soft X-ray tomography.

    PubMed

    Kapishnikov, Sergey; Grolimund, Daniel; Schneider, Gerd; Pereiro, Eva; McNally, James G; Als-Nielsen, Jens; Leiserowitz, Leslie

    2017-08-08

    A key drug target for malaria has been the detoxification pathway of the iron-containing molecule heme, which is the toxic byproduct of hemoglobin digestion. The cornerstone of heme detoxification is its sequestration into hemozoin crystals, but how this occurs remains uncertain. We report new results of in vivo rate of heme crystallization in the malaria parasite, based on a new technique to measure element-specific concentrations at defined locations in cell ultrastructure. Specifically, a high resolution correlative combination of cryo soft X-ray tomography has been developed to obtain 3D parasite ultrastructure with cryo X-ray fluorescence microscopy to measure heme concentrations. Our results are consistent with a model for crystallization via the heme detoxification protein. Our measurements also demonstrate the presence of considerable amounts of non-crystalline heme in the digestive vacuole, which we show is most likely contained in hemoglobin. These results suggest a tight coupling between hemoglobin digestion and heme crystallization, highlighting a new link in the crystallization pathway for drug development.

  14. Chemical Composition and Sulfur Speciation in Bulk Tissue by X-Ray Spectroscopy and X-Ray Microscopy: Corneal Development during Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Koudouna, Elena; Veronesi, Giulia; Patel, Imran I.; Cotte, Marine; Knupp, Carlo; Martin, Francis L.; Quantock, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The chemical composition and sulfur (S) speciation of developing chick corneas at embryonic days 12, 14, and 16 were investigated using synchrotron scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy and x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The aim was to develop techniques for the analysis of bulk tissue and identify critical physicochemical variations that correlate with changes in corneal structure-function relationships. Derived data were subjected to principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis, which highlighted differences in the elemental and S species composition at different stages of embryonic growth. Notably, distinct elemental compositions of chlorine, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and S altered with development during the transition of the immature opaque cornea to a mature transparent tissue. S  structure spectroscopy revealed developmentally regulated alterations in thiols, organic monosulfides, ester sulfate, and inorganic sulfate species. The transient molecular structures and compositional changes reported here provide a deeper understanding of the underlying basis of corneal development during the acquisition of transparency. The experimental and analytical approach is new, to our knowledge, and has wide potential applicability in the life sciences. PMID:22853914

  15. Chemical composition and sulfur speciation in bulk tissue by x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray microscopy: corneal development during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Koudouna, Elena; Veronesi, Giulia; Patel, Imran I; Cotte, Marine; Knupp, Carlo; Martin, Francis L; Quantock, Andrew J

    2012-07-18

    The chemical composition and sulfur (S) speciation of developing chick corneas at embryonic days 12, 14, and 16 were investigated using synchrotron scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy and x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The aim was to develop techniques for the analysis of bulk tissue and identify critical physicochemical variations that correlate with changes in corneal structure-function relationships. Derived data were subjected to principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis, which highlighted differences in the elemental and S species composition at different stages of embryonic growth. Notably, distinct elemental compositions of chlorine, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and S altered with development during the transition of the immature opaque cornea to a mature transparent tissue. S structure spectroscopy revealed developmentally regulated alterations in thiols, organic monosulfides, ester sulfate, and inorganic sulfate species. The transient molecular structures and compositional changes reported here provide a deeper understanding of the underlying basis of corneal development during the acquisition of transparency. The experimental and analytical approach is new, to our knowledge, and has wide potential applicability in the life sciences.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion X-ray spectrometry, X-ray powder diffraction, and NMR characterization of iron-rich fired clays.

    PubMed

    Presciutti, Federica; Capitani, Donatella; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni; Costantino, Ferdinando; Viel, Stéphane; Segre, Annalaura

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the structure of an iron-rich clay and the structural changes involved in the firing process as a preliminary step to get information on ancient ceramic technology. To this purpose, illite-rich clay samples fired at different temperatures were characterized using a multitechnique approach, i.e., by electron paramagnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy with electron dispersion X-ray spectrometry, X-ray powder diffraction, magic angle spinning and multiple quantum magic angle spinning NMR. During firing, four main reaction processes occur: dehydration, dehydroxylation, structural breakdown, and recrystallization. When the results are combined from all characterization methods, the following conclusions could be obtained. Interlayer H2O is located close to aluminum in octahedral sites and is driven off at temperatures lower than 600 degrees C. Between 600 and 700 degrees C dehydroxylation occurs whereas, between 800 and 900 degrees C, the aluminum in octahedral sites disappears, due to the breakdown of the illite structure, and all iron present is oxidized to Fe3+. In samples fired at 1000 and 1100 degrees C iron clustering was observed as well as large single crystals of iron with the occurrence of ferro- or ferrimagnetic effects. Below 900 degrees C the aluminum in octahedral sites presents a continuous distribution of chemical shift, suggesting the presence of slightly distorted sites. Finally, over the whole temperature range, the presence of at least two tetrahedral aluminum sites was revealed, characterized by different values of the quadrupolar coupling constant.

  17. Ultrahigh-resolution soft-x-ray microscopy with zone plates in high orders of diffraction.

    PubMed

    Rehbein, S; Heim, S; Guttmann, P; Werner, S; Schneider, G

    2009-09-11

    We present an x-ray optical approach to overcome the current limitations in spatial resolution of x-ray microscopes. Our new BESSY full-field x-ray microscope operates with an energy resolution up to E/DeltaE=10(4). We demonstrate that under these conditions it is possible to employ high orders of diffraction for imaging. Using the third order of diffraction of a zone plate objective with 25 nm outermost zone width, 14 nm lines and spaces of a multilayer test structure were clearly resolved. We believe that high-order imaging paves the way towards sub-10-nm real space x-ray imaging.

  18. X-ray microscopy: An emerging technique for semiconductor microstructure characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Padmore, H.A.

    1998-05-01

    The advent of third generation synchrotron radiation x-ray sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Berkeley have enabled the practical realization of a wide range of new techniques in which mature chemical or structural probes such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray diffraction are used in conjunction with microfocused x-ray beams. In this paper the characteristics of some of these new microscopes are described, particularly in reference to their applicability to the characterization of semiconductor microstructures.

  19. 3D localization of electrophysiology catheters from a single x-ray cone-beam projection

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, Normand Polack, George G.; Sethi, Benu; Rowlands, John A.; Crystal, Eugene

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: X-ray images allow the visualization of percutaneous devices such as catheters in real time but inherently lack depth information. The provision of 3D localization of these devices from cone beam x-ray projections would be advantageous for interventions such as electrophysiology (EP), whereby the operator needs to return a device to the same anatomical locations during the procedure. A method to achieve real-time 3D single view localization (SVL) of an object of known geometry from a single x-ray image is presented. SVL exploits the change in the magnification of an object as its distance from the x-ray source is varied. The x-ray projection of an object of interest is compared to a synthetic x-ray projection of a model of said object as its pose is varied. Methods: SVL was tested with a 3 mm spherical marker and an electrophysiology catheter. The effect of x-ray acquisition parameters on SVL was investigated. An independent reference localization method was developed to compare results when imaging a catheter translated via a computer controlled three-axes stage. SVL was also performed on clinical fluoroscopy image sequences. A commercial navigation system was used in some clinical image sequences for comparison. Results: SVL estimates exhibited little change as x-ray acquisition parameters were varied. The reproducibility of catheter position estimates in phantoms denoted by the standard deviations, (σ{sub x}, σ{sub y}, σ{sub z}) = (0.099 mm,  0.093 mm,  2.2 mm), where x and y are parallel to the detector plane and z is the distance from the x-ray source. Position estimates (x, y, z) exhibited a 4% systematic error (underestimation) when compared to the reference method. The authors demonstrated that EP catheters can be tracked in clinical fluoroscopic images. Conclusions: It has been shown that EP catheters can be localized in real time in phantoms and clinical images at fluoroscopic exposure rates. Further work is required to characterize

  20. Spatial Gradients in Particle Reinforced Polymers Characterized by X-Ray Attenuation and Laser Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LAGASSE,ROBERT R.; THOMPSON,KYLE R.

    2000-06-12

    The goal of this work is to develop techniques for measuring gradients in particle concentration within filled polymers, such as encapsulant. A high concentration of filler particles is added to such materials to tailor physical properties such as thermal expansion coefficient. Sedimentation and flow-induced migration of particles can produce concentration gradients that are most severe near material boundaries. Therefore, techniques for measuring local particle concentration should be accurate near boundaries. Particle gradients in an alumina-filled epoxy resin are measured with a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm using an x-ray beam attenuation technique, but an artifact related to the finite diameter of the beam reduces accuracy near the specimen's edge. Local particle concentration near an edge can be measured more reliably using microscopy coupled with image analysis. This is illustrated by measuring concentration profiles of glass particles having 40 {micro}m median diameter using images acquired by a confocal laser fluorescence microscope. The mean of the measured profiles of volume fraction agrees to better than 3% with the expected value, and the shape of the profiles agrees qualitatively with simple theory for sedimentation of monodisperse particles. Extending this microscopy technique to smaller, micron-scale filler particles used in encapsulant for microelectronic devices is illustrated by measuring the local concentration of an epoxy resin containing 0.41 volume fraction of silica.

  1. Combined scanning transmission X-ray and electron microscopy for the characterization of bacterial endospores.

    PubMed

    Jamroskovic, Jan; Shao, Paul P; Suvorova, Elena; Barak, Imrich; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2014-09-01

    Endospores (also referred to as bacterial spores) are bacterial structures formed by several bacterial species of the phylum Firmicutes. Spores form as a response to environmental stress. These structures exhibit remarkable resistance to harsh environmental conditions such as exposure to heat, desiccation, and chemical oxidants. The spores include several layers of protein and peptidoglycan that surround a core harboring DNA as well as high concentrations of calcium and dipicolinic acid (DPA). A combination of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy was used for the direct quantitative characterization of bacterial spores. The concentration and localization of DPA, Ca(2+) , and other elements were determined and compared for the core and cortex of spores from two distinct genera: Bacillus subtilis and Desulfotomaculum reducens. This micro-spectroscopic approach is uniquely suited for the direct study of individual bacterial spores, while classical molecular and biochemical methods access only bulk characteristics. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nondestructive investigation of damage in composites using x-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM)

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.H.; Saroyan, R.A.; Johnson, Q.C. ); Stock, S.R.; Breunig, T.M. ); Nichols, M.C. ); Bonse, U.; Nusshardt, R.; Busch, F. ); Antolovich, S.D. )

    1990-05-01

    X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM), utilizing intense, highly collimated synchrotron radiation, has been used to nondestructively image materials structures in three dimensions. The spatial resolution of the technique approaches that of conventional optical microscopy, but XTM does not require polished surfaces or serial sections. We present the results of an XTM investigation of a composite material composed of silicon-carbide fibers in an aluminum matrix. The results reveal the aluminum/silicon-carbide interfaces and show microcracks running along many of the interfaces as well as in the matrix. Excellent contrast is observed between the silicon-carbide sheath of the fiber surrounding the graphite core and the coating at the fiber-matrix interface. The sensitivity to small changes in the linear absorption coefficient allows nondestructive imaging of variations in chemistry between graphite and silicon carbide and between silicon carbide and aluminum. The experimentally determined values of the absorption coefficients of these phases are identical to values published in the literature. For the first time, XTM will allow observation of damage accumulation and crack growth {ital during} deformation testing. The availability of such data will greatly improve our understanding of failure in advanced materials.

  3. Focused ion beam patterned Fe thin films A study by selective area Stokes polarimetry and soft x-Ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, P. J.; Shen, T. H.; Grundy, P. J.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.; Morton, S. A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.

    2010-11-14

    We demonstrate the potential to modify the magnetic behavior and structural properties of ferromagnetic thin films using focused ion beam 'direct-write' lithography. Patterns inspired by the split-ring resonators often used as components in meta-materials were defined upon 15 nm Fe films using a 30 keV Ga{sup +} focused ion beam at a dose of 2 x 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. Structural, chemical and magnetic changes to the Fe were studied using transmission soft X-ray microscopy at the ALS, Berkeley CA. X-ray absorption spectra showed a 23% reduction in the thickness of the film in the Ga irradiated areas, but no chemical change to the Fe was evident. X-ray images of the magnetic reversal process show domain wall pinning around the implanted areas, resulting in an overall increase in the coercivity of the film. Transmission electron microscopy showed significant grain growth in the implanted regions.

  4. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kalegowda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties. PMID:27087141

  5. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kalegowda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2016-04-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties.

  6. Integrated circuit authentication using photon-limited x-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Markman, Adam; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-07-15

    A counterfeit integrated circuit (IC) may contain subtle changes to its circuit configuration. These changes may be observed when imaged using an x-ray; however, the energy from the x-ray can potentially damage the IC. We have investigated a technique to authenticate ICs under photon-limited x-ray imaging. We modeled an x-ray image with lower energy by generating a photon-limited image from a real x-ray image using a weighted photon-counting method. We performed feature extraction on the image using the speeded-up robust features (SURF) algorithm. We then authenticated the IC by comparing the SURF features to a database of SURF features from authentic and counterfeit ICs. Our experimental results with real and counterfeit ICs using an x-ray microscope demonstrate that we can correctly authenticate an IC image captured using orders of magnitude lower energy x-rays. To the best of our knowledge, this Letter is the first one on using a photon-counting x-ray imaging model and relevant algorithms to authenticate ICs to prevent potential damage.

  7. Condenser optics, partial coherence, and imaging for soft-x-ray projection lithography.

    PubMed

    Sommargren, G E; Seppala, L G

    1993-12-01

    A condenser system couples the radiation source to an imaging system, controlling the uniformity and partial coherence at the object, which ultimately affects the characteristics of the aerial image. A soft-x-ray projection lithography system based on a ring-field imaging system and a laser-produced plasma x-ray source places considerable constraints on the design of a condenser system. Two designs are proposed, critical illumination and Köhler illumination, each of which requires three mirrors and scanning for covering the entire ring field with the required uniformity and partial coherence. Images based on Hopkins' formulation of partially coherent imaging are simulated.

  8. The adaptive x-ray optic project at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, T.; Poyneer, L. A.; McCarville, T. J.; Macintosh, B.; Bauman, B.; Pivovaroff, M. J.

    2014-03-01

    Deformable mirrors (DMs) have been successfully used in astronomical adaptive optics at near-infrared wavelengths, greatly reducing atmospheric-induced aberrations [1]. Extending this capability to the soft and hard x-ray regime is now required in order to take full advantage of the beam quality characteristic of new generation synchrotron facilities and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs). Achieving this goal challenges both current mirror manufacturing techniques and physical optics modeling. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently developing an x-ray DM to correct wavefront aberrations introduced along the beam path of a typical x-ray beam-line [2]. To model the expected performance of such a mirror, we have also developed simulation code based on the wavefront propagation library of functions PROPER [3]. Here we present the current status of the project, including metrology done on the mirror substrate. Additionally we report on results from our wavefront simulation code, which have proven very useful in predicting technical aspects of mirror deployment at a typical x-ray facility.

  9. Performance Optimization for Hard X-ray Microscopy Beamlines Guided by Partially-Coherent Wavefront Propagation Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chubar, Oleg; Chu, Yong S.; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Yan, Hanfei

    2010-06-23

    Hard x-ray range synchrotron radiation still remains only partially coherent even for ultra-low emittance third-generation sources, such as NSLS-II. On the other hand, many of the scientific goals targeted by new advanced hard x-ray microscopy beamlines--e.g. development of scanning microscopy with nanometer-scale spatial resolution or coherent diffraction imaging microscopy--require high degree of transverse coherence and high radiation flux at a sample. Detailed quantitative prediction of partially-coherent x-ray beam properties at propagation from an undulator, along a beamline with a number of optical elements, can only be obtained from accurate physical-optics based numerical simulations. We present an example of such simulations performed for the NSLS-II Hard x-ray Nanoprobe beamline using ''Synchrotron Radiation Workshop''(SRW) computer code. In addition to tracking of intensity distributions at different locations of the beamline, we include numerical experiments with a two-slit interference scheme into our analysis, in order to characterize transverse coherence of the resulting wavefront. The wavefront propagation method which has been used offers high flexibility in the beamline optimization, allowing to choose optical element parameters for different types of microscopy experiments.

  10. Contact X-ray microscopy of living cells by using LiF crystal as imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Reale, L; Bonfigli, F; Lai, A; Flora, F; Albertano, P; DI Giorgio, M L; Mezi, L; Montereali, R M; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Almaviva, S; Francucci, M; Gaudio, P; Martellucci, S; Richetta, M; Poma, A

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the use of lithium fluoride (LiF) as imaging radiation detector to analyse living cells by single-shot soft X-ray contact microscopy is presented. High resolved X-ray images on LiF of cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya VRUC135, two unicellular microalgae of the genus Chlamydomonas and mouse macrophage cells (line RAW 264.7) have been obtained utilizing X-ray radiation in the water window energy range from a laser plasma source. The used method is based on loading of the samples, the cell suspension, in a special holder where they are in close contact with a LiF crystal solid-state X-ray imaging detector. After exposure and sample removal, the images stored in LiF by the soft X-ray contact microscopy technique are read by an optical microscope in fluorescence mode. The clear image of the mucilaginous sheath the structure of the filamentous Leptolyngbya and the visible nucleolus in the macrophage cells image, are noteworthiness results. The peculiarities of the used X-ray radiation and of the LiF imaging detector allow obtaining images in absorption contrast revealing the internal structures of the investigated samples at high spatial resolution. Moreover, the wide dynamic range of the LiF imaging detector contributes to obtain high-quality images. In particular, we demonstrate that this peculiar characteristic of LiF detector allows enhancing the contrast and reveal details even when they were obscured by a nonuniform stray light. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Reconstructing the projected gravitational potential of Abell 1689 from X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernin, Céline; Majer, Charles L.; Meyer, Sven; Sarli, Eleonora; Eckert, Dominique; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters can be used as cosmological probes, but to this end, they need to be thoroughly understood. Combining all cluster observables in a consistent way will help us to understand their global properties and their internal structure. Aims: We provide proof of the concept that the projected gravitational potential of galaxy clusters can directly be reconstructed from X-ray observations. We also show that this joint analysis can be used to locally test the validity of the equilibrium assumptions in galaxy clusters. Methods: We used a newly developed reconstruction method, based on Richardson-Lucy deprojection, that allows reconstructing projected gravitational potentials of galaxy clusters directly from X-ray observations. We applied this algorithm to the well-studied cluster Abell 1689 and compared the gravitational potential reconstructed from X-ray observables to the potential obtained from gravitational lensing measurements. We also compared the X-ray deprojected profiles obtained by the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm with the findings from the more conventional onion-peeling technique. Results: Assuming spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium, the potentials recovered from gravitational lensing and from X-ray emission agree very well beyond 500 kpc. Owing to the fact that the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm allows deprojecting each line of sight independently, this result may indicate that non-gravitational effects and/or asphericity are strong in the central regions of the clusters. Conclusions: We demonstrate the robustness of the potential reconstruction method based on the Richardson-Lucy deprojection algorithm and show that gravitational lensing and X-ray emission lead to consistent gravitational potentials. Our results illustrate the power of combining galaxy-cluster observables in a single, non-parametric, joint reconstruction of consistent cluster potentials that can be used to locally constrain the physical state

  12. Quantitative nanoscale metrology study of Cu/SiO2 interconnect technology using transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, X.; Stagarescu, C.; Xu, G.; Eastman, D. E.; McNulty, I.; Frigo, S. P.; Wang, Yuxin; Retsch, Cornelia C.; Noyan, I. C.; Hu, C.-K.

    2000-11-01

    This letter describes quantitative nondestructive measurements of multilayer submicron Cu/SiO2 interconnect structures such as Cu lines, vias, and W lines with lateral dimensions down to 300 nm and electromigration defect structures using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy employing a 0.2 μm x-ray beam. Typical measurement accuracies are ⩽60 nm for widths and lengths and ⩽10% in height. The high-resolution and nondestructive nature of this technique provide a very powerful probe of physical properties of nanoscale and submicron materials and structures.

  13. Multi-Scaled Microstructures in Natural Rubber Characterized by Synchrotron X-ray Scattering and Optical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Toki , S.; Hsiao, B; Amnuaypornsri , S; Sakdapipanich, J; Tanaka, Y

    2008-01-01

    Multi-scaled microstructures induced by natural impurities (i.e., proteins, phospholipids, carbohydrates) in natural rubber (NR) were investigated by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), and optical microscopy using several kinds of untreated and chemically treated un-vulcanized samples. These microstructures include large aggregates (size less than 50 m), well-defined crystals (size less than a few 10 m), and micelles (size much less than 10 m). In un-vulcanized NR samples, even though the concentrations of natural impurities are relatively low, the dispersion of these microstructures significantly affects the mechanical properties

  14. In situ alkali-silica reaction observed by x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtis, K.E.; Monteiro, P.J.M.; Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    In concrete, alkali metal ions and hydroxyl ions contributed by the cement and reactive silicates present in aggregate can participate in a destructive alkali-silica reaction (ASR). This reaction of the alkalis with the silicates produces a gel that tends to imbibe water found in the concrete pores, leading to swelling of the gel and eventual cracking of the affected concrete member. Over 104 cases of alkali-aggregate reaction in dams and spillways have been reported around the world. At present, no method exists to arrest the expansive chemical reaction which generates significant distress in the affected structures. Most existing techniques available for the examination of concrete microstructure, including ASR products, demand that samples be dried and exposed to high pressure during the observation period. These sample preparation requirements present a major disadvantage for the study of alkali-silica reaction. Given the nature of the reaction and the affect of water on its products, it is likely that the removal of water will affect the morphology, creating artifacts in the sample. The purpose of this research is to observe and characterize the alkali-silica reaction, including each of the specific reactions identified previously, in situ without introducing sample artifacts. For observation of unconditioned samples, x-ray microscopy offers an opportunity for such an examination of the alkali-silica reaction. Currently, this investigation is focusing on the effect of calcium ions on the alkali-silica reaction.

  15. Applications of Full-Field X-ray Microscopy for High Spatial Resolution Magnetic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denbeaux, Gregory; Chao, Weilun; Fischer, Peter; Kusinski, Greg; Le Gros, Mark; Pearson, Angelic; Schneider, Gerd

    2001-03-01

    The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope, located at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has recently been established as a tool for high-resolution imaging of magnetic domains. It is a "conventional" full-field transmission microscope which is able to achieve a resolution of 25 nm by using high-precision zone plates. It uses off-axis bend magnet radiation to illuminate samples with elliptically polarized light. When the illumination energy is tuned to absorption edges of specific elements, it can be used as an element-specific probe of magnetism on a 25 nm scale with a contrast provided by magnetic circular dichroism. The illumination energy can be tuned between 250-850 eV. This allows imaging of specific elements including chromium, iron and cobalt. The spectral resolution has been shown to be E/DE = 500-700. This spectral resolution allows a high sensitivity so that magnetization has been imaged within layers as thin as 3 nm. Since this is a photon based magnetic microscopy, fields can be applied to the sample even during imaging without affect ng the spatial resolution. Recent magnetic imaging results will be shown.

  16. Visualization of asymmetric wetting ridges on soft solids with X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Ji; Weon, Byung Mook; Lee, Ji San; Lee, Junho; Kim, Jinkyung; Je, Jung Ho

    2014-01-01

    One of the most questionable issues in wetting is the force balance that includes the vertical component of liquid surface tension. On soft solids, the vertical component leads to a microscopic protrusion of the contact line, that is, a ‘wetting ridge’. The wetting principle determining the tip geometry of the ridge is at the heart of the issues over the past half century. Here we reveal a universal wetting principle from the ridge tips directly visualized with high spatio-temporal resolution of X-ray microscopy. We find that the cusp of the ridge is bent with an asymmetric tip, whose geometry is invariant during ridge growth or by surface softness. This singular asymmetry is deduced by linking the macroscopic and microscopic contact angles to Young and Neuman laws, respectively. Our finding shows that this dual-scale approach would be contributable to a general framework in elastowetting, and give hints to issues in cell-substrate interaction and elasto-capillary problems. PMID:25007777

  17. Surface characterization of ginger powder examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Ao, Qiang; Du, Fangling; Zhu, Junqing; Liu, Jie

    2010-09-01

    The surface composition of five types of ginger powders with the particle sizes of 300, 149, 74, 37 and 8.34 microm was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and various types of physical-chemical characteristics regarding material particle size distributions, discoloration and chemical composition. The results show that the color differences are greater for superfine ground ginger than for conventional comminuted ones; the values of crude fibre, neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) decrease with decreasing ginger particle size. However, no relationship with the surface fat, crude protein, ash and total solids exists. With superfine grinding the XPS O/C ratios of the five ginger powders were similar since the surfaces were not oxidized. Correlations were observed between the XPS N/C ratios and the high resolution XPS N 1s spectra. SEM observations revealed that the surface of ginger powder with a particle size of 300 microm is rougher, while superfine ground powders with particle sizes of 149, 74, 37 and 8.34 microm are similar to each other. This roughness difference between these surfaces correlates with the differences in their O/C ratios and the surface morphology of five ginger powders. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 3D Analysis of Porosity in a Ceramic Coating Using X-ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, Uta; Ekberg, Johanna; Kelly, Stephen T.

    2017-02-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is a new, innovative plasma spray technique using a feedstock consisting of fine powder particles suspended in a liquid. Using SPS, ceramic coatings with columnar microstructures have been produced which are used as topcoats in thermal barrier coatings. The microstructure contains a wide pore size range consisting of inter-columnar spacings, micro-pores and nano-pores. Hence, determination of total porosity and pore size distribution is a challenge. Here, x-ray microscopy (XRM) has been applied for describing the complex pore space of the coatings because of its capability to image the (local) porosity within the coating in 3D at a resolution down to 50 nm. The possibility to quantitatively segment the analyzed volume allows analysis of both open and closed porosity. For an yttria-stabilized zirconia coating with feathery microstructure, both open and closed porosity were determined and it could be revealed that 11% of the pore volumes (1.4% of the total volume) are closed pores. The analyzed volume was reconstructed to illustrate the distribution of open and closed pores in 3D. Moreover, pore widths and pore volumes were determined. The results on the complex pore space obtained by XRM are discussed in connection with other porosimetry techniques.

  19. A four-dimensional X-ray tomographic microscopy study of bubble growth in basaltic foam.

    PubMed

    Baker, Don R; Brun, Francesco; O'Shaughnessy, Cedrick; Mancini, Lucia; Fife, Julie L; Rivers, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the influence of bubble foams on magma permeability and strength is critical to investigations of volcanic eruption mechanisms. Increasing foam porosity decreases strength, enhancing the probability of an eruption. However, higher porosities lead to larger permeabilities, which can lessen the eruption hazard. Here we measure bubble size and wall thickness distributions, as well as connectivity, and calculate permeabilities and tensile strengths of basaltic foams imaged by synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy during bubble growth in hydrated basaltic melts. Rapid vesiculation produces porous foams whose fragmentation thresholds are only 5-6 MPa and whose permeabilities increase from approximately 1×10(-10) to 1×10(-9) m(2) between 10 and 14 s despite decreasing connectivity between bubbles. These results indicate that basaltic magmas are most susceptible to failure immediately upon vesiculation and at later times, perhaps only 10's of seconds later, permeability increases may lessen the hazard of explosive, basaltic, Plinian eruptions.

  20. Detection of Genetically Altered Copper Levels in Drosophila Tissues by Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lye, Jessica C.; Hwang, Joab E. C.; Paterson, David; de Jonge, Martin D.; Howard, Daryl L.; Burke, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-specific manipulation of known copper transport genes in Drosophila tissues results in phenotypes that are presumably due to an alteration in copper levels in the targeted cells. However direct confirmation of this has to date been technically challenging. Measures of cellular copper content such as expression levels of copper-responsive genes or cuproenzyme activity levels, while useful, are indirect. First-generation copper-sensitive fluorophores show promise but currently lack the sensitivity required to detect subtle changes in copper levels. Moreover such techniques do not provide information regarding other relevant biometals such as zinc or iron. Traditional techniques for measuring elemental composition such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy are not sensitive enough for use with the small tissue amounts available in Drosophila research. Here we present synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microscopy analysis of two different Drosophila tissues, the larval wing imaginal disc, and sectioned adult fly heads and show that this technique can be used to detect changes in tissue copper levels caused by targeted manipulation of known copper homeostasis genes. PMID:22053217

  1. Quantitative comparison of preparation methodologies for X-ray fluorescence microscopy of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    James, Simon A; Myers, Damian E; de Jonge, Martin D; Vogt, Stefan; Ryan, Chris G; Sexton, Brett A; Hoobin, Pamela; Paterson, David; Howard, Daryl L; Mayo, Sheridan C; Altissimo, Matteo; Moorhead, Gareth F; Wilkins, Stephen W

    2011-08-01

    X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) facilitates high-sensitivity quantitative imaging of trace metals at high spatial resolution over large sample areas and can be applied to a diverse range of biological samples. Accurate determination of elemental content from recorded spectra requires proper calibration of the XFM instrument under the relevant operating conditions. Here, we describe the manufacture, characterization, and utilization of multi-element thin-film reference foils for use in calibration of XFM measurements of biological and other specimens. We have used these internal standards to assess the two-dimensional distribution of trace metals in a thin tissue section of a rat hippocampus. The data used in this study was acquired at the XFM beamline of the Australian Synchrotron using a new 384-element array detector (Maia) and at beamline 2-ID-E at the Advanced Photon Source. Post-processing of samples by different fixation techniques was investigated, with the conclusion that differences in solvent type and sample handling can significantly alter elemental content. The present study highlights the quantitative capability, high statistical power, and versatility of the XFM technique for mapping trace metals in biological samples, e.g., brain tissue samples in order to help understand neurological processes, especially when implemented in conjunction with a high-performance detector such as Maia.

  2. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals the role of selenium in spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kehr, Sebastian; Malinouski, Mikalai; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M; Kasaikina, Marina V; Carlson, Bradley A; Zhou, You; Hatfield, Dolph L; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2009-06-26

    Selenium (Se) is a trace element with important roles in human health. Several selenoproteins have essential functions in development. However, the cellular and tissue distribution of Se remains largely unknown because of the lack of analytical techniques that image this element with sufficient sensitivity and resolution. Herein, we report that X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) can be used to visualize and quantify the tissue, cellular, and subcellular topography of Se. We applied this technique to characterize the role of Se in spermatogenesis and identified a dramatic Se enrichment specifically in late spermatids, a pattern that was not seen in any other elemental maps. This enrichment was due to elevated levels of the mitochondrial form of glutathione peroxidase 4 and was fully dependent on the supplies of Se by selenoprotein P. High-resolution scans revealed that Se concentrated near the lumen side of elongating spermatids, where structural components of sperm are formed. During spermatogenesis, maximal Se associated with decreased phosphorus, whereas Zn did not change. In sperm, Se was primarily in the midpiece and colocalized with Cu and Fe. XFM allowed quantification of Se in the midpiece (0.8 fg) and head (0.2 fg) of individual sperm cells, revealing the ability of sperm cells to handle the amounts of this element well above its toxic levels. Overall, the use of XFM allowed visualization of tissue and cellular Se and provided important insights in the role of this and other trace elements in spermatogenesis.

  3. High resolution three dimensional microscopy of biological microstructures using zone plate lenses with x-ray laser illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.

    1990-12-12

    One of the goals of biomedical research is the development of imaging techniques capable of producing high resolution ({approximately}300{Angstrom}) three dimensional images of structures within live cells. Recent developments in zone plate lenses at LBL and in x-ray lasers at LLNL indicate that flash three dimensional x-ray microscopy of live biological objects can be achieved in the near term. This concept for a microscope utilizes an x-ray laser to backlit immunogold labeled biological objects. These backlit objects are then imaged with low f-number, high resolution zone plate lenses. Backlighting and imaging along several different directions allows a three dimensional image to be obtained using tomographic techniques.

  4. Contrast enhancement of biological nanoporous materials with zinc oxide infiltration for electron and X-ray nanoscale microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ocola, L E; Sampathkumar, V; Kasthuri, N; Winarski, R P

    2017-07-19

    We show that using infiltration of ZnO metal oxide can be useful for high resolution imaging of biological samples in electron and X-ray microscopy. The method is compatible with standard fixation techniques that leave the sample dry, such as finishing with super critical CO2 drying, or simple vacuum drying up to 95 °C. We demonstrate this technique can be applied on tooth and brain tissue samples. We also show that high resolution X-ray tomography can be performed on biological systems using Zn K edge (1s) absorption to enhance internal structures, and obtained the first nanoscale 10 KeV X-ray absorption images of the interior regions of a tooth.

  5. Contrast enhancement of biological nanoporous materials with zinc oxide infiltration for electron and X-ray nanoscale microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Ocola, L. E.; Sampathkumar, V.; Kasthuri, N.; ...

    2017-07-19

    Here, we show that using infiltration of ZnO metal oxide can be useful for high resolution imaging of biological samples in electron and X-ray microscopy. This method is compatible with standard fixation techniques that leave the sample dry, such as finishing with super critical CO2 drying, or simple vacuum drying at 95°C. We demonstrate this technique can be applied on tooth and brain tissue samples. We also show that high resolution X-ray tomography can be performed on biological systems using Zn K edge (1s) absorption to enhance internal structures, and obtained the first nanoscale 10 KeV X-ray absorption images ofmore » the interior regions of a tooth.« less

  6. Fast simulation of x-ray projections of spline-based surfaces using an append buffer.

    PubMed

    Maier, Andreas; Hofmann, Hannes G; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Keil, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-10-07

    Many scientists in the field of x-ray imaging rely on the simulation of x-ray images. As the phantom models become more and more realistic, their projection requires high computational effort. Since x-ray images are based on transmission, many standard graphics acceleration algorithms cannot be applied to this task. However, if adapted properly, the simulation speed can be increased dramatically using state-of-the-art graphics hardware. A custom graphics pipeline that simulates transmission projections for tomographic reconstruction was implemented based on moving spline surface models. All steps from tessellation of the splines, projection onto the detector and drawing are implemented in OpenCL. We introduced a special append buffer for increased performance in order to store the intersections with the scene for every ray. Intersections are then sorted and resolved to materials. Lastly, an absorption model is evaluated to yield an absorption value for each projection pixel. Projection of a moving spline structure is fast and accurate. Projections of size 640 × 480 can be generated within 254 ms. Reconstructions using the projections show errors below 1 HU with a sharp reconstruction kernel. Traditional GPU-based acceleration schemes are not suitable for our reconstruction task. Even in the absence of noise, they result in errors up to 9 HU on average, although projection images appear to be correct under visual examination. Projections generated with our new method are suitable for the validation of novel CT reconstruction algorithms. For complex simulations, such as the evaluation of motion-compensated reconstruction algorithms, this kind of x-ray simulation will reduce the computation time dramatically.

  7. Fast Simulation of X-ray Projections of Spline-based Surfaces using an Append Buffer

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Andreas; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Keil, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Many scientists in the field of x-ray imaging rely on the simulation of x-ray images. As the phantom models become more and more realistic, their projection requires high computational effort. Since x-ray images are based on transmission, many standard graphics acceleration algorithms cannot be applied to this task. However, if adapted properly, simulation speed can be increased dramatically using state-of-the-art graphics hardware. A custom graphics pipeline that simulates transmission projections for tomographic reconstruction was implemented based on moving spline surface models. All steps from tessellation of the splines, projection onto the detector, and drawing are implemented in OpenCL. We introduced a special append buffer for increased performance in order to store the intersections with the scene for every ray. Intersections are then sorted and resolved to materials. Lastly, an absorption model is evaluated to yield an absorption value for each projection pixel. Projection of a moving spline structure is fast and accurate. Projections of size 640×480 can be generated within 254 ms. Reconstructions using the projections show errors below 1 HU with a sharp reconstruction kernel. Traditional GPU-based acceleration schemes are not suitable for our reconstruction task. Even in the absence of noise, they result in errors up to 9 HU on average, although projection images appear to be correct under visual examination. Projections generated with our new method are suitable for the validation of novel CT reconstruction algorithms. For complex simulations, such as the evaluation of motion-compensated reconstruction algorithms, this kind of x-ray simulation will reduce the computation time dramatically. Source code is available at http://conrad.stanford.edu/ PMID:22975431

  8. Fast simulation of x-ray projections of spline-based surfaces using an append buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Andreas; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Keil, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-10-01

    Many scientists in the field of x-ray imaging rely on the simulation of x-ray images. As the phantom models become more and more realistic, their projection requires high computational effort. Since x-ray images are based on transmission, many standard graphics acceleration algorithms cannot be applied to this task. However, if adapted properly, the simulation speed can be increased dramatically using state-of-the-art graphics hardware. A custom graphics pipeline that simulates transmission projections for tomographic reconstruction was implemented based on moving spline surface models. All steps from tessellation of the splines, projection onto the detector and drawing are implemented in OpenCL. We introduced a special append buffer for increased performance in order to store the intersections with the scene for every ray. Intersections are then sorted and resolved to materials. Lastly, an absorption model is evaluated to yield an absorption value for each projection pixel. Projection of a moving spline structure is fast and accurate. Projections of size 640 × 480 can be generated within 254 ms. Reconstructions using the projections show errors below 1 HU with a sharp reconstruction kernel. Traditional GPU-based acceleration schemes are not suitable for our reconstruction task. Even in the absence of noise, they result in errors up to 9 HU on average, although projection images appear to be correct under visual examination. Projections generated with our new method are suitable for the validation of novel CT reconstruction algorithms. For complex simulations, such as the evaluation of motion-compensated reconstruction algorithms, this kind of x-ray simulation will reduce the computation time dramatically.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electron microprobe analysis of calcific deposits on intrauterine contraceptive devices

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S.R.; Wilkinson, E.J.

    1985-07-01

    Deposits found on intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) were studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. All seven devices, including five plastic and two copper IUDs, were coated with a crust containing cellular, acellular, and fibrillar material. The cellular material was composed of erythrocytes, leukocytes, cells of epithelial origin, sperm, and bacteria. Some of the bacteria were filamentous, with acute-angle branching. The fibrillar material appeared to be fibrin. Most of the acellular material was amorphous; calcite was identified by x-ray diffraction, and x-ray microanalysis showed only calcium. Some of the acellular material, particularly that on the IUD side of the crust, was organized in spherulitic crystals and was identified as calcium phosphate by x-ray microanalysis. The crust was joined to the IUD surface by a layer of fibrillar and amorphous material. It is suggested that the initial event in the formation of calcific deposits on IUD surfaces is the deposition of an amorphous and fibrillar layer. Various types of cells present in the endometrial environment adhere to this layer and then calcify. Thus, the deposition of calcific material on the IUDs is a calcification phenomenon, not unlike the formation of plaque on teeth.

  10. Feasibility study of high-resolution coherent diffraction microscopy using synchrotron x rays focused by Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Mimura, Hidekazu; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Kubo, Hideto; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2009-04-15

    High-flux coherent x rays are necessary for the improvement of the spatial resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM). In this study, high-resolution CXDM using Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors is proposed, and the mirrors are designed for experiments of the transmission scheme at SPring-8. Both the photon density and spatial coherence of synchrotron x rays focused by the KB mirrors are investigated by wave optical simulation. The KB mirrors can produce nearly diffraction-limited two-dimensional focusing x rays of approx1 mum in size at 8 keV. When the sample size is less than approx1 mum, the sample can be illuminated with full coherent x rays by adjusting the cross-slit size set between the source and the mirrors. From the estimated photon density at the sample position, the feasibility of CXDM with a sub-1-nm spatial resolution is suggested. The present ultraprecise figuring process enables us to fabricate mirrors for carrying out high-resolution CXDM experiments.

  11. Fast-scanning high-flux microprobe for biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy and microXAS

    SciTech Connect

    Barrea, R.A.; Gore, D.; Kujala, N.; Karanfil, C.; Kozyrenko, S.; Heurich, R.; Vukonich, M.; Huang, R.; Paunesku, T.; Woloschak, G.; Irving, T.C.

    2010-07-23

    There is a growing interest in the biomedical community in obtaining information concerning the distribution and local chemical environment of metals in tissues and cells. Recently, biological X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has emerged as the tool of choice to address these questions. A fast-scanning high-flux X-ray microprobe, built around a recently commissioned pair of 200 mm-long Rh-coated silicon Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors, has been constructed at BioCAT beamline 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source. The new optical system delivers a flux of 1.3 x 10{sup 12} photons s{sup -1} into a minimum focal spot size of {approx}3-5 {micro}m FWHM. A set of Si drift detectors and bent Laue crystal analyzers may be used in combination with standard ionization chambers for X-ray fluorescence measurements. BioCAT's scanning software allows fast continuous scans to be performed while acquiring and storing full multichannel analyzer spectra per pixel on-the-fly with minimal overhead time (<20 ms per pixel). Together, the high-flux X-ray microbeam and the rapid-scanning capabilities of the BioCAT beamline allow the collection of XFM and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (microXAS) measurements from as many as 48 tissue sections per day. This paper reports the commissioning results of the new instrument with representative XFM and microXAS results from tissue samples.

  12. Ultrastructural imaging and molecular modeling of live bacteria using soft x-ray contact microscopy with nanoseconds laser-plasma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Richardson, Martin C.; Gaebel, Kai; Torres, David S.; Rajyaguru, Jayshree; Muszynski, Michael J.

    1995-09-01

    X-ray images of the various live bacteria, such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, and micromolecule such as chromosomal DNA from Escherichis coli, and Lipopolysacchride from Burkholderia cepacia, are obtained with soft x-ray contact microscopy. A compact tabletop type glass laser system is used to produce x-rays from Al, Si, and Au targets. The PMMA photoresists are used to record x-ray images. An AFM (atomic force microscope) is used to reproduce the x-ray images from the developed photoresists. The performance of the 50nm spatial resolutions are achieved and images are able to be discussed on the biological view.

  13. The Role of Project Science in the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2006-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory, one of NASA's Great Observatories, has an outstanding record of scientific and technical success. This success results from the efforts of a team comprising NASA, its contractors, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the instrument groups, and other elements of the scientific community, including thousands of scientists who utilize this powerful facility for astrophysical research. We discuss the role of NASA Project Science in the formulation, development, calibration, and operation of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In addition to representing the scientific community within the Project, Project Science performed what we term "science systems engineering". This activity encompasses translation of science requirements into technical requirements and assessment of the scientific impact of programmatic and technical trades. We briefly describe several examples of science systems engineering conducted by Chandra Project Science.

  14. The role of project science in the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2006-06-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory, one of NASA's Great Observatories, has an outstanding record of scientific and technical success. This success results from the efforts of a team comprising NASA, its contractors, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the instrument groups, and other elements of the scientific community-including the thousands of scientists who utilize this powerful facility for astrophysical research. We discuss the role of NASA Project Science in the formulation, development, calibration, and operation of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In addition to serving as an interface between the scientific community and the Project, Project Science performed what we term "science systems engineering". This activity encompasses translation of science requirements into technical requirements and assessment of the scientific impact of programmatic and technical trades. We briefly describe several examples of science systems engineering conducted by Chandra Project Science.

  15. Techniques for deriving tissue structure from multiple projection dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Jr., Harry K. (Inventor); Beck, Thomas J. (Inventor); Feldmesser, Howard S. (Inventor); Magee, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Techniques for deriving bone properties from images generated by a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry apparatus include receiving first image data having pixels indicating bone mineral density projected at a first angle of a plurality of projection angles. Second image data and third image data are also received. The second image data indicates bone mineral density projected at a different second angle. The third image data indicates bone mineral density projected at a third angle. The third angle is different from the first angle and the second angle. Principal moments of inertia for a bone in the subject are computed based on the first image data, the second image data and the third image data. The techniques allow high-precision, high-resolution dual-energy x-ray attenuation images to be used for computing principal moments of inertia and strength moduli of individual bones, plus risk of injury and changes in risk of injury to a patient.

  16. The Role of Project Science in the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2006-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory, one of NASA's Great Observatories, has an outstanding record of scientific and technical success. This success results from the efforts of a team comprising NASA, its contractors, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the instrument groups, and other elements of the scientific community, including thousands of scientists who utilize this powerful facility for astrophysical research. We discuss the role of NASA Project Science in the formulation, development, calibration, and operation of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In addition to representing the scientific community within the Project, Project Science performed what we term "science systems engineering". This activity encompasses translation of science requirements into technical requirements and assessment of the scientific impact of programmatic and technical trades. We briefly describe several examples of science systems engineering conducted by Chandra Project Science.

  17. X-ray microscopy as an approach to increasing accuracy and efficiency of serial block-face imaging for correlated light and electron microscopy of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Bushong, Eric A; Johnson, Donald D; Kim, Keun-Young; Terada, Masako; Hatori, Megumi; Peltier, Steven T; Panda, Satchidananda; Merkle, Arno; Ellisman, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    The recently developed three-dimensional electron microscopic (EM) method of serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) has rapidly established itself as a powerful imaging approach. Volume EM imaging with this scanning electron microscopy (SEM) method requires intense staining of biological specimens with heavy metals to allow sufficient back-scatter electron signal and also to render specimens sufficiently conductive to control charging artifacts. These more extreme heavy metal staining protocols render specimens light opaque and make it much more difficult to track and identify regions of interest (ROIs) for the SBEM imaging process than for a typical thin section transmission electron microscopy correlative light and electron microscopy study. We present a strategy employing X-ray microscopy (XRM) both for tracking ROIs and for increasing the efficiency of the workflow used for typical projects undertaken with SBEM. XRM was found to reveal an impressive level of detail in tissue heavily stained for SBEM imaging, allowing for the identification of tissue landmarks that can be subsequently used to guide data collection in the SEM. Furthermore, specific labeling of individual cells using diaminobenzidine is detectable in XRM volumes. We demonstrate that tungsten carbide particles or upconverting nanophosphor particles can be used as fiducial markers to further increase the precision and efficiency of SBEM imaging.

  18. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C.; Vis, R.D.; Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W.; Bowen, D.K.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  19. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C. ); Vis, R.D. ); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. ); Jones, K.W. ); Bowen, D.K. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  20. Versatile atomic force microscopy setup combined with micro-focused X-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Slobodskyy, T. Tholapi, R.; Liefeith, L.; Hansen, W.; Zozulya, A. V. Fester, M.; Sprung, M.

    2015-06-15

    Micro-focused X-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron sources offer new perspective of studying strains and processes at nanoscale. Atomic force microscope setup combined with a micro-focused synchrotron beam allows precise positioning and nanomanipulation of nanostructures under illumination. In this paper, we report on integration of a portable commercial atomic force microscope setup into a hard X-ray synchrotron beamline. Details of design, sample alignment procedure, and performance of the setup are presented.

  1. Versatile atomic force microscopy setup combined with micro-focused X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodskyy, T.; Zozulya, A. V.; Tholapi, R.; Liefeith, L.; Fester, M.; Sprung, M.; Hansen, W.

    2015-06-01

    Micro-focused X-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron sources offer new perspective of studying strains and processes at nanoscale. Atomic force microscope setup combined with a micro-focused synchrotron beam allows precise positioning and nanomanipulation of nanostructures under illumination. In this paper, we report on integration of a portable commercial atomic force microscope setup into a hard X-ray synchrotron beamline. Details of design, sample alignment procedure, and performance of the setup are presented.

  2. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies of frozen erythrocyte membrane preparations.

    PubMed

    Rzepecki, L M; Berriman, J; Finean, J B

    1980-07-16

    Well-defined X-ray diffraction patterns have been recorded from erythrocyte membranes in the frozen state. At -40 degrees C, lamellar periodicities range from 19 to 95 nm depending on the glycerol content (0--40%, respectively). Freeze-fracture electon micrographs of samples frozen in two stages to approximate to the diffraction conditions show ice formation external to membrane stacks. The membrane stacks have periodicities of the same order of magnitude as those obtained by X-ray diffraction.

  3. WHOLE CELL TOMOGRAPHY/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY/STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: Affordable x-ray microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Blackborow, Paul; Horne, Stephen J.; Gelb, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Biological research spans 10 orders of magnitude from angstroms to meters. While electron microscopy can reveal structural details at most of these spatial length scales, transmission electron tomography only reliably reconstructs three-dimensional (3-D) volumes of cellular material with a spatial resolution between 1-5 nm from samples less than 500 nm thick1. Most biological cells are 2-30 times thicker than this threshold, which means that a cell must be cut into consecutive slices with each slice reconstructed individually in order to approximate the contextual information of the entire cell. Fortunately, due to a larger penetration depth2, X-ray computed tomography bypasses the need to physically section a cell and enables imaging of intact cells and tissues on the micrometer or larger scale with tens to hundreds of nanometer spatial resolution. While the technique of soft x-ray microscopy has been extensively developed in synchrotron facilities, advancements in laboratory x-ray source designs now increase its accessibility by supporting commercial systems suitable for a standard laboratory. In this paper, we highlight a new commercial compact cryogenic soft x-ray microscope designed for a standard laboratory setting and explore its capabilities for mesoscopic investigations of intact prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  4. Reverse projection retrieval in edge illumination x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) can provide three-dimensional distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (n=1-δ +\\text{i}β ) of the sample. Phase retrieval, i.e. the separation of attenuation and refraction data from projections that contain a combination of both, is a key step in the image reconstruction process. In EI-based x-ray phase contrast CT, this is conventionally performed on the basis of two projections acquired in opposite illumination configurations (i.e. with different positions of the pre-sample mask) at each CT angle. Displacing the pre-sample mask at each projection makes the scan susceptible to motor-induced misalignment and prevents a continuous sample rotation. We present an alternative method for the retrieval of attenuation and refraction data that does not require repositioning the pre-sample mask. The method is based on the reverse projection relation published by Zhu et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 13576-81) for grating interferometry-based x-ray phase contrast CT. We use this relation to derive a simplified acquisition strategy that allows acquiring data with a continuous sample rotation, which can reduce scan time when combined with a fast read-out detector. Besides discussing the theory and the necessary alignment of the experimental setup, we present tomograms obtained with reverse projection retrieval and demonstrate their agreement with those obtained with the conventional EI retrieval.

  5. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

    2012-03-08

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

  6. Nephila clavipes spider dragline silk microstructure studied by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Marie-Eve; Hernández Cruz, Daniel; West, M Marcia; Hitchcock, Adam P; Pézolet, Michel

    2007-04-04

    Nephila clavipes dragline silk microstructure has been investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), a technique that allows quantitative mapping of the level of orientation of the peptide groups at high spatial resolution (<50 nm). Maps of the orientation parameter P2 have been derived for spider silk for the first time. Dragline silk presents a very fine microstructure in which small, highly oriented domains (average area of 1800 nm2, thus clearly bigger than individual beta-sheet crystallites) are dispersed in a dominant, moderately oriented matrix with several small unoriented domains. Our results also highlight the orientation of the noncrystalline fraction in silk, which has been underestimated in numerous structural models. No evidence of either a regular lamellar structure or any periodicity along the fiber was observed at this spatial resolution. The surface of fresh spider silk sections consists of a approximately 30-120 nm thick layer of highly oriented protein chains, which was found to vary with the reeling speed, where web building (0.5 cm/s) and lifeline (10 cm/s) spinning speeds were investigated. While the average level of orientation of the protein chains is unaffected by the spinning speed, STXM measurements clearly highlight microstructure differences. The slowpull fiber contains a larger fraction of highly oriented domains, while the protein chains are more homogeneously oriented in the fastpull fiber. In comparison, cocoon silk from the silkworm Bombyx mori presents a narrower orientation distribution. The strength-extensibility combination found in spider dragline silk is associated with its broad orientation distribution of highly interdigitated and unoriented domains.

  7. Imaging Spin Dynamics on the Nanoscale using X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Hermann; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Richter, Kornel; Krüger, Benjamin; Reeve, Robert; Hänze, Max; Adolff, Christian; Stein, Falk-Ulrich; Meier, Guido; Kläui, Mathias; Schütz, Gisela

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of emergent magnetic quasiparticles, such as vortices, domain walls, and bubbles are studied by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM), combining magnetic (XMCD) contrast with about 25 nm lateral resolution as well as 70 ps time resolution. Essential progress in the understanding of magnetic vortex dynamics is achieved by vortex core reversal observed by sub-GHz excitation of the vortex gyromode, either by ac magnetic fields or spin transfer torque. The basic switching scheme for this vortex core reversal is the generation of a vortex-antivortex pair. Much faster vortex core reversal is obtained by exciting azimuthal spin wave modes with (multi-GHz) rotating magnetic fields or orthogonal monopolar field pulses in x and y direction, down to 45 ps in duration. In that way unidirectional vortex core reversal to the vortex core 'down' or 'up' state only can be achieved with switching times well below 100 ps. Coupled modes of interacting vortices mimic crystal properties. The individual vortex oscillators determine the properties of the ensemble, where the gyrotropic mode represents the fundamental excitation. By self-organized state formation we investigate distinct vortex core polarization configurations and understand these eigenmodes in an extended Thiele model. Analogies with photonic crystals are drawn. Oersted fields and spin-polarized currents are used to excite the dynamics of domain walls and magnetic bubbles. From the measured phase and amplitude of the displacement of domain walls we deduce the size of the non-adiabatic spin-transfer torque. For sensing applications, the displacement of domain walls is studied and a direct correlation between domain wall velocity and spin structure is found. Finally the synchronous displacement of multiple domain walls using perpendicular field pulses is demonstrated as a possible paradigm shift for magnetic memory and logic applications.

  8. A Comparison of Image Quality Evaluation Techniques for Transmission X-Ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bolgert, Peter J; /Marquette U. /SLAC

    2012-08-31

    Beamline 6-2c at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is capable of Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) at 30 nm resolution. Raw images from the microscope must undergo extensive image processing before publication. Since typical data sets normally contain thousands of images, it is necessary to automate the image processing workflow as much as possible, particularly for the aligning and averaging of similar images. Currently we align images using the 'phase correlation' algorithm, which calculates the relative offset of two images by multiplying them in the frequency domain. For images containing high frequency noise, this algorithm will align noise with noise, resulting in a blurry average. To remedy this we multiply the images by a Gaussian function in the frequency domain, so that the algorithm ignores the high frequency noise while properly aligning the features of interest (FOI). The shape of the Gaussian is manually tuned by the user until the resulting average image is sharpest. To automatically optimize this process, it is necessary for the computer to evaluate the quality of the average image by quantifying its sharpness. In our research we explored two image sharpness metrics, the variance method and the frequency threshold method. The variance method uses the variance of the image as an indicator of sharpness while the frequency threshold method sums up the power in a specific frequency band. These metrics were tested on a variety of test images, containing both real and artificial noise. To apply these sharpness metrics, we designed and built a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) called 'Blur Master.' We found that it is possible for blurry images to have a large variance if they contain high amounts of noise. On the other hand, we found the frequency method to be quite reliable, although it is necessary to manually choose suitable limits for the frequency band. Further research must be performed to design an algorithm which

  9. Nanopaleomagnetism of meteoritic Fe-Ni studied using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, James F. J.; Herrero-Albillos, Julia; Kronast, Florian; Ghidini, Massimo; Redfern, Simon A. T.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Harrison, Richard J.

    2014-06-01

    X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) enables natural remanent magnetisation to be imaged with ˜30 nm resolution across a field of view of 5-20 μm. The method is applied to structural features typical of the Widmanstätten microstructure (kamacite - tetrataenite rim - cloudy zone - plessite) in the Tazewell IIICD iron meteorite. Kamacite lamellae and the tetrataenite rim are multidomain, whereas plessite consists of laths of different phases displaying a range of stable magnetisation directions. The cloudy zone (CZ) displays a complex interlocking domain pattern resulting from nanoscale islands of tetrataenite with easy axes distributed along three possible crystallographic directions. Quantitative analysis of the coarse and intermediate CZ was achieved using a combination of image simulations and histogram profile matching. Remanence information was extracted from individual regions of interest ˜400 nm wide, demonstrating for the first time the capability of XPEEM to perform quantitative paleomagnetic analysis at sub-micron length scales. The three tetrataenite easy axis orientations occur with equal probability in the coarse and intermediate CZ, suggesting that spinodal decomposition in these regions was not strongly influenced by internal interaction fields, and that they are suitable candidates for future paleomagnetic studies. The fine CZ shows a strong dominance of one easy axis. This effect is attributed to island-island exchange interactions that render the fine CZ unsuitable for paleomagnetic study. Variations in the relative strength (proportion of dominant easy axis) and direction (direction of dominant easy axis) of a paleomagnetic field can be resolved from different regions of the CZ using XPEEM, raising the prospect of obtaining a time-resolved measurement of the active dynamo period in meteorites originating from the upper unmelted regions of differentiated asteroids (e.g. chondrites, pallasites, mesosiderites).

  10. Investigation of foreign substances in food using scanning electron microscopy-x-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, J E

    1998-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray microanalysis (EDS) were used to conduct forensic investigations on metal and glass foreign objects. SEM-EDS is an excellent method for identifying metal foreign objects in food, such as wire, dental fillings, bone, and metal packaging, based on their element composition. From a determination of the extent of corrosion of a metal foreign object using SEM-EDS, it is sometimes possible to determine whether the material has been processed with the food product. Case histories of processed aluminum, unprocessed nickel-coated steel, and corrosion resistant stainless steel foreign objects are discussed. A potential product-tampering problem involving a hole defect in a paperboard package was resolved using SEM-EDS. Blue fibers found in the hole were found to contain brass particles from a ball point pen rather than a syringe needle. SEM-EDS has been used to determine the elemental composition of glass foreign objects and is able to distinguish between many types of glass including container, electrical, and bakeware. A case history is presented to show that although container glasses cannot, in general, be distinguished from one another using SEM-EDS, they can be distinguished by trace element semiquantitative spectrograghic analysis. SEM-EDS can be used to distinguish glass-like foreign objects from glass. Case histories of struvite crystals found in salmon and cream of tartar crystals found in grape juice are discussed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) identified the cream of tartar crystal as calcium tartrate, and this complemented the calcium, carbon, and oxygen components of the compound found using SEM-EDS.

  11. A hybrid x-ray and microscopy method for diametrical profile measurement of internal holes in steel components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Malcolm, A. A.; Yin, X. M.; Liew, S. J.; Prawiradiraja, T. P.

    2008-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray is now an essential tool for internal defect and structure inspection in electronics and advanced materials industry. However, it is always a challenge to use it for accurate dimensional measurement due to the nature of the fan-beam X-ray source, particularly for cylindrical objects. This paper presents a novel hybrid X-ray and microscopy method for the profile measurement of the internal hole of a cylinder-shaped steel component. The part to be measured has a beer bottle shape but is open at the bottom side. The objective is to measure the diametrical profile of the internal hole with an accuracy of about 10μm. Traditionally this is measured with using a microscope after cutting and polishing the specimen. This is not only a tedious work, but is also inaccurate due to the uncertainty in cutting and polishing. This report demonstrates that the two edge-profiles of the internal hole can be obtained with X-ray inspection by sequentially placing each of them at the central of the X-ray beam so that the fan-beam effect can be minimized. The resolution of the X-ray inspection is about 6µm under a 20x magnification. Subsequently, the diameter of the hole is measured at two positions through the open end using a microscope with a 20x and a 10x objectives respectively. The results obtained with the two methods are then combined to generate the whole diametrical profile of the internal hole.

  12. Image restoration applied to x-ray microscopy: application to images with low signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Chassery, Jean-Marc; Robert-Nicoud, Michel

    1995-02-01

    X-ray microscopy makes it possible to obtain images at a higher spatial resolution (about 20 nm) as compared to optical microscopy. Moreover, x-ray microscopy permits direct acquisition from the specimen in 2D or 3D mode, without any preparation step (staining, fixation, ...), which is not possible in electron microscopy. Here we present deblurring methods to restore images after the acquisition process. An additive Poisson noise is generated by the use of x rays and also contributes to image degradation. Our purpose is to analyze such noise and to restore images. Due to the optical properties of the Fresnel zone plate, we presently associate it to an optical circular lens as is done for the optical microscope. Here we use the Richardson Lucy algorithm to deconvolute. A first step is to observe results of restoration obtained on an image grating (a star pattern) with inner zones of dimensions near the resolution. The next step involves the suppression of noise effects arising from the deconvolution process. The characteristics of the noise after deconvolution are evaluated by Fourier analysis. These effects are eliminated by a filtering process in the Fourier spectrum. This filtering is applied on images with different signal to noise ratio (obtained after different time exposures), in order to compare results obtained on noisy images with long time exposure images.

  13. Barriers to Quantitative Electron Probe X-Ray Microanalysis for Low Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E

    2002-01-01

    Low voltage x-ray microanalysis, defined as being performed with an incident beam energy ≤5 keV, can achieve spatial resolution, laterally and in depth, of 100 nm or less, depending on the exact selection of beam energy and the composition of the target. The shallow depth of beam penetration, with the consequent short path length for x-ray absorption, and the low overvoltage, the ratio of beam energy to the critical ionization energy, both contribute to minimizing the matrix effects in quantitative x-ray microanalysis when the unknown is compared to pure element standards. The low beam energy restricts the energy of the atomic shells that can be excited, forcing the analyst to choose unfamiliar shells/characteristic peaks. The low photon energy shells are subject to low fluorescence yield, so that the peak-to-continuum background is reduced, severely limiting detectability. The limited resolution of semiconductor energy dispersive spectrometry results in frequent peak interference situations and further exacerbates detection limits. Future improvements to the x-ray spectrometry limitations are possible with x-ray optics-augmented wavelength dispersive spectrometry and microcalorimeter energy dispersive spectrometry.

  14. Compact high-resolution differential interference contrast soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertilson, Michael C.; Hofsten, Olov von; Lindblom, Magnus; Hertz, Hans M.; Vogt, Ulrich

    2008-02-11

    We demonstrate high-resolution x-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) in a compact soft x-ray microscope. Phase contrast imaging is enabled by the use of a diffractive optical element objective which is matched to the coherence conditions in the microscope setup. The performance of the diffractive optical element objective is evaluated in comparison with a normal zone plate by imaging of a nickel siemens star pattern and linear grating test objects. Images obtained with the DIC optic exhibit typical DIC enhancement in addition to the normal absorption contrast. Contrast transfer functions based on modulation measurements in the obtained images show that the DIC optic gives a significant increase in contrast without reducing the spatial resolution. The phase contrast operation mode now available for our compact soft x-ray microscope will be a useful tool for future studies of samples with low absorption contrast.

  15. Tuning laser plasma x-ray source for single shot microscopy using nano-porous targets.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Reza

    2016-11-15

    Detailed calculations show that we can control and enhance x-ray line emission in the so-called water-window wavelength region using laser irradiated nano-porous or foam-like targets. The effects of target porosity on the non-LTE plasma ionization are studied to obtain optimum conditions for maximum narrowband line emission. Results show that for specified irradiation conditions, the population of emitting ions can be significantly improved using a target with optimum initial mass density. In such conditions, an efficient line x ray can be emitted from the created plasma making it a suitable flash point source for high-contrast x-ray imaging of living samples.

  16. Zernike-type phase contrast X-ray microscopy at 4 keV photon energy with 60 nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäusler, Ulrich; Schneider, Gerd

    2004-05-01

    X-ray microscopy in the multi-keV photon energy range offers unique possibilities to study thick dense samples with high spatial resolution. When employing a high numerical aperture (N.A.) condenser zone plate sample illumination in combination with a high resolution micro zone plate objective lens, a spatial resolution of currently 60 nm is achieved. Since the absorption becomes smaller with increasing photon energy, phase contrast imaging overcomes the limitation for imaging weakly absorbing structures in amplitude contrast mode. We report here on X-ray microscopy of advanced microelectronic devices imaged in Zernike phase contrast mode. While the amplitude contrast between copper and silicon dioxide in these samples is only 7 %, negative as well as positive phase contrast were demonstrated with a contrast of 40 % and 45 %, respectively.

  17. X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy with Two-Dimensional Knife-Edge Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeho; Park, Yong-Sung

    2012-04-01

    A novel scheme of X-ray differential phase imaging was implemented with an array source and a two-dimensional Foucault knife-edge (2DFK). A pinhole array lens was employed to manipulate the X-ray beam on the Fourier space. An emerging biaxial scanning procedure was also demonstrated with the periodic 2DFK. The differential phase images (DPIs) of the midrib in a leaf of a rose bush were visualized to verify the phase imaging of biological specimens by the proposed method. It also has features of depicting multiple-stack phase images, and rendering morphological DPIs, because it acquires pure phase information.

  18. Development of achromatic full-field hard x-ray microscopy with two monolithic imaging mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, S.; Kino, H.; Yasuda, S.; Kohmura, Y.; Okada, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics using two monolithic imaging mirrors was developed to realize an achromatic, high-resolution, and a high-stability full-field X-ray microscope. The mirror consists of an elliptical section and a hyperbolic section on a quartz glass substrate, in which the geometry follows the Wolter (type I) optics rules. A preliminary test was performed at SPring-8 using X-rays monochromatized to 9.881 keV. A 100-nm feature on a Siemens star chart could be clearly observed.

  19. X-ray diffraction imaging of defects in topography (microscopy) studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, E. V.; Smirnova, I. A.

    2015-09-01

    This review discusses how the X-ray diffraction images of crystal lattice defects form and acquire structure when using X-ray topography methods. Approaches for describing (ray optics and wave optics) and application fields of the geometrical and diffraction optics of a real crystal are analyzed. Specific experimental images of dislocations and other defects are used as examples to demonstrate the role of various diffraction effects (wave reflection from lattice distortions, diffraction focusing, channeling) in determining the character of the image formed. The potential for obtaining quantitative information on defect parameters is discussed.

  20. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetically targeted 3D visualisation of Drosophila neurons under Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Microscopy using miniSOG

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Julian; Browning, Alyssa; Lechner, Lorenz; Terada, Masako; Howard, Gillian; Jefferis, Gregory S. X. E.

    2016-01-01

    Large dimension, high-resolution imaging is important for neural circuit visualisation as neurons have both long- and short-range patterns: from axons and dendrites to the numerous synapses at terminal endings. Electron Microscopy (EM) is the favoured approach for synaptic resolution imaging but how such structures can be segmented from high-density images within large volume datasets remains challenging. Fluorescent probes are widely used to localise synapses, identify cell-types and in tracing studies. The equivalent EM approach would benefit visualising such labelled structures from within sub-cellular, cellular, tissue and neuroanatomical contexts. Here we developed genetically-encoded, electron-dense markers using miniSOG. We demonstrate their ability in 1) labelling cellular sub-compartments of genetically-targeted neurons, 2) generating contrast under different EM modalities, and 3) segmenting labelled structures from EM volumes using computer-assisted strategies. We also tested non-destructive X-ray imaging on whole Drosophila brains to evaluate contrast staining. This enabled us to target specific regions for EM volume acquisition. PMID:27958322

  2. The use of high energy laser-plasma sources in soft X-ray contact microscopy of living biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Botto, C.; Moret, M.; Milani, M.; Lucchini, G.; Eidmann, K.; Cotelli, F.; Lora Lamia Donin, C.; Poletti, G.; Ford, T.; Stead, A.

    2002-11-01

    In this paper the results of an experiment on soft X-ray contact microscopy using a laser-plasma source are presented. A resolution of 50 nm has been achieved imaging pig sperm cells, while other specimens, such as algae and yeast cells, showed internal details, proving the technique to be a powerful tool for biological investigations. Original biological information has been obtained and the conditions for optimal image formation have been studied.

  3. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy study of the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jääskeläinen, Pentti; Engelhardt, Peter; Hynönen, Ulla; Torkkeli, Mika; Palva, Airi; Serimaa, Ritva

    2010-10-01

    The structure of self-assembly domain containing recombinant truncation mutants of Lactobacillus brevis surface layer protein SlpA in aqueous solution was studied using small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The proteins were found out to interact with each other forming stable globular oligomers of about 10 monomers. The maximum diameter of the oligomers varied between 75 Å and 435 Å.

  4. Three-dimensional imaging of chemical phase transformations at the nanoscale with full-field transmission X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Meirer, Florian; Cabana, Jordi; Liu, Yijin; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C.; Pianetta, Piero

    2011-01-01

    The ability to probe morphology and phase distribution in complex systems at multiple length scales unravels the interplay of nano- and micrometer-scale factors at the origin of macroscopic behavior. While different electron- and X-ray-based imaging techniques can be combined with spectroscopy at high resolutions, owing to experimental time limitations the resulting fields of view are too small to be representative of a composite sample. Here a new X-ray imaging set-up is proposed, combining full-field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) with X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy to follow two-dimensional and three-dimensional morphological and chemical changes in large volumes at high resolution (tens of nanometers). TXM XANES imaging offers chemical speciation at the nanoscale in thick samples (>20 µm) with minimal preparation requirements. Further, its high throughput allows the analysis of large areas (up to millimeters) in minutes to a few hours. Proof of concept is provided using battery electrodes, although its versatility will lead to impact in a number of diverse research fields. PMID:21862859

  5. Time-resolved soft X-ray microscopy of magnetic nanostructures at the P04 beamline at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, P.; Ewald, J.; Wieland, M.; Nisius, T.; Abbati, G.; Baumbach, S.; Overbuschmann, J.; Vogel, A.; Neumann, A.; Viefhaus, J.; Oepen, H. P.; Meier, G.; Wilhein, T.; Drescher, M.

    2014-04-01

    We present first time-resolved measurements of a new mobile full-field transmission microscope [1] obtained at the soft X-ray beamline P04 at the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source PETRA III. A nanostructured magnetic permalloy (Ni80Fe20) sample can be excited by the magnetic field of a 400 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) long electric current pulse in a coplanar waveguide. The full-field soft X-ray microscope successively probes the time evolution of the sample magnetization via X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) [2] spectromicroscopy in a pump-probe scheme by varying the delay between pump and probe pulses electronically. Static and transient magnetic fields of a permanent magnet and a coil are available in the sample plane to reset the system and to provide external offset fields. The microscope generates a flat-top illumination field of 20 μm diameter by using a grating condenser [3] and the sample plane is directly imaged by a micro zone plate with 60 nm resolution onto a 2D gateable X-ray detector to select the particular bunch in the storage ring that contains the dynamic information. The setup is built into a mobile endstation vacuum system with in-house developed three-axis piezo motorized stages for high accuracy positioning of all microscopy-components inside the chambers.

  6. Laboratory-Based Cryogenic Soft X-ray Tomography with Correlative Cryo-Light and Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David B.; Gelb, Jeff; Palshin, Vadim; Evans, James E.

    2013-02-01

    Here we present a novel laboratory-based cryogenic soft X-ray microscope for whole cell tomography of frozen hydrated samples. We demonstrate the capabilities of this compact cryogenic microscope by visualizing internal sub-cellular structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The microscope is shown to achieve better than 50 nm spatial resolution with a Siemens star test sample. For whole biological cells, the microscope can image specimens up to 5 micrometers thick. Structures as small as 90 nm can be detected in tomographic reconstructions at roughly 70 nm spatial resolution following a low cumulative radiation dose of only 7.2 MGy. Furthermore, the design of the specimen chamber utilizes a standard sample support that permits multimodal correlative imaging of the exact same unstained yeast cell via cryo-fluorescence light microscopy, cryo-soft x-ray microscopy and cryo-transmission electron microscopy. This completely laboratory-based cryogenic soft x-ray microscope will therefore enable greater access to three-dimensional ultrastructure determination of biological whole cells without chemical fixation or physical sectioning.

  7. Taking X-ray Diffraction to the Limit: Macromolecular Structures from Femtosecond X-ray Pulses and Diffraction Microscopy of Cells with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Miao, J; Kirz, J; Sayre, D; Hodgson, K O

    2003-10-01

    The methodology of X-ray crystallography has recently been successfully extended to the structure determination of non-crystalline specimens. The phase problem was solved by using the oversampling method, which takes advantage of ''continuous'' diffraction pattern from non-crystalline specimens. Here we review the principle of this newly developed technique and discuss the ongoing experiments of imaging non-periodic objects, like cells and cellular structures using coherent and bright X-rays from the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation. In the longer run, the technique may be applied to image single biomolecules by using the anticipated X-ray free electron lasers. Computer simulations have so far demonstrated two important steps: (1) by using an extremely intense femtosecond X-ray pulse, a diffraction pattern can be recorded from a macromolecule before radiation damage manifests itself, and (2) the phase information can be ab initio retrieved from a set of calculated noisy diffraction patterns of single protein molecules.

  8. Taking X-Ray Diffraction to the Limit: Macromolecular Structures from Femtosecond X-Ray Pulses and Diffraction Microscopy of Cells with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, J.

    2004-06-04

    Recent work is extending the methodology of X-ray crystallography to the structure determination of noncrystalline specimens. The phase problem is solved using the oversampling method, which takes advantage of ''continuous'' diffraction patterns from noncrystalline specimens. Here we review the principle of this newly developed technique and discuss the ongoing experiments of imaging nonperiodic objects, such as cells and cellular structures, using coherent and bright X rays produced by third-generation synchrotron sources. In the longer run, the technique may be applicable to image single biomolecules using anticipated X-ray free electron lasers. Here, computer simulations have so far demonstrated two important steps: (a) by using an extremely intense femtosecond X-ray pulse, a diffraction pattern can be recorded from a macromolecule before radiation damage manifests itself; and (b) the phase information can be retrieved in an ab initio fashion from a set of calculated noisy diffraction patterns of single protein molecules.

  9. Stochastic Current-Driven Domain-Wall Motion Observed by X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Guido

    2008-03-01

    Transmission x-ray microscopy can directly visualize the influence of a spin-polarized current on the magnetization of micro- and nanostructures. We investigate the stochastic motion of domain walls in curved wires [1] and the motion of vortices in squares [2]. To observe domain-wall motion pulses of nanosecond duration and high current density are send through permalloy wires and either move or deform the domain wall. The current pulses have nanosecond duration and a high current density of up to 1.0 10^12 A/m^2 and drive the wall either undisturbed, i.e. as a composite particle through the wire or causes structural changes of the magnetization. Repetitive pulse measurements reveal the stochastic nature of current induced domain-wall motion. From the experiments we estimate the ratio between the degree of nonadiabaticity and the Gilbert damping parameter indicating the importance of the nonadiabatic contribution to current driven domain-wall motion. To compare experimental results with theory the spin-torque transfer model of Zhang and Li [3] is implemented in the micromagnetic framework OOMMF [4]. The code is applied to determine the current-induced domain wall velocity using the material parameters of permalloy. The simulations support the interpretation of the experimental results. Sinusoidal high-density currents are applied to micrometer-sized permalloy squares containing ferromagnetic vortices. Spin-torque induced vortex gyration on the nanosecond timescale is observed. The phase of the gyration in structures with different chirality are compared to an analytical model and micromagnetic simulations, considering both alternating spin-polarized currents and the current's Oersted fields. This analysis reveals that spin-torque is the main source of motion. Supported by the DFG via SFB 668 and GK 1286 as well as by the U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05-CH11231. References: [1] G. Meier, M. Bolte, R. Eiselt, U. Merkt, B. Krüger, D. Pfannkuche, D.-H. Kim, and P

  10. Variable magnification with Kirkpatrick-Baez optics for synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Jach, Terrence; Bakulin, Alex S.; Durbin, Stephen M.; ...

    2006-05-01

    In this study, we describe the distinction between the operation of a short focal length x-ray microscope forming a real image with a laboratory source (convergent illumination) and with a highly collimated intense beam from a synchrotron light source (Kohler illumination).

  11. The Chandra ACIS Timing Survey Project: glimpsing a sample of faint X-ray pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, G. L.; Esposito, P.; Rodríguez Castillo, G. A.; Sidoli, L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the discovery of 41 new pulsating sources in the data of the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which is sensitive to X-ray photons in the 0.3-10 keV band. The archival data of the first 15 yr of Chandra observations were retrieved and analysed by means of fast Fourier transforms, employing a peak-detection algorithm able to screen candidate signals in an automatic fashion. We carried out the search for new X-ray pulsators in light curves with more than 50 photons, for a total of about 190 000 light curves out of about 430 000 extracted. With these numbers, the ChAndra Timing Survey at Brera And Roma astronomical observatories (CATS @ BAR) - as we called the project - represents the largest ever systematic search for coherent signals in the classic X-ray band. More than 50 per cent of the signals were confirmed by further Chandra (for those sources with two or more pointings), XMM-Newton or ROSAT data. The period distribution of the new X-ray pulsators above ˜2000 s resembles that of cataclysmic variables, while there is a paucity of sources with shorter period and low fluxes. Since there is not an obvious bias against these detections, a possible interpretation is in terms of a magnetic gating mechanism in accreting neutron stars. Finally, we note that CATS @ BAR is a living project and the detection algorithm will continue to be routinely applied to the new Chandra data as they become public. Based on the results obtained so far, we expect to discover about three new pulsators every year.

  12. Power spectrum analysis of the x-ray scatter signal in mammography and breast tomosynthesis projections.

    PubMed

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bliznakova, Kristina; Fei, Baowei

    2013-10-01

    To analyze the frequency domain characteristics of the signal in mammography images and breast tomosynthesis projections with patient tissue texture due to detected scattered x-rays. Acquisitions of x-ray projection images of 19 different patient breasts were simulated using previously acquired volumetric patient images. Acquisition of these images was performed with a dedicated breast CT prototype system, and the images were classified into voxels representing skin, adipose, and glandular tissue with a previously validated automated algorithm. The classified three dimensional images then underwent simulated mechanical compression representing that which is performed during acquisition of mammography and breast tomosynthesis images. The acquisition of projection images of each patient breast was simulated using Monte Carlo methods with each simulation resulting in two images: one of the primary (non-scattered) signal and one of the scatter signal. To analyze the scatter signal for both mammography and breast tomosynthesis, two projections images of each patient breast were simulated, one with the x-ray source positioned at 0° (mammography and central tomosynthesis projection) and at 30° (wide tomosynthesis projection). The noise power spectra (NPS) for both the scatter signal alone and the total signal (primary + scatter) for all images were obtained and the combined results of all patients analyzed. The total NPS was fit to the expected power-law relationship NPS(f) = k/f β and the results were compared with those previously published on the power spectrum characteristics of mammographic texture. The scatter signal alone was analyzed qualitatively and a power-law fit was also performed. The mammography and tomosynthesis projections of three patient breasts were too small to analyze, so a total of 16 patient breasts were analyzed. The values of β for the total signal of the 0° projections agreed well with previously published results. As expected, the scatter

  13. Dear-Mama: A photon counting X-ray imaging project for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Díaz, A.; Díaz, F.; Fernández, J.; García, E.; García, J.; Kainberger, F.; Lozano, M.; Maiorino, M.; Martínez, R.; Montagne, J. P.; Moreno, I.; Pellegrini, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Sentís, M.; Teres, L.; Tortajada, M.; Ullán, M.

    2006-12-01

    Dear-Mama ( Detection of Early Markers in Mammography) is an EU funded project devoted to develop an X-ray Medical imaging device based on room temperature solid-state pixel detector coupled to photon counting readout electronics via bump bonding. The technology being used leads to signal-to-noise ratio enhancement and thus the ability to detect low contrast anomalies such as micro-calcifications. The Dear-Mama machine is currently being evaluated and preliminary results show an excellent MTF response. Dear-Mama consortium is made up from six European institutions, the project runs from December 2001 to March 2006.

  14. Method and apparatus for multiple-projection, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Jr., Harry K. (Inventor); Beck, Thomas J. (Inventor); Feldmesser, Howard S. (Inventor); Magee, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses for advanced, multiple-projection, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning systems include combinations of a conical collimator; a high-resolution two-dimensional detector; a portable, power-capped, variable-exposure-time power supply; an exposure-time control element; calibration monitoring; a three-dimensional anti-scatter-grid; and a gantry-gantry base assembly that permits up to seven projection angles for overlapping beams. Such systems are capable of high precision bone structure measurements that can support three dimensional bone modeling and derivations of bone strength, risk of injury, and efficacy of countermeasures among other properties.

  15. Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Peter

    2008-08-01

    The magnetic properties of low dimensional solid state matter is of the utmost interest both scientifically as well as technologically. In addition to the charge of the electron which is the base for current electronics, by taking into account the spin degree of freedom in future spintronics applications open a new avenue. Progress towards a better physical understanding of the mechanism and principles involved as well as potential applications of nanomagnetic devices can only be achieved with advanced analytical tools. Soft X-ray microscopy providing a spatial resolution towards 10nm, a time resolution currently in the sub-ns regime and inherent elemental sensitivity is a very promising technique for that. This article reviews the recent achievements of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy by selected examples of spin torque phenomena, stochastical behavior on the nanoscale and spin dynamics in magnetic nanopatterns. The future potential with regard to addressing fundamental magnetic length and time scales, e.g. imaging fsec spin dynamics at upcoming X-ray sources is pointed out.

  16. Studies of SmCo5/Fe nanocomposite magnetic bilayers with magnetic soft x-ray transmission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzad, F.; Siddiqi, S. A.; Im, M.-Y.; Avallone, A.; Fischer, P.; Hussain, Z.; Siddiqi, I.; Hellman, F.; Zhao, J.

    2009-12-04

    A hard/soft SmCo{sub 5}/Fe nanocomposite magnetic bilayer system has been fabricated on X-ray transparent 100-200 nm thin Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes by magnetron sputtering. The microscopic magnetic domain pattern and its behavior during magnetization reversal in the hard and soft magnetic phases have been individually studied by element specific magnetic soft x-ray microscopy at a spatial resolution of better than 25nm. We observe that the domain patterns for soft and hard phases switch coherently throughout the full hysteresis cycle upon applying external magnetic fields. We derived local M(H) curves from the images for Fe and SmCo5 separately and found switching for both hard and soft phases same.

  17. Pressure-induced densification in GeO2 glass: A transmission x-ray microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Yang, Wenge; Mao, Wendy L.

    2013-12-01

    Nanoscale transmission x-ray microscopy measurements have been performed to determine the effect of pressure (P) on the volume (V) change in GeO2 glass up to 38.5 GPa. The P-V data show a continuous increase upon compression, indicating that the density-driven structural transformation is a gradual process. Over the pressure range studied, a transition is observed at approximately 10-13 GPa, where the material displays distinct compression behaviors. The pressure-induced densification that involves the coordination number change has been discussed. Using this newly developed high-pressure imaging technique with tens of nanometer resolution, we have provided a direct and unequivocal way for measuring density of amorphous materials to much higher pressures with accuracy rivaling x-ray diffraction of crystalline solids.

  18. Development of synchrotron radiation x-ray intravital microscopy for in vivo imaging of rat heart vascular function.

    PubMed

    Umetani, Keiji; Pearson, James T; Schwenke, Daryl O; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2011-01-01

    This study elucidates the vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation in closed-chest rats to evaluate endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatory ability and to investigate disease mechanisms. For this study, we developed an X-ray intravital microscopy system using a microangiography technique and a synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8. An X-ray direct-conversion type detector with 7-μm spatial resolution was used for real-time imaging. Microangiographic images were stored in a digital frame memory system at a maximum rate of 30 frame/s with a 1024 × 1024-pixel, 10-bit format. In imaging experiments, the small coronary arteries were visualized after iodine contrast agent injection into the coronary artery.

  19. Residual solvent content in conducting polymer-blend films mapped with scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Robert; Schindler, Markus; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Watts, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectra prove the presence of solvent molecules in conducting polymer films and are used to calculate the absolute solvent uptake of, e.g., 5 vol.% in poly(vinylcarbazole) (PVK) films, which were prepared by solution casting with cyclohexanone as solvent. Nanoscale scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) reveals a thickness-independent solvent content in a PVK gradient sample due to the formation of an enrichment layer of residual solvent. In polymer-blend films of PVK and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), STXM probes a lateral residual solvent uptake, which depends on the composition of the phase-separation domains. For all measurements, oxygen-containing solvent molecules in oxygen-free conducting polymer films are used as marker material, and a significant amount of residual solvent is found in all types of investigated samples.

  20. In Situ Heater Design for Nanoscale Synchrotron-Based Full-Field Transmission X-Ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Andrew M.; Harris, William M.; Nakajo, Arata; Wang, Steve; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Deriy, Alex; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2015-03-05

    Abstract

    The oxidation of nickel powder under a controlled gas and temperature environment was studied using synchrotron-based full-field transmission X-ray microscopy. The use of this technique allowed for the reaction to be imagedin situat 55 nm resolution. The setup was designed to fit in the limited working distance of the microscope and to provide the gas and temperature environments analogous to solid oxide fuel cell operating conditions. Chemical conversion from nickel to nickel oxide was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure. Using an unreacted core model, the reaction rate as a function of temperature and activation energy were calculated. This method can be applied to study many other chemical reactions requiring similar environmental conditions.

  1. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, K.; Adams, F. . Dept. of Chemistry); Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W. )

    1992-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis ([mu]-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed.

  2. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy?

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, K.; Adams, F.; Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W.

    1992-10-01

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis ({mu}-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed.

  3. Uranium aerosols at a nuclear fuel fabrication plant: Characterization using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, E.; Pettersson, H. B. L.; Fortin, C.; Eriksson, M.

    2017-05-01

    Detailed aerosol knowledge is essential in numerous applications, including risk assessment in nuclear industry. Cascade impactor sampling of uranium aerosols in the breathing zone of nuclear operators was carried out at a nuclear fuel fabrication plant. Collected aerosols were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Imaging revealed remarkable variations in aerosol morphology at the different workshops, and a presence of very large particles (up to ≅ 100 × 50 μm2) in the operator breathing zone. Characteristic X-ray analysis showed varying uranium weight percentages of aerosols and, frequently, traces of nitrogen, fluorine and iron. The analysis method, in combination with cascade impactor sampling, can be a powerful tool for characterization of aerosols. The uranium aerosol source term for risk assessment in nuclear fuel fabrication appears to be highly complex.

  4. Composition measurement in substitutionally disordered materials by atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Taplin, D J; Weyland, M; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2017-05-01

    The increasing use of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy invites the question of whether its success in precision composition determination at lower magnifications can be replicated in the atomic resolution regime. In this paper, we explore, through simulation, the prospects for composition measurement via the model system of AlxGa1-xAs, discussing the approximations used in the modelling, the variability in the signal due to changes in configuration at constant composition, and the ability to distinguish between different compositions. Results are presented in such a way that the number of X-ray counts, and thus the expected variation due to counting statistics, can be gauged for a range of operating conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnosing and Mapping Pulmonary Emphysema on X-Ray Projection Images: Incremental Value of Grating-Based X-Ray Dark-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meinel, Felix G.; Schwab, Felix; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Herzen, Julia; Achterhold, Klaus; Auweter, Sigrid; Bamberg, Fabian; Yildirim, Ali Ö.; Bohla, Alexander; Eickelberg, Oliver; Loewen, Rod; Gifford, Martin; Ruth, Ronald; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether grating-based X-ray dark-field imaging can increase the sensitivity of X-ray projection images in the diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema and allow for a more accurate assessment of emphysema distribution. Materials and Methods Lungs from three mice with pulmonary emphysema and three healthy mice were imaged ex vivo using a laser-driven compact synchrotron X-ray source. Median signal intensities of transmission (T), dark-field (V) and a combined parameter (normalized scatter) were compared between emphysema and control group. To determine the diagnostic value of each parameter in differentiating between healthy and emphysematous lung tissue, a receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed both on a per-pixel and a per-individual basis. Parametric maps of emphysema distribution were generated using transmission, dark-field and normalized scatter signal and correlated with histopathology. Results Transmission values relative to water were higher for emphysematous lungs than for control lungs (1.11 vs. 1.06, p<0.001). There was no difference in median dark-field signal intensities between both groups (0.66 vs. 0.66). Median normalized scatter was significantly lower in the emphysematous lungs compared to controls (4.9 vs. 10.8, p<0.001), and was the best parameter for differentiation of healthy vs. emphysematous lung tissue. In a per-pixel analysis, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) for the normalized scatter value was significantly higher than for transmission (0.86 vs. 0.78, p<0.001) and dark-field value (0.86 vs. 0.52, p<0.001) alone. Normalized scatter showed very high sensitivity for a wide range of specificity values (94% sensitivity at 75% specificity). Using the normalized scatter signal to display the regional distribution of emphysema provides color-coded parametric maps, which show the best correlation with histopathology. Conclusion In a murine model, the complementary information provided by X-ray

  6. Diagnosing and mapping pulmonary emphysema on X-ray projection images: incremental value of grating-based X-ray dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Meinel, Felix G; Schwab, Felix; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Herzen, Julia; Achterhold, Klaus; Auweter, Sigrid; Bamberg, Fabian; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Bohla, Alexander; Eickelberg, Oliver; Loewen, Rod; Gifford, Martin; Ruth, Ronald; Reiser, Maximilian F; Pfeiffer, Franz; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    To assess whether grating-based X-ray dark-field imaging can increase the sensitivity of X-ray projection images in the diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema and allow for a more accurate assessment of emphysema distribution. Lungs from three mice with pulmonary emphysema and three healthy mice were imaged ex vivo using a laser-driven compact synchrotron X-ray source. Median signal intensities of transmission (T), dark-field (V) and a combined parameter (normalized scatter) were compared between emphysema and control group. To determine the diagnostic value of each parameter in differentiating between healthy and emphysematous lung tissue, a receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed both on a per-pixel and a per-individual basis. Parametric maps of emphysema distribution were generated using transmission, dark-field and normalized scatter signal and correlated with histopathology. Transmission values relative to water were higher for emphysematous lungs than for control lungs (1.11 vs. 1.06, p<0.001). There was no difference in median dark-field signal intensities between both groups (0.66 vs. 0.66). Median normalized scatter was significantly lower in the emphysematous lungs compared to controls (4.9 vs. 10.8, p<0.001), and was the best parameter for differentiation of healthy vs. emphysematous lung tissue. In a per-pixel analysis, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) for the normalized scatter value was significantly higher than for transmission (0.86 vs. 0.78, p<0.001) and dark-field value (0.86 vs. 0.52, p<0.001) alone. Normalized scatter showed very high sensitivity for a wide range of specificity values (94% sensitivity at 75% specificity). Using the normalized scatter signal to display the regional distribution of emphysema provides color-coded parametric maps, which show the best correlation with histopathology. In a murine model, the complementary information provided by X-ray transmission and dark-field images adds incremental

  7. Direct Observation of Mn Clusters in GaN by X-ray Scanning Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Criado, Gema; Somogyi, Andrea; Hermann, Martin; Eickhoff, Martin; Stutzmann, Martin

    2004-06-01

    The effect of Mn doping in GaN was studied by X-ray absorption techniques. In fluorescence detection mode, Ga and Mn elemental maps show homogeneous distributions in most of the samples, except for the highest Mn-doped GaN layer, which clearly exhibits the Mn cluster formation on the micrometer scale. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra measured around the Mn atom have revealed a smoothing and broadening of all features as a function of Mn content, suggesting the presence of short-range disorder. However, no evidence of disorder activated phonon modes and/or additional secondary phases were observed by Raman scattering, supporting that the long-range crystalline order was retained. Nevertheless, the frequency shift of the E2 phonon mode as well as the bound exciton data confirm the doping-induced tensile strain in the GaN layers.

  8. Ion beam lithography for Fresnel zone plates in X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Keskinbora, Kahraman; Grévent, Corinne; Bechtel, Michael; Weigand, Markus; Goering, Eberhard; Nadzeyka, Achim; Peto, Lloyd; Rehbein, Stefan; Schneider, Gerd; Follath, Rolf; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Yan, Hanfei; Schütz, Gisela

    2013-05-20

    Fresnel Zone Plates (FZP) are to date very successful focusing optics for X-rays. Established methods of fabrication are rather complex and based on electron beam lithography (EBL). Here, we show that ion beam lithography (IBL) may advantageously simplify their preparation. A FZP operable from the extreme UV to the limit of the hard X-ray was prepared and tested from 450 eV to 1500 eV. The trapezoidal profile of the FZP favorably activates its 2nd order focus. The FZP with an outermost zone width of 100 nm allows the visualization of features down to 61, 31 and 21 nm in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd order focus respectively. Measured efficiencies in the 1st and 2nd order of diffraction reach the theoretical predictions.

  9. Use of fractal zone plates for transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xin; Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Wang, Dajiang; Wu, Zhao; Chen, Jian; Pan, Zhiyun; Zhang, Kai; Hong, Youli; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2012-09-01

    In this contribution we discuss the possibility of designing a modified transmission X-ray microscope by using fractal zone plates (Fzps) as diffractive optical elements. In the modified transmission X-ray microscope optical layout, we first introduced a fractal zone plate as the microscope objective. Indeed, a fractal zone plate cannot only be used as an image-forming component but also as a condenser element to achieve an extended depth of field. Numerical analysis reveals that fractal zone plates and conventional Fresnel zone plates have similar imaging capabilities under different coherent illumination. Using a fractal zone plate as a condenser we also simulated axial irradiance. Results confirm that fractal zone plates can improve focusing capability with an extended depth of field. Although preliminary, these simulations clearly reveal that fractal zone plates, when available, will be of great help in microscope layouts, in particular for foreseen high-resolution applications in the "water window" as strongly required in biological research.

  10. Biochemistry of malaria parasite infected red blood cells by X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kapishnikov, S; Leiserowitz, L; Yang, Y; Cloetens, P; Pereiro, E; Awamu Ndonglack, F; Matuschewski, K; Als-Nielsen, J

    2017-04-11

    Red blood cells infected by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are correlatively imaged by tomography using soft X-rays as well as by scanning hard nano-X-ray beam to obtain fluorescence maps of various elements such as S and Fe. In this way one can deduce the amount of Fe bound either in hemoglobin or in hemozoin crystals in the digestive vacuole of the malaria parasite as well as determine the hemoglobin concentrations in the cytosols of the red blood cell and of the parasite. Fluorescence map of K shows that in the parasite's schizont stage the K concentration in the red blood cell cytosol is diminished by a factor of seven relative to a pristine red blood cell but the total amount of K in the infected red blood cell is the same as in the pristine red blood cell.

  11. Phase retrieval using polychromatic illumination for transmission X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yijin; Andrews, Joy C.; Wang, Junyue; Meirer, Florian; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu; Pianetta, Piero

    2011-01-01

    An alternative method for quantitative phase retrieval in a transmission X-ray microscope system at sub-50-nm resolution is presented. As an alternative to moving the sample in the beam direction in order to analyze the propagation-introduced phase effect, we have illuminated the TXM using X-rays of different energy without any motor movement in the TXM system. Both theoretical analysis and experimental studies have confirmed the feasibility and the advantage of our method, because energy tuning can be performed with very high energy resolution using a double crystal monochromator at a synchrotron beam line, and there is zero motor error in TXM system in our approach. High-spatial-resolution phase retrieval is accomplished using the proposed method. PMID:21263593

  12. Cadmium toxicity to the cornea of pregnant rats: Electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizuka, M.; McCarthy, K.J.; Kaye, G.I.; Fujimoto, S. )

    1990-05-01

    Cadmium toxicity to the cornea of pregnant rats was studied using the electron microscope and x-ray microanalyzer. In in-vivo experiments, severe corneal edema occurred in pregnant dams that received intraperitoneal injections of cadmium sulphate for 4 days during gestation, but not in nonpregnant rats. Prominent swelling of mitochondria and the occurrence of intra- and intercellular vacuoles in the corneal endothelium were observed only in pregnant dams. In in-vitro experiments, electron-dense deposits consisting of cadmium-oxine complexes were preferentially found in swollen mitochondria of the endothelial cells. Cadmium peaks were obtained from these deposits with x-ray microanalysis. These data suggest that the corneal edema observed after administration of cadmium may imply the disturbance of pump function and barrier function of the corneal endothelium due to the primary toxic effects of this metal on mitochondria.

  13. Fundamental Studies of Solidification in Microgravity Using Real-Time X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu; Bhat, Biliyar N.

    1999-01-01

    This research applies a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope, XTM, to image (with resolutions up to 3 micrometers) the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid interface. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in-situ metallography. During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lamellae from eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys. Current high resolution X-ray sources and high contrast X-ray detectors have advanced to allow systematic study of solidification dynamics and the resulting microstructure. We have employed a state-of-the-art sub-micron source with acceleration voltages of 10-100 kV to image solidification of metals. One useful strength of the XTM stems from the manner an image is formed. The radiographic image is a shadow formed by x-ray photons that are not absorbed as they pass through the specimen. Composition gradients within the specimen cause variations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integral of composition (or thickness). The ability to image these features in real-time enables more fundamental and detailed understanding of solidification dynamics than has previously been possible. Hence, application of this technique towards microgravity experiments will allow rigorous testing of critical solidification models.

  14. Confocal soft X-ray scanning transmission microscopy: setup, alignment procedure and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Späth, Andreas; Raabe, Jörg; Fink, Rainer H.

    2015-01-01

    Zone-plate-based scanning transmission soft X-ray microspectroscopy (STXM) is a well established technique for high-contrast imaging of sufficiently transparent specimens (e.g. ultrathin biological tissues, polymer materials, archaeometric specimens or magnetic thin films) with spatial resolutions in the regime of 20 nm and high spectroscopic or chemical sensitivity. However, due to the relatively large depth of focus of zone plates, the resolution of STXM along the optical axis so far stays unambiguously behind for thicker X-ray transparent specimens. This challenge can be addressed by the implementation of a second zone plate in the detection pathway of the beam, resulting in a confocal arrangement. Within this paper a first proof-of-principle study for a confocal STXM (cSTXM) and an elaborate alignment procedure in transmission and fluorescence geometry are presented. Based on first confocal soft X-ray micrographs of well known specimens, the advantage and limitation of cSTXM as well as further development potentials for future applications are discussed. PMID:25537596

  15. Non-destructive mapping of grain orientations in 3D by laboratory X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, S. A.; Reischig, P.; Holzner, C.; Lauridsen, E. M.; Withers, P. J.; Merkle, A. P.; Feser, M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterise crystallographic microstructure, non-destructively and in three-dimensions, is a powerful tool for understanding many aspects related to damage and deformation mechanisms in polycrystalline materials. To this end, the technique of X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) using monochromatic synchrotron and polychromatic laboratory X-ray sources has been shown to be capable of mapping crystal grains and their orientations non-destructively in 3D. Here we describe a novel laboratory-based X-ray DCT modality (LabDCT), enabling the wider accessibility of the DCT technique for routine use and in-depth studies of, for example, temporal changes in crystallographic grain structure non-destructively over time through ‘4D’ in situ time-lapse studies. The capability of the technique is demonstrated by studying a titanium alloy (Ti-β21S) sample. In the current implementation the smallest grains that can be reliably detected are around 40 μm. The individual grain locations and orientations are reconstructed using the LabDCT method and the results are validated against independent measurements from phase contrast tomography and electron backscatter diffraction respectively. Application of the technique promises to provide important insights related to the roles of recrystallization and grain growth on materials properties as well as supporting 3D polycrystalline modelling of materials performance. PMID:26494523

  16. THE CHANDRA CARINA COMPLEX PROJECT: DECIPHERING THE ENIGMA OF CARINA'S DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Gagne, Marc; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Montmerle, Thierry; Naze, Yael; Oey, M. S.; Park, Sangwook; Petre, Robert; Pittard, Julian M.

    2011-05-01

    We present a 1.42 deg{sup 2} mosaic of diffuse X-ray emission in the Great Nebula in Carina from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer camera. After removing >14,000 X-ray point sources from the field, we smooth the remaining unresolved emission, tessellate it into segments of similar apparent surface brightness, and perform X-ray spectral fitting on those tessellates to infer the intrinsic properties of the X-ray-emitting plasma. By modeling faint resolved point sources, we estimate the contribution to the extended X-ray emission from unresolved point sources and show that the vast majority of Carina's unresolved X-ray emission is truly diffuse. Line-like correlated residuals in the X-ray spectral fits suggest that substantial X-ray emission is generated by charge exchange at the interfaces between Carina's hot, rarefied plasma and its many cold neutral pillars, ridges, and clumps.

  17. High resolution imaging of the ultrastructure of living algal cells using soft x-ray contact microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, T.W.; Cotton, R.A.; Page, A.M.; Tomie, T.; Majima, T.; Stead, A.D.

    1995-12-31

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy provides the biologist with a technique for examining the ultrastructure of living cells at a much higher resolution than that possible by various forms of light microscopy. Readout of the developed photoresist using atomic force microscopy (AFM) produces a detailed map of the carbon densities generated in the resist following exposure of the specimen to water-window soft x-rays (2--4nm) produced by impact of a high energy laser onto a suitable target. The established high resolution imaging method of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has inherent problems in the chemical pre-treatment required for producing the ultrathin sections necessary for this technique. Using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas the ultrastructural appearance of the cells following SXCM and TEM has been compared. While SXCM confirms the basic structural organization of the cell as seen by TEM (e.g., the organization of the thylakoid membranes within the chloroplast; flagellar insertion into the cytoplasm), there are important differences. These are in the appearance of the cell covering and the presence of carbon-dense spherical cellular inclusions.

  18. The EXTraS project: Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Andrea; EXTraS Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    EXTraS (EU-FP7 framework) is the first systematic search for (and characterization of) all variable soft X-ray sources at all time scales in the whole archive of observations collected by the EPIC instrument on-board XMM-Newton since its launch in 1999, looking for transients, aperiodic, periodic and long-term variability. The project includes the phenomenological classification of all detected variable sources, extending and improving the 3XMM catalalogue. All results will be released in a public archive, together with new software tools.

  19. X-ray diffraction Microscopy of Bi2 Se3 thin film on graphene/SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Fenter, Paul

    2014-03-01

    We present an x-ray diffraction microscopy study of a thin film of Bi2Se3 on epitaxial graphene/6H-SiC(001). The Bi2Se3 thin film, consisting of 30 quintuple layers (Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se), is a topological insulator that was grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The x-ray microscope resolves the lateral distribution of the film thickness at the sub-100 nm scale with the contrast produced by the thin film diffraction signal. Utilizing the depth penetration of x-rays, we imaged the buried interfaces in this system, to probe the correlation between the structure and topography of the supporting interfaces and the growth of the thin film. We find that the Bi2Se3 thickness distribution closely follows the underlying substrate topography and is strongly affected by the inhomogeneous distribution of graphene near the steps of SiC, whereby nucleation induces the growth of a large number of carbon layers. High-resolution surface diffraction was also measured from this system to extract the atomic positions in the thin film to investigate the transition from graphene to Bi2Se3.

  20. TXM-Wizard: a program for advanced data collection and evaluation in full-field transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Williams, Phillip A; Wang, Junyue; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-03-01

    Transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) has been well recognized as a powerful tool for non-destructive investigation of the three-dimensional inner structure of a sample with spatial resolution down to a few tens of nanometers, especially when combined with synchrotron radiation sources. Recent developments of this technique have presented a need for new tools for both system control and data analysis. Here a software package developed in MATLAB for script command generation and analysis of TXM data is presented. The first toolkit, the script generator, allows automating complex experimental tasks which involve up to several thousand motor movements. The second package was designed to accomplish computationally intense tasks such as data processing of mosaic and mosaic tomography datasets; dual-energy contrast imaging, where data are recorded above and below a specific X-ray absorption edge; and TXM X-ray absorption near-edge structure imaging datasets. Furthermore, analytical and iterative tomography reconstruction algorithms were implemented. The compiled software package is freely available.

  1. Further development of soft X-ray scanning microscopy with anelliptical undulator at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; Ade, Harald; Fakra, Sirine; Gilles, Mary; Hitchcock, Adam; Kilcoyne, David; Shuh, David; Tyliszczak, Tolek

    2003-04-02

    Soft x-ray scanning microscopy (1) is under continuing development at the Advanced Light Source. Significant progress has been made implementing new scan control systems in both operational microscopes (2) and they now operate at beam lines 5.3.2 and 11.0.2 with interferometer servo scanning and stabilization. The interferometer servo loop registers the images on a universal x/y coordinate system and locks the x-ray spot on selected features for spectro-microscopic studies. At the present time zone plates are in use with 35nm outer zone width and the imaging spatial resolution is at the diffraction limit of these lenses. Current research programs are underway in areas of polymer chemistry, environmental chemistry and materials science. A dedicated polymer STXM is in operation on a bend magnet beam line (4) and is the subject of a separate article (3) in this issue. Here we focus on the capabilities of STXM at a new beam line that employs an elliptical undulator (5) to give control of the polarization of the x-ray beam. This facility is in the process of commissioning and some results are available, other capabilities will be developed during the first half of 2003.

  2. Comparative analysis of isolated cellular organelles by means of soft X-ray contact microscopy with laser-plasma source and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Limongi, T; Palladino, L; Tomassetti, G; Reale, L; Cesare, P; Flora, F; Aimola, P; Ragnelli, A M

    2004-04-01

    Soft X-ray contact microscopy (SXCM) is, at present, a useful tool for the examination at submicrometre resolution of biological systems maintained in their natural hydrated conditions. Among current X-ray-generating devices, laser-plasma sources are now easily available and, owing to their pulse nature, offer the opportunity to observe living biological samples before radiation damage occurs, even if the resolution achievable is not as high as with synchrotron-produced X-rays. To assess the potential of laser-plasma source SXCM in the study of cellular organelles, we applied it for the analysis of chloroplasts extracted from spinach leaves and mitochondria isolated from bovine heart and liver. X-ray radiation was generated by a nanosecond laser-plasma source, produced by a single shot excimer XeCl laser focused onto an yttrium target. The images obtained with SXCM were then compared with those produced by transmission electron microscopy observation of the same samples prepared with negative staining, a technique requiring no chemical fixation, in order to facilitate their interpretation and test the applicability of SXCM imaging.

  3. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; ...

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper wemore » address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.« less

  4. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in x-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D. A.; Spence, J. C. H.; Starodub, D.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper we address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called “dose fractionation theorem” of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and “Rose-criterion” image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm. PMID:20463854

  5. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D. A.; Spence, J. C.H.; Starodub, D.

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper we address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.

  6. Development of achromatic full-field x-ray microscopy with compact imaging mirror system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, S.; Emi, Y.; Kino, H.; Sano, Y.; Kohmura, Y.; Tamasaku, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K.

    2013-09-01

    Compact advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez optics are used to construct a microscope that is easy to align and robust against vibrations and thermal drifts. The entire length of the imaging mirror system is 286 mm, which is 34% shorter than the previous model. A spatial resolution test is performed in which magnified bright-field images of a pattern are taken with an X-ray camera at an energy of 10 keV at the BL29XUL beamline of SPring-8. A line-and-space pattern having a 50- nm width could be resolved, although the image contrast is low.

  7. Scanning three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy using a high-energy microbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y. Hirose, Y.; Seno, Y.

    2016-07-27

    A scanning three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope apparatus with a high-energy microbeam was installed at the BL33XU Toyota beamline at SPring-8. The size of the 50 keV beam focused using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors was 1.3 μm wide and 1.6 μm high in full width at half maximum. The scanning 3DXRD method was tested for a cold-rolled carbon steel sheet sample. A three-dimensional orientation map with 37 {sup 3} voxels was obtained.

  8. Accurate stochastic reconstruction of heterogeneous microstructures by limited x-ray tomographic projections.

    PubMed

    Li, Hechao; Kaira, Shashank; Mertens, James; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Jiao, Yang

    2016-12-01

    An accurate knowledge of the complex microstructure of a heterogeneous material is crucial for its performance prediction, prognosis and optimization. X-ray tomography has provided a nondestructive means for microstructure characterization in 3D and 4D (i.e. structural evolution over time), in which a material is typically reconstructed from a large number of tomographic projections using filtered-back-projection (FBP) method or algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART). Here, we present in detail a stochastic optimization procedure that enables one to accurately reconstruct material microstructure from a small number of absorption contrast x-ray tomographic projections. This discrete tomography reconstruction procedure is in contrast to the commonly used FBP and ART, which usually requires thousands of projections for accurate microstructure rendition. The utility of our stochastic procedure is first demonstrated by reconstructing a wide class of two-phase heterogeneous materials including sandstone and hard-particle packing from simulated limited-angle projections in both cone-beam and parallel beam projection geometry. It is then applied to reconstruct tailored Sn-sphere-clay-matrix systems from limited-angle cone-beam data obtained via a lab-scale tomography facility at Arizona State University and parallel-beam synchrotron data obtained at Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, we examine the information content of tomography data by successively incorporating larger number of projections and quantifying the accuracy of the reconstructions. We show that only a small number of projections (e.g. 20-40, depending on the complexity of the microstructure of interest and desired resolution) are necessary for accurate material reconstructions via our stochastic procedure, which indicates its high efficiency in using limited structural information. The ramifications of the stochastic reconstruction procedure in 4D materials science are also

  9. High-resolution diffraction microscopy using the plane-wave field of a nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Kubo, Hideto; Furukawa, Hayato; Mimura, Hidekazu; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2009-08-01

    X-ray waves in the center of the beam waist of nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beams can be considered to have amplitude and phase that are both almost uniform, i.e., they are x-ray plane waves. Here we report the results of an experimental demonstration of high-resolution diffraction microscopy using the x-ray plane wave of the synchrotron x-ray beam focused using Kirkpatrik-Baez mirrors. A silver nanocube with an edge length of {approx}100 nm is illuminated with the x-ray beam focused to a {approx}1 {mu}m spot at 12 keV. A high-contrast symmetric diffraction pattern of the nanocube is observed in the forward far field. An image of the nanocube is successfully reconstructed by an iterative phasing method and its half-period resolution is 3.0 nm. This method does not only dramatically improve the spatial resolution of x-ray microscopy but also is a key technology for realizing single-pulse diffractive imaging using x-ray free-electron lasers.

  10. Development of fast, simultaneous and multi-technique scanning hard X-ray microscopy at Synchrotron Soleil.

    PubMed

    Medjoubi, Kadda; Leclercq, Nicolas; Langlois, Florent; Buteau, Alain; Lé, Stephane; Poirier, Stéphane; Mercère, Pascal; Sforna, Marie Catherine; Kewish, Cameron M; Somogyi, Andréa

    2013-03-01

    A distributed fast-acquisition system for synchronized multi-technique experiments is presented, in which the collection of metadata and the asynchronous merging of large data volumes from multiple detectors are managed as part of the data collection process. This fast continuous scanning scheme, named FLYSCAN, enables measurement of microscopy data on a timescale of milliseconds per pixel. Proof-of-principle multi-technique experiments, namely scanning X-ray fluorescence spectrometry combined with absorption, differential phase contrast and dark-field imaging, have been performed on biological and geological samples.

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy study of bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.M.; Jimenez, I.; Vazquez, L.; Gomez-Aleixandre, C.; Albella, J.M.; Sanchez, O.; Terminello, L.J.; Himpsel, F.J.

    1998-04-01

    The bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond on Si(100) has been studied by x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and atomic force microscopy, two techniques well suited to characterize nanometric crystallites. Diamond nuclei of {approximately}15nm are formed after 5 min of bias-enhanced treatment. The number of nuclei and its size increases with the time of application of the bias voltage. A nanocrystalline diamond film is attained after 20 min of bias-enhanced nucleation. At the initial nucleation stages, the Si substrate appears covered with diamond crystallites and graphite, without SiC being detected by XANES. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Observation of field-induced domain wall propagation in magnetic nanowires by magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P.; Allwood, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) is used to image domain walls in magnetic ring structures formed by a 300 nm wide, 24 nm thick Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} nanowire. Both transverse and vortex type domain walls are observed after application of different field sequences. Domain walls can be observed by comparing images obtained from opposite field sequences, or else domain wall propagation observed by comparing successive images in a particular field sequence. This demonstrates the potential use of M-TXM in developing and understanding planar magnetic nanowire behavior.

  13. Quantitative metrology study of Cu/SiO2 interconnect structures using fluorescence x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyong; Su, X.; Stagarescu, C. B.; Eastman, D. E.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Noyan, I. C.; Hu, C.-K.

    2001-02-01

    We demonstrate the capability of fluorescence x-ray microscopy with a 0.25 μm beam for in situ measurements of Cu-wiring interconnects of submicron dimensions. We are able to measure submicron line widths, lengths, and thicknesses of both Cu and W structures, and a Ta liner in the test vehicle, to the absolute accuracy of 0.03 μm, and a relative accuracy of ˜4% in lateral dimensions, and ˜10% in heights. The shape of a buried electromigration void was also determined. This nanoscale nondestructive characterization technique promises to be powerful for a variety of materials systems.

  14. Combined use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy, phase contrast imaging for high resolution quantitative iron mapping in inflamed cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramaccioni, C.; Procopio, A.; Farruggia, G.; Malucelli, E.; Iotti, S.; Notargiacomo, A.; Fratini, M.; Yang, Y.; Pacureanu, A.; Cloetens, P.; Bohic, S.; Massimi, L.; Cutone, A.; Valenti, P.; Rosa, L.; Berlutti, F.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2017-06-01

    X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XRFM) is a powerful technique to detect and localize elements in cells. To derive information useful for biology and medicine, it is essential not only to localize, but also to map quantitatively the element concentration. Here we applied quantitative XRFM to iron in phagocytic cells. Iron, a primary component of living cells, can become toxic when present in excess. In human fluids, free iron is maintained at 10-18 M concentration thanks to iron binding proteins as lactoferrin (Lf). The iron homeostasis, involving the physiological ratio of iron between tissues/secretions and blood, is strictly regulated by ferroportin, the sole protein able to export iron from cells to blood. Inflammatory processes induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or bacterial pathoge inhibit ferroportin synthesis in epithelial and phagocytic cells thus hindering iron export, increasing intracellular iron and bacterial multiplication. In this respect, Lf is emerging as an important regulator of both iron and inflammatory homeostasis. Here we studied phagocytic cells inflamed by bacterial LPS and untreated or treated with milk derived bovine Lf. Quantitative mapping of iron concentration and mass fraction at high spatial resolution is obtained combining X-ray fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and synchrotron phase contrast imaging.

  15. Scanning Transmission X-Ray, Laser Scanning, and Transmission Electron Microscopy Mapping of the Exopolymeric Matrix of Microbial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J. R.; Swerhone, G. D. W.; Leppard, G. G.; Araki, T.; Zhang, X.; West, M. M.; Hitchcock, A. P.

    2003-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) were used to map the distribution of macromolecular subcomponents (e.g., polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) of biofilm cells and matrix. The biofilms were developed from river water supplemented with methanol, and although they comprised a complex microbial community, the biofilms were dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. TEM provided the highest-resolution structural imaging, CLSM provided detailed compositional information when used in conjunction with molecular probes, and STXM provided compositional mapping of macromolecule distributions without the addition of probes. By examining exactly the same region of a sample with combinations of these techniques (STXM with CLSM and STXM with TEM), we demonstrate that this combination of multimicroscopy analysis can be used to create a detailed correlative map of biofilm structure and composition. We are using these correlative techniques to improve our understanding of the biochemical basis for biofilm organization and to assist studies intended to investigate and optimize biofilms for environmental remediation applications. PMID:12957944

  16. Preserving elemental content in adherent mammalian cells for analysis by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaoling; Paunesku, Tatjana; Lai, Barry; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Chen, S I; Finney, Lydia; Vine, David; Vogt, Stefan; Woloschak, Gayle; Jacobsen, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Trace metals play important roles in biological function, and x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) provides a way to quantitatively image their distribution within cells. The faithfulness of these measurements is dependent on proper sample preparation. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells as an example, we compare various approaches to the preparation of adherent mammalian cells for XFM imaging under ambient temperature. Direct side-by-side comparison shows that plunge-freezing-based cryoimmobilization provides more faithful preservation than conventional chemical fixation for most biologically important elements including P, S, Cl, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and possibly Ca in adherent mammalian cells. Although cells rinsed with fresh media had a great deal of extracellular background signal for Cl and Ca, this approach maintained cells at the best possible physiological status before rapid freezing and it does not interfere with XFM analysis of other elements. If chemical fixation has to be chosen, the combination of 3% paraformaldehyde and 1.5 % glutaraldehyde preserves S, Fe, Cu and Zn better than either fixative alone. When chemically fixed cells were subjected to a variety of dehydration processes, air drying was proved to be more suitable than other drying methods such as graded ethanol dehydration and freeze drying. This first detailed comparison for x-ray fluorescence microscopy shows how detailed quantitative conclusions can be affected by the choice of cell preparation method. 2016 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. Imaging and etching: soft x-ray microscopy on whole wet cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, John R.; Pine, Jerry

    1993-01-01

    We have produced images of whole wet tissue culture cells with the Stony Brook/BNL scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM). For fixed cells we have taken images at theoretical resolutions of approximately 50 - 75 nm, and in practice have measured FWHM of features down to near 100 nm, without any exotic image processing. For un-fixed (i.e., initially live) cells we have imaged with 100 nm pixels and measured features down to 250 nm. In order to do this we have developed, tested, and used a wet cell for maintaining fixed or live cells on the STXM stage during imaging. Our design of the wet cell and the culture substrates that go with it make the STXM compatible with almost all standard systems for surface adherent tissue culture. We show some new images of whole wet fixed and unfixed cells, with visible sub-micron features. We also report data that helps to characterize the tissue damage due to x-ray absorption during STXM imaging.

  18. The EXTraS project: Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiengo, Andrea

    Modern soft X-ray observatories can yield unique insights into time domain astrophysics. Indeed, a huge amount of information is stored - and largely unexploited - in data archives. The EXTraS project will harvest the hitherto unexplored temporal domain information buried in the serendipitous data collected by the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument onboard the ESA XMM-Newton mission in more than 13 yr of observations. This will include a search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis, as well as a search and characterization of variability (both periodical and aperiodical) in hundreds of thousands of sources spanning more than nine orders of magnitude in time scale (from <1 s to >10 yr) and six orders of magnitude in flux (from 10(-9) to 10(-15) erg cm(-2) s(-1) in 0.2-12 keV). X-ray results will be complemented by multiwavelength characterization of all previously undetected sources. Phenomenological classification of variable sources will also be performed. All our results will be made available to the community in a public catalogue, together with new analysis tools. The EXTraS project, funded within the EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework, is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany).

  19. Balloon Valvuloplasty to Predict X-ray Projection Angles that are Perpendicular to Cardiovascular Structures: A TAVI Patient Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Fetterly, Kenneth; Greason, Kevin; Mathew, Verghese

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to describe methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of cardiovascular structures based on a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon. These methods facilitate X-ray beam alignment with respect to the anatomy of interest. X-ray beam projections which are perpendicular to the long axis of cardiovascular structures are required to support interventional procedures, including transcatheter aortic valve implant (TAVI). During the TAVI procedure, the 3D angular orientation of the LVOT of 10 patients was measured from a single planar image of an aortic valvuloplasty balloon and the continuous range of X-ray projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane were calculated (research method). Misalignment of the X-ray beam and TAVI valve frame was measured from images of the deployed valve. The accuracy of the research method was compared to clinical standard method to determine appropriate X-ray projection angles, which utilized CT and aortography. Using the clinical standard method, the median misalignment of the X-ray beam and TAVI valve frame was 8.6° (range 2.6° to 21°). Misalignment was reduced to 2.5° (range 0° to 10°) using the research method. The 3D angular orientation of cardiovascular structures can be measured accurately from a single X-ray projection image of a known cardiovascular device contained within the anatomy of interest. For TAVI procedures, improved X-ray beam alignment may help facilitate procedural success. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The transverse forefoot arch demonstrated by a novel X-ray projection.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, O; Vuust, M; Understrup, B; Højbjerre, M; Bøttcher, S; Voigt, M

    2009-01-01

    Metatarsalgia is often treated by metatarsal osteotomy. Exact knowledge of the normal anatomy of the forefoot is essential for pre-operative planning. The objective of this study was to investigate the forefoot arch during maximal loading in a randomly selected population sample. Two hundred subjects randomly selected from a municipality representative of Denmark were invited to interview and forefoot X-ray examination, including a novel horizontal X-ray projection by which the height of each metatarsal from the floor can be measured under maximal loading. One hundred and thirty-four subjects (79%) presented themselves for interview and X-ray examination. The study group was representative of the randomly selected population sample in terms of age, sex and incidence of metatarsalgia. The study verified that the interrelated geometry of the metatarsal heads in the AP plane corresponds to a parabola as suggested previously (Le Lièvre's parabola). Also in the horizontal plane, the metatarsal heads generally form an arch, the transverse forefoot arch (TFA). Mean height was 3.91mm (S.E.=0.10). The individual height of the TFA varied from -1 to 10mm and was dependent on the width of the forefoot. The relative height of the arch (arch height divided by forefoot width) was independent of age and sex. A non-significant tendency towards a lower arch among subjects with metatarsalgia was observed. This population study demonstrated that the metatarsal heads constitute arches in both planes (Le Lièvre's parabola in the AP plane and the transverse forefoot arch in the horizontal plane). This knowledge is essential for pre-operative planning in metatarsal osteotomy for metatarsalgia. Formulae for calculating the individual location of each metatarsal head were obtained.

  1. A new detector system for low energy X-ray fluorescence coupled with soft X-ray microscopy: First tests and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Bufon, Jernej; Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Altissimo, Matteo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Borghes, Roberto; Carrato, Sergio; Cautero, Giuseppe; Fabiani, Sergio; Giacomini, Gabriele; Giuressi, Dario; Kourousias, George; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Picciotto, Antonino; Piemonte, Claudio; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rashevskaya, Irina; Stolfa, Andrea; Vacchi, Andrea; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The last decades have witnessed substantial efforts in the development of several detector technologies for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) applications. In spite of the increasing trend towards performing, cost-effective and reliable XRF systems, detectors for soft X-ray spectroscopy still remain a challenge, requiring further study, engineering and customization in order to yield effective and efficient systems. In this paper we report on the development, first characterization and tests of a novel multielement detector system based on low leakage current silicon drift detectors (SDD) coupled to ultra low noise custom CMOS preamplifiers for synchrotron-based low energy XRF. This new system exhibits the potential for improving the count rate by at least an order of magnitude resulting in ten-fold shorter dwell time at an energy resolution similar to that of single element silicon drift detectors.

  2. X-ray and electron microscopy studies on the biodistribution and biomodification of iron oxide nanoparticles in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dongwook; Nho, Hyun Woo; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Biodistribution and biomodification of iron oxide (Fe3O4 and α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (NPs) in a well-known toxicity test organism, Daphnia magna (D. magna), were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). In addition to the morphological changes in the gut tissues of D. magna, biodistribution and biomodification of iron oxide NPs in the digestive tract of D. magna were also monitored in this study. Upon exposures to both iron oxide NPs, unique morphological changes (e.g., irregular shaped microvilli, epithelial cell protrusion, and dilatation of cytoplasmic inclusion) in the gut tissues of D. magna were observed along with bacterial colonization of the gut lumen. However, despite their heavy accumulations in the digesitive tract, TEM and STXM images confirmed us that both Fe3O4 and α-Fe2O3 NPs were not penetrating into the gut tissues of D. magna. Moreover, for the Fe3O4 NPs in direct contact with the gut microvilli of D. magna, slight but significant spectral changes were observed in their Fe L-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra, which indicated that there were biomodifications of Fe3O4 NPs, probably involving oxidative dissolution of Fe3O4 NPs followed by rapid precipitation of ferric oxide or hydroxide. However, no significant changes were observed in the Fe L-edge XANES spectra of the α-Fe2O3 NPs present in the gut lumen of D. magna. These X-ray and electron microscopic observations confirmed us that, despite similarities in core sizes and chemical compositions, NPs with different crystalline phase and dissolution rates can interact quite differently with their local environment, may result in different biodistribution and cause completely dissimilar toxicities.

  3. Optimized Fluoroscopy Setting and Appropriate Project Position Can Reduce X-ray Radiation Doses Rates during Electrophysiology Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bing-Bo; Yao, Yan; Wu, Ling-Min; Qiao, Yu; Zheng, Li-Hui; Ding, Li-Gang; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shu

    2015-05-05

    Nonfluoroscopic three-dimensional electroanatomical system is widely used nowadays, but X-ray remains indispensable for complex electrophysiology procedures. This study aimed to evaluate the value of optimized parameter setting and different projection position to reduce X-ray radiation dose rates. From June 2013 to October 2013, 105 consecutive patients who underwent complex ablation were enrolled in the study. After the ablation, the radiation dose rates were measured by two different settings (default setting and optimized setting) with three projection positions (posteroanterior [PA] projection; left anterior oblique [LAO] 30° projection; and LAO 45° projection). The parameter of preset voltage, pulse width, critical voltage, peak voltage, noise reduction, edge enhancement, pulse rate, and dose per frame was modified in the optimized setting. The optimized setting reduced radiation dose rates by 87.5% (1.7 Gy/min vs. 13.6 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in PA, 87.3% (2.5 Gy/min vs. 19.7 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in LAO 30°, 85.9% (3.1 Gy/min vs. 22.1 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in LAO 45°. Increase the angle of projection position will increase the radiation dose rate. We can reduce X-ray radiation dose rates by adjusting the parameter setting of X-ray system. Avoiding oblique projection of large angle is another way to reduce X-ray radiation dose rates.

  4. X-ray propagation microscopy of biological cells using waveguides as a quasipoint source

    SciTech Connect

    Giewekemeyer, K.; Krueger, S. P.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Bartels, M.; Salditt, T.; Beta, C.

    2011-02-15

    We have used x-ray waveguides as highly confining optical elements for nanoscale imaging of unstained biological cells using the simple geometry of in-line holography. The well-known twin-image problem is effectively circumvented by a simple and fast iterative reconstruction. The algorithm which combines elements of the classical Gerchberg-Saxton scheme and the hybrid-input-output algorithm is optimized for phase-contrast samples, well-justified for imaging of cells at multi-keV photon energies. The experimental scheme allows for a quantitative phase reconstruction from a single holographic image without detailed knowledge of the complex illumination function incident on the sample, as demonstrated for freeze-dried cells of the eukaryotic amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. The accessible resolution range is explored by simulations, indicating that resolutions on the order of 20 nm are within reach applying illumination times on the order of minutes at present synchrotron sources.

  5. Real-Time X-Ray Microscopy of Al-Cu Eutectic Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.; Sen, Subhayu

    1998-01-01

    Recent improvements in the resolution of the X-ray Transmission Microscope (XTM) for Solidification Studies provide microstructure feature detectability down to 5 micrometers during solidification. This presentation will show the recent results from observations made in real-time of the solid-liquid interfacial morphologies of the Al-CuAI2 eutectic alloy. Lamellar dimensions and spacings, transitions of morphology caused by growth rate changes, and eutectic grain structures are open to measurements. A unique vantage point viewing the face of the interface isotherm is possible for the first time with the XTM due to its infinite depth of field. A video of the solid-liquid interfaces seen in-situ and in real-time will be shown.

  6. In situ azimuthal rotation device for linear dichroism measurements in scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cruz, D.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Tyliszczak, T.; Rousseau, M.-E.; Pézolet, M.

    2007-03-01

    A novel miniature rotation device used in conjunction with a scanning transmission x-ray microscope is described. It provides convenient in situ sample rotation to enable measurements of linear dichroism at high spatial resolution. The design, fabrication, and mechanical characterization are presented. This device has been used to generate quantitative maps of the spatial distribution of the orientation of proteins in several different spider and silkworm silks. Specifically, quantitative maps of the dichroic signal at the C 1s→π*amide transition in longitudinal sections of the silk fibers give information about the spatial orientation, degree of alignment, and spatial distribution of protein peptide bonds. A new approach for analyzing the dichroic signal to extract orientation distributions, in addition to magnitudes of aligned components, is presented and illustrated with results from Nephila clavipes dragline spider silk measured using the in situ rotation device.

  7. X-ray propagation microscopy of biological cells using waveguides as a quasipoint source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giewekemeyer, K.; Krüger, S. P.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Bartels, M.; Beta, C.; Salditt, T.

    2011-02-01

    We have used x-ray waveguides as highly confining optical elements for nanoscale imaging of unstained biological cells using the simple geometry of in-line holography. The well-known twin-image problem is effectively circumvented by a simple and fast iterative reconstruction. The algorithm which combines elements of the classical Gerchberg-Saxton scheme and the hybrid-input-output algorithm is optimized for phase-contrast samples, well-justified for imaging of cells at multi-keV photon energies. The experimental scheme allows for a quantitative phase reconstruction from a single holographic image without detailed knowledge of the complex illumination function incident on the sample, as demonstrated for freeze-dried cells of the eukaryotic amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. The accessible resolution range is explored by simulations, indicating that resolutions on the order of 20 nm are within reach applying illumination times on the order of minutes at present synchrotron sources.

  8. Multi-scale 3D investigations of a commercial 18650 Li-ion battery with correlative electron- and X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelb, Jeff; Finegan, Donal P.; Brett, Dan J. L.; Shearing, Paul R.

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, a commercial 18650 Li-ion cylindrical cell is investigated with non-destructive 3D X-ray microscopy across a range of length scales, beginning with a survey of the entire cell and non-destructively enlarging a smaller section. Active materials are extracted from a disassembled cell and imaging performed using a combination of sub-micron X-ray microscopy and 2D scanning-electron microscopy, which point toward the need for multi-scale analysis in order to accurately characterize the cell. Furthermore, a small section is physically isolated for 3D nano-scale X-ray microscopy, which provides a measurement of porosity and enables the effective diffusivity and 3-dimensional tortuosities to be calculated via computer simulation. Finally, the 3D X-ray microscopy data is loaded into a correlative microscopy environment, where a representative sub-surface region is identified and, subsequently, analyzed using electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results of this study elucidate the microstructural characteristics and potential degradation mechanisms of a commercial NCA battery and, further, establish a technique for extracting the Bruggeman exponent for a real-world microstructure using correlative microscopy.

  9. Preserving elemental content in adherent mammalian cells for analysis by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Qiaoling; Paunesku, Tatjana; Lai, Barry; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Vine, David; Vogt, Stefan; Woloschak, Gayle; Jacobsen, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Trace metals play important roles in biological function, and x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) provides a way to quantitatively image their distribution within cells. The faithfulness of these measurements is dependent on proper sample preparation. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells as an example, we compare various approaches to the preparation of adherent mammalian cells for XFM imaging under ambient temperature. Direct side-by-side comparison shows that plunge-freezing-based cryoimmobilization provides more faithful preservation than conventional chemical fixation for most biologically important elements including P, S, Cl, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and possibly Ca in adherent mammalian cells. Although cells rinsed with fresh media had a great deal of extracellular background signal for Cl and Ca, this approach maintained cells at the best possible physiological status before rapid freezing and it does not interfere with XFM analysis of other elements. If chemical fixation has to be chosen, the combination of 3% paraformaldehyde and 1.5 % glutaraldehyde preserves S, Fe, Cu and Zn better than either fixative alone. When chemically fixed cells were subjected to a variety of dehydration processes, air drying was proved to be more suitable than other drying methods such as graded ethanol dehydration and freeze drying. This first detailed comparison for x-ray fluorescence microscopy shows how detailed quantitative conclusions can be affected by the choice of cell preparation method

  10. Preserving elemental content in adherent mammalian cells for analysis by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, Qiaoling; Paunesku, Tatjana; Lai, Barry; ...

    2016-08-31

    Trace metals play important roles in biological function, and x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) provides a way to quantitatively image their distribution within cells. The faithfulness of these measurements is dependent on proper sample preparation. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells as an example, we compare various approaches to the preparation of adherent mammalian cells for XFM imaging under ambient temperature. Direct side-by-side comparison shows that plunge-freezing-based cryoimmobilization provides more faithful preservation than conventional chemical fixation for most biologically important elements including P, S, Cl, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and possibly Ca in adherent mammalian cells. Although cells rinsed with freshmore » media had a great deal of extracellular background signal for Cl and Ca, this approach maintained cells at the best possible physiological status before rapid freezing and it does not interfere with XFM analysis of other elements. If chemical fixation has to be chosen, the combination of 3% paraformaldehyde and 1.5 % glutaraldehyde preserves S, Fe, Cu and Zn better than either fixative alone. Lastly, when chemically fixed cells were subjected to a variety of dehydration processes, air drying was proved to be more suitable than other drying methods such as graded ethanol dehydration and freeze drying. This first detailed comparison for x-ray fluorescence microscopy shows how detailed quantitative conclusions can be affected by the choice of cell preparation method.« less

  11. Preserving elemental content in adherent mammalian cells for analysis by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Qiaoling; Paunesku, Tatjana; Lai, Barry; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Vine, David; Vogt, Stefan; Woloschak, Gayle; Jacobsen, Chris

    2016-08-31

    Trace metals play important roles in biological function, and x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) provides a way to quantitatively image their distribution within cells. The faithfulness of these measurements is dependent on proper sample preparation. Using mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells as an example, we compare various approaches to the preparation of adherent mammalian cells for XFM imaging under ambient temperature. Direct side-by-side comparison shows that plunge-freezing-based cryoimmobilization provides more faithful preservation than conventional chemical fixation for most biologically important elements including P, S, Cl, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and possibly Ca in adherent mammalian cells. Although cells rinsed with fresh media had a great deal of extracellular background signal for Cl and Ca, this approach maintained cells at the best possible physiological status before rapid freezing and it does not interfere with XFM analysis of other elements. If chemical fixation has to be chosen, the combination of 3% paraformaldehyde and 1.5 % glutaraldehyde preserves S, Fe, Cu and Zn better than either fixative alone. Lastly, when chemically fixed cells were subjected to a variety of dehydration processes, air drying was proved to be more suitable than other drying methods such as graded ethanol dehydration and freeze drying. This first detailed comparison for x-ray fluorescence microscopy shows how detailed quantitative conclusions can be affected by the choice of cell preparation method.

  12. The use of X-ray diffraction, microscopy, and magnetic measurements for analysing microstructural features of a duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro Miranda, M.A.; Neto, J.M.

    2005-05-15

    X-ray diffraction, light optical microscopy, and magnetization saturation measurements were employed to analyse the microstructural features of a UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel modified by high-temperature treatments. The samples were heated to 1300 deg. C and cooled by different ways to produce five different microstructures. Solution treatments at 1000 deg. C were also employed to produce another five conditions. Three methods were employed to determine the austenite/ferrite proportions. X-ray diffraction gave higher austenite values than the other methods, due to the influence of texture, but can be successfully used to determine the microstrain level in each phase. Magnetic saturation measurement is a very simple and precise method for quantification of austenite and ferrite volume fractions in samples that were fast-cooled and slow-cooled. Light microscopy can give a fast and precise measurement of the phase proportions and reveals important features related to the morphology of the phases, but in the samples where the austenite content is low, quantification becomes difficult and imprecise.

  13. Current status of X-ray spectrometer development in the SELENE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Okada, T.; Shiraishi, H.; Shirai, K.; Arai, T.; Ogawa, K.; Hosono, K.; Arakawa, M.; Kato, M.

    2008-07-01

    The X-ray spectrometer (XRS) on the SELENE (SELenological and ENgineering Explorer) spacecraft, XRS, will observe fluorescent X-rays from the lunar surface. The energy of the fluorescent X-ray depends on the elements of which the lunar soil consists, therefore we can determine elemental composition of the upper most lunar surface. The XRS consists of three components: XRF-A, SOL-B, and SOL-C. XRF-A is the main sensor to observe X-rays from the lunar surface. SOL-B is direct monitor of Solar X-ray using Si-PIN photodiode. SOL-C is another Solar X-ray monitor but observes the X-rays from the standard sample attached on the base plate. This enables us to analyze by a comparative method similar to typical laboratory XRF methods. XRF-A and SOL-C adopt charge coupled device as an X-ray detector which depletion layer is deep enough to detect X-rays. The X-ray spectra were obtained by the flight model of XRS components, and all components has been worked well to analyze fluorescent X-rays. Currently, development of the hardware and software of the XRS has been finished and we are preparing for system integration test for the launch.

  14. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    penetration by nanoradiators. In conclusion, the combined use of a synchrotron X-ray microbeam-irradiated three-dimensional ROS gel and confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy provides a simple dosimetry method for track analysis of X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator radiation, suggesting extensive cellular damage with dose-enhancement beyond a single cell containing IONs.

  15. Exploiting the Photoelectric effect for X-ray Polarimetry using Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, Keith; Black, Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Hill, Joanne; Swank, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The promise of photoelectric X-ray polarimetry has now been realized in laboratory demonstrations and may soon be used for astrophysical observations. Photoelectric polarimetry in gas filled proportional counters achieves high sensitivity through a combination of broad band width and good modulation. The band can be tuned by careful choice of gas composition and pressure. The measurements rely on imaging the tracks of photoelectrons. The initial direction of each track carries information about the electric field of the X-ray photon, and an ensemble of such measurements thus measures the net polarization of the source. A novel readout geometry using time projection chambers (TPC) allows deep (i.e. high efficiency) detectors, albeit without the ability to image the sky. Polarimeters which exploit the TPC geometry can be optimized for use behind telescopes, to study faint persistent sources, or as wide field of view instruments, designed to study bright transient events such as gamma-ray bursts or solar flares. We present the conceptual design of both types of TPC polarimeter. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that these polarimeters can achieve substantial gains in the polarization sensitivity achievable in experiments of modest size.

  16. 3D Forward and Back-Projection for X-Ray CT Using Separable Footprints

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yong; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Balter, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Iterative methods for 3D image reconstruction have the potential to improve image quality over conventional filtered back projection (FBP) in X-ray computed tomography (CT). However, the computation burden of 3D cone-beam forward and back-projectors is one of the greatest challenges facing practical adoption of iterative methods for X-ray CT. Moreover, projector accuracy is also important for iterative methods. This paper describes two new separable footprint (SF) projector methods that approximate the voxel footprint functions as 2D separable functions. Because of the separability of these footprint functions, calculating their integrals over a detector cell is greatly simplified and can be implemented efficiently. The SF-TR projector uses trapezoid functions in the transaxial direction and rectangular functions in the axial direction, whereas the SF-TT projector uses trapezoid functions in both directions. Simulations and experiments showed that both SF projector methods are more accurate than the distance-driven (DD) projector, which is a current state-of-the-art method in the field. The SF-TT projector is more accurate than the SF-TR projector for rays associated with large cone angles. The SF-TR projector has similar computation speed with the DD projector and the SF-TT projector is about two times slower. PMID:20529732

  17. Analysis of Individual Environmental Particles Using Modern Methods of Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Cowin, James P.; Iedema, Martin J.

    2006-02-01

    Understanding the composition of particles in the atmosphere is critical because of their health effects and their direct and indirect effects on radiative forcing, and hence on climate. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the utility of single particle off-line analysis to investigate the chemistry of individual atmospheric particles using modern, state-of-the-art electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry techniques. We show that these methods provide specific, detailed data on particle composition, chemistry, morphology, phase and internal structure. This information is crucial for evaluating hygroscopic properties of aerosols, understanding aerosol aging and reactivity, and correlating the characteristics of aerosols with their optical properties. The manuscript presents a number of analytical advances in methods of electron probe particle analysis along with a brief review of a number of the research projects carried out in the authors’ laboratory on the chemical characterization of environmental particles. The obtained data offers a rich set of qualitative and quantitative information on the particle chemistry, composition and the mechanisms of gas-particle interactions which are of high importance to atmospheric processes involving particulate matter and air pollution.

  18. Raman microscopy and x-ray fluorescence analysis of pigments on medieval and Renaissance Italian manuscript cuttings.

    PubMed

    Burgio, Lucia; Clark, Robin J H; Hark, Richard R

    2010-03-30

    Italian medieval and Renaissance manuscript cuttings and miniatures from the Victoria and Albert Museum were analyzed by Raman microscopy to compile a database of pigments used in different periods and different Italian regions. The palette identified in most manuscripts and cuttings was found to include lead white, gypsum, azurite, lazurite, indigo, malachite, vermilion, red lead, lead tin yellow (I), goethite, carbon, and iron gall ink. A few of the miniatures, such as the historiated capital "M" painted by Gerolamo da Cremona and the Petrarca manuscript by Bartolomeo Sanvito, are of exceptional quality and were analyzed extensively; some contained unusual materials. The widespread usage of iron oxides such as goethite and hematite as minor components of mixtures with azurite is particularly notable. The use of a needle-shaped form of iron gall ink as a pigment rather than a writing material was established by both Raman microscopy and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the Madonna and Child by Franco de' Russi.

  19. Equilibrium, FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and small wide angle X-ray scattering studies of chromates adsorption on modified bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdan, Marek; Maryuk, Oksana; Pikus, Stanisław; Olszewska, Elzbieta; Kwiatkowski, Ryszard; Skrzypek, Henryk

    2005-04-01

    The study presents a discussion about the adsorption mechanism of chromate anions on bentonite modified by hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br). The formation of alkylammonium chromates: HDTMAHCrO 4, (HDTMA) 2Cr 2O 7 and to the lesser extent (HDTMA) 2CrO 4 at the water-bentonite interface is examined based on the Scanning Electron Microscopy and surface tension measurements. The histograms of HDTMA/Cr(VI) molar ratio on the bentonite surface, found from Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) measurements, show that for the majority of points of bentonite surface the value of this ratio is in 1-2 range. FTIR spectra of modified bentonite samples show the change from gauche to trans conformation in the surfactant arrangement in the clay interlayer accompanying its concentration increase. In turn Small Wide Angle X-Ray Scattering (SWAXS) patterns evidently suggest incorporation of chromate anions into the interlamellar space of bentonite structure.

  20. Quantification of Biogenic Magnetite by Synchrotron X-ray Microscopy During the PETM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Kent, D. V.; Chen-Wiegart, Y. C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals, including spearhead-like and spindle-like ones up to 4 microns, have been reported in clay-rich sediments recording the ~56 Ma Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and carbon isotope excursion (CIE) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ and along with magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) chains, were suggested [Schumann et al. 2008 PNAS; Kopp et al. 2009 Paleoceanography] to account for the distinctive single domain (SD) rock magnetic properties of these sediments [Lanci et al. 2002 JGR]. However, because uncalibrated magnetic extraction techniques were used to provide material for TEM imaging of the biogenic magnetite, it is difficult to quantitatively analyze their concentration in the bulk clay. In this study, we use a synchrotron transmission X-ray microscope to image bulk CIE clay. We first take mosaic images of sub-millimeter-sized bulk clay samples, in which we can identify many of the various types of giant biogenic magnetite crystals, as well as several other types of iron minerals, such as pyrite framboids, siderite, and detrital magnetite. However, limited by the instrument resolution (~50 nm), we are not able to identify MTB chains let alone isolated magnetic nanoparticles that may be abundant the clay. To quantitatively estimate the concentration of the giant biogenic magnetite, we re-deposited the bulk clay sample in an alcohol solution on a silicon nitride membrane for 2D X-ray scans. After scanning a total area of 0.55 mm2 with average clay thickness of 4 μm, we identified ~40 spearheads, ~5 spindles and a few elongated rods and estimated their total magnetization as SD particles to be less than about 10% of the mass normalized clay for the scanned area. This result suggests that the giant biogenic magnetite is not a major source of the SD signal for the clay and is in good agreement with rock magnetic analyses using high-resolution first-order reversal curves and thermal fluctuation tomography on bulk CIE clay

  1. Experimental analysis of high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Denbeaux, Gregory; Harteneck, Bruce; Pearson, Angelic L.; Olynick, Deirdre; Schneider, Gerd; Attwood, David

    2001-09-06

    The soft x-ray, full-field microscope XM-1 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Advanced Light Source has already demonstrated its capability to resolve 25-nm features. This was accomplished using a micro zone plate (MZP) with an outer zone width of 25 nm. Limited by the aspect ratio of the resist used in the fabrication, the gold-plating thickness of that zone plate is around 40 nm. However, some applications, in particular, biological imaging, prefer improved efficiency, which can be achieved by high-aspect-ratio zone plates. We accomplish this by using a bilayer-resist process in the zone plate fabrication. As our first attempt, a 40-nm-outer-zone-width MZP with a nickel-plating thickness of 150 nm (aspect ratio of 4:1) was successfully fabricated. Relative to the 25-nm MZP, this zone plate is ten times more efficient. Using this high-efficiency MZP, a line test pattern with half period of 30 nm is resolved by the microscope at photon energy of 500 eV. Furthermore, with a new multilayer mirror, the XM-1 can now perform imaging up to 1.8 keV. An image of a line test pattern with half period of 40 nm has a measured modulation of 90%. The image was taken at 1.77 keV with the high-efficiency MZP with an outer zone width of 35 nm and a nickel-plating thickness of 180 nm (aspect ratio of 5:1). XM-1 provides a gateway to high-resolution imaging at high energy. To measure frequency response of the XM-1, a partially annealed gold ''island'' pattern was chosen as a test object. After comparison with the SEM image of the pattern, the microscope has the measured cutoff of 19 nm, close to the theoretical one of 17 nm. The normalized frequency response, which is the ratio of the power density of the soft x-ray image to that of the SEM image, is shown in this paper.

  2. Hard x-ray contact microscopy with 250 nm spatial resolution using a LiF film detector and a tabletop microsource

    SciTech Connect

    Almaviva, S.; Bonfigli, F.; Franzini, I.; Lai, A.; Montereali, R. M.; Pelliccia, D.; Cedola, A.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2006-07-31

    An innovative route for deep-submicrometer spatial resolution hard x-ray microscopy with tabletop x-ray source is proposed. A film of lithium fluoride (LiF) was used as imaging detector in contact mode. We present here the x-ray images recorded on LiF films of a Fresnel zone plate with submicrometer gold structures and of an onion cataphyll. The images were read with an optical confocal microscope in fluorescence mode. The measured spatial resolution was about 250 nm, i.e., close to the resolution limit of the confocal microscope. The advantages and drawbacks, and the possible improvements, of this route are discussed.

  3. Hard x-ray contact microscopy with 250 nm spatial resolution using a LiF film detector and a tabletop microsource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaviva, S.; Bonfigli, F.; Franzini, I.; Lai, A.; Montereali, R. M.; Pelliccia, D.; Cedola, A.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2006-07-01

    An innovative route for deep-submicrometer spatial resolution hard x-ray microscopy with tabletop x-ray source is proposed. A film of lithium fluoride (LiF) was used as imaging detector in contact mode. We present here the x-ray images recorded on LiF films of a Fresnel zone plate with submicrometer gold structures and of an onion cataphyll. The images were read with an optical confocal microscope in fluorescence mode. The measured spatial resolution was about 250nm, i.e., close to the resolution limit of the confocal microscope. The advantages and drawbacks, and the possible improvements, of this route are discussed.

  4. Visualizing chemical states and defects induced magnetism of graphene oxide by spatially-resolved-X-ray microscopy and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y F; Singh, Shashi B; Limaye, Mukta V; Shao, Y C; Hsieh, S H; Chen, L Y; Hsueh, H C; Wang, H T; Chiou, J W; Yeh, Y C; Chen, C W; Chen, C H; Ray, Sekhar C; Wang, J; Pong, W F; Takagi, Y; Ohigashi, T; Yokoyama, T; Kosugi, N

    2015-10-20

    This investigation studies the various magnetic behaviors of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and elucidates the relationship between the chemical states that involve defects therein and their magnetic behaviors in GO sheets. Magnetic hysteresis loop reveals that the GO is ferromagnetic whereas photo-thermal moderately reduced graphene oxide (M-rGO) and heavily reduced graphene oxide (H-rGO) gradually become paramagnetic behavior at room temperature. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and corresponding X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were utilized to investigate thoroughly the variation of the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups, as well as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states in flat and wrinkle regions to clarify the relationship between the spatially-resolved chemical states and the magnetism of GO, M-rGO and H-rGO. The results of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism further support the finding that C 2p(σ*)-derived states are the main origin of the magnetism of GO. Based on experimental results and first-principles calculations, the variation in magnetic behavior from GO to M-rGO and to H-rGO is interpreted, and the origin of ferromagnetism is identified as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states that involve defects/vacancies rather than the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups on GO sheets.

  5. New insights into globoids of protein storage vacuoles in wheat aleurone using synchrotron soft X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Regvar, Marjana; Eichert, Diane; Kaulich, Burkhard; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Pongrac, Paula; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Kreft, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Mature developed seeds are physiologically and biochemically committed to store nutrients, principally as starch, protein, oils, and minerals. The composition and distribution of elements inside the aleurone cell layer reflect their biogenesis, structural characteristics, and physiological functions. It is therefore of primary importance to understand the mechanisms underlying metal ion accumulation, distribution, storage, and bioavailability in aleurone subcellular organelles for seed fortification purposes. Synchrotron radiation soft X-ray full-field imaging mode (FFIM) and low-energy X-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) spectromicroscopy were applied to characterize major structural features and the subcellular distribution of physiologically important elements (Zn, Fe, Na, Mg, Al, Si, and P). These direct imaging methods reveal the accumulation patterns between the apoplast and symplast, and highlight the importance of globoids with phytic acid mineral salts and walls as preferential storage structures. C, N, and O chemical topographies are directly linked to the structural backbone of plant substructures. Zn, Fe, Na, Mg, Al, and P were linked to globoid structures within protein storage vacuoles with variable levels of co-localization. Si distribution was atypical, being contained in the aleurone apoplast and symplast, supporting a physiological role for Si in addition to its structural function. These results reveal that the immobilization of metals within the observed endomembrane structures presents a structural and functional barrier and affects bioavailability. The combination of high spatial and chemical X-ray microscopy techniques highlights how in situ analysis can yield new insights into the complexity of the wheat aleurone layer, whose precise biochemical composition, morphology, and structural characteristics are still not unequivocally resolved. PMID:21447756

  6. Localization and chemical forms of cadmium in plant samples by combining analytical electron microscopy and X-ray spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Fayard, Barbara; Sarret, Géraldine; Pairis, Sébastien; Bourguignon, Jacques

    2006-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a metal of high toxicity for plants. Resolving its distribution and speciation in plants is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance, trafficking and accumulation. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was exposed to cadmium under controlled conditions. Elemental distributions in the roots and in the leaves were determined using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX), and synchrotron-based micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), which offers a better sensitivity. The chemical form(s) of cadmium was investigated using Cd L III-edge (3538 eV) micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy. Plant μ-XANES spectra were fitted by linear combination of Cd reference spectra. Biological sample preparation and conditioning is a critical point because of possible artifacts. In this work we compared freeze-dried samples analyzed at ambient temperature and frozen hydrated samples analyzed at -170 °C. Our results suggest that in the roots Cd is localized in vascular bundles, and coordinated to S ligands. In the leaves, trichomes (epidermal hairs) represent the main compartment of Cd accumulation. In these specialized cells, μ-XANES results show that the majority of Cd is bound to O/N ligands likely provided by the cell wall, and a minor fraction could be bound to S-containing ligands. No significant difference in Cd speciation was observed between freeze-dried and frozen hydrated samples. This work illustrates the interest and the sensitivity of Cd L III-edge XANES spectroscopy, which is applied here for the first time to plant samples. Combining μ-XRF and Cd L III-edge μ-XANES spectroscopy offers promising tools to study Cd storage and trafficking mechanisms in plants and other biological samples.

  7. Visualizing chemical states and defects induced magnetism of graphene oxide by spatially-resolved-X-ray microscopy and spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. F.; Singh, Shashi B.; Limaye, Mukta V.; Shao, Y. C.; Hsieh, S. H.; Chen, L. Y.; Hsueh, H. C.; Wang, H. T.; Chiou, J. W.; Yeh, Y. C.; Chen, C. W.; Chen, C. H.; Ray, Sekhar C.; Wang, J.; Pong, W. F.; Takagi, Y.; Ohigashi, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Kosugi, N.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation studies the various magnetic behaviors of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and elucidates the relationship between the chemical states that involve defects therein and their magnetic behaviors in GO sheets. Magnetic hysteresis loop reveals that the GO is ferromagnetic whereas photo-thermal moderately reduced graphene oxide (M-rGO) and heavily reduced graphene oxide (H-rGO) gradually become paramagnetic behavior at room temperature. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and corresponding X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were utilized to investigate thoroughly the variation of the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups, as well as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states in flat and wrinkle regions to clarify the relationship between the spatially-resolved chemical states and the magnetism of GO, M-rGO and H-rGO. The results of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism further support the finding that C 2p(σ*)-derived states are the main origin of the magnetism of GO. Based on experimental results and first-principles calculations, the variation in magnetic behavior from GO to M-rGO and to H-rGO is interpreted, and the origin of ferromagnetism is identified as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states that involve defects/vacancies rather than the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups on GO sheets. PMID:26481557

  8. Intracellular distribution and stability of a luminescent rhenium(I) tricarbonyl tetrazolato complex using epifluorescence microscopy in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wedding, Jason L.; Harris, Hugh H.; Bader, Christie A.; Plush, Sally E.; Mak, Rachel; Massi, Massimiliano; Brooks, Douglas A.; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan; Werrett, Melissa V.; Simpson, Peter V.; Skelton, Brian W.; Stagni, Stefano

    2016-11-23

    Optical fluorescence microscopy was used in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence microscopy to monitor the stability and intracellular distribution of the luminescent rhenium(I) complex fac-[Re(CO)3(phen)L], where phen = 1,10-phenathroline and L = 5-(4-iodophenyl)tetrazolato, in 22Rv1 cells. The rhenium complex showed no signs of ancillary ligand dissociation, a conclusion based on data obtained via X-ray fluorescence imaging aligning iodine and rhenium distributions. A diffuse reticular localisation was detected for the complex, in the nuclear/perinuclear region of cells, by either optical or X-ray fluorescence techniques. Furthermore, X-ray fluorescence also showed that the Re-I complex disrupted the homeostasis of some biologically relevant elements, such as chlorine, potassium and zinc.

  9. Intracellular distribution and stability of a luminescent rhenium(I) tricarbonyl tetrazolato complex using epifluorescence microscopy in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Wedding, Jason L.; Harris, Hugh H.; Bader, Christie A.; ...

    2016-11-23

    Optical fluorescence microscopy was used in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence microscopy to monitor the stability and intracellular distribution of the luminescent rhenium(I) complex fac-[Re(CO)3(phen)L], where phen = 1,10-phenathroline and L = 5-(4-iodophenyl)tetrazolato, in 22Rv1 cells. The rhenium complex showed no signs of ancillary ligand dissociation, a conclusion based on data obtained via X-ray fluorescence imaging aligning iodine and rhenium distributions. A diffuse reticular localisation was detected for the complex, in the nuclear/perinuclear region of cells, by either optical or X-ray fluorescence techniques. Furthermore, X-ray fluorescence also showed that the Re-I complex disrupted the homeostasis of some biologically relevant elements, suchmore » as chlorine, potassium and zinc.« less

  10. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy with X-ray Fluorescence Detection at the XUV Beamline P04, PETRA III, DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, K.; Lühl, L.; Nisius, T.; Haidl, A.; Gnewkow, R.; Lötgering, L.; Dierks, H.; Kanngießer, B.; Wilhein, T.

    2017-06-01

    The presented scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM), build on top of our existing modular platform (FlexIX) for high resolution imaging experiments, allows versatile investigations of different samples. The FlexIX endstation allows to switch between a Full Field and a STXM mode. For the STXM mode we use a spatialy resolved detector together with an energy dispersive detector, this allows to investigate the morphology and the chemical or elemental distribution of the sample simultaneous. The combination of the nanoscopy endstation and the XUV beamline P04 results in a powerful tool for investigations of life science samples.

  11. Trace metals and their relation to bacterial infections studied by X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maser, J.; Wagner, D.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Legnini, D.; Moric, I.; Bermudez, L.

    2003-03-01

    Bacterial pathogens survive in different environments in the human host by responding with expression of virulence factors that enable them to adapt to changing conditions. Trace elements regulate the expression of many virulence genes in bacteria and are thus important for their survival in the host. Mycobacteria are intracellular pathogens that can cause diseases such as tuberculosis or secondary infections in immunocompromised patients. We have used a hard x-ray microprobe to study the trace element distribution in the mycobacterial phagosome after infection of macrophages. We have studied phagosomes with virulent (M. avium) and nonvirulent (M. smegmatis) mycobacteria. In this article, we will show that the iron concentration in phagosomes with macrophages infected with nonvirulent M. smegmatis is reduced 24 hours after infection but increased in phagosomes in cells infected with virulent M. avium. In addition, we will show the effect activation of macrophages with tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) or interferon (IFN-γ) has on the iron concentration in M. avium.

  12. Multivariate statistics applications in scanning transmission electron microscopy X-ray spectrum imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M

    2011-01-01

    A modern scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) fitted with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) system can quickly and easily produce spectrum image (SI) datasets containing so much information (hundreds to thousands of megabytes) that they cannot be comprehensively interrogated by a human analyst. Therefore, advanced mathematical techniques are needed to glean materials science and engineering insight into the processing-structure-properties relationship of the examined material from the SI data. This review will discuss recent advances in the application of multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) methods to STEM-EDS SI experiments. In particular, the fundamental mathematics of principal component analysis (PCA) and related methods are reviewed, and advanced methods such as multivariate curve resolution (MCR) are discussed. The applications of PCA and MCR-based techniques to solve difficult materials science problems, such as the analysis of a particle fully embedded in a matrix phase are discussed, as well as confounding effects such as rank deficiency that can confuse the results of MVSA computations. Possible future advances and areas in need of study are also mentioned.

  13. X-ray tomographic microscopy for non-destructive inspection and advanced materials characterization. Final report, May 22, 1992--May 21, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-27

    This was a CRADA to transfer the x-ray tomographic microscope technology to the Quality Technology Center of General Electric Air Craft Engines Division in Ohio. The x-ray tomographic microscope (XTM) is a high resolution, three-dimensional imaging system that can be used to image materials microstructures noninvasively. The apparatus consists of an x-ray source, x-ray collimators, sample positioning stages, a fluorescent screen to convert x-rays to visible light, an optical lens, and a thermoelectrically cooled charge coupled device detector. The details of the microscope`s design have been described elsewhere. In practice, the sample to be imaged is positioned on a rotating stage. The sample is initially translated out of the x-ray path, and an image is obtained of the incident x-ray beam (the reference image). Next, the sample is placed between the x-ray path and the scintillator, and another image, the projection image, is acquired. The ratios of the logarithms of the reference image and the projection image provide values of the integrated x-ray attenuation through the sample. By rotating the sample in discrete angular increments through 180 degrees, enough data can be obtained to reconstruct the two-dimensional projection images into a three-dimensional image of the mineral density distribution in the sample. This reconstruction procedure, known as reconstruction from projections, is usually performed with the technique of Fourier-filtered back-projection. Using the present microscope, a 1 cubic centimeter volume can be imaged with five micrometer volume elements in about one hour or less.

  14. The Swift Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients Project:. [A Review, New Results and Future Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Vercellone, S.; Bocchino, F.; Burrows, D. N.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Gehrels, N.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present a review of the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT) Project, a systematic investigation of the properties of SFXTs with a strategy that combines Swift monitoring programs with outburst follow-up observations. This strategy has quickly tripled the available sets of broad-band data of SFXT outbursts, and gathered a wealth of out-of-outburst data, which have led us to a broad-band spectral characterization, an assessment of the fraction of the time these sources spend in each phase, and their duty cycle of inactivity. We present some new observational results obtained through our outburst follow-ups, as fitting examples of the exceptional capabilities of Swift in catching bright flares and monitor them panchromatically.

  15. A final report to the Laboratory Directed Research and Development committee on Project 93-ERP-075: ``X-ray laser propagation and coherence: Diagnosing fast-evolving, high-density laser plasmas using X-ray lasers``

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Cauble, R.; Da Silva, L.B.; Libby, S.B.; Moreno, J.C.

    1996-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Exploratory Research Project (ERP) entitled ``X-ray Laser Propagation and Coherence: Diagnosing Fast-evolving, High-density Laser Plasmas Using X-ray Lasers,`` tracking code 93-ERP-075. The most significant accomplishment of this project is the demonstration of a new laser plasma diagnostic: a soft x-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a neonlike yttrium x-ray laser at 155 {angstrom} as the probe source. Detailed comparisons of absolute two-dimensional electron density profiles obtained from soft x-ray laser interferograms and profiles obtained from radiation hydrodynamics codes, such as LASNEX, will allow us to validate and benchmark complex numerical models used to study the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Thus the development of soft x-ray interferometry technique provides a mechanism to probe the deficiencies of the numerical models and is an important tool for, the high-energy density physics and science-based stockpile stewardship programs. The authors have used the soft x-ray interferometer to study a number of high-density, fast evolving, laser-produced plasmas, such as the dynamics of exploding foils and colliding plasmas. They are pursuing the application of the soft x-ray interferometer to study ICF-relevant plasmas, such as capsules and hohlraums, on the Nova 10-beam facility. They have also studied the development of enhanced-coherence, shorter-pulse-duration, and high-brightness x-ray lasers. The utilization of improved x-ray laser sources can ultimately enable them to obtain three-dimensional holographic images of laser-produced plasmas.

  16. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-10

    In this study, we present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme in order to study high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes of the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combination of the developed excitation mechanism with a single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. The required mechanical stability is achieved by a compact design of the microscope. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with 35 nm resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a –6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ~0.1° amplitude at –9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  17. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, Stefano Chen, Zhao; Kukreja, Roopali; Spoddig, Detlef; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ollefs, Katharina; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-15

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  18. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ˜6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ˜0.1° amplitude at ˜9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  19. Fast two-dimensional grid and transmission X-ray microscopy scanning methods for visualizing and characterizing protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Wojdyla, Justyna Aleksandra; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Martiel, Isabelle; Ebner, Simon; Huang, Chia-Ying; Caffrey, Martin; Bunk, Oliver; Wang, Meitian

    2016-01-01

    A fast continuous grid scan protocol has been incorporated into the Swiss Light Source (SLS) data acquisition and analysis software suite on the macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamlines. Its combination with fast readout single-photon counting hybrid pixel array detectors (PILATUS and EIGER) allows for diffraction-based identification of crystal diffraction hotspots and the location and centering of membrane protein microcrystals in the lipid cubic phase (LCP) in in meso in situ serial crystallography plates and silicon nitride supports. Diffraction-based continuous grid scans with both still and oscillation images are supported. Examples that include a grid scan of a large (50 nl) LCP bolus and analysis of the resulting diffraction images are presented. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) complements and benefits from fast grid scanning. STXM has been demonstrated at the SLS beamline X06SA for near-zero-dose detection of protein crystals mounted on different types of sample supports at room and cryogenic temperatures. Flash-cooled crystals in nylon loops were successfully identified in differential and integrated phase images. Crystals of just 10 µm thickness were visible in integrated phase images using data collected with the EIGER detector. STXM offers a truly low-dose method for locating crystals on solid supports prior to diffraction data collection at both synchrotron microfocusing and free-electron laser X-ray facilities. PMID:27275141

  20. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; ...

    2016-02-26

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase seperated regions. The ability to simultanousely track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of- the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiatedmore » at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, which is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. Lastly, the direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.« less

  1. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems. PMID:26915398

  2. Micron-Resolution X-ray Structural Microscopy Studies of 3-D Grain Growth in Polycrystalline Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budai, J. D.; Yang, W.; Tischler, J. Z.; Liu, W.; Larson, B. C.; Ice, G. E.

    2004-03-01

    We describe a new polychromatic x-ray microdiffraction technique providing 3D measurements of lattice structure, orientation and strain with submicron point-to-point spatial resolution. The instrument is located on the UNI-CAT II undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source and uses Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors, differential aperture CCD measurements and automated analysis of spatially-resolved Laue patterns. 3D x-ray structural microscopy is applicable to a wide range of materials investigations and here we describe 3D thermal grain growth studies in polycrystalline aluminum ( ˜1% Fe,Si) from Alcoa. The morphology and orientations of the grains in a hot-rolled aluminum sample were initially mapped. The sample was then annealed to induce grain growth, cooled to room temperature, and the same volume region was re-mapped to determine the thermal migration of all grain boundaries. Significant grain growth was observed after annealing above ˜350^oC where both low-angle and high-angle boundaries were mobile. These measurements will provide the detailed 3D experimental input needed for testing theories and computer models of 3D grain growth in bulk materials.

  3. Charge transfer in nanocrystalline-Au /ZnO nanorods investigated by x-ray spectroscopy and scanning photoelectron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, J. W.; Ray, S. C.; Tsai, H. M.; Pao, C. W.; Chien, F. Z.; Pong, W. F.; Tsai, M.-H.; Wu, J. J.; Tseng, C. H.; Chen, C.-H.; Lee, J. F.; Guo, J.-H.

    2007-05-01

    O K- and Zn and Au L3-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and scanning photoelectron microscopy (SPEM) are performed to investigate the electronic structure of ZnO nanorods with nanocrystalline (nc)-Au particles grown on the surfaces. The XANES spectra of nc-Au /ZnO nanorods reveal the decrease of the number of both O 2p and Zn 4s/3d unoccupied states with the increase of the nc-Au particle size. The number of Au 6s /5d unoccupied states increases when the size of nc-Au particle decreases, indicating that the deposition of nc-Au particles on the surface of ZnO nanorods promotes charge transfer from the ZnO nanorods to nc-Au particles. Excitation energy dependent XES and SPEM spectra show that the number of electrons in the valence band of O 2p-Zn 4sp hybridized states decreases as the nc-Au particle size increases, revealing that more electrons are excited from the valence band to the conduction band of ZnO nanorods and the storage of electrons in nc-Au particles.

  4. In-situ transmission x-ray microscopy study of photon-induced oxidation of silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Le; Sun, Yugang; Wang, Yuxin; Cai, Zhonghou; Han, Ping; Cheng, X. M.

    Oxidation of metal nanoparticles usually follows a Kirkendall process to transform solid nanoparticles to hollow metal oxide nanoshells. However the morphological trajectory of nanoparticles and the mass diffusion kinetics involved in the nanoscale Kirkendall process are complex. In this presentation we report the use of in-situ transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) to directly image individual silver nanowires under oxidation atmosphere, which are created from radiolysis of air under illumination of the focused synchrotron x-ray beam. The in-situ results clearly show the morphological transformation from solid silver nanowires to hollow nanotubes in the course of oxidation reaction of silver. Quantitative analysis of the time-resolved TXM images provides unprecedented details on reaction kinetics and mass diffusion kinetics associated with the oxidation process. Work at Bryn Mawr College is supported by NSF Grant #1207085. Use of the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Fast two-dimensional grid and transmission X-ray microscopy scanning methods for visualizing and characterizing protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Wojdyla, Justyna Aleksandra; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Martiel, Isabelle; Ebner, Simon; Huang, Chia-Ying; Caffrey, Martin; Bunk, Oliver; Wang, Meitian

    2016-06-01

    A fast continuous grid scan protocol has been incorporated into the Swiss Light Source (SLS) data acquisition and analysis software suite on the macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamlines. Its combination with fast readout single-photon counting hybrid pixel array detectors (PILATUS and EIGER) allows for diffraction-based identification of crystal diffraction hotspots and the location and centering of membrane protein microcrystals in the lipid cubic phase (LCP) in in meso in situ serial crystallography plates and silicon nitride supports. Diffraction-based continuous grid scans with both still and oscillation images are supported. Examples that include a grid scan of a large (50 nl) LCP bolus and analysis of the resulting diffraction images are presented. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) complements and benefits from fast grid scanning. STXM has been demonstrated at the SLS beamline X06SA for near-zero-dose detection of protein crystals mounted on different types of sample supports at room and cryogenic temperatures. Flash-cooled crystals in nylon loops were successfully identified in differential and integrated phase images. Crystals of just 10 µm thickness were visible in integrated phase images using data collected with the EIGER detector. STXM offers a truly low-dose method for locating crystals on solid supports prior to diffraction data collection at both synchrotron microfocusing and free-electron laser X-ray facilities.

  6. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    DOE PAGES

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; ...

    2015-09-10

    In this study, we present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme in order to study high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes of the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combination of the developed excitation mechanism with a single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. The required mechanical stability is achieved by a compact design of the microscope. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range,more » with 35 nm resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a –6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ~0.1° amplitude at –9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.« less

  7. Fine structure and X-ray microanalysis of silicified woods from a Tertiary basin Pohang, Korea by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Woo; Yoon, Chul Jong; Kim, Pan-Gi; Lee, Myung Bo; Lim, Joo-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    Anatomical descriptions are provided on silicified woods from a Tertiary basin Pohang, Korea by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis. The silicified woods appeared to retain the original exterior morphology of the once grown trees, and exhibited various colors on the surface. As a component of the axial system in the secondary xylem, pores were oval to globose and measured approximately 200-300 microm in diameter in transverse planes. Seemingly bordered pits were also frequently observed in the tracheary elements. As a component of the axial system in the secondary phloem, sieve elements were found to have many sieve pores that were filled with numerous fine particles. In tangential planes, rays in the vascular cambium were approximately 500 microm long, and usually several cells wide (multiseriate). Meanwhile, several forms of microbial growth such as bacterial chains and hyphal growth of either fungi or actinomycetes were evident in the vessel lumens of unpolished silicified wood pieces. Some fracture surfaces were mainly characterized by the occurrence of polyhedral crystals, probably quartz, in the fissures. By X-ray microanalysis, iron was detected from the brown-colored regions, whereas calcium was also detected together with iron in the black-colored regions. Based on the rare occurrence of tracheids as the axial system in the secondary xylem, the silicified woods in this study can be intrinsically categorized into angiosperm groups in the region.

  8. Combined small angle X-ray solution scattering with atomic force microscopy for characterizing radiation damage on biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luca; Andriatis, Alexander; Brennich, Martha; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Chen, Shu-Wen W; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Round, Adam

    2016-10-27

    Synchrotron radiation facilities are pillars of modern structural biology. Small-Angle X-ray scattering performed at synchrotron sources is often used to characterize the shape of biological macromolecules. A major challenge with high-energy X-ray beam on such macromolecules is the perturbation of sample due to radiation damage. By employing atomic force microscopy, another common technique to determine the shape of biological macromolecules when deposited on flat substrates, we present a protocol to evaluate and characterize consequences of radiation damage. It requires the acquisition of images of irradiated samples at the single molecule level in a timely manner while using minimal amounts of protein. The protocol has been tested on two different molecular systems: a large globular tetremeric enzyme (β-Amylase) and a rod-shape plant virus (tobacco mosaic virus). Radiation damage on the globular enzyme leads to an apparent increase in molecular sizes whereas the effect on the long virus is a breakage into smaller pieces resulting in a decrease of the average long-axis radius. These results show that radiation damage can appear in different forms and strongly support the need to check the effect of radiation damage at synchrotron sources using the presented protocol.

  9. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A; Dufresne, Eric M; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G; Parkin, Stuart S P; Freeland, John W; Evans, Paul G; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-26

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  10. Ordering in bio-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials probed by in situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Tunuguntla, Ramya; ...

    2015-04-15

    Here, phospholipid bilayer coated Si nanowires are one-dimensional (1D) composites that provide versatile bio-nanoelectronic functionality via incorporation of a wide variety of biomolecules into the phospholipid matrix. The physiochemical behaviour of the phospholipid bilayer is strongly dependent on its structure and, as a consequence, substantial modelling and experimental efforts have been directed at the structural characterization of supported bilayers and unsupported phospholipid vesicles; nonetheless, the experimental studies conducted to date have exclusively involved volume-averaged techniques, which do not allow for the assignment of spatially resolved structural variations that could critically impact the performance of the 1D phospholipid-Si NW composites. Inmore » this manuscript, we use scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe bond orientation and bilayer thickness as a function of position with a spatial resolution of ~30 nm for Δ9-cis 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine layers prepared Si NWs. When coupled with small angle X-ray scattering measurements, the STXM data reveal structural motifs of the Si NWs that give rise to multi-bilayer formation and enable assignment of the orientation of specific bonds known to affect the order and rigidity of phospholipid bilayers.« less

  11. X-ray fluorescent microscopy reveals large-scale relocalization and extracellular translocation of cellular copper during angiogenesis.

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, L.; Mandava, S.; Ursos, L.; Zhang, W.; Rodi, D.; Vogt, S.; Legnini, D.; Maser, J.; Ikpatt, F.; Olopade, O. I.; Glesne, D.; Univ. of Chicago

    2007-02-13

    Although copper has been reported to influence numerous proteins known to be important for angiogenesis, the enhanced sensitivity of this developmental process to copper bioavailability has remained an enigma, because copper metalloproteins are prevalent and essential throughout all cells. Recent developments in x-ray optics at third-generation synchrotron sources have provided a resource for highly sensitive visualization and quantitation of metalloproteins in biological samples. Here, we report the application of x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to in vitro models of angiogenesis and neurogenesis, revealing a surprisingly dramatic spatial relocalization specific to capillary formation of 80-90% of endogenous cellular copper stores from intracellular compartments to the tips of nascent endothelial cell filopodia and across the cell membrane. Although copper chelation had no effect on process formation, an almost complete ablation of network formation was observed. XFM of highly vascularized ductal carcinomas showed copper clustering in putative neoangiogenic areas. This use of XFM for the study of a dynamic developmental process not only sheds light on the copper requirement for endothelial tube formation but highlights the value of synchrotron-based facilities in biological research.

  12. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  13. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Langkilde, Annette E.; Morris, Kyle L.; Serpell, Louise C.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-04-01

    The aggregation process and the fibril state of an amyloidogenic peptide suggest monomer addition to be the prevailing mechanism of elongation and a model of the peptide packing in the fibrils has been obtained. Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the peptide fragment. The elongation of these fibrils proceeds without the accumulation of any detectable amount of intermediate oligomeric species, as is otherwise reported for, for example, glucagon, insulin and α-synuclein. Ribbons constituted of linearly arranged protofilaments are formed. An additional hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from high-resolution crystal structures, with specific differences in the relative peptide orientation. The complexity of protein fibrillation and structure emphasizes the need to use multiple complementary methods.

  14. Accelerated x-ray scatter projection imaging using multiple continuously moving pencil beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dydula, Christopher; Belev, George; Johns, Paul C.

    2017-03-01

    Coherent x-ray scatter varies with angle and photon energy in a manner dependent on the chemical composition of the scattering material, even for amorphous materials. Therefore, images generated from scattered photons can have much higher contrast than conventional projection radiographs. We are developing a scatter projection imaging prototype at the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility of the Canadian Light Source (CLS) synchrotron in Saskatoon, Canada. The best images are obtained using step-and-shoot scanning with a single pencil beam and area detector to capture sequentially the scatter pattern for each primary beam location on the sample. Primary x-ray transmission is recorded simultaneously using photodiodes. The technological challenge is to acquire the scatter data in a reasonable time. Using multiple pencil beams producing partially-overlapping scatter patterns reduces acquisition time but increases complexity due to the need for a disentangling algorithm to extract the data. Continuous sample motion, rather than step-and-shoot, also reduces acquisition time at the expense of introducing motion blur. With a five-beam (33.2 keV, 3.5 mm2 beam area) continuous sample motion configuration, a rectangular array of 12 x 100 pixels with 1 mm sampling width has been acquired in 0.4 minutes (3000 pixels per minute). The acquisition speed is 38 times the speed for single beam step-and-shoot. A system model has been developed to calculate detected scatter patterns given the material composition of the object to be imaged. Our prototype development, image acquisition of a plastic phantom and modelling are described.

  15. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  16. A method for volumetric imaging in radiotherapy using single x-ray projection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan; Yan, Hao; Ouyang, Luo; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Steve B. E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu Jia, Xun E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu; Zhou, Linghong; Cervino, Laura

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: It is an intriguing problem to generate an instantaneous volumetric image based on the corresponding x-ray projection. The purpose of this study is to develop a new method to achieve this goal via a sparse learning approach. Methods: To extract motion information hidden in projection images, the authors partitioned a projection image into small rectangular patches. The authors utilized a sparse learning method to automatically select patches that have a high correlation with principal component analysis (PCA) coefficients of a lung motion model. A model that maps the patch intensity to the PCA coefficients was built along with the patch selection process. Based on this model, a measured projection can be used to predict the PCA coefficients, which are then further used to generate a motion vector field and hence a volumetric image. The authors have also proposed an intensity baseline correction method based on the partitioned projection, in which the first and the second moments of pixel intensities at a patch in a simulated projection image are matched with those in a measured one via a linear transformation. The proposed method has been validated in both simulated data and real phantom data. Results: The algorithm is able to identify patches that contain relevant motion information such as the diaphragm region. It is found that an intensity baseline correction step is important to remove the systematic error in the motion prediction. For the simulation case, the sparse learning model reduced the prediction error for the first PCA coefficient to 5%, compared to the 10% error when sparse learning was not used, and the 95th percentile error for the predicted motion vector was reduced from 2.40 to 0.92 mm. In the phantom case with a regular tumor motion, the predicted tumor trajectory was successfully reconstructed with a 0.82 mm error for tumor center localization compared to a 1.66 mm error without using the sparse learning method. When the tumor motion

  17. Electron Microscopy and Analytical X-ray Characterization of Compositional and Nanoscale Structural Changes in Fossil Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatman, Elizabeth Marie

    The nanoscale structure of compact bone contains several features that are direct indicators of bulk tissue mechanical properties. Fossil bone tissues represent unique opportunities to understand the compact bone structure/property relationships from a deep time perspective, offering a possible array of new insights into bone diseases, biomimicry of composite materials, and basic knowledge of bioapatite composition and nanoscale bone structure. To date, most work with fossil bone has employed microscale techniques and has counter-indicated the survival of bioapatite and other nanoscale structural features. The obvious disconnect between the use of microscale techniques and the discernment of nanoscale structure has prompted this work. The goal of this study was to characterize the nanoscale constituents of fossil compact bone by applying a suite of diffraction, microscopy, and spectrometry techniques, representing the highest levels of spatial and energy resolution available today, and capable of complementary structural and compositional characterization from the micro- to the nanoscale. Fossil dinosaur and crocodile long bone specimens, as well as modern ratite and crocodile femurs, were acquired from the UC Museum of Paleontology. Preserved physiological features of significance were documented with scanning electron microscopy back-scattered imaging. Electron microprobe wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) revealed fossil bone compositions enriched in fluorine with a complementary loss of oxygen. X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrated that all specimens were composed of apatite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging revealed preserved nanocrystallinity in the fossil bones and electron diffraction studies further identified these nanocrystallites as apatite. Tomographic analyses of nanoscale elements imaged by TEM and small angle X-ray scattering were performed, with the results of each analysis further indicating that nanoscale structure is

  18. Synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy for improved extraction in shale during hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Andrew M.; Jew, Adam D.; Joe-Wong, Claresta; Maher, Kate M.; Liu, Yijin; Brown, Gordon E.; Bargar, John

    2015-09-01

    Engineering topics which span a range of length and time scales present a unique challenge to researchers. Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) of oil shales is one of these challenges and provides an opportunity to use multiple research tools to thoroughly investigate a topic. Currently, the extraction efficiency from the shale is low but can be improved by carefully studying the processes at the micro- and nano-scale. Fracking fluid induces chemical changes in the shale which can have significant effects on the microstructure morphology, permeability, and chemical composition. These phenomena occur at different length and time scales which require different instrumentation to properly study. Using synchrotron-based techniques such as fluorescence tomography provide high sensitivity elemental mapping and an in situ micro-tomography system records morphological changes with time. In addition, the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) beamline 6-2 is utilized to collect a nano-scale three-dimensional representation of the sample morphology with elemental and chemical sensitivity. We present the study of a simplified model system, in which pyrite and quartz particles are mixed and exposed to oxidizing solution, to establish the basic understanding of the more complex geology-relevant oxidation reaction. The spatial distribution of the production of the oxidation reaction, ferrihydrite, is retrieved via full-field XANES tomography showing the reaction pathway. Further correlation between the high resolution TXM data and the high sensitivity micro-probe data provides insight into potential morphology changes which can decrease permeability and limit hydrocarbon recovery.

  19. MISTRAL: a transmission soft X-ray microscopy beamline for cryo nano-tomography of biological samples and magnetic domains imaging.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Nicolás, Josep; Valcárcel, Ricardo; Chichón, Francisco Javier; Rosanes, Marc; Avila, Jose; Tkachuk, Andrei; Irwin, Jeff; Ferrer, Salvador; Pereiro, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The performance of MISTRAL is reported, the soft X-ray transmission microscopy beamline at the ALBA light source (Barcelona, Spain) which is primarily dedicated to cryo soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) for three-dimensional visualization of whole unstained cells at spatial resolutions down to 30 nm (half pitch). Short acquisition times allowing for high-throughput and correlative microscopy studies have promoted cryo-SXT as an emerging cellular imaging tool for structural cell biologists bridging the gap between optical and electron microscopy. In addition, the beamline offers the possibility of imaging magnetic domains in thin magnetic films that are illustrated here with an example.

  20. X-rays of inner worlds: the mid-twentieth-century American projective test movement.

    PubMed

    Lemov, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    This essay begins to tell the neglected history of the projective test movement in the U.S. behavioral sciences from approximately 1941 to 1968. This cross-disciplinary enterprise attempted to use projective techniques as "X-ray" machines to see into the psyches of subjects tested around the world. The aim was to gather subjective materials en masse, pursuing data on a scope, scale, and manner rarely hazarded before in any science. In particular, the targeted data included the traces of the inner life and elusive aspects of subjective experience including dreams, life stories, and myriad test results from a battery of tests. This essay explores how the movement and the experimental data bank that resulted were unlikely yet telling sites for the practice and pursuit of the Cold War human sciences. To look closely at the encounters that resulted is to show how the most out-of-the-way places and seemingly insignificant moments played a role in heady scientific ambitions and global geopolitical projects. At times, the projective test movement became a mirror of Cold War rationality itself, as tests were employed at the very limits of their possible extension. The essay argues for an off-kilter centrality in the movement itself, shedding light on the would-be unified social sciences after World War II and the "subjective turn" they took. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.