Science.gov

Sample records for projects office remedial

  1. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.

    1996-05-01

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

  2. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office Quality Assurance Program Plan]. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project was established to accomplish remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites in accordance with Public Law 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRA Project`s mission is to stabilize and control the residual radioactive materials at designated sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner so as to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public. The US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office (UMTRA PO) directs the overall project. Since these efforts may involve possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance (QA) program that conforms to the applicable criteria (set forth in the reference documents) has been established to control the quality of the work. This document, the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), brings into one document the essential criteria to be applied on a selective basis, depending upon the nature of the activity being conducted, and describes how those criteria shall be applied to the UMTRA Project. The UMTRA PO shall require each Project contractor to prepare and submit for approval a more detailed QAPP that is based on the applicable criteria of this QAPP and the referenced documents. All QAPPs on the UMTRA Project shall fit within the framework of this plan.

  3. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office Quality Assurance Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project was established to accomplish remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites in accordance with Public Law 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRA Project's mission is to stabilize and control the residual radioactive materials at designated sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner so as to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public. The US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office (UMTRA PO) directs the overall project. Since these efforts may involve possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance (QA) program that conforms to the applicable criteria (set forth in the reference documents) has been established to control the quality of the work. This document, the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), brings into one document the essential criteria to be applied on a selective basis, depending upon the nature of the activity being conducted, and describes how those criteria shall be applied to the UMTRA Project. The UMTRA PO shall require each Project contractor to prepare and submit for approval a more detailed QAPP that is based on the applicable criteria of this QAPP and the referenced documents. All QAPPs on the UMTRA Project shall fit within the framework of this plan.

  4. Confirmatory radiological survey of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project exterior portions, 1989-1995

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, G.H.; Egidi, P.V.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this independent assessment was to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with an independent verification (IV) that the soil at the Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) complies with applicable DOE guidelines. Oak Ridge National Laboratory/ Environmental Technology Section (ORNL/ETS) which is also located at the GJPO, was assigned by DOE as the Independent Verification Contractor (IVC). The assessment included reviews of the decontamination and decommissioning plan, annual environmental monitoring reports, data in the pre- and post-remedial action reports, reassessment reports and IV surveys. Procedures and field methods used during the remediation were reviewed, commented on, and amended as needed. The IV surveys included beta-gamma and gamma radiation scans, soil sampling and analyses. Based on the data presented in the post-remedial action report and the results of the IV surveys, the remediation of the outdoor portions of the GJPO has achieved the objectives. Residual deposits of uranium contamination may exist under asphalt because the original characterization was not designed to identify uranium and subsequent investigations were limited. The IVC recommends that this be addressed with the additional remediation. The IVC is working with the remedial action contractor (RAC) to assure that final documentation WM be sufficient for certification. The IVC will address additional remediation of buildings, associated utilities, and groundwater in separate reports. Therefore, this is considered a partial verification.

  5. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 52 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Building 52 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  6. Documenting cost and performance for environmental remediation projects: Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-08

    The purpose of this DOE guide is to facilitate the use of consistent procedures to document cost and performance information for projects involving the remediation of media contaminated with hazardous and radioactive wastes. It provides remedial action project managers with a standardized set of data to document completed remediation projects. Standardized reporting of data will broaden the utility of the information, increase confidence in the effectiveness of future remedial technologies, and enhance the organization, storage and retrieval of relevant information for future cleanup projects. The foundation for this guide was laid down by the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable (FRTR) in their publication, Guide to Documenting Cost and Performance for Remediation Projects, EPA-542-B- 95-002. Member agencies of the FRTR include the US EPA, the US DOD, the US DOE, and the US DOI. All the member agencies are involved in site remediation projects and anticipate following the guidance provided in the above reference. Therefore, there is much to be gained for DOE to be consistent with the other member agencies as it will be easier to compare projects across different agencies and also to learn from the experiences of a wider spectrum of prior completed projects.

  7. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project: Feasibility test of real-time radiation monitoring during removal of surface contamination from concrete floors

    SciTech Connect

    Leino, R.; Corle, S.

    1995-10-01

    This feasibility test was conducted to determine if real-time radiation-monitoring instruments could be mounted on decontamination machines during remediation activities to provide useful and immediate feedback to equipment operators. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored this field test under the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to identify a more efficient method to remove radiological contamination from concrete floor surfaces. This test demonstrated that project durations and costs may be reduced by combining radiation-monitoring equipment with decontamination machines. The test also demonstrated that a microprocessor-based instrument such as a radiation monitor can withstand the type of vibration that is characteristic of floor scabblers with no apparent damage. Combining radiation-monitoring equipment with a decontamination machine reduces the time and costs required to decontaminate concrete surfaces. These time and cost savings result from the reduction in the number of interim radiological surveys that must be conducted to complete remediation. Real-time radiation monitoring allows equipment operators to accurately monitor contamination during the decontamination process without support from radiological technicians, which also reduces the project duration and costs. The DOE Grand Junction Projects Office recommends more extensive and rigorous testing of this real-time radiation monitoring to include a variety of surfaces and decontamination machines. As opportunities arise, additional testing will be conducted under GJPORAP.

  8. FIFRA Project Officers Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The FIFRA Project Officers Manual provides guidance to new as well as experienced project officers in the management of grants and cooperative agreements under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act.

  9. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This report contains brief outlines of the multiple projects under the responsibility of the Western Environmental Technology Office in Butte Montana. These projects include biomass remediation, remediation of contaminated soils, mine waste technology, and several other types of remediation.

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  11. Saxton soil remediation project

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

  12. DNAPL Remediation: Selected Projects Approaching Regulatory Closure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This paper is a status update on the use of DNAPL source reduction remedial technologies, and provides information about recent projects where regulatory closure has been reached or projects are approaching regulatory closure, following source reduction.

  13. Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study of the Defense Property Disposal Office, Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Final Quality Control Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-05-01

    0)N Final Quality Control Plan Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study of the Defense Property Disposal Office Fort George G. Meade, Maryland...8 2.1.2 Remedial Investigation Project Manager ................. 8 2.1.3 Feasibility Study Project Manager ..................... 8...20 4.0 SAMPLE COLLECTION ................................. 21 4.1 Sampling for the Remedial Investigation at the DRMO Yard ....... 21 4.1.1

  14. The 100-C-7 Remediation Project. An Overview of One of DOE's Largest Remediation Projects - 13260

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Thomas C.; Strom, Dean; Beulow, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH) completed remediation of one of the largest waste sites in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The waste site, 100-C-7, covers approximately 15 football fields and was excavated to a depth of 85 feet (groundwater). The project team removed a total of 2.3 million tons of clean and contaminated soil, concrete debris, and scrap metal. 100-C-7 lies in Hanford's 100 B/C Area, home to historic B and C Reactors. The waste site was excavated in two parts as 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1. The pair of excavations appear like pit mines. Mining engineers were hired to design their tiered sides, with safety benches every 17 feet and service ramps which allowed equipment access to the bottom of the excavations. The overall cleanup project was conducted over a span of almost 10 years. A variety of site characterization, excavation, load-out and sampling methodologies were employed at various stages of remediation. Alternative technologies were screened and evaluated during the project. A new method for cost effectively treating soils was implemented - resulting in significant cost savings. Additional opportunities for minimizing waste streams and recycling were identified and effectively implemented by the project team. During the final phase of cleanup the project team applied lessons learned throughout the entire project to address the final, remaining source of chromium contamination. The C-7 cleanup now serves as a model for remediating extensive deep zone contamination sites at Hanford. (authors)

  15. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project: Project plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-11

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) [Public Law (PL) 95-604, 42 United States Code (USC) 7901], hereinafter referred to as the ``Act,`` authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination. To fulfill this mission, the DOE has established two projects under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. The Ground Water Project was established in April 1991 as a major project and a separate project plan will be prepared for that portion of the mission. This project plan covers the UMTRA Surface Project, a major system acquisition (MSA).

  16. Annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the US Department of Energy's cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites, January--December 1991. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is a summary of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) cultural resource investigations for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE's obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Summaries of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources are provided for the UMTRA Project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. This report covers all UMTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado from January through December 1991.

  17. UMTRA Project Office Quality Assurance Program Plan. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project was established to accomplish remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites in accordance with Public Law 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRA Project`s mission is to stabilize and control the residual radioactive materials at designated sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner so as to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public. The US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office directs the overall Project. Because these efforts may involve possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance (QA) program that conforms to the applicable criteria (set forth in the reference documents) has been established to control the quality of the work. This document, the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), brings into one document the essential criteria to be applied on a selective basis, depending upon the nature of the activity being conducted, and describes how those criteria shall be applied to the UMTRA Project. The UMTRA Project Office shall require each Project contractor to prepare and submit for approval a more detailed QAPP that is based on the applicable criteria of this QAPP and the referenced documents. All QAPPs on the UMTRA Project shall fit within the framework of this plan or an industry standard format that has been approved by the DOE Project Office.

  18. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: Cost Reduction and Productivity Improvement Program Project Plan. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program Plan is to formalize and improve upon existing efforts to control costs which have been underway since project inception. This program plan has been coordinated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the DOE Field Office, Albuquerque (AL). It incorporates prior Uranium Mill Tallings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office guidance issued on the subject. The opportunities for reducing cosh and improving productivity are endless. The CR/PIP has these primary objectives: Improve productivity and quality; heighten the general cost consciousness of project participants, at all levels of their organizations; identify and implement specific innovative employee ideas that extend beyond what is required through existing processes and procedures; emphasize efforts that create additional value for the money spent by maintaining the project Total Estimated Cost (TEC) at the lowest possible level.

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: Cost Reduction and Productivity Improvement Program Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program Plan is to formalize and improve upon existing efforts to control costs which have been underway since project inception. This program plan has been coordinated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the DOE Field Office, Albuquerque (AL). It incorporates prior Uranium Mill Tallings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office guidance issued on the subject. The opportunities for reducing cosh and improving productivity are endless. The CR/PIP has these primary objectives: Improve productivity and quality; heighten the general cost consciousness of project participants, at all levels of their organizations; identify and implement specific innovative employee ideas that extend beyond what is required through existing processes and procedures; emphasize efforts that create additional value for the money spent by maintaining the project Total Estimated Cost (TEC) at the lowest possible level.

  20. UMTRA Project Office quality assurance program plan. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project was established to accomplish remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites. The UMTRA Project`s mission is to stabilize and control the residual radioactive materials at designated sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner so as to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public. Because these efforts may involve possible risks to public health and safety, a quality assurance (QA) program that conforms to the applicable criteria has been established to control the quality of the work. This document, the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP), brings into one document the essential criteria to be applied on a selective basis, depending upon the nature of the activity being conducted, and describes how those criteria shall be applied to the UMTRA Project. QA requirements contained in this QAPP shall apply to all personnel, processes, and activities, including planning, scheduling, and cost control, performed by the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors.

  1. In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Northeast Site Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Juhlin, R.; Butherus, M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting thermal remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site that is part of the Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project. The Northeast Site is located on the Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center in Largo, Florida. The STAR Center was formerly a DOE facility. The NAPL remediation was performed at Area A and is currently being performed at Area B at the Northeast Site. The remediation at Area A was completed in 2003 and covered an area of 900 m{sup 2} (10,000 ft{sup 2}) and a depth of remediation that extended to 10.7 m (35 ft) below ground surface. Cleanup levels achieved were at or below maximum contaminant levels in almost all locations. The remediation project at Area B is ongoing and covers an area of 3,240 m{sup 2} (36,000 ft{sup 2}), a volume of 41,300 m (54,000 yd 3), and a depth of remediation to 12 m (40 ft) below ground surface. In addition, a portion of the subsurface under an occupied building in Area B is included in the remediation. The cleanup levels achieved from this remediation will be available in the Area B Final Report that will be posted on the DOE Office of Legacy Management web site (www.lm.doe.gov/land/sites/fl/ pinellas/pinellas.htm) in January 2007. Electrical resistive heating and steam were the chosen remediation methods at both areas. Lessons learned from the Area A remediation were incorporated into the Area B remediation and could benefit managers of similar remediation projects. (authors)

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. [UMTRA project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereinafter referred to as the Act.'' Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at designated inactive uranium processing sites (Attachment 1 and 2) and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing site. The purpose of the remedial actions is to stabilize and control such uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials in a safe and environmentally sound manner to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. The principal health hazards and environmental concerns are: the inhalation of air particulates contaminated as a result of the emanation of radon from the tailings piles and the subsequent decay of radon daughters; and the contamination of surface and groundwaters with radionuclides or other chemically toxic materials. This UMTRA Project Plan identifies the mission and objectives of the project, outlines the technical and managerial approach for achieving them, and summarizes the performance, cost, and schedule baselines which have been established to guide operational activity. Estimated cost increases by 15 percent, or if the schedule slips by six months. 4 refs.

  3. Volatile organic compound remedial action project

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews a proposed project that is planned to reduce the levels of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants present in the Mound domestic water supply. The potable and industrial process water supply for Mound is presently obtained from a shallow aquifer via on-site production wells. The present levels of VOCs in the water supply drawn from the on-site wells are below the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) permissible for drinking water under Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA; 40 CFR 141); however, Mound has determined that remedial measures should be taken to further reduce the VOC levels. The proposed project action is the reduction of the VOC levels in the water supply using packed tower aeration (PTA). This document is intended to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and associated Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508) as implemented through U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5440.1D and supporting DOE NEPA Guidelines (52 FR 47662), as amended (54 FR 12474; 55 FR 37174), and as modified by the Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN) 15-90 and associated guidance. As required, this EA provides sufficient information on the probable environmental impacts of the proposed action and alternatives to support a DOE decision either to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  5. Final 2014 Remedial Action Report Project Chariot, Cape Thompson, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-03-01

    This report was prepared to document remedial action (RA) work performed at the former Project Chariot site located near Cape Thompson, Alaska during 2014. The work was managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Alaska District for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM). Due to the short field season and the tight barge schedule, all field work was conducted at the site July 6 through September 12, 2014. Excavation activities occurred between July 16 and August 26, 2014. A temporary field camp was constructed at the site prior to excavation activities to accommodate the workers at the remote, uninhabited location. A total of 785.6 tons of petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL)-contaminated soil was excavated from four former drill sites associated with test holes installed circa 1960. Diesel was used in the drilling process during test hole installations and resulted in impacts to surface and subsurface soils at four of the five sites (no contamination was identified at Test Hole Able). Historic information is not definitive as to the usage for Test Hole X-1; it may have actually been a dump site and not a drill site. In addition to the contaminated soil, the steel test hole casings were decommissioned and associated debris was removed as part of the remedial effort.

  6. Fiscal Year 2010 Program of the U.S. DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2011-03-07

    The mission of the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) is to perform assessments, establish technical criteria and promote cross-site integration. The Office provides guidance for the development and implementation of plans for remediation of groundwater and is responsible for development of technologies needed to reduce risk from groundwater contamination. It is also responsible for providing technical direction and/or assistance to sites in resolving difficult technical groundwater and soil remediation problems. This paper discusses the activities funded by EM-32 for FY-2010.

  7. U.S. Department of Energy/Environmental Management's Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, C.

    2007-07-01

    The vision for the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is to focus and place high visibility on program achievements and broad-based remediation challenges and uncertainties facing the Office of Environmental Management. These include, but are not limited to, the development of contract performance measures; monitoring and controlling the cleanup investments for remediating groundwater and soil; finding and implementing interim and permanent cleanup remedies for technetium-99, strontium-90, chromium, uranium, and trichloroethylene; the development and use of sophisticated groundwater and fate and transport models; presenting the best science and engineering principles and practices for remediating groundwater and soil to environmental regulators and other key stakeholders; and ensuring that all source terms of contamination are fully identified and all sites are appropriately characterized. (authors)

  8. Flight Projects Office Information Systems Testbed (FIST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, Patricia

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Flight Projects Office Information Systems Testbed (FIST) are presented. The goal is to perform technology evaluation and prototyping of information systems to support SFOC and JPL flight projects in order to reduce risk in the development of operational data systems for such projects.

  9. NASA Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task, Overview and Project Summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romeo, James G.

    2014-01-01

    An overview presentation of NASA's Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task including the following project summaries: in situ groundwater monitor, in situ chemical oxidation, in situ bioremediation, horizontal multi-port well, and high resolution site characterization.

  10. The Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Project performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy commissioned Independent Project Analysis, Inc. (IPA) to perform this Project Performance Study to provide a quantitative analysis determining how well EM develops and executes environmental remediation and waste management projects. The approach consisted of collecting detailed data on a sample of 65 completed and ongoing EM projects conducted since 1984. These data were then compared with key project characteristics and outcomes from 233 environmental remediation projects (excluding EM) in IPA`s Environmental Remediation Database and 951 projects In IPA`s Capital Projects Database. The study establishes the standing of the EM system relative to other organizations, and suggests areas and opportunities for improvement.

  11. The Office of Groundwater & Soil Remediation Fiscal Year 2011 Research & Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Aylward, R. S.; Cercy, Mike; Seitz, Roger; Ramirez, Rosa; Skubal, Karen L.; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Liang, Liyuan; Pierce, Eric M.

    2011-12-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation supports applied research and technology development (AR&TD) for remediation of environments contaminated by legacy nuclear waste. The program centers on delivering advanced scientific approaches and technologies from highly-leveraged, strategic investments that maximize impact to reduce risk and life-cycle cleanup costs. The current groundwater and soil remediation program consists of four applied programmatic areas: • Deep Vadose Zone – Applied Field Research Initiative • Attenuation Based Remedies – Applied Field Research Initiative • Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants – Applied Field Research Initiative • Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management. This paper provides an overview of the applied programmatic areas, fiscal year 11 accomplishments, and their near-term technical direction.

  12. DSN Aperture Enhancement Project Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marina, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    All contracts are underway for antennas, associated facilities modifications and new transmitters. High risk CPI 100kW klystron and JPL high power uplink microwave components have been designed, prototyped and successfully tested at GDSCC to support the 80kW transmitter implementation and testing at vendor facility. Open issues, which might affect project delivery date, have plans in place or are being created, to maintain DSS-35 Operational Date. There are no known open issues that affect performance. Overall good progress has been made in all areas (procurements, contracts, design and development) and the project is confident that DSS-35 & 36 antennas and the three 80kW Uplink systems will be delivered according to plan.

  13. Environmental Audit of the Grand Junction Projects Office

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is located in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately south and west of the Grand Junction city limits. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Colorado Raw Materials Office at the present-day Grand Junction Projects Office in 1947, to aid in the development of a viable domestic uranium industry. Activities at the site included sampling uranium concentrate; pilot-plant milling research, including testing and processing of uranium ores; and operation of a uranium mill pilot plant from 1954 to 1958. The last shipment of uranium concentrate was sent from GJPO in January, 1975. Since that time the site has been utilized to support various DOE programs, such as the former National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), and the Technical Measurements Center (TMC). All known contamination at GJPO is believed to be the result of the past uranium milling, analyses, and storage activities. Hazards associated with the wastes impounded at GJPO include surface and ground-water contamination and potential radon and gamma-radiation exposure. This report documents the results of the Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Grand Junction Baseline Environmental Audit was conducted from May 28 to June 12, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at GJPO, as well as GJPO activities at the State-Owned Temporary Repository. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Effective Showcase Projects: Office of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (ED), Washington, DC. Indian Education Programs.

    The Indian Education Programs supplement state, local, and tribal education efforts to improve the quality of Indian education and assure parental and community participation. Each year, the Office of Indian Education, assisted by the six regional Indian Education Technical Assistance Centers, selects effective projects to be showcased at the…

  15. Preliminary remediation goals for use at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This technical memorandum presents Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for use in human health risk assessment efforts under the United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Environmental Restoration (ER) Division. This document provides the ER Division with standardized PRGs which are integral to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process. They are used during project scooping (Data Quality Objectives development), in screening level risk assessments to support early action or No Further Investigation decisions, and in the baselines risk assessment where they are employed in the selection of chemicals of potential concern. The primary objective of this document is to standardize these values and eliminate any duplication of effort by providing PRGs to all contractors involved in risk activities. In addition, by managing the assumptions and systems used in PRG derivation, the ER Risk Assessment Program will be able to control the level of quality assurance associated with these risk-based guideline values.

  16. Bartlesville Project Office FY 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Bartlesville Project Office (BPO) was established in 1983 to succeed the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC). Its lead mission from the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the US Department of energy is to plan and implement research in the Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Advanced Extraction and Process Technology (AEPT) subprograms of the Petroleum Program. As such, BPO oversees some 160 research projects falling within these two broad subprograms and support activities. These projects, form the major portion of DOE's National Petroleum Research Program. The EOR subprogram consists of two research categories: Light Oil and Heavy Oil. These two categories include research activities in: (1) geoscience and reservoir characterization, (2) chemical flooding (3) gas flooding, (4) thermal recovery, (5) novel technology, and (6) microbial EOR. The AEPT subprogram includes research activities in (1) fundamental geoscience and extraction research, (2) supporting technology and environmental research, and (3) university geoscience research. 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Support of US CLIVAR Project Office 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Donna

    2013-08-31

    Director of JOSS, supervised the U.S. CLIVAR Project Office Director and helped direct the officer to enhance the goals and objectives of the U.S. CLIVAR Project and budget. Financial Manager of JOSS, worked to complete proposals and monitor compliance with award requirements and funding limitations and ensure the U.S. CLIVAR Project Office complied with UCAR policies and procedures. Project Coordinator administered the funding for the U.S. CLIVAR Project Office and was responsible for coordinating special projects that required additional support from JOSS technical staff. These projects included activities such as website updates, technology upgrades, production of printed reports, and development of graphic elements like logos. Web Developer worked both on web development and graphic work and the work consisted of the following: Maintaining the site ? installing updates to Drupal CMS (Content Management System). Creating new templates for webpages and styling them with CSS and JavaScript/jQuery code. Fixing the styling on webpages that the content contributor/manager (Jenn Mays) created and has had trouble with. Creating new web forms for abstract uploading, subscriptions, and meeting registrations. Created 4 webpages for the ?ASP: Key Uncertainties in the Global Carbon-Cycle? meeting. Developed a document review form, instruction webpages, login redirect, dynamic table with form submissions for the US CLIVAR SSC Science Plan Document Review. This was open to the public from June 12, 2013 until July 10, 2013. During this time the user accounts had to be checked (daily) that were created by the public, to delete any spam ones. Graphics work: preparing images for general use on webpages, webpage banners, and for meeting name badges, creating a US CLIVAR letterhead, redesigning the US AMOC logo. System Administrator spent time working on the migration of the US CLIVAR site from the USGCRP office to UCAR here Boulder. This was done to increase the general speed of

  18. Project management oversight; Controversy or remedy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, N.B.; Mortensen, M.W. )

    1989-01-01

    In today's complex and litigious society with construction projects becoming ever more sophisticated, owners can no longer accept as a given that hiring a design engineer, construction manager, general contractor or an engineer procure construct (EPC) contractor ensures that their project will be well managed to complete on time and within budget. Mega capital projects today routinely encounter cost overruns and schedule delays. These circumstances create management problems, finger pointing, and lead to contractor claims which are becoming a major source of concern. This paper discusses one such avenue open to today's owners, to utilize the services of a project management oversight (PMO) consultant. PMO is a relatively new concept within the construction industry and as such is the subject of ongoing discussion and debate regarding its value.

  19. Guide to Documenting and Managing Cost and Performance Information for Remediation Projects - Revised Version

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Guide to Documenting and Managing Cost and Performance Information for Remediation Projects provides the recommended procedures for documenting the results of completed and on-going full-scale and demonstration-scale remediation projects.

  20. The Office of Groundwater & Soil Remediation Fiscal Year 2011 Research & Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Skip; Aylward, R. S.; Cercy, Mike; Seitz, Roger; Ramirez, Rosa; Skubal, Karen L.; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Liang, Liyuan; Pierce, Eric M.

    2011-03-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation supports technology development and technical assistance for the remediation of environments contaminated by legacy nuclear waste. The core of the program is centered on delivering proactive, responsive expertise and technologies with highly-leveraged, carefully selected investments that maximum impact on life-cycle cleanup costs and risks across the DOE complex. The program currently focuses on four main priorities: improved sampling and characterization strategies, advanced predictive capabilities, enhanced remediation methods, and improved long-term performance evaluation and monitoring. In FY 2010, the program developed a detailed research and development (R and D) plan in support of a larger initiative to integrate R and D efforts across EM. This paper provides an overview of the priority action areas and the program's near-term technical direction.

  1. Remediation Technologies for Environmental Projects in the United States Military: Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    Remediation Technologies for Environmental Projects in the United States Military: Part II by Joseph Aloysius Campbell, B.S.M.E. Thesis Presented...Science in Engineering The University of Texas at Austin May 1998 Remediation Technologies for Environmental Projects in the United States...Military: Part II APPROVED BY SUPERVISING COMMITTEE: * %hnD. Borcherding ABSTRACT Remediation Technologies for Environmental Projects in the

  2. [Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James (Technical Monitor); Merkey, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

  3. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC).

  4. Managing a potentially high profile NORM containing remediation project

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, R.K.

    1997-06-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) contained in scale and sludge in a large earthen pit, approximately 12 acres, had the potential to turn a relatively straightforward remediation project into a public relations nightmare. Lack of specific regulations for dealing with NORM, at this location, further complicated the situation. Proactive early involvement with local officials as part of a detailed comprehensive public relations plan minimized potential public relations problems. Education of local employees, who were then prepared to answer any questions from their neighbors, was also a key part of the plan. Early, frequent, and complete communication with potential agencies was critical to the success of the project. Multiple agencies potentially had jurisdiction. Close cooperation with all potential agencies was a necessity, even after the lead agency had been determined. Selection of the right contractors with well defined scopes of work eased the burdens of the project. Contractors must be well respected experts in the appropriate disciplines. Local contractors with good working relationships with the agencies was also beneficial. Orchestrating all of these components can be time consuming and frustrating, but necessary. Be patient, the time spent in remediation plan preparation and the education of local officials and agency staff, resulted in a smooth running remediation project that protected both the environment and human health at a substantial cost savings compared to other available NORM disposal options.

  5. National Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project Office

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goplen, Susan E.; Sloan, Jeff L.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Project Office leads the implementation of UAS technology in the Department of the Interior (DOI). Our mission is to support the transition of UAS into DOI as a new cost-effective tool for collecting remote-sensing data to monitor environmental conditions, respond to natural hazards, recognize the consequences and benefits of land and climate change and conduct wildlife inventories. The USGS is teaming with all DOI agencies and academia as well as local, State, and Tribal governments with guidance from the Federal Aviation Administration and the DOI Office of Aviation Services (OAS) to lead the safe, efficient, costeffective and leading-edge adoption of UAS technology into the scientific research and operational activities of the DOI.

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

  7. Radiological survey activities: uranium mill tailings remedial action project procedures manual

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Carter, T.E.; Espegren, M.L.; O'Donnell, F.R.; Ramos, S.J.; Retolaza, C.D.; Rood, A.S.; Santos, F.A.; Witt, D.A.

    1986-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility for conducting remedial action at 24 sites, which are located in one eastern and nine western states. The DOE's responsibilities are being met through its Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA-PO) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group in the Dosimetry and Biophysical Transport Section (DABTS) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in its role as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC). Members of the RASA group assigned to the UMTRA Project are headquartered in the ORNL/RASA office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and report to the ORNL/RASA Project Manager. The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of the RASA/UMTRA group conform properly to those of the ISC as described in the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual and the Summary Protocol. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by the RASA/UMTRA group and contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards.

  8. Programmatic Environmental Report for remedial actions at UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project vicinity properties

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This Environmental Report (ER) examines the environmental consequences of implementing a remedial action that would remove radioactive uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated materials from 394 vicinity properties near 14 inactive uranium processing sites included in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project pursuant to Public Law 95--604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Vicinity properties are those properties in the vicinity of the UMTRA Project inactive mill sites, either public or private, that are believed to be contaminated by residual radioactive material originating from one of the 14 inactive uranium processing sites, and which have been designated under Section 102(a)(1) of UMTRCA. The principal hazard associated with the contaminated properties results from the production of radon, a radioactive decay product of the radium contained in the tailings. Radon, a radioactive gas, can diffuse through the contaminated material and be released into the atmosphere where it and its radioactive decay products may be inhaled by humans. A second radiation exposure pathway results from the emission of gamma radiation from uranium decay products contained in the tailings. Gamma radiation emitted from contaminated material delivers an external exposure to the whole body. If the concentration of radon and its decay products is high enough and the exposure time long enough, or if the exposure to direct gamma radiation is long enough, cancers (i.e., excess health effects) may develop in persons living and working at the vicinity properties. 3 refs., 7 tabs.

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, A.T.

    1993-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references.

  10. Green PCB Remediation from Sediment Systems (GPRSS) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Quinn, Jacqueline; Parrish, Lewis M.

    2014-01-01

    An ongoing problem facing the global environment community including NASA centers is the removal and remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PCBs were commonly used in a variety of materials including paints, caulking, and adhesives due to the advantageous physical and chemical properties that PCBs imparted to these various materials. Unfortunately, these properties have made the treatment of sites contaminated with these chemicals extremely difficult to deal with, due to their inherent chemical stability. The remediation of sediments contaminated with PCBs is especially difficult, primarily due to the risk of releasing the contaminant into the environment during the treatment process. Traditional treatment options involve the use of dredging and incineration of the contaminated soils/sediments, in which the chance of releasing the contaminants is greatly increased. The purpose of this project is to develop cleanup technology capable of remediating contaminated sediments in-situ, with minimum intrusion. This allows for the minimization of any potential contaminant release during the treatment process, providing a safer method for cleanup operations (as opposed to dredging/incineration) and still treating the basic problem of PCB contamination (as opposed to capping).

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Public Participation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1981-05-01

    The purpose of this Public Participation Plan is to explain the Department of Energy`s plan for involving the public in the decision-making process related to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This project was authorized by Congress in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. The Act provides for a cooperative effort with affected states and Indian tribes for the eventual cleanup of abandoned or inactive uranium mill tailings sites, which are located in nine western states and in Pennsylvania. Section 111 of the Act states, ``in carrying out the provisions of this title, including the designation of processing sites, establishing priorities for such sites, the selection of remedial actions and the execution of cooperative agreements, the Secretary (of Energy), the Administrator (of the Environmental Protection Agency), and the (Nuclear Regulatory) Commission shall encourage public participation and, where appropriate, the Secretary shall hold public hearings relative to such matters in the States where processing sites and disposal sites are located.`` The objective of this document is to show when, where, and how the public will be involved in this project.

  12. Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1992 at the US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) facility in Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1992 included those associated with environmental compliance, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. Four phases of the on-site Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project were completed in 1992. Remediation activities, which included the removal of 161,589 tons of uranium-mill-tailings-contaminated material from the facility, were conducted in compliance with all applicable permits. Off-site dose modeling for the GJPO was conducted to determine compliance with current National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, and applicable DOE Orders (5400.1 and 5400.5). The total off-site EDE to the public from all sources of radiation emanating from the facility (radon, air particulates, gamma) was calculated as 9 mrem/yr, which is well below the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr above background. The radiological and nonradiological monitoring program at the GJPO facility included monitoring of activities that generate potentially hazardous or toxic wastes and monitoring of ambient air, surface water, and ground water.

  13. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE`s overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program.

  15. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the exterior land areas at the Grand Junction Projects Office facility

    SciTech Connect

    Widdop, M.R.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility occupies approximately 56.4 acres (22.8 hectares) along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. The site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium-refining activities conducted by the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot-milling experiments conducted for the US Atomic Energy Commission`s (AEC`s) domestic uranium procurement program. The GJPO facility was the collection and assay point for AEC uranium and vanadium oxide purchases until the early 1970s. The DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program sponsored the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to remediate the facility lands, site improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor, Rust Geotech, was the Remedial Action Contractor for GJPORAP. The exterior land areas of the facility assessed as contaminated have been remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unrestricted use. Restoration of the aquifer will be accomplished through the natural flushing action of the aquifer during the next 50 to 80 years. The remediation of the DOE-GJPO facility buildings is ongoing and will be described in a separate report.

  16. Sustainable geoengineering projects for the remediation of mine site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Martinez-Lopez, Salvadora; Gonzalez, Eva; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Molina-Ruiz, Jose; Belen Martinez, Lucia; Hernandez, Carmen; Bech, Jaime; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    A large number of soils are contaminated by heavy metals due to mining activities, generating adverse effects on human health and the environment. In response to these negative effects, a variety of technologies have been developed. In situ immobilization by means of soil amendment is a non-intrusive and cost effective alternative that transforms the highly mobile toxic heavy metals to physico-chemically stable forms. Limestone filler is a good selection for such a purpose, because of its characteristics. In addition, the use of this amendment could revalorize the residues, reducing the costs of the process. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of an immobilization technique in sediments contaminated by heavy metals. Two experimental areas, approximately 1 Ha each one, were selected, and technosols were developed as follows: original sediments, sediments mixed with limestone filler in a 1:1 proportion, gravel to avoid capillary and natural soil to allow plant growth. After the remediation technique was applied, monitoring was done in 18 points collecting samples (sediment and water) during a 4 years period at two month intervals. The pH and electrical conductivity as well as the heavy metal (Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu and As) contents were measured. Microtox bioassay was also applied. Sediments before the remediation technique showed acidic pH, high EC values and high trace elements content. The results obtained after the immobilization showed that sediment samples had neutral pH (average value of 8.3) low electrical conductivity (1.32 dS m-1) and low trace elements concentration. It can be concluded that the use of limestone filler is an excellent option in sediments polluted because of the risk for human health or ecosystem disappears or is decreased in a large extent. In addition, the designed experience allows stabilizer proportion to be optimized and may suppose a big cost-saving in the project in areas affected by mining activities.

  17. Remediation activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, T.J.; Danner, R.

    1996-07-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a United States Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwestern Ohio. The facility began manufacturing uranium products in the early 1950`s and continued processing uranium ore concentrates until 1989. The facility used a variety of chemical and metallurgical processes to produce uranium metals for use at other DOE sites across the country. Since the facility manufactured uranium metals for over thirty years, various amounts of radiological contamination exists at the site. Because of the chemical and metallurgical processes employed at the site, some hazardous wastes as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) were also generated at the site. In 1989. the FEMP was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) requiring cleanup of the facility`s radioactive and chemical contamination under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This paper discusses the proposed remediation activities at the five Operable Units (OUs) designated at the FEMP. In addition, the paper also examines the ongoing CERCLA response actions and RCRA closure activities at the facility.

  18. 1991 New Mexico economic impact study for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research completed an abbreviated cost-benefit analysis of the income and employment impact of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor offices in Albuquerque. Since the Project Office will have a significant positive impact on the State`s economy (shown on Table 8), the impact is combined with the impact of remedial actions at the Ambrosia Lake site to highlight the cost-benefit of the entire Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project at the Ambrosia Lake site will generate $12.509 million in gross labor income in New Mexico between 1989 and 1994. This includes $1.161 million in federal tax revenue, $1.015 million in State personal income tax revenue, and seven thousand in local tax revenue. The UMTRA Project will generate the equivalent of 84 full-time jobs during the peak year of remedial action at Ambrosia Lake site. New Mexico`s total funding requirement for the UMTRA Project is estimated to be $2.963 million. The net economic benefit of the Ambrosia Lake portion of the UMTRA Project to New Mexico after the State`s share of the project`s cost, the federal income tax, and the $0.936 million income impact of the alternate use of the State funding are subtracted, will be $7.451 million between 1990 and 1994. In Fiscal Year 1990 the UMTRA Project DOE and contractor offices in Albuquerque directly employed 163 people. Another 78 jobs were also maintained in support of the industry sector and 166 jobs were also maintained in other sections of the New Mexico economy. It is estimated that $19 million dollars of income was generated and 1.949 million of State and local taxes were collected. The University of New Mexico study shows that for every dollar the State of New Mexico invests in the UMTRA Project, it will realize $95.05 in gross labor income. This corresponds to a net return on the States investment in the Project of $97.20 for every dollar invested.

  19. Senior Officer Oral History Program Project Handlist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army War Coll., Carlisle Barracks, PA.

    This publication contains a project list of taped interviews and transcribed work covering approximately 900 personalities and special topics in military history. The historical material was given by various associations and individuals who donated oral histories to the U.S. Army Military History Institute for use by researchers. Each project…

  20. Scoping session of the programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-08

    This report contains documentation of the scoping session of the environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The purpose of the meeting was to talk about the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on the groundwater.

  1. Status of activities on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This report on the status of the Office of Environment's program for inactive uranium mill tailings sites is an analysis of the current status and a forecast of future activities of the Office of Environment. The termination date for receipt of information was September 30, 1980. Aerial radiological surveys and detailed ground radiological assessments of properties within the communities in the vicinity of the designated processing sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho led to the designation of an initial group of vicinity properties for remedial action. The potential health effects of the residual radioactive materials on or near these properties were estimated, and the Assistant Secretary for Environment recommended priorities for performing remedial action to the Department's Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. In designating these properties and establishing recommended priorities for performing remedial action, the Office of Environment consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, representatives from the affected State and local governments, and individual property owners. After notifying the Governors of each of the affected States and the Navajo Nation of the Secretary of Energy's designation of processing sites within their areas of jurisdiction and establishment of remedial action priorities, a Sample Cooperative Agreement was developed by the Department in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and provided to the affected States and the Navajo Nation for comments. During September 1980, a Cooperative Agreement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the designated Canonsburg processing site was executed by the Department. It is anticipated that a Cooperative Agreement between the State of Utah and the Department to perform remedial actions at the designated Salt Lake City site will be executed in the near future.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1995 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Environmental activities conducted at the GJPO facility during 1995 were associated with mixed-waste treatment, site remediation, off-site dose modeling, and radiological and nonradiological monitoring. As part of the GJPO Mixed-Waste Treatment Program, on-site treatability studies were conducted in 1995 that made use of pilot-scale evaporative-oxidation and thermal-desorption units and bench-scale stabilization. DOE-GJPO used some of its own mixed-waste as well as samples received from other DOE sites for these treatability studies. These studies are expected to conclude in 1996. Removal of radiologically contaminated materials from GJPO facility buildings was conducted under the provisions of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Remediation activities included the removal of 394 metric tons of contaminated material from Buildings 18 and 28 and revegetation activities on the GJPO site; remediation was conducted in compliance with applicable permits.

  3. Scheduling the Remediation of Port Hope: Logistical and Regulatory Challenges of a Multiple Site Urban Remediation Project - 13119

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Lee, Angela; Palmeter, Tim

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Project is part of the larger CAN$1.28 billion Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the Municipalities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, Canada. Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is the Project Proponent, Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) is managing the procurement of services and the MMM Group Limited - Conestoga Rovers and Associates Joint Venture (MMM-CRA Joint Venture) is providing detailed design and construction oversight and administration services for the Project. The Port Hope Project includes the construction of a long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) in the Municipality of Port Hope and the remediation of 18 (eighteen) large-scale LLRW, numerous small-scale sites still being identified and industrial sites within the Municipality. The total volume to be remediated is over one million cubic metres and will come from sites that include temporary storage sites, ravines, beaches, parks, private commercial and residential properties and vacant industrial sites all within the urban area of Port Hope. Challenges that will need to be overcome during this 10 year project include: - Requirements stipulated by the Environmental Assessment (EA) that affect Project logistics and schedule. - Coordination of site remediation with the construction schedule at the LTWMF. - Physical constraints on transport routes and at sites affecting production rates. - Despite being an urban undertaking, seasonal constrains for birds and fish (i.e., nesting and spawning seasons). - Municipal considerations. - Site-specific constraints. - Site interdependencies exist requiring consideration in the schedule. Several sites require the use of an adjacent site for staging. (authors)

  4. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This quarterly report briefly describes recent progress in eight projects. The projects are entitled Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Spray Casting Project; and Watervliet Arsenal Project.

  5. Calculation of the number of cancer deaths prevented by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.L.; Pomatto, C.B. ); Cornish, R.E. . Albuquerque Operations Office)

    1999-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project has completed remedial action at 22 uranium mill tailings sites and about 5,000 properties (vicinity properties) where tailings were used in construction, at a total cost of $1.45 billion. This paper uses existing data from Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments, and vicinity property calculations, to determine the total number of cancer deaths averted by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The cost-effectiveness of remediating each site, the vicinity properties, and the entire project is calculated. The cost per cancer death averted was four orders of magnitude higher at the least cost-effective site than at the most cost-effective site.

  6. Calculation of the number of cancer deaths prevented by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project.

    PubMed

    Miller, M L; Cornish, R E; Pomatto, C B

    1999-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project has completed remedial action at 22 uranium mill tailings sites and about 5,000 properties ("vicinity properties") where tailings were used in construction, at a total cost of $1.45 billion. This paper uses existing data from Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments, and vicinity property calculations, to determine the total number of cancer deaths averted by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The cost-effectiveness of remediating each site, the vicinity properties, and the entire project is calculated. The cost per cancer death averted was four orders of magnitude higher at the least cost-effective site than at the most cost-effective site.

  7. Office of Inspector General report on audit of selected hazardous waste remedial actions program costs

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    In 1986, the Department of Energy (Department) entered into a work-for-others agreement with the Department of the Air Force (Air Force) to provide technical assistance in support of environmental compliance issues. Lockheed Martin Energy System`s (Energy Systems) Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) supported the Department in fulfilling its responsibilities to the Air Force. The objective of this audit was to determine if costs charged to selected HAZWRAP customers were in accordance with Department regulations and the terms of the Air Force`s interagency agreement. Energy Systems did not properly manage and account for costs claimed under its interagency agreements for HAZWRAP. Specifically, Energy Systems transferred costs among accounts to avoid overruns and to use the maximum funds authorized by HAZWRAP customers. By avoiding cost overruns, Energy Systems hoped to receive higher award fees from the Department. As a result of its actions, Energy Systems mischarged one HAZWRAP customer by $504,750. It was recommended that the Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office: (1) direct Energy Systems to ensure that existing management controls are adhered to and that adequate management controls are maintained; (2) determine the allowability of $504,750 in questioned costs, recover the appropriate amount from Energy Systems, and refund mischarged amounts to the appropriate customers; and (3) perform a ``for cause`` review of the Work-for-Others Program to identify, recover, and refund amounts received by Energy Systems as the result of improper cost transfers. Management concurred with the finding and recommendations and agreed to take appropriate action.

  8. Social and ethical issues in environmental remediation projects.

    PubMed

    Oughton, D H

    2013-05-01

    The contamination of environments with radionuclides can give rise to consequences that encompass far more than health risks from exposure to radiation. As experience from Chernobyl demonstrated, both the accident and remediation measures can have serious social and economic consequences. This paper presents a review of some of these issues, including their ethical relevance, and presents a check-list of socio-ethical aspects of remediation measures. The paper concludes with an overview of social remediation measures, encompassing actions that are directed towards benefits other than dose reduction (e.g., local food monitoring stations or medical check-up), or measures that require social rather than technical implementation (e.g. information centres, stakeholder dialogue). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Support to 2nd Generation RLV Propulsion Project Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    In this final report regarding support to the second generation RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicle) propulsion project office, a list of tasks accomplished is presented. During this period, Lee & Associates, LLC participated in numerous Systems Requirements Reviews (SRR) related to the Cobra development program.

  10. 48 CFR 2052.215-71 - Project officer authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the work description. (3) Review and, where required by the contract, approve technical reports... subject to the technical direction of the NRC project officer. The term technical direction is defined to include the following: (1) Technical direction to the contractor which shifts work emphasis between...

  11. 48 CFR 2052.215-71 - Project officer authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the work description. (3) Review and, where required by the contract, approve technical reports... subject to the technical direction of the NRC project officer. The term technical direction is defined to include the following: (1) Technical direction to the contractor which shifts work emphasis between...

  12. 48 CFR 2052.215-71 - Project officer authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of the work description. (3) Review and, where required by the contract, approve technical reports... subject to the technical direction of the NRC project officer. The term technical direction is defined to include the following: (1) Technical direction to the contractor which shifts work emphasis between...

  13. 48 CFR 2052.215-71 - Project officer authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of the work description. (3) Review and, where required by the contract, approve technical reports... subject to the technical direction of the NRC project officer. The term technical direction is defined to include the following: (1) Technical direction to the contractor which shifts work emphasis between...

  14. 48 CFR 2052.215-71 - Project officer authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of the work description. (3) Review and, where required by the contract, approve technical reports... subject to the technical direction of the NRC project officer. The term technical direction is defined to include the following: (1) Technical direction to the contractor which shifts work emphasis between...

  15. 40 CFR 300.120 - On-scene coordinators and remedial project managers: general responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... project managers: general responsibilities. 300.120 Section 300.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS... Response § 300.120 On-scene coordinators and remedial project managers: general responsibilities. (a)...

  16. Preliminary remediation goals for use at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report presents Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for use in human health risk assessment efforts under the United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Environmental Restoration (ER) Division. Chemical-specific PRGs are concentration goals for individual chemicals for specific medium and land use combinations. The PRGs are referred to as risk-based because they have been calculated using risk assessment procedures. Risk-based calculations set concentration limits using both carcinogenic or noncarcinogenic toxicity values under specific exposure pathways. The PRG is a concentration that is derived from a specified excess cancer risk level or hazard quotient. This report provides the ER Division with standardized PRGs which are integral to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process. By managing the assumptions and systems used in PRG derivation, the Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program will be able to control the level of quality assurance associated with these risk-based guideline values.

  17. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  18. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

  19. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the radiological survey activities program --- Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, R.R.; Little, C.A.

    1991-08-01

    The Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) at the Grand Junction Office (GJO), Colorado, of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude these sites from UMTRAP based on whether the on-site residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels on-site are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the PAG in conducting all activities related to UMTRAP. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the PAG/UMTRA QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. A prenatal nutrition project using dietetic students in physicians' offices.

    PubMed

    Morales, R; Cheung, S S

    1980-06-01

    A prenatal nutritional counseling project utilizing senior dietetic students in private physicians' offices was developed. The objectives were to provide sound nutritional information to pregnant women and a realistic work experience for students committed to a career in nutritional counseling. The results were positive for the patients, the participating physicians, and the student nutritionists. Further research is indicated to determine the specific effect of nutritional counseling on pregnancy outcomes.

  1. Final report of the decontamination and decommission of Building 31 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the domestic uranium procurement program funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Radiological contamination was identified in Building 31 and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This area was addressed in the summary final report of the remediation of the exterior areas of the GJPO facility. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  2. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence.

  3. Office of River Protection: Simplifying Project management tools

    SciTech Connect

    TAYLOR, D.G.

    2000-09-24

    The primary approach to the effort was to form a multi-organizational team comprised of federal and contractor staff to develop and implement the necessary tools and systems to manage the project. In late 1999 the DOE Manager of the Office of River Protection formed the Project Integration Office to achieve the objective of managing the efforts as a single project. The first major task, and the foundation upon which to base the development of all other tools, was the establishment of a single baseline of activities. However, defining a single scope schedule and cost was a difficult matter indeed. Work scopes were available throughout the project, but the level of detail and the integration of the activities existed primarily between working groups and individuals and not on a project-wide basis. This creates a situation where technical needs, logic flaws, resource balancing, and other similar integration needs are not elevated for management attention and resolution. It should be noted that probably 90% of the interface issues were known and being addressed. The key is simplifying the process and providing tangible assurance that the other 10% does not contain issues that can delay the project. Fortunately all of the contractors employed a common scheduling tool, which served as the basis for first communicating and then integrating baseline activities. Utilizing a powerful computer-based scheduling tool, it was soon possible to integrate the various schedules after the following was accomplished: Establishment of a scheduling specification (standardized input, coding, and approach to logic); and Clearly defined project assumptions.

  4. The project management office: transforming healthcare in the context of a hospital redevelopment project.

    PubMed

    Richer, Marie-Claire; Marchionni, Caroline; Lavoie-Tremblay, Melanie; Aubry, Monique

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that classifying projects into a typology allows improved allocation of resources and promotes project success. However, a typology of healthcare projects has yet to be developed. The projects encountered by the Transition Support Office at the McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, Quebec, where a major redevelopment project is under way, were classified into a typology unique to the healthcare context. Examples of the 3 project types, Process, People, and Practice, are provided to clarify the specific support strategies and context-adapted interventions that were instrumental to their success.

  5. Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale in SITU Thermal NAPL Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Butherus, Michael; Ingle, David S.; Juhlin, Randall; Daniel, Joseph; none,

    2004-10-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a field-scale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The Young-Rainey STAR Center is a former DOE facility that was previously known as the Pinellas Plant and the Pinellas STAR Center. The remediation project encompassed an area of 10,000 ft2 and depths extending to 35 ft below ground surface. Prior to the remediation, DOE evaluated technologies that had the potential to remove NAPLs from the subsurface at the site. Because of site conditions (clay lenses and an underlying clay layer that were thought to be contaminated), steam injection and electrical heating were considered to be the only technologies that had the potential to remove these NAPLs. In July 2001, DOE’s contractor awarded a subcontract for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were a combination of steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Remedial operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted during a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Additional confirmatory sampling was conducted 18 months after operations ended. Analytical results of the confirmatory sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects.

  6. Project Manager Performance and the Decision to Backsource the Project Management Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lively, William R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews a management decision of an Information Technology Outsource (ITO) provider to backshore the management oversight of its Project Management Office (PMO) after only one year of offshore operations. Governance is a term used in project management to refer to management oversight. The review is a quantitative analysis of existing…

  7. Project Manager Performance and the Decision to Backsource the Project Management Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lively, William R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews a management decision of an Information Technology Outsource (ITO) provider to backshore the management oversight of its Project Management Office (PMO) after only one year of offshore operations. Governance is a term used in project management to refer to management oversight. The review is a quantitative analysis of existing…

  8. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the

  9. Scoping session of the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    This document is about the scoping session which was held at the Community Center in Falls City, Texas. The purpose was to obtain public comment on the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), specifically on the ground water project. Presentations made by the manager for the entire UMTRA program, manager of the site and ground water program, comments made by two residents of Fall City are included in this document.

  10. TANK FARM REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AN EXERCISE IN TECHNICAL & REGULATORY COLLABORATION

    SciTech Connect

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-08

    The Tank Farm Remediation Technology Development Project at the Hanford Site focuses on waste storage tanks, pipelines and associated ancillary equipment that are part of the C-200 single-shell tank (SST) farm system located in the C Tank Farm. The purpose of the project is to obtain information on the implementation of a variety of closure activities and to answer questions on technical, operational and regulatory issues associated with closure.

  11. Report on game species of concern associated with the Gunnison Remedial Action Project, Gunnison, Colorado. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This report provides background information and data used in the analysis of potential impacts to game species reported in the Environmental Assessment of the Proposed Remedial Action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. That environmental assessment provides details regarding proposed remedial action at the Gunnison site along with a description of existing conditions and projected environmental impacts. A summary of the proposed action is provided. The uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials at the Gunnison processing site would be transported to the Landfill disposal site via the Tenderfoot Mountain (TM) haul route. The remedial action would take place over a three-year period with two six-month winter shutdowns. The first year would consist of site preparation and haul road construction. The second year would consist of moving the tailings. Movement of the radon/infiltration barrier cover material and erosion protection material would take place during the third construction year. The material used to cover the pile is fine-grained material for the radon/infiltration barrier (Sixmile Lane borrow site) and rock for erosion protection from the Chance Gulch borrow site. The location of the borrow sites used to obtain these materials and the associated haul roads is shown.

  12. Approved CAMU equals faster, better, cheaper remediation at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis-Nouille, E.M.; Goidell, L.C.; Strimbu, M.J.; Nickel, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A 1,050 acre Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) was approved for the Fernald Protection Agency Environmental Management Project (FEMP) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to manage environmental media remediation waste in the Operable Unit 5 Record of Decision, 1995. Debris is also proposed for management as remediation waste under the CAMU Rule in the Operable Unit 3 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Report, as of December 1995. Application of the CAMU Rule at the FEMP will allow consolidation of low-level mixed waste and hazardous waste that presents minimal threat from these two operable units in an on-property engineered disposal facility without triggering land disposal restrictions (LDRs). The waste acceptance criteria for the on property disposal facility are based on a combination of site-specific risk-based concentration standards, as opposed to non-site-specific requirements imposed by regulatory classifications.

  13. Sewer Project Remedies ‘Third World’ Conditions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An EPA-funded project to process sewage from homes on a West Virginia hillside has resolved what a county health department report described as “Third World” conditions caused by failing or non-existent on-site systems to manage human waste.

  14. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies

    SciTech Connect

    Board, D.C.

    1997-09-24

    This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised of eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer`s quality requirements known as the `RULE`, 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance.

  15. Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies

    SciTech Connect

    Trible, T.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised on eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer`s quality requirements known as the `RULE`, 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance.

  16. Causes and remedies for the dominant risk factors in Enterprise System implementation projects: the consultants' perspective.

    PubMed

    Lech, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the causes of the dominant risk factors, affecting Enterprise System implementation projects and propose remedies for those risk factors from the perspective of implementation consultants. The study used a qualitative research strategy, based on e-mail interviews, semi-structured personal interviews with consultants and participant observation during implementation projects. The main contribution of this paper is that it offers viable indications of how to mitigate the dominant risk factors. These indications were grouped into the following categories: stable project scope, smooth communication supported by the project management, dedicated, competent and decision-making client team, competent and engaged consultant project manager, schedule and budget consistent with the project scope, use of methodology and procedures, enforced and enabled by the project managers, competent and dedicated consultants. A detailed description is provided for each category.

  17. Remedial Action Contacts Directory - 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This document, which was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (ER), is a directory of 2628 individuals interested or involved in environmental restoration and/or remedial actions at radioactively contaminated sites. This directory contains a list of mailing addresses and phone numbers of DOE operations, area, site, project, and contractor offices; an index of DOE operations, area, site, project, and contractor office sorted by state; a list of individuals, presented by last name, facsimile number, and e-mail address; an index of affiliations presented alphabetically, with individual contacts appearing below each affiliation name; and an index of foreign contacta sorted by country and affiliation. This document was generated from the Remedial Action Contacts Database, which is maintained by the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC).

  18. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER WITHIN USEPA'S OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) was established in 1970 and currently employs over 17,000 personnel. Headquartered in Washington D.C., the USEPA has 10 regional offices (located in various cities throughout the USA) and 13 national laboratories that com...

  19. Examples from the Greenland-Project - Gentle Remediation Optiones (GROs) on Pb/zn Contaminated Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Kidd, Petra; Siebielec, Grzegorz

    2017-04-01

    The GREENLAND-project brought together "best practice" examples of several field applied gentle remediation techniques (EUFP7-project "Gentle remediation of trace element-contaminated land - GREENLAND; www.greenland-project.eu) with 17 partners from 11 countries. Gentle remediation options (GRO) comprise environmentally friendly technologies that have little or no negative impact on the soil. The main technologies are • phytoextraction • in situ immobilization and • assisted phytostabilization. Mining and processing activities affecting many sites worldwide negatively. The huge amounts of moved and treated materials have led to considerable flows of wastes and emissions. Alongside the many advantages of processed ores to our society, adverse effects in nature and risks for the environment and human health are observed. Three stages of impact of Pb/Zn-ore-treatment on the environment are discussed here: (1) On sites where the ores are mined impacts are the result of crushing, grinding, concentrating activities, and where additionally parts of the installations remain after abandoning the mine, as well as by the massive amounts of remaining deposits or wastes (mine tailings). (2) On sites where smelting and processing takes place, depending on the process (Welz, Doerschel) different waste materials are deposited. The Welz process waste generally contains less Cd and Pb than the Doerschel process waste which additionally shows higher water- extractable metals. (3) On sites close to the emitting source metal contamination can be found in areas for housing, gardening, and agricultural use. Emissions consist mainly from oxides and sulfides (Zn, Cd), sulfates (Zn, Pb, and Cd), chlorides (Pb) and carbonates (Cd). All these wastes and emissions pose potential risks of dispersion of pollutants into the food chain due to erosion (wind, water), leaching and the transfer into feeding stuff and food crops. In-situ treatments have the potential for improving the situation

  20. Source modification special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect

    1989-04-01

    One of the major issues that must be addressed during the evaluation of the efficiency of tailings embankment designs for compliance with groundwater standards is the estimation of source concentrations and the change in these concentrations with time. Because any effort to predict concentrations of contaminants in the uppermost aquifer requires a source concentration, data from these analyses are essential. Thetechnical approach of this study was twofold. The first approach was to investigate the rates of natural flushing of contaminants. Two sets of tailings samples were collected at two sites on the Old Rifle tailings pile at the Rifle UMTRA Project site in Colorado. One set of samples was collected at a site where the lower portion of the profile is continuously inundated with water and the other set was collected in anarea that only receives water from precipitation. The tailings samples were refluxed in strong acid (nitric acid) and the leachate was analyzed for hazardous constituents. The results of this investigation indicate that many of the hazardous constituents have been leached from the tailings at the wet site and that there has been little redistribution of elemental hazardous constituents at the dry site. The second approach involved a laboratory investigation of contaminant removal from tailings by doubly distilled water and two lixiviants. Tailings samples from the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project site were subjected to leaching by doubly distilled water, and by the lixiviants sodium bicarbonate and disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The resulting data were tabulated and plotted with concentration as a function of pore volume. Evaluation of the data indicates that pore fluids should show a decrease in concentration after very few pore volumes of liquid have eluted through the tailings. It is also demonstrated that lixiviants significantly increase the solubility and rate of elution of all of the hazardous constituents.

  1. Modern Sorters for Soil Segregation on Large Scale Remediation Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Kelley, J.E.; O'Brien, J.M.

    2008-01-15

    volume is 50 kilograms or less. Smaller sorting volumes can be obtained with lower throughput or by re-sorting the diverted material. This equipment can also handle large objects. The use of spectroscopy systems allows several regions of- interest to be set. Super-Sorters can bring waste processing charges down to less than $30/ metric ton on smaller jobs and can save hundreds of dollars per metric ton in disposal charges. The largest effect on the overall project cost occurs during planning and implementation. The overall goal is reduction of the length of the project, which dictates the most efficient soil processing. With all sorting systems the parameters that need to be accounted for are matrix type, soil feed rate, soil pre-processing, site conditions, and regulatory issues. The soil matrix and its ability to flow are extremely crucial to operations. It is also important to consider that as conditions change (i.e., moisture), the flowability of the soil matrix will change. Many soil parameters have to be considered: cohesive strength, internal and wall friction, permeability, and bulk density as a function of consolidating pressure. Clay bearing soils have very low permeability and high cohesive strength which makes them difficult to process, especially when wet. Soil feed speed is dependent on the equipment present and the ability to move the soil in the Super-Sorter processing area. When a Super-Sorter is running at 400 metric tons per hour it is difficult to feed the system. As an example, front-end loaders with large buckets would move approximately 5-10 metric tons of material, and 400 metric tons per hour would require 50-100 bucket-loads per hour to attain. Because the flowability of the soil matrix is important, poor material is often pre-processed before it is added to the feed hopper of the 'survey' conveyor. This pre-processing can consist of a 'grizzly' to remove large objects from the soil matrix, followed screening plant to prepare the soil so that it

  2. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 18 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. The soil beneath Building 18 was found to be radiologically contaminated; the building was not contaminated. The soil was remediated in accordance with identified standards. Building 18 and the underlying soil can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  3. Constellation Program Mission Operations Project Office Status and Support Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest; Webb, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The Constellation Program Mission Operations Project Office (CxP MOP) at Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas is preparing to support the CxP mission operations objectives for the CEV/Orion flights, the Lunar Lander, and and Lunar surface operations. Initially the CEV will provide access to the International Space Station, then progress to the Lunar missions. Initial CEV mission operations support will be conceptually similar to the Apollo missions, and we have set a challenge to support the CEV mission with 50% of the mission operations support currently required for Shuttle missions. Therefore, we are assessing more efficient way to organize the support and new technologies which will enhance our operations support. This paper will address the status of our preparation for these CxP missions, our philosophical approach to CxP operations support, and some of the technologies we are assessing to streamline our mission operations infrastructure.

  4. Constellation Program Mission Operations Project Office Status and Support Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest; Webb, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The Constellation Program Mission Operations Project Office (CxP MOP) at Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas is preparing to support the CxP mission operations objectives for the CEV/Orion flights, the Lunar Lander, and and Lunar surface operations. Initially the CEV will provide access to the International Space Station, then progress to the Lunar missions. Initial CEV mission operations support will be conceptually similar to the Apollo missions, and we have set a challenge to support the CEV mission with 50% of the mission operations support currently required for Shuttle missions. Therefore, we are assessing more efficient way to organize the support and new technologies which will enhance our operations support. This paper will address the status of our preparation for these CxP missions, our philosophical approach to CxP operations support, and some of the technologies we are assessing to streamline our mission operations infrastructure.

  5. Integrating removal actions and remedial actions: Soil and debris management at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    Goidell, L.C.; Hagen, T.D.; Strimbu, M.J.; Dupuis-Nouille, E.M.; Taylor, A.C.; Weese, T.E.; Yerace, P.J.

    1996-02-01

    Since 1991, excess soil and debris generated at the Fernald Environmental management Project (FEMP) have been managed in accordance with the principles contained in a programmatic Removal Action (RvA) Work Plan (WP). This plan provides a sitewide management concept and implementation strategy for improved storage and management of excess soil and debris over the period required to design and construct improved storage facilities. These management principles, however, are no longer consistent with the directions in approved and draft Records of Decision (RODs) and anticipated in draft RODs other decision documents. A new approach has been taken to foster improved management techniques for soil and debris that can be readily incorporated into remedial design/remedial action plans. Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This paper describes the methods that were applied to address the issues associated with keeping the components of the new work plan field implementable and flexible; this is especially important as remedial design is either in its initial stages or has not been started and final remediation options could not be precluded.

  6. US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project. Revision 1, Version 1: Final project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-21

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date.

  7. THE POSITIVE IMPACTS OF AMERICAN REINVESTMENT AND RECOVERY ACT (ARRA) FUNDING TO THE WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ON HANFORD'S PLATEAU REMEDIATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    BLACKFORD LT

    2010-01-19

    In April 2009, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) was allocated $1.6 billion (B) in ARRA funding to be applied to cleanup projects at the Hanford Site. DOE-RL selected projects to receive ARRA funding based on 3-criteria: creating/saving jobs, reducing the footprint of the Hanford Site, and reducing life-cycle costs for cleanup. They further selected projects that were currently covered under regulatory documents and existing prime contracts, which allowed work to proceed quickly. CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is a prime contractor to the DOE focused on the environmental cleanup of the DOE Hanford Site Central Plateau. CHPRC was slated to receive $1.36B in ARRA funding. As of January, 2010, CHPRC has awarded over $200 million (M) in subcontracts (64% to small businesses), created more that 1,100 jobs, and touched more than 2,300 lives - all in support of long-term objectives for remediation of the Central Plateau, on or ahead of schedule. ARRA funding is being used to accelerate and augment cleanup activities already underway under the baseline Plateau Remediation Contract (PRC). This paper details challenges and accomplishments using ARRA funding to meet DOE-RL objectives of creating/saving jobs, expediting cleanup, and reducing lifecycle costs for cleanup during the first months of implementation.

  8. Consensus implementation of a groundwater remediation project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, K.R.; Carlson, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    Because of significant characterization uncertainties existing when the Record of Decision was signed and the unfavorable national reputation of groundwater pump and treat remediation projects, the Test Area North (TAN) groundwater ROD includes the evaluation of five emerging technologies that show potential for treating the organic contamination in situ or reducing the toxicity of contaminants above ground. Treatability studies will be conducted to ascertain whether any may be suitable for implementation at TAN to yield more timely or cost effective restoration of the aquifer. The implementation approach established for the TAN groundwater project is a consensus approach, maximizing a partnership relation with stakeholders in constant, iterative implementation decision making.

  9. WSSRAP chemical plant geotechnical investigations for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This document has been prepared for the United states Department of Energy (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) by the Project Management Contractor (PMC), which consists of MK-Ferguson Company (MKF) and Morrison Knudsen Corporation Environmental Services Group (MKES) with Jacobs Engineering Group (JEG) as MKF's predesignated subcontractor. This report presents the results of site geotechnical investigations conducted by the PMC in the vicinity of the Weldon Spring chemical plant and raffinate pits (WSCP/RP) and in potential on-site and off-site clayey material borrow sources. The WSCP/RP is the proposed disposal cell (DC) site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Waste Management Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Remedial Action Project Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Remedial Action project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the floodplain of LEFPC, dispose of these soils at the Y-12 Landfill V, and restore the affected floodplain upon completion of remediation activities. This effort will be conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision (ROD) for LEFPC as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) action. The Waste Management Plan addresses management and disposition of all wastes generated during the remedial action for the LEFPC Project Most of the solid wastes will be considered to be sanitary or construction/demolition wastes and will be disposed of at existing Y-12 facilities for those types of waste. Some small amounts of hazardous waste are anticipated, and the possibility of low- level or mixed waste exists (greater than 35 pCi/g), although these are not expected. Liquid wastes will be generated which will be sanitary in nature and which will be capable of being disposed 0214 of at the Oak Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant.

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project fiscal year 1997 annual report to stakeholders

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The fiscal year (FY) 1997 annual report is the 19th report on the status of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping. Cleanup has been undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the groundwater project. This report addresses specifics about the UMTRA surface project.

  12. Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) Project Office Business Team of the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO) Org. 0140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttler, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    The program for which I am working at this summer is Propulsion and Power/Low Emissions Alternative Power (P&P/LEAP). It invests in a fundamental TRL 1-6 research and technology portfolio that will enable the future of: Alternative fuels and/or alternative propulsion systems, non-combustion (electric) propulsion systems. P&P/LEAP will identify and capitalize on the highest potential concepts generated both internal and external to the Agency. During my 2004 summer at NASA Glenn Research Center, I worked with my mentor Barbara Mader, in the Project Office with the Business Team completing various tasks for the project and personnel. The LEAP project is a highly matrixed organization. The Project Office is responsible for the goals advocacy and dollar (budget) of the LEAP project. The objectives of the LEAP Project are to discover new energy sources and develop unconventional engines and power systems directed towards greatly reduced emissions, enable new vehicle concepts for public mobility, new science missions and national security. The Propulsion and PowerLow Emissions Alternative Power directly supports the environmental, mobility, national security objectives of the Vehicle Systems Program and the Aeronautics Technology Theme. Technology deliverables include the demonstration through integrated ground tests, a constant volume combustor in an engine system, and UAV/small transport aircraft all electric power system. My mentor serves as a key member of the management team for the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO). She has represented the office on numerous occasions, and is a member of a number of center-wide panels/teams, such as the Space management Committee and is chair to the Business Process Consolidation Team. She is responsible for the overall coordination of resources for the Propulsion and Power Project - from advocacy to implementation. The goal for my summer at NASA was to document processes and archive program documents from the past

  13. Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) Project Office Business Team of the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO) Org. 0140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttler, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    The program for which I am working at this summer is Propulsion and Power/Low Emissions Alternative Power (P&P/LEAP). It invests in a fundamental TRL 1-6 research and technology portfolio that will enable the future of: Alternative fuels and/or alternative propulsion systems, non-combustion (electric) propulsion systems. P&P/LEAP will identify and capitalize on the highest potential concepts generated both internal and external to the Agency. During my 2004 summer at NASA Glenn Research Center, I worked with my mentor Barbara Mader, in the Project Office with the Business Team completing various tasks for the project and personnel. The LEAP project is a highly matrixed organization. The Project Office is responsible for the goals advocacy and dollar (budget) of the LEAP project. The objectives of the LEAP Project are to discover new energy sources and develop unconventional engines and power systems directed towards greatly reduced emissions, enable new vehicle concepts for public mobility, new science missions and national security. The Propulsion and PowerLow Emissions Alternative Power directly supports the environmental, mobility, national security objectives of the Vehicle Systems Program and the Aeronautics Technology Theme. Technology deliverables include the demonstration through integrated ground tests, a constant volume combustor in an engine system, and UAV/small transport aircraft all electric power system. My mentor serves as a key member of the management team for the Aeropropulsion Research Program Office (ARPO). She has represented the office on numerous occasions, and is a member of a number of center-wide panels/teams, such as the Space management Committee and is chair to the Business Process Consolidation Team. She is responsible for the overall coordination of resources for the Propulsion and Power Project - from advocacy to implementation. The goal for my summer at NASA was to document processes and archive program documents from the past

  14. Oppenheimer's Box of Chocolates: Remediation of the Manhattan Project Landfill at Los Alamos National Laboratory - 12283

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Donald L.; Ramsey, Susan S.; Finn, Kevin P.; Chaloupka, Allan B.

    2012-07-01

    Material Disposal Area B (MDA B) is the oldest radioactive waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Operated from 1944-48, MDA B was the disposal facility for the Manhattan Project. Recognized as one of the most challenging environmental remediation projects at Los Alamos, the excavation of MDA B received $110 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to accelerate this complex remediation work. Several factors combined to create significant challenges to remediating the landfill known in the 1940's as the 'contaminated dump'. The secrecy surrounding the Manhattan Project meant that no records were kept of radiological materials and chemicals disposed or of the landfill design. An extensive review of historical documents and interviews with early laboratory personnel resulted in a list of hundreds of hazardous chemicals that could have been buried in MDA B. Also, historical reports of MDA B spontaneously combusting on three occasions -with 50-foot flames and pink smoke spewing across the mesa during the last incident in 1948-indicated that hazardous materials were likely present in MDA B. To complicate matters further, though MDA B was located on an isolated mesa in the 1940's, the landfill has since been surrounded by a Los Alamos commercial district. The local newspaper, hardware store and a number of other businesses are located directly across the street from MDA B. This close proximity to the public and the potential for hazardous materials in MDA B necessitated conducting remediation work within protective enclosures. Potential chemical hazards and radiological inventory were better defined using a minimally intrusive sampling method called direct push technology (DPT) prior to excavation. Even with extensive sampling and planning the project team encountered many surprises and challenges during the project. The one area where planning did not fail to meet reality was safety. There were no serious worker injuries and

  15. 48 CFR 301.606-71 - Project Officer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., including development of an Acquisition Plan (AP) or other acquisition request documentation—see 307.71, for... Officer must provide a course completion certificate to the Contracting Officer with any AP or...

  16. 48 CFR 301.606-71 - Project Officer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., including development of an Acquisition Plan (AP) or other acquisition request documentation—see 307.71, for... Officer must provide a course completion certificate to the Contracting Officer with any AP or...

  17. 48 CFR 301.606-71 - Project Officer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., including development of an Acquisition Plan (AP) or other acquisition request documentation—see 307.71, for... Officer must provide a course completion certificate to the Contracting Officer with any AP or...

  18. 48 CFR 301.606-71 - Project Officer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., including development of an Acquisition Plan (AP) or other acquisition request documentation—see 307.71, for... Officer must provide a course completion certificate to the Contracting Officer with any AP or...

  19. 48 CFR 301.606-71 - Project Officer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., including development of an Acquisition Plan (AP) or other acquisition request documentation—see 307.71, for... Officer must provide a course completion certificate to the Contracting Officer with any AP or...

  20. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  1. Using the project management office to connect the dots between projects and strategy.

    PubMed

    Phan, Jacqueline

    2015-03-01

    Project management is recognized as an essential skill required for healthcare leadership and as a result, Project Management Offices (PMOs) in healthcare organizations have become commonplace. When PMOs are well suited and fit to their organization, they are being valued for their ability to support appropriate trade-offs between investments, capacity, and quality. This article provides an overview of healthcare PMOs and advocates for elevating the role of the healthcare PMO from a monitoring and reporting function to a leader and the engine for strategic change within an organization. © 2015 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  2. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 1 [of 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. A phased and integrated approach to waste retrieval operations was used for the GAAT Remediation Project. The project promoted safety by obtaining experience from low-risk operations in the North Tank Farm before moving to higher-risk operations in the South Tank Farm. This approach allowed project personnel to become familiar with the tanks and waste, as well as the equipment, processes, procedures, and operations required to perform successful waste retrieval. By using an integrated approach to tank waste retrieval and tank waste management, the project was completed years ahead of the original baseline schedule, which resulted in avoiding millions of dollars in associated costs. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the GAAT Remediation Project. It also describes the different types of equipment and how they were used. The emphasis of Volume 1 is on the description of the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the GAAT Remediation Project. Volume 2 provides the appendixes for the report, which include the following information: (A) Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; (B) Annotated Bibliography; (C) Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; (D) GAAT Equipment Matrix; and (E) Vendor List

  3. Report on game species of concern associated with the Gunnison Remedial Action Project, Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This report provides background information and data used in the analysis of potential impacts to game species reported in the Environmental Assessment of the Proposed Remedial Action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. That environmental assessment provides details regarding proposed remedial action at the Gunnison site along with a description of existing conditions and projected environmental impacts. A summary of the proposed action is provided. The uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials at the Gunnison processing site would be transported to the Landfill disposal site via the Tenderfoot Mountain (TM) haul route. The remedial action would take place over a three-year period with two six-month winter shutdowns. The first year would consist of site preparation and haul road construction. The second year would consist of moving the tailings. Movement of the radon/infiltration barrier cover material and erosion protection material would take place during the third construction year. The material used to cover the pile is fine-grained material for the radon/infiltration barrier (Sixmile Lane borrow site) and rock for erosion protection from the Chance Gulch borrow site. The location of the borrow sites used to obtain these materials and the associated haul roads is shown.

  4. Mobile water treatment plant special study. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. To begin implementation of Phase 11 groundwater remediation, the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested that (1) the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) conduct a study to provide for the design of a mobile water treatment plant to treat groundwater extracted during site characterization studies at completed Phase I UMTRA sites, and (2) the results of the TAC investigations be documented in a special study report. This special study develops the design criteria for a water treatment plant that can be readily transported from one UMTRA site to another and operated as a complete treatment system. The 1991 study provides the basis for selecting a mobile water treatment system to meet the operating requirements recommended in this special study. The scope of work includes the following: Determining contaminants, flows, and loadings. Setting effluent quality criteria. Sizing water treatment unit(s). Evaluating non-monetary aspects of alternate treatment processes. Comparing costs of alternate treatment processes. Recommending the mobile water treatment plant design criteria.

  5. Cost-benefit analysis of copper recovery in remediation projects: A case study from Sweden.

    PubMed

    Volchko, Yevheniya; Norrman, Jenny; Rosén, Lars; Karlfeldt Fedje, Karin

    2017-12-15

    Contamination resulting from past industrial activity is a problem throughout the world and many sites are severely contaminated by metals. Advances in research in recent years have resulted in the development of technologies for recovering metal from metal-rich materials within the framework of remediation projects. Using cost-benefit analysis (CBA), and explicitly taking uncertainties into account, this paper evaluates the potential social profitability of copper recovery as part of four remediation alternatives at a Swedish site. One alternative involves delivery of copper-rich ash to a metal production company for refining. The other three alternatives involve metal leaching from materials and sale of the resulting metal sludge for its further processing at a metal production company using metallurgical methods. All the alternatives are evaluated relative to the conventional excavation and disposal method. Metal recovery from the ash, metal sludge sale, and disposal of the contaminated soil and the ash residue at the local landfill site, was found to be the best remediation alternative. However, given the present conditions, its economic potential is low relative to the conventional excavation and disposal method but higher than direct disposal of the copper-rich ash for refining. Volatile copper prices, the high cost of processing equipment, the highly uncertain cost of the metal leaching and washing process, coupled with the substantial project risks, contribute most to the uncertainties in the CBA results for the alternatives involving metal leaching prior to refining. However, investment in processing equipment within the framework of a long-term investment project, production of safe, reusable soil residue, and higher copper prices on the metal market, can make metal recovery technology socially profitable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary (QEDS) for fourth quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    This report contains the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1998 in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses) were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the fourth quarter of 1998. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during fourth quarter 1998 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  7. The software analysis project for the Office of Human Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tureman, Robert L., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    There were two major sections of the project for the Office of Human Resources (OHR). The first section was to conduct a planning study to analyze software use with the goal of recommending software purchases and determining whether the need exists for a file server. The second section was analysis and distribution planning for retirement planning computer program entitled VISION provided by NASA Headquarters. The software planning study was developed to help OHR analyze the current administrative desktop computing environment and make decisions regarding software acquisition and implementation. There were three major areas addressed by the study: current environment new software requirements, and strategies regarding the implementation of a server in the Office. To gather data on current environment, employees were surveyed and an inventory of computers were produced. The surveys were compiled and analyzed by the ASEE fellow with interpretation help by OHR staff. New software requirements represented a compilation and analysis of the surveyed requests of OHR personnel. Finally, the information on the use of a server represents research done by the ASEE fellow and analysis of survey data to determine software requirements for a server. This included selection of a methodology to estimate the number of copies of each software program required given current use and estimated growth. The report presents the results of the computing survey, a description of the current computing environment, recommenations for changes in the computing environment, current software needs, management advantages of using a server, and management considerations in the implementation of a server. In addition, detailed specifications were presented for the hardware and software recommendations to offer a complete picture to OHR management. The retirement planning computer program available to NASA employees will aid in long-range retirement planning. The intended audience is the NASA civil

  8. The office of real soon now, western pilot (projectors in offices project)

    SciTech Connect

    Uselton, S L

    2002-03-11

    The ASCI VIEWS program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been investigating a variety of display technologies, motivated by the large size, high resolution and complexity of some data sets that ASCI users explore and analyze. The purpose of this report is to describe the design, deployment and initial user reactions to one display system. The inspiration for the system comes from a similar experimental deployment at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), one of the VIEWS program's academic partners. The display system features the use of multiple projectors in individual offices creating oversized displays to replace standard monitors. Some discussion on alternative multi-projector display systems provides context for this description.The VIEWS program began exploring the possibilities of alternative displays by building large, tiled displays and supporting the development of extremely high-pixel density LCD panels [ASCI]. The same considerations have led to partnerships with several groups of researchers working on various aspects of multi-projector display systems including groups at UNC, Stanford University, Princeton University, the University of Utah, Argonne National Lab, and the two NSF supercomputer centers, NCSA and SDSC. This report is divided into eight sections. The following section describes the background for the development of this multi-projector display system, including brief descriptions of other large-format and high-resolution display projects, and provides some LLNL motivations for exploring further. Section III covers the evolution of the design intended specifically for LLNL and explains some of the factors that influenced the decisions made. Section IV provides a detailed description of the two installations, including materials and resources involved. After a few weeks of experience with the systems, the users were interviewed and their reactions and comments are summarized in Section V. Conclusions

  9. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 2 [of 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the project and describes the types of equipment used. Volume 1 also discusses the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the remediation effort. Volume 2 consists of the following appendixes, which are referenced in Vol. 1: A--Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; B--Annotated Bibliography; C--GAAT Equipment Matrix; D--Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; and E--Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435K below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

  10. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  11. Innovation in health service management: Adoption of project management offices to support major health care transformation.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Aubry, Monique; Cyr, Guylaine; Richer, Marie-Claire; Fortin-Verreault, Jean-François; Fortin, Claude; Marchionni, Caroline

    2017-09-10

    To explore the characteristics that influence project management offices acceptance and adoption in healthcare sector. The creation of project management offices has been suggested as a promising avenue to promote successful organisational change and facilitate evidence-based practice. However, little is known about the characteristics that promote their initial adoption and acceptance in health care sector. This knowledge is important in the context where many organisations are considering implementing project management offices with nurse managers as leaders. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. The unit of analysis was the project management offices. The study was conducted in three university-affiliated teaching hospitals in 2013-14 (Canada). Individual interviews (n = 34) were conducted with senior managers. Results reveal that project management offices dedicated to project and change management constitute an innovation and an added value that addresses tangible needs in the field. Project management offices are an innovation highly compatible with health care managers and their approach has parallels to the process of clinical problem solving and reasoning well-known to adopters. This knowledge is important in a context where many nurses hold various roles in project management offices, such as Director, project manager, clinical expert and knowledge broker. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Gunite Tanks Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Successful Integration & Deployment of Technologies Results in Remediated Underground Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Billingsley, K.; Bolling, D.

    2002-02-27

    This paper presents an overview of the underground technologies deployed during the cleanup of nine large underground storage tanks (USTs) that contained residual radioactive sludge, liquid low-level waste (LLLW), and other debris. The Gunite Tanks Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was successfully completed in 2001, ending with the stabilization of the USTs and the cleanup of the South Tank Farm. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project was the first of its kind completed in the United States of America. The Project integrated robotic and remotely operated technologies into an effective tank waste retrieval system that safely retrieved more than 348 m3 (92,000 gal) of radioactive sludge and 3.15E+15 Bq (85,000 Ci) of radioactive contamination from the tanks. The Project successfully transferred over 2,385 m3 (630,000 gal) of waste slurry to ORNL's active tank waste management system. The project team avoided over $120 Million in costs and shortened the original baseline schedule by over 10 years. Completing the Gunite Tanks Remediation Project eliminated the risks posed by the aging USTs and the waste they contained, and avoid the $400,000 annual costs associated with maintaining and monitoring the tanks.

  13. Unique Regulatory Approach for Licensing the Port Hope Remediation Project in Canada - 13315

    SciTech Connect

    Kostova, M.; Howard, D.; Elder, P.

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope remediation project is a part of a larger initiative of the Canadian Federal Government the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI) which is based upon a community proposal. The Government of Canada, through Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is investing $1.28 billion over 10 years to clean up historic low-level radioactive waste in the Port Hope Area and to provide long-term safe management of the low-level radioactive wastes in the Port Hope Area. These wastes arose from the activities of a former Federal Crown Corporation (Eldorado Nuclear) and its private sector predecessors. In Canada, historic waste are defined as low-level radioactive waste that was managed in a manner no longer considered acceptable, but for which the original producer cannot reasonably be held responsible or no longer exists and for which the Federal Government has accepted responsibility. In Canada, under the current regulatory framework, the environmental remediation is not considered as a distinct phase of the nuclear cycle. The regulatory approach for dealing with existing sites contaminated with radioactive residues is defined on the basis of risk and application of existing regulations. A unique regulatory approach was taken by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) to address the various licensing issues and to set out the requirements for licensing of the Port Hope Project within the current regulatory framework. (authors)

  14. Quarry geotechnical report for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report has been prepared for the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) by the Project Management Contractor (PMC), which is MK-Ferguson Company (MK-Ferguson) with Jacobs Engineering Group (JEG) as its designated subcontractor. The Weldon Spring site (WSS) comprises the Weldon Spring quarry area and the Weldon Spring chemical plant and raffinate pit areas. This report presents the results of geotechnical investigations conducted during 1989--1990 at the proposed Weldon Spring quarry staging and water treatment facilities in the quarry area. The facilities are intended for treatment of water removed from the quarry area. An access road and a decontamination pad will be necessary for handling and transportation of bulk waste. Results of previous geotechnical investigations performed by other geoscience and environmental engineering firms in the quarry area, were reviewed, summarized and incorporated into this report. Well logging, stratigraphy data, piezometer data, elevations, and soil characteristics are also included.

  15. Plutonium Immobilization Project, Project Office Quality Assurance Program Description Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, T.

    1998-04-30

    ''The quality assurance activity involves the establishment and implementation of the Quality Assurance Program and the development of a Quality Assurance Plan and Procedures. Quality Assurance provides the plans, procedures and controls that are required for repository acceptance and the immobilization plant licensing and design activities.'' The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) has a policy that all development, testing and operational activities be planned and performed in accordance with its customer's needs and expectations, and with a commitment to excellence and continuous improvement. The Immobilization Development and Testing (D&T) Quality Assurance Program establishes implementation requirements which, when completed, will ensure that the program development and test activities conform to the appropriate QA requirements. In order for the program to be effective, a designated quality lead must be in place at the Project Office and each participating site.

  16. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Falls City, Texas, site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This final audit report for the Falls City, Texas, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site summarizes the radiological audits and the quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, audits, and final close-out inspection performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). It also summarizes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) surveillances. One radiological audit and three radiological surveillances were performed at the Falls City site. These surveillances and audit, which resulted in 31 observations, focused primarily on processing site activities and were performed on the following dates: 3-6 August 1992, 29-30 October 1992, 22-26 March 1993, and 1-3 November 1993. All outstanding radiological issues were closed out at the completion of the construction activities. Six QA in-process surveillances, which resulted in 71 observations, were performed at the Falls City site on the following dates: 22-24 July 1992, 23-25 November 1992, 17-19 May 1993, 16-18 August 1993, 13-15 October 1993, and 2-4 February 1994. All outstanding issues were closed out with the February surveillance on 3 March 1994. The DOE/TAC remedial action close-out inspections of the Falls City site, which resulted in 56 observations, were conducted 9-10 June 1994 and 26 July 1994. The inspections were closed out on 26 January 1995. The NRC performed three on-site construction reviews (OSCR), resulting in seven observations of remedial action construction activities that occurred during site visits. The OSCRs were performed 9 December 1992, 12 May 1993, and 25 October 1993. Since all audit and surveillance observations and recommendations have been closed out, this final audit report segment of the site certification process is complete.

  17. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and a QA final closeout inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). One radiological surveillance and three radiological audits were performed at the Ambrosia Lake site. The surveillance was performed on 12--16 April 1993 (DOE, 1993d). The audits were performed on 26--29 July 1993 (DOE, 1993b); 21--23 March 1994 (DOE, 1994d); and 1--2 August 1994 (DOE, 1994d). The surveillance and audits resulted in 47 observations. Twelve of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were satisfactorily closed out on 28 December 1994. The radiological surveillance and audits are discussed in this report. A total of seven QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Ambrosia Lake UMTRA site are discussed. The DOE/TAC Ambrosia Lake final remedial action close-out inspection was conducted on 26 July 1995 (DOE, 1995a). To summarize, a total of 155 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. Follow-up to responses required from the RAC for the DOE/TAC surveillance and audit observations indicated that all issues related to the Ambrosia Lake site were resolved and closed to the satisfaction of the DOE.

  18. Post Remedial Action Report, Lansdowne Radioactive Residence Complex, Dismantlement/Removal Project. Volume 1. Government Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Health Physicist ; Sherri Johnson, Office6Manager, Raymond Huston, Project Manager. pwWCrk o .Fotrw lf orgt oo aw - auoiCne,,ss esmy.Fot oleft to...treatment of cancer patients. Process effluent from the refining process permeated through all parts of the house, including the adjacent 107 side, then...Decision of 22 Sept., 1986, they elected to exercise an existing inter-agency agreement with the Corps of Engineers for undertaking Federal Lead

  19. Radiation Protection Considerations at USACE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.H.

    2008-07-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was initially authorized by Congress in 1974. FUSRAP was enacted to address residual radioactive contamination associated with numerous sites across the U.S. at which radioactive material (primarily Uranium ores and related milling products) had been processed in support of the nation's nuclear weapons program dating back to the Manhattan Project and the period immediately following World War II. In October 1997, Congress transferred the management of this program from the Department of Energy to the United States Corp of Engineers. Through this program, the Corps addresses the environmental remediation of certain sites once used by DOE's predecessor agencies, the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. The waste at FUSRAP sites consists mainly of low levels of uranium, thorium and radium, along with some mixed wastes. Upon completion of remedial activities, these sites are transferred to DOE for long-term stewardship activities. This paper presents and contrasts the radiological conditions and recent monitoring results associated with five large ongoing FUSRAP projects including Maywood, N.J.; the Linde site near Buffalo, N.Y.; Colonie in Albany N.Y. and the St Louis, Mo. airport and downtown sites. The radiological characteristics of soil and debris at each site and respective regulatory clean up criteria is presented and contrasted. Some differences are discussed in the radiological characteristics of material at some sites that result in variations in radiation protection monitoring programs. Additionally, summary data for typical personnel radiation exposure monitoring results are presented. In summary: 1. The FUSRAP projects for which data and observations are reported in this paper are considered typical of the radiological nature of FUSRAP sites in general. 2. These sites are characterized by naturally occurring uranium and thorium series radionuclides in soil and debris, at

  20. Regenerative medicine, resource and regulation: lessons learned from the remedi project.

    PubMed

    Ginty, Patrick J; Rayment, Erin A; Hourd, Paul; Williams, David J

    2011-03-01

    The successful commercialization of regenerative medicine products provides a unique challenge to the manufacturer owing to a lack of suitable investment/business models and a constantly evolving regulatory framework. The resultant slow translation of scientific discovery into safe and clinically efficacious therapies is preventing many potential products from reaching the market. This is despite of the need for new therapies that may reduce the burden on the world's healthcare systems and address the desperate need for replacement tissues and organs. The collaborative Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded remedi project was devised to take a holistic but manufacturing-led approach to the challenge of translational regenerative medicine in the UK. Through strategic collaborations and discussions with industry and other academic partners, many of the positive and negative issues surrounding business and regulatory success have been documented to provide a remedi-led perspective on the management of risk in business and the elucidation of the regulatory pathways, and how the two are inherently linked. This article represents the findings from these discussions with key stakeholders and the research into best business and regulatory practices.

  1. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project, Grand Junction, Colorado, processing site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This final audit report (FAR) for remedial action at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project processing site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/ audits, the quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and the QA final close-out inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). The FAR also summarizes other surveillances performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). To summarize, a total of one finding and 127 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. The NRC noted general site-related observations during the OSCRs. Follow-up to responses required from MK-Ferguson for the DOE/TAC finding and observations indicated that all issues related to the Grand Junction processing site were resolved and closed out to the DOE`s satisfaction. The NRC OSCRs resulted in no issues related to the Grand Junction processing site requiring a response from MK-Ferguson.

  2. Office of Maternal and Child Health Active Projects FY 1989. An Annotated Listing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    An annotated listing is presented of projects offering maternal and child health care services. These projects, referred to as special projects of regional and national significance (SPRANS), are supported by the Office of Maternal and Child Health of the Department of Health and Human Services. The first section provides information on services…

  3. Tank waste remediation system year 2000 dedicated file server project HNF-3418 project plan

    SciTech Connect

    SPENCER, S.G.

    1999-04-26

    The Server Project is to ensure that all TWRS supporting hardware (fileservers and workstations) will not cause a system failure because of the BIOS or Operating Systems cannot process Year 2000 dates.

  4. Program management plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    The primary mission of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project is to effectively implement the risk-reduction strategies and technical plans to stabilize and prevent further migration of uranium within the MSRE facility, remove the uranium and fuel salts from the system, and dispose of the fuel and flush salts by storage in appropriate depositories to bring the facility to a surveillance and maintenance condition before decontamination and decommissioning. This Project Management Plan (PMP) for the MSRE Remediation Project details project purpose; technical objectives, milestones, and cost objectives; work plan; work breakdown structure (WBS); schedule; management organization and responsibilities; project management performance measurement planning, and control; conduct of operations; configuration management; environmental, safety, and health compliance; quality assurance; operational readiness reviews; and training.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project: Project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA Project processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1987). This scope of work will entail the following activities on a site-specific basis: Develop a compliance strategy based on modification of the UMTRA Surface Project RAPs or develop Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC concurrence on the RAP and full participation of the affected states and tribes. Implement the RAP to include institutional controls, where appropriate, as an interim measure until compliance with the standards is achieved. Institute long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate long-term surveillance program on or before the Project end date. Prepare certification or confirmation reports and modify the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP), where needed, on those sites completed prior to the Project end date.

  6. Key programmatic steps and activities for implementing the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) was enacted based upon findings by Congress that uranium mill tailings located at active and inactive hazard to the public, and that protection of the public health, safety and welfare, and the regulations of interstate commerce, require that every reasonable effort be made to provide for the stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize radon diffusion into the environment and to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings.'' A general understanding of the steps leading to elimination of the hazards associated with designated uranium mill tailings sites, and the parties involved in that effort, are presented in this document. A representative schedule is also presented in this document to show both program sequence and activity interdependence. Those activities that have the most potential to influence program duration, because of the significant amount of additional time that may be required, include identification and selection of a suitable site, field data collection delays due to weather, actual acquisition of the designated or alternate disposal site, construction delays due to weather, and site licensing. This document provides an understanding of the steps, the sequence, the parties involved, and a representative duration of activities leading to remedial action and cleanup at the designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF IN-SITU THERMAL REMEDIATION: THE LORING AFB STEAM INJECTION PROJECT EXAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental remediation programs require that adequate planning be done before field work for characterization or remediation is undertaken. However, the heterogeneous nature of the subsurface can often thwart our best planning efforts. More recently, dynamic work plans which...

  8. OPTIMIZATION OF IN-SITU THERMAL REMEDIATION: THE LORING AFB STEAM INJECTION PROJECT EXAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental remediation programs require that adequate planning be done before field work for characterization or remediation is undertaken. However, the heterogeneous nature of the subsurface can often thwart our best planning efforts. More recently, dynamic work plans which...

  9. Analyzing Navy Officer Inventory Projection Using Data Farming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    researcher employs a process that runs the model iteratively to observe t-statistics for individual model coefficients and remove additional terms manually ...officer manpower optimization revisited (Master’s thesis). Naval Postgraduate School. Yardley, R. J., Schirmer, P., Thie, H. J., & Merck , S. J

  10. Senior Officer Oral History Program Project Handlist. [Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army War Coll., Carlisle Barracks, PA.

    The Senior Officer Oral History Program (SOOHP) is sponsored jointly by the U.S. Army War College and the U.S. Army Military History Institute, as an educational service. As of 1992, this program includes over 2,000 hours of taped interviews and 100,000 transcribed pages covering 900 military personalities and special topics. This document is a…

  11. Projecting Officer Strength of the United States Army Reserve from 2008-2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Officer Accesions by Fiscal Year (Exponential Smoothing) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2LT 1LT...Accessions Forecasts (Holt Smoothing) Projected RC Officer Accesions by Fiscal Year (Holt Smoothing) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 2003

  12. Region 9 Tribal Grant Program - Project Officer and Tribal Contact Information Map Service

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This compilation of geospatial data is for the purpose of managing and communicating information about current EPA project officers, tribal contacts, and tribal grants, both internally and with external stakeholders.

  13. Report: EPA Managers Did Not Hold Supervisors and Project Officers Accountable for Grants Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2005-P-00027, September 27, 2005. Managers did not sufficiently hold supervisors and project officers accountable for grants management because there is no process to measure most grants management activity.

  14. SAFETY IMPROVES DRAMATICALLY IN FLUOR HANFORD SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER MS

    2007-12-05

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walkdowns, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site.

  15. Project BRACER: Technical Report of the Remediation of the Biological Waste Pits Located Behind Building H-55, CFB Kingston, Ontario

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    Project BRACER Technical Report of the Remediation of the Biological Waste Pits Located Behind Building H-55, CFB Kingston...Ontario K. Pirie DRDC Suffield T. Cousins DRDC Ottawa Andrew Wollin Base Env O, CFB Kingston Brian Armstrong VP Hytec Hydrocarbon Reclamation...Public Consultation Process ............................................................................. 6 2.5.1 CFB Kingston

  16. Investigation of the Use of "Cucumis Sativus" for Remediation of Chromium from Contaminated Environmental Matrices: An Interdisciplinary Instrumental Analysis Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lynsey R.; Edwards, Michael R.; Farmer, Russell; Greenly, Kathryn J.; Hensler, Sherri; Jenkins, Scott E.; Joyce, J. Michael; Mann, Jason A.; Prentice, Boone M.; Puckette, Andrew E.; Shuford, Christopher M.; Porter, Sarah E. G.; Rhoten, Melissa C.

    2009-01-01

    An interdisciplinary, semester-long project is presented in which students grow Cucumis sativus (cucumber) plants from seeds and study the ability of the plants to remediate a heavy metal from contaminated soil or water or both. Phytoremediation strategies for environmental cleanup are presented as possible alternatives to chemical based clean-up…

  17. DOE responses to Ecology review comments for ``Sampling and analysis plans for the 100-D Ponds voluntary remediation project``

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the sampling and analytical activities which will be performed to support closure of the 100-D Ponds at the Hanford Reservation. This report contains responses by the US Department of Energy to Ecology review for ``Sampling and Analysis Plan for the 100-D Ponds Voluntary Remediation Project.``

  18. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state`s 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs.

  19. Investigation of the Use of "Cucumis Sativus" for Remediation of Chromium from Contaminated Environmental Matrices: An Interdisciplinary Instrumental Analysis Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lynsey R.; Edwards, Michael R.; Farmer, Russell; Greenly, Kathryn J.; Hensler, Sherri; Jenkins, Scott E.; Joyce, J. Michael; Mann, Jason A.; Prentice, Boone M.; Puckette, Andrew E.; Shuford, Christopher M.; Porter, Sarah E. G.; Rhoten, Melissa C.

    2009-01-01

    An interdisciplinary, semester-long project is presented in which students grow Cucumis sativus (cucumber) plants from seeds and study the ability of the plants to remediate a heavy metal from contaminated soil or water or both. Phytoremediation strategies for environmental cleanup are presented as possible alternatives to chemical based clean-up…

  20. Vicinity Property Assessments at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Project Sites in the New York District - 13420

    SciTech Connect

    Ewy, Ann; Hays, David

    2013-07-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) has addressed sites across the nation for almost 4 decades. Multiple stake holder pressures, multiple regulations, and process changes occur over such long time periods. These result in many challenges to the FUSRAP project teams. Initial FUSRAP work was not performed under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Records of Decision (ROD). The ROD identifies the remedy decision and ultimately the criteria to be used to release a site. Early FUSRAP projects used DOE Orders or the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) standards. Under current RODs, regulations may differ, resulting in different cleanup criteria than that used in prior Vicinity Property (VP) remediation. The USACE, in preparation for closeout of Sites, conducts reviews to evaluate whether prior actions were sufficient to meet the cleanup criteria specified in the current ROD. On the basis of these reviews, USACE has conducted additional sampling, determined that prior actions were sufficient, or conducted additional remediation consistent with the selected remedy in the ROD. As the public pressures, regulations, and processes that the FUSRAP encounters continue to change, the program itself continues to evolve. Assessment of VPs at FUSRAP sites is a necessary step in the life cycle of our site management. (authors)

  1. Effective Time Management in the Project Office. Executive Summary.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-05

    manager. It can be concluded from the study that project managers have difficulty in managing their time and that although neglected, time management should...be taught to project managers so as to preclude spending an inordinate amount of time to accomplish their job. An understanding and use of the time ... management principles delineated in the study should allow the manager to make much more effective use of his available time. (Author)

  2. Bentonite-amended soil special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This special study was conducted to assess the viability of soil with a high percentage of bentonite added as an infiltration barrier in the cover of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cells. To achieve maximum concentration limits (MCLs) at several UMTRA Project sites, covers with a very low permeability are needed. If alternate concentration limits (ACLs) are the appropriate site groundwater compliance strategy, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is required to demonstrate, among other things, that the infiltration to the disposal cell is as low as reasonably achievable, and hence that the cover has a very low permeability. When the study discussed here was begun, the lowest permeability element available was CLAYMAX[sub R], a manufactured liner material constructed of natural material (bentonite clay) between two geosynthetics.The strength of soil-bentonite mixes was measured to see if they could be placed on sideslopes and not pose stability problems. Also evaluated were the hydraulic conductivities of soil-bentonite mixes. If the strengths and permeabilities of soils with a high percentage of bentonite are favorable, the soils may be used as infiltration barriers in current cover designs without changing pile geometries. The scope of work for this study called for a literature review and a two-phased laboratory testing program. This report presents the results of the literature review and the first phase of the testing program.

  3. Overview of the LAU Center Technical Assistance Process and the Office for Civil Rights Task Force Remedies: Phase 1 Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazon, M. Reyes

    This manual, first in a series dealing with the Lau Center technical assistance approach, is designed to assist school districts in their efforts to develop an educational master plan to meet Title VI (1964 Civil Rights Act) compliance guidelines. The manual summarizes the legislation, judicial decisions, and the Task Force Remedies which have…

  4. 18 CFR 375.308 - Delegations to the Director of the Office of Energy Projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Delegations to the Director of the Office of Energy Projects. 375.308 Section 375.308 Conservation of Power and Water... applications for: (1) Amendments (including changes in the use or disposal of water power project lands...

  5. 18 CFR 375.308 - Delegations to the Director of the Office of Energy Projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Delegations to the Director of the Office of Energy Projects. 375.308 Section 375.308 Conservation of Power and Water... applications for: (1) Amendments (including changes in the use or disposal of water power project lands...

  6. 18 CFR 375.308 - Delegations to the Director of the Office of Energy Projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Delegations to the Director of the Office of Energy Projects. 375.308 Section 375.308 Conservation of Power and Water... applications for: (1) Amendments (including changes in the use or disposal of water power project lands...

  7. INVENTORY OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECTS - PUBLISHED ON THE OFFICE OF WATER WEB PAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory working jointly with the Office of Water, has developed an Internet-accessible database of ecosystem restoration projects within the Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) region. This article informs project owners of the i...

  8. Building Bridges: Using the Office Consultation Project to Connect Students to Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzynski, Korine Steinke; Jessup-Anger, Jody E.

    2014-01-01

    The Office Consultation Project is an innovative capstone project that partners graduate students in student affairs preparation programs with academic and student affairs practitioners. It provides an opportunity for students to apply research and scholarship to practical settings, while giving practitioners new insight into their units,…

  9. Building Bridges: Using the Office Consultation Project to Connect Students to Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzynski, Korine Steinke; Jessup-Anger, Jody E.

    2014-01-01

    The Office Consultation Project is an innovative capstone project that partners graduate students in student affairs preparation programs with academic and student affairs practitioners. It provides an opportunity for students to apply research and scholarship to practical settings, while giving practitioners new insight into their units,…

  10. Quality assurance plan for the molten salt reactor experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) identifies and describes the systems utilized by Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project personnel to implement the requirements and associated applicable guidance contained in the Quality Program Description, Y/QD-15 Rev. 2 (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., 1995) and Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities Work Smart Standards. This QAP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements applicable to all activities and operations in and directly pertinent to the MSRE Remediation Project. This QAP will be periodically reviewed, revised, and approved as necessary. This QAP identifies and describes the QA activities and procedures implemented by the various Oak Ridge National Laboratory support organizations and personnel to provide confidence that these activities meet the requirements of this project. Specific support organization (Division) quality requirements, including the degree of implementation of each, are contained in the appendixes of this plan.

  11. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

  12. Community Energy Project of ACTION's Office of Voluntary Citizen Participation

    SciTech Connect

    Crangle, M

    1980-01-01

    Several memoranda dated from March 4, 1980 to September 18, 1980 from the Community Energy Project personnel to the Acting Director of Weatherization Assistance Program within ACTION are compiled. Information on community-based efforts and programs for low cost/no cost energy conservation is presented. (LCL)

  13. Cancer Genome Anatomy Project | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the research community access to biological tissue characterization data. Request a free copy of the CGAP Website Virtual Tour CD from ocg@mail.nih.gov.

  14. Cancer Genome Anatomy Project | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the research community access to biological tissue characterization data. Request a free copy of the CGAP Website Virtual Tour CD from ocg@mail.nih.gov.

  15. Space Launch Initiative Propulsion Projects Office Overview Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyles, Garry; Richards, Steve

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this Space Launch Initiative is for NASA to meet its future space flight needs, including human access to space, using commercial launch vehicles that will improve safety and reliability and reduce cost. The topics include: 1) Second Generation RLV Program Overview; 2) Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Investment Areas; 3) SLI Organizational Summary; 4) Propulsion Projects Overview; 5) Current Propulsion Content; and 6) Critical Needs Roadmap. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  16. Chemical Research Projects Office: Functions, accomplishments, and programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose, technical accomplishments, and related activities of the Chemical Research Project Group are outlined. Data cover efforts made to: (1) identify chemical research and technology required for solutions to problems of national urgency, synchronous with aeronautics and space effort; (2) conduct basic and applied interdisciplinary research on chemical problems in the areas of macromolecular science and fire research, and (3) provide productive liason with the engineering community and effective transfer of technology to other agencies and industry.

  17. [Factors associated with investment in an office medicine project by general practice residents].

    PubMed

    Munck, Stéphane; Massin, Sophie; Hofliger, Philippe; Darmon, David

    2015-01-01

    To identify thefactors associated with investment in an office medicine project by French general practice (GP) residents. We conducted a national survey using a web-based self-administered questionnaire and analyzed the data collected by multiple logistic regressions. The dependent variable was "an office medicine project" The explanatory variables were both individual (socio-demographic and linked to training trajectories) and contextual (related to the available training programmes and the regional medical demography). The response rate was 48.5%. Out of the 1,695 residents of the study sample, 315 (18.6%) already had a project to setup an office practice during their third cycle ofmedical studies. The main factors associated with this project were (p < 0.05): to receive strong academic support, to live in a rural or semi-rural area, to work as a GP locum, to perform residency training in the same city as the medical training and to perform residency training in a region with a high percentage of GPs 55years and older. This study showed that a project to setup an office practice was influenced by both individual and contextualfactors. Special attention should be paid to the means and content of training to ensure better supportfor residents, which could make office general practice more attractive.

  18. Implementation of a Project Management Office (PMO)--experiences from year 1.

    PubMed

    Isola, Miriam; Polikaitis, Audrius; Laureto, Rose Ann

    2006-01-01

    Recognized as an early leader in clinical information systems, the University of Illinois Medical Center was challenged to meet the ever-increasing demand for information systems. Interviews with key stakeholders revealed unfavorable attitudes toward the Information Services department. Reasons given were that projects often are not aligned with business strategy, projects are delayed, IS itself is a barrier to progress, and a lack of proactive planning precipitates crises. Under the leadership of a new CIO, IS began developing a Project Management Office, or PMO, to better meet medical center business objectives and to more effectively manage technology projects. Successes during the first year included comprehensive IT strategic planning. Collaborative relationships were established with departmental leaders for planning, prioritizing, budgeting, and executing projects. A formal Web-based process for requesting IS projects was implemented, project management training was provided, and elements of standard project management methodology were implemented. While a framework for effective project management was created, significant effort is still required to firmly root these new processes within the organizational culture. Project management office goals for the second year include implementing a project portfolio management tool, refining the benefits methodology, and continuing the advancement of the project management methodology.

  19. Chemical research projects office: An overview and bibliography, 1975-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Heimbuch, A. H.; Parker, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Chemical Research Projects Office at Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California are reported. The office conducts basic and applied research in the fields of polymer chemistry, computational chemistry, polymer physics, and physical and organic chemistry. It works to identify the chemical research and technology required for solutions to problems of national urgency, synchronous with the aeronautic and space effort. It conducts interdisciplinary research on chemical problems, mainly in areas of macromolecular science and fire research. The office also acts as liaison with the engineering community and assures that relevant technology is made available to other NASA centers, agencies, and industry. Recent accomplishments are listed in this report. Activities of the three research groups, Polymer Research, Aircraft Operating and Safety, and Engineering Testing, are summarized. A complete bibliography which lists all Chemical Research Projects Office publications, contracts, grants, patents, and presentations from 1975 to 1980 is included.

  20. SETTING DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR THERMALLY ENHANCED, IN SITU REMEDIATION PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The design and implementation of an in-situ technology requires an up-front and clear understanding of the remedial objectives of the technology application and the data that will be collected to track the progress of remediation and to assess the ultimate success of in-sit...

  1. SETTING DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR THERMALLY ENHANCED, IN SITU REMEDIATION PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The design and implementation of an in-situ technology requires an up-front and clear understanding of the remedial objectives of the technology application and the data that will be collected to track the progress of remediation and to assess the ultimate success of in-sit...

  2. 40 CFR 300.120 - On-scene coordinators and remedial project managers: general responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the lead agency to manage remedial or other response actions at NPL sites, except as provided in... paragraph (b) of this section. EPA will also assume all remedial actions at NPL sites in the coastal zone... the proposed or promulgated NPL, and for sites not on the NPL but under the jurisdiction, custody,...

  3. 40 CFR 300.120 - On-scene coordinators and remedial project managers: general responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the lead agency to manage remedial or other response actions at NPL sites, except as provided in... paragraph (b) of this section. EPA will also assume all remedial actions at NPL sites in the coastal zone... the proposed or promulgated NPL, and for sites not on the NPL but under the jurisdiction, custody,...

  4. 40 CFR 300.120 - On-scene coordinators and remedial project managers: general responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the lead agency to manage remedial or other response actions at NPL sites, except as provided in... paragraph (b) of this section. EPA will also assume all remedial actions at NPL sites in the coastal zone... the proposed or promulgated NPL, and for sites not on the NPL but under the jurisdiction, custody,...

  5. 40 CFR 300.120 - On-scene coordinators and remedial project managers: general responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the lead agency to manage remedial or other response actions at NPL sites, except as provided in... paragraph (b) of this section. EPA will also assume all remedial actions at NPL sites in the coastal zone... the proposed or promulgated NPL, and for sites not on the NPL but under the jurisdiction, custody,...

  6. An Exploratory Analysis of Projected Navy Officer Inventory Strength Using Data Farming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    stochastic simulation model that allows for projection of annual future officer inventory and losses across communities by applying various historical...job that is not filled by a competent and qualified person, while on sea rotation. RSCM is a stochastic queuing inventory model that represents the...outbound transfers by community and paygrade. Figure 6. Officer Strategic Analysis Model Promotion Methods 2. Simulation Model Output Once each

  7. Weldon Spring Site environmental report for calendar year 1993. Weldon Springs Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1993 describes the environmental monitoring programs at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The objectives of these programs are to assess actual or potential exposure to contaminant effluents from the project area by providing public use scenarios and dose estimates, to demonstrate compliance with Federal and State permitted levels, and to summarize trends and/or changes in contaminant concentrations from environmental monitoring program. In 1993, the maximum committed dose to a hypothetical individual at the chemical plant site perimeter was 0.03 mrem (0.0003 mSv). The maximum committed dose to a hypothetical individual at the boundary of the Weldon Spring Quarry was 1.9 mrem (0.019 mSv). These scenarios assume an individual walking along the perimeter of the site-once a day at the chemical plant/raffinate pits and twice a day at the quarry-250 days per year. This hypothetical individual also consumes fish, sediment, and water from lakes and other bodies of water in the area. The collective dose, based on an effected population of 112,000 was 0.12 person-rem (0.0012 person-Sv). This calculation is based on recreational use of the August A. Busch Memorial Conservation Area and the Missouri Department of Conservation recreational trail (the Katy Trail) near the quarry. These estimates are below the U.S. Department of Energy requirement of 100 mrem (I mSv) annual committed effective dose equivalent for all exposure pathways. Results from air monitoring for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) program indicated that the estimated dose was 0.38 mrem, which is below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard of 10 mrem per year.

  8. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information.

  9. Project officer's perspective: quality assurance as a management tool.

    PubMed

    Heiby, J

    1993-06-01

    Advances in the management of health programs in less developed countries (LDC) have not kept pace with the progress of the technology used. The US Agency for International Development mandated the Quality Assurance Project (QAP) to provide quality improvement technical assistance to primary health care systems in LDCs while developing appropriate quality assurance (QA) strategies. The quality of health care in recent years in the US and Europe focused on the introduction of management techniques developed for industry into health systems. The experience of the QAP and its predecessor, the PRICOR Project, shows that quality improvement techniques facilitate measurement of quality of care. A recently developed WHO model for the management of the sick child provides scientifically based standards for actual care. Since 1988, outside investigators measuring how LDC clinicians perform have revealed serious deficiencies in quality compared with the program's own standards. This prompted developed of new QA management initiatives: 1) communicating standards clearly to the program staff; 2) actively monitoring actual performance corresponds to these standards; and 3) taking action to improve performance. QA means that managers are expected to monitor service delivery, undertake problem solving, and set specific targets for quality improvement. Quality improvement methods strengthen supervision as supervisors can objectively assess health worker performance. QA strengthens the management functions that support service delivery, e.g., training, records management, finance, logistics, and supervision. Attention to quality can contribute to improved health worker motivation and effective incentive programs by recognition for a job well done and opportunities for learning new skills. These standards can also address patient satisfaction. QA challenges managers to aim for the optimal level of care attainable.

  10. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data for the inactive uranium mill site near Tuba City, Arizona. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meterological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs of the remedial actions.

  11. Colorado economic impact study on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-12

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1993. To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are: Direct employment was estimated at 894 workers; An estimated 89 percent of all direct employment was local; Secondary employment resulting from remedial action at the active Colorado UMTRA Project sites and the Grand Junction vicinity property program is estimated at 546 workers. Total employment (direct and secondary) is estimated at 1440 workers for the period of study (July 1, 1992, to June 30, 1993). An estimated $24.1 million was paid in wages to UMTRA workers in Colorado during FY1993; Direct and secondary wage earnings were estimated at $39.9 million; Income tax payments to the state of Colorado were estimated at $843,400 during FY1993; The gross economic impact of UMTRA Project activities in the state of Colorado is estimated at $70 million during the 1-year study period; and the net economic benefit to the state of Colorado was estimated at $57.5 million, or $5.90 per dollar of funding provided by Colorado. This figure includes both direct and secondary benefits but does not include the impact of alternative uses of the state funding.

  12. Identification of remediation needs and technology development focus areas for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.D.; Valdez, J.M.; Khan, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project has been tasked with the characterization, assessment, remediation and long-term monitoring of contaminated waste sites at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). Many of these sites will require remediation which will involve the use of baseline technologies, innovative technologies that are currently under development, and new methods which will be developed in the near future. The Technology Applications Program (TAP) supports the ER Project and is responsible for development of new technologies for use at the contaminated waste sites, including technologies that will be used for remediation and restoration of these sites. The purpose of this report is to define the remediation needs of the ER Project and to identify those remediation needs for which the baseline technologies and the current development efforts are inadequate. The area between the remediation needs and the existing baseline/innovative technology base represents a technology gap which must be filled in order to remediate contaminated waste sites at SNL/NM economically and efficiently. In the first part of this report, the remediation needs of the ER Project are defined by both the ER Project task leaders and by TAP personnel. The next section outlines the baseline technologies, including EPA defined Best Demonstrated Available Technologies (BDATs), that are applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. This is followed by recommendations of innovative technologies that are currently being developed that may also be applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. Finally, the gap between the existing baseline/innovative technology base and the remediation needs is identified. This technology gap will help define the future direction of technology development for the ER Project.

  13. PROJECT STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDIATION AND DISPOSITION OF LEGACY TRANSURANIC WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE, South Carolina, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.

    2010-12-17

    This paper discusses the Savannah River Site Accelerated Transuranic (TRU) Waste Project that was initiated in April of 2009 to accelerate the disposition of remaining legacy transuranic waste at the site. An overview of the project execution strategy that was implemented is discussed along with the lessons learned, challenges and improvements to date associated with waste characterization, facility modifications, startup planning, and remediation activities. The legacy waste was generated from approximately 1970 through 1990 and originated both on site as well as at multiple US Department of Energy sites. Approximately two thirds of the waste was previously dispositioned from 2006 to 2008, with the remaining one third being the more hazardous waste due to its activity (curie content) and the plutonium isotope Pu-238 quantities in the waste. The project strategy is a phased approach beginning with the lower activity waste in existing facilities while upgrades are made to support remediation of the higher activity waste. Five waste remediation process lines will be used to support the full remediation efforts which involve receipt of the legacy waste container, removal of prohibited items, venting of containers, and resizing of contents to fit into current approved waste shipping containers. Modifications have been minimized to the extent possible to meet the accelerated goals and involve limited upgrades to address life safety requirements, radiological containment needs, and handling equipment for the larger waste containers. Upgrades are also in progress for implementation of the TRUPACT III for the shipment of Standard Large Boxes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the US TRU waste repository. The use of this larger shipping container is necessary for approximately 20% of the waste by volume due to limited size reduction capability. To date, approximately 25% of the waste has been dispositioned, and several improvements have been made to the overall processing

  14. Project Management Series Case Study: The Office of Registration and Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgher, Karl E.; Snyder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of eight articles on project management (PM) in the academy. In this article, the authors describe the step-by-step implementation of a structural change to Indiana State University's (ISU's) Office of Registration and Records (ORR). The process described may vary as it is implemented elsewhere, but the authors…

  15. 48 CFR 301.606-75 - Additional Project Officer training requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Responsibilities 301.606-75 Additional Project Officer training requirements. (a) See HHS' COTR Handbook for information on additional training requirements. (b) Training policy exceptions—(1) EVM training. In the event... training requirements. 301.606-75 Section 301.606-75 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH...

  16. 48 CFR 301.606-75 - Additional Project Officer training requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Responsibilities 301.606-75 Additional Project Officer training requirements. (a) See HHS' COTR Handbook for information on additional training requirements. (b) Training policy exceptions—(1) EVM training. In the event... training requirements. 301.606-75 Section 301.606-75 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH...

  17. 48 CFR 301.606-75 - Additional Project Officer training requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Responsibilities 301.606-75 Additional Project Officer training requirements. (a) See HHS' COTR Handbook for information on additional training requirements. (b) Training policy exceptions—(1) EVM training. In the event... training requirements. 301.606-75 Section 301.606-75 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH...

  18. 48 CFR 301.606-75 - Additional Project Officer training requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Responsibilities 301.606-75 Additional Project Officer training requirements. (a) See HHS' COTR Handbook for information on additional training requirements. (b) Training policy exceptions—(1) EVM training. In the event... training requirements. 301.606-75 Section 301.606-75 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH...

  19. 48 CFR 301.606-75 - Additional Project Officer training requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Responsibilities 301.606-75 Additional Project Officer training requirements. (a) See HHS' COTR Handbook for information on additional training requirements. (b) Training policy exceptions—(1) EVM training. In the event... training requirements. 301.606-75 Section 301.606-75 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH...

  20. Information Retrieval in an Office Filing Facility and Future Work in Project Minstrel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeaton, A. F.; van Rijsbergen, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Review of office filing facility filing and retrieval mechanisms for unstructured and mixed media information focuses on free text methods. Also discussed are the state of the art in handling voice and image data, problems with searching text surrogates to implement free text content retrieval, and work of Project Minstrel. (Author/MBR)

  1. Project Management Series Case Study: The Office of Registration and Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgher, Karl E.; Snyder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of eight articles on project management (PM) in the academy. In this article, the authors describe the step-by-step implementation of a structural change to Indiana State University's (ISU's) Office of Registration and Records (ORR). The process described may vary as it is implemented elsewhere, but the authors…

  2. Office of Education, Region 7, Guidance and Counseling Project for Adult Basic Education. Phase 1 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Teaching and Field Service Bureau.

    As indicated in the original project application to the United States Office of Education, this report seeks mainly to analyze and clarify the current state of adult basic educational guidance and counseling in the states of Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Statistics appear on (1) numbers of potential and actual students in…

  3. Business and Office Education Audio-Response Research Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillenberg, Carl K.

    Because employers substantiated that business and office education students often do not obtain jobs due to an inability to communicate effectively in an interview and a lack of confidence in verbal expression, a three-year project was designed to study the effects of instruction by audio-response (AR) equipment as a means of improving…

  4. Sour gas plant subsurface remediation technology research and demonstration project. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan, D.J.; Kuehnel, V.

    1994-04-01

    Recognizing the potential impacts of sour gas plant operations on the subsurface environment, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), formerly the Canadian Petroleum Association (CPA), and Environment Canada initiated a multiphase study focusing on research related to the development and demonstration of remedial technologies for soil and groundwater contamination at these facilities. The first phase of the project was completed in 1990, and consisted of a comprehensive review of all soil and groundwater monitoring data submitted to Alberta Environment by sour gas plants in accordance with the Clean Water Act (1980). That review indicated that all but one of the 45 sour gas plants for which data were available exhibited some form of impact on soil and groundwater quality. The study identified the most frequently occurring contamination situations at the sites and classified them by source, type of contaminant, and the hydrogeological characteristics of the contaminated setting. The project steering committee subsequently selected the Strachan Gas Plant, located near Rocky Mountain House, Alberta, Canada, as a field research and remediation technology demonstration site. Research to be performed under this agreement is for activities in the areas of soil vapor extraction (SVE), bioventing, and bioremediation, all focusing on residual contamination in the unsaturated, or vadose, zone at the site, as well as evaluations of biological treatment of groundwater and ex situ soil remediation using solvent extraction in conjunction with photooxidation, solvent extraction in conjunction with microwave irradiation, and low-temperature thermal desorption.

  5. Sour gas plant remediation technology research and demonstration project, Task 7.53. Topical report, January--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan, D.J.; Kuehnel, V.; Schmit, C.R.

    1994-02-01

    Recognizing the potential impacts of sour gas plant operations on the subsurface environment, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) and Environment Canada initiated a multiphase study focusing on research related to the development and demonstration of remedial technologies for soil and groundwater contamination at these facilities. Research performed under this project was designed to supplement and be coordinated with research activities being conducted at an operational sour gas plant located in Rocky Mountain House, Alberta, Canada. These research tasks included hydrogeological site characterization, subsurface contaminant characterization, ex situ treatment of groundwater, and subsurface remediation of residual contamination in the unsaturated zone. Ex situ treatment of groundwater included evaluations of air stripping, steam stripping, advanced oxidation, and biological treatment, as well as the development of an artificial freeze crystallization process. Soil vapor extraction was evaluated as a technique to address residual contamination in the unsaturated zone.

  6. 287(g): Cross-Delegating State and Local Law Enforcement Officers with Federal Immigration Authority - Homeland Security Remedy or Rue?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    recommendations on policies dealing with illegal immigrants, Sen. Scott Jenkins , R-Plain City: SB52-Identity Theft Amendment: Authorizes restitution...interests (both right and left 85 Comment by Utah U.S. Attorney Brett Tolman during a meeting in St. George...gangs, U.S. Attorney Brett Tolman said his office also has the option to go after these gangs as criminal organizations.123 During the operation this

  7. The Role of the Project Management Office on Information Technology Project Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jacob S.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of failed and challenged Information Technology (IT) projects is too high according to the CHAOS Studies by the Standish Group and the literature on project management (Standish Group, 2008). The CHAOS Studies define project success as meeting the triple constraints of scope, time, and cost. Assessing critical success factors is another…

  8. The Role of the Project Management Office on Information Technology Project Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jacob S.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of failed and challenged Information Technology (IT) projects is too high according to the CHAOS Studies by the Standish Group and the literature on project management (Standish Group, 2008). The CHAOS Studies define project success as meeting the triple constraints of scope, time, and cost. Assessing critical success factors is another…

  9. 78 FR 53477 - Notice of Relocation of the Bureau of Land Management's San Pedro Project Office in Sierra Vista, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Relocation of the Bureau of Land Management's San Pedro Project Office in Sierra Vista, AZ AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces the relocation of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) San Pedro Project Office...

  10. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluations of absorbents for the TRU Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Carraway, Anthony C.; Hill, Larry

    2005-10-17

    SRNL has been preparing to receive transuranic (TRU) waste drums from the Solid Waste Management Facility (SWMF) to aid in the remediation of Waste Acceptance Criteria prohibited items in SRS TRU waste drums. These prohibited items are primarily containerized liquids and aerosol cans which are easily identified using radiography. The remediation of these drums requires the use of an approved absorbent that is acceptable to the SWMF and Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) for disposal. The goal of this document is to help establish guidelines that should be met to produce a final waste product that will be acceptable at the WIPP facility.

  11. Executive summary: Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1992. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report has been prepared to provide information about the public safety and environmental protection programs conducted by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project. The Weldon Spring site is located in southern St. Charles County, Missouri, approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The site consists of two main areas, the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The objectives of the Site Environmental Report are to present a summary of data from the environmental monitoring program, to characterize trends and environmental conditions at the site, and to confirm compliance with environmental and health protection standards and requirements. The report also presents the status of remedial activities and the results of monitoring these activities to assess their impacts on the public and environment. The scope of the environmental monitoring program at the Weldon Spring site has changed since it was initiated. Previously, the program focused on investigations of the extent and level of contaminants in the groundwater, surface waters, buildings, and air at the site. In 1992, the level of remedial activities required monitoring for potential impacts of those activities, particularly on surface water runoff and airborne effluents. This report includes monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological sampling activities. These data include estimates of dose to the public from the Weldon Spring site; estimates of effluent releases; and trends in groundwater contaminant levels. Also, applicable compliance requirements, quality assurance programs, and special studies conducted in 1992 to support environmental protection programs are reviewed.

  12. Waste minimization opportunities at the U.S. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Rifle, Colorado, site

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, G.L.; Arp, S.; Hempill, H.

    1993-12-31

    At two uranium mill sites in Rifle, Colorado, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is removing uranium mill tailings and contaminated subgrade soils. This remediation activity will result in the production of groundwater contaminated with uranium, heavy metals, ammonia, sulfates, and total dissolved solids (TDS). The initial remediation plan called for a wastewater treatment plant for removal of the uranium, heavy metals, and ammonia, with disposal of the treated water, which still includes the sulfates and TDSS, to the Colorado River. The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination (NPDES) permit issued by the Colorado Department of Health for the two Rifle sites contained more restrictive discharge limits than originally anticipated. During the detailed review of alternate treatment systems to meet these more restrictive limits, the proposed construction procedures were reviewed emphasizing the methods to minimize groundwater production to reduce the size of the water treatment facility, or to eliminate it entirely. It was determined that with changes to the excavation procedures and use of the contaminated groundwater for use in dust suppression at the disposal site, discharge to the river could be eliminated completely.

  13. SYNTHESIS REPORT ON FIVE DENSE, NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUID (DNAPL) REMEDIATION PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) poses a difficult problem for subsurface remediation because it serves as a continuing source to dissolved phase ground water contamination and is difficult to remove from interstitial pore space or bedrock fractures in the subsurface. Numer...

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Rifle, Colorado: Phase 2, Construction drawings [Engineering Materials

    SciTech Connect

    1991-05-13

    This document consists of engineering drawings related to the remedial action of the Old Rifle Processing site, the New Rifle Processing site, and the Estes Gulch disposal site. This report is intended to accompany report DOE/UMTRA--050506 volume 3, appendix F.

  15. SYNTHESIS REPORT ON FIVE DENSE, NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUID (DNAPL) REMEDIATION PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) poses a difficult problem for subsurface remediation because it serves as a continuing source to dissolved phase ground water contamination and is difficult to remove from interstitial pore space or bedrock fractures in the subsurface. Numer...

  16. How to accelerate the Fernald remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, M.K.; Reising, J.

    1996-01-10

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project is unique among Department of Energy (DOE) sites by virtue of successful efforts by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) and DOE-Fernald Area Office (FN) in securing a stak-eholder-assisted final site closure vision and all Record of Decisions (ROD) or Interim RODs required to set the stage for final remediation. DOE and FERMCO have agreed in principle on a Ten Year Plan which accelerates all activities to remediate the site in approximately half the target schedule. This paper presents the path that led to the current Ten Year Plan, the key elements of the plan and the implementation strategies.

  17. Establishment of a Japan Sea Project Office at the University of Washington

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    Establishment of a Japan Sea Project Office at the University of Washington Stephen C. Riser School of Oceanography, Box 357940 University of...participating in the ONR Japan Sea initiative and scientists in Asia, including Japan , Korea, and Russia. This communication will take the form of sponsored...visits, joint cruises, data exchange, and meetings. OBJECTIVES As part of the ONR Japan Sea DRI, it is necessary to work closely with

  18. Weldon Spring quarry construction staging area and water treatment plant site remedial action characterization report for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The quarry construction staging area (QCSA) and water treatment plant (WTP) are located in the areas that border the western edge of the Weldon Spring quarry (WSQ). These facilities were constructed to support bulk waste removal from the WSQ. This area was contaminated with U-238, Ra-226, and Th-230 and was remediated prior to construction in order to allow release of the area for use without radiological restrictions. This report documents the methods of characterization, the remediation activities, and the post remedial action sampling methods and analytical results. 4 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Remediation Technologies for Environmental Projects in the United States Military: Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    remediation method is appropriate for sites contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquids ( DNAPLs ), metals, or semi-volatile organic compounds. If the... Mercury (mm Hg). Bioventing Fuel, BTEX, or THC hydrocarbon contamination (i.e.. non-halogenated hydrocarbon) in the vadose zone; - Soil gas...thorougly fractured bedrock. Capping DNAPL . sesnivolatile, or metal/inorganic contamination in the vadose zone; - Area of capping contamination less than 24

  20. SF Box--a tool for evaluating the effects on soil functions in remediation projects.

    PubMed

    Volchko, Yevheniya; Norrman, Jenny; Rosén, Lars; Norberg, Tommy

    2014-10-01

    Although remediation is usually aimed at reducing the risks posed by contaminants to human health and the environment, it is also desirable that the remediated soil within future green spaces is capable of providing relevant ecological functions, e.g., basis for primary production. Yet while addressing a contamination problem by reducing contaminant concentration and/or amounts in the soil, the remedial action itself can lead to soil structure disturbances, decline in organic matter and nutrient deficiencies, and in turn affect a soil's capacity to carry out its ecological soil functions. This article presents the Soil Function Box (SF Box) tool that is aimed to facilitate integration of information from suggested soil quality indicators (SQIs) into a management process in remediation using a scoring method. The scored SQIs are integrated into a soil quality index corresponding to 1 of 5 classes. SF Box is applied to 2 cases from Sweden (Kvillebäcken and Hexion), explicitly taking into consideration uncertainties in the results by means of Monte Carlo simulations. At both sites the generated soil quality indices corresponded to a medium soil performance (soil class 3) with a high certainty. The main soil constraints at both Kvillebäcken and Hexion were associated with biological activity in the soil, as soil organisms were unable to supply plant-available N. At the Kvillebäcken site the top layer had a content of coarse fragment (ø > 2 mm) higher than 35%, indicating plant rooting limitations. At the Hexion site, the soil had limited amount of organic matter, thus poor aggregate stability and nutrient cycling potential. In contrast, the soil at Kvillebäcken was rich in organic matter. The soils at both sites were capable of storing a sufficient amount of water for soil organisms between precipitation events.

  1. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, A.; Hoopes, J.; Morycz, D. ); Bone, M.; Cox, S.; Jones, D.; Lechel, D.; Meyer, C.; Nelson, M.; Peel, R.; Portillo, R.; Rogers, L.; Taber, B.; Zelle, P. , Inc., Washington, DC ); Rice, G. )

    1984-12-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Gunnison uranium of mill tailings site located 0.5 miles south of Gunnison, Colorado. The site covers 56 acres and contains 35 acres of tailings, 2 of the original mill buildings and a water tower. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control of Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated (vicinity) properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the occurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Four alternatives have been addressed in this document. The first alternative is to consolidate the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile on the southern portion of the existing site. A radon barrier of silty clay would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Two other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a location farther from the city of Gunnison. The no action alternative is also assessed.

  2. Notification: Oversight of Superfund State Contracts for Remedial Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY15-0054, December 30, 2014. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is beginning an audit of the EPA's oversight of Superfund State Contracts (SSCs) for remedial activities.

  3. GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SOLUTIONS AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Truex, Michael J.; Williams, Mark D.

    2007-02-26

    In 2006, Congress provided funding to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to study new technologies that could be used to treat contamination from the Hanford Site that might impact the Columbia River. The contaminants of concern are primarily metals and radionuclides, which are byproducts of Hanford’s cold war mission to produce plutonium for atomic weapons. The DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to consider this problem and develop approaches to address the contamination that threatens the river. DOE identified three high priority sites that had groundwater contamination migrating towards the Columbia river for remediation. The contaminants included strontium-90, uranium and chromium. Remediation techniques for metals and radionuclides focus primarily on altering the oxidation state of the contaminant chemically or biologically, isolating the contaminants from the environment through adsorption or encapsulation or concentrating the contaminants for removal. A natural systems approach was taken that uses a mass balance concept to frame the problem and determine the most appropriate remedial approach. This approach provides for a scientifically based remedial decision. The technologies selected to address these contaminants included an apatite adsorption barrier coupled with a phytoremediation to address the strontium-90 contamination, injection of polyphosphate into the subsurface to sequester uranium, and a bioremediation approach to reduce chromium contamination in the groundwater. The ability to provide scientifically based approaches is in large part due to work developed under previous DOE Office of Science and Office of Environmental Management projects. For example, the polyphosphate and the bioremediation techniques, were developed by PNNL under the EMSP and NABIR programs. Contaminated groundwater under the Hanford Site poses a potential risk to humans and the Columbia River. These new technologies holds great promise for

  4. Project ExPreSS: Social studies and science remediation program for the Georgia High School Graduation Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearouse, Randy

    Over half of the states now require students to pass a high stakes exit exam before being allowed to graduate from high school. No Child Left Behind requires that standardized testing be included to determine whether or not a school makes Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). The purpose of this study is to examine the results of the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT) of students who participated in the remedial program Project ExPreSS with those students who did not participate. Using a quantitative research design, the question that will be answered is whether Project ExPreSS makes a difference in passing the GHSGT in science and social studies among three groups: all Georgia students, African American students in one Georgia school system, and all students in one Georgia school system. A chi-square test was conducted and a determination was made that there is a statistically significant relationship between project participation and pass-fail status in all but one area. The majority of students in this study were 17--18 years of age and were taking the science or social studies section of the GHSGT for the second time. The findings of this study will be important not only for Georgia and the school system examined, but also for other states and systems that give High Stakes Exit Exams (HSEEs). The results indicate that highly focused remedial programs like Project ExPreSS make a difference for students who may not be successful on their first attempt at passing a HSEE.

  5. Capital assets management process (CAMP) prioritization exercise for FY 1994 and FY 1995 projects at Field Office, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-16

    This report presents figures derived from a rating process to determine budget needs for projects for 1994 and 1995 at the Albuquerque Field Office. Projects for 1994 include plant life safety code upgrades, roads and parking lot upgrades, and emergency system notification replacement. Projects for 1995 include reconfiguration of inert operations, steam and condensate system upgrades, and site drainage control.

  6. OPERATION SUN BEAM, SHOT SMALL BOY. Project Officer’s Report - Project 7.1.4. Transient Radiation Effects Measurements on Guidance System Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    BEAM, SHOT SMALL BOY Project Officer’s Report—Project 7.1.4 00 oo in en < i Q < CJ> Transient Radiation Effects Measurements on Guidance...This is an extract of P0R-2239 (WT-2239), Operation SUN BEAM. Shot Small Boy. Project 7.1.4. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...UNIT ACCESSION NO ; ■ ■ i ./nc/uc/e sr.unty c/.m.f/Mf.ofijOPERATION SUN BEAM, SHOT SMALL BOY, Project Officer’s Report- Project 7.1.4, Transient

  7. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Annual Environmental Monitoring Report calendar year 1992: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report describes environmental monitoring and compliance at eight UMTRA sites where remedial action was underway during 1992 and at the ten sites that were complete at the end of 1992. Volume I contains information for Ambrosia Lake, NM; Cannonsburg/Burrell, PA; Durango, CO; Falls City, TX; Grand Junction, CO; Green River, UT; and Gunnison, CO. Each site report contains a site description, compliance summary, environmental program information, environmental radiological and non-radiological program information, water resources protection, and quality assurance information.

  8. EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates

  9. The healthy workplace project: Reduced viral exposure in an office setting.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kelly A; Beamer, Paloma I; Plotkin, Kevin R; Sifuentes, Laura Y; Koenig, David W; Gerba, Charles P

    2016-05-03

    Viral illnesses such as gastroenteritis and the common cold create a substantial burden in the workplace due to reduced productivity, increased absenteeism, and increased health care costs. Behaviors in the workplace contribute to the spread of human viruses via direct contact between hands, contaminated surfaces, and the mouth, eyes, and/or nose. This study assessed whether implementation of the Healthy Workplace Project (HWP) (providing hand sanitizers, disinfecting wipes, facial tissues, and use instructions) would reduce viral loads in an office setting of approximately 80 employees after seeding fomites and the hands of volunteer participants with an MS-2 phage tracer. The HWP significantly reduced viable phage detected on participants' hands, communal fomites, and personal fomites (p ≤ .010) in office environments and presents a cost-effective method for reducing the health and economic burden associated with viral illnesses in the workplace.

  10. Change of the layout of an office of a metallurgical company: simple projects, big solutions.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Luiz Carlos da Silva; Eckhardt, Moacir; da Motta, Giordano Paulo

    2012-01-01

    The posture, a good organization and the proper layout of the environment and workplaces have a positive influence on the income of an employee. To develop the work it is used a methodology that addressed the study phases of the theory involving the subject, description of the current situation, preparation of conceptions, choice of design, implementation and reporting of results. Through the project of "Change of the layout of an office of a metallurgical company" there was an intervention in these reported aspects providing improvements in the office, regarding ergonomic, layout, workplace and lighting issues, bringing welfare to the official, with the intent to improve its performance within the company and facilitating its actions, as the company's customer service. The results provided improvements in layout, in the workplace and especially in comfort for the human resources that perform their activities.

  11. Impact of SciDAC on accelerator projects across the office of science through electromagnetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, K.; Folwell, N.; Ge, L.; Guetz, A.; Ivanov, V.; Kabel, A.; Kowalski, M.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.; Xiao, L.; Collaborators, ISICs/SAPP

    2005-01-01

    Electromagnetic Modelling led by SLAC is a principal component of the "Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology" SciDAC project funded through the Office of High Energy Physics. This large team effort comprises three other national laboratories (LBNL, LLNL, SNL) and six universities (CMU, Columbia, RPI, Stanford, UC Davis and U of Wisconsin) with the goal to develop a set of parallel electromagnetic codes based on unstructured grids to target challenging problems in accelerators, and solve them to unprecedented realism and accuracy. Essential to the code development are the collaborations with the ISICs/SAPP in eigensolvers, meshing, adaptive refinement, shape optimization and visualization (see "Achievements in ISICs/SAPP Collaborations for Electromagnetic Modelling of Accelerators"). Supported by these advances in computational science, we have successfully performed the large-scale simulations that have impacted important accelerator projects across the Office of Science (SC) including the Positron Electron Project (PEP) -II, Next Linear Collider (NLC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) in High Energy Physics (HEP), the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) in Nuclear Physics (NP) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in Basic Energy Science (BES).

  12. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project -2006 Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2006-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. This paper presents a status of the coolant stability over the past year as well as results from destructive analyses of hardware removed from the on-orbit system and the current approach to coolant remediation.

  13. Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Egidi, P.V.; Roemer, E.K.; Schlosser, R.M.

    2000-09-01

    f I The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m3 of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain wi th 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity.

  14. OPERATION SUNBEAM, SHOT SMALL BOY. Project Officer’s Report - Project 1. 1. Nuclear Airblast Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    DISCUSSIONS AND CONCLUSIONS 𔃼 4.1 Free-Field Blast Parameter» •-—" 72 4.2 Nonclasslcal Waveforms •♦ 73 4.3 Instrumentation Discussion and...magnetic tape, frequency modulated (FM) lystem. Project 1.1 recording iyftemf, located in the ihelter, were all of standard varieties adapted for use...II waveform was observed. A 10-millisecond separation existed between the precursor wave and the main wave at 520 feet. By 680-foot distance

  15. Audit of electrical system construction projects at the Nevada Operations Office

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-06

    The Nevada Test Site became the nation`s continental nuclear weapons test site on January 11, 1951. Over the years, the Nevada Operations Office (Nevada) built an extensive infrastructure to support and conduct nuclear tests at the site and in Las Vegas. Roads, housing, test towers, electrical systems, and water systems are just a few of the construction projects that have been required by the Site`s nuclear testing mission. Nuclear testing continued through 1992. A presidential decision directive issued in October that year stopped testing but required Nevada to conduct and experimental program and maintain a readiness posture to resume nuclear testing within 6 months through fiscal year 1995. The directive further required that, beginning with fiscal year 1996, Nevada maintain a 2-3 year readiness posture. This change in Nevada`s mission coupled with Department downsizing requires that only cost effective projects with defined mission needs be undertaken. Although Nevada has changed and rescoped some construction projects in response to the changing Test Site mission, there are two projects, one underway and one planned, that contain unneeded overlap of capability. Specifically, the audit identified two electrical system projects that provided unnecessary duplicate capability at a cost of about $1.35 million. Management concurred with our finding and agreed to implement the recommendation. Details of management`s comments and our response are included.

  16. Implementing Earned Value Management in the CxP EVA Systems Project Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorge, Les L.

    2009-01-01

    Earned Value Management (EVM), like project management, is as much art as it is science to develop an implementation plan for a project. This presentation will cover issues that were overcome and the implementation strategy to deploy Earned Value Management (EVM) within the Constellation Program (CxP), EVA Systems Project Office (ESPO), as well as discuss additional hurdles that currently prevent the organization from optimizing EVM. Each organization and each project within an organization needs to mold an EVM implementation plan around existing processes and tools, while at the same time revising those existing processes and tools as necessary to make them compatible with EVM. The ESPO EVM implementation covers work breakdown structure, organizational breakdown structure, control account, work/planning package development; integrated master schedule development using an integrated master plan; incorporating reporting requirements for existing funding process such as Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution (PPBE) and JSC Internal Task Agreements (ITA); and interfacing with other software tools such as the Systems Applications and Products (SAP) accounting system and the CxP wInsight EVM analysis tool. However, there are always areas for improvement and EVM is no exception. As EVM continues to mature within the NASA CxP, these areas will continue to be worked to resolution to provide the Program Managers, Project Managers, and Control Account Managers the best EVM data possible to make informed decisions.

  17. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE C-400 INTERIM REMEDIAL PROJECT PHASE I RESULTS, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart,L.; Richards, W.

    2010-10-29

    The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in 2007 to assess the C-400 ERH plans prior

  18. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement: Quarterly environmental data summary for third quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-06

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the third quarter of 1998 is enclosed. The data presented in this letter and attachment constitute the QEDS. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the third quarter of 1998. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined above normal Level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal Level 2 values are based, in ES and H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits, and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in the event that above normal data occur.

  19. Quarry Haul Road Ecological Survey. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This biological survey was performed to document the summer flora and fauna found along the haul road constructed as part of the remedial action for the quarry bulk waste. State and Federal species listed as threatened or endangered were noted if encountered while surveying. Sampling locations were equally spaced along the quarry haul road, and a survey for vegetation and birds conducted at each location. Bird observations were conducted as breeding bird surveys once in June of 1991, and again in June of 1992. Each year`s survey includes two observations in the early morning and one late in the evening. Vegetation surveys were conducted in 1991 using quadrants and transects. mammal, reptile, and amphibian sightings were noted as encountered.

  20. Operation Sun Beam, Shot Small Boy. Project Officers report. Project 1. 9. Crater measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rooke, A.D.; Davis, L.K.; Strange, J.N.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of Project 1.9 were to obtain the dimensions of the apparent and true craters formed by the Small Boy event and to measure the permanent earth deformation occurring beyond the true crater boundary. Measurements were made of the apparent crater by aerial stereophotography and ground survey and of the true crater and subsurface zones of residual deformation by the excavation and mapping of an array of vertical, colored sand columns which were placed along one crater diameter prior to the shot. The results of the crater exploration are discussed, particularly the permanent compression of the medium beneath the true crater which was responsible for the major portion of the apparent and true crater volumes. Apparent and true crater dimensions are compared with those of previous cratering events.

  1. Operation Sun Beam, Shot Small Boy. Project Officers report. Project 1. 4. Shock photography

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, P.; Dieter, C.F.

    1985-09-01

    The objective of this project was to measure the shock position as a function of time from which shock velocities and pressures in limited regions could be calculated, and any asymmetric growth both along along and above the surface could be detected. An outgrowth of the fireball along the surface was observed, and it was attributed to surface heating. The rate of growth along the surface was asymmetric. The growth along the 113 deg azimuth was markedly greater than in any of the other directions measured. Contrary to previous experience with surface shots, the peak pressures obtained above ground zero were less than those obtained along the surface at the same distances. there is some evidence to suggest that the focusing noted on previous shots did not occur or was very much reduced. Scaled Small Boy peak pressure-distance data are in agreement with the composite surface-burst pressure-distance curve.

  2. Office of Inspector General audit report on credit card usage at the Ohio Field Office and the Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    In 1994 the Department of Energy (Department) obtained the services of Rocky Mountain BankCard System, through the use of a General Services Administration contract, as a means for the Department and its contractors to make small purchases. The use of credit cards was expected to simplify small purchase procedures and improve cash management. The Ohio Field Office (Field Office) uses the credit card system and oversees usage by its area offices. Contractors under the Field Office also use the credit card system to make small purchases. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has issued one audit report concerning the use of credit cards. In April 1996, the OIG issued Report WR-B-96-06, Audit of Bonneville Power Administration`s Management of Information Resources. The audit concluded that improvements could be made in implementing credit card and property procedures in Bonneville`s management of computer-related equipment. Specifically, many credit card purchases were made by employees whose authority to buy was not properly documented, and the purchasing files often lacked invoices that would show what was purchased. Additionally, some cardholders split purchases to avoid credit card limits. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Field Office, Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects, Fluor Daniel, and B and W were using credit cards for the appropriate purposes and within the limitations established by Federal and Departmental regulations.

  3. Permeable reactive barriers for the remediation of groundwater in a mining area: results for a pilot-scale project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Martinez-Lopez, Salvadora; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Gonzalez-Ciudad, Eva; Belen Martinez-Martinez, Lucia; Hernandez, Carmen; Molina-Ruiz, Jose

    2017-04-01

    The Sierra Minera of Cartagena-La Union is located in the Region of Murcia, Southeast of Spain. This zone presents high levels of heavy metals due to natural, geogenic reasons. In addition, the prolonged mining activity, and subsequent abandonment of farms, has had consequences on the environment, including severe affectation of the groundwater in the area. To remediate this situation, the Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) technology was assayed, which required in addition to the hydro-geological study of the zone, a careful optimization study for the design and construction of PRBs. For such a purpose a pilot-scale project was developed, and this communication reports some of the most relevant findings obtained after a four-years monitorization period. The selected reactive material for the PRBs was limestone filler. The filler is a waste material produced in many factories in the zone. These residues have good adsorption properties, high alkalinity, low cost and high availability, which make them suitable for use in remediation. The PRB was constituted by a 50% limestone filler and 50% sand, a proportion optimized by means of independent batch experiments. A layer of gravel was placed at the top, and on it a layer of natural soil. The barrier was designed in the form of a continuous trench, because the level of the contaminated groundwater was not very deep. In this way, the barrier could be prepared with standard excavation equipment. Parallel to the barrier, 6 wells where arranged downstream for sample collection. The pH and conductivity of the samples was measured directly in situ, and the content of Zn, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Pb were analyzed in the laboratory. All the samples collected after the PRB was constructed had basic pH values between 7.5 and 8. The conductivity was between 5 and 11 mS / cm except for the well 4, which had a value of 3.70 mS / cm. The concentration values of trace elements were below the detection limit (atomic absorption measurement) in

  4. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Chernoff, A.R. . Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office); Lacker, D.K. . Bureau of Radiation Control)

    1992-09-01

    The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

  5. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, fiscal year 1995 annual report to stakeholders

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-30

    In 1978, Congress authorized the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping projects. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about both phases of the UMTRA Project. DOE`s UMTRA Project is the world`s largest materials management project ever undertaken to reduce or eliminate risk to the general public from exposure to potentially hazardous and radioactive materials. With an estimated cost at completion of nearly $2 billion for both phases of the UMTRA Project, and with the responsibility for encapsulating and isolating almost one-fourth of all the uranium mill tailings generated across the entire US (more than 44 million cubic yards), the UMTRA Project and its people have achieved a long record of safely and effectively completing its mission. It continually enhances its national reputation through its diligent process and cost efficiency as well as its international recognition for its technological innovation.

  6. Teaching weather and climate science in primary schools - a pilot project from the UK Met Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrell, Richard; Liggins, Felicity; Challenger, Lesley; Lethem, Dom; Campbell, Katy

    2017-04-01

    Wow Schools is a pilot project from the Met Office with an aim to inspire and educate the next generation of scientists and, uniquely, use the data collected by schools to improve weather forecasts and warnings across the UK. Wow Schools was launched in late 2015 with a competition open to primary schools across the UK. 74 schools entered the draw, all hoping to be picked as one of the ten lucky schools taking part in the pilot scheme. Each winning school received a fully automatic weather station (AWS), enabling them to transmit real-time local weather observations to the Met Office's Weather Observation Website (WOW - wow.metoffice.gov.uk), an award winning web portal for uploading and sharing a range of environmental observations. They were also given a package of materials designed to get students out of the classroom to observe the weather, get hands-on with the science underpinning weather forecasting, and analyse the data they are collecting. The curriculum-relevant materials were designed with the age group 7 to 11 in mind, but could be extended to support other age groups. Each school was offered a visit by a Wow Schools Ambassador (a Met Office employee) to bring the students' learning to life, and access to a dedicated forecast for its location generated by our new supercomputer. These forecasts are improved by the school's onsite AWS reinforcing the link between observations and forecast production. The Wow Schools pilot ran throughout 2016. Here, we present the initial findings of the project, examining the potential benefits and challenges of working with schools across the UK to: enrich students' understanding of the science of weather forecasting; to source an ongoing supply of weather observations and discover how these might be used in the forecasting process; and explore what materials and business model(s) would be most useful and affordable if a wider roll-out of the initiative was undertaken.

  7. The New York State Office of Mental Health Positive Alternatives to Restraint and Seclusion (PARS) Project.

    PubMed

    Wisdom, Jennifer P; Wenger, David; Robertson, David; Van Bramer, Jayne; Sederer, Lloyd I

    2015-08-01

    The Positive Alternatives to Restraint and Seclusion (PARS) project of the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) was designed to build capacity to use alternatives to restraint and seclusion within state-operated and licensed inpatient and residential treatment programs serving children with severe emotional disturbances. Its long-term goal was to eliminate the use of these restrictive interventions throughout the state's mental health system of care by creating coercion- and violence-free treatment environments governed by a philosophy of recovery, resiliency, and wellness. The central feature of the PARS project was training in, implementation of, and engagement with the Six Core Strategies to Reduce the Use of Seclusion and Restraint, a comprehensive approach developed by the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors. This report provides an overview of the project, results from January 2007 through December 2011, and lessons learned by OMH. The three participating mental health treatment facilities demonstrated significant decreases in restraint and seclusion episodes per 1,000 client-days. Each identified specific activities that contributed to success, including ways to facilitate open, respectful two-way communication between management and staff and between staff and youths and greater involvement of youths in program decision making. All three facilities continued to implement key components of the PARS initiative after termination of grant-funded activities, and OMH initiated multiple activities to disseminate lessons learned during the project to all inpatient and residential treatment programs throughout the state mental health system.

  8. State of Nevada, Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office narrative report, January 1--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) is the State of Nevada agency designated by State law to monitor and oversee US Department of Energy (DOE) activities relative to the possible siting, construction, operation and closure of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and to carry out the State of Nevada`s responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During the reporting period the NWPO continued to work toward the five objectives designed to implement the Agency`s oversight responsibilities. (1) Assure that the health and safety of Nevada`s citizens are adequately protected with regard to any federal high-level radioactive waste program within the State. (2) Take the responsibilities and perform the duties of the State of Nevada as described in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. (3) Advise the Governor, the State Commission on Nuclear Projects and the Nevada State Legislature on matters concerning the potential disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the State. (4) Work closely and consult with affected local governments and State agencies. (5) Monitor and evaluate federal planning and activities regarding high-level radioactive waste disposal. Plan and conduct independent State studies regarding the proposed repository.

  9. Office of Legacy Management Decision Tree for Solar Photovoltaic Projects - 13317

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, John; Butherus, Michael; Barr, Deborah L.

    2013-07-01

    To support consideration of renewable energy power development as a land reuse option, the DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) established a partnership to conduct an assessment of wind and solar renewable energy resources on LM lands. From a solar capacity perspective, the larger sites in the western United States present opportunities for constructing solar photovoltaic (PV) projects. A detailed analysis and preliminary plan was developed for three large sites in New Mexico, assessing the costs, the conceptual layout of a PV system, and the electric utility interconnection process. As a result of the study, a 1,214-hectare (3,000-acre) site near Grants, New Mexico, was chosen for further study. The state incentives, utility connection process, and transmission line capacity were key factors in assessing the feasibility of the project. LM's Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site was also chosen for consideration because the uranium mill tailings disposal cell is on a hillside facing south, transmission lines cross the property, and the community was very supportive of the project. LM worked with the regulators to demonstrate that the disposal cell's long-term performance would not be impacted by the installation of a PV solar system. A number of LM-unique issues were resolved in making the site available for a private party to lease a portion of the site for a solar PV project. A lease was awarded in September 2012. Using a solar decision tree that was developed and launched by the EPA and NREL, LM has modified and expanded the decision tree structure to address the unique aspects and challenges faced by LM on its multiple sites. The LM solar decision tree covers factors such as land ownership, usable acreage, financial viability of the project, stakeholder involvement, and transmission line capacity. As additional sites are transferred to LM in the future, the decision tree will assist in determining whether a solar

  10. The Inventive Thinking Curriculum Project. An Outreach Program of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.

    The Inventive Thinking Curriculum Project is one of the many projects included in the national outreach program of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. It is designed to be used in conjunction with a thinking skills program as a means of applying critical and creative thinking and problem-solving skills through the activity of creating an…

  11. The Curriculum Improvement Project in Business Careers Programs: Business Manager, Officer Administrator, Real Estate Agent, Real Estate Broker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Mainland, Texas City, TX.

    In 1987, the College of the Mainland undertook a project to update curricula in real estate, business management, and office technology. The project entailed a survey of the labor market to clarify personnel needs in selected fields; the use of the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process, which involved expert workers in the creation of task…

  12. Innovative Remediation Technologies: Field-Scale Demonstration Projects in North America, 2nd Edition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report consolidates key reference information in a matrix that allows project mangers to quickly identify new technologies that may answer their cleanup needs and contacts for obtaining technology demonstration results and other information.

  13. Process Knowledge Characterization of Radioactive Waste at the Classified Waste Landfill Remediation Project Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    DOTSON,PATRICK WELLS; GALLOWAY,ROBERT B.; JOHNSON JR,CARL EDWARD

    1999-11-03

    This paper discusses the development and application of process knowledge (PK) to the characterization of radioactive wastes generated during the excavation of buried materials at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Classified Waste Landfill (CWLF). The CWLF, located in SNL/NM Technical Area II, is a 1.5-acre site that received nuclear weapon components and related materials from about 1950 through 1987. These materials were used in the development and testing of nuclear weapon designs. The CWLF is being remediated by the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Project pursuant to regulations of the New Mexico Environment Department. A goal of the CWLF project is to maximize the amount of excavated materials that can be demilitarized and recycled. However, some of these materials are radioactively contaminated and, if they cannot be decontaminated, are destined to require disposal as radioactive waste. Five major radioactive waste streams have been designated on the CWLF project, including: unclassified soft radioactive waste--consists of soft, compatible trash such as paper, plastic, and plywood; unclassified solid radioactive waste--includes scrap metal, other unclassified hardware items, and soil; unclassified mixed waste--contains the same materials as unclassified soft or solid radioactive waste, but also contains one or more Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents; classified radioactive waste--consists of classified artifacts, usually weapons components, that contain only radioactive contaminants; and classified mixed waste--comprises radioactive classified material that also contains RCRA constituents. These waste streams contain a variety of radionuclides that exist both as surface contamination and as sealed sources. To characterize these wastes, the CWLF project's waste management team is relying on data obtained from direct measurement of radionuclide activity content to the maximum extent possible and, in cases where

  14. Status Report for Remediation Decision Support Project, Task 1, Activity 1.B – Physical and Hydraulic Properties Database and Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.

    2008-09-26

    The objective of Activity 1.B of the Remediation Decision Support (RDS) Project is to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for sediments from the Hanford Site, to port these data into the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS), and to make the data web-accessible to anyone on the Hanford Local Area Network via the so-called Virtual Library. In past years efforts were made by RDS project staff to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for Hanford sediments and to transfer these data into SoilVision{reg_sign}, a commercial geotechnical software package designed for storing, analyzing, and manipulating soils data. Although SoilVision{reg_sign} has proven to be useful, its access and use restrictions have been recognized as a limitation to the effective use of the physical and hydraulic property databases by the broader group of potential users involved in Hanford waste site issues. In order to make these data more widely available and useable, a decision was made to port them to HEIS and to make them web-accessible via a Virtual Library module. In FY08 the objectives of Activity 1.B of the RDS Project were to: (1) ensure traceability and defensibility of all physical and hydraulic property data currently residing in the SoilVision{reg_sign} database maintained by PNNL, (2) transfer the physical and hydraulic property data from the Microsoft Access database files used by SoilVision{reg_sign} into HEIS, which has most recently been maintained by Fluor-Hanford, Inc., (3) develop a Virtual Library module for accessing these data from HEIS, and (4) write a User's Manual for the Virtual Library module. The development of the Virtual Library module was to be performed by a third party under subcontract to Fluor. The intent of these activities is to make the available physical and hydraulic property data more readily accessible and useable by technical staff and operable unit managers involved in waste site assessments and

  15. Annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the US Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites, January--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is a summary of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) cultural resource investigations for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE`s obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Summaries of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources are provided for the UMTRA Project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. This report covers all UMTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado from January through December 1991.

  16. DISSS/PSDB - Personnel Security Database Modernization Project: Compilation of data gathered from DOE Operations Office`s site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.; Sweeney, D.

    1995-03-15

    This document is a compilation of the information gathered from visits to the DOE Operations Offices. The purpose of these visits was to gather requirements for the modernization of the personnel security database. The initial phase of visits were to sites which had known local systems to augment CPCI. They were; Rocky Flats, Richland, Las Vegas, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Oakland. The second phase of site visits were to; Headquarters, Schenectady, Pittsburgh, Idaho Falls, Chicago, and Albuquerque. We also visited the NRC. At each site we reviewed the current clearance process in use at the field office. If the site had a local personnel security database (PSDB), we also reviewed the current PSDB processing. Each meeting was began with the a discussion on the purpose of the meeting and the background of the redesign effort.

  17. Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Volume 2, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.

    1995-03-01

    J-Field encompasses about 460 acres at the southern end of the Gunpowder Neck Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of APG (Figure 2.1). Since World War II, the Edgewood Area of APG has been used to develop, manufacture, test, and destroy chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). For the purposes of this project, J-Field has been divided into eight geographic areas or facilities that are designated as areas of concern (AOCs): the Toxic Burning Pits (TBP), the White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP), the Riot Control Burning Pit (RCP), the Robins Point Demolition Ground (RPDG), the Robins Point Tower Site (RPTS), the South Beach Demolition Ground (SBDG), the South Beach Trench (SBT), and the Prototype Building (PB). The scope of this project is to conduct a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and ecological risk assessment to evaluate the impacts of past disposal activities at the J-Field site. Sampling for the RI will be carried out in three stages (I, II, and III) as detailed in the FSP. A phased approach will be used for the J-Field ecological risk assessment (ERA).

  18. An assessment of plant biointrusion at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project rock-covered disposal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This study is one of a number of special studies that have been conducted regarding various aspects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This special study was proposed following routine surveillance and maintenance surveys and observations reported in a special study of vegetative covers (DOE, 1988), in which plants were observed growing up through the rock erosion layer at recently completed disposal cells. Some of the plants observed were deep-rooted woody species, and questions concerning root intrusion into disposal cells and the need to control plant growth were raised. The special study discussed in this report was designed to address some of the ramifications of plant growth on disposal cells that have rock covers. The NRC has chosen rock covers over vegetative covers in the arid western United States because licenses cannot substantiate that the vegetative covers will be significantly greater than 30 percent and preferably 70 percent,'' which is the amount of vegetation required to reduce flow to a point of stability.'' The potential impacts of vegetation growing in rock covers are not addressed by the NRC (1990). The objectives, then, of this study were to determine the species of plants growing on two rock-covered disposal cells, study the rooting pattern of plants on these cells, and identify possible impacts of plant root penetration on these and other UMTRA Project rock-covered cells.

  19. Examples of Department of Energy Successes for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater: Permeable Reactive Barrier and Dynamic Underground Stripping ASTD Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, C.; Gerdes, K.; Aljayoushi, J.; Kaback, D.; Ivory, T.

    2002-02-27

    Since 1998, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has funded the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Program to expedite deployment of alternative technologies that can save time and money for the environmental cleanup at DOE sites across the nation. The ASTD program has accelerated more than one hundred deployments of new technologies under 76 projects that focus on a broad spectrum of EM problems. More than 25 environmental restoration projects have been initiated to solve the following types of problems: characterization of the subsurface using chemical, radiological, geophysical, and statistical methods; treatment of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs, metals, or radionuclides; and other projects such as landfill covers, purge water management systems, and treatment of explosives-contaminated soils. One of the major goals of the ASTD Program is to deploy a new technology or process at multiple DOE sites. ASTD projects are encouraged to identify subsequent deployments at other sites. Some of the projects that have successfully deployed technologies at multiple sites focusing on cleanup of contaminated groundwater include: Permeable Reactive Barriers (Monticello, Rocky Flats, and Kansas City), treating uranium and organics in groundwater; and Dynamic Underground Stripping (Portsmouth, and Savannah River), thermally treating DNAPL source zones. Each year more and more new technologies and approaches are being used at DOE sites due to the ASTD program. DOE sites are sharing their successes and communicating lessons learned so that the new technologies can replace the baseline or standard approaches at DOE sites, thus expediting cleanup and saving money.

  20. Gunite and associated tanks remediation project recycling and waste minimization effort

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Saunders, A.D.

    1998-05-01

    The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has initiated clean up of legacy waste resulting from the Manhattan Project. The gunite and associated tanks project has taken an active pollution prevention role by successfully recycling eight tons of scrap metal, reusing contaminated soil in the Area of Contamination, using existing water (supernate) to aid in sludge transfer, and by minimizing and reusing personal protective equipment (PPE) and on-site equipment as much as possible. Total cost savings for Fiscal Year 1997 activities from these efforts are estimated at $4.2 million dollars.

  1. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 8 Air-Based Remediation Technology Selection Logic

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  2. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 7 Sustainable Remediation And Air-Based Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites, " the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Enviro...

  3. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 8 Air-Based Remediation Technology Selection Logic

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  4. Final Project Report for DPD, Inc. Office Building in Lansing, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Sherman, M.

    2003-03-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated with DPD, Inc., in the thermal analysis of buildings constructed using concrete with recycled materials in the aggregate. This project was part of a Phase II Small Business Innovative Research grant to determine how the thermal properties of concrete can be''tuned'' for use in passive solar buildings. DPD Inc. and Michigan State University developed techniques to alter the thermal properties of concrete by introducing recycled materials into the aggregate. Two office/retail buildings were built in Lansing, Michigan for this research. The objective of NREL's involvement was to evaluate the effects of concrete thermal properties on the building performance through energy simulations and monitoring. This report presents a summary of work accomplished on this project, including a predesign analysis of the concrete properties and building designs as well as energy performance analysis after construction. The test results were used to calibrate computer models that were later used to predict long-term performance of the buildings.

  5. Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: Groundwater contaminant transport. Final project report 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997.

  6. 48 CFR 301.607-78 - Contracting Officer designation of a Program/Project Manager as the Contracting Officer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Representative. Personnel who are FAC-P/PM certified, at any level, meet the requirements for FAC-COTR certification and are, therefore, not required to obtain FAC-COTR certification to serve as a COTR for an HHS acquisition. However, for those individuals serving as a Program or Project Manager under a FAC-P/PM...

  7. 48 CFR 301.607-78 - Contracting Officer designation of a Program/Project Manager as the Contracting Officer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Representative. Personnel who are FAC-P/PM certified, at any level, meet the requirements for FAC-COTR certification and are, therefore, not required to obtain FAC-COTR certification to serve as a COTR for an HHS acquisition. However, for those individuals serving as a Program or Project Manager under a FAC-P/PM...

  8. 48 CFR 301.607-78 - Contracting Officer designation of a Program/Project Manager as the Contracting Officer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Representative. Personnel who are FAC-P/PM certified, at any level, meet the requirements for FAC-COTR certification and are, therefore, not required to obtain FAC-COTR certification to serve as a COTR for an HHS acquisition. However, for those individuals serving as a Program or Project Manager under a FAC-P/PM...

  9. 48 CFR 301.607-78 - Contracting Officer designation of a Program/Project Manager as the Contracting Officer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Representative. Personnel who are FAC-P/PM certified, at any level, meet the requirements for FAC-COTR certification and are, therefore, not required to obtain FAC-COTR certification to serve as a COTR for an HHS acquisition. However, for those individuals serving as a Program or Project Manager under a FAC-P/PM...

  10. 48 CFR 301.607-78 - Contracting Officer designation of a Program/Project Manager as the Contracting Officer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Representative. Personnel who are FAC-P/PM certified, at any level, meet the requirements for FAC-COTR certification and are, therefore, not required to obtain FAC-COTR certification to serve as a COTR for an HHS acquisition. However, for those individuals serving as a Program or Project Manager under a FAC-P/PM...

  11. UMTRA Project remedial action planning and disposal cell design to comply with the proposed EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) standards (40 CFR Part 192)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project involves stabilizing 24 inactive uranium mill tailings piles in 10 states. Remedial work must meet standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Remedial action must be designed and constructed to prevent dispersion of the tailings and other contaminated materials, and must prevent the inadvertent use of the tailings by man. This report is prepared primarily for distribution to parties involved in the UMTRA Project, including the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and states and tribes. It is intended to record the work done by the DOE since publication of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards, and to show how the DOE has attempted to respond and react in a positive way to the new requirements that result from the proposed standards. This report discusses the groundwater compliance strategies now being defined and implemented by the DOE, and details the changes in disposal cell designs that result from studies to evaluate ways to facilitate compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. This report also serves to record the technical advances, planning, and progress made on the UMTRA Project since the appearance of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. The report serves to establish, document, and disseminate technical approaches and engineering and groundwater information to people who may be interested or involved in similar or related projects. 24 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project: Report from the DOE voluntary protection program onsite review, November 17--21, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-28

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), conducted November 17--21, 1997. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in ``US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements`` to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. DOE-VPP consists of three programs, with names and functions similar to those in OSHA`s VPP. These programs are STAR, MERIT, and DEMONSTRATION. The STAR program is the core of DOE-VPP. The program is aimed at truly outstanding protectors of employee safety and health. The MERIT program is a steppingstone for contractors and subcontractors that have good safety and health programs but need time and DOE guidance to achieve STAR status. The DEMONSTRATION program is rarely used; it allows DOE to recognize achievements in unusual situations about which DOE needs to learn more before determining approval requirements for the STAR status.

  13. GLASS FORMULATION DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER (CCIM) ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - 9208

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J; Amanda Billings, A; David Peeler, D; Michael Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-08-27

    Over the past few years, Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) demonstrations have been completed using SRS sludge batches 2, 3 and 4 (SB2, SB3 and SB4) simulant compositions. These campaigns demonstrated the ability of the CCIM to effectively produce quality glasses at high waste loadings. The current Advanced Remediation Technology (ART) Phase II-A Project is aimed at demonstrating the CCIM technology under representative DWPF flowsheet conditions and to demonstrate extended operations of the melter. A glass composition development effort was completed to identify and recommend a frit composition and sludge batch 4 (SB4) simulant waste loading target for subsequent ART-Phase II-A CCIM demonstration testing. Based on the results of the glass formulation testing, it was recommended that the Frit 503-R6 composition (B{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 14 wt %; Li{sub 2}O = 9 wt %; Na{sub 2}O = 3 wt %; and SiO{sub 2} = 74 wt %) be utilized for the demonstration. Furthermore, a waste loading of 46 wt % was recommended. The recommended frit and waste loading would produce a glass with acceptable durability with a liquidus temperature adequately below the 1250 C nominal CCIM operating temperature. This frit composition and waste loading was found to result in a glass that met CCIM processing requirements for viscosity, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity. The recommended frit and waste loading level should also provide a buffer for sludge product compositional variation to support the Phase II-A CCIM demonstration.

  14. Environmental summary of the F- and H-area seepage basins groundwater remediation project, Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect

    Friday, G.P.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of nearly 70 investigations of the baseline environment, describes the remedial action, and identifies constituents of interest that pose potential risk to human health and the environment. It also proposes an approach for evaluating the effectiveness of the remedial action.

  15. A performance assessment framework for hospitals: the WHO regional office for Europe PATH project.

    PubMed

    Veillard, J; Champagne, F; Klazinga, N; Kazandjian, V; Arah, O A; Guisset, A-L

    2005-12-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe launched in 2003 a project aiming to develop and disseminate a flexible and comprehensive tool for the assessment of hospital performance and referred to as the performance assessment tool for quality improvement in hospitals (PATH). This project aims at supporting hospitals in assessing their performance, questioning their own results, and translating them into actions for improvement, by providing hospitals with tools for performance assessment and by enabling collegial support and networking among participating hospitals. PATH was developed through a series of four workshops gathering experts representing most valuable experiences on hospital performance assessment worldwide. An extensive review of the literature on hospital performance projects was carried out, more than 100 performance indicators were scrutinized, and a survey was carried out in 20 European countries. Six dimensions were identified for assessing hospital performance: clinical effectiveness, safety, patient centredness, production efficiency, staff orientation and responsive governance. The following outcomes were achieved: (i) definition of the concepts and identification of key dimensions of hospital performance; (ii) design of the architecture of PATH to enhance evidence-based management and quality improvement through performance assessment; (iii) selection of a core and a tailored set of performance indicators with detailed operational definitions; (iv) identification of trade-offs between indicators; (v) elaboration of descriptive sheets for each indicator to support hospitals in interpreting their results; (vi) design of a balanced dashboard; and (vii) strategies for implementation of the PATH framework. PATH is currently being pilot implemented in eight countries to refine its framework before further expansion.

  16. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in

  17. 6430.1A Compliance Matrix for 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    ERHART, M.F.

    1999-08-18

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has recently exhibited a steady waste surface level growth. A path forward to mitigate the SY-101 surface level growth issue has been developed. The project has been directed to install the necessary equipment to transfer 380-570m{sup 3} (100,000-150,000 gallons) of waste from SY-101 to SY-102 before the waste elevation reached the region of the tank where the transition from a double to a single shell tank occurs. The purpose of this document is to record the design attributes of the RAPID mitigation system which fulfill the requirements specified in DOE order 6430.1A as it relates to the 241-SY-101 RAPID Mitigation System.

  18. Overall Quality Assurance Project Plan, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Fort Sheridan, Illinois, Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-15

    15 l:367w926 3138 PAGE.002 Section FM Revision 0 Date 03/ 16 /95 Page iiL of xxii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Paae EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES-1 1.0 PROJECT...MEMBERS 2-8 2.3.7 SAMPLE CUSTODIAN 2-8 P/CA/FrSHER.FM 03/ 16 /95 iii Section FM Revision 0 Date 03/ 16 /95 Page i.v._ of xxii TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued...INSTALLATION 4-12 4.5.2 PERMEABILITY TESTING 4-15 4.5.3 GROUNDWATER SAMPLING PROCEDURES 4-20 P/QA/FTSHER.FM 03/ 16 ,󈨣 iv Section FM Revision 0 Date 03/ 16 /95

  19. [Differences between office and ambulatory control of hypertension in very elderly patients. The CARDIORISC - MAPAPRES project].

    PubMed

    Llisterri, José L; Alonso, Francisco J; Gorostidi, Manuel; Sierra, Cristina; de La Sierra, Alejandro; Banegas, José R; Segura, Julián; Sobrino, Javier; De La Cruz, Juan J; Madruga, Felipe; Aranda, Pedro; Redon, Josep; Ruilope, Luis M

    2009-11-28

    Hypertension is highly prevalent in the very elderly. We studied control rates of hypertension according to clinic blood pressure (BP) and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) in treated hypertensives aged > or =80 years. Data came from the Spanish Society of Hypertension ABPM Registry (CARDIORISC - MAPAPRES project), which comprises a nation-wide network of more than 1,000 physicians sending standardized ABPM registries via web. Between June 2004 and April 2007 we obtained a 33.829-patient database. Control of hypertension was defined at the clinic when office BP was <140/90mmHg and at the ABPM when mean BP during the 24-h period was <130/80mmHg. We identified 2,311 patients (6.8%) aged > or =80 years. Mean age (SD) was 83.1 (3.2) years and 63% were women. Control of clinic BP was observed in 21.5% of cases (95%CI: 19.1-23.9) and control of 24-h BP in ABPM was 42.1% (95%CI: 39.7-45.3). Prevalence of masked hypertension was 7.0% (95%CI: 6.0-8.0) and prevalence of office-resistant control (white coat) was 27.6% (95% CI: 25.7-29.4). Diabetes, kidney disease, and duration of hypertension were associated with lack of control in ABPM. In very old hypertensives, control of clinic BP was 21.5% but ambulatory-based hypertension control was 42.1%. Physicians should be aware that the likelihood of misestimating BP control is high in these subjects. A wider use of ABPM in the elderly with hypertension should be considered.

  20. Project Execution Plan, Waste Management Division, Nevada Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy, April 2000

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2000-04-01

    This plan addresses project activities encompassed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Waste Management Division and conforms to the requirements contained in the ''Life Cycle Asset Management,'' U.S. Department of Energy Order O430.1A; the Joint Program Office Policy on Project Management in Support of DOE Order O430.1, and the Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning Guide. The plan also reflects the milestone philosophies of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, as agreed to by the state of Nevada; and traditional project management philosophies such as the development of life cycle costs, schedules, and work scope; identification of roles and responsibilities; and baseline management and controls.

  1. The DuPont, Monsanto, General Electric {open_quotes}Lasagna{close_quotes} Remediation Project - joint R&D and financing

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, P.A.

    1995-03-01

    The Lasagna project is the first of what we expect will be several large cooperative projects between industry consortia and government to develop improved remediation technologies. In 1992, Monsanto Company began contacting other major corporations to see if they were experiencing similar difficulties in applying cost-effective, or even workable technologies for industrial site remediation. Both General Electric and DuPont were early participants in the effort to develop a meeting with the EPA to discuss technical problems faced in cleanup, research needs, and ways to accelerate development of more cost-effective techniques. This paper provides some background on how this cooperative process came to reality, what the Lasagna process is and how the cooperative arrangements and financing are structured.

  2. Soil remediation demonstration project: Biodegradation of heavy fuel oils. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, C.M.; Bhunia, P.; Koenen, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    Treatment of oil-contaminated soils is necessary to protect water supplies, human health, and environmental quality; but because of limited funds, cleanup costs are often prohibitive. High costs are exacerbated in cold regions such as Alaska, where spills are often in areas inaccessible to heavy equipment and where there is limited infrastructure. Owing to the lack of infrastructure, widespread fuel distribution systems, and the need for heating in the cold climate, there are numerous small-scale oil spills. Low-cost treatments applicable to small-scale spills are needed. The object of this CPAR project was to examine using cost-effective, on-site bioremediation techniques for heavy-oil-contaminated soil in cold regions. Both heavy-oil and diesel-contaminated soils were used to compare landfarming, a low-intensity treatment, to pile bioventing, a costlier treatment. For each soil-contaminant combination, we compared nutrient additions to a control with no nutrient additions. Under the conditions of this study, landfarming with nutrient additions was as effective for treating diesel-contaminated soil as was bioventing with nutrient additions. For heavy oils, landfarming with nutrients resulted in lower soil concentrations after one year, but differences among treatments were not statistically significant. Because landfarming does not require pumps, electricity, or plumbing, all costs are less than for bioventing. The minimal requirements for infrastructure also make landfarming attractive in remote sites typical of cold regions.

  3. Sampling and analysis plan for the 100-D Ponds voluntary remediation project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) describes the sampling and analytical activities which will be performed to support closure of the 100-D Ponds Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. This SAP includes the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) presented in Section 2.0, and the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) described in Section 3.0. The FSP defines the sampling and analytical methodologies to be performed, and the QAPjP provides or includes information on the requirements for precision, accuracy, representativeness, comparability, and completeness of the analytical data. This sampling and analysis plan was developed using the Environmental Protection Agency`s Seven-Step Data Quality Objectives (DQO) Guidance (EPA, 1994). The purpose of the DQO meetings was (1) to identify the contaminants of concern and their cleanup levels under the Washington State Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA, WAC-173-340) Method B, and (2) to determine the number and locations of samples necessary to verify that the 100-D Ponds meet the cleanup criteria. The data collected will be used to support RCRA closure of this TSD unit.

  4. COST OF MTBE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread contamination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in ground water has raised concerns about the increased cost of remediation of MTBE releases compared to BTEX-only sites. To evaluate these cost, cost information for 311 sites was furnished by U.S. EPA Office of Undergr...

  5. Trade Remedies: A Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-02

    ornamental fish, tilapia , monkfish).36 The European Union proposes to establish an additional 15% tariff on imports of certain women’s apparel, office...which reversed (continued...) ruling.39 Supporters of trade remedies, including many in Congress and domestic industry representatives, believe that

  6. COST OF MTBE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread contamination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in ground water has raised concerns about the increased cost of remediation of MTBE releases compared to BTEX-only sites. To evaluate these cost, cost information for 311 sites was furnished by U.S. EPA Office of Undergr...

  7. Atmospheric release advisory capability pilot project at two nuclear power plants and associated state offices of emergency preparedness. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    A project to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) limited service with commercial nuclear power plants and their associated state offices of emergency preparedness is discussed. Preliminary planning, installation and testing of the ARAC site facilities at Indian Point Nucler Power Station, New York State; at New York State Office of Emergency Preparedness, Albany, New York; at Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, California; and at the State of California Office of Emergency Services, Sacramento, California, are summarized. ARAC participation in the Robert E. Ginna nuclear generating plant accident in New York on January 25, 1982, is discussed. The ARAC system is evaluated with emphasis on communications, the suite of models contained within the ARAC system, and the staff. The implications of this project in designing the next-generation ARAC system to service federal and state needs are assessed.

  8. Dental Office Assisting; Glossary of Key Words. Vocational Reading Power Project, Title III, E.S.E.A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremer, Bonnie

    The glossary is one of twenty in various subject areas of vocational education designed to assist the student in vocabulary mastery for particular vocational education courses. They are part of the Vocational Reading Power Project, Title III, E.S.E.A. This glossary is for a course in dental office assisting. It is divided into two parts: one…

  9. Remediation technologies for contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.M.

    1995-09-01

    Although soil and groundwater remediation has been conducted for many years, sediment remediation is still in its infancy. Regulatory agencies are now beginning to identify areas where contaminated sediments exist and evaluate their environmental impact. As these evaluations are completed, the projects must shift focus to how these sediments can be remediated. Also as the criteria for aquatic disposal of dredged sediments become more stringent, remediation technologies must be developed to address contaminated sediments generated by maintenance dredging.This report describes the various issues and possible technologies for sediment remediation.

  10. Overview of Science and Technology Improvements at Office of Legacy Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, S.; Bartlett, T.; Boylan, J.; Carpenter, C.; Miller, D.; Kothari, V.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) supports science and technology (S and T) initiatives to more effectively manage LM sites, help protect human health and the environment, and reduce long-term costs of site maintenance and remediation by ensuring that sound engineering and scientific principles are used. Through the use of telemetry, LM's SOARS (System Operation and Analysis of Remote Sites) project provides project scientists and engineers with timely information needed to evaluate, maintain, and optimize remediation systems, while limiting the amount of required travel. This paper presents three recent S and T activities focused on enhancing remediation of ground water at LM sites. (authors)

  11. Project management office in health care: a key strategy to support evidence-based practice change.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Bonneville-Roussy, Arielle; Richer, Marie-Claire; Aubry, Monique; Vezina, Michel; Deme, Mariama

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the contribution of a Transition Support Office (TSO) in a health care center in Canada to supporting changes in practice based on evidence and organizational performance in the early phase of a major organizational change. Semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 11 members of the TSO and 13 managers and clinicians from an ambulatory sector in the organization who received support from the TSO. The main themes addressed in the interviews were the description of the TSO, the context of implementation, and the impact. Using the Competing Value Framework by Quinn and Rohrbaugh [Public Product Rev. 1981;5(2):122-140], results revealed that the TSO is a source of expertise that facilitates innovation and implementation of change. It provides material support and human expertise for evidence-based projects. As a single organizational entity responsible for managing change, it gives a sense of cohesiveness. It also facilitates communication among human resources of the entire organization. The TSO is seen as an expertise provider that promotes competency development, training, and evidence-based practices. The impact of a TSO on change in practices and organizational performance in a health care system is discussed.

  12. The Ares Projects Office: Building an Exploration Culture from the Inside Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, Bartholomew

    2008-01-01

    NASA is building its first new human-rated space exploration vehicles in nearly 40 years. This marks an important operational and cultural change from the Space Shuttle. In the wake of the Columbia disaster, the agency and the nation realized that NASA's goals and culture needed to change. The Ares Projects Office (APO), which is building the launch vehicles that will power human beings to the Moon, Mars, and beyond, is taking a page from the Saturn playbook by having NASA lead both the overall integration and the development of the Ares I upper stage. APO is also creating a new culture of cooperation, openness, and informed risk taking as we set our sights on other worlds. APO has established a team environment where issues can be discussed, information is shared, fun and teamwork are encouraged, and constructive conflict and accountability are expected. Following a "One NASA" philosophy, APO is taking steps to strengthen cooperation among space centers, contractor partners, engineering and scientific communities, and headquarters personnel. As we learn lessons from things that Went wrong with the Space Shuttle, we are also borrowing best practices from what has gone right with that program and others. All of these cultural elements will be necessary as we take the next steps beyond Earth orbit.

  13. The Ares Projects Office: Building an Exploration Culture from the Inside Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, Bartholomew

    2008-01-01

    NASA is building its first new human-rated space exploration vehicles in nearly 40 years. This marks an important operational and cultural change from the Space Shuttle. In the wake of the Columbia disaster, the agency and the nation realized that NASA's goals and culture needed to change. The Ares Projects Office (APO), which is building the launch vehicles that will power human beings to the Moon, Mars, and beyond, is taking a page from the Saturn playbook by having NASA lead both the overall integration and the development of the Ares I upper stage. APO is also creating a new culture of cooperation, openness, and informed risk taking as we set our sights on other worlds. APO has established a team environment where issues can be discussed, information is shared, fun and teamwork are encouraged, and constructive conflict and accountability are expected. Following a "One NASA" philosophy, APO is taking steps to strengthen cooperation among space centers, contractor partners, engineering and scientific communities, and headquarters personnel. As we learn lessons from things that Went wrong with the Space Shuttle, we are also borrowing best practices from what has gone right with that program and others. All of these cultural elements will be necessary as we take the next steps beyond Earth orbit.

  14. THERMAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal remediation is being proposed by Region I for remediation of the overburden soil and groundwater at the Solvent Recovery Services New England Superfund site. This presentation at the public meeting will acquaint area residents with thermal remediation. The two types of ...

  15. THERMAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal remediation is being proposed by Region I for remediation of the overburden soil and groundwater at the Solvent Recovery Services New England Superfund site. This presentation at the public meeting will acquaint area residents with thermal remediation. The two types of ...

  16. Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium-Contaminated Soil Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    2000-12-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m{sup 3} of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain with 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity. In previous IV tasks, ORNL has (1) evaluated and tested the soil sorter system software and hardware and (2) evaluated the quality control (QC) program used at the soil sorter plant. The IV has found that the soil sorter decontamination was effective and significantly reduced plutonium contamination in the soil processed at the JA site. The Field Command Defense Threat Reduction Agency currently plans to re-use soil from the clean pile as a cover to remaining contamination in portions of the radiological control area. Therefore, ORNL was requested to provide an IV. The survey team collected samples from 103 random locations within the top 4 ft of the clean storage pile. The samples were analyzed in the on-site radioanalytical counting laboratory with an American Nuclear Systems (ANS) field instrument used for the detection of low

  17. Organizational Considerations for Implementing Systems Engineering and Integration in the Ares Projects Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, LeAnn; Doreswamy, Rajiv N.

    2008-01-01

    Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) is a critical discipline in developing new space systems. In 2005, NASA performed an internal study of 24 agency and Department of Defense (DoD) programs to evaluate methods of integrating SE&I practices and determine their effectiveness. The goal of the study was to determine the best SE&I implementation strategy for the Ares Projects Office. The study identified six SE&I organizational structures: 1. Lead systems integrator (LSI) with SE&I responsibility and government technical insight. 2a. Integration contractor with government SE&I responsibility (government insight). 2b. Integration contractor with government SE&I responsibility (government oversight). 3a. Prime contractor with SE&I responsibility (government insight). 3b. Prime contractor with SE&I responsibility (government oversight). 3c. Prime contractor with SE&I responsibility (government/industry partnership). 4a.Prime contractor with government SE&I responsibility (government insight). 4b. Prime contractor with government SE&I responsibility (government oversight). 4d.Prime contractors with total system performance responsibility (TSPR). 5. Prime contractor with government SE&I responsibility and integration products through a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC). 6. Government/FFRDC in-house development with SE&I responsibility and function. The organizational structure used most often was number 4, using a prime contractor with government SE&I responsibility and government technical insight. However, data analyses did not establish a positive relationship between program development costs and specific SE&I organizational types, nor did it positively determine the relationship between successful programs or projects and their SE&I structure. The SE&I study reached the following conclusions: (1) Large, long-duration, technically complex programs or projects reach their technical goals, but rarely meet schedule or cost goals. NASA's recent

  18. Technical safety requirements for the South Tank Farm remediation project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    The South Tank Farm (STF) is a series of six, 170,000-gal underground, domed storage tanks that were placed into service in 1943. The tanks were constructed of a concrete mixture known as gunite. They were used as a portion of the Liquid LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW) System for the collection, neutralization, storage, and transfer of the aqueous portion of the radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes produced as part of normal facility operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Although the last of the tanks was taken out of service in 1986, they have been shown by structural analysis to continue to be structurally sound. An attempt was made in 1983 to empty the tanks; however, removal of all the sludge from the tanks was not possible with the equipment and schedule available. Since removal of the liquid waste in 1983, liquid continues to accumulate within the tanks. The in-leakage is believed to be the result of groundwater dripping into the tanks around penetrations in the domes. The tanks are currently being maintained under a Surveillance and Maintenance Program, which includes activities such as level monitoring, vegetation control, High Efficiency Particulate Air filter leakage requirement testing/replacement, sign erection/repair, pump-out of excess liquids, and instrument calibration/maintenance. A technique known as confined sluicing, which uses a high-pressure, low-volume water jet integrated with a jet pump, will be used to remove the sludge. The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) are those operational requirements that specify the operating limits and surveillance requirements, the basis thereof, safety boundaries, and the management of administrative controls necessary to ensure the safe operation of the STF remediation project. Effective implementation of TSRs will limit to acceptable levels the risks to the public and workers from uncontrolled releases of radioactive or other hazardous material.

  19. Dark Skies Africa: a Prototype Project with the IAU Office of Astronomy for Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance Elaine; Tellez, Daniel; Pompea, Stephen M.

    2015-08-01

    The IAU’s Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) awarded the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) with a grant to deliver a “Dark Skies Outreach to Sub-Saharan Africa” program to institutions in 12 African countries during 2013: Algeria, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, Ghana, Zambia, South Africa, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kenya, Namibia and Senegal. The program helped students identify wasteful and inefficient lighting and provided ways to reduce consumption and to keep energy costs in check. The goal was to inspire students to be responsible stewards in helping their community safeguard one of Africa’s natural resources - a dark night sky.Thirteen kits made by the NOAO Education and Public Outreach group were sent to coordinators at university, science center and planetarium-type institutions in the 12 countries and to the IAU OAD. The program’s kit included complete instructional guides and supplies for six hands-on activities (e.g., on the importance of shielding lights and using energy efficient bulbs) and a project on energy conservation and responsible lighting (through energy audits). The activities were taught to the coordinators in a series of six Google+ Hangout sessions scheduled from June to mid-November. The coordinators at the institutions in turn trained local teachers in junior and senior high schools. The Google+ Hangout sessions also included instruction on carrying out evaluations. From the end of November until mid-December students from the different African countries shared final class projects (such as posters or powerpoints) on the program’s website.The entire program was designed to help coordinators and educators work with students, parents and the community to identify dark sky resource, lighting and energy issues and to assess their status, efficiency and effectiveness. The audience will take away from the presentation lessons learned on how well the techniques succeeded in using Google+ Hangout sessions to instruct and

  20. Should Student Affairs Offer Remedial Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Hansel E.; Butner, Bonita K.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the opinions of 108 community college chief student affairs officers regarding whether student affairs offices should offer remedial instruction. Through examination of personal and institutional variables, two opposing opinions emerged - one for student affairs offering remediation and the other against. Few characteristics significantly…

  1. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of commercializing a biotechnology that uses plants to remediate soils, sediments, surface waters, and groundwaters contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. This technology, known as phytoremediation, is particularly suited to remediation of soils or water where low levels of contaminants are widespread. Project objectives are to provide an accurate estimate of the capability and rate of phytoremediation for removal of contaminants of concern from soils and groundwaters at Department of Energy (DOE) sites and to develop data suitable for engineering design and economic feasibility evaluations, including methods for destruction or final disposition of plants containing contaminants of concern. The bioremediation systems being evaluated could be less expensive than soil removal and treatment systems, given the areal extent and topography of sites under consideration and the investment of energy and money in soil-moving and -treating processes. In situ technology may receive regulatory acceptance more easily than ex situ treatments requiring excavation, processing, and replacement of surface soils. In addition, phytoremediation may be viable for cleanup of contaminated waters, either as the primary treatment or the final polishing stage, depending on the contaminant concentrations and process economics considerations.

  2. Office of Inspector General audit report on Project Hanford management contract costs and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    On August 6, 1996, the Richland Operations Office (Richland) awarded the Project Hanford Management Contract (Management Contract) to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (Fluor Daniel). This performance-based, 5-year contract to support cleanup of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site (Hanford) contained performance goals or expectations related to the stabilization, transition, and diversification of the Tri-Cities` economy near Hanford in southeastern Washington. One of these economic goals was that Fluor Daniel and its major subcontractors would help generate 3,000 new, non-Hanford, private sector jobs that would help stabilize and diversify the Tri-Cities` economy. The contract specifically called for Fluor Daniel to help generate 200 jobs, establish an investment fund, and bring 6 new growth-oriented enterprise companies to the Tri-Cities by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 1997. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Richland was making adequate progress in stabilizing and diversifying the economy of the Tri-Cities by creating 3,000 new, non-Hanford jobs within 5 years. Accordingly, the author examined the progress made in FY 1997, which was the first year of the Management Contract. Richland and Fluor Daniel are at risk of not meeting the Management Contract`s goals of stabilizing and diversifying the economy of the Tri-Cities because most of the new jobs created during FY 1997 were not comparable to Hanford jobs and, thus, may not sustain long-term economic goals. Therefore, Fluor Daniel has not met its expectations in the first year and is not making adequate progress toward meeting the Management Contract`s overall economic goals.

  3. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  4. Project Integration Office for the electric and hybrid vehicle R and D program. Eighth progress report, March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-19

    The Project Integration Office (PIO) was established to assist the US DOE with the direction and coordination of its multiple electric vehicle and hybrid electric vehicle research programs in order to get the maximum payoff from these research efforts. In addition, the PIO performs objective independent technical and economic studies, analyses and modeling, and maintains a technical information liaison service to facilitate information exchange between the program participants and industry. Progress in each of these activities is reported. (LCL)

  5. Remediating while preserving wetland habitat at an LLR waste site in Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Kleb, H.R.; Zelmer, R.L.

    2007-07-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office was established in 1982 to carry out the federal government's responsibilities for low-level radioactive (LLR) waste management in Canada. The Office operates programs to characterize, delineate, decontaminate and consolidate historic LLR waste for interim and long-term storage. In this capacity, the Office is currently considering the remediation of 9,000 cubic metres of contaminated sediment in a coastal marsh in the context of a major remediation project involving multiple urban sites. The marsh is situated between the Lake Ontario shoreline and the urban fringe of the Town of Port Hope. The marsh is designated a Cattail Mineral Shallow Marsh under the Ecological Land Classification system for Southern Ontario and was recently named the A.K. Sculthorpe Marsh in memory of a local community member. The marsh remediation will therefore require trade off between the disruption of a sensitive wetland and the removal of contaminated sediment. This paper discusses the issues and trade-off relating to the waste characterization, environmental assessment and regulatory findings and thus the remediation objectives for the marsh. Considerations include the spatial distribution of contaminated sediment, the bioavailability of contaminants, the current condition of the wetland and the predicted effects of remediation. Also considered is the significance of the wetland from provincial and municipal regulatory perspectives and the resulting directives for marsh remediation. (authors)

  6. Caresoil: A multidisciplinar Project to characterize, remediate, monitor and evaluate the risk of contaminated soils in Madrid (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Martín, Alfonso; Antón, Loreto; Granja, Jose Luis; Villarroya, Fermín; Montero, Esperanza; Rodríguez, Vanesa

    2016-04-01

    Soil contamination can come from diffuse sources (air deposition, agriculture, etc.) or local sources, these last being related to anthropogenic activities that are potentially soil contaminating activities. According to data from the EU, in Spain, and particularly for the Autonomous Community of Madrid, it can be considered that heavy metals, toxic organic compounds (including Non Aqueous Phases Liquids, NAPLs) and combinations of both are the main problem of point sources of soil contamination in our community. The five aspects that will be applied in Caresoil Program (S2013/MAE-2739) in the analysis and remediation of a local soil contamination are: 1) the location of the source of contamination and characterization of soil and aquifer concerned, 2) evaluation of the dispersion of the plume, 3) application of effective remediation techniques, 4) monitoring the evolution of the contaminated soil and 5) risk analysis throughout this process. These aspects involve advanced technologies (hydrogeology, geophysics, geochemistry,...) that require new developing of knowledge, being necessary the contribution of several researching groups specialized in the fields previously cited, as they are those integrating CARESOIL Program. Actually two cases concerning hydrocarbon spills, as representative examples of soil local contamination in Madrid area, are being studied. The first is being remediated and we are monitoring this process to evaluate its effectiveness. In the second location we are defining the extent of contamination in soil and aquifer to define the most effective remediation technique.

  7. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado: Remedial action selection report. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Gunnison uranium mill tailings site is just south of the city limits of Gunnison, Colorado, in the south-central part of the state. The entire site covers 61 acres in the valley of the Gunnison River and Tomichi Creek. Contaminated materials at the Gunnison processing site include the tailings pile, covering about 35 acres to an average depth of nine feet and containing 459,000 cubic yards. Ore storage areas and the former mill processing area cover about 20 acres on the south side of the site. The volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 718,900 cubic yards. An interim action was approved by the US Department of Energy to eliminate existing safety hazards to the Gunnison community. These actions, started in September 1991, included demolition of mill buildings and related processing facilities, excavation of two underground storage tanks, removal of asbestos and other hazardous materials from buildings, storage of those materials in a secured area on the site, and improvements of site security.

  8. Air-Base Remediation Workshop - Section 3 Bioventig

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  9. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 2 Soil Vapor Extraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sties," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  10. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 6 Thermal Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  11. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 6 Thermal Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  12. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 2 Soil Vapor Extraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sties," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  13. Air-Base Remediation Workshop - Section 3 Bioventig

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  14. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 1 Sampling And Analysis Revelant To Air-Based Remediation Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Force Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environme...

  15. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 1 Sampling And Analysis Revelant To Air-Based Remediation Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Force Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environme...

  16. Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This fourteenth annual status report for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Surface (UMTRA-Surface) and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater (UMTRA-Groundwater) Projects undertaken during fiscal year (FY) 1992 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1993 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604. The DOE will continue to submit annual reports to DOE-Headquarters, the states, tribes, and local representatives through Project completion in order to inform the public of the yearly Project status. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive material (RRM) located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner, and to minimize or eliminate potential health hazards. Commercial and residential properties near designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as ``vicinity properties (VP),`` are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated VPs located in 10 states, and the VPs associated with the Edgemont, South Dakota, uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (Figure A.1, Appendix A).

  17. Utilizing geochemical, hydrologic, and boron isotopic data to assess the success of a salinity and selenium remediation project, Upper Colorado River Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Bullen, T.D.; Stolp, B.J.; Wilkowske, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Stream discharge and geochemical data were collected at two sites along lower Ashley Creek, Utah, from 1999 to 2003, to assess the success of a site specific salinity and Se remediation project. The remediation project involved the replacement of a leaking sewage lagoon system that was interacting with Mancos Shale and increasing the dissolved salinity and Se load in Ashley Creek. Regression modeling successfully simulated the mean daily dissolved salinity and Se loads (R2 values ranging from 0.82 to 0.97) at both the upstream (AC1) and downstream (AC2/AC2A) sites during the study period. Prior to lagoon closure, net gain in dissolved-salinity load exceeded 2177??metric tons/month and decreased after remediation to less than 590??metric tons/month. The net gain in dissolved Se load during the same pre-closure period exceeded 120??kg/month and decreased to less than 18??kg/month. Sen's slope estimator verified the statistical significance of the modeled reduction in monthly salinity and Se loads. Measured gain in dissolved constituent loads during seepage tests conducted during September and November 2003 ranged from 0.334 to 0.362??kg/day for dissolved Se and 16.9 to 26.1??metric tons/day for dissolved salinity. Stream discharge and changes in the isotopic values of delta boron-11 (??11B) were used in a mixing model to differentiate between constituent loadings contributed by residual sewage effluent and naturally occurring ground-water seepage entering Ashley Creek. The majority of the modeled ??11B values of ground-water seepage were positive, indicative of minimal seepage contributions from sewage effluent. The stream reach between sites S3 and AC2A contained a modeled ground-water seepage ??11B value of - 2.4???, indicative of ground-water seepage composed of remnant water still draining from the abandoned sewage lagoons.

  18. Utilizing geochemical, hydrologic, and boron isotopic data to assess the success of a salinity and selenium remediation project, Upper Colorado River Basin, Utah.

    PubMed

    Naftz, David L; Bullen, Thomas D; Stolp, Bert J; Wilkowske, Christopher D

    2008-03-15

    Stream discharge and geochemical data were collected at two sites along lower Ashley Creek, Utah, from 1999 to 2003, to assess the success of a site specific salinity and Se remediation project. The remediation project involved the replacement of a leaking sewage lagoon system that was interacting with Mancos Shale and increasing the dissolved salinity and Se load in Ashley Creek. Regression modeling successfully simulated the mean daily dissolved salinity and Se loads (R(2) values ranging from 0.82 to 0.97) at both the upstream (AC1) and downstream (AC2/AC2A) sites during the study period. Prior to lagoon closure, net gain in dissolved-salinity load exceeded 2177 metric tons/month and decreased after remediation to less than 590 metric tons/month. The net gain in dissolved Se load during the same pre-closure period exceeded 120 kg/month and decreased to less than 18 kg/month. Sen's slope estimator verified the statistical significance of the modeled reduction in monthly salinity and Se loads. Measured gain in dissolved constituent loads during seepage tests conducted during September and November 2003 ranged from 0.334 to 0.362 kg/day for dissolved Se and 16.9 to 26.1 metric tons/day for dissolved salinity. Stream discharge and changes in the isotopic values of delta boron-11 (delta(11)B) were used in a mixing model to differentiate between constituent loadings contributed by residual sewage effluent and naturally occurring ground-water seepage entering Ashley Creek. The majority of the modeled delta(11)B values of ground-water seepage were positive, indicative of minimal seepage contributions from sewage effluent. The stream reach between sites S3 and AC2A contained a modeled ground-water seepage delta(11)B value of -2.4 per thousand, indicative of ground-water seepage composed of remnant water still draining from the abandoned sewage lagoons.

  19. UMTRA Project document control system manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This manual defines the Project Document Control System (PDCS) operated by the US DOE Uranium Mill tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) project Office. The purpose of the PDCS is to provide an active and continuing program for acquiring, controlling, retaining, retrieving, retiring and disposing of all UMTRA Project documents. The PDCS also provides guidance and coordination in transferring documents by various UMTRA Projection document control centers to a central location.

  20. Integrating Passive Sampling Methods into Management of Contaminated Sediment Sites: A Guide for Department of Defense Remedial Project Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    samplers include assessments of: • Contaminant sources and fate (Case 1) • Health and environmental risks (Case 2) • Remedy effectiveness (Case 3...sediment matrix are what matter with respect to exposure and risk to biota. Such exposures can result in direct effects on these animals or in...bioaccumulation into food webs that lead to wildlife and people. Please refer to the following images to get a more concrete feel for what passive

  1. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite processing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Beranich, S.; Berger, N.; Bierley, D.; Bond, T.M.; Burt, C.; Caldwell, J.A.; Dery, V.A.; Dutcher, A.; Glover, W.A.; Heydenburg, R.J.; Larson, N.B.; Lindsey, G.; Longley, J.M.; Millard, J.B.; Miller, M.; Peel, R.C.; Persson-Reeves, C.H.; Titus, F.B.; Wagner, L.

    1989-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to clean up the Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, uraniferous lignite processing sites to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at these sites. Remedial action at these sites must be performed in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standards promulgated for the remedial action and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of North Dakota. The inactive Belfield uraniferous lignite processing site is one mile southeast of Belfield, North Dakota. The inactive Bowman uraniferous lignite processing site at the former town of Griffin, is seven miles northwest of Bowman, North Dakota and 65 road miles south of Belfield. Lignite ash from the processing operations has contaminated the soils over the entire 10.7-acre designated Belfield site and the entire 12.1-acre designated Bowman site. Dispersion of the ash has contaminated an additional 20.6 acres surrounding the Belfield processing site and an additional 59.2 acres surrounding the Bowman processing site. The proposed remedial action is to relocate the contaminated materials at the Belfield processing site to the Bowman processing/disposal site for codisposal with the Bowman contaminated soils. The environmental impacts assessed in this EA were evaluated for the proposed remedial action and the no action alternative and demonstrate that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment and would be performed in compliance with applicable environmental laws. The no action alternative would not be consistent with the intent of Public Law 95-604 and would not comply with the EPA standards. 48 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Business Office Skills Development: Aetna Cooperative Work Experience Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meriden Public Schools, CT.

    Disadvantaged minority students were provided with training in clerical skills and general business procedures and reinforcement of communication and computation skills through application in an office setting. Seniors from Meriden Public Schools were paired with minority adults who were successful role models involved on a career path at the…

  3. National Assessment of School Resource Officer Programs. Final Project Report. Document Number 209273

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; McDevitt, Jack

    2005-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in placing sworn police officers in schools as SROs to improve school safety. The purpose of the National Assessment was to identify what program "models" have been implemented, how programs have been implemented, and what the programs' possible effects may be. To obtain this information, Abt Associates conducted…

  4. Articulated Instruction Objectives Guide for Office Procedures (Module 7.0). Project Period, March 1981-February 1982 (Pilot Model). Edition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Gladys; Campbell, Creola

    Developed during a project designed to provide a continuous, competency-based line of vocational training in business and office education programs at the secondary and postsecondary levels, this package consists of an instructor's guide and learning module for a course on office procedures. Various aspects of implementing and articulating…

  5. Pilot Project to Optimize Ground Water Remediation Systems at RCRA Corrective Action Facilities: Summary Report and Lessons Learned

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Based on previous success with conducting independent optimization evaluations at Fund-lead pump and treat sites (i.e., those sites with pump and treat systems funded and managed by Superfund and the States), the EPA Office of Superfund .....

  6. Implications of Office of Education Bureau of Research Teacher Education Project for Developing Institutions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, E. C.

    The purposes of the Teacher Education Project Study at Jarvis Christian College were to investigate the relevance for small developing colleges of the new models for elementary education and to stimulate the adoption of the systems approach to institutional development in general. A 12-member Project Task Force composed of Jarvis faculty,…

  7. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review—Biodiesel Cellulosic Ethanol Research Project (Hendry County Sustainable Biofuels Center)

    SciTech Connect

    Capece, John

    2013-05-22

    The presentation provides an overview of the Biodiesel Cellulosic Ethanol Research Project (Hendry County Sustainable Biofuels Center). It summarizes the project history, timeline, budget, partners, objectives, goals, future plans and in closer detail reviews the used approaches and technical accomplishments. The main project goals were (1) developing strategies and tools that assist in the creation of economically and environmentally sustainable bioenergy industries within ecologically-sensitive regions such as South Florida and, in particular, the greater Everglades, (2) using these bioenergy strategies and tools in evolving the existing agricultural, urban, and ecological sectors towards more sustainable structures and practices and (3) using bioenergy as a focal point in the larger effort to mitigate climate change and sea level rise, realities with particularly catastrophic consequences for South Florida. The project started on Oct 1, 2010 and ended on Feb 28, 2013. It yearly average budget was $369,770, with the Dept. of Energy annual cost share of $317,167. The main project partners were Hendry County, University of Florida - Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Intelligentsia International, Inc., Edison State College and University of South Florida. Used approaches, main accomplishments and results in the categories of (1) technical research, (2) education and (3) business development are presented in detail. The project uniqueness is mainly related to the use of system approaches and integrating several systems analyses. Relevance of the project applicable to sustainability of bioenergy, food production, & restoration is explained, critical success factors are challenges are outlined and future work drafted. Finally, the main publications and presentations catalogue list is presented.

  8. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Vol. 18. Part 2. Indexes

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. This report is the eighteenth in a series of bibliographies prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been included in Part 1 of the report. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D&D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluations; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues. Within the 16 sections, the citations are sorted by geographic location. If a geographic location is not specified, the citations are sorted according to the document title. In Part 2 of the report, indexes are provided for author, author affiliation, selected title phrase, selected title word, publication description, geographic location, and keyword.

  9. Office of Inspector General report on audit of renovation and new construction projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-05

    The Oakland Operations Office (Oakland) is responsible for acquiring facilities needed to satisfy mission needs and to do so at the least cost to the Department of Energy (Department). The objective of the audit was to determine if proposed renovation and new construction projects at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore) met mission needs while minimizing cost to the Government. In pursuing three projects, estimated to cost over $78 million, Livermore had not demonstrated that it had selected the best alternatives for meeting the Department`s needs while minimizing cost. Livermore was able to pursue these projects because Oakland did not ensure that the laboratory had performed cost and benefit analyses of all alternatives. Further, Oakland did not establish benchmarks to assess the reasonableness of the total costs of designing, constructing, and managing these projects. As a result, it was likely that the Department was spending more than necessary on renovation and new construction projects at Livermore. Although the projects met mission needs, it was recommended that the Manager, Oakland: (1) require Livermore to perform analyses of expected costs and benefits for alternatives; (2) evaluate the adequacy of Livermore`s cost and benefit analyses of alternatives; (3) establish benchmarks based on industry and other government agency cost data to assess the reasonableness of Livermore`s total design, construction, and project management costs; and (4) select the alternative that meets established needs at the least cost to the Government. Oakland agreed with the recommendations and will implement them starting with the Fiscal Year 1999 project submission and validation.

  10. Transfer of Physical and Hydraulic Properties Databases to the Hanford Environmental Information System - PNNL Remediation Decision Support Project, Task 1, Activity 6

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Middleton, Lisa A.

    2009-03-31

    This report documents the requirements for transferring physical and hydraulic property data compiled by PNNL into the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) Project is managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support Hanford Site waste management and remedial action decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy and one of their current site contractors - CH2M-Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). The objective of Task 1, Activity 6 of the RDS project is to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for sediments from the Hanford Site, to port these data into the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS), and to make the data web-accessible to anyone on the Hanford Local Area Network via the so-called Virtual Library.1 These physical and hydraulic property data are used to estimate parameters for analytical and numerical flow and transport models that are used for site risk assessments and evaluation of remedial action alternatives. In past years efforts were made by RDS project staff to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for Hanford sediments and to transfer these data into SoilVision{reg_sign}, a commercial geotechnical software package designed for storing, analyzing, and manipulating soils data. Although SoilVision{reg_sign} has proven to be useful, its access and use restrictions have been recognized as a limitation to the effective use of the physical and hydraulic property databases by the broader group of potential users involved in Hanford waste site issues. In order to make these data more widely available and useable, a decision was made to port them to HEIS and to make them web-accessible via a Virtual Library module. In FY08 the original objectives of this activity on the RDS project were to: (1) ensure traceability and defensibility of all physical and hydraulic property data currently residing in the SoilVision{reg_sign} database

  11. Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater Remedial Design/Remedial Action Scope of Work

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shanklin

    2007-07-25

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) Scope of Work pertains to OU 3-14 Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the Idaho National Laboratory and identifies the remediation strategy, project scope, schedule, and budget that implement the tank farm soil and groundwater remediation, in accordance with the May 2007 Record of Decision. Specifically, this RD/RA Scope of Work identifies and defines the remedial action approach and the plan for preparing the remedial design documents.

  12. Contributing to Tumor Molecular Characterization Projects with a Global Impact | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    My name is Nicholas Griner and I am the Scientific Program Manager for the Cancer Genome Characterization Initiative (CGCI) in the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG). Until recently, I spent most of my scientific career working in a cancer research laboratory. In my postdoctoral training, my research focused on identifying novel pathways that contribute to both prostate and breast cancers and studying proteins within these pathways that may be targeted with cancer drugs.

  13. Characterization Modeling and Remediation Method Selection to Support Remedial Design Solution Development for the Hanford 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, L.M.; Winters, J.N.; Little, N.C.; Parnell, S.E.

    2007-07-01

    Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office, is currently conducting deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of excess facilities; placing former production reactors in an interim, safe, and stable condition; and remediating waste sites and burial grounds in support of the closure of the Hanford Site River Corridor. The Hanford Site River Corridor consists of approximately 565 square kilometers (218 square miles) of the Hanford Site along the Columbia River, in the State of Washington. The regulatory framework to achieve the Hanford Site remediation is established in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, commonly known as the Tri-Party Agreement, entered into by the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 10 (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology. This paper describes the significant challenges associated with the planned remediation of the Hanford 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds. It discusses the process used to identify remediation options, and the process and analysis used to determine the preferred remediation methods that will be included in the Project's design solution document. Additionally, this paper discusses the preferred retrieval methods and how they allow flexibility for change in remediation approach and disposal based on conditions encountered in the field and as waste characterization understanding increases during field characterization, pre-retrieval, and retrieval activities. Finally, this paper discusses the challenges in development of a characterization model, given that little or no records were available to start the project. (authors)

  14. Remedial design and remedial action guidance for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region X (EPA), and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW) have developed this guidance on the remedial design and remedial action (RD/RA) process. This guidance is applicable to activities conducted under the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO) and Action Plan. The INEL FFA/CO and Action Plan provides the framework for performing environmental restoration according to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The guidance is intended for use by the DOE-ID, the EPA, and the IDHW Waste Area Group (WAG) managers and others involved in the planning and implementation of CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The scope of the guidance includes the RD/RA strategy for INEL environmental restoration projects and the approach to development and review of RD/RA documentation. Chapter 2 discusses the general process, roles and responsibilities, and other elements that define the RD/RA strategy. Chapters 3 through 7 describe the RD/RA documents identified in the FFA/CO and Action Plan. Chapter 8 provides examples of how this guidance can be applied to restoration projects. Appendices are included that provide excerpts from the FFA/CO pertinent to RD/RA (Appendix A), a applicable US Department of Energy (DOE) orders (Appendix B), and an EPA Engineering ``Data Gaps in Remedial Design`` (Appendix C).

  15. Dame School Project (Bi-Lingual Pre School Project), Santa Clara County Office of Education. Final Report, August 1, 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micotti, Antonia R.

    The objectives of this 1-year project were (1) to demonstrate an at-home procedure of teaching in order to improve the concept formation and language development environment of 40 children (3-5 years) residing in low income homes where the primary language was Spanish; (2) to train 11 women from the community as home teachers; and (3) to give…

  16. PROJECT UPLIFT--REFLECTIONS ON A QUIET SUMMER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WOOCK, ROGER

    PROJECT UPLIFT WAS ESTABLISHED IN THE SUMMER OF 1965 IN HARLEM IN PART TO AVOID POSSIBLE RIOTS. CONNECTED WITH HARYOU-ACT, AND FUNDED THROUGH THE OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY, THE PROJECT'S ACTIVITIES INCLUDED--CONSTRUCTION OF VEST POCKET PARKS, PLANTING OF TREES IN CENTRAL HARLEM, A REMEDIAL READING PROGRAM, BOOTHS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT…

  17. 10 CFR 1706.10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Remedies. 1706.10 Section 1706.10 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD ORGANIZATIONAL AND CONSULTANT CONFLICTS OF INTERESTS § 1706.10 Remedies. The refusal to provide the certificate, or upon request of the contracting officer the additional...

  18. 10 CFR 1706.10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Remedies. 1706.10 Section 1706.10 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD ORGANIZATIONAL AND CONSULTANT CONFLICTS OF INTERESTS § 1706.10 Remedies. The refusal to provide the certificate, or upon request of the contracting officer the additional...

  19. 10 CFR 1706.10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Remedies. 1706.10 Section 1706.10 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD ORGANIZATIONAL AND CONSULTANT CONFLICTS OF INTERESTS § 1706.10 Remedies. The refusal to provide the certificate, or upon request of the contracting officer the additional...

  20. 10 CFR 1706.10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedies. 1706.10 Section 1706.10 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD ORGANIZATIONAL AND CONSULTANT CONFLICTS OF INTERESTS § 1706.10 Remedies. The refusal to provide the certificate, or upon request of the contracting officer the additional...

  1. 10 CFR 1706.10 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Remedies. 1706.10 Section 1706.10 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD ORGANIZATIONAL AND CONSULTANT CONFLICTS OF INTERESTS § 1706.10 Remedies. The refusal to provide the certificate, or upon request of the contracting officer the additional...

  2. 45 CFR 1303.4 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedies. 1303.4 Section 1303.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... from pursuing any other remedies authorized by law....

  3. 45 CFR 1303.4 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedies. 1303.4 Section 1303.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... from pursuing any other remedies authorized by law....

  4. 45 CFR 1303.4 - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedies. 1303.4 Section 1303.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... from pursuing any other remedies authorized by law....

  5. 32 CFR 310.47 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil remedies. 310.47 Section 310.47 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.47 Civil remedies. In addition to specific...

  6. 32 CFR 310.47 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil remedies. 310.47 Section 310.47 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.47 Civil remedies. In addition to specific...

  7. 32 CFR 310.47 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil remedies. 310.47 Section 310.47 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.47 Civil remedies. In addition to specific...

  8. 32 CFR 310.47 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil remedies. 310.47 Section 310.47 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.47 Civil remedies. In addition to specific...

  9. 32 CFR 310.47 - Civil remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil remedies. 310.47 Section 310.47 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Privacy Act Violations § 310.47 Civil remedies. In addition to specific...

  10. 7 CFR 7.17 - Remedial measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedial measures. 7.17 Section 7.17 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SELECTION AND FUNCTIONS OF FARM SERVICE AGENCY STATE AND COUNTY COMMITTEES § 7.17 Remedial measures. (a) FSA will consider additional efforts to achieve the objective that...

  11. 7 CFR 7.17 - Remedial measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Remedial measures. 7.17 Section 7.17 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SELECTION AND FUNCTIONS OF FARM SERVICE AGENCY STATE AND COUNTY COMMITTEES § 7.17 Remedial measures. (a) FSA will consider additional efforts to achieve the objective that...

  12. Technology and Media Services. Discretionary Projects Supported by the Office of Special Education Programs under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Fiscal Year 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Jeanne; DeCarme, Judi; Orkwis, Ray

    This book is the third of four volumes in a directory of more than 1,000 discretionary grants and contracts supported by the Research to Practice Division of the Office of Special Education Programs. This volume focuses on projects concerned with technology and media services. These projects are intended to: (1) support educational media…

  13. Office of Education, Region 7, Guidance and Counseling Project for Adult Basic Education. Phase 2 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Teaching and Field Service Bureau.

    This report interprets information from the first phase of a Federally funded adult basic educational guidance and counseling project in Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Findings and conclusions are presented as to the cultural, psychological, and other characteristics of students; problems encountered in designing guidance…

  14. New Continuous Isosorbide Production from Sorbitol: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Agriculture Project Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Carde, T.

    2001-09-12

    Isosorbide is a new polymer additive derived from corn (via sorbitol) that when copolymerized with polyethylene terephthalate (PET), increases the strength and rigidity of the plastic. This project will develop an economically-viable, continuous catalytic process to convert sorbitol to isosorbide.

  15. Chemical research projects office fuel tank sealants review. [flight testing of fluorosilicone sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Parker, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The status of high-temperature fuel tank sealants for military and potentially commercial supersonic aircraft is examined. The interrelationships of NASA's sealants program comprise synthesis and development of new fluoroether elastomers, sealant prediction studies, flight simulation and actual flight testing of best state-of-the-art fluorosilicone sealants. The technical accomplishments of these projects are reviewed.

  16. Operation Sun Beam, Shot Small Boy. Project Officer's report - Project 7. 8. Arming and fuzing component test

    SciTech Connect

    Taslitt, N.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) determine whether the radiation from a nuclear weapon can disable various arming and fuzing components by causing permanent damage; (2) determine whether transient nuclear radiation can induce an operating fuze to malfunction; and (3) compare nuclear weapon radiation effects with those produced by various radiation simulators. Data obtained revealed that none of the inertial components were detrimentally affected. The electronic components were severely degraded but would have satisfactorily accomplished their tactical functions. No electromagnetic effects were detected.

  17. OPERATION DOMINIC, FISH BOWL Series. Project Officer’s Report - Project 2.2. Gamma Radiation Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    3.5 Location of gamma dosimeters in Project 2.1 neutron detector containers. m 43 ^-pafi ytl - US (dj-UtL^- n M r L ■ L ■ «^ i. n V ^. w^» U...Washington, D. C; SECRET- RESTRICTED DATA. 6. A. latter and R. Latter; "Sunlamp Calculations" Rand Corporation Report 1956; Santa Monica...RESTEICTED DATA. 38. "The Nuclear Radiation Handbook" AFSWP-1100, Nuclear Development Corporation of America, White Plains, New York, 25 March 1957; SECRET-RESTRICTED DATA. 64

  18. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  19. Reducing Plug Loads in Office Spaces: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppy, M.; Metzger, I.; Cutler, D.; Holland, G.; Hanada, A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of its overall strategy to meet its energy goals, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) partnered with the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. This project was one of several demonstrations of new or underutilized commercial energy technologies. The common goal was to demonstrate and measure the performance and economic benefit of the system while monitoring any ancillary impacts to related standards of service and operation and maintenance (O&M) practices. In short, demonstrations at naval facilities simultaneously evaluate the benefits and compatibility of the technology with the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) mission, and with NAVFAC's design, construction, operations, and maintenance practices, in particular. This project demonstrated the performance of commercially available advanced power strips (APSs) for plug load energy reductions in building A4 at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH), Hawaii.

  20. Regulator Interface Strategies Implemented at the Y-12 National Security Complex Old Salvage Yard Soils Remediation Project, Oak Ridge, TN - 12162

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Linda; Wilkerson, Laura; Skinner, Ralph; Birchfield, Joseph W. III

    2012-07-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex housed an area known as the Old Salvage Yard (OSY) that was approximately 7 acres. The OSY was used as an area for the accumulation, processing and storage of scrap metal and equipment from Y-12 operations extending from 1968 until 2009. Areas in the northern sections of OSY also have been used for the storage of used oils containing solvents and the accumulation and recycling or de-heading and crushing of 55-gal metal drums. Scrap metal operations historically involved the accumulation, sorting, storage, public sale or disposal of scrap metal and equipment. Non-containerised storage of scrap metal was routine until 1995 when scrap metal received at OSY was placed in B-24 and B-25 boxes. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), approximately 26,759 cubic meters of scrap metal and debris were removed and disposed at both on and off-site disposal facilities including the on-site, Oak Ridge Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) landfill in 2010 and 2011. This removal action was performed in accordance with a CERCLA Record of Decision (ROD) and a close working relationship with both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Due to efficiencies and the excellent cooperative relationship forged with EPA Region IV and TDEC for Y-12 ARRA Cleanup Projects, a surplus of funding was available for additional remediation work that was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2011. The underlying OSY soils were targeted for characterization and potential remediation. To expedite these important activities, the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Environmental Management partnered with the regulators during detailed planning sessions through a variety of means to quickly and efficiently characterize and pinpoint areas requiring remediation according to previous ROD commitments. Data Quality Objectives (DQOs

  1. Partial support for the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Core Project Office

    SciTech Connect

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    2001-05-04

    IGAC provides an international framework for the planning, coordination, and execution of atmospheric--biospheric research with emphasis on projects which require resources beyond the capabilities of any single nation. The development of chemical emission inventories by IGAC scientists, the development and intercomparison under IGAC leadership of existing chemical transport models, the analysis of data gathered during IGAC-sponsored field campaigns, etc., has provided new scientific information essential to the development of the discipline.

  2. Operation Dominic, Fish Bowl Series. Project Officer's report. Project 9. 1b. Ionospheric wind and diffusion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, K.; Manring, E.R.

    1985-09-01

    The aim of this project was to measure high-altitude wind velocities and diffusion coefficients in the altitude region between 60 and 150 km. The method involved the ejection of a sodium vapor trail from a Cajun rocket at dust or dawn twilight. The sodium was sunlit, and as a result of emission of resonance radiation, was visible against a darkened background for about 20 minutes. The trail was photographed simultaneously from four different sites, allowing for subsequent triangulation to determine the altitude of various parts of the cloud. A major application of these wind and diffusion data, taken at dusk and dawn following the high-altitude nuclear tests, was to aid in determining the disposition of the nuclear debris.

  3. Operation Dominic. Christmas and Fish Bowl Series. Project Officers report -- Project 7. 1. Electromagnetic signal, underwater measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, A.P.; Bittner, B.J.; Peckham, V.D.; Moorhead, A.D.; Cole, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This project was conducted to obtain measurements of the electromangetic (EM) signals from nuclear detonations at large distances from the detonation point, above and beneath the sea surface. The planned use of the data is that of determining the feasibility of an Indirect Bomb Damage Assessment (IBDA) system based on the nuclear EM signature. The specific tests were conducted from two ships. The EM signatures recorded both above and below the water surface for the various nuclear events are unique, recognizable, and predictable to a useful degree. It appears entirely feasible to utilize this nuclear EM signal as a method of IBDA. The significance of the data presented herein lies primarily in the demonstrated ability to detect an above-water EM signal with an underwater antenna system. Signal characteristics are changed in magnitude and phase but are very easily recognizable with but a minimum of measuring equipment.

  4. Operation Sun Beam, Shots Little Feller I and II. Project Officer's report - Project 1. 9. Crater size and shape

    SciTech Connect

    Rooke, A.D.; Strange, J.N.

    1985-09-01

    Objectives of Project 1.9 were to obtain the dimensions of the apparent and true craters formed in desert alluvium by the Little Feller II event, a low airburst, and to measure the permanent earth deformation occurring within the plastic response zone. A later requirement was the measurement of the apparent crater formed by Little Feller I, fired ten days after Little Feller II. The Little Feller II experiment used colored sand columns, vertically embedded in the vicinity of ground zero, to enable postshot measurement of permanent earth deformation below the apparent crater. In this report, postshot excavation and mapping of these columns is discussed, the results are evaluated, and correlation is made with previous cratering data.

  5. Development of Computer Software to Aid Environmental Decision Makers in the Education and Training of Air Force Remedial Project Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    purpose of this study was to define the Air Force Institute of Technology Civil Engineering and Services Environmental Education Centers’ (AFIT/CEV-EEC...this research was to develop prototype knowledge-based systems to determine the feasibility of creating an environmental education course blueprint and...Civil Engineering and Services Department of Environmental Management named the Environmental Education Center (AFIT/CEV-EEC). This office provides

  6. Front-office staff can improve clinical tobacco intervention: health coordinator pilot project.

    PubMed

    Bass, Frederic; Naish, Brigham; Buwembo, Isaac

    2013-11-01

    To learn whether front-line personnel in primary care practices can increase delivery of clinical tobacco interventions and also help smokers address physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression. Uncontrolled before-and-after design. Vancouver, BC, area (4 practices); northern British Columbia (2 practices). Six practices, with 1 staff person per practice serving as a "health coordinator" who tracked and, after the baseline period, delivered preventive interventions to all patients who smoked. To assess delivery of preventive interventions, each practice was to sample 300 consecutive patient records, both at baseline and at follow-up 15 months later. Front-office staff were recruited, trained, paid, and given ongoing support to provide preventive care. Clinicians supplemented this care with advice and guided the use of medication. Effectiveness of the intervention was based on comparison, at baseline and at follow-up, of the proportion of patients with any of the following 6 proven intervention components documented in their medical records: chart reminder, advice received, self-management plan, target quit date, referral, and follow-up date (as they applied to tobacco, physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression). A Tobacco Intervention Flow Sheet cued preventive care, and its data were entered into a spreadsheet (which served as a smokers' registry). Qualitative appraisal data were noted. For tobacco, substantial increases occurred after the intervention period in the proportion of patients with each of the intervention components noted in their charts: chart reminder (20% vs 94%); provision of advice (34% vs 79%); self-management plan (14% vs 57%); target quit date (5% vs 11%); referral (6% vs 11%); and follow-up date (7% vs 42%). Interventions for physical inactivity and depression showed some gains, but there were no gains for at-risk alcohol use. Front-line staff, patients, and clinicians were enthusiastic about the services offered

  7. Toxic remediation

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  8. Reimagining Remediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Stephen J.; Williams, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the College Board's Community College Advisory Panel--a group of college presidents that advises the organization's membership on community college issues--asked these authors to write a paper describing effective remedial education programs. They never wrote the paper. The problem was not the lack of dedicated faculty and staff working…

  9. Cost of presumptive source term Remedial Actions Laboratory for energy-related health research, University of California, Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Josephson, G.B.; Lanigan, D.C.; Liikala, T.L.; Newcomer, D.R.; Pearson, A.W.; Teel, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    A Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) is in progress at the Laboratory for Energy Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis. The purpose of the RI/FS is to gather sufficient information to support an informed risk management decision regarding the most appropriate remedial actions for impacted areas of the facility. In an effort to expedite remediation of the LEHR facility, the remedial project managers requested a more detailed evaluation of a selected set of remedial actions. In particular, they requested information on both characterization and remedial action costs. The US Department of Energy -- Oakland Office requested the assistance of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to prepare order-of-magnitude cost estimates for presumptive remedial actions being considered for the five source term operable units. The cost estimates presented in this report include characterization costs, capital costs, and annual operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. These cost estimates are intended to aid planning and direction of future environmental remediation efforts.

  10. Station, local, and public participation plan, Salt Repository Project Office, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of the SRPO State, Local, and Public Participation Plan is to provide an ''umbrella'' document for the ongoing and planned institutional involvement. One of the major goals is to develop project-specific outreach and participation programs based on input received from interested parties. DOE's commitment to interaction and information programs is to be demonstrated by conducting activities in an open environment, listening to and understanding the concerns of interested parties, actively involving affected parties in the program, executing faithfully the intent of Congress expressed through the NWPA, and providing equitable treatment for all affected parties. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. The Challenges of Integrating NASA's Human, Budget, and Data Capital within the Constellation Program's Exploration Launch Projects Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, Luanne; Morris, Kenneth B.; Self, Tim

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Vision for Space Exploration directs NASA to retire the Space Shuttle in 2010 and replace it with safe, reliable, and cost-effective space transportation systems for crew and cargo travel to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Such emerging space transportation initiatives face massive organizational challenges, including building and nurturing an experienced, dedicated team with the right skills for the required tasks; allocating and tracking the fiscal capital invested in achieving technical progress against an integrated master schedule; and turning generated data into usehl knowledge that equips the team to design and develop superior products for customers and stakeholders. This paper discusses how NASA's Exploration Launch Projects Office, which is responsible for delivering these new launch vehicles, integrates these resources to create an engineering business environment that promotes mission success.

  12. Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  13. Trade Remedies: A Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-30

    Developing nations, such as India and South Africa , had begun using trade remedy actions more frequently, whereas they were tools used almost exclusively...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...group of products are minerals and metals (such as brass sheet and strip; gray portland cement and clinker ; magnesium). The fourth largest group

  14. The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project. This project is a U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies, and technologies for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Technologies Project staff.

  15. B.O.P., Inc.: A Simulated Mortgage and Loan Office: Exemplary Project in Vocational Education: Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham County Career Education, Blackfoot, ID.

    BOP, Inc. is a mobile educational service that places the student in a simulated mortgage and loan office to provide a realistic office learning environment. The student manual opens with a brief reference information section on: the purposes of an office simulation, an explanation of a mortgage loan office, an outline of normal business…

  16. Mold remediation in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tang G

    2009-01-01

    As occupants in a hospital, patients are susceptible to air contaminants that can include biological agents dispersed throughout the premise. An exposed patient can become ill and require medical intervention. A consideration for patients is that they may have become environmentally sensitive and require placement in an environment that does not compromise their health. Unfortunately, the hospital environment often contains more biological substances than can be expected in an office or home environment. When a hospital also experiences water intrusion such as flooding or water leaks, resulting mold growth can seriously compromise the health of patients and others such as nursing staff and physicians (Burge, Indoor Air and Infectious Disease. Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews, 1980; Lutz et al., Clinical Infectious Diseases 37: 786-793, 2003). Micro-organism growth can propagate if the water is not addressed quickly and effectively. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk when subjected to fungal infection such that the US Center for Disease Control issued guideline for building mold in health care facilities (Centers for Disease and Control [CDC], Centers for Disease and Control: Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds, 2000). This paper is based on mold remediation of one portion of a hospital unit due to water from construction activity and inadequate maintenance, resulting in mold growth. A large proportion of the hospital staff, primarily nurses in the dialysis unit, exhibited health symptoms consistent with mold exposure. Unfortunately, the hospital administrators did not consider the mold risk to be serious and refused an independent consultant retained by the nurse's union to examine the premise (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [CBC], Nurses file complaints over mold at Foothills. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2003). The nurse's union managed to have the premise examined by submitting a court order of

  17. Individual and Group Sensitivity to Remedial Reading Program Design: Examining Reading Gains across Three Middle School Reading Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoon, Mary Beth; Petscher, Yaacov

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine group- and individual-level responses by struggling adolescents readers (6th-8th grades; N = 155) to three different modalities of the same reading program, Reading Achievement Multi-Component Program. The three modalities differ in the combination of reading components (phonological decoding, spelling,…

  18. Individual and Group Sensitivity to Remedial Reading Program Design: Examining Reading Gains across Three Middle School Reading Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoon, Mary Beth; Petscher, Yaacov

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine group- and individual-level responses by struggling adolescents readers (6th-8th grades; N = 155) to three different modalities of the same reading program, Reading Achievement Multi-Component Program. The three modalities differ in the combination of reading components (phonological decoding, spelling,…

  19. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lowman, Idaho: Remedial action selection report for the Lowman UMTRA project site, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.L. . Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office); Nagel, J. . Div. of Environmental Quality)

    1991-09-01

    The inactive uranium mill tailings site near Lowman, Idaho, was designated as one of 24 abandoned uranium tailings sites to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan and certify that the remedial action complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The remedial action plan (RAP), which includes this remedial action selection report (RAS), has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Lowman, Idaho. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Idaho, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement (No. DE-FC04-85AL20535) between the DOE and the State of Idaho.

  20. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lowman, Idaho: Remedial action selection report for the Lowman UMTRA project site, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.L.; Nagel, J.

    1991-09-01

    The inactive uranium mill tailings site near Lowman, Idaho, was designated as one of 24 abandoned uranium tailings sites to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan and certify that the remedial action complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The remedial action plan (RAP), which includes this remedial action selection report (RAS), has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Lowman, Idaho. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Idaho, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement (No. DE-FC04-85AL20535) between the DOE and the State of Idaho.

  1. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: FY 1994 program summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) in November 1989. In an effort to focus resources and address priority needs, EM-50 introduced the concept of integrated programs (IPs) and integrated demonstrations (IDs). The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) focuses research and development on the in-place treatment of contaminated environmental media, such as soil and groundwater, and the containment of contaminants to prevent the contaminants from spreading through the environment. Using in situ remediation technologies to clean up DOE sites minimizes adverse health effects on workers and the public by reducing contact exposure. The technologies also reduce cleanup costs by orders of magnitude. This report summarizes project work conducted in FY 1994 under the ISR IP in three major areas: treatment (bioremediation), treatment (physical/chemical), and containment technologies. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized waste are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive waste, volatile and nonvolatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials.

  2. HANDBOOK: APPROACHES FOR REMEDIATION OF ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This publication was developed by the Center for Environmental Research Information (CERI), Office of Research and Development, of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The information in the document is based primarily on presentations at two technology transfer seminar series: Technologies for Remediating Sites Contaminated with Explosive and Radioactive Wastes, sponsored jointly by EPA and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in spring and summer 1993; and Radioactive Site Remediation, sponsored by EPA and the Department of Energy (DOE) in summer 1992. Additional information has been provided by technical experts from EPA, DOD, DOE, academia, and private industry. present information

  3. Single-Concept Videotapes for College Remedial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utz, Peter

    1973-01-01

    More than 100 videotapes form part of a new remedial algebra program developed by Kingsborough Community College at Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn. Project aim was to improve remedial education in a difficult subject during a budget crisis. (Author)

  4. Single-Concept Videotapes for College Remedial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utz, Peter

    1973-01-01

    More than 100 videotapes form part of a new remedial algebra program developed by Kingsborough Community College at Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn. Project aim was to improve remedial education in a difficult subject during a budget crisis. (Author)

  5. 34 CFR 682.413 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.413 Section 682.413 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Administration of the Federal...

  6. 34 CFR 682.609 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.609 Section 682.609 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Requirements, Standards,...

  7. 34 CFR 682.609 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.609 Section 682.609 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Requirements, Standards,...

  8. 34 CFR 682.609 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.609 Section 682.609 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Requirements, Standards,...

  9. 34 CFR 682.609 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.609 Section 682.609 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Requirements, Standards,...

  10. 34 CFR 682.609 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remedial actions. 682.609 Section 682.609 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Requirements, Standards, and...

  11. 34 CFR 685.308 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remedial actions. 685.308 Section 685.308 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM Requirements, Standards, and Payments...

  12. Office of the Chief Financial Officer Annual Report 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2009-12-15

    Presented is the 2009 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office.

  13. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This document analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives for conducting the Ground Water Project. One of these alternatives is the proposed action. These alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance strategies because the PEIS is a planning document only. It assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. This PEIS differs substantially from a site-specific environmental impact statement because multiple ground water compliance strategies, each with its own set of potential impacts, could be used to implement all the alternatives except the no action alternative. In a traditional environmental impact statement, an impacts analysis leads directly to the defined alternatives. The impacts analysis for implementing alternatives in this PEIS first involves evaluating a ground water compliance strategy or strategies, the use of which will result in site-specific impacts. This PEIS impacts analysis assesses only the potential impacts of the various ground water compliance strategies, then relates them to the alternatives to provide a comparison of impacts.

  14. Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The US Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) conducts cutting-edge research that provides the underpinning of science and technology for public health and environmental policies and decisions made by federal, state and other governmental organizations. ORD’s six research programs identify the pressing research needs with input from EPA offices and stakeholders. Research is conducted by ORD’s 3 labs, 4 centers, and 2 offices located in 14 facilities. The EPA booth at APHL will have several resources available to attendees, mostly in the form of print materials, that showcase our research labs, case studies of research activities, and descriptions of specific research projects. The Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM), a library of selected methods that are helping to increase the nation's laboratory capacity to support large-scale emergency response operations, will be demoed by EPA scientists at the APHL Experience booth in the Exhibit Hall on Tuesday during the morning break. Please come to the EPA booth #309 for more information! To be on a loop at our ORD booth demo during APHL.

  15. 300-FF-1 remedial design report/remedial action work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, F.W.

    1997-02-01

    The 300 Area has been divided into three operable units 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-5 all of which are in various stages of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) process. The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the subject of this report, includes liquid waste disposal sites, landfills, and a burial ground. This Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan (RDR/RAWP) provides a summary description of each waste site included in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the basis for remedial actions to be taken, and the remedial action approach and management process for implementing these actions. The remedial action approach and management sections provide a description of the remedial action process description, the project schedule, the project team, required planning documentation, the remedial action change process, the process for verifying attainment of the remedial action goals, and the required CERCLA and RCRA closeout documentation. Appendix A provides additional details on each waste site. In addition to remediation of the waste sites, waste generated during the remedial investigation/feasibility study portions of the project will also be disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Appendix B provides a summary of the modeling performed in the 300-FF-1 Phase 3 FS and a description of the modeling effort to be used to show attainment of the remedial action goals. Appendix C provides the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for all sampling and field-screening activities performed during remediation and for verification of attainment with the remedial action goals. Appendix D provides the public involvement plan, prepared to ensure information is provided to the public during remedial design and remedial action processes.

  16. B.O.P., Inc.: A Simulated Mortgage and Loan Office. Exemplary Project in Vocational Education: Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham County Career Education, Blackfoot, ID.

    BOP, Inc., is a simulated mortgage and loan office serving students in the high schools of Bingham County, Idaho, through a mobile educational service program. The program's primary purpose is to provide work experiences for high school students who have office skills so that they can make decisions about working in an office. The teacher's manual…

  17. Collaborative Efforts among Higher Education, CETA and the Private Sector: Implications for Instructional Heads and Institutional Business Officers. Higher Education/CETA Project Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buettner, David

    Advice for higher education institutional business officers, instructional heads, and continuing education and community services personnel regarding collaborative efforts with employers and government resources is offered as part of the American Council on Education's Higher Education/Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) Project,…

  18. Technology and Media Services. Discretionary Projects Supported by the Office of Special Education Programs under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Fiscal Year 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orkwis, Ray; DeCarme, Judi; Glover, Jeanne

    This book is a directory that describes about 1,100 discretionary grants and contracts supported by the Research to Practice Division of the Office of Special Education Programs. The projects are grouped into sections representing the seven program areas of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Amendments (1997), Part D. This…

  19. Technology and Media Services. Discretionary Projects Supported by the Office of Special Education Programs under the Individuals with Disabilities Act, Fiscal Year 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orkwis, Raymond; DeCarme, Judi; Glover, Jeanne

    This 5-volume directory describes more than 1,000 discretionary grants and contracts supported by the Research to Practice Division of the Office of Special Education Programs. The projects are grouped into sections representing the seven program areas of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Amendments (1997), Part D. This volume, the…

  20. Discretionary Projects Supported by the Office of Special Education Programs under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Fiscal Year 1997: Technology and Media Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orkwis, Ray; DeCarme, Judi; Glover, Jeanne

    The five-volume directory describes more than 1,200 discretionary grants and contracts supported by the Research to Practice Division of the Office of Special Education Programs. The projects are grouped into sections representing the seven program areas of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Amendments (1997), Part D. This volume, the…

  1. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek remedial action project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has three major operating facilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed by Lockheed Martin Environmental Research Corporation. All facilities are managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (Energy Systems) for the DOE. The Y-12 Plant is adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge and is also upstream from Oak Ridge along East Fork Poplar Creek. The portion of the creek downstream from the Y-12 Plant is Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC). This project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the LEFPC floodplain, transport the soils to Industrial Landfill V (ILF-V), and restore any affected areas. This project contains areas that were designated in 1989 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. The site includes DOE property and portions of commercial, residential, agricultural, and miscellaneous areas within the city of Oak Ridge.

  2. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997--April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County.

  3. Nye County nuclear waste repository project office independent scientific investigations program. Summary annual report, May 1996--April 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by Multimedia Environmental Technology, Inc. (MET) on behalf of Nye County Nuclear Waste Project Office, summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1996 to April 30, 1997. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: (1) Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment. (2) Identifying areas not being addressed adequately by DOE Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues.

  4. Student Data Requirements of Lau Remedies and Texas Senate Bill 121. Title IV-C Pilot Program: An Educational Needs Projection Model. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Herbert L.

    The general purpose of the Title IV-C Pilot Program (An Educational Needs Projection Model) is to develop procedures for forecasting the personnel needed by the Houston Independent School District (HISD) for a five-year period in response to current and expected legislation and changing student population. The present report reviews: (1) the…

  5. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 5 Multi-Phase Extraction And Product Recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  6. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 4 In Situ Air Sparging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  7. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 4 In Situ Air Sparging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  8. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 5 Multi-Phase Extraction And Product Recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  9. [Psychiatric patients and relatives instruct German police officers - an anti-stigma project of "BASTA - the alliance for mentally ill people"].

    PubMed

    Wundsam, Kerstin; Pitschel-Walz, Gabi; Leucht, Stefan; Kissling, Werner

    2007-05-01

    Contact with police officers due to schizophrenia and resort to violence in such interactions is a common occurrence and represents a source for stigmatisation of mentally ill people. Aim of this project was to establish a program for police officers to reduce that stigma. The seminar was developed by a German anti-stigma organisation in cooperation with sociology teachers of the Bavarian police academy. Evaluations focussed on the police officers "social distance" and "negative stereotypes" towards mentally ill people. The personal contact between officers and the referees (patients, relatives, professionals) was the core of the seminar. Results of a debriefing after the pilot-project was overall positive. Evaluations in the renewal years showed significant improvement within the scale "social distance" (p < 0.0001) and amelioration in the stereotype-categories "violence" and "treatability". The need for special training of the police regarding mental illnesses was acknowledged by all participants. Personal contact of police officers with patients and relatives appeared to be important for the efficacy of this seminar and should become a main focus in similar anti-stigma interventions.

  10. Individual and group sensitivity to remedial reading program design: Examining reading gains across three middle school reading projects.

    PubMed

    Calhoon, Mary Beth; Petscher, Yaacov

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine group- and individual-level responses by struggling adolescents readers (6(th) - 8(th) grades; N = 155) to three different modalities of the same reading program, Reading Achievement Multi-Component Program (RAMP-UP). The three modalities differ in the combination of reading components (phonological decoding, spelling, fluency, comprehension) that are taught and their organization. Latent change scores were used to examine changes in phonological decoding, fluency, and comprehension for each modality at the group level. In addition, individual students were classified as gainers versus non-gainers (a reading level increase of a year or more vs. less than one year) so that characteristics of gainers and differential sensitivity to instructional modality could be investigated. Findings from both group and individual analyses indicated that reading outcomes were related to modalities of reading instruction. Furthermore, differences in reading gains were seen between students who began treatment with higher reading scores than those with lower reading scores; dependent on modality of treatment. Results, examining group and individual analyses similarities and differences, and the effect the different modalities have on reading outcomes for older struggling readers will be discussed.

  11. Individual and group sensitivity to remedial reading program design: Examining reading gains across three middle school reading projects

    PubMed Central

    Calhoon, Mary Beth; Petscher, Yaacov

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine group- and individual-level responses by struggling adolescents readers (6th – 8th grades; N = 155) to three different modalities of the same reading program, Reading Achievement Multi-Component Program (RAMP-UP). The three modalities differ in the combination of reading components (phonological decoding, spelling, fluency, comprehension) that are taught and their organization. Latent change scores were used to examine changes in phonological decoding, fluency, and comprehension for each modality at the group level. In addition, individual students were classified as gainers versus non-gainers (a reading level increase of a year or more vs. less than one year) so that characteristics of gainers and differential sensitivity to instructional modality could be investigated. Findings from both group and individual analyses indicated that reading outcomes were related to modalities of reading instruction. Furthermore, differences in reading gains were seen between students who began treatment with higher reading scores than those with lower reading scores; dependent on modality of treatment. Results, examining group and individual analyses similarities and differences, and the effect the different modalities have on reading outcomes for older struggling readers will be discussed. PMID:25657503

  12. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    ROMINE, L.D.

    2006-02-01

    A systematic approach to closure planning is being implemented at the Hanford Site's Central Plateau to help achieve the goal of closure by the year 2035. The overall objective of Central Plateau remediation is to protect human health and the environment from the significant quantity of contaminated material that resulted from decades of plutonium production in support of the nation's defense. This goal will be achieved either by removing contaminants or placing the residual contaminated materials in a secure configuration that minimizes further migration to the groundwater and reduces the potential for inadvertent intrusion into contaminated sites. The approach to Central Plateau cleanup used three key concepts--closure zones, closure elements, and closure process steps--to create an organized picture of actions required to complete remediation. These actions were merged with logic ties, constraints, and required resources to produce an integrated time-phased schedule and cost profile for Central Plateau closure. Programmatic risks associated with implementation of Central Plateau closure were identified and analyzed. Actions to mitigate the most significant risks are underway while high priority remediation projects continue to make progress.

  13. Characterization, performance modeling, and design of an active capping remediation project in a heavily polluted urban channel.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ke; Viana, Priscilla; Zhao, Xiuhong; Rockne, Karl

    2010-07-15

    Collateral Channel is a heavily polluted former navigation slip to the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (Illinois, USA). Characterization of sediment cores taken in the channel show high levels of heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other contaminants in deposited sediment dating back to the 1800's. Of these, PAHs were the contaminants of greatest concern based upon exceedance of sediment contamination criteria (Sigma(16) PAHs up to 1500mg/kg). Benthic animal counts revealed a lack of biodiversity, with relatively low levels of small tubificid oligochaetes (generally <3000/m(2)) in surficial sediments. Comparison of surficial sediment contaminant levels between 1995 and 2005 showed few decreases in contaminant levels, indicating a lack of "natural recovery" processes occurring in the channel. These results led to an analysis of sediment amendments for an active capping demonstration project in the channel using transport models developed in our previous work (Viana et al., 2008). Based on the sediment characterization and modeling results, the active capping design will be focused on organic contaminant sequestration through the use of organoclay. A site-specific difficulty is the substantial rates of gas ebullition from anaerobic organic matter biodegradation in the sediments, particularly in the summer months. These gases can open advective channels that may result in substantial pollution release and compromise cap effectiveness, and thus the capping scenario must control for such releases. The active capping layer will underlay a sloped sand layer and a high permeability gas venting system to allow biogenically-produced gas migration to shoreline collectors through an innovative support grid. The cap will include an overlaying wetland to remove nutrients from the adjoining Chicago River and provide a public recreational space.

  14. The Challenges of Integrating NASA's Human, Budget, and Data Capital within the Constellation Program's Exploration Launch Projects Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, Luanne; Morris, Kenneth B.; Self, Timothy A.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Vision for Space Exploration directs NASA to retire the Space Shuttle in 2010 and replace it with safe, reliable, and cost-effective space transportation systems for crew and cargo travel to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Such emerging space transportation initiatives face massive organizational challenges, including building and nurturing an experienced, dedicated team with the right skills for the required tasks; allocating and tracking the fiscal capital invested in achieving technical progress against an integrated master schedule; and turning generated data into useful knowledge that equips the team to design and develop superior products for customers and stakeholders. It has been more than 30 years since the Space Shuttle was designed; therefore, the current aerospace workforce has limited experience with developing new designs for human-rated spaceflight hardware. To accomplish these activities, NASA is using a wide range of state-of-the-art information technology tools that connect its diverse, decentralized teams and provide timely, accurate information for decision makers. In addition, business professionals are assisting technical managers with planning, tracking, and forecasting resource use against an integrated master schedule that horizontally and vertically interlinks hardware elements and milestone events. Furthermore, NASA is employing a wide variety of strategies to ensure that it has the motivated and qualified staff it needs for the tasks ahead. This paper discusses how NASA's Exploration Launch Projects Office, which is responsible for delivering these new launch vehicles, integrates its resources to create an engineering business environment that promotes mission success, which is defined by replacing the Space Shuttle by 2014 and returning to the Moon by 2020.

  15. The Challenges of Integrating NASA's Human, Budget, and Data Capital within the Constellation Program's Exploration Launch Projects Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, Luanne; Morris, Kenneth B.; Self, Timothy A.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Vision for Space Exploration directs NASA to retire the Space Shuttle in 2010 and replace it with safe, reliable, and cost-effective space transportation systems for crew and cargo travel to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Such emerging space transportation initiatives face massive organizational challenges, including building and nurturing an experienced, dedicated team with the right skills for the required tasks; allocating and tracking the fiscal capital invested in achieving technical progress against an integrated master schedule; and turning generated data into useful knowledge that equips the team to design and develop superior products for customers and stakeholders. It has been more than 30 years since the Space Shuttle was designed; therefore, the current aerospace workforce has limited experience with developing new designs for human-rated spaceflight hardware. To accomplish these activities, NASA is using a wide range of state-of-the-art information technology tools that connect its diverse, decentralized teams and provide timely, accurate information for decision makers. In addition, business professionals are assisting technical managers with planning, tracking, and forecasting resource use against an integrated master schedule that horizontally and vertically interlinks hardware elements and milestone events. Furthermore, NASA is employing a wide variety of strategies to ensure that it has the motivated and qualified staff it needs for the tasks ahead. This paper discusses how NASA's Exploration Launch Projects Office, which is responsible for delivering these new launch vehicles, integrates its resources to create an engineering business environment that promotes mission success, which is defined by replacing the Space Shuttle by 2014 and returning to the Moon by 2020.

  16. Office of Inspector General report on audit of proposal to acquire land at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-05

    The US Department of Energy (Department) obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate to acquire 78 to 100 acres of privately-held land adjoining the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) as an additional buffer for a waste disposal facility. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the proposed purchase of land was essential to support the site`s mission. The Department obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate to acquire the additional land without confirming that av lid need for the land existed. If the land is acquired, the Department could spend between $655,000 and $2.2 million unnecessarily. Additionally, the Department could incur unnecessary maintenance and security costs to maintain the land after acquisition. It was recommended that the Manager, Ohio Field Office, dismiss the proposal to acquire the additional land. Management agreed with the recommendation, stating that the acquisition could not be justified at this time. However, management did not agree with the finding that the Department obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate without confirming that a valid need for the land existed. Management stated that the appraisal and cost estimate were principal and necessary to determining whether a need for the land existed. It was concluded that the appraisal and cost estimate should not have been performed because a valid need for the land was never established. Also, it was concluded that it would be inappropriate to reconsider the proposal to acquire the land at a later date if additional funds become available, unless a valid need for the land is first established.

  17. 76 FR 56973 - Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Final Policy and Permit Guidance for Submarine Cable Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 15 CFR Part 922 Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Final... adheres to the National Marine Sanctuaries Act and ONMS regulations (15 CFR part 922). The ONMS...

  18. Effective Remediation Strategies in Mathematics: Characteristics of an Effective Remedial Mathematics Teacher; Effective Remedial Math Teacher Checklist; Math Remediation Methods Questionnaire. Occasional Papers in Educational Policy Analysis No. 417.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Gypsy Anne; McEntire, Elizabeth

    This manual describes the process used in determining the objectives of a project to develop effective remediation strategies for use by teachers of mathematics. It presents two tools developed for use in assessing remedial mathematics teaching: (1) the "Effective Remedial Mathematics Checklist," for use in supervising teachers of…

  19. Nanotechnology for Site Remediation: Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet presents a snapshot of nanotechnology and its current uses in remediation. It presents information to help site project managers understand the potential applications of this group of technologies at their sites.

  20. Green Remediation Best Management Practices: Mining Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet describes best management practices (BMPs) that can be used to reduce the environmental footprint of cleanup activities associated with common project components, cleanup phases, and implementation of remediation technologies.

  1. Remediation Evaluation Model for Chlorinated Solvents (REMChlor)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new analytical solution has been developed for simulating the transient effects of groundwater source and plume remediation. This development was performed as part of a Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) research project, which was a joint effort ...

  2. Remediation Evaluation Model for Chlorinated Solvents (REMChlor)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new analytical solution has been developed for simulating the transient effects of groundwater source and plume remediation. This development was performed as part of a Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) research project, which was a joint effort ...

  3. Scotts Valley Energy Office and Human Capacity Building that will provide energy-efficiency services and develop sustainable renewable energy projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Temashio

    2013-06-28

    The primary goal of this project is to develop a Scotts Valley Energy Development Office (SVEDO). This office will further support the mission of the Tribe's existing leadership position as the DOE Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program (TMCWEP) in creating jobs and providing tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance to increase energy efficiency, occupant comfort and improved indoor air quality. This office will also spearhead efforts to move the Tribe towards its further strategic energy goals of implementing renewable energy systems through specific training, resource evaluation, feasibility planning, and implementation. Human capacity building and continuing operations are two key elements of the SVEDO objectives. Therefore, the project will 1) train and employ additional Tribal members in energy efficiency, conservation and renewable resource analyses and implementation; 2) purchase materials and equipment required to implement the strategic priorities as developed by the Scotts Valley Tribe which specifically include implementing energy conservation measures and alternative energy strategies to reduce energy costs for the Tribe and its members; and 3) obtain a dedicated office and storage space for ongoing SVEDO operations.

  4. JOIDES Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Office of the Joint Oceanographic Institutions for Deep Earth Sampling (JOIDES), the international group of scientific institutions that gives scientific guidance to the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP), will be located at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science from July 1, 1982, to June 30, 1984. The university is one of 15 member institutions of JOIDES; 14 of these are active, and 10 are in the United States.While JOIDES is based at the Rosenstiel School, Alan Berman, new dean of the school, will serve as chairman of the group's executive committee. Jose Honnorez, professor of marine geology at Rosenstiel, is chairman of the JOIDES planning committee. He will direct the office, which is responsible for the coordination of the planning committee and 13 advisory panels and nine working groups.

  5. Can an ethics officer role reduce delays in research ethics approval? A mixed-method evaluation of an improvement project

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Woods, Mary; Foy, Chris; Hayden, Charlotte; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Tebbutt, Stephen; Schroter, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objective Frustration continues to be directed at delays in gaining approvals for undertaking health research in the UK. We aimed to evaluate the impact of an ethics officer intervention on rates of favourable opinions (approval) and provisional opinions (requiring revision and resubmission) and on the time taken to reach a final opinion by research ethics committees (RECs), to characterise how the role operated in practice, and to investigate applicants' views. Design Mixed-method study involving (i) a 2-group, non-randomised before-and-after intervention study of RECs assigned an ethics officer and a matched comparator group; (ii) a process evaluation involving a survey of applicants and documentary analysis. Participants 6 RECs and 3 associated ethics officers; 18 comparator RECs; REC applicants. Results Rates of provisional and favourable opinions between ethics officer and comparator RECs did not show a statistically significant effect of the intervention (logistic regression, p=0.26 for favourable opinions and p=0.31 for provisional opinions). Mean time to reach a decision showed a non-significant reduction (ANOVA, p=0.22) from 33.3 to 32.0 days in the ethics officer RECs compared with the comparator RECs (32.6 to 32.9 days). The survey (30% response rate) indicated applicant satisfaction and also suggested that ethics officer support might be more useful before submission. Ethics officers were successful in identifying many issues with applications, but the intervention did not function exactly as designed: in 31% of applicants, no contact between the applicants and the ethics officer took place before REC review. Limitations This study was a non-randomised comparison cohort study. Some data were missing. Conclusions An ethics officer intervention, as designed and implemented in this study, did not increase the proportion of applications to RECs that were approved on first review and did not reduce the time to a committee decision. PMID:27580832

  6. Critical care checklists, the Keystone Project, and the Office for Human Research Protections: a case for streamlining the approval process in quality-improvement research.

    PubMed

    Savel, Richard H; Goldstein, Evan B; Gropper, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    Checklists have been recently promulgated as a method to enhance patient safety and improve outcomes for critically ill patients. Specifically, recent work performed by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions has demonstrated that the addition of checklists to usual care in the intensive care unit is associated with a decrease in the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections. Initially evaluated at the institutional level, this effort has been successfully expanded to the state level as part of the Michigan Keystone Project. Although this work has recently received significant positive attention in the lay press, the Office for Human Research Protections--as they felt that this was a research project requiring Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent--put the data collection on hold for lack of approval by the Institutional Review Board at the participating hospitals in Michigan as well as for not having obtained informed consent from each patient and clinician involved in the project. This article documents the recent events surrounding the Keystone Project and the response to the actions taken by the Office for Human Research Protections in the lay press and the new media (Internet and blogs), articulates how a determination can be made if a project is quality-improvement, human-subjects research, or both, and proposes some solutions to create a structured approach to this kind of research in the future.

  7. Assessing sustainable remediation frameworks using sustainability principles.

    PubMed

    Ridsdale, D Reanne; Noble, Bram F

    2016-12-15

    The remediation industry has grown exponentially in recent decades. International organizations of practitioners and remediation experts have developed several frameworks for integrating sustainability into remediation projects; however, there has been limited attention to how sustainability is approached and operationalized in sustainable remediation frameworks and practices - or whether sustainability plays any meaningful role at all in sustainable remediation. This paper examines how sustainability is represented in remediation frameworks and the guidance provided for practical application. Seven broad sustainability principles and review criteria are proposed and applied to a sample of six international remediation frameworks. Not all review criteria were equally satisfied and none of the frameworks fully met all criteria; however, the best performing frameworks were those identified as sustainability remediation frameworks. Intra-generational equity was addressed by all frameworks. Integrating social, economic and biophysical components beyond triple-bottom-line indicators was explicitly addressed only by the sustainable remediation frameworks. No frameworks provided principle- or rule-based guidance for dealing with trade-offs in sustainability decisions.

  8. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  9. 28 CFR 32.8 - Exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaustion of administrative remedies. 32.8 Section 32.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS' DEATH, DISABILITY, AND EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE BENEFIT CLAIMS General Provisions § 32.8 Exhaustion of administrative remedies. No determination or negative...

  10. 32 CFR 220.7 - Remedies and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Remedies and procedures. 220.7 Section 220.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES § 220.7 Remedies...

  11. 32 CFR 220.7 - Remedies and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Remedies and procedures. 220.7 Section 220.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES § 220.7 Remedies...

  12. 32 CFR 220.7 - Remedies and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Remedies and procedures. 220.7 Section 220.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES § 220.7 Remedies...

  13. Risk-based systems analysis of emerging high-level waste tank remediation technologies. Volume 2: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormack, W.D.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of DOE`s Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area is to identify and develop new technologies that will reduce the risk and/or cost of remediating DOE underground waste storage tanks and tank contents. There are, however, many more technology investment opportunities than the current budget can support. Current technology development selection methods evaluate new technologies in isolation from other components of an overall tank waste remediation system. This report describes a System Analysis Model developed under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) program. The report identifies the project objectives and provides a description of the model. Development of the first ``demonstration`` version of this model and a trial application have been completed and the results are presented. This model will continue to evolve as it undergoes additional user review and testing.

  14. Heavy Metals Contaminated Soil Project, Resource Recovery Project, and Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) (OTD) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November, 1989. OTD has begun to search out, develop, test and demonstrate technologies that can now or in the future be applied to the enormous remediation problem now facing the DOE and the United States public in general. Technology demonstration projects have been designed to attack a separate problem as defined by DOE. The Heavy Metals Contaminated Soil Project was conceived to test and demonstrate off-the-shelf technologies (dominantly from the mining industry) that can be brought to bear on the problem of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination in soils and sediments. The Resource Recovery Project is tasked with identifying, developing, testing, and evaluating new and innovative technologies for the remediation of metal contaminated surface and groundwater. An innovative twist on this project is the stated goal of recovering the metals, formerly disposed of as a waste, for reuse and resale, thereby transforming them into a usable resource. Finally, the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project was developed to demonstrate and remediate underground spills of hydrocarbons from formations that are (1) too deep for excavation, and/or (2) require in-situ remediation efforts of long duration. This project has already been shown effective in reducing the time for remediation by conventional methods from an estimated 200 years at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to less than one year. The savings in time and dollars from this technology alone can be immeasurable.

  15. Need for a Remedial Reading Program for Fourth Grade Children Using Supplementary Syntactically-Oriented Reading Materials. Triple "T" Project Monograph Series, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Frances E.

    A reading problem does exist within the schools; moreover, reading retardation is of epidemic proportions in the inner-city schools. Educators continue to seek new materials and different approaches to reading instruction for students who read below their grade and expectancy levels and who need a remedial program. Reading, like speaking and…

  16. Groundwater remediation: the next 30 years.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Paul W; Newell, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater remediation technologies are designed, installed, and operated based on the conceptual models of contaminant hydrogeology that are accepted at that time. However, conceptual models of remediation can change as new research, new technologies, and new performance data become available. Over the past few years, results from multiple-site remediation performance studies have shown that achieving drinking water standards (i.e., Maximum Contaminant Levels, MCLs) at contaminated groundwater sites is very difficult. Recent groundwater research has shown that the process of matrix diffusion is one key constraint. New developments, such as mass discharge, orders of magnitude (OoMs), and SMART objectives are now being discussed more frequently by the groundwater remediation community. In this paper, the authors provide their perspectives on the existing "reach MCLs" approach that has historically guided groundwater remediation projects, and advocate a new approach built around the concepts of OoMs and mass discharge.

  17. 24 CFR 81.46 - Remedial actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... States Court, a HUD Administrative Law Judge, or the Secretary. (2) Following a final determination... Secretary will also, without limitation, consider the following: (i) The gravity of the violation; (ii) The... Office of Administrative Law Judges. (2) Where a lender does not timely request a hearing on a remedial...

  18. 43 CFR 4770.3 - Administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Prohibited Acts, Administrative Remedies, and Penalties § 4770.3... issuance or on a date established in the decision so as to allow repossession of wild horses or burros from... this title, the authorized officer may provide that decisions to remove wild horses or burros...

  19. 24 CFR 4.38 - Administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative remedies. 4.38 Section 4.38 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD REFORM ACT Prohibition of Advance Disclosure of Funding Decisions § 4.38...

  20. The Soils and Groundwater – EM-20 S&T Roadmap Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-02-11

    The Soils and Groundwater – EM-20 Science and Technology Roadmap Project is a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies and technology for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by EM-20 Roadmap Project staff.

  1. Lasagna{trademark} soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Lasagna{trademark} is an integrated, in situ remediation technology being developed by an industrial consortium consisting of Monsanto, E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., Inc. (DuPont), and General Electric, with participation from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology (EM-50), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development (Figure 1). Lasagna{trademark} remediates soils and soil pore water contaminated with soluble organic compounds. Lasagna{trademark} is especially suited to sites with low permeability soils where electroosmosis can move water faster and more uniformly than hydraulic methods, with very low power consumption. The process uses electrokinetics to move contaminants in soil pore water into treatment zones where the contaminants can be captured or decomposed. Initial focus is on trichloroethylene (TCE), a major contaminant at many DOE and industrial sites. Both vertical and horizontal configurations have been conceptualized, but fieldwork to date is more advanced for the vertical configuration.

  2. Groundwater Remediation in a Floodplain Aquifer at Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Dave; Miller, David; Kautsky, Mark; Dander, David; Nofchissey, Joni

    2016-03-06

    A uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill operated from 1954 to 1968 within the Navajo Nation near Shiprock, New Mexico. By September 1986, all tailings and structures on the former mill property were encapsulated in a disposal cell built on top of two existing tailings piles on the Shiprock site (the site) [1]. Local groundwater was contaminated by multiple inorganic constituents as a result of the milling operations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took over management of the site in 1978 as part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The DOE Office of Legacy Management currently manages ongoing activities at the former mill facility, including groundwater remediation. Remediation activities are designed primarily to reduce the concentrations and total plume mass of the mill-related contaminants sulfate, uranium, and nitrate. In addition to contaminating groundwater in alluvial and bedrock sediments directly below the mill site, ore processing led to contamination of a nearby floodplain bordering the San Juan River. Groundwater in a shallow alluvial aquifer beneath the floodplain is strongly influenced by the morphology of the river channel as well as changing flows in the river, which provides drainage for regional runoff from the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. As part of a recent study of the floodplain hydrology, a revised conceptual model was developed for the alluvial aquifer along with an updated status of contaminant plumes that have been impacted by more than 10 years of groundwater pumping for site remediation purposes. Several findings from the recent study will be discussed here.

  3. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  4. NASA Parts Program Office responsibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilroy, Patrick L.

    1994-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: NASA Parts Program Office responsibilities; NASA Parts Project Office responsibilities; development priorities; and candidate functions for EPIMS baseline.

  5. SUMMER MIGRANT PROJECT, UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT NUMBER 467, WICHITA COUNTY, LEOTI, KANSAS. EVALUATION REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HARRIS, ALTON E.

    THE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT 3467 CONDUCTED A SUMMER REMEDIAL PROGRAM FOR 121 MIGRANTS AND 19 NON-MIGRANTS IN CO-OPERATION WITH THE LEOTI COMMUNITY SERVICES AND THE LOCAL OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY. THE PROJECT OFFERED A HEALTH AND FOOD SERVICE IN ADDITION TO THE EDUCATIONAL CURRICULUM. THE CURRICULUM FOR GRADES KINDERGARTEN THROUGH 6 WAS…

  6. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2004-02-27

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional

  7. River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    SEEMAN, S.E.

    2000-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in accordance with the Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999, established the Office of River Protection (ORP) to successfully execute and manage the River Protection Project (RPP), formerly known as the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The mission of the RPP is to store, retrieve, treat, and dispose of the highly radioactive Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The team shown in Figure 1-1 is accomplishing the project. The ORP is providing the management and integration of the project; the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) is responsible for providing tank waste storage, retrieval, and disposal; and the Privatization Contractor (PC) is responsible for providing tank waste treatment.

  8. Remedial technology and characterization development at the SRS F/H Retention Basins using the DOE SAFER methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, W.C. Jr.; Kuelske, K.J.

    1994-07-01

    The Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) is a strategy used to accelerate and improve the environmental assessment and remediation of the F/H Retention Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS). TMs strategy combines the data quality objectives (DQO) process and the observational approach to focus on data collection and converge on a remedial action early. This approach emphasizes stakeholder involvement throughout the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process. The SAFER methodology is being applied to the characterization, technology development, and remediation tasks for the F/H Retention Basins. This ``approach was initiated in the scoping phase of these projects through the involvment of major stakeholders; Department of Energy (DOE)-Savannah River Field Office, DOE-Headquarters, Westinghouse Savannah River Company, United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the state of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), in the development of the Remedial Investigation (RI) workplans. A major activity that has been initiated is the development and implementation of a phase I workplan to identify preliminary contaminants of concern (pCOCs). A sampling plan was developed and approved by the major stakeholders for preliminary characterization of wastes remaining in the F/H Retention Basins. The involvement of stakeholders, development of a site conceptual model, development of remedial objectives for probable conditions, identification of the problem and reasonable deviations, and development of initial decision rules in the planning stages will ensure that preliminary data needs are identified and obtained prior to the initiation of the assessment and implementation phases of the projects resulting in the final remediation of the sites in an accelerated and more cost effective manner.

  9. Reinventing Remedial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2009-01-01

    Remedial education, although widely used and disguised with other names, was rarely talked about for it could tarnish a school's reputation if widely discussed. Today, more and more colleges and universities are ditching the old stigma associated with remedial education, reinventing their remedial education and retention programs and, in the…

  10. Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

  11. Linking the orthopaedic office-hospital continuum: results before and after implementation of an automated patient health history project.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J A; Dodds, K L; Mallory, T H; Lombardi, A V; Adams, J B

    2001-01-01

    This article introduces an innovative collaboration between an orthopaedic surgeon's office and the hospital to assure complete and accurate admission information without duplication. With the use of point-of-care software, the assessment process was re-tooled. This change involved the patient/family assuming responsibility for completing paper and pencil in-depth history and systems review that was then used as part of the evaluation process and inputted into the database allowing for more effective outcomes assessment. In this re-tooling process, the concept of "sharing" information with the partnering hospital was explored. In collaborative discussions, the nursing admission assessment was targeted as a process where there was significant duplication. In fact, much of the information required on the 4-page form was already assessed and documented in the office setting. Consequently it was agreed that the majority of the inpatient nursing history/admission assessment form would be replaced with the assessment completed by the professional office staff. Because of incompatible software, the systems could not be linked but a printed copy of the form was sent to the hospital. Results measuring satisfaction, timesaving, and compliance with JCAHO documentation standards were part of the evaluation. Patients and clinicians were satisfied with the process. There was a significant timesaving for the in-patient RN which facilitated more direct contact with the patient and family.

  12. Exemption of certain research and demonstration projects from regulations for protection of human research subjects--Office of the Secretary, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1983-03-04

    The Department of Health and Human Services (the Department or HHS) is including among the types of research specifically exempt from the application of the regulatory requirements of 45 CFR Part 46 (protection of human research subjects) research and demonstration projects conducted under the Social Security Act and other federal statutory authority and designed to study certain public benefit or service programs, the procedures for obtaining benefits or services under those programs, and possible changes or alternatives to those programs or procedures, including changes in methods or levels of payment. These demonstration and service projects are already subject to procedures which provide for extensive review by high level officials in various program administration offices. Review by an Institutional Review Board (IRB), as required under Part 46, would be duplicative and burdensome to state and local agencies and to other entities participating in demonstration projects. Removal of this unnecessary layer of review will not only reduce the cost of the projects but help to avoid unnecessary delays in project implementation. However, in order to ensure the continued protection of human subjects participating in such research activity, the Department is adding a specific requirement of written, informed consent in any instance, not reviewed by an IRB, in which the Secretary determines that the research activity presents a danger to the physical, mental or emotional well-being of a participant.

  13. Final Quality Assurance Project Plan, Installation Restoration Program Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    Diazotization and Record Value from Scale Phosphate PC.-19 Colorimetric with D-50 Compare from Color Disk Ascorbic acid and Record Value from Scale...with contamination. Under SARA, early determination of Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requiremet (ARARs) is required, and potential remediation...so that the RI/FS would be conducted as parallel activities rather than serial activities. The program now includes ARAR determinations

  14. Operation Sun Beam shots Little Feller I and II, Johnie boy, and Small Boy. Project Officer's report. Project 2. 3. Neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rigotti, D.L.; McNeilly, J.H.; Brady, R.E.; Tarbox, J.L.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) to measure free-field neutron flux and spectrum as required in support of other projects; (2) to document the neutron flux versus ground range; and (3) to determine the effect of various blast containers and shields on detector activation.

  15. California seeks new technologies for site remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    Innovative new technologies for site remediation will be sought by the California Department of Health Services (Department), Toxic Substances Control Division, Alternative Technology Section, for assessment in the field as full-scale demonstration projects. The Remedial Technology Assessment Program (RTAP) fosters emerging technologies, which have been successfully tested in the laboratory, at bench scale, or at pilot scale and are ready for field or full-scale demonstration project testing. The Department will solicit interest from companies to conduct full-scale demonstrations of remedial treatment technologies for site remediation. The solicitation responses will be used to compile a list of treatment technologies which can be considered during the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) process for implementation at State-lead Bond Expenditure Plan sites and possibly responsible party sites. RTAP will attempt to match submitted remedial technologies to specific hazardous waste sites via the RAP process. A technical report, including an evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility, will be prepared after each demonstration project.

  16. Summary of computational support and general documentation for computer code (GENTREE) used in Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation Pilot Salt Site Selection Project

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, J.A.; Younker, J.L.; Rousseau, W.F.; Elayat, H.A.

    1983-12-06

    A Decision Tree Computer Model was adapted for the purposes of a Pilot Salt Site Selection Project conducted by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI). A deterministic computer model was developed to structure the site selection problem with submodels reflecting the five major outcome categories (Cost, Safety, Delay, Environment, Community Impact) to be evaluated in the decision process. Time-saving modifications were made in the tree code as part of the effort. In addition, format changes allowed retention of information items which are valuable in directing future research and in isolation of key variabilities in the Site Selection Decision Model. The deterministic code was linked to the modified tree code and the entire program was transferred to the ONWI-VAX computer for future use by the ONWI project.

  17. 30 CFR 1290.110 - How do I exhaust administrative remedies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I exhaust administrative remedies? 1290.110 Section 1290.110 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... administrative remedies, you must appeal an Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR) or delegated State order...

  18. 30 CFR 1290.110 - How do I exhaust administrative remedies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I exhaust administrative remedies? 1290.110 Section 1290.110 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... administrative remedies, you must appeal an Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR) or delegated State order...

  19. 30 CFR 1290.110 - How do I exhaust administrative remedies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I exhaust administrative remedies? 1290.110 Section 1290.110 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...) To exhaust administrative remedies, you must appeal an Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR) or...

  20. 30 CFR 1290.110 - How do I exhaust administrative remedies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I exhaust administrative remedies? 1290.110 Section 1290.110 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... administrative remedies, you must appeal an Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR) or delegated State order...

  1. Job task and functional analysis of the Division of Reactor Projects, office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morzinski, J.A.; Gilmore, W.; Hahn, H.A.

    1998-07-10

    A job task and functional analysis was recently completed for the positions that make up the regional Divisions of Reactor Projects. Among the conclusions of that analysis was a recommendation to clarify roles and responsibilities among site, regional, and headquarters personnel. As that analysis did not cover headquarters personnel, a similar analysis was undertaken of three headquarters positions within the Division of Reactor Projects: Licensing Assistants, Project Managers, and Project Directors. The goals of this analysis were to systematically evaluate the tasks performed by these headquarters personnel to determine job training requirements, to account for variations due to division/regional assignment or differences in several experience categories, and to determine how, and by which positions, certain functions are best performed. The results of this analysis include recommendations for training and for job design. Data to support this analysis was collected by a survey instrument and through several sets of focus group meetings with representatives from each position.

  2. Duct Remediation Program: Remediation operations and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-11-01

    Plutonium holdup material has accumulated in the process ventilation duct systems at Rocky Flats. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) measurements identified ducts containing this material. The Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board and the Department of Energy established the criteria for remediation of these ducts. A remediation team was assembled and a program plan created. This program plan included activities such as fissile material accumulation identification, criticality safety assessments, radiation dose determinations, facility safety evaluations, prevention of future accumulation, and removal of holdup material. Several operational considerations had to be evaluated in determining completion of remediation.

  3. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2002-12-01

    The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership

  4. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2003-06-30

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day, who contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2002, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin

  5. Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

  6. Overview of Green and Sustainable Remediation for Soil and Groundwater Remediation - 12545

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkin, Thomas J.; Favara, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Making remediation efforts more 'sustainable' or 'green' is a topic of great interest in the remediation community. It has been spurred on by Executive Orders from the White House, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability plans. In private industry, it is motivated by corporate sustainability goals and corporate social responsibility. It has spawned new organizations, areas of discussion, tools and practices, and guidance documents around sustainable remediation or green remediation. Green remediation can be thought of as a subset of sustainable remediation and is mostly focused on reducing the environmental footprint of cleanup efforts. Sustainable remediation includes both social and economic considerations, in addition to environmental. Application of both green and sustainable remediation (GSR) may involve two primary activities. The first is to develop technologies and alternatives that are greener or more sustainable. This can also include making existing remediation approaches greener or more sustainable. The second is to include GSR criteria in the evaluation of remediation alternatives and strategies. In other words, to include these GSR criteria in the evaluation of alternatives in a feasibility study. In some cases, regulatory frameworks allow the flexibility to include GSR criteria into the evaluation process (e.g., state cleanup programs). In other cases, regulations allow less flexibility to include the evaluation of GSR criteria (e.g., Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)). New regulatory guidance and tools will be required to include these criteria in typical feasibility studies. GSR provides a number of challenges for remediation professionals performing soil and groundwater remediation projects. Probably the most significant is just trying to stay on top of the ever changing landscape of products, tools, and guidance documents coming out of various groups, the US EPA, and states. However, this

  7. 34 CFR 110.39 - Exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaustion of administrative remedies. 110.39 Section 110.39 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL...

  8. 34 CFR 110.38 - Remedial action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Remedial action by recipients. 110.38 Section 110.38 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  9. Research Plan: Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Hart, Andrea T.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ankeny, Mark; Hull, Laurence; Oostrom, Martinus; Freshley, Mark D.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-01-16

    Research proposals were submitted to the Scientific and Technical Basis for In Situ Treatment of Metals and Radionuclides Technical Working Group under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (specifically, EM-22). After a peer review and selection process, the proposal, “Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation,” submitted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was selected for support by the program. A research plan was requested for this EM funded project. The overall objective of this project is to develop foam delivery technology for the distribution of remedial amendments to deep vadose zone sediments for in situ immobilization of metal and radionuclide contaminants. The focus of this research in FY 2009 is on the physical aspects of the foam delivery approach. Specific objectives are to 1) study the foam quality (i.e. the gas volume fraction in foam) influence on injection pressure, 2) study the sediment air permeability influence on injection pressure, 3) investigate liquid uptake in sediment and determine whether a water front will be formed during foam delivery, 4) test amendment distance (and mass) delivery by foam from the injection point, 5) study the enhanced sweeping over heterogeneous systems (i.e., low K zones) by foam delivery relative to water-based delivery under vadose zone conditions, and 6) numerically simulate foam delivery processes in the vadose zone. Laboratory scale experiments will be conducted at PNNL to study a range of basic physical aspects of the foam propagation in sediments, including foam quality and sediment permeability influence on injection pressure, liquid uptake, and foam sweeping across heterogeneous systems. This study will be augmented with separate studies to be conducted at MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate foam transport and amendment delivery at the intermediate-scale. The results of intermediate

  10. Characterization of airborne fungal levels after mold remediation.

    PubMed

    Kleinheinz, G T; Langolf, B M; Englebert, E

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of this project was to evaluate levels of airborne fungi present after a mold remediation project and determine the effectiveness of this remediation using airborne mold levels to determine the success of these projects. Andersen N6 (viable) and Air-O-Cell (non-viable) sampling techniques were utilized. Both test methodologies demonstrated that levels of mold in the successfully remediated portions of buildings were significantly different (p<0.05) from the levels found in non-complaint and outdoor samples from the same building, respectively. Conversely, levels in unsuccessful remediation projects were not significantly different (p>0.05) to non-complaint and outdoor samples. Both techniques showed high variability in the overall mold levels found between sites; however, the ratios of specific mold groups in each area tested, within the same site, were remarkably similar. The use of either viable or non-viable mold sampling techniques after mold remediation is essential for determining the success of such projects. This project demonstrates the relationship between mold levels and the success of a mold remediation projects, and will assist in the interpretation of data collected at the conclusion of a mold remediation project.

  11. The Craft of Teaching and the Schooling of Teachers. National Conference, the U. S. Office of Education Tri-University Project in Elementary Education (1st, Denver, September 18-20, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    This report of the First National Conference of the U.S. Office of Education Tri-University Project in Elementary Education (a project to study what goes into the education of teachers and to picture optimum learning situations for children with the aim of improving the education of teachers) includes a list of conference participants; an…

  12. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2001-03-01

    The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and

  13. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: Watershed Restoration Projects: Annual Report, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    1999-10-01

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous US and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1998, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed

  14. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11

  15. Enhancing International Research and Development-Project Activity on University Campuses: Insights from U.S. Senior International Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Peter H.; Deardorff, Darla K.; Bolognese, Kerry D.

    2011-01-01

    In the interconnected world of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, the ability of higher-education institutions to contribute to and benefit from international research undertakings, sustainable-development-project activity, and capacity-building endeavors requires transnational involvement. While the potential benefits are…

  16. Enhancing International Research and Development-Project Activity on University Campuses: Insights from U.S. Senior International Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Peter H.; Deardorff, Darla K.; Bolognese, Kerry D.

    2011-01-01

    In the interconnected world of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, the ability of higher-education institutions to contribute to and benefit from international research undertakings, sustainable-development-project activity, and capacity-building endeavors requires transnational involvement. While the potential benefits are…

  17. Environmental Restoration Program project management plan for the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office Major System Acquisition OR-1. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    In the early 1940s, the Manhattan Project was conducted in a regulatory and operational environment less sophisticated than today. Less was known of the measures needed to protect human health and safety and the environment from the dangers posed by radioactive and hazardous wastes, and experience in dealing with these hazardous materials has grown slowly. Certain hazards were recognized and dealt with from the beginning. However, the techniques used, though standard practices at the time, are now known to have been inadequate. Consequently, the DOE has committed to an aggressive program for cleaning up the environment and has initiated an Environmental Restoration Program involving all its field offices. The objective of this program is to ensure that inactive and surplus DOE facilities and sites meet current standards to protect human health and the environment. The objective of these activities is to ensure that risks posed to human health and safety and the environment by inactive sites and surplus facilities contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, and/or mixed wastes are either eliminated or reduced to prescribed safe levels. This Project Management Plan for Major System Acquisition OR-1 Project documents, communicates, and contributes to the evolution of, the management organizations, systems, and tools necessary to carry out effectively the long-range complex cleanup of the DOE sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and at the Paducah, Kentucky, and Piketon, Ohio, uranium enrichment plants managed by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office; the cleanup of off-site contamination resulting from past releases; and the Decontamination and Decommissioning of surplus DOE facilities at these installations.

  18. Annual Report 2008 -- Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO)

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2008-12-22

    It is with great pleasure that I present to you the 2008 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office. Also included are some financial comparisons with other DOE Laboratories and a glossary of commonly used acronyms.

  19. Technology development activities supporting tank waste remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, W.F.; Beeman, G.H.

    1994-06-01

    This document summarizes work being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The specific work activities are organized by the following categories: safety, characterization, retrieval, barriers, pretreatment, low-level waste, and high-level waste. In most cases, the activities presented here were identified as supporting tank remediation by EM-50 integrated program or integrated demonstration lead staff and the selections were further refined by contractor staff. Data sheets were prepared from DOE-HQ guidance to the field issued in September 1993. Activities were included if a significant portion of the work described provides technology potentially needed by TWRS; consequently, not all parts of each description necessarily support tank remediation.

  20. Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

  1. Protocol for VOC-Arid ID remediation performance characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tegner, B.J.; Hassig, N.L.; Last, G.V.

    1994-09-01

    The Volatile Organic Compound-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) is a technology development program sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development that is targeted to acquire, develop, demonstrate, and deploy new technologies for the remediation of VOC contaminants in the soils and groundwaters of arid DOE sites. Technologies cannot be adequately evaluated unless sufficient site characterization and technology performance data have been collection and analyzed. The responsibility for identifying these data needs has been placed largely on the Principal Investigators (PIs) developing the remediation technology, who usually are not experts in site characterization or in identification of appropriate sampling, analysis, and monitoring techniques to support the field testing. This document provides a protocol for planning the collection of data before, during, and after a test of a new technology. This generic protocol provides the PIs and project managers with a set of steps to follow. The protocol is based on a data collection planning process called the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process, which was originally developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency and has been expanded by DOE to support site cleanup decisions. The DQO process focuses on the quality and quantity of data required to make decision. Stakeholders to the decisions must negotiate such key inputs to the process as the decision rules that will be used and the acceptable probabilities of making decision errors.

  2. Grand Junction projects office mixed-waste treatment program, VAC*TRAX mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, R.R.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented VAC*TRAX mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses an indirectly heated, batch vacuum dryer to thermally desorb organic compounds from mixed wastes. This process hazards analysis evaluated 102 potential hazards. The three significant hazards identified involved the inclusion of oxygen in a process that also included an ignition source and fuel. Changes to the design of the MTU were made concurrent with the hazard identification and analysis; all hazards with initial risk rankings of 1 or 2 were reduced to acceptable risk rankings of 3 or 4. The overall risk to any population group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

  3. SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION SOFTWARE TOOL EXERCISE AND EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, J.; Nichols, R.; Looney, B.

    2011-05-12

    The goal of this study was to examine two different software tools designed to account for the environmental impacts of remediation projects. Three case studies from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC were used to exercise SiteWise (SW) and Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT) by including both traditional and novel remediation techniques, contaminants, and contaminated media. This study combined retrospective analysis of implemented projects with prospective analysis of options that were not implemented. Input data were derived from engineering plans, project reports, and planning documents with a few factors supplied from calculations based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Conclusions drawn from software output were generally consistent within a tool; both tools identified the same remediation options as the 'best' for a given site. Magnitudes of impacts varied between the two tools, and it was not always possible to identify the source of the disagreement. The tools differed in their quantitative approaches: SRT based impacts on specific contaminants, media, and site geometry and modeled contaminant removal. SW based impacts on processes and equipment instead of chemical modeling. While SW was able to handle greater variety in remediation scenarios, it did not include a measure of the effectiveness of the scenario.

  4. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Addendum D1

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junctions Project Office in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. The objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on- pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra- 226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  5. Remedial action report for Monticello, Utah, Vicinity Properties National Priority List Site, Operable Unit A

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    Uranium and vanadium milling activities were conducted by and for the US Atomic Energy Commission in Monticello, Utah, between 1942 and 1959, which resulted in the production of mill tailings containing radioactive materials. The tailings were wind blown and used to a limited extent for construction purposes in the Monticello area. In 1984, the US Department of Energy Grand Junction Office implemented the Monticello Vicinity Properties Project to isolate tailings-related sources from the environment and thereby prevent them from causing harm to human health or the environment. Remedial action is complete at Operable Unit A of the Monticello Vicinity Properties Project, which consists of 104 properties within the city limits of Monticello, Utah. These properties have been reconstructed and, pending the outcome of possible postconstruction activities on six properties, can be recommended for certification of conformance to project guidelines.

  6. 20. DETAIL OF OFFICE FURNITURE IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECRETARIES' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL OF OFFICE FURNITURE IN NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECRETARIES' OFFICE ALONG NORTH SIDE OF FIRST FLOOR. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Boise Project, Boise Project Office, 214 Broadway, Boise, Ada County, ID

  7. 75 FR 55786 - Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education; Notice of Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver for the National...

  8. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Prepare a written summary of significant comments, criticisms, and new relevant information submitted... select a remedy. Developing and conducting an RI/FS generally includes the following activities: project... of analyses; and (ii) The quality assurance project plan, which describes policy, organization, and...

  9. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Prepare a written summary of significant comments, criticisms, and new relevant information submitted... select a remedy. Developing and conducting an RI/FS generally includes the following activities: project... of analyses; and (ii) The quality assurance project plan, which describes policy, organization, and...

  10. DECISION ANALYSIS OF INCINERATION COSTS IN SUPERFUND SITE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the decision-making process of the remedial design (RD) phase of on-site incineration projects conducted at Superfund sites. Decisions made during RD affect the cost and schedule of remedial action (RA). Decision analysis techniques are used to determine the...

  11. 3,000 Paper Cranes: Children's Literature for Remedial Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumaker, Marjorie P.; Shumaker, Ronald C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes how the educational experience of sixth grade remedial readers was revitalized and enriched through a project that grew out of reading "Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes." Suggests using "real" books (literature) to liberate remedial students from skill drills and reading games. (NH)

  12. Reuse of surfactants and cosolvents for NAPL remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, D.F.; Oubre, C.L.; Ward, C.H.

    2000-07-01

    Recovery and reuse of surfactants used in site remediation can substantially improve the overall economics. Prior to this project, it has not been demonstrated that a surfactant recovery process could be reliably designed and operated at field conditions. Nor had the question of the most cost effective surfactant recovery scheme been addressed. This book highlights innovative and cost effective technologies for ground water remediation.

  13. Reaction Paper on Remediation in the Community College Mathematics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Shawn

    Remedial mathematics has taken several forms over the years--across the nation, within departments, and among mathematics instructors. There is a growing debate over the effectiveness of remedial courses in relationship to eventual student matriculation, which increases institution funding. The use of technology, real-life problems and projects,…

  14. Designing Clinical Remediation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleszewski, Susan C.

    1989-01-01

    Elements and considerations in the provision of effective remediation for optometry students not achieving in clinical competence are discussed. Remediation of technical, cognitive, and noncognitive skills are included. A course in professional communication offered by the Pennsylvania College of Optometry is described. (MSE)

  15. Coupling Environmental Contracting Using Risk Allocation with U.S. Department of Energy Remediation Marketplace

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, Walter S.; Boyd, Gerald G.; Sink, Claire H.; Lynn, Douglas A.

    2000-03-02

    As the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) enters the 21st century, its primary mission remains unchanged: to clean up sites contaminated with radioactive, chemical, and other hazardous wastes from over fifty years of government nuclear operations, particularly weapons production. A major challenge confronting DOE EM in doing environmental cleanup is to improve project management and to allocate project risks into an optimal contracting strategy. Data show DOE’s site remediation work as 30% of the U.S. remediation market with major remediation activities scheduled to occur by 2006. In the era of reduced funding and increased fiscal accountability, it is incumbent on DOE to adopt a cleanup strategy that applies best practices and expertise of private industry and capitalizes on optimal risk allocation among cleanup project participants. DOE should provide better incentives to accomplish its mission. Traditionally, DOE has focused on technical risk only. Lessons learned, however, from DOE privatization initiatives, such as Tank Waste Remediation System, show risks, including technical, operational/business, and people, are interrelated. To devise an effective cleanup strategy using improved project management and tailored contracting strategies therefore requires all risk to be addressed as an integrated composite. This paper presents an overview of outcome-oriented risk management and applicability of outcome-oriented risk management to accelerating DOE’s cleanup mission. In the context of privatization and contract reform, the paper discusses how DOE could use risk allocation in environmental remediation contracts to achieve an optimal contracting strategy that is more efficient and effective for cleanup of contaminated sites across the complex. Technical risk includes new technology, its implementation and performance; operational/business risk includes site conditions, construction issues, program management, and financial

  16. Status report: Fernald site remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, J.R. Jr.; Saric, J.A.; Schneider, T.; Yates, M.K.

    1995-01-30

    The Fernald site is rapidly transitioning from a Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study (RI/FS) site to one where design and construction of the remedies dominates. Fernald is one of the first sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex to accomplish this task and real physical progress is being made in moving the five operable units through the CERCLA process. Two of the required Records of Decision (ROD) are in hand and all five operable units will have received their RODs (IROD for OU3) by the end of 1995. Pre-design investigations, design work or construction are now in progress on the operable units. The lessons learned from the work done to date include implementing innovations in the RI and FS process as well as effective use of Removal Actions to begin the actual site remediation. Also, forging close working relationships with the Federal and State Regulators, citizens action groups and the Fernald Citizens Task Force has helped move the program forward. The Fernald successes have been achieved by close coordination and cooperation among all groups working on the projects and by application of innovative technologies within the decision making process.

  17. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  18. Operation Dominic, Shot Sword Fish. Project Officer's report - Project 1. 3b. Effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on hydroacoustic systems

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, T.; La Houssaye, W.P.; Johnson, C.T.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of Project 1.2 were to determine and evaluate the effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on the operational capabilities of shipboard sonar and other types of hydroacoustic systems. Project 1.3b included all measurements at ranges greater than 10 nautical miles and the results of these measurements constitute the subject of this report. This report concerns the effects of the underwater nuclear explosion, Sword Fish, on: (a) Long-range active detection systems at the first convergence zone (25 to 30 miles); (b) Passive shipboard or submarine sonars at a few hundred miles; and (c) Long-range passive detection and surveillance at Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) and Missile Impact Locating System (MILS) stations at several hundred to several thousand miles. A submarine station at the first convergence zone and five shipboard stations at ranges from 200 miles to 5,000 miles recorded signals from hydrophones suspended at various depths to approximately 2,000 feet. Submarines on other assignments recorded signals on standard submarine sonar equipment on a not-to interfere basis. SOSUS and MILS stations operated normally during the period and also made special magnetic-tape and strip-chart recordings of signals from single hydrophones from before burst time to several hours after burst.

  19. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  20. Environmental Remediation Data Management Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wierowski, J. V.; Henry, L. G.; Dooley, D. A.

    2002-02-26

    Computer software tools for data management can improve site characterization, planning and execution of remediation projects. This paper discusses the use of two such products that have primarily been used within the nuclear power industry to enhance the capabilities of radiation protection department operations. Advances in digital imaging, web application development and programming technologies have made development of these tools possible. The Interactive Visual Tour System (IVTS) allows the user to easily create and maintain a comprehensive catalog containing digital pictures of the remediation site. Pictures can be cataloged in groups (termed ''tours'') that can be organized either chronologically or spatially. Spatial organization enables the user to ''walk around'' the site and view desired areas or components instantly. Each photo is linked to a map (floor plan, topographical map, elevation drawing, etc.) with graphics displaying the location on the map and any available tour/component links. Chronological organization enables the user to view the physical results of the remediation efforts over time. Local and remote management teams can view these pictures at any time and from any location. The Visual Survey Data System (VSDS) allows users to record survey and sample data directly on photos and/or maps of areas and/or components. As survey information is collected for each area, survey data trends can be reviewed for any repetitively measured location or component. All data is stored in a Quality Assurance (Q/A) records database with reference to its physical sampling point on the site as well as other information to support the final closeout report for the site. The ease of use of these web-based products has allowed nuclear power plant clients to plan outage work from their desktop and realize significant savings with respect to dose and cost. These same tools are invaluable for remediation and decommissioning planning of any scale and for recording