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Sample records for prokaryotic dna segregation

  1. Prokaryotic DNA ligases unwind superhelical DNA.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, M; van Holde, K; Zlatanova, J

    1996-09-13

    We have studied the effect on DNA topology of binding of prokaryotic DNA ligases (T4 and E. coli) to superhelical or nicked circular DNA. Performing topoisomerase I-mediated relaxation in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase led to a shift in the topoisomer distribution to increasingly more negative values. This result suggested that T4 ligase unwound the DNA and was further substantiated by ligation of nicked circular molecules by E. coli DNA ligase in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase. Such an experiment was possible since the two DNA ligases require different cofactors for enzymatic activity. Performing a similar experiment with reverse partners, using E. coli DNA ligase as ligand, and T4 ligase as sealing agent, we observed that the E. coli enzyme also unwound the DNA. Thus, prokaryotic DNA ligases can be added to an ever-growing list of DNA-binding proteins that unwind the DNA upon binding.

  2. Plasmid segregation: how to survive as an extra piece of DNA.

    PubMed

    Salje, Jeanne

    2010-08-01

    Non-essential extra-chromosomal DNA elements such as plasmids are responsible for their own propagation in dividing host cells, and one means to ensure this is to carry a miniature active segregation system reminiscent of the mitotic spindle. Plasmids that are maintained at low numbers in prokaryotic cells have developed a range of such active partitioning systems, which are characterized by an impressive simplicity and efficiency and which are united by the use of dynamic, nucleotide-driven filaments to separate and position DNA molecules. A comparison of different plasmid segregation systems reveals (i) how unrelated filament-forming and DNA-binding proteins have been adopted and modified to create a range of simple DNA segregating complexes and (ii) how subtle changes in the few components of these DNA segregation machines has led to a remarkable diversity in the molecular mechanisms of closely related segregation systems. Here, our current understanding of plasmid segregation systems is reviewed and compared with other DNA segregation systems, and this is extended by a discussion of basic principles of plasmid segregation systems, evolutionary implications and the relationship between an autonomous DNA element and its host cell.

  3. Bacterial DNA segregation dynamics mediated by the polymerizing protein ParF

    PubMed Central

    Barillà, Daniela; Rosenberg, Mark F; Nobbmann, Ulf; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-01-01

    Prokaryotic DNA segregation most commonly involves members of the Walker-type ParA superfamily. Here we show that the ParF partition protein specified by the TP228 plasmid is a ParA ATPase that assembles into extensive filaments in vitro. Polymerization is potentiated by ATP binding and does not require nucleotide hydrolysis. Analysis of mutations in conserved residues of the Walker A motif established a functional coupling between filament dynamics and DNA partitioning. The partner partition protein ParG plays two separable roles in the ParF polymerization process. ParF is unrelated to prokaryotic polymerizing proteins of the actin or tubulin families, but is a homologue of the MinD cell division protein, which also assembles into filaments. The ultrastructures of the ParF and MinD polymers are remarkably similar. This points to an evolutionary parallel between DNA segregation and cytokinesis in prokaryotic cells, and reveals a potential molecular mechanism for plasmid and chromosome segregation mediated by the ubiquitous ParA-type proteins. PMID:15775965

  4. Structural and functional relationships between prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Bernad, A; Zaballos, A; Salas, M; Blanco, L

    1987-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis phage luminal diameter 29 DNA polymerase, involved in protein-primed viral DNA replication, was inhibited by phosphonoacetic acid (PAA), a known inhibitor of alpha-like DNA polymerases, by decreasing the rate of elongation. Three highly conserved regions of amino acid homology, found in several viral alpha-like DNA polymerases and in the luminal diameter 29 DNA polymerase, one of them proposed to be the PAA binding site, were also found in the T4 DNA polymerase. This prokaryotic enzyme was highly sensitive to the drugs aphidicolin and the nucleotide analogues butylanilino dATP (BuAdATP) and butylphenyl dGTP (BuPdGTP), known to be specific inhibitors of eukaryotic alpha-like DNA polymerases. Two potential DNA polymerases from the linear plasmid pGKL1 from yeast and the S1 mitochondrial DNA from maize have been identified, based on the fact that they contain the three conserved regions of amino acid homology. Comparison of DNA polymerases from prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin showed extensive amino acid homology in addition to highly conserved domains. These findings reflect evolutionary relationships between hypothetically unrelated DNA polymerases. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:3127204

  5. The chromosome cycle of prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Summary In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, chromosomal DNA undergoes replication, condensation-decondensation and segregation, sequentially, in some fixed order. Other conditions, like sister-chromatid cohesion (SCC), may span several chromosomal events. One set of these chromosomal transactions within a single cell cycle constitutes the “chromosome cycle”. For many years it was generally assumed that the prokaryotic chromosome cycle follows major phases of the eukaryotic one: -replication-condensation-segregation-(cell division)-decondensation-, with SCC of unspecified length. Eventually it became evident that, in contrast to the strictly consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes, all stages of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle run concurrently. Thus, prokaryotes practice “progressive” chromosome segregation separated from replication by a brief SCC, and all three transactions move along the chromosome at the same fast rate. In other words, in addition to replication forks, there are “segregation forks” in prokaryotic chromosomes. Moreover, the bulk of prokaryotic DNA outside the replication-segregation transition stays compacted. I consider possible origins of this concurrent replication-segregation and outline the “nucleoid administration” system that organizes the dynamic part of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle. PMID:23962352

  6. Streamlined purification of plasmid DNA from prokaryotic cultures.

    PubMed

    Pueschel, Laura; Li, Hongshan; Hymes, Matthew

    2011-01-05

    We describe the complete process of AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates for 96 plasmid preparations, starting from prokaryotic culture and ending with high purity DNA. Based on multi-well filtration for bacterial lysate clearance and DNA purification, this method creates a streamlined process for plasmid preparation. Filter plates containing silica-based media can easily be processed by vacuum filtration or centrifuge to yield appreciable quantities of plasmid DNA. Quantitative analyses determine the purified plasmid DNA is consistently of high quality with average OD(260/280;) ratios of 1.97. Overall, plasmid yields offer more pure DNA for downstream applications, such as sequencing and cloning. This streamlined method of using AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates allows for manual, semi-automated or fully-automated processing.

  7. Streamlined Purification of Plasmid DNA From Prokaryotic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pueschel, Laura; Li, Hongshan; Hymes, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    We describe the complete process of AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates for 96 plasmid preparations, starting from prokaryotic culture and ending with high purity DNA. Based on multi-well filtration for bacterial lysate clearance and DNA purification, this method creates a streamlined process for plasmid preparation. Filter plates containing silica-based media can easily be processed by vacuum filtration or centrifuge to yield appreciable quantities of plasmid DNA. Quantitative analyses determine the purified plasmid DNA is consistently of high quality with average OD260/280 ratios of 1.97. Overall, plasmid yields offer more pure DNA for downstream applications, such as sequencing and cloning. This streamlined method of using AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates allows for manual, semi-automated or fully-automated processing. PMID:21248696

  8. Transcription-coupled DNA repair in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ann; Spivak, Graciela; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2012-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) that acts specifically on lesions in the transcribed strand of expressed genes. First reported in mammalian cells, TCR was then documented in Escherichia coli. In this organism, an RNA polymerase arrested at a lesion is displaced by the transcription repair coupling factor, Mfd. This protein recruits the NER lesion-recognition factor UvrA, and then dissociates from the DNA. UvrA binds UvrB, and the assembled UvrAB* complex initiates repair. In mutants lacking active Mfd, TCR is absent. A gene transcribed by the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase in E. coli also requires Mfd for TCR. The CSB protein (missing or defective in cells of patients with Cockayne syndrome, complementation group B) is essential for TCR in humans. CSB and its homologs in higher eukaryotes are likely functional equivalents of Mfd. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Co-polymer tracts in eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and organellar DNA.

    PubMed

    Behe, M J; Beasty, A M

    1991-01-01

    Large variations in DNA base composition and noticeable strand asymmetries are known to occur between different organisms and within different regions of the genomes of single organisms. Apparently such composition and sequence biases occur to fulfill structural rather than informational requirements. Here we report the wide occurrence of a more subtle biasing of DNA sequence that can have structural consequences: an increase or a suppression of the number of long tracts of two-base co-polymers. Strong biases were observed when the DNA sequences of the longest eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and organellar entries in the GenBank data base (totaling 773 kilobases) were analyzed for the number of occurrences of tracts of the two-base co-polymers (A,T)n, (G,C)n, and (A,C)n as a function of tract length. (The expression (A,T)n is used here to denote an uninterrupted tract, n nucleotides in length, of A and T bases in any proportion or order, terminated at each end by a G or C residue.) Characteristic differences are also observed in tract biases of eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic organisms.

  10. Integrating prokaryotes and eukaryotes: DNA transposases in light of structure

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Alison Burgess; Chandler, Michael; Dyda, Fred

    2011-01-01

    DNA rearrangements are important in genome function and evolution. Genetic material can be rearranged inadvertently during processes such as DNA repair, or can be moved in a controlled manner by enzymes specifically dedicated to the task. DNA transposases comprise one class of such enzymes. These move DNA segments known as transposons to new locations, without the need for sequence homology between transposon and target site. Several biochemically distinct pathways have evolved for DNA transposition, and genetic and biochemical studies have provided valuable insights into many of these. However, structural information on transposases – particularly with DNA substrates – has proven elusive in most cases. On the other hand, large-scale genome sequencing projects have led to an explosion in the number of annotated prokaryotic and eukaryotic mobile elements. Here, we briefly review biochemical and mechanistic aspects of DNA transposition, and propose that integrating sequence information with structural information using bioinformatics tools such as secondary structure prediction and protein threading can lead not only to an additional level of understanding but possibly also to testable hypotheses regarding transposition mechanisms. Detailed understanding of transposition pathways is a prerequisite for the long-term goal of exploiting DNA transposons as genetic tools and as a basis for genetic medical applications. PMID:20067338

  11. Cell Biology of Prokaryotic Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Dorothee; Byrne, Meghan; Komeili, Arash

    2010-01-01

    Mounting evidence in recent years has challenged the dogma that prokaryotes are simple and undefined cells devoid of an organized subcellular architecture. In fact, proteins once thought to be the purely eukaryotic inventions, including relatives of actin and tubulin control prokaryotic cell shape, DNA segregation, and cytokinesis. Similarly, compartmentalization, commonly noted as a distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells, is also prevalent in the prokaryotic world in the form of protein-bounded and lipid-bounded organelles. In this article we highlight some of these prokaryotic organelles and discuss the current knowledge on their ultrastructure and the molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and maintenance. PMID:20739411

  12. Cell biology of prokaryotic organelles.

    PubMed

    Murat, Dorothee; Byrne, Meghan; Komeili, Arash

    2010-10-01

    Mounting evidence in recent years has challenged the dogma that prokaryotes are simple and undefined cells devoid of an organized subcellular architecture. In fact, proteins once thought to be the purely eukaryotic inventions, including relatives of actin and tubulin control prokaryotic cell shape, DNA segregation, and cytokinesis. Similarly, compartmentalization, commonly noted as a distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells, is also prevalent in the prokaryotic world in the form of protein-bounded and lipid-bounded organelles. In this article we highlight some of these prokaryotic organelles and discuss the current knowledge on their ultrastructure and the molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and maintenance.

  13. Short-Sequence DNA Repeats in Prokaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, Alex; Scherer, Stewart; van Alphen, Loek; Verbrugh, Henri

    1998-01-01

    Short-sequence DNA repeat (SSR) loci can be identified in all eukaryotic and many prokaryotic genomes. These loci harbor short or long stretches of repeated nucleotide sequence motifs. DNA sequence motifs in a single locus can be identical and/or heterogeneous. SSRs are encountered in many different branches of the prokaryote kingdom. They are found in genes encoding products as diverse as microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules and specific bacterial virulence factors such as lipopolysaccharide-modifying enzymes or adhesins. SSRs enable genetic and consequently phenotypic flexibility. SSRs function at various levels of gene expression regulation. Variations in the number of repeat units per locus or changes in the nature of the individual repeat sequences may result from recombination processes or polymerase inadequacy such as slipped-strand mispairing (SSM), either alone or in combination with DNA repair deficiencies. These rather complex phenomena can occur with relative ease, with SSM approaching a frequency of 10−4 per bacterial cell division and allowing high-frequency genetic switching. Bacteria use this random strategy to adapt their genetic repertoire in response to selective environmental pressure. SSR-mediated variation has important implications for bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary fitness. Molecular analysis of changes in SSRs allows epidemiological studies on the spread of pathogenic bacteria. The occurrence, evolution and function of SSRs, and the molecular methods used to analyze them are discussed in the context of responsiveness to environmental factors, bacterial pathogenicity, epidemiology, and the availability of full-genome sequences for increasing numbers of microorganisms, especially those that are medically relevant. PMID:9618442

  14. Biased DNA segregation in Drosophila male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2013-01-01

    The immortal strand hypothesis, which emerged four decades ago, proposes that certain cells retain a template copy of chromosomal DNA to protect against replication-induced mutations. As the interest in stem cells rose in recent years, researchers speculated that stem cells, which must maintain proliferative capacity throughout the life of the organism, may be the population that most needs the strong protection afforded by immortal strand segregation. Alternative hypotheses have also been proposed to explain observed non-random sister chromatid segregation. We recently found that Drosophila male germline stem cells segregate sister chromatids non-randomly, but such bias was limited to the sex chromosomes. Interestingly, the biased segregation does not lead to immortal strand segregation. We will discuss the implications of this observation and molecular mechanisms, which might be applicable to non-random sister chromatid segregation in other systems as well.

  15. GTAG- and CGTC-tagged palindromic DNA repeats in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background REPs (Repetitive Extragenic Palindromes) are small (20–40 bp) palindromic repeats found in high copies in some prokaryotic genomes, hypothesized to play a role in DNA supercoiling, transcription termination, mRNA stabilization. Results We have monitored a large number of REP elements in prokaryotic genomes, and found that most can be sorted into two large DNA super-families, as they feature at one end unpaired motifs fitting either the GTAG or the CGTC consensus. Tagged REPs have been identified in >80 species in 8 different phyla. GTAG and CGTC repeats reside predominantly in microorganisms of the gamma and alpha division of Proteobacteria, respectively. However, the identification of members of both super- families in deeper branching phyla such Cyanobacteria and Planctomycetes supports the notion that REPs are old components of the bacterial chromosome. On the basis of sequence content and overall structure, GTAG and CGTC repeats have been assigned to 24 and 4 families, respectively. Of these, some are species-specific, others reside in multiple species, and several organisms contain different REP types. In many families, most units are close to each other in opposite orientation, and may potentially fold into larger secondary structures. In different REP-rich genomes the repeats are predominantly located between unidirectionally and convergently transcribed ORFs. REPs are predominantly located downstream from coding regions, and many are plausibly transcribed and function as RNA elements. REPs located inside genes have been identified in several species. Many lie within replication and global genome repair genes. It has been hypothesized that GTAG REPs are miniature transposons mobilized by specific transposases known as RAYTs (REP associated tyrosine transposases). RAYT genes are flanked either by GTAG repeats or by long terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) unrelated to GTAG repeats. Moderately abundant families of TIRs have been identified in

  16. Specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA using a recombinant DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sandetskaya, Natalia; Naumann, Andreas; Hennig, Katharina; Kuhlmeier, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Targeted enrichment of DNA is often necessary for its detection and characterization in complex samples. We describe the development and application of the novel molecular tool for the specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA. A fused protein comprising the DNA-binding subunit of the bacterial topoisomerase II, gyrase, was expressed, purified, and immobilized on magnetic particles. We demonstrated the specific affinity of the immobilized protein towards bacterial DNA and investigated its efficiency in the samples with high background of eukaryotic DNA. The reported approach allowed for the selective isolation and further detection of as few as 5 pg Staphylococcus aureus DNA from the sample with 4 × 10(6)-fold surplus of human DNA. This method is a promising approach for the preparation of such type of samples, for example in molecular diagnostics of sepsis.

  17. Structural biology of plasmid partition: uncovering the molecular mechanisms of DNA segregation.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A

    2008-05-15

    DNA segregation or partition is an essential process that ensures stable genome transmission. In prokaryotes, partition is best understood for plasmids, which serve as tractable model systems to study the mechanistic underpinnings of DNA segregation at a detailed atomic level owing to their simplicity. Specifically, plasmid partition requires only three elements: a centromere-like DNA site and two proteins: a motor protein, generally an ATPase, and a centromere-binding protein. In the first step of the partition process, multiple centromere-binding proteins bind co-operatively to the centromere, which typically consists of several tandem repeats, to form a higher-order nucleoprotein complex called the partition complex. The partition complex recruits the ATPase to form the segrosome and somehow activates the ATPase for DNA separation. Two major families of plasmid par systems have been delineated based on whether they utilize ATPase proteins with deviant Walker-type motifs or actin-like folds. In contrast, the centromere-binding proteins show little sequence homology even within a given family. Recent structural studies, however, have revealed that these centromere-binding proteins appear to belong to one of two major structural groups: those that employ helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs or those with ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding domains. The first structure of a higher-order partition complex was recently revealed by the structure of pSK41 centromere-binding protein, ParR, bound to its centromere site. This structure showed that multiple ParR ribbon-helix-helix motifs bind symmetrically to the tandem centromere repeats to form a large superhelical structure with dimensions suitable for capture of the filaments formed by the actinlike ATPases. Surprisingly, recent data indicate that the deviant Walker ATPase proteins also form polymer-like structures, suggesting that, although the par families harbour what initially appeared to be structurally and functionally

  18. Segregation of prokaryotic magnetosomes organelles is driven by treadmilling of a dynamic actin-like MamK filament.

    PubMed

    Toro-Nahuelpan, Mauricio; Müller, Frank D; Klumpp, Stefan; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Bramkamp, Marc; Schüler, Dirk

    2016-10-12

    The navigation of magnetotactic bacteria relies on specific intracellular organelles, the magnetosomes, which are membrane-enclosed crystals of magnetite aligned into a linear chain. The magnetosome chain acts as a cellular compass, aligning the cells in the geomagnetic field in order to search for suitable environmental conditions in chemically stratified water columns and sediments. During cytokinesis, magnetosome chains have to be properly positioned, cleaved and separated in order to be evenly passed into daughter cells. In Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, the assembly of the magnetosome chain is controlled by the actin-like MamK, which polymerizes into cytoskeletal filaments that are connected to magnetosomes through the acidic MamJ protein. MamK filaments were speculated to recruit the magnetosome chain to cellular division sites, thus ensuring equal organelle inheritance. However, the underlying mechanism of magnetic organelle segregation has remained largely unknown. Here, we performed in vivo time-lapse fluorescence imaging to directly track the intracellular movement and dynamics of magnetosome chains as well as photokinetic and ultrastructural analyses of the actin-like cytoskeletal MamK filament. We show that magnetosome chains undergo rapid intracellular repositioning from the new poles towards midcell into the newborn daughter cells, and the driving force for magnetosomes movement is likely provided by the pole-to-midcell treadmilling growth of MamK filaments. We further discovered that splitting and equipartitioning of magnetosome chains occurs with unexpectedly high accuracy, which depends directly on the dynamics of MamK filaments. We propose a novel mechanism for prokaryotic organelle segregation that, similar to the type-II bacterial partitioning system of plasmids, relies on the action of cytomotive actin-like filaments together with specific connectors, which transport the magnetosome cargo in a fashion reminiscent of eukaryotic actin

  19. Novel actin filaments from Bacillus thuringiensis form nanotubules for plasmid DNA segregation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shimin; Narita, Akihiro; Popp, David; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Lee, Lin Jie; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K.; Oda, Toshiro; Koh, Fujiet; Larsson, Mårten; Robinson, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the discovery of a bacterial DNA-segregating actin-like protein (BtParM) from Bacillus thuringiensis, which forms novel antiparallel, two-stranded, supercoiled, nonpolar helical filaments, as determined by electron microscopy. The BtParM filament features of supercoiling and forming antiparallel double-strands are unique within the actin fold superfamily, and entirely different to the straight, double-stranded, polar helical filaments of all other known ParMs and of eukaryotic F-actin. The BtParM polymers show dynamic assembly and subsequent disassembly in the presence of ATP. BtParR, the DNA-BtParM linking protein, stimulated ATP hydrolysis/phosphate release by BtParM and paired two supercoiled BtParM filaments to form a cylinder, comprised of four strands with inner and outer diameters of 57 Å and 145 Å, respectively. Thus, in this prokaryote, the actin fold has evolved to produce a filament system with comparable features to the eukaryotic chromosome-segregating microtubule. PMID:26873105

  20. Prokaryotic cDNA Subtraction: A Method to Rapidly Identify Functional Gene Biomarkers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    FINAL REPORT Prokaryotic cDNA Subtraction: A Method to Rapidly Identify Functional Gene Biomarkers SERDP Project ER-1563 OCTOBER 2008... Method to Rapidly Identify Functional Gene Biomarkers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Studying Biological Treatment with MBT ...................................................................5 2.2 Methods for Obtaining Gene Sequences

  1. Relaxed specificity of prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases results in DNA site-specific modification of RNA/DNA heteroduplexes.

    PubMed

    Wons, Ewa; Mruk, Iwona; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2015-11-01

    RNA/DNA hybrid duplexes regularly occur in nature, for example in transcriptional R loops. Their susceptibility to modification by DNA-specific or RNA-specific enzymes is, thus, a biologically relevant question, which, in addition, has possible biotechnological implications. In this study, we investigated the activity of four isospecific DNA methyltransferases (M.EcoVIII, M.LlaCI, M.HindIII, M.BstZ1II) toward an RNA/DNA duplex carrying one 5'-AAGCUU-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5' target sequence. The analyzed enzymes belong to the β-group of adenine N6-methyltransferases and recognize the palindromic DNA sequence 5'-AAGCTT-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5'. Under standard conditions, none of these isospecific enzymes could detectibly methylate the RNA/DNA duplex. However, the addition of agents that generally relax specificity, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol, resulted in substantial methylation of the RNA/DNA duplex by M.EcoVIII and M.LlaCI. Only the DNA strand of the RNA/DNA duplex was methylated. The same was not observed for M.HindIII or M.BstZ1II. This is, to our knowledge, the first report that demonstrates such activity by prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases. Possible applications of these findings in a laboratory practice are also discussed.

  2. Repairing DNA double-strand breaks by the prokaryotic non-homologous end-joining pathway.

    PubMed

    Brissett, Nigel C; Doherty, Aidan J

    2009-06-01

    The NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) pathway is one of the major mechanisms for repairing DSBs (double-strand breaks) that occur in genomic DNA. In common with eukaryotic organisms, many prokaryotes possess a conserved NHEJ apparatus that is essential for the repair of DSBs arising in the stationary phase of the cell cycle. Although the bacterial NHEJ complex is much more minimal than its eukaryotic counterpart, both pathways share a number of common mechanistic features. The relative simplicity of the prokaryotic NHEJ complex makes it a tractable model system for investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DSB repair. The present review describes recent advances in our understanding of prokaryotic end-joining, focusing primarily on biochemical, structural and cellular aspects of the mycobacterial NHEJ repair pathway.

  3. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA helicases. Essential molecular motor proteins for cellular machinery.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra; Tuteja, Renu

    2004-05-01

    DNA helicases are ubiquitous molecular motor proteins which harness the chemical free energy of ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the unwinding of energetically stable duplex DNA, and thus play important roles in nearly all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism, including replication, repair, recombination, and transcription. They break the hydrogen bonds between the duplex helix and move unidirectionally along the bound strand. All helicases are also translocases and DNA-dependent ATPases. Most contain conserved helicase motifs that act as an engine to power DNA unwinding. All DNA helicases share some common properties, including nucleic acid binding, NTP binding and hydrolysis, and unwinding of duplex DNA in the 3' to 5' or 5' to 3' direction. The minichromosome maintenance (Mcm) protein complex (Mcm4/6/7) provides a DNA-unwinding function at the origin of replication in all eukaryotes and may act as a licensing factor for DNA replication. The RecQ family of helicases is highly conserved from bacteria to humans and is required for the maintenance of genome integrity. They have also been implicated in a variety of human genetic disorders. Since the discovery of the first DNA helicase in Escherichia coli in 1976, and the first eukaryotic one in the lily in 1978, a large number of these enzymes have been isolated from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, and the number is still growing. In this review we cover the historical background of DNA helicases, helicase assays, biochemical properties, prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA helicases including Mcm proteins and the RecQ family of helicases. The properties of most of the known DNA helicases from prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, including viruses and bacteriophages, are summarized in tables.

  4. DNA looping in prokaryotes: experimental and theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Cournac, Axel; Plumbridge, Jacqueline

    2013-03-01

    Transcriptional regulation is at the heart of biological functions such as adaptation to a changing environment or to new carbon sources. One of the mechanisms which has been found to modulate transcription, either positively (activation) or negatively (repression), involves the formation of DNA loops. A DNA loop occurs when a protein or a complex of proteins simultaneously binds to two different sites on DNA with looping out of the intervening DNA. This simple mechanism is central to the regulation of several operons in the genome of the bacterium Escherichia coli, like the lac operon, one of the paradigms of genetic regulation. The aim of this review is to gather and discuss concepts and ideas from experimental biology and theoretical physics concerning DNA looping in genetic regulation. We first describe experimental techniques designed to show the formation of a DNA loop. We then present the benefits that can or could be derived from a mechanism involving DNA looping. Some of these are already experimentally proven, but others are theoretical predictions and merit experimental investigation. Then, we try to identify other genetic systems that could be regulated by a DNA looping mechanism in the genome of Escherichia coli. We found many operons that, according to our set of criteria, have a good chance to be regulated with a DNA loop. Finally, we discuss the proposition recently made by both biologists and physicists that this mechanism could also act at the genomic scale and play a crucial role in the spatial organization of genomes.

  5. Promoters responsive to DNA bending: a common theme in prokaryotic gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, J; Rojo, F; de Lorenzo, V

    1994-01-01

    The early notion of DNA as a passive target for regulatory proteins has given way to the realization that higher-order DNA structures and DNA-protein complexes are at the basis of many molecular processes, including control of promoter activity. Protein binding may direct the bending of an otherwise linear DNA, exacerbate the angle of an intrinsic bend, or assist the directional flexibility of certain sequences within prokaryotic promoters. The important, sometimes essential role of intrinsic or protein-induced DNA bending in transcriptional regulation has become evident in virtually every system examined. As discussed throughout this article, not every function of DNA bends is understood, but their presence has been detected in a wide variety of bacterial promoters subjected to positive or negative control. Nonlinear DNA structures facilitate and even determine proximal and distal DNA-protein and protein-protein contacts involved in the various steps leading to transcription initiation. PMID:8078436

  6. Assessing diversity of DNA structure-related sequence features in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongjie; Mrázek, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Prokaryotic genomes are diverse in terms of their nucleotide and oligonucleotide composition as well as presence of various sequence features that can affect physical properties of the DNA molecule. We present a survey of local sequence patterns which have a potential to promote non-canonical DNA conformations (i.e. different from standard B-DNA double helix) and interpret the results in terms of relationships with organisms' habitats, phylogenetic classifications, and other characteristics. Our present work differs from earlier similar surveys not only by investigating a wider range of sequence patterns in a large number of genomes but also by using a more realistic null model to assess significant deviations. Our results show that simple sequence repeats and Z-DNA-promoting patterns are generally suppressed in prokaryotic genomes, whereas palindromes and inverted repeats are over-represented. Representation of patterns that promote Z-DNA and intrinsic DNA curvature increases with increasing optimal growth temperature (OGT), and decreases with increasing oxygen requirement. Additionally, representations of close direct repeats, palindromes and inverted repeats exhibit clear negative trends with increasing OGT. The observed relationships with environmental characteristics, particularly OGT, suggest possible evolutionary scenarios of structural adaptation of DNA to particular environmental niches. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  7. DnaK-Dependent Accelerated Evolutionary Rate in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Kadibalban, A. Samer; Bogumil, David; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins depend on an interaction with molecular chaperones in order to fold into a functional tertiary structure. Previous studies showed that protein interaction with the GroEL/GroES chaperonine and Hsp90 chaperone can buffer the impact of slightly deleterious mutations in the protein sequence. This capacity of GroEL/GroES to prevent protein misfolding has been shown to accelerate the evolution of its client proteins. Whether other bacterial chaperones have a similar effect on their client proteins is currently unknown. Here, we study the impact of DnaK (Hsp70) chaperone on the evolution of its client proteins. Evolutionary parameters were derived from comparison of the Escherichia coli proteome to 1,808,565 orthologous proteins in 1,149 proteobacterial genomes. Our analysis reveals a significant positive correlation between protein binding frequency with DnaK and evolutionary rate. Proteins with high binding affinity to DnaK evolve on average 4.3-fold faster than proteins in the lowest binding affinity class at the genus resolution. Differences in evolutionary rates of DnaK interactor classes are still significant after adjusting for possible effects caused by protein expression level. Furthermore, we observe an additive effect of DnaK and GroEL chaperones on the evolutionary rates of their common interactors. Finally, we found pronounced similarities in the physicochemical profiles that characterize proteins belonging to DnaK and GroEL interactomes. Our results thus implicate DnaK-mediated folding as a major component in shaping protein evolutionary dynamics in bacteria and supply further evidence for the long-term manifestation of chaperone-mediated folding on genome evolution. PMID:27189986

  8. The repertoire of DNA-binding transcription factors in prokaryotes: functional and evolutionary lessons.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Martinez-Nuñez, Mario Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The capabilities of organisms to contend with environmental changes depend on their genes and their ability to regulate their expression. DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in this process, because they regulate gene expression positively and/or negatively, depending on the operator context and ligand-binding status. In this review, we summarise recent findings regarding the function and evolution of TFs in prokaryotes. We consider the abundance of TFs in bacteria and archaea, the role of DNA-binding domains and their partner domains, and the effects of duplication events in the evolution of regulatory networks. Finally, a comprehensive picture for how regulatory networks have evolved in prokaryotes is provided.

  9. Mathematical relationships among DNA supercoiling, cation concentration, and temperature for prokaryotic transcription.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Y

    1998-08-01

    DNA twist has been proposed to affect transcription from some promoters of Escherichia coli, but involvement of twist has been difficult to test because it cannot be measured in transcription reaction mixtures. However, changes in other factors affect both DNA twist and transcription. These parameters are expected to be related when maximum transcription initiation is considered. In the present work, mathematical relationships among supercoiling, cation concentration, and temperature are derived for prokaryotic transcription initiation. The relationships indicate that as DNA becomes more negatively supercoiled, maximal initiation occurs at a higher cation concentration and at a lower temperature. For example, when superhelical density becomes more negative by 0.0025, a 1.6-fold increase in potassium concentration is predicted to be required to maintain transcription initiation at its maximum rate. Experimental verification of the relationships should provide a useful test of the idea that transcription initiation is sensitive to DNA twist.

  10. Prokaryotic suppression subtractive hybridization PCR cDNA subtraction, a targeted method to identify differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    De Long, Susan K; Kinney, Kerry A; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2008-01-01

    Molecular biology tools can be used to monitor and optimize biological treatment systems, but the application of nucleic acid-based tools has been hindered by the lack of available sequences for environmentally relevant biodegradation genes. The objective of our work was to extend an existing molecular method for eukaryotes to prokaryotes, allowing us to rapidly identify differentially expressed genes for subsequent sequencing. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) PCR cDNA subtraction is a technique that can be used to identify genes that are expressed under specific conditions (e.g., growth on a given pollutant). While excellent methods for eukaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction are available, to our knowledge, no methods previously existed for prokaryotes. This work describes our methodology for prokaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction, which we validated using a model system: Pseudomonas putida mt-2 degrading toluene. cDNA from P. putida mt-2 grown on toluene (model pollutant) or acetate (control substrate) was subjected to our prokaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction protocol to generate subtraction clone libraries. Over 90% of the sequenced clones contained gene fragments encoding toluene-related enzymes, and 20 distinct toluene-related genes from three key operons were sequenced. Based on these results, prokaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction shows promise as a targeted method for gene identification.

  11. DNA segregation in Escherichia coli cells with 5-bromodeoxyuridine-substituted nucleoids.

    PubMed Central

    Cánovas, J L; Tresguerres, E F; Yousif, A M; López-Sáez, J F; Navarrete, M H

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of segregation of DNA in Escherichia coli K-12 was analyzed by labeling replicating DNA with 5-bromodeoxyuridine followed by differential staining of nucleoids. Three types of visible arrangement were found in four-nucleoid groups derived from a native nucleoid after two replication rounds. Type A, segregation of both old strands toward cell poles, appeared with the highest frequency (0.6 to 0.8). Type B, segregation of one old strand toward the cell pole and the other toward the cell center, was twice as frequent as type C, segregation of both old strands toward the cell center. These results confirm previous data showing that DNA segregation in E. coli is nonrandom while presenting a certain degree of randomness. The proportions of the three indicated types of arrangement suggest a new probabilistic model to explain the observed segregation pattern. It is proposed that DNA strands segregate either nonrandomly, with a probability of between 0 and 1, or randomly. In nonrandom segregation, both old strands are always directed toward cell poles. Experimental data reported here or by other authors fit better with the predictions of this model than with those of other previously proposed proposed deterministic or probabilistic models. Images PMID:6370953

  12. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A is required for the segregation of mitochondrial DNA in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Sumitani, Megumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2011-01-15

    The segregation and transmission of the mitochondrial genome in humans are complicated processes but are particularly important for understanding the inheritance and clinical abnormalities of mitochondrial disorders. However, the molecular mechanism of the segregation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is largely unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is required for the segregation of mtDNA in cultured cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of TFAM in HeLa cells resulted in the enlarged mtDNA, as indicated by the assembly of fluorescent signals stained with PicoGreen. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the enlarged mtDNA and further showed the existence of increased numbers of mitochondria lacking mtDNA signals in TFAM knockdown cells. By complementation analysis, the C-terminal tail of TFAM, which enhances its affinity with DNA, was found to be required for the appropriate distribution of mtDNA. Furthermore, we found that TFAM knockdown induced asymmetric segregation of mtDNA between dividing daughter cells. These results suggest an essential role for human TFAM in symmetric segregation of mtDNA.

  13. Folded DNA in Action: Hairpin Formation and Biological Functions in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Bikard, David; Loot, Céline; Baharoglu, Zeynep; Mazel, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Structured forms of DNA with intrastrand pairing are generated in several cellular processes and are involved in biological functions. These structures may arise on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) produced during replication, bacterial conjugation, natural transformation, or viral infections. Furthermore, negatively supercoiled DNA can extrude inverted repeats as hairpins in structures called cruciforms. Whether they are on ssDNA or as cruciforms, hairpins can modify the access of proteins to DNA, and in some cases, they can be directly recognized by proteins. Folded DNAs have been found to play an important role in replication, transcription regulation, and recognition of the origins of transfer in conjugative elements. More recently, they were shown to be used as recombination sites. Many of these functions are found on mobile genetic elements likely to be single stranded, including viruses, plasmids, transposons, and integrons, thus giving some clues as to the manner in which they might have evolved. We review here, with special focus on prokaryotes, the functions in which DNA secondary structures play a role and the cellular processes giving rise to them. Finally, we attempt to shed light on the selective pressures leading to the acquisition of functions for DNA secondary structures. PMID:21119018

  14. DNA replication fidelity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by an ancestral prokaryotic proofreader.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jeremy M; Lang, Ulla F; Chase, Michael R; Ford, Christopher B; Gerrick, Elias R; Gawande, Richa; Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien; Fortune, Sarah M; Lamers, Meindert H

    2015-06-01

    The DNA replication machinery is an important target for antibiotic development in increasingly drug-resistant bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although blocking DNA replication leads to cell death, disrupting the processes used to ensure replication fidelity can accelerate mutation and the evolution of drug resistance. In Escherichia coli, the proofreading subunit of the replisome, the ɛ exonuclease, is essential for high-fidelity DNA replication; however, we find that the corresponding subunit is completely dispensable in M. tuberculosis. Rather, the mycobacterial replicative polymerase DnaE1 itself encodes an editing function that proofreads DNA replication, mediated by an intrinsic 3'-5' exonuclease activity within its PHP domain. Inactivation of the DnaE1 PHP domain increases the mutation rate by more than 3,000-fold. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of DNA replication proofreading in the bacterial kingdom suggests that E. coli is a phylogenetic outlier and that PHP domain-mediated proofreading is widely conserved and indeed may be the ancestral prokaryotic proofreader.

  15. DNA replication fidelity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by an ancestral prokaryotic proofreader

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Jeremy M.; Lang, Ulla F.; Chase, Michael R.; Ford, Christopher B.; Gerrick, Elias R.; Gawande, Richa; Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien; Fortune, Sarah M.; Lamers, Meindert H.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA replication machinery is an important target for antibiotic development for increasingly drug resistant bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis1. While blocking DNA replication leads to cell death, disrupting the processes used to ensure replication fidelity can accelerate mutation and the evolution of drug resistance. In E. coli, the proofreading subunit of the replisome, the ε-exonuclease, is essential for high fidelity DNA replication2; however, we find that it is completely dispensable in M. tuberculosis. Rather, the mycobacterial replicative polymerase, DnaE1, encodes a novel editing function that proofreads DNA replication, mediated by an intrinsic 3′-5′ exonuclease activity within its PHP domain. Inactivation of the DnaE1 PHP domain increases the mutation rate by greater than 3,000 fold. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of DNA replication proofreading in the bacterial kingdom suggests that E. coli is a phylogenetic outlier and that PHP-domain mediated proofreading is widely conserved and indeed may be the ancestral prokaryotic proofreader. PMID:25894501

  16. Changes in 16s RNA Gene Microbial Community Profiling by Concentration of Prokaryotic DNA.

    PubMed

    Glassing, Angela; Dowd, Scot E; Galandiuk, Susan; Davis, Brian; Jorden, Jeffrey R; Chiodini, Rodrick J

    2015-12-01

    Microbial metagenomics are hindered in clinical tissue samples as a result of the large relative amount of human DNA in relation to microbial DNA acting as competitive inhibitors of downstream applications. We evaluated the LOOXSTER® Enrichment Kit to separate eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA in submucosal intestinal tissue samples having a low microbial biomass and to determine the effects of enrichment on 16s rRNA microbiota sequencing. The enrichment kit reduced the amount of human DNA in the samples 40-70% resulting in a 3.5-fold increase in the number of 16s bacterial gene sequences detected on the Illumina MiSeq platform. This increase was accompanied by the detection of 41 additional bacterial genera and 94 tentative species. The additional bacterial taxa detected accounted for as much as 25% of the total bacterial population that significantly altered the relative prevalence and composition of the intestinal microbiota. The ability to reduce the competitive inhibition created by human DNA and the concentration of bacterial DNA may allow metagenomics to be performed on complex tissues containing a low bacterial biomass.

  17. Computational Model for DNA Organization Mediated by Protein Interaction in Prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, Karthik; Kharel, Savan

    2016-03-01

    In Escherichia Coli, there are several mechanisms that drive chromosomal organization. We know through experiments that the E. Coli chromosome is condensed into highly structured regions known as macrodomains (MDs). One of the regions known as the Terminus undergoes DNA-bridging condensation that form loops between distant DNA sites and it is known to be mediated by a Terminus specific protein, which binds to specific markers within the Terminus region. In the absence of Terminus specific protein, however, the Terminus region is known to not condense nearly as much, which will likely impede several biological processes including DNA replication. In order to understand the molecular basis of protein mediation in vivo several models of Terminus specific segregation have been constructed in silico which model DNA as polymer chains.

  18. Metakaryotic stem cell nuclei use pangenomic dsRNA/DNA intermediates in genome replication and segregation.

    PubMed

    Thilly, William G; Gostjeva, Elena V; Koledova, Vera V; Zukerberg, Lawrence R; Chung, Daniel; Fomina, Janna N; Darroudi, Firouz; Stollar, B David

    2014-01-01

    Bell shaped nuclei of metakaryotic cells double their DNA content during and after symmetric and asymmetric amitotic fissions rather than in the separate, pre-mitotic S-phase of eukaryotic cells. A parsimonious hypothesis was tested that the two anti-parallel strands of each chromatid DNA helix were first segregated as ssDNA-containing complexes into sister nuclei then copied to recreate a dsDNA genome. Metakaryotic nuclei that were treated during amitosis with RNase A and stained with acridine orange or fluorescent antibody to ssDNA revealed large amounts of ssDNA. Without RNase treatment metakaryotic nuclei in amitosis stained strongly with an antibody complex specific to dsRNA/DNA. Images of amitotic figures co-stained with dsRNA/DNA antibody and DAPI indicated that the entire interphase dsDNA genome (B-form helices) was transformed into two dsRNA/DNA genomes (A-form helices) that were segregated in the daughter cell nuclei then retransformed into dsDNA. As this process segregates DNA strands of opposite polarity in sister cells it hypothetically offers a sequential switching mechanism within the diverging stem cell lineages of development.

  19. Metakaryotic stem cell nuclei use pangenomic dsRNA/DNA intermediates in genome replication and segregation

    PubMed Central

    Thilly, William G; Gostjeva, Elena V; Koledova, Vera V; Zukerberg, Lawrence R; Chung, Daniel; Fomina, Janna N; Darroudi, Firouz; Stollar, B David

    2014-01-01

    Bell shaped nuclei of metakaryotic cells double their DNA content during and after symmetric and asymmetric amitotic fissions rather than in the separate, pre-mitotic S-phase of eukaryotic cells. A parsimonious hypothesis was tested that the two anti-parallel strands of each chromatid DNA helix were first segregated as ssDNA-containing complexes into sister nuclei then copied to recreate a dsDNA genome. Metakaryotic nuclei that were treated during amitosis with RNase A and stained with acridine orange or fluorescent antibody to ssDNA revealed large amounts of ssDNA. Without RNase treatment metakaryotic nuclei in amitosis stained strongly with an antibody complex specific to dsRNA/DNA. Images of amitotic figures co-stained with dsRNA/DNA antibody and DAPI indicated that the entire interphase dsDNA genome (B-form helices) was transformed into two dsRNA/DNA genomes (A-form helices) that were segregated in the daughter cell nuclei then retransformed into dsDNA. As this process segregates DNA strands of opposite polarity in sister cells it hypothetically offers a sequential switching mechanism within the diverging stem cell lineages of development. PMID:24418910

  20. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  1. Quantitative Changes in Gimap3 and Gimap5 Expression Modify Mitochondrial DNA Segregation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jokinen, Riikka; Lahtinen, Taina; Marttinen, Paula; Myöhänen, Maarit; Ruotsalainen, Pilvi; Yeung, Nicolas; Shvetsova, Antonina; Kastaniotis, Alexander J.; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Öhman, Tiina; Nyman, Tuula A.; Weiler, Hartmut; Battersby, Brendan J.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a high-copy maternally inherited genome essential for aerobic energy metabolism. Mutations in mtDNA can lead to heteroplasmy, the co-occurence of two different mtDNA variants in the same cell, which can segregate in a tissue-specific manner affecting the onset and severity of mitochondrial dysfunction. To investigate mechanisms regulating mtDNA segregation we use a heteroplasmic mouse model with two polymorphic neutral mtDNA haplotypes (NZB and BALB) that displays tissue-specific and age-dependent selection for mtDNA haplotypes. In the hematopoietic compartment there is selection for the BALB mtDNA haplotype, a phenotype that can be modified by allelic variants of Gimap3. Gimap3 is a tail-anchored member of the GTPase of the immunity-associated protein (Gimap) family of protein scaffolds important for leukocyte development and survival. Here we show how the expression of two murine Gimap3 alleles from Mus musculus domesticus and M. m. castaneus differentially affect mtDNA segregation. The castaneus allele has incorporated a uORF (upstream open reading frame) in-frame with the Gimap3 mRNA that impairs translation and imparts a negative effect on the steady-state protein abundance. We found that quantitative changes in the expression of Gimap3 and the paralogue Gimap5, which encodes a lysosomal protein, affect mtDNA segregation in the mouse hematopoietic tissues. We also show that Gimap3 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and not mitochondria as previously reported. Collectively these data show that the abundance of protein scaffolds on the endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes are important to the segregation of the mitochondrial genome in the mouse hematopoietic compartment. PMID:25808953

  2. Structures of archaeal DNA segregation machinery reveal bacterial and eukaryotic linkages.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A; Tonthat, Nam K; Lee, Jeehyun; Rodriguez-Castañeda, Fernando A; Chinnam, Naga Babu; Kalliomaa-Sanford, Anne K; Ng, Irene W; Barge, Madhuri T; Shaw, Porsha L R; Barillà, Daniela

    2015-09-04

    Although recent studies have provided a wealth of information about archaeal biology, nothing is known about the molecular basis of DNA segregation in these organisms. Here, we unveil the machinery and assembly mechanism of the archaeal Sulfolobus pNOB8 partition system. This system uses three proteins: ParA; an atypical ParB adaptor; and a centromere-binding component, AspA. AspA utilizes a spreading mechanism to create a DNA superhelix onto which ParB assembles. This supercomplex links to the ParA motor, which contains a bacteria-like Walker motif. The C domain of ParB harbors structural similarity to CenpA, which dictates eukaryotic segregation. Thus, this archaeal system combines bacteria-like and eukarya-like components, which suggests the possible conservation of DNA segregation principles across the three domains of life. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. A novel mechanism for direct real-time polymerase chain reaction that does not require DNA isolation from prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takashi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2016-06-23

    Typically, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed after DNA isolation. Real-time PCR (qPCR), also known as direct qPCR in mammalian cells with weak membranes, is a common technique using crude samples subjected to preliminary boiling to elute DNA. However, applying this methodology to prokaryotic cells, which have solid cell walls, in contrast to mammalian cells which immediately burst in water, can result in poor detection. We successfully achieved PCR elongation with the addition of 1.3 cfu of Cronobacter muytjensii to a newly developed direct qPCR master mix without performing any crude DNA extraction (detection limit of 1.6 × 10(0) cfu/ml for the test sample compared with a detection limit of 1.6 × 10(3) cfu/ml primarily for crude (boiling) or classical DNA isolation). We revealed that the chromosomal DNA retained in prokaryotic cells can function as a PCR template, similarly to the mechanism in in situ PCR. Elucidating this reaction mechanism may contribute to the development of an innovative master mix for direct qPCR to detect genes in a single bacterium with solid cell walls and might lead to numerous novel findings in prokaryotic genomics research.

  4. A novel mechanism for direct real-time polymerase chain reaction that does not require DNA isolation from prokaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Soejima, Takashi; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Typically, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed after DNA isolation. Real-time PCR (qPCR), also known as direct qPCR in mammalian cells with weak membranes, is a common technique using crude samples subjected to preliminary boiling to elute DNA. However, applying this methodology to prokaryotic cells, which have solid cell walls, in contrast to mammalian cells which immediately burst in water, can result in poor detection. We successfully achieved PCR elongation with the addition of 1.3 cfu of Cronobacter muytjensii to a newly developed direct qPCR master mix without performing any crude DNA extraction (detection limit of 1.6 × 100 cfu/ml for the test sample compared with a detection limit of 1.6 × 103 cfu/ml primarily for crude (boiling) or classical DNA isolation). We revealed that the chromosomal DNA retained in prokaryotic cells can function as a PCR template, similarly to the mechanism in in situ PCR. Elucidating this reaction mechanism may contribute to the development of an innovative master mix for direct qPCR to detect genes in a single bacterium with solid cell walls and might lead to numerous novel findings in prokaryotic genomics research. PMID:27334801

  5. The mortal strand hypothesis: non-random chromosome inheritance and the biased segregation of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    If a eukaryotic cell is to reproduce, it must duplicate its genetic information in the form of DNA, and faithfully segregate that information during a complex process of cell division. During this division process, the resulting cells inherit one, and only one, copy of each chromosome. Over thirty years ago, it was predicted that the segregation of sister chromosomes could occur non-randomly, such that a daughter cell would preferentially inherit one of the two sister chromosomes according to some characteristic of that chromosome's template DNA strand. Although this prediction has been confirmed in studies of various cell-types, we know little of both the mechanism by which the asymmetric inheritance occurs and the significance it has to cells. In this essay, we propose a new model of non-random chromosome segregation-the mortal strand hypothesis-and discuss tests of the model that will provide insight into the molecular choreography of this intriguing phenomenon. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Segregation of Naturally Occurring Mitochondrial DNA Variants in a Mini-Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Cagnone, Gael; Tsai, Te-Sha; Srirattana, Kanokwan; Rossello, Fernando; Powell, David R; Rohrer, Gary; Cree, Lynsey; Trounce, Ian A; St John, Justin C

    2016-03-01

    The maternally inherited mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is present in multimeric form within cells and harbors sequence variants (heteroplasmy). While a single mtDNA variant at high load can cause disease, naturally occurring variants likely persist at low levels across generations of healthy populations. To determine how naturally occurring variants are segregated and transmitted, we generated a mini-pig model, which originates from the same maternal ancestor. Following next-generation sequencing, we identified a series of low-level mtDNA variants in blood samples from the female founder and her daughters. Four variants, ranging from 3% to 20%, were selected for validation by high-resolution melting analysis in 12 tissues from 31 animals across three generations. All four variants were maintained in the offspring, but variant load fluctuated significantly across the generations in several tissues, with sex-specific differences in heart and liver. Moreover, variant load was persistently reduced in high-respiratory organs (heart, brain, diaphragm, and muscle), which correlated significantly with higher mtDNA copy number. However, oocytes showed increased heterogeneity in variant load, which correlated with increased mtDNA copy number during in vitro maturation. Altogether, these outcomes show that naturally occurring mtDNA variants segregate and are maintained in a tissue-specific manner across generations. This segregation likely involves the maintenance of selective mtDNA variants during organogenesis, which can be differentially regulated in oocytes and preimplantation embryos during maturation.

  7. Self-organized patterning through the dynamic segregation of DNA and silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Joksimovic, Rastko; Watanabe, Shun; Riemer, Sven; Gradzielski, Michael; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Exotic pattern formation as a result of drying of an aqueous solution containing DNA and silica nanoparticles is reported. The pattern due to segregation was found to critically depend on the relative ratio of nanoparticles and DNA, as revealed by polarization microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. The blurred radial pattern that is usually observed in the drying of a colloidal solution was shown to be vividly sharpened in the presence of DNA. Uniquely curved, crescent-shaped micrometer-scale domains are generated in regions that are rich in nanoparticles. The characteristic segregated patterns observed in the present study are interpreted in terms of a large aspect ratio between the persistence length (∼50 nm) and the diameter (∼2 nm) of double-stranded DNA, and the relatively small silica nanoparticles (radius: 5 nm). PMID:24413900

  8. Theory of phase segregation in DNA assemblies containing two different base-pair sequence types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (O’ Lee, Dominic J.; Wynveen, Aaron; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous pairing of homologous DNA sequences—a challenging subject in molecular biophysics, often referred to as ‘homology recognition’—has been observed in vitro for several DNA systems. One of these experiments involved liquid crystalline quasi-columnar phases formed by a mixture of two kinds of double stranded DNA oligomer. Both oligomer types were of the same length and identical stoichiometric base-pair composition, but the base-pairs followed a different order. Phase segregation of the two DNA types was observed in the experiments, with the formation of boundaries between domains rich in molecules of one type (order) of base pair sequence. We formulate here a modified ‘X–Y model’ for phase segregation in such assemblies, obtain approximate solutions of the model, compare analytical results to Monte Carlo simulations, and rationalise past experimental observations. This study, furthermore, reveals the factors that affect the degree of segregation. Such information could be used in planning new versions of similar segregation experiments, needed for deepening our understanding of forces that might be involved, e.g., in gene–gene recognition.

  9. Rapid quantification and taxonomic classification of environmentalDNA from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origins using a microarray

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Stone, Carol E.; Murray, Sonya R.; Moberg,Jordan P.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2005-02-22

    A microarray has been designed using 62,358 probes matched to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes. The array categorized environmental DNA to specific phylogenetic clusters in under 9 h. To a background of DNA generated from natural outdoor aerosols, known quantities of rRNA gene copies from distinct organisms were added producing corresponding hybridization intensity scores that correlated well with their concentrations (r=0.917). Reproducible differences in microbial community composition were observed by altering the genomic DNA extraction method. Notably, gentle extractions produced peak intensities for Mycoplasmatales and Burkholderiales, whereas a vigorous disruption produced peak intensities for Vibrionales,Clostridiales, and Bacillales.

  10. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  11. Selection of T-DNA-tagged male and female gametophytic mutants by segregation distortion in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Howden, R; Park, S K; Moore, J M; Orme, J; Grossniklaus, U; Twell, D

    1998-01-01

    As a strategy for the identification of T-DNA-tagged gametophytic mutants, we have used T-DNA insertional mutagenesis based on screening for distorted segregation ratios by antibiotic selection. Screening of approximately 1000 transgenic Arabidopsis families led to the isolation of eight lines showing reproducible segregation ratios of approximately 1:1, suggesting that these lines are putative gametophytic mutants caused by T-DNA insertion at a single locus. Genetic analysis of T-DNA transmission through reciprocal backcrosses with wild type showed severe reductions in genetic transmission of the T-DNA through the male and/or female gametes. Direct evidence for mutant phenotypes in these lines was investigated by DAPI staining of mature pollen grains and by the analysis of seed set and embryo sac morphology in cleared ovules. One line, termed limpet pollen, showed a novel pollen phenotype in that the generative cell failed to migrate inward after pollen mitosis I, such that the generative or sperm cells remained against the pollen wall. Two other lines, andarta and tistrya, were defective in female transmission and showed an early arrest of embryo sac development with the viable megaspore not initiating the nuclear division cycles. These data demonstrate the efficacy of a segregation ratio distortion strategy for the identification of T-DNA-tagged gametophytic mutants in Arabidopsis. PMID:9611178

  12. Specific and non-specific interactions of ParB with DNA: implications for chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, James A.; Pastrana, Cesar L.; Butterer, Annika; Pernstich, Christian; Gwynn, Emma J.; Sobott, Frank; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of many bacterial chromosomes is dependent on the interactions of ParB proteins with centromere-like DNA sequences called parS that are located close to the origin of replication. In this work, we have investigated the binding of Bacillus subtilis ParB to DNA in vitro using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. We observe tight and specific binding of a ParB homodimer to the parS sequence. Binding of ParB to non-specific DNA is more complex and displays apparent positive co-operativity that is associated with the formation of larger, poorly defined, nucleoprotein complexes. Experiments with magnetic tweezers demonstrate that non-specific binding leads to DNA condensation that is reversible by protein unbinding or force. The condensed DNA structure is not well ordered and we infer that it is formed by many looping interactions between neighbouring DNA segments. Consistent with this view, ParB is also able to stabilize writhe in single supercoiled DNA molecules and to bridge segments from two different DNA molecules in trans. The experiments provide no evidence for the promotion of non-specific DNA binding and/or condensation events by the presence of parS sequences. The implications of these observations for chromosome segregation are discussed. PMID:25572315

  13. PICH promotes mitotic chromosome segregation: Identification of a novel role in rDNA disjunction.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian F; Hickson, Ian D

    2016-10-17

    PICH is an SNF2-family DNA translocase that appears to play a role specifically in mitosis. Characterization of PICH in human cells led to the initial discovery of "ultra-fine DNA bridges" (UFBs) that connect the 2 segregating DNA masses in the anaphase of mitosis. These bridge structures, which arise from specific regions of the genome, are a normal feature of anaphase but had escaped detection previously because they do not stain with commonly used DNA dyes. Nevertheless, UFBs are important for genome maintenance because defects in UFB resolution can lead to cytokinesis failure. We reported recently that PICH stimulates the unlinking (decatenation) of entangled DNA by Topoisomerase IIα (Topo IIα), and is important for the resolution of UFBs. We also demonstrated that PICH and Topo IIα co-localize at the rDNA (rDNA). In this Extra View article, we discuss the mitotic roles of PICH and explore further the role of PICH in the timely segregation of the rDNA locus.

  14. PICH promotes mitotic chromosome segregation: Identification of a novel role in rDNA disjunction

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Christian F.; Hickson, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT PICH is an SNF2-family DNA translocase that appears to play a role specifically in mitosis. Characterization of PICH in human cells led to the initial discovery of “ultra-fine DNA bridges” (UFBs) that connect the 2 segregating DNA masses in the anaphase of mitosis. These bridge structures, which arise from specific regions of the genome, are a normal feature of anaphase but had escaped detection previously because they do not stain with commonly used DNA dyes. Nevertheless, UFBs are important for genome maintenance because defects in UFB resolution can lead to cytokinesis failure. We reported recently that PICH stimulates the unlinking (decatenation) of entangled DNA by Topoisomerase IIα (Topo IIα), and is important for the resolution of UFBs. We also demonstrated that PICH and Topo IIα co-localize at the rDNA (rDNA). In this Extra View article, we discuss the mitotic roles of PICH and explore further the role of PICH in the timely segregation of the rDNA locus. PMID:27565185

  15. Viruses, prokaryotes and DNA in the sediments of a deep-hypersaline anoxic basin (DHAB) of the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Danovaro, R; Corinaldesi, C; Dell'Anno, A; Fabiano, M; Corselli, C

    2005-04-01

    Viral and prokaryote abundance were investigated in a deep-hypersaline anoxic basin of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea (DHAB Atalante basin at c. 3000 m depth). This system was compared with two nearby deep-sea sites characterized by oxic conditions. Viral abundance and virus to prokaryote abundance ratio in hypersaline anoxic sediments displayed values close to those reported in oxic sites. The analysis of vertical profiles of viral abundance in the Atalante basin revealed the lack of significant changes with depth in the sediment, suggesting that benthic viruses in these anoxic and hypersaline conditions are preserved or resistant to decay. The anoxic basin displayed also very high concentrations of labile organic components (proteins and lipids) and extracellular DNA. These findings suggest that the DHAB sediments represent a reservoir for long-term preservation of benthic viruses and nucleic acids.

  16. Dipole angular entropy techniques for intron-exon segregation in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Nithya; Bose, R.

    2012-04-01

    We propose techniques for computing the angular entropies of DNA sequences, based on the orientations of the dipole moments of the nucleotide bases. The angles of the dipole moment vectors of the bases are used to compute the dipole angular entropy and the Fourier harmonics of the angles are used to compute the dipole angular spectral entropy for a given sequence. We also show that the coding (exons) and noncoding (introns) regions of the DNA can be segregated based on their dipole angular entropies and dipole angular spectral entropies. Segregation using these techniques is found to be computationally faster and more accurate than the previously reported methods. The proposed techniques can also be improvised to use the magnitude of the dipole moments of the bases in addition to the angles.

  17. Large-scale evaluation of experimentally determined DNA G+C contents with whole genome sequences of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mincheol; Park, Sang-Cheol; Baek, Inwoo; Chun, Jongsik

    2015-03-01

    Historically, DNA G+C content has played a critical role in the description of bacterial and archaeal species. Despite its importance in prokaryote taxonomy, its accuracy has been questioned due to methodological heterogeneity and measurement errors of conventional methods. Here we investigated the extent of accuracy of experimentally determined DNA G+C contents by comparing the reference values calculated from whole genome sequences. The large-scale comparison revealed that G+C contents determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and buoyant density centrifugation methods were more similar to the genome-derived reference values than those generated by thermal denaturation method. However, there was a substantial degree of discrepancy in DNA G+C contents between values obtained by conventional methods and genome-derived reference values. The majority of the differences between them fell out of the acceptable range (i.e. 1 mol% G+C content difference) for species delimitation of prokaryotes. In contrast, when average nucleotide identity (ANI) was correlated to G+C difference among genomes, most G+C difference was confined to less than 1% within species. Therefore, erroneous conventional methods are not meaningful in the description of bacterial and archaeal species. For taxonomic purposes, DNA G+C content should be determined by calculating directly from high-quality genome sequences with at least 16× or higher sequencing depth of coverage.

  18. A septal chromosome segregator protein evolved into a conjugative DNA-translocator protein

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Edgardo; Vogelmann, Jutta

    2011-01-01

    Streptomycetes, Gram-positive soil bacteria well known for the production of antibiotics feature a unique conjugative DNA transfer system. In contrast to classical conjugation which is characterized by the secretion of a pilot protein covalently linked to a single-stranded DNA molecule, in Streptomyces a double-stranded DNA molecule is translocated during conjugative transfer. This transfer involves a single plasmid encoded protein, TraB. A detailed biochemical and biophysical characterization of TraB, revealed a close relationship to FtsK, mediating chromosome segregation during bacterial cell division. TraB translocates plasmid DNA by recognizing 8-bp direct repeats located in a specific plasmid region clt. Similar sequences accidentally also occur on chromosomes and have been shown to be bound by TraB. We suggest that TraB mobilizes chromosomal genes by the interaction with these chromosomal clt-like sequences not relying on the integration of the conjugative plasmid into the chromosome. PMID:22479692

  19. Mitochondria: Biogenesis and mitophagy balance in segregation and clonal expansion of mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Valerio; Maresca, Alessandra; Caporali, Leonardo; Trifunov, Selena; Zanna, Claudia; Rugolo, Michela

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are cytoplasmic organelles containing their own multi-copy genome. They are organized in a highly dynamic network, resulting from balance between fission and fusion, which maintains homeostasis of mitochondrial mass through mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutates much faster than nuclear DNA. In particular, mtDNA point mutations and deletions may occur somatically and accumulate with aging, coexisting with the wild type, a condition known as heteroplasmy. Under specific circumstances, clonal expansion of mutant mtDNA may occur within single cells, causing a wide range of severe human diseases when mutant overcomes wild type. Furthermore, mtDNA deletions accumulate and clonally expand as a consequence of deleterious mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA replication and maintenance, as well as in mitochondrial fusion genes (mitofusin-2 and OPA1), possibly implicating mtDNA nucleoids segregation. We here discuss how the intricacies of mitochondrial homeostasis impinge on the intracellular propagation of mutant mtDNA. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  20. Probing for DNA damage with β-hairpins: Similarities in incision efficiencies of bulky DNA adducts by prokaryotic and human nucleotide excision repair systems in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Reeves, Dara; Kropachev, Konstantin; Cai, Yuqin; Ding, Shuang; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Kolbanovskiy, Alexander; Bolton, Judith L.; Broyde, Suse; Van Houten, Bennett; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important prokaryotic and eukaryotic defense mechanism that removes a large variety of structurally distinct lesions in cellular DNA. While the proteins involved are completely different, the mode of action of these two repair systems is similar, involving a cut-and-patch mechanism in which an oligonucleotide sequence containing the lesion is excised. The prokaryotic and eukaryotic NER damage-recognition factors have common structural features of β-hairpin intrusion between the two DNA strands at the site of the lesion. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that this common β-hairpin intrusion motif is mirrored in parallel NER incision efficiencies in the two systems. We have utilized human HeLa cell extracts and the prokaryotic UvrABC proteins to determine their relative NER incision efficiencies. We report here comparisons of relative NER efficiencies with a set of stereoisomeric DNA lesions derived from metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene and equine estrogens in different sequence contexts, utilizing 21 samples. We found a general qualitative trend towards similar relative NER incision efficiencies for ~ 65% of these substrates; the other cases deviate mostly by ~ 30% or less from a perfect correlation, although several more distant outliers are also evident. This resemblance is consistent with the hypothesis that lesion recognition through β-hairpin insertion, a common feature of the two systems, is facilitated by local thermodynamic destabilization induced by the lesions in both cases. In the case of the UvrABC system, varying the nature of the UvrC endonuclease, while maintaining the same UvrA/B proteins, can markedly affect the relative incision efficiencies. These observations suggest that, in addition to recognition involving the initial modified duplexes, downstream events involving UvrC can also play a role in distinguishing and processing different lesions in prokaryotic NER. PMID:21741328

  1. Depletion of RNase HI activity in Escherichia coli lacking DNA topoisomerase I leads to defects in DNA supercoiling and segregation

    PubMed Central

    Usongo, Valentine; Nolent, Flora; Sanscartier, Patrick; Tanguay, Cynthia; Broccoli, Sonia; Baaklini, Imad; Drlica, Karl; Drolet, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Gyrase-mediated hypernegative supercoiling is one manifestation of R-loop formation, a phenomenon that is normally suppressed by topoisomerase I (topA) in Escherichia coli. Overproduction of RNase HI (rnhA), an enzyme that removes the RNA moiety of R-loops, prevents hypernegative supercoiling and allows growth of topA null mutants. We previously showed that topA and rnhA null mutations are incompatible. We now report that such mutants were viable when RNase HI or topoisomerase III was expressed from a plasmid-borne gene. Surprisingly, DNA of topA null mutants became relaxed rather than hypernegatively supercoiled following depletion of RNase HI activity. This result failed to correlate with the cellular concentration of gyrase or topoisomerase IV (the other relaxing enzyme in the cell) or with transcription-induced supercoiling. Rather, intracellular DNA relaxation in the absence of RNase HI was related to inhibition of gyrase activity both in vivo and in extracts. Cells lacking topA and rnhA also exhibited properties consistent with segregation defects. Overproduction of topoisomerase III, an enzyme that can carry out DNA decatenation, corrected the segregation defects without restoring supercoiling activity. Collectively these data reveal 1) the existence of a cellular response to loss of RNase HI that counters the supercoiling activity of gyrase and 2) supercoiling-independent segregation defects due to loss of RNase HI from topA null mutants. Thus RNase HI plays a more central role in DNA topology than previously thought. PMID:18554330

  2. Plasmid protein TubR uses a distinct mode of HTH-DNA binding and recruits the prokaryotic tubulin homolog TubZ to effect DNA partition.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lisheng; Xu, Weijun; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Schumacher, Maria A

    2010-06-29

    The segregation of plasmid DNA typically requires three elements: a DNA centromere site, an NTPase, and a centromere-binding protein. Because of their simplicity, plasmid partition systems represent tractable models to study the molecular basis of DNA segregation. Unlike eukaryotes, which utilize the GTPase tubulin to segregate DNA, the most common plasmid-encoded NTPases contain Walker-box and actin-like folds. Recently, a plasmid stability cassette on Bacillus thuringiensis pBtoxis encoding a putative FtsZ/tubulin-like NTPase called TubZ and DNA-binding protein called TubR has been described. How these proteins collaborate to impart plasmid stability, however, is unknown. Here we show that the TubR structure consists of an intertwined dimer with a winged helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif. Strikingly, however, the TubR recognition helices mediate dimerization, making canonical HTH-DNA interactions impossible. Mutagenesis data indicate that a basic patch, encompassing the two wing regions and the N termini of the recognition helices, mediates DNA binding, which indicates an unusual HTH-DNA interaction mode in which the N termini of the recognition helices insert into a single DNA groove and the wings into adjacent DNA grooves. The TubZ structure shows that it is as similar structurally to eukaryotic tubulin as it is to bacterial FtsZ. TubZ forms polymers with guanine nucleotide-binding characteristics and polymer dynamics similar to tubulin. Finally, we show that the exposed TubZ C-terminal region interacts with TubR-DNA, linking the TubR-bound pBtoxis to TubZ polymerization. The combined data suggest a mechanism for TubZ-polymer powered plasmid movement.

  3. Microcompartments and Protein Machines in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryotic cell was once thought of as a “bag of enzymes” with little or no intracellular compartmentalization. In this view, most reactions essential for life occurred as a consequence of random molecular collisions involving substrates, cofactors and cytoplasmic enzymes. Our current conception of a prokaryote is far from this view. We now consider a bacterium or an archaeon as a highly structured, non-random collection of functional membrane-embedded and proteinaceous molecular machines, each of which serves a specialized function. In this article we shall present an overview of such microcompartments including (i) the bacterial cytoskeleton and the apparati allowing DNA segregation during cells division, (ii) energy transduction apparati involving light-driven proton pumping and ion gradient-driven ATP synthesis, (iii) prokaryotic motility and taxis machines that mediate cell movements in response to gradients of chemicals and physical forces, (iv) machines of protein folding, secretion and degradation, (v) metabolasomes carrying out specific chemical reactions, (vi) 24 hour clocks allowing bacteria to coordinate their metabolic activities with the daily solar cycle and (vii) proteinaceous membrane compartmentalized structures such as sulfur granules and gas vacuoles. Membrane-bounded prokaryotic organelles were considered in a recent JMMB written symposium concerned with membraneous compartmentalization in bacteria [Saier and Bogdanov, 2013]. By contrast, in this symposium, we focus on proteinaceous microcompartments. These two symposia, taken together, provide the interested reader with an objective view of the remarkable complexity of what was once thought of as a simple non-compartmentalized cell. PMID:23920489

  4. The cohesion stabilizer sororin favors DNA repair and chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jie; Yuan, Yi-Feng; Wu, Di; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Jiao, Xiao-Fei; Huo, Li-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Maintenance and timely termination of cohesion on chromosomes ensures accurate chromosome segregation to guard against aneuploidy in mammalian oocytes and subsequent chromosomally abnormal pregnancies. Sororin, a cohesion stabilizer whose relevance in antagonizing the anti-cohesive property of Wings-apart like protein (Wapl), has been characterized in mitosis; however, the role of Sororin remains unclear during mammalian oocyte meiosis. Here, we show that Sororin is required for DNA damage repair and cohesion maintenance on chromosomes, and consequently, for mouse oocyte meiotic program. Sororin is constantly expressed throughout meiosis and accumulates on chromatins at germinal vesicle (GV) stage/G2 phase. It localizes onto centromeres from germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) to metaphase II stage. Inactivation of Sororin compromises the GVBD and first polar body extrusion (PBE). Furthermore, Sororin inactivation induces DNA damage indicated by positive γH2AX foci in GV oocytes and precocious chromatin segregation in MII oocytes. Finally, our data indicate that PlK1 and MPF dissociate Sororin from chromosome arms without affecting its centromeric localization. Our results define Sororin as a determinant during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation by favoring DNA damage repair and chromosome separation, and thereby, maintaining the genome stability and generating haploid gametes.

  5. Comparative evaluation of prokaryotic 16S rDNA clone libraries and SSCP in groundwater samples.

    PubMed

    Larentis, Michael; Alfreider, Albin

    2011-06-01

    A comparison of ribosomal RNA sequence analysis methods based on clone libraries and single-strand conformational polymorphism technique (SSCP) was performed with groundwater samples obtained between 523-555 meters below surface. The coverage of analyzed clones by phylotype-richness estimates was between 88-100%, confirming that the clone libraries were adequately examined. Analysis of individual bands retrieved from SSCP gels identified 1-6 different taxonomic units per band, suggesting that a single SSCP band does often represent more than one single prokaryotic species. The prokaryotic diversity obtained by both methods showed an overall difference of 42-80%. In comparison to SSCP, clone libraries underestimated the phylogenetic diversity and only 36-66% of the phylotypes observed with SSCP were also detected with the clone libraries. An exception was a sample where the SSCP analysis of Archaea identified only half of the phylotypes retrieved by the clone library. Overall, this study suggests that the clone library and the SSCP approach do not provide an identical picture of the prokaryotic diversity in groundwater samples. The results clearly show that the SSCP method, although this approach is prone to generate methodological artifacts, was able to detect significantly more phylotypes than microbial community analysis based on clone libraries.

  6. Synonymous codon bias and functional constraint on GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics in the prokaryotic nucleoid.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Gregory A; Alawad, Mohammed A; Schulze, Katharina V; Hudson, André O

    2014-01-01

    While mRNA stability has been demonstrated to control rates of translation, generating both global and local synonymous codon biases in many unicellular organisms, this explanation cannot adequately explain why codon bias strongly tracks neighboring intergene GC content; suggesting that structural dynamics of DNA might also influence codon choice. Because minor groove width is highly governed by 3-base periodicity in GC, the existence of triplet-based codons might imply a functional role for the optimization of local DNA molecular dynamics via GC content at synonymous sites (≈GC3). We confirm a strong association between GC3-related intrinsic DNA flexibility and codon bias across 24 different prokaryotic multiple whole-genome alignments. We develop a novel test of natural selection targeting synonymous sites and demonstrate that GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics have been subject to moderate selective pressure, perhaps contributing to our observation that many genes possess extreme DNA backbone dynamics for their given protein space. This dual function of codons may impose universal functional constraints affecting the evolution of synonymous and non-synonymous sites. We propose that synonymous sites may have evolved as an 'accessory' during an early expansion of a primordial genetic code, allowing for multiplexed protein coding and structural dynamic information within the same molecular context.

  7. Synonymous codon bias and functional constraint on GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics in the prokaryotic nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Gregory A.; Alawad, Mohammed A.; Schulze, Katharina V.; Hudson, André O.

    2014-01-01

    While mRNA stability has been demonstrated to control rates of translation, generating both global and local synonymous codon biases in many unicellular organisms, this explanation cannot adequately explain why codon bias strongly tracks neighboring intergene GC content; suggesting that structural dynamics of DNA might also influence codon choice. Because minor groove width is highly governed by 3-base periodicity in GC, the existence of triplet-based codons might imply a functional role for the optimization of local DNA molecular dynamics via GC content at synonymous sites (≈GC3). We confirm a strong association between GC3-related intrinsic DNA flexibility and codon bias across 24 different prokaryotic multiple whole-genome alignments. We develop a novel test of natural selection targeting synonymous sites and demonstrate that GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics have been subject to moderate selective pressure, perhaps contributing to our observation that many genes possess extreme DNA backbone dynamics for their given protein space. This dual function of codons may impose universal functional constraints affecting the evolution of synonymous and non-synonymous sites. We propose that synonymous sites may have evolved as an ‘accessory’ during an early expansion of a primordial genetic code, allowing for multiplexed protein coding and structural dynamic information within the same molecular context. PMID:25200075

  8. Asymmetric cell division and template DNA co-segregation in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pine, Sharon R; Liu, Wenyu

    2014-01-01

    During tissue homeostasis, normal stem cells self-renew and repopulate the diverse cell types found within the tissue via a series of carefully controlled symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs). The notion that solid tumors comprise a subset of cancer stem cells (CSCs) with dysregulated self-renewal and excessive symmetric cell divisions has led to numerous studies aimed to elucidate the mechanisms regulating ACD under steady-state conditions, during stem-cell expansion and in cancer. In this perspective, we focus on a type of asymmetry that can be established during ACD, called non-random co-segregation of template DNA, which has been identified across numerous species, cell types, and cancers. We discuss the role of p53 loss in maintaining self-renewal in both normal and malignant cells. We then review our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying co-segregation of template DNA strands and the stem-cell pathways associated with it in normal and CSCs.

  9. Evidence for a DNA-relay mechanism in ParABS-mediated chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoong Chuin; Surovtsev, Ivan Vladimirovich; Beltran, Bruno Gabriel; Huang, Fang; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-05-23

    The widely conserved ParABS system plays a major role in bacterial chromosome segregation. How the components of this system work together to generate translocation force and directional motion remains uncertain. Here, we combine biochemical approaches, quantitative imaging and mathematical modeling to examine the mechanism by which ParA drives the translocation of the ParB/parS partition complex in Caulobacter crescentus. Our experiments, together with simulations grounded on experimentally-determined biochemical and cellular parameters, suggest a novel 'DNA-relay' mechanism in which the chromosome plays a mechanical function. In this model, DNA-bound ParA-ATP dimers serve as transient tethers that harness the elastic dynamics of the chromosome to relay the partition complex from one DNA region to another across a ParA-ATP dimer gradient. Since ParA-like proteins are implicated in the partitioning of various cytoplasmic cargos, the conservation of their DNA-binding activity suggests that the DNA-relay mechanism may be a general form of intracellular transport in bacteria.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02758.001.

  10. Analysis of mtDNA variant segregation during early human embryonic development: a tool for successful NARP preimplantation diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Steffann, J; Frydman, N; Gigarel, N; Burlet, P; Ray, P F; Fanchin, R; Feyereisen, E; Kerbrat, V; Tachdjian, G; Bonnefont, J‐P; Frydman, R; Munnich, A

    2006-01-01

    Background Diseases arising from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are usually serious pleiotropic disorders with maternal inheritance. Owing to the high recurrence risk in the progeny of carrier females, “at‐risk” couples often ask for prenatal diagnosis. However, reliability of such practices remains under debate. Preimplantation diagnosis (PGD), a theoretical alternative to conventional prenatal diagnosis, requires that the mutant load measured in a single cell from an eight cell embryo accurately reflects the overall heteroplasmy of the whole embryo, but this is not known to be the case. Objective To investigate the segregation of an mtDNA length polymorphism in blastomeres of 15 control embryos from four unrelated couples, the NARP mutation in blastomeres of three embryos from a carrier of this mutation. Results Variability of the mtDNA polymorphism heteroplasmy among blastomeres from each embryo was limited, ranging from zero to 19%, with a mean of 7%. PGD for the neurogenic ataxia retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) mtDNA mutation (8993T→G) was therefore carried out in the carrier mother of an affected child. One of three embryos was shown to carry 100% of mutant mtDNA species while the remaining two were mutation‐free. These two embryos were transferred, resulting in a singleton pregnancy with delivery of a healthy child. Conclusions This PGD, the first reported for a mtDNA mutation, illustrates the skewed meiotic segregation of the NARP mtDNA mutation in early human development. However, discrepancies between the segregation patterns of the NARP mutation and the HV2 polymorphism indicate that a particular mtDNA nucleotide variant might differentially influenced the mtDNA segregation, precluding any assumption on feasibility of PGD for other mtDNA mutations. PMID:16155197

  11. Cytokinesis in Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes: Common Principles and Different Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Nanninga, Nanne

    2001-01-01

    Cytokinesis requires duplication of cellular structures followed by bipolarization of the predivisional cell. As a common principle, this applies to prokaryotes as well as eukaryotes. With respect to eukaryotes, the discussion has focused mainly on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Escherichia coli and to a lesser extent Bacillus subtilis have been used as prokaryotic examples. To establish a bipolar cell, duplication of a eukaryotic origin of DNA replication as well as its genome is not sufficient. Duplication of the microtubule-organizing center is required as a prelude to mitosis, and it is here that the dynamic cytoskeleton with all its associated proteins comes to the fore. In prokaryotes, a cytoskeleton that pervades the cytoplasm appears to be absent. DNA replication and the concomitant DNA segregation seem to occur without help from extensive cytosolic supramacromolecular assemblies but with help from the elongating cellular envelope. Prokaryotic cytokinesis proceeds through a contracting ring, which has a roughly 100-fold-smaller circumference than its eukaryotic counterpart. Although the ring contains proteins that can be considered as predecessors of actin, tubulin, and microtubule-associated proteins, its macromolecular composition is essentially different. PMID:11381104

  12. Structures of partition protein ParA with nonspecific DNA and ParB effector reveal molecular insights into principles governing Walker-box DNA segregation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengshan; Schumacher, Maria A

    2017-03-01

    Walker-box partition systems are ubiquitous in nature and mediate the segregation of bacterial and archaeal DNA. Well-studied plasmid Walker-box partition modules require ParA, centromere-DNA, and a centromere-binding protein, ParB. In these systems, ParA-ATP binds nucleoid DNA and uses it as a substratum to deliver ParB-attached cargo DNA, and ParB drives ParA dynamics, allowing ParA progression along the nucleoid. How ParA-ATP binds nonspecific DNA and is regulated by ParB is unclear. Also under debate is whether ParA polymerizes on DNA to mediate segregation. Here we describe structures of key ParA segregation complexes. The ParA-β,γ-imidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (AMPPNP)-DNA structure revealed no polymers. Instead, ParA-AMPPNP dimerization creates a multifaceted DNA-binding surface, allowing it to preferentially bind high-density DNA regions (HDRs). DNA-bound ParA-AMPPNP adopts a dimer conformation distinct from the ATP sandwich dimer, optimized for DNA association. Our ParA-AMPPNP-ParB structure reveals that ParB binds at the ParA dimer interface, stabilizing the ATPase-competent ATP sandwich dimer, ultimately driving ParA DNA dissociation. Thus, the data indicate how harnessing a conformationally adaptive dimer can drive large-scale cargo movement without the requirement for polymers and suggest a segregation mechanism by which ParA-ATP dimers equilibrate to HDRs shown to be localized near cell poles of dividing chromosomes, thus mediating equipartition of attached ParB-DNA substrates. © 2017 Zhang and Schumacher; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. Cell cycle-dependent spatial segregation of telomerase from sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ouenzar, Faissal; Lalonde, Maxime; Laprade, Hadrien; Morin, Geneviève; Gallardo, Franck; Tremblay-Belzile, Samuel; Chartrand, Pascal

    2017-08-07

    Telomerase can generate a novel telomere at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), an event called de novo telomere addition. How this activity is suppressed remains unclear. Combining single-molecule imaging and deep sequencing, we show that the budding yeast telomerase RNA (TLC1 RNA) is spatially segregated to the nucleolus and excluded from sites of DNA repair in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Although TLC1 RNA accumulates in the nucleoplasm in G1/S, Pif1 activity promotes TLC1 RNA localization in the nucleolus in G2/M. In the presence of DSBs, TLC1 RNA remains nucleolar in most G2/M cells but accumulates in the nucleoplasm and colocalizes with DSBs in rad52Δ cells, leading to de novo telomere additions. Nucleoplasmic accumulation of TLC1 RNA depends on Cdc13 localization at DSBs and on the SUMO ligase Siz1, which is required for de novo telomere addition in rad52Δ cells. This study reveals novel roles for Pif1, Rad52, and Siz1-dependent sumoylation in the spatial exclusion of telomerase from sites of DNA repair. © 2017 Ouenzar et al.

  14. Casposons: a new superfamily of self-synthesizing DNA transposons at the origin of prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas immunity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diverse transposable elements are abundant in genomes of cellular organisms from all three domains of life. Although transposons are often regarded as junk DNA, a growing body of evidence indicates that they are behind some of the major evolutionary innovations. With the growth in the number and diversity of sequenced genomes, previously unnoticed mobile elements continue to be discovered. Results We describe a new superfamily of archaeal and bacterial mobile elements which we denote casposons because they encode Cas1 endonuclease, a key enzyme of the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity systems of archaea and bacteria. The casposons share several features with self-synthesizing eukaryotic DNA transposons of the Polinton/Maverick class, including terminal inverted repeats and genes for B family DNA polymerases. However, unlike any other known mobile elements, the casposons are predicted to rely on Cas1 for integration and excision, via a mechanism similar to the integration of new spacers into CRISPR loci. We identify three distinct families of casposons that differ in their gene repertoires and evolutionary provenance of the DNA polymerases. Deep branching of the casposon-encoded endonuclease in the Cas1 phylogeny suggests that casposons played a pivotal role in the emergence of CRISPR-Cas immunity. Conclusions The casposons are a novel superfamily of mobile elements, the first family of putative self-synthesizing transposons discovered in prokaryotes. The likely contribution of capsosons to the evolution of CRISPR-Cas parallels the involvement of the RAG1 transposase in vertebrate immunoglobulin gene rearrangement, suggesting that recruitment of endonucleases from mobile elements as ready-made tools for genome manipulation is a general route of evolution of adaptive immunity. PMID:24884953

  15. Persistence of Unselected Transgenic DNA during a Plastid Transformation and Segregation Approach to Herbicide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Guang-Ning; Colburn, Susan M.; Xu, Charles W.; Hajdukiewicz, Peter T. J.; Staub, Jeffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of a nonlethal selection scheme, most often using the aadA gene that confers resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin, has been considered critical for recovery of plastid transformation events. In this study, the plastid-lethal markers, glyphosate or phosphinothricin herbicides, were used to develop a selection scheme for plastids that circumvents the need for integration of an antibiotic resistance marker. The effect of selective agents on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mesophyll chloroplasts was first examined by transmission electron microscopy. We found that at concentrations typically used for selection of nuclear transformants, herbicides caused rapid disintegration of plastid membranes, whereas antibiotics had no apparent effect. To overcome this apparent herbicide lethality to plastids, a “transformation segregation” scheme was developed that used two independent transformation vectors for a cotransformation approach and two different selective agents in a phased selection scheme. One transformation vector carried an antibiotic resistance (aadA) marker used for early nonlethal selection, and the other transformation vector carried the herbicide (CP4 or bar) resistance marker for use in a subsequent lethal selection phase. Because the two markers were carried on separate plasmids and were targeted to different locations on the plastid genome, we reasoned that segregation of the two markers in some transplastomic lines could occur. We report here a plastid cotransformation frequency of 50% to 64%, with a high frequency (20%) of these giving rise to transformation segregants containing exclusively the initially nonselected herbicide resistance marker. Our studies indicate a high degree of persistence of unselected transforming DNA, providing useful insights into plastid chromosome dynamics. PMID:12970505

  16. Chromosome segregation by the Escherichia coli Min system

    PubMed Central

    Di Ventura, Barbara; Knecht, Benoît; Andreas, Helena; Godinez, William J; Fritsche, Miriam; Rohr, Karl; Nickel, Walter; Heermann, Dieter W; Sourjik, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying chromosome segregation in prokaryotes remain a subject of debate and no unifying view has yet emerged. Given that the initial disentanglement of duplicated chromosomes could be achieved by purely entropic forces, even the requirement of an active prokaryotic segregation machinery has been questioned. Using computer simulations, we show that entropic forces alone are not sufficient to achieve and maintain full separation of chromosomes. This is, however, possible by assuming repeated binding of chromosomes along a gradient of membrane-associated tethering sites toward the poles. We propose that, in Escherichia coli, such a gradient of membrane tethering sites may be provided by the oscillatory Min system, otherwise known for its role in selecting the cell division site. Consistent with this hypothesis, we demonstrate that MinD binds to DNA and tethers it to the membrane in an ATP-dependent manner. Taken together, our combined theoretical and experimental results suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of chromosome segregation based on the Min system, further highlighting the importance of active segregation of chromosomes in prokaryotic cell biology. PMID:24022004

  17. Dbf4-dependent CDC7 kinase links DNA replication to the segregation of homologous chromosomes in meiosis I.

    PubMed

    Matos, Joao; Lipp, Jesse J; Bogdanova, Aliona; Guillot, Sylvine; Okaz, Elwy; Junqueira, Magno; Shevchenko, Andrej; Zachariae, Wolfgang

    2008-11-14

    Meiosis differs from mitosis in that DNA replication is followed by the segregation of homologous chromosomes but not sister chromatids. This depends on the formation of interhomolog connections through crossover recombination and on the attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules emanating from the same spindle pole. We show that in yeast, the Dbf4-dependent Cdc7 kinase (DDK) provides a link between premeiotic S phase, recombination, and monopolar attachment. Independently from its established role in initiating DNA replication, DDK promotes double-strand break formation, the first step of recombination, and the recruitment of the monopolin complex to kinetochores, which is essential for monopolar attachment. DDK regulates monopolin localization together with the polo-kinase Cdc5 bound to Spo13, probably through phosphorylation of the monopolin subunit Lrs4. Thus, activation of DDK both initiates DNA replication and commits meiotic cells to reductional chromosome segregation in the first division of meiosis.

  18. Segregation of mtDNA Throughout Human Embryofetal Development: m.3243A > G as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Monnot, Sophie; Gigarel, Nadine; Samuels, David C; Burlet, Philippe; Hesters, Laetitia; Frydman, Nelly; Frydman, René; Kerbrat, Violaine; Funalot, Benoit; Martinovic, Jelena; Benachi, Alexandra; Feingold, Josué; Munnich, Arnold; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Steffann, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause a wide range of serious diseases with high transmission risk and maternal inheritance. Tissue heterogeneity of the heteroplasmy rate (“mutant load”) accounts for the wide phenotypic spectrum observed in carriers. Owing to the absence of therapy, couples at risk to transmit such disorders commonly ask for prenatal (PND) or preimplantation diagnosis (PGD). The lack of data regarding heteroplasmy distribution throughout intrauterine development, however, hampers the implementation of such procedures. We tracked the segregation of the m.3243A > G mutation (MT-TL1 gene) responsible for the MELAS syndrome in the developing embryo/fetus, using tissues and cells from eight carrier females, their 38 embryos and 12 fetuses. Mutant mtDNA segregation was found to be governed by random genetic drift, during oogenesis and somatic tissue development. The size of the bottleneck operating for m.3243A > G during oogenesis was shown to be individual-dependent. Comparison with data we achieved for the m.8993T > G mutation (MT-ATP6 gene), responsible for the NARP/Leigh syndrome, indicates that these mutations differentially influence mtDNA segregation during oogenesis, while their impact is similar in developing somatic tissues. These data have major consequences for PND and PGD procedures in mtDNA inherited disorders. Hum Mutat 32:116–125, 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21120938

  19. Single-molecule study of DNA unlinking by eukaryotic and prokaryotic type-II topoisomerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvin, G.; Bensimon, D.; Croquette, V.

    2003-08-01

    Type-II topoisomerases are responsible for untangling DNA during replication by removing supercoiled and interlinked DNA structures. Using a single-molecule micromanipulation setup, we follow the real-time decatenation of two mechanically braided DNA molecules by Drosophila melanogaster topoisomerase (Topo) II and Escherichia coli Topo IV. Although Topo II relaxes left-handed (L) and right-handed (R-) braids similarly at a rate of 2.9 s-1, Topo IV has a marked preference for L-braids, which it relaxes completely and processively at a rate of 2.4 s-1. However, Topo IV can unlink R-braids at about half that rate when they supercoil to form L-plectonemes. These results imply that the preferred substrate for unlinking by Topo IV has the symmetry of an L-crossing and shed new light on the decatenation of daughter strands during DNA replication, which are usually assumed to be linked in an R-braid. DNA replication

  20. Estimating the Age of the Common Ancestor of a DNA Sample Using the Number of Segregating Sites

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Y. X.

    1996-01-01

    The number of segregating sites in a sample of DNA sequences and the age of the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the sequences in the sample are positively correlated. The value of the former can be used to estimate the value of the latter. Using the coalescent approach, we derive in this paper the joint probability distribution of the number of segregating sites and the age of the MRCA of a sample under the neutral Wright-Fisher model. From this distribution, we are able to compute the likelihood function of the number of segregating sites and the posterior probability of the age of the MRCA of a sample. Three point estimators and one interval estimator of the age of the MRCA are developed; their relationships and properties are investigated. The estimation of the age of the MRCA of human Y chromosomes from a sample of no variation is discussed. PMID:8889543

  1. Conservation of DNA curvature signals in regulatory regions of prokaryotic genes

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui, Ruy; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Collado-Vides, Julio; Merino, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    DNA curvature plays a well-characterized role in many transcriptional regulation mechanisms. We present evidence for the conservation of curvature signals in putative regulatory regions of several archaeal and eubacterial genomes. Genes with highly curved upstream regions were identified in orthologous groups, based on the annotations of the Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COG) database. COGs possessing a significant number of genes with curvature signals were analyzed, and conserved properties were found in several cases. Curvature signals related to regulatory sites, previously described in single organisms, were located in a broad spectrum of bacterial genomes. Global regulatory proteins, such as HU, IHF and FIS, known to bind to curved DNA and to be autoregulated, were found to present conserved DNA curvature signals in their regulatory regions, emphasizing the fact that structural parameters of the DNA molecule are conserved elements in the process of transcriptional regulation of some systems. It is currently an open question whether these diverse systems are part of an integrated global regulatory response in different microorganisms. PMID:14627810

  2. Evolution of RNA- and DNA-guided antivirus defense systems in prokaryotes and eukaryotes: common ancestry vs convergence.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-02-10

    Complementarity between nucleic acid molecules is central to biological information transfer processes. Apart from the basal processes of replication, transcription and translation, complementarity is also employed by multiple defense and regulatory systems. All cellular life forms possess defense systems against viruses and mobile genetic elements, and in most of them some of the defense mechanisms involve small guide RNAs or DNAs that recognize parasite genomes and trigger their inactivation. The nucleic acid-guided defense systems include prokaryotic Argonaute (pAgo)-centered innate immunity and CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity as well as diverse branches of RNA interference (RNAi) in eukaryotes. The archaeal pAgo machinery is the direct ancestor of eukaryotic RNAi that, however, acquired additional components, such as Dicer, and enormously diversified through multiple duplications. In contrast, eukaryotes lack any heritage of the CRISPR-Cas systems, conceivably, due to the cellular toxicity of some Cas proteins that would get activated as a result of operon disruption in eukaryotes. The adaptive immunity function in eukaryotes is taken over partly by the PIWI RNA branch of RNAi and partly by protein-based immunity. In this review, I briefly discuss the interplay between homology and analogy in the evolution of RNA- and DNA-guided immunity, and attempt to formulate some general evolutionary principles for this ancient class of defense systems.

  3. Microcompartments and protein machines in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Saier, Milton H

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryotic cell was once thought of as a 'bag of enzymes' with little or no intracellular compartmentalization. In this view, most reactions essential for life occurred as a consequence of random molecular collisions involving substrates, cofactors and cytoplasmic enzymes. Our current conception of a prokaryote is far from this view. We now consider a bacterium or an archaeon as a highly structured, nonrandom collection of functional membrane-embedded and proteinaceous molecular machines, each of which serves a specialized function. In this article we shall present an overview of such microcompartments including (1) the bacterial cytoskeleton and the apparati allowing DNA segregation during cell division; (2) energy transduction apparati involving light-driven proton pumping and ion gradient-driven ATP synthesis; (3) prokaryotic motility and taxis machines that mediate cell movements in response to gradients of chemicals and physical forces; (4) machines of protein folding, secretion and degradation; (5) metabolosomes carrying out specific chemical reactions; (6) 24-hour clocks allowing bacteria to coordinate their metabolic activities with the daily solar cycle, and (7) proteinaceous membrane compartmentalized structures such as sulfur granules and gas vacuoles. Membrane-bound prokaryotic organelles were considered in a recent Journal of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology written symposium concerned with membranous compartmentalization in bacteria [J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 2013;23:1-192]. By contrast, in this symposium, we focus on proteinaceous microcompartments. These two symposia, taken together, provide the interested reader with an objective view of the remarkable complexity of what was once thought of as a simple noncompartmentalized cell.

  4. cDNA cloning and prokaryotic expression of maize calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Y; Hata, S; Sheen, J; Izui, K

    1997-02-07

    Using degenerate oligonucleotide primers corresponding to conserved regions of the calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) family, we carried out a polymerase chain reaction and obtained four distinct partial-length cDNAs from a maize leaf library. We then used these clones as probes for conventional screening and isolated 19 longer clones from another cDNA library of maize seedlings. These clones were classified into four groups based on their DNA cross-hybridization. Two full-length cDNAs, designated as ZmCDPK9 and ZmCDPK7, were sequenced and characterized. The predicted protein of each clone was a typical CDPK with eleven canonical subdomains of protein kinases, and four EF-hand calcium-binding motifs in its N-terminal and C-terminal halves, respectively. The catalytic and regulatory domains were linked by a well-conserved junction domain. The N-terminus of the protein also contained a consensus sequence for an N-myristoylation signal. Northern blot analysis showed that the transcription level of each gene was higher in roots and etiolated leaves than in green leaves. To confirm the calcium dependency of the maize enzymes, the entire coding region of ZmCDPK9 was subcloned into an expression vector so that it was in frame with the vector-encoded peptide tags. A cell-free extract of Escherichia coli transformed with the recombinant plasmid exhibited calcium-dependent phosphorylation activity, using casein as a substrate.

  5. The hidden side of the prokaryotic cell: rediscovering the microbial world.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Ricardo; Berlanga, Mercedes

    2007-09-01

    How many different forms of life exist and how they are evolutionarily related is one of the most challenging problems in biology. In 1962, Roger Y. Stanier and Cornelis B. van Niel proposed "the concept of a bacterium" and thus allowed (micro)biologists to divide living organisms into two primary groups: prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Initially, prokaryotes were believed to be devoid of any internal organization or other characteristics typical of eukaryotes, due to their minute size and deceptively simple appearance. However, the last few decades have demonstrated that the structure and function of the prokaryotic cell are much more intricate than initially thought. We will discuss here two characteristics of prokaryotic cells that were not known to Stanier and van Niel but which now allow us to understand the basis of many characteristics that are fully developed in eukaryotic cells: First, it has recently become clear that bacteria contain all of the cytoskeletal elements present in eukaryotic cells, demonstrating that the cytoskeleton was not a eukaryotic invention; on the contrary, it evolved early in evolution. Essential processes of the prokaryotic cell, such as the maintenance of cell shape, DNA segregation, and cell division, rely on the cytoskeleton. Second, the accumulation of intracellular storage polymers, such as polyhydroxyalkanoates (a property studied in detail by Stanier and colleagues), provides a clear evolutionary advantage to bacteria. These compounds act as a "time-binding" mechanism, one of several prokaryotic strategies to increases survival in the Earth's everchanging environments.

  6. Unveiling DNA structural features of promoters associated with various types of TSSs in prokaryotic transcriptomes and their role in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aditya; Bansal, Manju

    2017-02-01

    Next-generation sequencing studies have revealed that a variety of transcripts are present in the prokaryotic transcriptome and a significant fraction of them are functional, being involved in various regulatory activities apart from coding for proteins. Identification of promoters associated with different transcripts is necessary for characterization of the transcriptome. Promoter regions have been shown to have unique structural features as compared with their flanking region, in organisms covering all domains of life. Here we report an in silico analysis of DNA sequence dependent structural properties like stability, bendability and curvature in the promoter region of six different prokaryotic transcriptomes. Using these structural features, we predicted promoters associated with different categories of transcripts (mRNA, internal, antisense and non-coding), which constitute the transcriptome. Promoter annotation using structural features is fairly accurate and reliable with about 50% of the primary promoters being characterized by all three structural properties while at least one property identifies 95%. We also studied the relative differences of these structural features in terms of gene expression and found that the features, viz. lower stability, lesser bendability and higher curvature are more prominent in the promoter regions which are associated with high gene expression as compared with low expression genes. Hence, promoters, which are associated with higher gene expression, get annotated well using DNA structural features as compared with those, which are linked to lower gene expression. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  7. Simultaneous cell by cell study of both DNA fragmentation and chromosomal segregation in spermatozoa from chromosomal rearrangement carriers.

    PubMed

    Rouen, Alexandre; Pyram, Ketty; Pollet-Villard, Xavier; Hyon, Capucine; Dorna, Maud; Marques, Sandrine; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Joyé, Nicole; Cassuto, Nino Guy; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Balanced chromosomal translocations are found in one out of 500 subjects in the general population. They usually do not carry any phenotypic consequences, except for possible infertility and for the production of unbalanced gametes leading to spontaneous abortions or chromosomal syndromes in the offspring. An association between chromosomal rearrangements and increased apoptosis markers has been demonstrated on a global scale in sperm samples of translocation and inversion carriers. In order to specify which kind of sperm cells is subject to an increased apoptosis process, this present study was aimed to analyse both chromosomal segregation and DNA fragmentation, sperm cell by sperm cell. Six patients carrying a chromosomal rearrangement (three reciprocal translocations, two Robertsonian translocations, and one chromosomal pericentric inversion) were included in a retrospective manner. Both DNA fragmentation and chromosomal segregation in spermatozoa were evaluated simultaneously using a modified TUNEL assay associated with FISH. Two thousand spermatozoa were analysed for each patient. We showed a higher proportion of spermatozoa with fragmented DNA among the unbalanced sperm cells, compared to the balanced ones, in all six patients. These results suggest an increased fragility of unbalanced spermatozoa to exogenous fragmentation factors. The exact mechanisms of those processes remain to be elucidated.

  8. Unveiling DNA structural features of promoters associated with various types of TSSs in prokaryotic transcriptomes and their role in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Aditya

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Next-generation sequencing studies have revealed that a variety of transcripts are present in the prokaryotic transcriptome and a significant fraction of them are functional, being involved in various regulatory activities apart from coding for proteins. Identification of promoters associated with different transcripts is necessary for characterization of the transcriptome. Promoter regions have been shown to have unique structural features as compared with their flanking region, in organisms covering all domains of life. Here we report an in silico analysis of DNA sequence dependent structural properties like stability, bendability and curvature in the promoter region of six different prokaryotic transcriptomes. Using these structural features, we predicted promoters associated with different categories of transcripts (mRNA, internal, antisense and non-coding), which constitute the transcriptome. Promoter annotation using structural features is fairly accurate and reliable with about 50% of the primary promoters being characterized by all three structural properties while at least one property identifies 95%. We also studied the relative differences of these structural features in terms of gene expression and found that the features, viz. lower stability, lesser bendability and higher curvature are more prominent in the promoter regions which are associated with high gene expression as compared with low expression genes. Hence, promoters, which are associated with higher gene expression, get annotated well using DNA structural features as compared with those, which are linked to lower gene expression. PMID:27803028

  9. Amphibian interorder nuclear transfer embryos reveal conserved embryonic gene transcription, but deficient DNA replication or chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Narbonne, Patrick; Gurdon, John B

    2012-01-01

    Early interspecies nuclear transfer (iNT) experiments suggested that a foreign nucleus may become permanently damaged after a few rounds of cell division in the cytoplasm of another species. That is, in some distant species combinations, nucleocytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) blastula nuclei can no longer support development, even if they are back-transferred into their own kind of egg cytoplasm. We monitored foreign DNA amplification and RNA production by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and RT-qPCR in interorder amphibian hybrids and cybrids formed by the transfer of newt (Pleurodeles waltl) embryonic nuclei into intact and enucleated frog (Xenopus laevis) eggs. We found a dramatic reduction in the expansion of foreign DNA and cell numbers in developing cybrid embryos that correlated with reduced gene transcription. Interestingly, expansion in cell numbers was rescued by the recipient species (Xenopus) maternal genome in iNT hybrids, but it did not improve P. waltl DNA expansion or gene transcription. Also, foreign gene transcripts, normalized to DNA copy numbers, were mostly normal in both iNT hybrids and cybrids. Thus, incomplete foreign DNA replication and/or chromosome segregation during cell division may be the major form of nuclear damage occurring as a result of nuclear replication in a foreign cytoplasmic environment. It also shows that the mechanisms of embryonic gene transcription are highly conserved across amphibians and may not be a major cause of cybrid lethality.

  10. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  11. Genome Segregation and Packaging Machinery in Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus Is Reminiscent of Bacterial Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Chelikani, Venkata; Ranjan, Tushar; Zade, Amrutraj; Shukla, Avi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genome packaging is a critical step in the virion assembly process. The putative ATP-driven genome packaging motor of Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV) and other nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) is a distant ortholog of prokaryotic chromosome segregation motors, such as FtsK and HerA, rather than other viral packaging motors, such as large terminase. Intriguingly, APMV also encodes other components, i.e., three putative serine recombinases and a putative type II topoisomerase, all of which are essential for chromosome segregation in prokaryotes. Based on our analyses of these components and taking the limited available literature into account, here we propose for the first time a model for genome segregation and packaging in APMV that can possibly be extended to NCLDV subfamilies, except perhaps Poxviridae and Ascoviridae. This model might represent a unique variation of the prokaryotic system acquired and contrived by the large DNA viruses of eukaryotes. It is also consistent with previous observations that unicellular eukaryotes, such as amoebae, are melting pots for the advent of chimeric organisms with novel mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Extremely large viruses with DNA genomes infect a wide range of eukaryotes, from human beings to amoebae and from crocodiles to algae. These large DNA viruses, unlike their much smaller cousins, have the capability of making most of the protein components required for their multiplication. Once they infect the cell, these viruses set up viral replication centers, known as viral factories, to carry out their multiplication with very little help from the host. Our sequence analyses show that there is remarkable similarity between prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and large DNA viruses, such as mimivirus, vaccinia virus, and pandoravirus, in the way that they process their newly synthesized genetic material to make sure that only one copy of the complete genome is generated and is meticulously placed inside

  12. "Anticipated" nucleosome positioning pattern in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Alexandra E; Trifonov, Edward N

    2011-11-15

    Linguistic (word count) analysis of prokaryotic genome sequences, by Shannon N-gram extension, reveals that the dominant hidden motifs in A+T rich genomes are T(A)(T)A and G(A)(T)C with uncertain number of repeating A and T. Since prokaryotic sequences are largely protein-coding, the motifs would correspond to amphipathic alpha-helices with alternating lysine and phenylalanine as preferential polar and non-polar residues. The motifs are also known in eukaryotes, as nucleosome positioning patterns. Their existence in prokaryotes as well may serve for binding of histone-like proteins to DNA. In this case the above patterns in prokaryotes may be considered as "anticipated" nucleosome positioning patterns which, quite likely, existed in prokaryotic genomes before the evolutionary separation between eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

  13. Segregation by Complementarity of nanoDNA based on Liquid Crystal Ordering and Centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory; Tsai, Ethan; Robins, T.; Khodaghulyan, Armond; Zanchetta, Giuliano; Fraccia, Tommaso; Bellini, Tommaso; Walba, David; Clark, Noel

    2012-02-01

    Nanometer length DNA segments ( <20 base pair long) that are complementary can duplex and condense to make liquid crystal phases at concentrations >˜500 mg/mL This nanoDNA duplexing combined with order-disorder phase separation offers a means of sequestering molecules in mixtures of different DNA sequences based on their degree of complementarity. Here we show that isotropic and liquid crystalline phases, comprising respectively single strands and duplexes in multi-component nanoDNA solutions, can be physically separated by liquid crystal condensation followed by centrifugation.

  14. Segregation of naturally occurring mitochondrial DNA variants in a mini-pig model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Within cells and tissues, the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is present in multimeric form and can harbour naturally occurring variants. Whilst high variant load can cause mitochondrial disease, naturally occurring mtDNA variants likely persist at low levels across generations of ...

  15. The Epigenomic Landscape of Prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Blow, Matthew J.; Clark, Tyson A.; Daum, Chris G.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Fomenkov, Alexey; Fries, Roxanne; Froula, Jeff; Kang, Dongwan D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Morgan, Richard D.; Posfai, Janos; Singh, Kanwar; Visel, Axel; Wetmore, Kelly; Zhao, Zhiying; Rubin, Edward M.; Korlach, Jonas; Pennacchio, Len A.; Roberts, Richard J.; Fang, Gang

    2016-02-12

    DNA methylation acts in concert with restriction enzymes to protect the integrity of prokaryotic genomes. Studies in a limited number of organisms suggest that methylation also contributes to prokaryotic genome regulation, but the prevalence and properties of such non-restriction-associated methylation systems remain poorly understood. Here, we used single molecule, real-time sequencing to map DNA modifications including m6A, m4C, and m5C across the genomes of 230 diverse bacterial and archaeal species. We observed DNA methylation in nearly all (93%) organisms examined, and identified a total of 834 distinct reproducibly methylated motifs. This data enabled annotation of the DNA binding specificities of 620 DNA Methyltransferases (MTases), doubling known specificities for previously hard to study Type I, IIG and III MTases, and revealing their extraordinary diversity. Strikingly, 48% of organisms harbor active Type II MTases with no apparent cognate restriction enzyme. These active ‘orphan’ MTases are present in diverse bacterial and archaeal phyla and show motif specificities and methylation patterns consistent with functions in gene regulation and DNA replication. Our results reveal the pervasive presence of DNA methylation throughout the prokaryotic kingdoms, as well as the diversity of sequence specificities and potential functions of DNA methylation systems.

  16. The Epigenomic Landscape of Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Blow, Matthew J.; Clark, Tyson A.; Daum, Chris G.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Fomenkov, Alexey; Fries, Roxanne; Froula, Jeff; Kang, Dongwan D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Morgan, Richard D.; Posfai, Janos; Singh, Kanwar; Visel, Axel; Wetmore, Kelly; Zhao, Zhiying; Rubin, Edward M.; Korlach, Jonas; Pennacchio, Len A.; Roberts, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation acts in concert with restriction enzymes to protect the integrity of prokaryotic genomes. Studies in a limited number of organisms suggest that methylation also contributes to prokaryotic genome regulation, but the prevalence and properties of such non-restriction-associated methylation systems remain poorly understood. Here, we used single molecule, real-time sequencing to map DNA modifications including m6A, m4C, and m5C across the genomes of 230 diverse bacterial and archaeal species. We observed DNA methylation in nearly all (93%) organisms examined, and identified a total of 834 distinct reproducibly methylated motifs. This data enabled annotation of the DNA binding specificities of 620 DNA Methyltransferases (MTases), doubling known specificities for previously hard to study Type I, IIG and III MTases, and revealing their extraordinary diversity. Strikingly, 48% of organisms harbor active Type II MTases with no apparent cognate restriction enzyme. These active ‘orphan’ MTases are present in diverse bacterial and archaeal phyla and show motif specificities and methylation patterns consistent with functions in gene regulation and DNA replication. Our results reveal the pervasive presence of DNA methylation throughout the prokaryotic kingdoms, as well as the diversity of sequence specificities and potential functions of DNA methylation systems. PMID:26870957

  17. The Epigenomic Landscape of Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Blow, Matthew J; Clark, Tyson A; Daum, Chris G; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Fomenkov, Alexey; Fries, Roxanne; Froula, Jeff; Kang, Dongwan D; Malmstrom, Rex R; Morgan, Richard D; Posfai, Janos; Singh, Kanwar; Visel, Axel; Wetmore, Kelly; Zhao, Zhiying; Rubin, Edward M; Korlach, Jonas; Pennacchio, Len A; Roberts, Richard J

    2016-02-01

    DNA methylation acts in concert with restriction enzymes to protect the integrity of prokaryotic genomes. Studies in a limited number of organisms suggest that methylation also contributes to prokaryotic genome regulation, but the prevalence and properties of such non-restriction-associated methylation systems remain poorly understood. Here, we used single molecule, real-time sequencing to map DNA modifications including m6A, m4C, and m5C across the genomes of 230 diverse bacterial and archaeal species. We observed DNA methylation in nearly all (93%) organisms examined, and identified a total of 834 distinct reproducibly methylated motifs. This data enabled annotation of the DNA binding specificities of 620 DNA Methyltransferases (MTases), doubling known specificities for previously hard to study Type I, IIG and III MTases, and revealing their extraordinary diversity. Strikingly, 48% of organisms harbor active Type II MTases with no apparent cognate restriction enzyme. These active 'orphan' MTases are present in diverse bacterial and archaeal phyla and show motif specificities and methylation patterns consistent with functions in gene regulation and DNA replication. Our results reveal the pervasive presence of DNA methylation throughout the prokaryotic kingdoms, as well as the diversity of sequence specificities and potential functions of DNA methylation systems.

  18. The Epigenomic Landscape of Prokaryotes

    DOE PAGES

    Blow, Matthew J.; Clark, Tyson A.; Daum, Chris G.; ...

    2016-02-12

    DNA methylation acts in concert with restriction enzymes to protect the integrity of prokaryotic genomes. Studies in a limited number of organisms suggest that methylation also contributes to prokaryotic genome regulation, but the prevalence and properties of such non-restriction-associated methylation systems remain poorly understood. Here, we used single molecule, real-time sequencing to map DNA modifications including m6A, m4C, and m5C across the genomes of 230 diverse bacterial and archaeal species. We observed DNA methylation in nearly all (93%) organisms examined, and identified a total of 834 distinct reproducibly methylated motifs. This data enabled annotation of the DNA binding specificities ofmore » 620 DNA Methyltransferases (MTases), doubling known specificities for previously hard to study Type I, IIG and III MTases, and revealing their extraordinary diversity. Strikingly, 48% of organisms harbor active Type II MTases with no apparent cognate restriction enzyme. These active ‘orphan’ MTases are present in diverse bacterial and archaeal phyla and show motif specificities and methylation patterns consistent with functions in gene regulation and DNA replication. Our results reveal the pervasive presence of DNA methylation throughout the prokaryotic kingdoms, as well as the diversity of sequence specificities and potential functions of DNA methylation systems.« less

  19. Strict sex-specific mtDNA segregation in the germ line of the DUI species Venerupis philippinarum (Bivalvia: Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Milani, Liliana; Passamonti, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) is one of the most striking exceptions to the common rule of standard maternal inheritance of metazoan mitochondria. In DUI, two mitochondrial genomes are present, showing different transmission routes, one through eggs (F-type) and the other through sperm (M-type). In this paper, we report results from a multiplex real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis on the Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum (formerly Tapes philippinarum). We quantified M- and F-types in somatic tissues, gonads, and gametes. Nuclear and external reference sequences were used, and the whole experimental process was designed to avoid any possible cross-contamination. In most male somatic tissues, the M-type is largely predominant: This suggests that the processes separating sex-linked mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) in somatic tissues are less precise than in other DUI species. In the germ line, we evidenced a strict sex-specific mtDNA segregation because both sperm and eggs do carry exclusively M- and F-types, respectively, an observation that is in contrast with a previous analysis on Mytilus galloprovincialis. More precisely, whereas two mtDNAs are present in the whole gonad, only the sex-specific one is detected in gametes. Because of this, we propose that the mtDNA transmission is achieved through a three-checkpoint process in V. philippinarum. The cytological mechanisms of male mitochondria segregation in males and degradation in females during the embryo development (here named Checkpoint #1 and Checkpoint #2) are already well known for DUI species; a Checkpoint #3 would act when primordial germ cells (PGCs) are first formed and would work in both males and females. We believe that Checkpoint #3 is a mere variation of the "mitochondrial bottleneck" in species with standard maternal inheritance, established when their PGCs separate during embryo cleavage.

  20. Structure and regulation of gene expression of a Clo DF13 plasmid DNA region involved in plasmid segregation and incompatibility.

    PubMed Central

    van den Elzen, P J; Hakkaart, M J; van Putten, A J; Walters, H H; Veltkamp, E; Nijkamp, H J

    1983-01-01

    The bacteriocinogenic plasmid Clo DF13 contains genetic information involved in the accurate partitioning of the plasmid (parA and parB) as well as in incompatibility phenomena (incA, B, C and D). In this paper we report on the primary structure and regulation of gene expression of the 29% - 50% part of Clo DF13, containing the DNA regions incA, incB and parB as well as genes K and L. According to the results of our DNA sequence analysis, mapping of transposon insertions, RNA blotting and S1 mapping experiments, we conclude that: a) genes K and L are transcribed as one operon; transcription of this operon is initiated at a promoter (P2) located at 32.5% and proceeds in a clockwise direction. b) treatment of cells with mitomycin-C, significantly enhances transcription from P2, although this promoter is probably not directly repressed by lexA protein. c) Termination of transcription of this operon occurs between genes K and L, as well as distal to gene L. The possible role of gene products and/or sites, located within the 29-50% DNA region, in plasmid incompatibility and segregation is discussed. Images PMID:6324101

  1. Repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells: Properties and biological roles of the Fpg and OGG1 DNA N-glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Serge; Coste, Franck; Castaing, Bertrand

    2017-06-01

    Oxidatively damaged DNA results from the attack of sugar and base moieties by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are formed as byproducts of normal cell metabolism and during exposure to endogenous or exogenous chemical or physical agents. Guanine, having the lowest redox potential, is the DNA base the most susceptible to oxidation, yielding products such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2-6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG). In DNA, 8-oxoG was shown to be mutagenic yielding GC to TA transversions upon incorporation of dAMP opposite this lesion by replicative DNA polymerases. In prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, 8-oxoG is primarily repaired by the base excision repair pathway (BER) initiated by a DNA N-glycosylase, Fpg and OGG1, respectively. In Escherichia coli, Fpg cooperates with MutY and MutT to prevent 8-oxoG-induced mutations, the "GO-repair system". In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, OGG1 cooperates with nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), post-replication repair (PRR) and DNA polymerase η to prevent mutagenesis. Human and mouse cells mobilize all these pathways using OGG1, MUTYH (MutY-homolog also known as MYH), MTH1 (MutT-homolog also known as NUDT1), NER, MMR, NEILs and DNA polymerases η and λ, to prevent 8-oxoG-induced mutations. In fact, mice deficient in both OGG1 and MUTYH develop cancer in different organs at adult age, which points to the critical impact of 8-oxoG repair on genetic stability in mammals. In this review, we will focus on Fpg and OGG1 proteins, their biochemical and structural properties as well as their biological roles. Other DNA N-glycosylases able to release 8-oxoG from damaged DNA in various organisms will be discussed. Finally, we will report on the role of OGG1 in human disease and the possible use of 8-oxoG DNA N-glycosylases as therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Environmental distribution of prokaryotic taxa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The increasing availability of gene sequences of prokaryotic species in samples extracted from all kind of locations allows addressing the study of the influence of environmental patterns in prokaryotic biodiversity. We present a comprehensive study to address the potential existence of environmental preferences of prokaryotic taxa and the commonness of the specialist and generalist strategies. We also assessed the most significant environmental factors shaping the environmental distribution of taxa. Results We used 16S rDNA sequences from 3,502 sampling experiments in natural and artificial sources. These sequences were taxonomically assigned, and the corresponding samples were also classified into a hierarchical classification of environments. We used several statistical methods to analyze the environmental distribution of taxa. Our results indicate that environmental specificity is not very common at the higher taxonomic levels (phylum to family), but emerges at lower taxonomic levels (genus and species). The most selective environmental characteristics are those of animal tissues and thermal locations. Salinity is another very important factor for constraining prokaryotic diversity. On the other hand, soil and freshwater habitats are the less restrictive environments, harboring the largest number of prokaryotic taxa. All information on taxa, samples and environments is provided at the envDB online database, http://metagenomics.uv.es/envDB. Conclusions This is, as far as we know, the most comprehensive assessment of the distribution and diversity of prokaryotic taxa and their associations with different environments. Our data indicate that we are still far from characterizing prokaryotic diversity in any environment, except, perhaps, for human tissues such as the oral cavity and the vagina. PMID:20307274

  3. Environmental distribution of prokaryotic taxa.

    PubMed

    Tamames, Javier; Abellán, Juan José; Pignatelli, Miguel; Camacho, Antonio; Moya, Andrés

    2010-03-22

    The increasing availability of gene sequences of prokaryotic species in samples extracted from all kind of locations allows addressing the study of the influence of environmental patterns in prokaryotic biodiversity. We present a comprehensive study to address the potential existence of environmental preferences of prokaryotic taxa and the commonness of the specialist and generalist strategies. We also assessed the most significant environmental factors shaping the environmental distribution of taxa. We used 16S rDNA sequences from 3,502 sampling experiments in natural and artificial sources. These sequences were taxonomically assigned, and the corresponding samples were also classified into a hierarchical classification of environments. We used several statistical methods to analyze the environmental distribution of taxa. Our results indicate that environmental specificity is not very common at the higher taxonomic levels (phylum to family), but emerges at lower taxonomic levels (genus and species). The most selective environmental characteristics are those of animal tissues and thermal locations. Salinity is another very important factor for constraining prokaryotic diversity. On the other hand, soil and freshwater habitats are the less restrictive environments, harboring the largest number of prokaryotic taxa. All information on taxa, samples and environments is provided at the envDB online database, http://metagenomics.uv.es/envDB. This is, as far as we know, the most comprehensive assessment of the distribution and diversity of prokaryotic taxa and their associations with different environments. Our data indicate that we are still far from characterizing prokaryotic diversity in any environment, except, perhaps, for human tissues such as the oral cavity and the vagina.

  4. Detection of an en masse and reversible B- to A-DNA conformational transition in prokaryotes in response to desiccation.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Donna R; Hiscox, Thomas J; Rood, Julian I; Bambery, Keith R; McNaughton, Don; Wood, Bayden R

    2014-08-06

    The role that DNA conformation plays in the biochemistry of cells has been the subject of intensive research since DNA polymorphism was discovered. B-DNA has long been considered the native form of DNA in cells although alternative conformations of DNA are thought to occur transiently and along short tracts. Here, we report the first direct observation of a fully reversible en masse conformational transition between B- and A-DNA within live bacterial cells using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. This biospectroscopic technique allows for non-invasive and reagent-free examination of the holistic biochemistry of samples. For this reason, we have been able to observe the previously unknown conformational transition in all four species of bacteria investigated. Detection of this transition is evidence of a previously unexplored biological significance for A-DNA and highlights the need for new research into the role that A-DNA plays as a cellular defence mechanism and in stabilizing the DNA conformation. Such studies are pivotal in understanding the role of A-DNA in the evolutionary pathway of nucleic acids. Furthermore, this discovery demonstrates the exquisite capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy and opens the door for further investigations of cell biochemistry with this under-used technique.

  5. Detection of an en masse and reversible B- to A-DNA conformational transition in prokaryotes in response to desiccation

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Donna R.; Hiscox, Thomas J.; Rood, Julian I.; Bambery, Keith R.; McNaughton, Don; Wood, Bayden R.

    2014-01-01

    The role that DNA conformation plays in the biochemistry of cells has been the subject of intensive research since DNA polymorphism was discovered. B-DNA has long been considered the native form of DNA in cells although alternative conformations of DNA are thought to occur transiently and along short tracts. Here, we report the first direct observation of a fully reversible en masse conformational transition between B- and A-DNA within live bacterial cells using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. This biospectroscopic technique allows for non-invasive and reagent-free examination of the holistic biochemistry of samples. For this reason, we have been able to observe the previously unknown conformational transition in all four species of bacteria investigated. Detection of this transition is evidence of a previously unexplored biological significance for A-DNA and highlights the need for new research into the role that A-DNA plays as a cellular defence mechanism and in stabilizing the DNA conformation. Such studies are pivotal in understanding the role of A-DNA in the evolutionary pathway of nucleic acids. Furthermore, this discovery demonstrates the exquisite capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy and opens the door for further investigations of cell biochemistry with this under-used technique. PMID:24898023

  6. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  7. PprA Protein Is Involved in Chromosome Segregation via Its Physical and Functional Interaction with DNA Gyrase in Irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Devigne, Alice; Guérin, Philippe; Lisboa, Johnny; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Armengaud, Jean; Sommer, Suzanne; Bouthier de la Tour, Claire

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, was previously shown to be required for cell survival and accurate chromosome segregation after exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, we used an in vivo approach to determine, by shotgun proteomics, putative PprA partners coimmunoprecipitating with PprA when cells were exposed to gamma rays. Among them, we found the two subunits of DNA gyrase and, thus, chose to focus our work on characterizing the activities of the deinococcal DNA gyrase in the presence or absence of PprA. Loss of PprA rendered cells hypersensitive to novobiocin, an inhibitor of the B subunit of DNA gyrase. We showed that treatment of bacteria with novobiocin resulted in induction of the radiation desiccation response (RDR) regulon and in defects in chromosome segregation that were aggravated by the absence of PprA. In vitro, the deinococcal DNA gyrase, like other bacterial DNA gyrases, possesses DNA negative supercoiling and decatenation activities. These two activities are inhibited in vitro by novobiocin and nalidixic acid, whereas PprA specifically stimulates the decatenation activity of DNA gyrase. Together, these results suggest that PprA plays a major role in chromosome decatenation via its interaction with the deinococcal DNA gyrase when D. radiodurans cells are recovering from exposure to ionizing radiation. IMPORTANCE D. radiodurans is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. This bacterium is able to cope with high levels of DNA lesions generated by exposure to extreme doses of ionizing radiation and to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Here, we identified partners of PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, previously shown to be required for radioresistance. Our study leads to three main findings: (i) PprA interacts with DNA gyrase after irradiation, (ii) treatment of cells with novobiocin results in defects in chromosome segregation

  8. Bub3–BubR1-dependent sequestration of Cdc20Fizzy at DNA breaks facilitates the correct segregation of broken chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Derive, Nicolas; Landmann, Cedric; Montembault, Emilie; Claverie, Marie-Charlotte; Pierre-Elies, Priscillia; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Founounou, Nabila; McCusker, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The presence of DNA double-strand breaks during mitosis is particularly challenging for the cell, as it produces broken chromosomes lacking a centromere. This situation can cause genomic instability resulting from improper segregation of the broken fragments into daughter cells. We recently uncovered a process by which broken chromosomes are faithfully transmitted via the BubR1-dependent tethering of the two broken chromosome ends. However, the mechanisms underlying BubR1 recruitment and function on broken chromosomes were largely unknown. We show that BubR1 requires interaction with Bub3 to localize on the broken chromosome fragments and to mediate their proper segregation. We also find that Cdc20, a cofactor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), accumulates on DNA breaks in a BubR1 KEN box–dependent manner. A biosensor for APC/C activity demonstrates a BubR1-dependent local inhibition of APC/C around the segregating broken chromosome. We therefore propose that the Bub3–BubR1 complex on broken DNA inhibits the APC/C locally via the sequestration of Cdc20, thus promoting proper transmission of broken chromosomes. PMID:26553926

  9. Bacterial Chromosome Organization and Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Esteban; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are generally ∼1000 times longer than the cells in which they reside, and concurrent replication, segregation, and transcription/translation of this crowded mass of DNA poses a challenging organizational problem. Recent advances in cell-imaging technology with subdiffraction resolution have revealed that the bacterial nucleoid is reliably oriented and highly organized within the cell. Such organization is transmitted from one generation to the next by progressive segregation of daughter chromosomes and anchoring of DNA to the cell envelope. Active segregation by a mitotic machinery appears to be common; however, the mode of chromosome segregation varies significantly from species to species. PMID:20182613

  10. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Potts, M

    1994-01-01

    The removal of cell-bound water through air drying and the addition of water to air-dried cells are forces that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of the prokaryotes. In bacterial cells that have been subjected to air drying, the evaporation of free cytoplasmic water (Vf) can be instantaneous, and an equilibrium between cell-bound water (Vb) and the environmental water (vapor) potential (psi wv) may be achieved rapidly. In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1. At these levels the monolayer coverage by water of macromolecules, including DNA and proteins, is disturbed. As a consequence the mechanisms that confer desiccation tolerance upon air-dried bacteria are markedly different from those, such as the mechanism of preferential exclusion of compatible solutes, that preserve the integrity of salt-, osmotically, and freeze-thaw-stressed cells. Desiccation tolerance reflects a complex array of interactions at the structural, physiological, and molecular levels. Many of the mechanisms remain cryptic, but it is clear that they involve interactions, such as those between proteins and co-solvents, that derive from the unique properties of the water molecule. A water replacement hypothesis accounts for how the nonreducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose preserve the integrity of membranes and proteins. Nevertheless, we have virtually no insight into the state of the cytoplasm of an air-dried cell. There is no evidence for any obvious adaptations of proteins that can counter the effects of air drying or for the occurrence of any proteins that provide a direct and a tangible contribution to cell stability. Among the prokaryotes that can exist as anhydrobiotic cells, the cyanobacteria have a marked capacity to do so. One

  11. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Potts, M

    1994-12-01

    The removal of cell-bound water through air drying and the addition of water to air-dried cells are forces that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of the prokaryotes. In bacterial cells that have been subjected to air drying, the evaporation of free cytoplasmic water (Vf) can be instantaneous, and an equilibrium between cell-bound water (Vb) and the environmental water (vapor) potential (psi wv) may be achieved rapidly. In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1. At these levels the monolayer coverage by water of macromolecules, including DNA and proteins, is disturbed. As a consequence the mechanisms that confer desiccation tolerance upon air-dried bacteria are markedly different from those, such as the mechanism of preferential exclusion of compatible solutes, that preserve the integrity of salt-, osmotically, and freeze-thaw-stressed cells. Desiccation tolerance reflects a complex array of interactions at the structural, physiological, and molecular levels. Many of the mechanisms remain cryptic, but it is clear that they involve interactions, such as those between proteins and co-solvents, that derive from the unique properties of the water molecule. A water replacement hypothesis accounts for how the nonreducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose preserve the integrity of membranes and proteins. Nevertheless, we have virtually no insight into the state of the cytoplasm of an air-dried cell. There is no evidence for any obvious adaptations of proteins that can counter the effects of air drying or for the occurrence of any proteins that provide a direct and a tangible contribution to cell stability. Among the prokaryotes that can exist as anhydrobiotic cells, the cyanobacteria have a marked capacity to do so. One

  12. Identification of quantitative trait loci for flowering time by a combination of restriction site–associated DNA sequencing and bulked segregant analysis in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Chikaharu; Oshita, Tatsuki; Yamada, Tetsuya; Anai, Toyoaki; Kaga, Akito

    2017-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) has a paleopolyploid genome, and many re-sequencing experiments to characterize soybean genotypes have been conducted using next-generation sequencing platforms. The accumulation of information about single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) throughout the soybean genome has accelerated identification of genomic regions related to agronomically important traits through association studies. However, although many efficient mapping techniques that use next-generation sequencing are available, the number of practical approaches to identify genes/loci is still limited. In this study, we used a combination of restriction site–associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) and bulk segregant analysis (BSA) to identify quantitative trait locus (QTLs) for flowering time in a segregating population derived from a cross between Japanese soybean cultivars. Despite the homogeneous genetic background of the parents, over 7000 SNPs were identified and can be used to detect QTLs by RAD-seq BSA analysis. By comparing genotype frequency between early and late-flowering bulks from the F3 segregating population, we identified a QTL on Gm10, which corresponds to the previously identified E2 locus, and a QTL on Gm04, which is close to the E8 locus. Out of these SNPs, more than 2000 were easily converted to conventional DNA markers. Our approach would improve the efficiency of genetic mapping. PMID:28744181

  13. PRAP: An automated de novo repeat finder pipeline for prokaryotic genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gwo-Liang

    2007-01-01

    Repeat finding has been given little attention in most published complete prokaryotic genome annotations, and yet repeated sequences are ubiquitous in prokaryotic genomes. Without identifying the repetitive DNA in genomes, it not only makes systematical characterization the prokaryotic repeats impossible, it leaves the genome annotations incomplete, resulting in a barrier to genome analysis. We have developed a software package that can identify repeats in the whole prokaryotic genome from the DNA sequence.

  14. Reconstitution of a prokaryotic minus end-tracking system using TubRC centromeric complexes and tubulin-like protein TubZ filaments

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Gero; Löwe, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Segregation of DNA is a fundamental process during cell division. The mechanism of prokaryotic DNA segregation is largely unknown, but several low-copy-number plasmids encode cytomotive filament systems of the actin type and tubulin type important for plasmid inheritance. Of these cytomotive filaments, only actin-like systems are mechanistically well characterized. In contrast, the mechanism by which filaments of tubulin-like TubZ protein mediate DNA motility is unknown. To understand polymer-driven DNA transport, we reconstituted the filaments of TubZ protein (TubZ filaments) from Bacillus thuringiensis pBtoxis plasmid with their centromeric TubRC complexes containing adaptor protein TubR and tubC DNA. TubZ alone assembled into polar filaments, which annealed laterally and treadmilled. Using single-molecule imaging, we show that TubRC complexes were not pushed by filament polymerization; instead, they processively tracked shrinking, depolymerizing minus ends. Additionally, the TubRC complex nucleated TubZ filaments and allowed for treadmilling. Overall, our results indicate a pulling mechanism for DNA transport by the TubZRC system. The discovered minus end-tracking property of the TubRC complex expands the mechanistic diversity of the prokaryotic cytoskeleton. PMID:25825718

  15. Sites of termination of in vitro DNA synthesis on ultraviolet- and N-acetylaminofluorene-treated phi X174 templates by prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.D.; Bose, K.K.; Rabkin, S.D.; Strauss, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro DNA synthesis on a phi X174 template primed with a restriction fragment and catalyzed by the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I large (Klenow) fragment (pol I) terminates at the nucleotide preceding a site that has been altered by ultraviolet irradiation or treatment with N-acetylaminofluorene. Termination on ultraviolet-irradiated templates is similar when synthesis is catalyzed by E. coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (pol III), phage T4DNA polymerase a polymerase ..cap alpha.. from human lymphoma cells, or avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase. 3' ..-->.. 5' exonuclease activity cannot be detected in the reverse transcriptase and DNA polymerase ..cap alpha.. preparations. On N-acetylaminofluorene templates, pol I, pol III, and T4 polymerase reactions terminate immediately preceding the lesion, whereas reverse transcriptase-catalyzed reactions and, at some positions in the sequence, polymerase ..cap alpha..-catalyzed reactions terminate at the site of the lesion. Substitution of Mn/sup 2 +/ for Mg/sup 2 +/ changes the pattern of pol I-catalyzed termination sites. The data sugest that termination is a complicated process that does not depend exclusively on the 3' ..-->.. 5' exonuclease activity associated with many polymerases.

  16. DnaA and ORC: more than DNA replication initiators.

    PubMed

    Scholefield, Graham; Veening, Jan-Willem; Murray, Heath

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in DNA replication initiator genes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes lead to a pleiotropic array of phenotypes, including defects in chromosome segregation, cytokinesis, cell cycle regulation and gene expression. For years, it was not clear whether these diverse effects were indirect consequences of perturbed DNA replication, or whether they indicated that DNA replication initiator proteins had roles beyond their activity in initiating DNA synthesis. Recent work from a range of organisms has demonstrated that DNA replication initiator proteins play direct roles in many cellular processes, often functioning to coordinate the initiation of DNA replication with essential cell-cycle activities. The aim of this review is to highlight these new findings, focusing on the pathways and mechanisms utilized by DNA replication initiator proteins to carry out a diverse array of cellular functions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nonstructural NSs protein of rift valley fever virus interacts with pericentromeric DNA sequences of the host cell, inducing chromosome cohesion and segregation defects.

    PubMed

    Mansuroglu, Z; Josse, T; Gilleron, J; Billecocq, A; Leger, P; Bouloy, M; Bonnefoy, E

    2010-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging, highly pathogenic virus; RVFV infection can lead to encephalitis, retinitis, or fatal hepatitis associated with hemorrhagic fever in humans, as well as death, abortions, and fetal deformities in animals. RVFV nonstructural NSs protein, a major factor of the virulence, forms filamentous structures in the nuclei of infected cells. In order to further understand RVFV pathology, we investigated, by chromatin immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and confocal microscopy, the capacity of NSs to interact with the host genome. Our results demonstrate that even though cellular DNA is predominantly excluded from NSs filaments, NSs interacts with some specific DNA regions of the host genome such as clusters of pericentromeric gamma-satellite sequence. Targeting of these sequences by NSs was correlated with the induction of chromosome cohesion and segregation defects in RVFV-infected murine, as well as sheep cells. Using recombinant nonpathogenic virus rZHDeltaNSs210-230, expressing a NSs protein deleted of its region of interaction with cellular factor SAP30, we showed that the NSs-SAP30 interaction was essential for NSs to target pericentromeric sequences, as well as for induction of chromosome segregation defects. The effect of RVFV upon the inheritance of genetic information is discussed with respect to the pathology associated with fetal deformities and abortions, highlighting the main role played by cellular cofactor SAP30 on the establishment of NSs interactions with host DNA sequences and RVFV pathogenesis.

  18. Terpenoid biosynthesis in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Boronat, Albert; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic organisms (archaea and eubacteria) are found in all habitats where life exists on our planet. This would not be possible without the astounding biochemical plasticity developed by such organisms. Part of the metabolic diversity of prokaryotes was transferred to eukaryotic cells when endosymbiotic prokaryotes became mitochondria and plastids but also in a large number of horizontal gene transfer episodes. A group of metabolites produced by all free-living organisms is terpenoids (also known as isoprenoids). In prokaryotes, terpenoids play an indispensable role in cell-wall and membrane biosynthesis (bactoprenol, hopanoids), electron transport (ubiquinone, menaquinone), or conversion of light into chemical energy (chlorophylls, bacteriochlorophylls, rhodopsins, carotenoids), among other processes. But despite their remarkable structural and functional diversity, they all derive from the same metabolic precursors. Here we describe the metabolic pathways producing these universal terpenoid units and provide a complete picture of the main terpenoid compounds found in prokaryotic organisms.

  19. Theory of prokaryotic genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Sela, Itamar; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2016-10-11

    Bacteria and archaea typically possess small genomes that are tightly packed with protein-coding genes. The compactness of prokaryotic genomes is commonly perceived as evidence of adaptive genome streamlining caused by strong purifying selection in large microbial populations. In such populations, even the small cost incurred by nonfunctional DNA because of extra energy and time expenditure is thought to be sufficient for this extra genetic material to be eliminated by selection. However, contrary to the predictions of this model, there exists a consistent, positive correlation between the strength of selection at the protein sequence level, measured as the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates, and microbial genome size. Here, by fitting the genome size distributions in multiple groups of prokaryotes to predictions of mathematical models of population evolution, we show that only models in which acquisition of additional genes is, on average, slightly beneficial yield a good fit to genomic data. These results suggest that the number of genes in prokaryotic genomes reflects the equilibrium between the benefit of additional genes that diminishes as the genome grows and deletion bias (i.e., the rate of deletion of genetic material being slightly greater than the rate of acquisition). Thus, new genes acquired by microbial genomes, on average, appear to be adaptive. The tight spacing of protein-coding genes likely results from a combination of the deletion bias and purifying selection that efficiently eliminates nonfunctional, noncoding sequences.

  20. Cyclic AMP in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L; Harman, J G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is found in a variety of prokaryotes including both eubacteria and archaebacteria. cAMP plays a role in regulating gene expression, not only for the classic inducible catabolic operons, but also for other categories. In the enteric coliforms, the effects of cAMP on gene expression are mediated through its interaction with and allosteric modification of a cAMP-binding protein (CRP). The CRP-cAMP complex subsequently binds specific DNA sequences and either activates or inhibits transcription depending upon the positioning of the complex relative to the promoter. Enteric coliforms have provided a model to explore the mechanisms involved in controlling adenylate cyclase activity, in regulating adenylate cyclase synthesis, and in performing detailed examinations of CRP-cAMP complex-regulated gene expression. This review summarizes recent work focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of CRP-cAMP complex-mediated processes. For other bacteria, less detail is known. cAMP has been implicated in regulating antibiotic production, phototrophic growth, and pathogenesis. A role for cAMP has been suggested in nitrogen fixation. Often the only data that support cAMP involvement in these processes includes cAMP measurement, detection of the enzymes involved in cAMP metabolism, or observed effects of high concentrations of the nucleotide on cell growth. PMID:1315922

  1. Bioinformatics of prokaryotic RNAs.

    PubMed

    Backofen, Rolf; Amman, Fabian; Costa, Fabrizio; Findeiß, Sven; Richter, Andreas S; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The genome of most prokaryotes gives rise to surprisingly complex transcriptomes, comprising not only protein-coding mRNAs, often organized as operons, but also harbors dozens or even hundreds of highly structured small regulatory RNAs and unexpectedly large levels of anti-sense transcripts. Comprehensive surveys of prokaryotic transcriptomes and the need to characterize also their non-coding components is heavily dependent on computational methods and workflows, many of which have been developed or at least adapted specifically for the use with bacterial and archaeal data. This review provides an overview on the state-of-the-art of RNA bioinformatics focusing on applications to prokaryotes.

  2. Bioinformatics of prokaryotic RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Backofen, Rolf; Amman, Fabian; Costa, Fabrizio; Findeiß, Sven; Richter, Andreas S; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The genome of most prokaryotes gives rise to surprisingly complex transcriptomes, comprising not only protein-coding mRNAs, often organized as operons, but also harbors dozens or even hundreds of highly structured small regulatory RNAs and unexpectedly large levels of anti-sense transcripts. Comprehensive surveys of prokaryotic transcriptomes and the need to characterize also their non-coding components is heavily dependent on computational methods and workflows, many of which have been developed or at least adapted specifically for the use with bacterial and archaeal data. This review provides an overview on the state-of-the-art of RNA bioinformatics focusing on applications to prokaryotes. PMID:24755880

  3. A three-dimensional ParF meshwork assembles through the nucleoid to mediate plasmid segregation

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Brett N.; Allison-Gamble, Gina E.; Barge, Madhuri T.; Tonthat, Nam K.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Hayes, Finbarr

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Genome segregation is a fundamental step in the life cycle of every cell. Most bacteria rely on dedicated DNA partition proteins to actively segregate chromosomes and low copy-number plasmids. Here, by employing super resolution microscopy, we establish that the ParF DNA partition protein of the ParA family assembles into a three-dimensional meshwork that uses the nucleoid as a scaffold and periodically shuttles between its poles. Whereas ParF specifies the territory for plasmid trafficking, the ParG partner protein dictates the tempo of ParF assembly cycles and plasmid segregation events by stimulating ParF adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis. Mutants in which this ParG temporal regulation is ablated show partition deficient phenotypes as a result of either altered ParF structure or dynamics and indicate that ParF nucleoid localization and dynamic relocation, although necessary, are not sufficient per se to ensure plasmid segregation. We propose a Venus flytrap model that merges the concepts of ParA polymerization and gradient formation and speculate that a transient, dynamic network of intersecting polymers that branches into the nucleoid interior is a widespread mechanism to distribute sizeable cargos within prokaryotic cells. PMID:28034957

  4. Analysis of inserts in prokaryote genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul Dan; Tuduce, Rodica Aurora

    2008-02-01

    Nucleotide genomic signals satisfy regularities that reveal restrictions in the distribution of nucleotides and pairs of nucleotides along DNA sequences. Structurally, a chromosome appears to be more than a plain text, by satisfying symmetry constrains that evoke the rhythm and rhyme in poems. These regularities make it easy to identify exogenous inserts in the genomes of prokaryotes, because such inserts obey different regularities than the background sequence. The paper presents instances of inserts found in the genomes of Bacillus subtilis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other prokaryotes. Inserts of exogenous material are frequently accompanied by complementary inserts tending to restore the original constrains.

  5. [Prokaryotic expression systems].

    PubMed

    Porowińska, Dorota; Wujak, Magdalena; Roszek, Katarzyna; Komoszyński, Michał

    2013-03-01

    For overproduction of recombinant proteins both eukaryotic and prokaryotic expression systems are used. Choosing the right system depends, among other things, on the growth rate and culture of host cells, level of the target gene expression and posttranslational processing of the synthesized protein. Regardless of the type of expression system, its basic elements are the vector and the expression host. The most widely used system for protein overproduction, both on a laboratory and industrial scale, is the prokaryotic system. This system is based primarily on the bacteria E. coli, although increasingly often Bacillus species are used. The prokaryotic system allows one to obtain large quantities of recombinant proteins in a short time. A simple and inexpensive bacterial cell culture and well-known mechanisms of transcription and translation facilitate the use of these microorganisms. The simplicity of genetic modifications and the availability of many bacterial mutants are additional advantages of the prokaryotic system. In this article we characterize the structural elements of prokaryotic expression vectors. Also strategies for preparation of the target protein gene that increase productivity, facilitate detection and purification of recombinant protein and provide its activity are discussed. Bacterial strains often used as host cells in expression systems as well as the potential location of heterologous proteins are characterized. Knowledge of the basic elements of the prokaryotic expression system allows for production of biologically active proteins in a short time and in satisfactory quantities. 

  6. Recombination and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, David J; Søballe, Britta; Barre, François-Xavier; Filipe, Sergio; Lau, Ivy; Massey, Thomas; Yates, James

    2004-01-01

    The duplication of DNA and faithful segregation of newly replicated chromosomes at cell division is frequently dependent on recombinational processes. The rebuilding of broken or stalled replication forks is universally dependent on homologous recombination proteins. In bacteria with circular chromosomes, crossing over by homologous recombination can generate dimeric chromosomes, which cannot be segregated to daughter cells unless they are converted to monomers before cell division by the conserved Xer site-specific recombination system. Dimer resolution also requires FtsK, a division septum-located protein, which coordinates chromosome segregation with cell division, and uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to activate the dimer resolution reaction. FtsK can also translocate DNA, facilitate synapsis of sister chromosomes and minimize entanglement and catenation of newly replicated sister chromosomes. The visualization of the replication/recombination-associated proteins, RecQ and RarA, and specific genes within living Escherichia coli cells, reveals further aspects of the processes that link replication with recombination, chromosome segregation and cell division, and provides new insight into how these may be coordinated. PMID:15065657

  7. Application of subtracted gDNA microarray-assisted Bulked Segregant Analysis for rapid discovery of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa)

    PubMed Central

    Gor, Mian Chee; Mantri, Nitin; Pang, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    A Fragaria Discovery Panel (FDP; strawberry-specific SDA) containing 287 features was constructed by subtracting the pooled gDNA of nine non-angiosperm species from the pooled gDNA of five strawberry genotypes. This FDP was used for Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA) to enable identification of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality. Analysis of hybridisation patterns of a short day (SD) DNA bulk and three day-neutral (DN) DNA bulks varying in flowering strength allowed identification of a novel feature, FaP2E11, closely linked to CYTOKININ OXIDASE 1 (CKX1) gene possibly involved in promoting flowering under non-inductive condition. The signal intensities of FaP2E11 feature obtained from the strong DN bulk (DN1) is three fold higher than the short day bulk (SD), indicating that the putative marker may linked to a CKX1 variant allele with lower enzyme activity. We propose a model for flowering regulation based on the hypothesis that flowering strength may be regulated by the copy number of FaP2E11-linked CKX1 alleles. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the SDA-based BSA approach for the identification of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality in strawberry. This innovative strategy is an efficient and cost-effective approach for molecular marker discovery. PMID:27586242

  8. Segregated growth kinetics of Escherichia coli DH5α-NH36 in exponential-fed perfusion culture for pDNA vaccine production.

    PubMed

    Munguía-Soto, Rodolfo; García-Rendón, Aurora; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Guerrero-Germán, Patricia; Tejeda-Mansir, Armando

    2015-01-01

    The clinical demand of plasmid DNA (pDNA) has been increasing constantly. An exponential-fed perfusion (EFP) culture is a new mode for plasmid production for clinical trials and commercialization. However, the culture conditions may lead to cell filamentation and growth cessation. In this study, the variation of the physiological state and the plasmid contents of Escherichia coli DH5α hosting pVAX1-NH36 in an EFP culture for application as a Leishmaniasis vaccine was investigated. The culture performance was monitored using flow cytometry (FC) and real-time quantitative PCR. The FC studies showed a high viability of cell population and a constant distribution of complexity and size. A high homogeneity of pDNA (>95 % of supercoiled) was obtained, which might be attributed to a better culture environment. The obtained plasmid specific and volumetric yields of 1.8 mg/g dcw and 36.5 mg/L represent typical values for laboratory-scale plasmid production in a defined medium. A segregated kinetic model of the perfusion system was developed and fitted to the experimental data (R(2) > 0.96). A practical conclusion of this work is that a space-time yield analysis of a bioprocess requires a viability evaluation. This new strategy of culture operation might help in the efficient production of pDNA for therapeutic use.

  9. Structure–function relationships of two paralogous single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from Streptomyces coelicolor: implication of SsbB in chromosome segregation during sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Paradzik, Tina; Ivic, Nives; Filic, Zelimira; Manjasetty, Babu A.; Herron, Paul; Luic, Marija; Vujaklija, Dusica

    2013-01-01

    The linear chromosome of Streptomyces coelicolor contains two paralogous ssb genes, ssbA and ssbB. Following mutational analysis, we concluded that ssbA is essential, whereas ssbB plays a key role in chromosome segregation during sporulation. In the ssbB mutant, ∼30% of spores lacked DNA. The two ssb genes were expressed differently; in minimal medium, gene expression was prolonged for both genes and significantly upregulated for ssbB. The ssbA gene is transcribed as part of a polycistronic mRNA from two initiation sites, 163 bp and 75 bp upstream of the rpsF translational start codon. The ssbB gene is transcribed as a monocistronic mRNA, from an unusual promoter region, 73 bp upstream of the AUG codon. Distinctive DNA-binding affinities of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins monitored by tryptophan fluorescent quenching and electrophoretic mobility shift were observed. The crystal structure of SsbB at 1.7 Å resolution revealed a common OB-fold, lack of the clamp-like structure conserved in SsbA and previously unpublished S-S bridges between the A/B and C/D subunits. This is the first report of the determination of paralogous single-stranded DNA-binding protein structures from the same organism. Phylogenetic analysis revealed frequent duplication of ssb genes in Actinobacteria, whereas their strong retention suggests that they are involved in important cellular functions. PMID:23393191

  10. Gigantism in a Bacterium, Epulopiscium fishelsoni, Correlates with Complex Patterns in Arrangement, Quantity, and Segregation of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bresler, V.; Montgomery, W. L.; Fishelson, L.; Pollak, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    Epulopiscium fishelsoni, gut symbiont of the brown surgeonfish (Acanthurus nigrofuscus) in the Red Sea, attains a larger size than any other eubacterium, varies 10- to 20-fold in length (and >2,000-fold in volume), and undergoes a complex daily life cycle. In early morning, nucleoids contain highly condensed DNA in elongate, chromosome-like structures which are physically separated from the general cytoplasm. Cell division involves production of two (rarely three) nucleoids within a cell, deposition of cell walls around expanded nucleoids, and emergence of daughter cells from the parent cell. Fluorescence measurements of DNA, RNA, and other cell components indicate the following. DNA quantity is proportional to cell volume over cell lengths of ∼30 μm to >500 μm. For cells of a given size, nucleoids of cells with two nucleoids (binucleoid) contain approximately equal amounts of DNA. And each nucleoid of a binucleoid cell contains one-half the DNA of the single nucleoid in a uninucleoid cell of the same size. The life cycle involves approximately equal subdivision of DNA among daughter cells, formation of apical caps of condensed DNA from previously decondensed and diffusely distributed DNA, and “pinching” of DNA near the middle of the cell in the absence of new wall formation. Mechanisms underlying these patterns remain unclear, but formation of daughter nucleoids and cells occurs both during diurnal periods of host feeding and bacterial cell growth and during nocturnal periods of host inactivity when mean bacterial cell size declines. PMID:9791108

  11. Fission yeast Drp1 is an essential protein required for recovery from DNA damage and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Ahamad, Nafees; Ahmed, Shakil

    2014-12-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most critical types of DNA damage that can leads to chromosomal aberrations, genomic instability and cancer. Several genetic disorders such as Xeroderma pigmentosum are linked with defects in DNA repair. Human Rint1, a TIP1 domain containing protein is involved in membrane trafficking but its role in DNA damage response is elusive. In this study we characterized the role of Drp1 (damage responsive protein 1), a Rint1 family protein during DNA damage response in fission yeast. We identified that Drp1 is an essential protein and indispensable for survival and growth. Using in vitro random mutagenesis approach we isolated a temperature sensitive mutant allele of drp1 gene (drp1-654) that exhibits sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, in particular to alkylation damage and UV associated DNA damage. The drp1-654 mutant cells are also sensitive to double strand break inducing agent bleomycin. Genetic interaction studies identified that Rad50 and Drp1 act in the same pathway during DNA damage response and the physical interaction of Drp1 with Rad50 was unaffected in drp1-654 mutant at permissive as well as non permissive temperature. Furthermore Drp1 was found to be required for the recovery from MMS induced DNA damage. We also demonstrated that the Drp1 protein localized to nucleus and was required to maintain the chromosome stability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ecology of prokaryotic viruses.

    PubMed

    Weinbauer, Markus G

    2004-05-01

    The finding that total viral abundance is higher than total prokaryotic abundance and that a significant fraction of the prokaryotic community is infected with phages in aquatic systems has stimulated research on the ecology of prokaryotic viruses and their role in ecosystems. This review treats the ecology of prokaryotic viruses ('phages') in marine, freshwater and soil systems from a 'virus point of view'. The abundance of viruses varies strongly in different environments and is related to bacterial abundance or activity suggesting that the majority of the viruses found in the environment are typically phages. Data on phage diversity are sparse but indicate that phages are extremely diverse in natural systems. Lytic phages are predators of prokaryotes, whereas lysogenic and chronic infections represent a parasitic interaction. Some forms of lysogeny might be described best as mutualism. The little existing ecological data on phage populations indicate a large variety of environmental niches and survival strategies. The host cell is the main resource for phages and the resource quality, i.e., the metabolic state of the host cell, is a critical factor in all steps of the phage life cycle. Virus-induced mortality of prokaryotes varies strongly on a temporal and spatial scale and shows that phages can be important predators of bacterioplankton. This mortality and the release of cell lysis products into the environment can strongly influence microbial food web processes and biogeochemical cycles. Phages can also affect host diversity, e.g., by 'killing the winner' and keeping in check competitively dominant species or populations. Moreover, they mediate gene transfer between prokaryotes, but this remains largely unknown in the environment. Genomics or proteomics are providing us now with powerful tools in phage ecology, but final testing will have to be performed in the environment.

  13. Lack of the H-NS Protein Results in Extended and Aberrantly Positioned DNA during Chromosome Replication and Segregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Helgesen, Emily; Fossum-Raunehaug, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The architectural protein H-NS binds nonspecifically to hundreds of sites throughout the chromosome and can multimerize to stiffen segments of DNA as well as to form DNA-protein-DNA bridges. H-NS has been suggested to contribute to the orderly folding of the Escherichia coli chromosome in the highly compacted nucleoid. In this study, we investigated the positioning and dynamics of the origins, the replisomes, and the SeqA structures trailing the replication forks in cells lacking the H-NS protein. In H-NS mutant cells, foci of SeqA, replisomes, and origins were irregularly positioned in the cell. Further analysis showed that the average distance between the SeqA structures and the replisome was increased by ∼100 nm compared to that in wild-type cells, whereas the colocalization of SeqA-bound sister DNA behind replication forks was not affected. This result may suggest that H-NS contributes to the folding of DNA along adjacent segments. H-NS mutant cells were found to be incapable of adopting the distinct and condensed nucleoid structures characteristic of E. coli cells growing rapidly in rich medium. It appears as if H-NS mutant cells adopt a “slow-growth” type of chromosome organization under nutrient-rich conditions, which leads to a decreased cellular DNA content. IMPORTANCE It is not fully understood how and to what extent nucleoid-associated proteins contribute to chromosome folding and organization during replication and segregation in Escherichia coli. In this work, we find in vivo indications that cells lacking the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS have a lower degree of DNA condensation than wild-type cells. Our work suggests that H-NS is involved in condensing the DNA along adjacent segments on the chromosome and is not likely to tether newly replicated strands of sister DNA. We also find indications that H-NS is required for rapid growth with high DNA content and for the formation of a highly condensed nucleoid structure under such

  14. In vivo analysis of polyadenylation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bijoy K; Kushner, Sidney R

    2014-01-01

    Polyadenylation at the 3' ends of mRNAs, tRNAs, rRNAs, and sRNAs plays important roles in RNA metabolism in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, the nature of poly(A) tails in prokaryotes is distinct compared to their eukaryotic counterparts. Specifically, depending on the organism, eukaryotic poly(A) tails average between 50 and >200 nt and can easily be isolated by several techniques involving oligo(dT)-dependent cDNA amplification. In contrast, the bulk of the poly(A) tails present on prokaryotic transcripts is relatively short (<10 nt) and is difficult to characterize using similar techniques. This chapter describes methods that can circumvent these problems. For example, we discuss how to isolate total RNA and characterize its overall polyadenylation status employing a poly(A) sizing assay. Furthermore, we describe a technique involving RNase H treatment of total RNA followed by northern analysis in order to distinguish length of poly(A) tails on various types of transcripts. Finally, we outline a useful procedure to clone the poly(A) tails of specific transcripts using 5'-3' end-ligated RNA, which is independent of oligo(dT)-dependent cDNA amplification. These approaches are particularly helpful in analyzing transcripts with either short or long poly(A) tails both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  15. The viral eukaryogenesis hypothesis: a key role for viruses in the emergence of eukaryotes from a prokaryotic world environment.

    PubMed

    Bell, Philip John Livingstone

    2009-10-01

    Understanding how the gulf between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular design arose is a major challenge. The viral eukaryogenesis (VE) hypothesis addresses the challenge of eukaryotic origins by suggesting the first eukaryotic cell was a multimember consortium consisting of a viral ancestor of the nucleus, an archaeal ancestor of the eukaryotic cytoplasm, and a bacterial ancestor of the mitochondria. Using only prokaryotes and their viruses, and invoking selective pressures observed in modern organisms, the VE hypothesis can explain the origins of the eukaryotic cell, sex, and meiosis. In the VE hypothesis, a cell wall-less archaeon and an alpha-proteobacterium established a syntrophic relationship, and then a complex DNA virus permanently lysogenized the archaeal syntroph to produce a consortium of three organisms that evolved into the eukaryotic cell. The mechanisms by which the virus replicated, controlled its copy number, and segregated to daughter cells led to the evolution of the asexual mitotic replication cycle and the sexual meiotic replication cycle. The VE hypothesis conceptually unifies prokaryotic and eukaryotic sex into variants of a single process.

  16. An acellular assay to assess the genotoxicity of complex mixtures of organic pollutants bound on size segregated aerosol. Part I: DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Topinka, Jan; Hovorka, Jan; Milcova, Alena; Schmuczerova, Jana; Krouzek, Jiri; Rossner, Pavel; Sram, Radim J

    2010-10-20

    An acellular assay consisting of calf thymus DNA with/without rat liver microsomal S9 fraction was used to study the genotoxicity of complex mixtures of organic air pollutants bound to size segregated aerosols by means of DNA adduct analysis. We compared the genotoxicity of the organic extracts (EOMs) from three size fractions of aerosol ranging from 0.17μm to 10μm that were collected by high volume cascade impactors in four localities of the Czech Republic differing in the extent of the environmental pollution: (1) small village in proximity of a strip mine, (2) highway, (3) city center of Prague and (4) background station. The total DNA adduct levels induced by 100μg/ml of EOMs were analyzed by (32)P-postlabelling analysis with a nuclease P1 method for adduct enrichment. The main finding of the study was most of the observed genotoxicity was connected with a fine particulate matter fraction (<1μm). The concentrations of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs) in EOMs indicate that fine fractions (0.5-1μm) bound the highest amount of c-PAHs in all aerosol sampling sites, which might be related to the higher specific surface of this fraction as compared with a course fraction (1-10μm) and higher mass as compared with a condensational fraction (0.17-0.5μm). As for aerosol mass, both fine and condensational fractions are effective carriers of c-PAHs. Similarly, the DNA adduct levels per m(3) of air were highest for the fine fraction, while the condensational fraction (strip mine site and city center) revealed the highest DNA adduct levels in cases where aerosol mass is taken into consideration. A strong correlation was found between the c-PAHs and DNA adduct levels induced by EOMs in all the localities and for various size fractions (R(2)=0.98, p<0.001). It may be concluded that the analysis of total DNA adducts induced in an acellular assay with/without metabolic activation represents a relatively simple method to assess the genotoxic potential

  17. DNA asymmetry and cell fate regulation in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yennek, Siham; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2013-01-01

    The semi-conservative nature of DNA replication has suggested that identical DNA molecules within chromatids are inherited by daughter cells after cell division. Numerous reports of non-random DNA segregation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes suggest that this is not always the case, and that epigenetic marks on chromatids, if not the individual DNA strands themselves, could have distinct signatures. Their selective distribution to daughter cells provides a novel mechanism for gene and cell fate regulation by segregating chromatids asymmetrically. Here we highlight some examples and potential mechanisms that can regulate this process. We propose that cellular asymmetry is inherently present during each cell division, and that it provides an opportunity during each cell cycle for moderating cell fates.

  18. Accurate Chromosome Segregation at First Meiotic Division Requires AGO4, a Protein Involved in RNA-Dependent DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Cecilia; Santos, Juan Luis; Pradillo, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    The RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway is important for the transcriptional repression of transposable elements and for heterochromatin formation. Small RNAs are key players in this process by regulating both DNA and histone methylation. Taking into account that methylation underlies gene silencing and that there are genes with meiosis-specific expression profiles, we have wondered whether genes involved in RdDM could play a role during this specialized cell division. To address this issue, we have characterized meiosis progression in pollen mother cells from Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants defective for several proteins related to RdDM. The most relevant results were obtained for ago4-1 In this mutant, meiocytes display a slight reduction in chiasma frequency, alterations in chromatin conformation around centromeric regions, lagging chromosomes at anaphase I, and defects in spindle organization. These abnormalities lead to the formation of polyads instead of tetrads at the end of meiosis, and might be responsible for the fertility defects observed in this mutant. Findings reported here highlight an involvement of AGO4 during meiosis by ensuring accurate chromosome segregation at anaphase I.

  19. Structural and functional conservation of the human homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad2 gene, which is required for chromosome segregation and recovery from DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, J M; Tavassoli, M; al-Harithy, R; Sheldrick, K S; Lehmann, A R; Carr, A M; Watts, F Z

    1994-01-01

    The rad2 mutant of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is sensitive to UV irradiation and deficient in the repair of UV damage. In addition, it has a very high degree of chromosome loss and/or nondisjunction. We have cloned the rad2 gene and have shown it to be a member of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD2/S. pombe rad13/human XPG family. Using degenerate PCR, we have cloned the human homolog of the rad2 gene. Human cDNA has 55% amino acid sequence identity to the rad2 gene and is able to complement the UV sensitivity of the rad2 null mutant. We have thus isolated a novel human gene which is likely to be involved both in controlling the fidelity of chromosome segregation and in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Its involvement in two fundamental processes for maintaining chromosomal integrity suggests that it is likely to be an important component of cancer avoidance mechanisms. Images PMID:8007985

  20. The phylogeny of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Stackebrandt, E; Woese, C R

    1984-08-01

    Data from methods such as 5S RNA sequencing have enabled phylogenetic relationships within the prokaryotes to be determined. A basic evolutionary dichotomy is suggested by the diversion of the archaebacteria and the eubacteria. Possible inter-relationships of the former and eukaryotic organisms are discussed.

  1. Regulation of prokaryotic gene expression by eukaryotic-like enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Kellie; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Summary A growing body of evidence indicates that serine/threonine kinases (STK) and phosphatases (STP) regulate gene expression in prokaryotic organisms. As prokaryotic STKs and STPs are not DNA binding proteins, regulation of gene expression is accomplished through post-translational modification of their targets. These include two-component response regulators, DNA binding proteins and proteins that mediate transcription and translation. This review summarizes our current understanding of how STKs and STPs mediate gene expression in prokaryotes. Further studies to identify environmental signals that trigger the signaling cascade and elucidation of mechanisms that regulate cross-talk between eukaryotic-like signaling enzymes, two-component systems, and components of the transcriptional and translational machinery will facilitate a greater understanding of prokaryotic gene regulation. PMID:22221896

  2. Mutations reducing replication from R-loops suppress the defects of growth, chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling in cells lacking topoisomerase I and RNase HI activity.

    PubMed

    Usongo, Valentine; Martel, Makisha; Balleydier, Aurélien; Drolet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    R-loop formation occurs when the nascent RNA hybridizes with the template DNA strand behind the RNA polymerase. R-loops affect a wide range of cellular processes and their use as origins of replication was the first function attributed to them. In Escherichia coli, R-loop formation is promoted by the ATP-dependent negative supercoiling activity of gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and is inhibited by topoisomerase (topo) I (topA) relaxing transcription-induced negative supercoiling. RNase HI (rnhA) degrades the RNA moiety of R-loops. The depletion of RNase HI activity in topA null mutants was previously shown to lead to extensive DNA relaxation, due to DNA gyrase inhibition, and to severe growth and chromosome segregation defects that were partially corrected by overproducing topo III (topB). Here, DNA gyrase assays in crude cell extracts showed that the ATP-dependent activity (supercoiling) of gyrase but not its ATP-independent activity (relaxation) was inhibited in topA null cells lacking RNase HI. To characterize the cellular event(s) triggered by the absence of RNase HI, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the growth defect of topA rnhA null cells. Suppressors affecting genes in replication (holC2::aph and dnaT18::aph) nucleotide metabolism (dcd49::aph), RNA degradation (rne59::aph) and fimbriae synthesis (fimD22::aph) were found to reduce replication from R-loops and to restore supercoiling, thus pointing to a correlation between R-loop-dependent replication in topA rnhA mutants and the inhibition of gyrase activity and growth. Interestingly, the position of fimD on the E. coli chromosome corresponds to the site of one of the five main putative origins of replication from R-loops in rnhA null cells recently identified by next-generation sequencing, thus suggesting that the fimD22::aph mutation inactivated one of these origins. Furthermore, we show that topo III overproduction is unable to complement the growth defect of topA rnhA null mutants at low

  3. Prokaryote diversity and taxonomy: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2004-01-01

    The prokaryotes are by far the most abundant organisms inhabiting planet Earth. They are also by far the most diverse, both metabolically and phylogenetically; they encompass the Bacteria and the Archaea, two out of the three major divisions of living organisms. The current prokaryote species classification is based on a combination of genomic and phenotypic properties. The recommended cut-off value of 70% DNA-DNA similarity to delineate species signifies an extremely broad species definition for the prokaryotes compared with the higher eukaryotes. The number of validly named species of prokaryotes is currently slightly more than 6200. However, on the basis of small-subunit rDNA characterization of whole communities and other approaches, the more exact number of species present can be inferred to be at least two orders of magnitude larger. Classic culturing methods based on colony formation on agar are generally unsatisfactory for the recovery of bacteria from the environment. Many of the most abundant prokaryotes in nature have not yet been brought into culture. Some of these may thrive by means of as yet unknown modes of energy generation. Several novel methods have recently enabled the isolation of some interesting organisms of environmental significance. A better coverage of the prokaryote diversity on Earth depends on such innovative approaches, combined with appropriate funding. PMID:15253349

  4. Prokaryote diversity and taxonomy: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2004-04-29

    The prokaryotes are by far the most abundant organisms inhabiting planet Earth. They are also by far the most diverse, both metabolically and phylogenetically; they encompass the Bacteria and the Archaea, two out of the three major divisions of living organisms. The current prokaryote species classification is based on a combination of genomic and phenotypic properties. The recommended cut-off value of 70% DNA-DNA similarity to delineate species signifies an extremely broad species definition for the prokaryotes compared with the higher eukaryotes. The number of validly named species of prokaryotes is currently slightly more than 6200. However, on the basis of small-subunit rDNA characterization of whole communities and other approaches, the more exact number of species present can be inferred to be at least two orders of magnitude larger. Classic culturing methods based on colony formation on agar are generally unsatisfactory for the recovery of bacteria from the environment. Many of the most abundant prokaryotes in nature have not yet been brought into culture. Some of these may thrive by means of as yet unknown modes of energy generation. Several novel methods have recently enabled the isolation of some interesting organisms of environmental significance. A better coverage of the prokaryote diversity on Earth depends on such innovative approaches, combined with appropriate funding.

  5. In vitro replication by prokaryotic and eukaryotic polymerases on DNA templates containing site-specific and stereospecific benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide adducts.

    PubMed Central

    Chary, P; Lloyd, R S

    1995-01-01

    DNA adducts of the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE) interact stereospecifically with prokaryotic and eukaryotic polymerases in vitro. Toward understanding the capacity to replicate past different diastereomers of BPDE at specific sites in DNA, six deoxyoligonucleotides, each 33 bases long, were constructed with stereochemically defined BPDE adducts on adenine N6 at position two of the human N-ras codon 61. Four polymerases that were studied under single encounters with the template-primer complex terminated synthesis one base 3' to the lesion with all the adducted templates. When multiple encounters between polymerase and substrate were permitted, each of the polymerases analyzed revealed a unique pattern for a given adducted template. The general replication pattern was encompassed under two categories, reflecting the significance of the R and S configurations of C10 of the pyrenyl ring attached to the single-stranded DNA template. Furthermore, within each of these categories, every polymerase demonstrated distinct quantitative differences in product accumulation at a given site, for the various adducted templates. Among the polymerases utilized in this study, exonuclease-deficient Klenow fragment of polymerase I (exo- KF) exhibited the most efficient translesion synthesis resulting in approximately 16% full-length products with the modified templates bearing adducts with C10-S configuration. In contrast, chain elongation with bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase bearing an active 3'-->5' exonucleolytic activity was most strongly inhibited by all six BPDE-adducted templates. Misincorporation of A opposite the adduct occurred in all the templates when polymerized with Sequenase, whereas exo- KF preferentially incorporated C opposite the C10-R BPDE adducts and A opposite the C10-S BPDE adducts. Images PMID:7753632

  6. Keeping the Wolves at Bay: Antitoxins of Prokaryotic Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Yeo, Chew Chieng

    2016-01-01

    In their initial stages of discovery, prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems were confined to bacterial plasmids where they function to mediate the maintenance and stability of usually low- to medium-copy number plasmids through the post-segregational killing of any plasmid-free daughter cells that developed. Their eventual discovery as nearly ubiquitous and repetitive elements in bacterial chromosomes led to a wealth of knowledge and scientific debate as to their diversity and functionality in the prokaryotic lifestyle. Currently categorized into six different types designated types I-VI, type II TA systems are the best characterized. These generally comprised of two genes encoding a proteic toxin and its corresponding proteic antitoxin, respectively. Under normal growth conditions, the stable toxin is prevented from exerting its lethal effect through tight binding with the less stable antitoxin partner, forming a non-lethal TA protein complex. Besides binding with its cognate toxin, the antitoxin also plays a role in regulating the expression of the type II TA operon by binding to the operator site, thereby repressing transcription from the TA promoter. In most cases, full repression is observed in the presence of the TA complex as binding of the toxin enhances the DNA binding capability of the antitoxin. TA systems have been implicated in a gamut of prokaryotic cellular functions such as being mediators of programmed cell death as well as persistence or dormancy, biofilm formation, as defensive weapons against bacteriophage infections and as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. It is thus apparent that these antitoxins, as DNA-binding proteins, play an essential role in modulating the prokaryotic lifestyle whilst at the same time preventing the lethal action of the toxins under normal growth conditions, i.e., keeping the proverbial wolves at bay. In this review, we will cover the diversity and characteristics of various type II TA antitoxins. We shall

  7. Keeping the Wolves at Bay: Antitoxins of Prokaryotic Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Yeo, Chew Chieng

    2016-01-01

    In their initial stages of discovery, prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems were confined to bacterial plasmids where they function to mediate the maintenance and stability of usually low- to medium-copy number plasmids through the post-segregational killing of any plasmid-free daughter cells that developed. Their eventual discovery as nearly ubiquitous and repetitive elements in bacterial chromosomes led to a wealth of knowledge and scientific debate as to their diversity and functionality in the prokaryotic lifestyle. Currently categorized into six different types designated types I–VI, type II TA systems are the best characterized. These generally comprised of two genes encoding a proteic toxin and its corresponding proteic antitoxin, respectively. Under normal growth conditions, the stable toxin is prevented from exerting its lethal effect through tight binding with the less stable antitoxin partner, forming a non-lethal TA protein complex. Besides binding with its cognate toxin, the antitoxin also plays a role in regulating the expression of the type II TA operon by binding to the operator site, thereby repressing transcription from the TA promoter. In most cases, full repression is observed in the presence of the TA complex as binding of the toxin enhances the DNA binding capability of the antitoxin. TA systems have been implicated in a gamut of prokaryotic cellular functions such as being mediators of programmed cell death as well as persistence or dormancy, biofilm formation, as defensive weapons against bacteriophage infections and as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. It is thus apparent that these antitoxins, as DNA-binding proteins, play an essential role in modulating the prokaryotic lifestyle whilst at the same time preventing the lethal action of the toxins under normal growth conditions, i.e., keeping the proverbial wolves at bay. In this review, we will cover the diversity and characteristics of various type II TA antitoxins. We shall

  8. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation

    PubMed Central

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung BK; Laub, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly one millimeter long, or approximately 1000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length-scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  9. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation.

  10. Advantages and limitations of genomics in prokaryotic taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Sentausa, E; Fournier, P-E

    2013-09-01

    Taxonomic classification is an important field of microbiology, as it enables scientists to identify prokaryotes worldwide. Although the current classification system is still based on the one designed by Carolus Linnaeus, the currently available genomic content of several thousands of sequenced prokaryotic genomes represents a unique source of taxonomic information that should not be ignored. In addition, the development of faster, cheaper and improved sequencing methods has made genomics a tool that has a place in the workflow of a routine microbiology laboratory. Thus, genomics has reached a stage where it may be used in prokaryotic taxonomic classification, with criteria such as the genome index of average nucleotide identity being an alternative to DNA-DNA hybridization. However, several hurdles remain, including the lack of genomic sequences of many prokaryotic taxonomic representatives, and consensus procedures to describe new prokaryotic taxa that do not, as yet, accommodate genomic data. We herein review the advantages and disadvantages of using genomics in prokaryotic taxonomy. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  11. YbiB from Escherichia coli, the Defining Member of the Novel TrpD2 Family of Prokaryotic DNA-binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Daniel; Kaiser, Wolfgang; Stutz, Cian; Holinski, Alexandra; Mayans, Olga; Babinger, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We present the crystal structure and biochemical characterization of Escherichia coli YbiB, a member of the hitherto uncharacterized TrpD2 protein family. Our results demonstrate that the functional diversity of proteins with a common fold can be far greater than predictable by computational annotation. The TrpD2 proteins show high structural homology to anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase (TrpD) and nucleoside phosphorylase class II enzymes but bind with high affinity (KD = 10–100 nm) to nucleic acids without detectable sequence specificity. The difference in affinity between single- and double-stranded DNA is minor. Results suggest that multiple YbiB molecules bind to one longer DNA molecule in a cooperative manner. The YbiB protein is a homodimer that, therefore, has two electropositive DNA binding grooves. But due to negative cooperativity within the dimer, only one groove binds DNA in in vitro experiments. A monomerized variant remains able to bind DNA with similar affinity, but the negative cooperative effect is eliminated. The ybiB gene forms an operon with the DNA helicase gene dinG and is under LexA control, being induced by DNA-damaging agents. Thus, speculatively, the TrpD2 proteins may be part of the LexA-controlled SOS response in bacteria. PMID:26063803

  12. Analysis of branched DNA replication and recombination intermediates from prokaryotic cells by two-dimensional (2D) native-native agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules are generated by the essential processes of replication and recombination. Owing to their distinctive extended shapes, these intermediates migrate differently from linear double-stranded DNA under certain electrophoretic conditions. However, these branched species exist in the cell at much low abundance than the bulk linear DNA. Consequently, branched molecules cannot be visualized by conventional electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining. Two-dimensional native-native agarose electrophoresis has therefore been developed as a method to facilitate the separation and visualization of branched replication and recombination intermediates. A wide variety of studies have employed this technique to examine branched molecules in eukaryotic, archaeal, and bacterial cells, providing valuable insights into how DNA is duplicated and repaired in all three domains of life.

  13. Thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The present studies have shown that GSH metabolism arose in the purple bacteria and cyanobacteria where it functions to protect against oxygen toxicity. Evidence was obtained indicating that GSH metabolism was incorporated into eucaryotes via the endosymbiosis giving rise to mitochrondria and chloroplasts. Aerobic bacteria lacking GSH utilize other thiols for apparently similar functions, the thiol being coenzyme A in Gram positive bacteria and chi-glutamylcysteine in the halobacteria. The thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes is thus seen to be much more highly diversified than that of eucaryotes and much remains to be learned about this subject.

  14. The chromosome cycle: coordinating replication and segregation

    PubMed Central

    Blow, J. Julian; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U.

    2005-01-01

    During the cell-division cycle, chromosomal DNA must initially be precisely duplicated and then correctly segregated to daughter cells. The accuracy of these two events is maintained by two interlinked cycles: the replication licensing cycle, which ensures precise duplication of DNA, and the cohesion cycle, which ensures correct segregation. Here we provide a general overview of how these two systems are coordinated to maintain genetic stability during the cell cycle. PMID:16264427

  15. Dynamics of tobacco DNA topoisomerases II in cell cycle regulation: to manage topological constrains during replication, transcription and mitotic chromosome condensation and segregation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Badri Nath; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Panditi, Varakumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2017-08-01

    The topoisomerase II expression varies as a function of cell proliferation. Maximal topoisomerase II expression was tightly coupled to S phase and G2/M phase via both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Investigation in meiosis using pollen mother cells also revealed that it is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, it seems to diffuse out once meiotic chromosomal condensation is completed. Synchronized tobacco BY-2 cell cultures were used to study the role of topoisomerase II in various stages of the cell cycle. Topoisomerase II transcript accumulation was observed during the S- and G2/M- phase of cell cycle. This biphasic expression pattern indicates the active requirement of topoisomerase II during these stages of the cell cycle. Through immuno-localization of topoisomerase II was observed diffusely throughout the nucleoplasm in interphase nuclei, whereas, the nucleolus region exhibited a more prominent immuno-positive staining that correlated with rRNA transcription, as shown by propidium iodide staining and BrUTP incorporation. The immuno-staining analysis also showed that topoisomerase II is the major component of mitotic chromosomes and remain attached to the chromosomes during cell division. The inhibition of topoisomerase II activity using specific inhibitors revealed quite dramatic effect on condensation of chromatin and chromosome individualization from prophase to metaphase transition. Partially condensed chromosomes were not arranged on metaphase plate and chromosomal perturbations were observed when advance to anaphase, suggesting the importance of topoisomerase II activity for proper chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. Contrary, topoisomerase II is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, even though mitosis and meiosis share many processes, including the DNA replication, chromosome condensation and precisely regulated partitioning of chromosomes into daughter cells. Even if topoisomerase II is

  16. Overcoming Triple Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandara, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Latinos are, after whites, the most segregated student group in the United States, and their segregation is closely tied to poor academic outcomes. Latinos experience a triple segregation: by race/ethnicity, poverty, and language. Racial segregation perpetuates negative stereotypes, reduces the likelihood of a strong teaching staff, and is often…

  17. Do prokaryotes contain microtubules?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bermudes, D.; Hinkle, G.; Margulis, L.

    1994-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, microtubules are 24-nm-diameter tubular structures composed of a class of conserved proteins called tubulin. They are involved in numerous cell functions including ciliary motility, nerve cell elongation, pigment migration, centrosome formation, and chromosome movement. Although cytoplasmic tubules and fibers have been observed in bacteria, some with diameters similar to those of eukaryotes, no homologies to eukaryotic microtubules have been established. Certain groups of bacteria including azotobacters, cyanobacteria, enteric bacteria, and spirochetes have been frequently observed to possess microtubule-like structures, and others, including archaebacteria, have been shown to be sensitive to drugs that inhibit the polymerization of microtubules. Although little biochemical or molecular biological information is available, the differences observed among these prokaryotic structures suggest that their composition generally differs among themselves as well as from that of eukaryotes. We review the distribution of cytoplasmic tubules in prokaryotes, even though, in all cases, their functions remain unknown. At least some tend to occur in cells that are large, elongate, and motile, suggesting that they may be involved in cytoskeletal functions, intracellular motility, or transport activities comparable to those performed by eukaryotic microtubules. In Escherichia coli, the FtsZ protein is associated with the formation of a ring in the division zone between the newly forming offspring cells. Like tubulin, FtsZ is a GTPase and shares with tubulin a 7-amino-acid motif, making it a promising candidate in which to seek the origin of tubulins.

  18. Do prokaryotes contain microtubules?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bermudes, D.; Hinkle, G.; Margulis, L.

    1994-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, microtubules are 24-nm-diameter tubular structures composed of a class of conserved proteins called tubulin. They are involved in numerous cell functions including ciliary motility, nerve cell elongation, pigment migration, centrosome formation, and chromosome movement. Although cytoplasmic tubules and fibers have been observed in bacteria, some with diameters similar to those of eukaryotes, no homologies to eukaryotic microtubules have been established. Certain groups of bacteria including azotobacters, cyanobacteria, enteric bacteria, and spirochetes have been frequently observed to possess microtubule-like structures, and others, including archaebacteria, have been shown to be sensitive to drugs that inhibit the polymerization of microtubules. Although little biochemical or molecular biological information is available, the differences observed among these prokaryotic structures suggest that their composition generally differs among themselves as well as from that of eukaryotes. We review the distribution of cytoplasmic tubules in prokaryotes, even though, in all cases, their functions remain unknown. At least some tend to occur in cells that are large, elongate, and motile, suggesting that they may be involved in cytoskeletal functions, intracellular motility, or transport activities comparable to those performed by eukaryotic microtubules. In Escherichia coli, the FtsZ protein is associated with the formation of a ring in the division zone between the newly forming offspring cells. Like tubulin, FtsZ is a GTPase and shares with tubulin a 7-amino-acid motif, making it a promising candidate in which to seek the origin of tubulins.

  19. Do prokaryotes contain microtubules?

    PubMed Central

    Bermudes, D; Hinkle, G; Margulis, L

    1994-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, microtubules are 24-nm-diameter tubular structures composed of a class of conserved proteins called tubulin. They are involved in numerous cell functions including ciliary motility, nerve cell elongation, pigment migration, centrosome formation, and chromosome movement. Although cytoplasmic tubules and fibers have been observed in bacteria, some with diameters similar to those of eukaryotes, no homologies to eukaryotic microtubules have been established. Certain groups of bacteria including azotobacters, cyanobacteria, enteric bacteria, and spirochetes have been frequently observed to possess microtubule-like structures, and others, including archaebacteria, have been shown to be sensitive to drugs that inhibit the polymerization of microtubules. Although little biochemical or molecular biological information is available, the differences observed among these prokaryotic structures suggest that their composition generally differs among themselves as well as from that of eukaryotes. We review the distribution of cytoplasmic tubules in prokaryotes, even though, in all cases, their functions remain unknown. At least some tend to occur in cells that are large, elongate, and motile, suggesting that they may be involved in cytoskeletal functions, intracellular motility, or transport activities comparable to those performed by eukaryotic microtubules. In Escherichia coli, the FtsZ protein is associated with the formation of a ring in the division zone between the newly forming offspring cells. Like tubulin, FtsZ is a GTPase and shares with tubulin a 7-amino-acid motif, making it a promising candidate in which to seek the origin of tubulins. Images PMID:7968920

  20. [Eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA-polymerase. II. The role of internucleotide phosphate groups of a template in its binding with the enzyme].

    PubMed

    Nevinskiĭ, G A; Levina, A S; Podust, V N; Lavrik, O I

    1987-01-01

    The affinity of different ligands (phosphate, nucleoside monophosphates, oligonucleotides) to the template binding site of DNA polymerase alpha from human placenta was estimated. To this goal, dependences of rate of the enzyme inactivation by the affinity reagent d(pT)2pC[Pt2+(NH3)2OH](pT)7 on the concentration of these ligands as competitive inhibitors were determined. Minimal ligands capable to bind with the template site of DNA polymerase alpha were shown to be triethylphosphate (Kd 600 microM) and phosphate (Kd 53 microM). Ligand affinity increases by the factor 1.71 per added monomer unit from phosphate to d(pT) and then for oligothymidylates d(Tp)nT (n 1 to 14). The partial ethylation of phosphodiester groups does not change the efficiency of the oligothymidylate binding with the enzyme. However, the complete ethylation of these groups lowers affinity of the oligothymidylates to the enzyme by 7-9 times. The decrease is comparable with the change of Pt2+-decathymidylate affinity to the enzyme caused by Mn2+-ions. The data obtained led to suggestion that an electrostatic contact (most likely, Me2+-dependent) of phosphodiester group with the enzyme takes place. The type of contact is confirmed by Gibbs' energy change 1.1-1.4 kcal/mole. Formation of a hydrogen bond with the oxygen atom of P = O group of the same phosphate is also assumed (delta G =--4.4 . . .--4.5 kcal/mole). The other internucleotide phosphates and all bases of oligonucleotides form neither hydrogen bonds nor electrostatic contacts with the template binding site. Gibbs' energy changes by 0.32 kcal/mole when the template is lengthened by one unit. We suppose that this value characterizes the energy gain in the transition of oligonucleotide template from aquous medium to the hydrophobic environement of the enzyme active site. Comparison of Km values of oligothymidylates and their partially or completely ethylated analogues as templates in the reaction of DNA polymerization catalysed by DNA

  1. Simple sequence repeats in prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Mrázek, Jan; Guo, Xiangxue; Shah, Apurva

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in DNA sequences are composed of tandem iterations of short oligonucleotides and may have functional and/or structural properties that distinguish them from general DNA sequences. They are variable in length because of slip-strand mutations and may also affect local structure of the DNA molecule or the encoded proteins. Long SSRs (LSSRs) are common in eukaryotes but rare in most prokaryotes. In pathogens, SSRs can enhance antigenic variance of the pathogen population in a strategy that counteracts the host immune response. We analyze representations of SSRs in >300 prokaryotic genomes and report significant differences among different prokaryotes as well as among different types of SSRs. LSSRs composed of short oligonucleotides (1–4 bp length, designated LSSR1–4) are often found in host-adapted pathogens with reduced genomes that are not known to readily survive in a natural environment outside the host. In contrast, LSSRs composed of longer oligonucleotides (5–11 bp length, designated LSSR5–11) are found mostly in nonpathogens and opportunistic pathogens with large genomes. Comparisons among SSRs of different lengths suggest that LSSR1–4 are likely maintained by selection. This is consistent with the established role of some LSSR1–4 in enhancing antigenic variance. By contrast, abundance of LSSR5–11 in some genomes may reflect the SSRs' general tendency to expand rather than their specific role in the organisms' physiology. Differences among genomes in terms of SSR representations and their possible interpretations are discussed. PMID:17485665

  2. Progress in prokaryotic transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Filiatrault, Melanie J

    2011-10-01

    Genome-wide expression studies transformed the field of transcriptomics and made it feasible to study global gene expression in extraordinary detail. These new methods have revealed an enhanced view of the transcriptional landscape and have yielded many biological insights. It is increasingly clear that the prokaryotic transcriptome is much more complex than once thought. Recent advances in microbial transcriptome analyses are highlighted in this review. Areas of progress include the development of optimized techniques that minimize the abundance of ribosomal RNAs in RNA samples as well as the development of novel methods to create transcriptome libraries. Advances such as these have led to a new emphasis in areas such as metatranscriptomics and single cell gene expression studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. CRISPR-Cas immunity in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Marraffini, Luciano A

    2015-10-01

    Prokaryotic organisms are threatened by a large array of viruses and have developed numerous defence strategies. Among these, only clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems provide adaptive immunity against foreign elements. Upon viral injection, a small sequence of the viral genome, known as a spacer, is integrated into the CRISPR locus to immunize the host cell. Spacers are transcribed into small RNA guides that direct the cleavage of the viral DNA by Cas nucleases. Immunization through spacer acquisition enables a unique form of evolution whereby a population not only rapidly acquires resistance to its predators but also passes this resistance mechanism vertically to its progeny.

  4. Evolution of small prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cano, David J.; Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Partida-Martínez, Laila P.; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Delaye, Luis

    2015-01-01

    As revealed by genome sequencing, the biology of prokaryotes with reduced genomes is strikingly diverse. These include free-living prokaryotes with ∼800 genes as well as endosymbiotic bacteria with as few as ∼140 genes. Comparative genomics is revealing the evolutionary mechanisms that led to these small genomes. In the case of free-living prokaryotes, natural selection directly favored genome reduction, while in the case of endosymbiotic prokaryotes neutral processes played a more prominent role. However, new experimental data suggest that selective processes may be at operation as well for endosymbiotic prokaryotes at least during the first stages of genome reduction. Endosymbiotic prokaryotes have evolved diverse strategies for living with reduced gene sets inside a host-defined medium. These include utilization of host-encoded functions (some of them coded by genes acquired by gene transfer from the endosymbiont and/or other bacteria); metabolic complementation between co-symbionts; and forming consortiums with other bacteria within the host. Recent genome sequencing projects of intracellular mutualistic bacteria showed that previously believed universal evolutionary trends like reduced G+C content and conservation of genome synteny are not always present in highly reduced genomes. Finally, the simplified molecular machinery of some of these organisms with small genomes may be used to aid in the design of artificial minimal cells. Here we review recent genomic discoveries of the biology of prokaryotes endowed with small gene sets and discuss the evolutionary mechanisms that have been proposed to explain their peculiar nature. PMID:25610432

  5. Evolution of small prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cano, David J; Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Partida-Martínez, Laila P; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Delaye, Luis

    2014-01-01

    As revealed by genome sequencing, the biology of prokaryotes with reduced genomes is strikingly diverse. These include free-living prokaryotes with ∼800 genes as well as endosymbiotic bacteria with as few as ∼140 genes. Comparative genomics is revealing the evolutionary mechanisms that led to these small genomes. In the case of free-living prokaryotes, natural selection directly favored genome reduction, while in the case of endosymbiotic prokaryotes neutral processes played a more prominent role. However, new experimental data suggest that selective processes may be at operation as well for endosymbiotic prokaryotes at least during the first stages of genome reduction. Endosymbiotic prokaryotes have evolved diverse strategies for living with reduced gene sets inside a host-defined medium. These include utilization of host-encoded functions (some of them coded by genes acquired by gene transfer from the endosymbiont and/or other bacteria); metabolic complementation between co-symbionts; and forming consortiums with other bacteria within the host. Recent genome sequencing projects of intracellular mutualistic bacteria showed that previously believed universal evolutionary trends like reduced G+C content and conservation of genome synteny are not always present in highly reduced genomes. Finally, the simplified molecular machinery of some of these organisms with small genomes may be used to aid in the design of artificial minimal cells. Here we review recent genomic discoveries of the biology of prokaryotes endowed with small gene sets and discuss the evolutionary mechanisms that have been proposed to explain their peculiar nature.

  6. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) in prokaryotic taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, Stefanie P; Kämpfer, Peter

    2015-06-01

    To obtain a higher resolution of the phylogenetic relationships of species within a genus or genera within a family, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) is currently a widely used method. In MLSA studies, partial sequences of genes coding for proteins with conserved functions ('housekeeping genes') are used to generate phylogenetic trees and subsequently deduce phylogenies. However, MLSA is not only suggested as a phylogenetic tool to support and clarify the resolution of bacterial species with a higher resolution, as in 16S rRNA gene-based studies, but has also been discussed as a replacement for DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) in species delineation. Nevertheless, despite the fact that MLSA has become an accepted and widely used method in prokaryotic taxonomy, no common generally accepted recommendations have been devised to date for either the whole area of microbial taxonomy or for taxa-specific applications of individual MLSA schemes. The different ways MLSA is performed can vary greatly for the selection of genes, their number, and the calculation method used when comparing the sequences obtained. Here, we provide an overview of the historical development of MLSA and critically review its current application in prokaryotic taxonomy by highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of the method's numerous variations. This provides a perspective for its future use in forthcoming genome-based genotypic taxonomic analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. A repressor with similarities to prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA helicases controls the assembly of the CAAT box binding complex at a photosynthesis gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Bezhani, S; Sherameti, I; Pfannschmidt, T; Oelmüller, R

    2001-06-29

    A single nucleotide exchange in a promoter region located immediately upstream of the CAAT box of the spinach photosynthesis gene AtpC (gene product is subunit gamma of the chloroplast ATP synthase) prevents the formation of a secondary structure and causes an unregulated, constitutive high level of expression (Kusnetsov, V., Landsberger, M., Oelmüller, R. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 36009-36014). We have isolated cDNAs for ATPC-2, a new polypeptide with homologies to pro- and eukaryotic helicases, which specifically binds to this promoter region. Binding of ATPC-2 competes strongly with that of a CAAT box binding factor (CBF), consistent with the idea that both complexes cannot be formed simultaneously because of sterical reasons. In gel mobility shift assays, high binding activities of ATPC-2 and low binding activities of CBF were observed with nuclear extracts from tissue with low AtpC expression levels, and the opposite was observed with extracts from tissues with high AtpC expression levels. Binding of ATPC-2 to the mutant sequence, which directs a constitutively high level expression in vivo and prevents the formation of a secondary structure in vitro, is significantly weaker than binding to the wild-type sequence. Again, the opposite results were obtained for the CBF. Thus, we conclude that the assembly of the CBF.DNA complex stimulates transcription of AtpC and that CBF binding is prevented if ATPC-2 is bound to the promoter region. The novel mechanism of gene regulation and the role of the helicase-like protein ATPC-2 as a potential transcriptional repressor is discussed in relation to its modular structure.

  8. A novel method to transform prokaryotic cells using shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataraja, K. N.; Udayakumar, M.; Jagadeesh, G.

    The transgenic approach that is being used to study gene function or to improve the efficiency of crop plants/organisms involves transformation of a wide range of cells, tissues, and organisms with nucleic acid. In this study we report a new micro- shock assisted prokaryotic cell transformation technique. An underwater electric discharge based shock wave generator (25 kV; 150 m A; high voltage capacitor) has been designed and fabricated to carry out the prokaryotic cell transformation experiments. Test tubes with bacterial cell suspension with appropriate plasmid DNA, immersed in water are exposed to shock wave loading (typical overpressure 130 bar). The transformation efficiency of samples of the prokaryotic cells exposed to shock waves is very high compared to conventional methods.

  9. Viral Diversity Threshold for Adaptive Immunity in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Ariel D.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Lobkovsky, Alexander E.; Gilmore, Michael S.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria and archaea face continual onslaughts of rapidly diversifying viruses and plasmids. Many prokaryotes maintain adaptive immune systems known as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (Cas). CRISPR-Cas systems are genomic sensors that serially acquire viral and plasmid DNA fragments (spacers) that are utilized to target and cleave matching viral and plasmid DNA in subsequent genomic invasions, offering critical immunological memory. Only 50% of sequenced bacteria possess CRISPR-Cas immunity, in contrast to over 90% of sequenced archaea. To probe why half of bacteria lack CRISPR-Cas immunity, we combined comparative genomics and mathematical modeling. Analysis of hundreds of diverse prokaryotic genomes shows that CRISPR-Cas systems are substantially more prevalent in thermophiles than in mesophiles. With sequenced bacteria disproportionately mesophilic and sequenced archaea mostly thermophilic, the presence of CRISPR-Cas appears to depend more on environmental temperature than on bacterial-archaeal taxonomy. Mutation rates are typically severalfold higher in mesophilic prokaryotes than in thermophilic prokaryotes. To quantitatively test whether accelerated viral mutation leads microbes to lose CRISPR-Cas systems, we developed a stochastic model of virus-CRISPR coevolution. The model competes CRISPR-Cas-positive (CRISPR-Cas+) prokaryotes against CRISPR-Cas-negative (CRISPR-Cas−) prokaryotes, continually weighing the antiviral benefits conferred by CRISPR-Cas immunity against its fitness costs. Tracking this cost-benefit analysis across parameter space reveals viral mutation rate thresholds beyond which CRISPR-Cas cannot provide sufficient immunity and is purged from host populations. These results offer a simple, testable viral diversity hypothesis to explain why mesophilic bacteria disproportionately lack CRISPR-Cas immunity. More generally, fundamental limits on the adaptability of biological

  10. Global analysis of gene transcription regulation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Yang, R

    2006-10-01

    Prokaryotes have complex mechanisms to regulate their gene transcription, through the action of transcription factors (TFs). This review deals with current strategies, approaches and challenges in the understanding of i) how to map the repertoires of TF and operon on a genome, ii) how to identify the specific cis-acting DNA elements and their DNA-binding TFs that are required for expression of a given gene, iii) how to define the regulon members of a given TF, iv) how a given TF interacts with its target promoters, v) how these TF-promoter DNA interactions constitute regulatory networks, and vi) how transcriptional regulatory networks can be reconstructed by the reverse-engineering methods. Our goal is to depict the power of newly developed genomic techniques and computational tools, alone or in combination, to dissect the genetic circuitry of transcription regulation, and how this has the tremendous potential to model the regulatory networks in the prokaryotic cells.

  11. Prokaryotic Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation. PMID:23457260

  12. Prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation.

  13. Segregation and manifestations of the mtDNA tRNA[sup Lys] A[r arrow]G[sup (8344)] mutation of myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, N.G.; Tulinius, M.H.; Holme, E.; Oldfors, A.; Andersen, O.; Wahlstroem, J. ); Aasly, J. )

    1992-12-01

    The authors have studied the segregation and manifestations of the tRNA[sup Lys] A[r arrow]G[sup (8344)] mutation of mtDNA. Three unrelated patients with myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome were investigated, along with 30 of their maternal relatives. Mutated mtDNA was not always found in the offspring of women carrying the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation. Four women had 10%-33% of mutated mtDNA in lymphocytes, and no mutated mtDNA was found in 7 of their 14 investigated children. The presence of mutated mtDNA was excluded at a level of 3:1,000. Five women had a proportion of 43%-73% mutated mtDNA in lymphocytes, and mutated mtDNA was found in all their 12 investigated children. This suggests that the risk for transmission of mutated mtDNA to the offspring increases if high levels are present in the mother and that, above a threshold level of 35%-40%, it is very likely that transmission will occur to all children. The three patients with MERRF syndrone had, in muscle, both 94%-96% mutated mtDNA and biochemical and histochemical evidence of a respiratory-chain dysfunction. Four relatives had a proportion of 61%-92% mutated mtDNA in muscle, and biochemical measurements showed a normal respiratory-chain function in muscle in all cases. These findings suggest that >92% of mtDNA with the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation in muscle is required to cause a respiratory-chain dysfunction that can be detected by biochemical methods. There was a positive correlation between the levels of mtDNA with the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation in lymphocytes and the levels in muscle, in all nine investigated cases. The levels of mutated mtDNA were higher in muscle than in lymphocytes in all cases. 30 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Evolutionary patterns in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Eduardo Pc

    2008-10-01

    Prokaryotic genomics is shifting towards comparative approaches to unravel how and why genomes change over time. Both phylogenetic and population genetics approaches are required to dissect the relative roles of selection and drift under these conditions. Lineages evolve adaptively by selection of changes in extant genomes and the way this occurs is being explored from a systemic and evolutionary perspective to understand how mutations relate with gene repertoire changes and how both are contextualized in cellular networks. Through an increased appreciation of genome dynamics in given ecological contexts, a more detailed picture of the genetic basis of prokaryotic evolution is emerging.

  15. Capturing prokaryotic dark matter genomes.

    PubMed

    Gasc, Cyrielle; Ribière, Céline; Parisot, Nicolas; Beugnot, Réjane; Defois, Clémence; Petit-Biderre, Corinne; Boucher, Delphine; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Prokaryotes are the most diverse and abundant cellular life forms on Earth. Most of them, identified by indirect molecular approaches, belong to microbial dark matter. The advent of metagenomic and single-cell genomic approaches has highlighted the metabolic capabilities of numerous members of this dark matter through genome reconstruction. Thus, linking functions back to the species has revolutionized our understanding of how ecosystem function is sustained by the microbial world. This review will present discoveries acquired through the illumination of prokaryotic dark matter genomes by these innovative approaches. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro topological loading of bacterial condensin MukB on DNA, preferentially single-stranded DNA rather than double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Niki, Hironori; Yano, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Condensin is the major driving force in the segregation of daughter chromosomes in prokaryotes. Core subunits of condensin belong to the SMC protein family, whose members are characterized by a unique ATPase activity and dimers with a V-shaped structure. The V-shaped dimers might close between head domains, forming a ring structure that can encircle DNA. Indeed, cohesin, which is a subfamily of SMC proteins, encircles double-stranded DNA to hold sister chromatids in eukaryotes. However, the question of whether or not condensin encircles the chromosomal DNA remains highly controversial. Here we report that MukB binds topologically to DNA in vitro, and this binding is preferentially single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) rather than double-stranded DNA. The binding of MukB to ssDNA does not require ATP. In fact, thermal energy enhances the binding. The non-SMC subunits MukF and MukE did stimulate the topological binding of MukB, although they hindered DNA-binding of MukB. Recent reports on the distribution of condensin in genomes reveal that actively transcribed genes in yeast and humans are enriched in condensin. In consideration of all these results, we propose that the binding specificity of condensin to chromosome is provided not by the DNA sequence but by the DNA structure, which is ssDNA. PMID:27387439

  17. Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cytoskeletons: Structure and Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    The eukaryotic cytoskeleton is an assembly of filamentous proteins and a host of associated proteins that collectively serve functional needs ranging from spatial organization and transport to the production and transmission of forces. These systems can exhibit a wide variety of non-equilibrium, self-assembled phases depending on context and function. While much recent progress has been made in understanding the self-organization, rheology and nonlinear mechanical properties of such active systems, in this talk, we will concentrate on some emerging aspects of cytoskeletal physics that are promising. One such aspect is the influence of cytoskeletal network topology and its dynamics on both active and passive intracellular transport. Another aspect we will highlight is the interplay between chirality of filaments, their elasticity and their interactions with the membrane that can lead to novel conformational states with functional implications. Finally we will consider homologs of cytoskeletal proteins in bacteria, which are involved in templating cell growth, segregating genetic material and force production, which we will discuss with particular reference to contractile forces during cell division. These prokaryotic structures function in remarkably similar yet fascinatingly different ways from their eukaryotic counterparts and can enrich our understanding of cytoskeletal functioning as a whole.

  18. Explaining gender segregation.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Robert M; Browne, Jude; Brooks, Bradley; Jarman, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Occupational gender segregation--the tendency for women and men to work in different occupations--is an important feature of all societies, and particularly the wealthy industrialized ones. To understand this segregation, and to explain its significance, we need to distinguish between vertical segregation entailing inequality and horizontal segregation representing difference without inequality, with overall segregation being the resultant of these components. Three major theoretical approaches to understanding occupational gender segregation are examined: human capital/rational choice, patriarchy, and preference theories. All are found to be inadequate; they tend to confuse overall segregation with its vertical component, and each entails a number of other faults. It is generally assumed or implied that greater empowerment of women would reduce gender segregation. This is the reverse of what actually happens; in countries where the degree of women's empowerment is greater, the level of gender segregation is also greater. An alternative theoretical approach based on processes of social reproduction is shown to be more useful.

  19. Income inequality and income segregation.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Sean F; Bischoff, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates how the growth in income inequality from 1970 to 2000 affected patterns of income segregation along three dimensions: the spatial segregation of poverty and affluence, race-specific patterns of income segregation, and the geographic scale of income segregation. The evidence reveals a robust relationship between income inequality and income segregation, an effect that is larger for black families than for white families. In addition, income inequality affects income segregation primarily through its effect on the large-scale spatial segregation of affluence rather than by affecting the spatial segregation of poverty or by altering small-scale patterns of income segregation.

  20. CRISPR-Cas Systems in Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Burmistrz, Michał; Pyrć, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic organisms possess numerous strategies that enable survival in hostile conditions. Among others, these conditions include the invasion of foreign nucleic acids such as bacteriophages and plasmids. The clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins (CRISPR-Cas) system provides the majority of bacteria and archaea with adaptive and hereditary immunity against this threat. This mechanism of immunity is based on short fragments of foreign DNA incorporated within the hosts genome. After transcription, these fragments guide protein complexes that target foreign nucleic acids and promote their degradation. The aim of this review is to summarize the current status of CRISPR-Cas research, including the mechanisms of action, the classification of different types and subtypes of these systems, and the development of new CRISPR-Cas-based molecular biology tools.

  1. Segregation and Civic Virtue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merry, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Michael Merry defends the following prima facie argument: that civic virtue is not dependent on integration and in fact may be best fostered under conditions of segregation. He demonstrates that civic virtue can and does take place under conditions of involuntary segregation, but that voluntary separation--as a response to…

  2. Segregation and School Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dentler, Robert A.

    Segregation has been part of the cultural design of American society from the pre-industrial rural period to the present, post-industrial urban period. This paper, however, is concerned with learning within contemporary school settings. Ethnic segregation is one major type of group separation within American schools and within the society.…

  3. Segregation and Civic Virtue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merry, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Michael Merry defends the following prima facie argument: that civic virtue is not dependent on integration and in fact may be best fostered under conditions of segregation. He demonstrates that civic virtue can and does take place under conditions of involuntary segregation, but that voluntary separation--as a response to…

  4. Translational Selection Is Ubiquitous in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Supek, Fran; Škunca, Nives; Repar, Jelena; Vlahoviček, Kristian; Šmuc, Tomislav

    2010-01-01

    Codon usage bias in prokaryotic genomes is largely a consequence of background substitution patterns in DNA, but highly expressed genes may show a preference towards codons that enable more efficient and/or accurate translation. We introduce a novel approach based on supervised machine learning that detects effects of translational selection on genes, while controlling for local variation in nucleotide substitution patterns represented as sequence composition of intergenic DNA. A cornerstone of our method is a Random Forest classifier that outperformed previous distance measure-based approaches, such as the codon adaptation index, in the task of discerning the (highly expressed) ribosomal protein genes by their codon frequencies. Unlike previous reports, we show evidence that translational selection in prokaryotes is practically universal: in 460 of 461 examined microbial genomes, we find that a subset of genes shows a higher codon usage similarity to the ribosomal proteins than would be expected from the local sequence composition. These genes constitute a substantial part of the genome—between 5% and 33%, depending on genome size—while also exhibiting higher experimentally measured mRNA abundances and tending toward codons that match tRNA anticodons by canonical base pairing. Certain gene functional categories are generally enriched with, or depleted of codon-optimized genes, the trends of enrichment/depletion being conserved between Archaea and Bacteria. Prominent exceptions from these trends might indicate genes with alternative physiological roles; we speculate on specific examples related to detoxication of oxygen radicals and ammonia and to possible misannotations of asparaginyl–tRNA synthetases. Since the presence of codon optimizations on genes is a valid proxy for expression levels in fully sequenced genomes, we provide an example of an “adaptome” by highlighting gene functions with expression levels elevated specifically in thermophilic

  5. How to build segregation complexes in bacteria: Use bridges.

    PubMed

    Funnell, Barbara E

    2014-06-01

    In this issue of Genes & Development, Graham and colleagues (pp. 1228-1238) examine how ParBs, which bind to prokaryotic centromere-like partition sites, spread into nearby nonspecific DNA and assemble into higher-order protein-DNA complexes. Spreading is accomplished by looping rather than one-dimensional filamentation, thereby compacting the DNA into an extensively bridged complex. © 2014 Funnell; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. NCBI prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline.

    PubMed

    Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Badretdin, Azat; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Nawrocki, Eric P; Zaslavsky, Leonid; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Pruitt, Kim D; Borodovsky, Mark; Ostell, James

    2016-08-19

    Recent technological advances have opened unprecedented opportunities for large-scale sequencing and analysis of populations of pathogenic species in disease outbreaks, as well as for large-scale diversity studies aimed at expanding our knowledge across the whole domain of prokaryotes. To meet the challenge of timely interpretation of structure, function and meaning of this vast genetic information, a comprehensive approach to automatic genome annotation is critically needed. In collaboration with Georgia Tech, NCBI has developed a new approach to genome annotation that combines alignment based methods with methods of predicting protein-coding and RNA genes and other functional elements directly from sequence. A new gene finding tool, GeneMarkS+, uses the combined evidence of protein and RNA placement by homology as an initial map of annotation to generate and modify ab initio gene predictions across the whole genome. Thus, the new NCBI's Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP) relies more on sequence similarity when confident comparative data are available, while it relies more on statistical predictions in the absence of external evidence. The pipeline provides a framework for generation and analysis of annotation on the full breadth of prokaryotic taxonomy. For additional information on PGAP see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/annotation_prok/ and the NCBI Handbook, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK174280/. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. [Progress in proteogenomics of prokaryotes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengpu; Xu, Ping; Zhu, Yunping

    2014-07-01

    With the rapid development of genome sequencing technologies, a large amount of prokaryote genomes have been sequenced in recent years. To further investigate the models and functions of genomes, the algorithms for genome annotations based on the sequence and homology features have been widely implemented to newly sequenced genomes. However, gene annotations only using the genomic information are prone to errors, such as the incorrect N-terminals and pseudogenes. It is even harder to provide reasonable annotating results in the case of the poor genome sequencing results. The transcriptomics based on the technologies such as microarray and RNA-seq and the proteomics based on the MS/MS have been used widely to identify the gene products with high throughput and high sensitivity, providing the powerful tools for the verification and correction of annotated genome. Compared with transcriptomics, proteomics can generate the protein list for the expressed genes in the samples or cells without any confusion of the non-coding RNA, leading the proteogenomics an important basis for the genome annotations in prokaryotes. In this paper, we first described the traditional genome annotation algorithms and pointed out the shortcomings. Then we summarized the advantages of proteomics in the genome annotations and reviewed the progress of proteogenomics in prokaryotes. Finally we discussed the challenges and strategies in the data analyses and potential solutions for the developments of proteogenomics.

  8. ASM Conference on Prokaryotic Development

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, H. B.

    2005-07-13

    Support was provided by DOE for the 2nd ASM Conference on Prokaryotic Development. The final conference program and abstracts book is attached. The conference presentations are organized around topics that are central to the current research areas in prokaryotic development. The program starts with topics that involve relatively simple models systems and ends with systems that are more complex. The topics are: i) the cell cycle, ii) the cytoskeleton, iii) morphogenesis, iv) developmental transcription, v) signaling, vi) multicellularity, and vii) developmental diversity and symbiosis. The best-studied prokaryotic development model systems will be highlighted at the conference through research presentations by leaders in the field. Many of these systems are also model systems of relevance to the DOE mission including carbon sequestration (Bradyrizobium, Synechococcus), energy production (Anabaena, Rhodobacter) and bioremediation (Caulobacter, Mesorhizobium). In addition, many of the highlighted organisms have important practical applications; the actinomycetes and myxobacteria produce antimicrobials that are of commercial interest. It is certain that the cutting-edge science presented at the conference will be applicable to the large group of bacteria relevant to the DOE mission.

  9. Illusions of Job Segregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, James P.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of statistical analysis to identify patterns of discrimination in employment. Analyzes the effects of job segregation on women and minorities at the American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (FMW)

  10. Bacterial partition complexes segregate within the volume of the nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Le Gall, Antoine; Cattoni, Diego I.; Guilhas, Baptiste; Mathieu-Demazière, Céline; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Rech, Jérôme; Abrahamsson, Sara; Murray, Heath; Bouet, Jean-Yves; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Precise and rapid DNA segregation is required for proper inheritance of genetic material. In most bacteria and archaea, this process is assured by a broadly conserved mitotic-like apparatus in which a NTPase (ParA) displaces the partition complex. Competing observations and models imply starkly different 3D localization patterns of the components of the partition machinery during segregation. Here we use super-resolution microscopies to localize in 3D each component of the segregation apparatus with respect to the bacterial chromosome. We show that Par proteins locate within the nucleoid volume and reveal that proper volumetric localization and segregation of partition complexes requires ATPase and DNA-binding activities of ParA. Finally, we find that the localization patterns of the different components of the partition system highly correlate with dense chromosomal regions. We propose a new mechanism in which the nucleoid provides a scaffold to guide the proper segregation of partition complexes. PMID:27377966

  11. Structural Properties of Prokaryotic Promoter Regions Correlate with Functional Features

    PubMed Central

    Meysman, Pieter; Collado-Vides, Julio; Morett, Enrique; Viola, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The structural properties of the DNA molecule are known to play a critical role in transcription. In this paper, the structural profiles of promoter regions were studied within the context of their diversity and their function for eleven prokaryotic species; Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella Typhimurium, Pseudomonas auroginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Synechocystis sp., Synechoccocus elongates, Bacillus anthracis, and the archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus. The main anchor point for these promoter regions were transcription start sites identified through high-throughput experiments or collected within large curated databases. Prokaryotic promoter regions were found to be less stable and less flexible than the genomic mean across all studied species. However, direct comparison between species revealed differences in their structural profiles that can not solely be explained by the difference in genomic GC content. In addition, comparison with functional data revealed that there are patterns in the promoter structural profiles that can be linked to specific functional loci, such as sigma factor regulation or transcription factor binding. Interestingly, a novel structural element clearly visible near the transcription start site was found in genes associated with essential cellular functions and growth in several species. Our analyses reveals the great diversity in promoter structural profiles both between and within prokaryotic species. We observed relationships between structural diversity and functional features that are interesting prospects for further research to yet uncharacterized functional loci defined by DNA structural properties. PMID:24516674

  12. The excess of small inverted repeats in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ladoukakis, Emmanuel D; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2008-09-01

    Recent analyses have shown that there is a large excess of perfect inverted repeats in many prokaryotic genomes but not in eukaryotic ones. This difference could be due to a genuine difference between prokaryotes and eukaryotes or to differences in the methods and types of data analyzed--full genome versus protein coding sequences. We used simulations to show that the method used previously tends to underestimate the expected number of inverted repeats. However, this bias is not large and cannot explain the excess of inverted repeats observed in real data. In contrast, our method is unbiased. When both methods are applied to bacterial protein coding sequences they both detect an excess of inverted repeats, which is much lower than previously reported in whole prokaryotic genomes. This suggests that the reported large excess of inverted repeats is due to repeats found in intergenic regions. These repeats could be due to transcription factor binding sites, or other types of repetitive DNA, on opposite strands of the DNA sequence. In contrast, the smaller, but significant, excess of inverted repeats that we report in protein coding sequences may be due to sequence-directed mutagenesis (SDM). SDM is a process where one copy of a small, imperfect, inverted repeat corrects the other copy via strand misalignment, resulting in a perfect repeat and a series of mutations. We show by simulation that even very low levels of SDM, relative to the rate of point mutation, can generate a substantial excess of inverted repeats.

  13. Structural properties of prokaryotic promoter regions correlate with functional features.

    PubMed

    Meysman, Pieter; Collado-Vides, Julio; Morett, Enrique; Viola, Roberto; Engelen, Kristof; Laukens, Kris

    2014-01-01

    The structural properties of the DNA molecule are known to play a critical role in transcription. In this paper, the structural profiles of promoter regions were studied within the context of their diversity and their function for eleven prokaryotic species; Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella Typhimurium, Pseudomonas auroginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Synechocystis sp., Synechoccocus elongates, Bacillus anthracis, and the archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus. The main anchor point for these promoter regions were transcription start sites identified through high-throughput experiments or collected within large curated databases. Prokaryotic promoter regions were found to be less stable and less flexible than the genomic mean across all studied species. However, direct comparison between species revealed differences in their structural profiles that can not solely be explained by the difference in genomic GC content. In addition, comparison with functional data revealed that there are patterns in the promoter structural profiles that can be linked to specific functional loci, such as sigma factor regulation or transcription factor binding. Interestingly, a novel structural element clearly visible near the transcription start site was found in genes associated with essential cellular functions and growth in several species. Our analyses reveals the great diversity in promoter structural profiles both between and within prokaryotic species. We observed relationships between structural diversity and functional features that are interesting prospects for further research to yet uncharacterized functional loci defined by DNA structural properties.

  14. SEGREGATION IN SMALL STEEL CASTINGS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Carbon segregation in small castings often occurs near riser necks. Systematic studies were continued to determine effect on segregation of such...intensity of carbon segregation under ’neck-down’ risers varies directly as the neck length and inversely as the neck diameter. The degree of segregation

  15. Commentary: Genger Segregation in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maccoby, Eleanor E.

    1994-01-01

    Provides an overview of the preceding articles in this journal issue. Considers the timing of gender segregation, compatibility between play styles and gender segregation, possible physiological processes underlying gender segregation in play, children's cognitive knowledge about gender, and the consequences of gender segregation. (BAC)

  16. Counterselection of prokaryotic ribosomal RNA during reverse transcription using non-random hexameric oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J M; Robb, F T

    2007-12-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is the major component in total RNA extracts, interfering with the synthesis of cDNA corresponding to messenger RNA (mRNA). In this study, we present a novel strategy for selectively discriminating against rRNA and favoring mRNA from prokaryotes during synthesis of cDNA by reverse transcriptase. Our technique is based on the fact that rRNA sequences, in many species, are G+C rich relative to the genome at large, and highly conserved among prokaryotes. The sequence TTTT is therefore rarely found in rRNA sequences. However, TTTT priming sites are found at a much higher frequency in protein-encoding gene sequences. We designed specific hexamers (HD/DHTTTT) to prime reverse transcription reactions resulting in a selective synthesis of cDNA corresponding to mRNA from prokaryotic total RNA extractions.

  17. SSR DNA markers linked with Broad-Spectrum rust resistance in common bean discovered by bulk segregant analysis using a large set of SNP markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA markers are invaluable plant breeding tools that can be used in the development of new crop cultivars with disease resistance. We wanted to develop the capacity for marker-assisted selection using the broad-spectrum rust resistance trait present in Mesoamerican common bean PI 310762. This commo...

  18. Functional Advantages Conferred by Extracellular Prokaryotic Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Andrew J.; Kuehn, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials, and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world. PMID:23615201

  19. Understanding Segregation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, Elizabeth

    There is growing consensus that living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty increases the likelihood of social problems such as teenage parenthood, drug and alcohol use, crime victimization, and chronic unemployment. Neighborhood inequality is also implicated in studies of enduring race/ethnic health disparities, and there are recent moves to broaden the definition of health care policy to policies targeting social inequality (Mechanic 2007). Residential segregation affects health outcomes in several different ways. First, income, education, and occupation are all strongly related to health (Adler and Newman 2002). Segregation is a key mechanism through which socioeconomic inequality is perpetuated and reinforced, as it hinders the upward mobility of disadvantaged groups by limiting their educational and employment opportunities. Second, segregation increases minority exposure to unhealthy neighborhood environments. Residential segregation creates areas with concentrated poverty and unemployment, both of which are key factors that predict violence and create racial differences in homicide (Samson and Wilson 1995). Neighborhood characteristics, such as exposure to environmental hazards, fear of violence, and access to grocery stores, affect health risks and health behaviors (Cheadle et al. 1991). Tobacco and alcohol industries also advertise their products disproportionately in poor, minority areas (Moore, Williams, and Qualls 1996). Finally, residential segregation leads to inequalitie in health care resources, which contributes to disparities in quality of treatment (Smedley, Stith, and Nelson 2002).

  20. Emerging facets of prokaryotic glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Christina; Messner, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins is one of the most prevalent post-translational modifications occurring in nature, with a wide repertoire of biological implications. Pathways for the main types of this modification, the N- and O-glycosylation, can be found in all three domains of life—the Eukarya, Bacteria and Archaea—thereby following common principles, which are valid also for lipopolysaccharides, lipooligosaccharides and glycopolymers. Thus, studies on any glycoconjugate can unravel novel facets of the still incompletely understood fundamentals of protein N- and O-glycosylation. While it is estimated that more than two-thirds of all eukaryotic proteins would be glycosylated, no such estimate is available for prokaryotic glycoproteins, whose understanding is lagging behind, mainly due to the enormous variability of their glycan structures and variations in the underlying glycosylation processes. Combining glycan structural information with bioinformatic, genetic, biochemical and enzymatic data has opened up an avenue for in-depth analyses of glycosylation processes as a basis for glycoengineering endeavours. Here, the common themes of glycosylation are conceptualised for the major classes of prokaryotic (i.e. bacterial and archaeal) glycoconjugates, with a special focus on glycosylated cell-surface proteins. We describe the current knowledge of biosynthesis and importance of these glycoconjugates in selected pathogenic and beneficial microbes. PMID:27566466

  1. The universally conserved prokaryotic GTPases.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Versées, Wim; Michiels, Jan

    2011-09-01

    Members of the large superclass of P-loop GTPases share a core domain with a conserved three-dimensional structure. In eukaryotes, these proteins are implicated in various crucial cellular processes, including translation, membrane trafficking, cell cycle progression, and membrane signaling. As targets of mutation and toxins, GTPases are involved in the pathogenesis of cancer and infectious diseases. In prokaryotes also, it is hard to overestimate the importance of GTPases in cell physiology. Numerous papers have shed new light on the role of bacterial GTPases in cell cycle regulation, ribosome assembly, the stress response, and other cellular processes. Moreover, bacterial GTPases have been identified as high-potential drug targets. A key paper published over 2 decades ago stated that, "It may never again be possible to capture [GTPases] in a family portrait" (H. R. Bourne, D. A. Sanders, and F. McCormick, Nature 348:125-132, 1990) and indeed, the last 20 years have seen a tremendous increase in publications on the subject. Sequence analysis identified 13 bacterial GTPases that are conserved in at least 75% of all bacterial species. We here provide an overview of these 13 protein subfamilies, covering their cellular functions as well as cellular localization and expression levels, three-dimensional structures, biochemical properties, and gene organization. Conserved roles in eukaryotic homologs will be discussed as well. A comprehensive overview summarizing current knowledge on prokaryotic GTPases will aid in further elucidating the function of these important proteins.

  2. Digital Quantification of DNA Replication and Chromosome Segregation Enables Determination of Antimicrobial Susceptibility after only 15 Minutes of Antibiotic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Schoepp, Nathan G; Khorosheva, Eugenia M; Schlappi, Travis S; Curtis, Matthew S; Humphries, Romney M; Hindler, Janet A; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-08-08

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) would decrease misuse and overuse of antibiotics. The "holy grail" of AST is a phenotype-based test that can be performed within a doctor visit. Such a test requires the ability to determine a pathogen's susceptibility after only a short antibiotic exposure. Herein, digital PCR (dPCR) was employed to test whether measuring DNA replication of the target pathogen through digital single-molecule counting would shorten the required time of antibiotic exposure. Partitioning bacterial chromosomal DNA into many small volumes during dPCR enabled AST results after short exposure times by 1) precise quantification and 2) a measurement of how antibiotics affect the states of macromolecular assembly of bacterial chromosomes. This digital AST (dAST) determined susceptibility of clinical isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) after 15 min of exposure for all four antibiotic classes relevant to UTIs. This work lays the foundation to develop a rapid, point-of-care AST and strengthen global antibiotic stewardship.

  3. The DNase domain-containing protein TATDN1 plays an important role in chromosomal segregation and cell cycle progression during zebrafish eye development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Liu, Changwei; Jamsen, Joonas; Wu, Zhenxing; Wang, Yingjie; Chen, Jun; Zheng, Li; Shen, Binghui

    2012-01-01

    The DNase domain-containing protein TATDN1 is a conserved nuclease in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It was previously implicated to play a role in apoptotic DNA fragmentation in yeast and C. elegans. However, its biological function in higher organisms, such as vertebrates, is unknown. Here, we report that zebrafish TATDN1 (zTATDN1) possesses a novel endonuclease activity, which first makes a nick at the DNA duplex and subsequently converts the nick into a DNA double-strand break in vitro. This biochemical property allows zTATDN1 to catalyze decatenation of catenated kinetoplast DNA to produce separated linear DNA in vitro. We further determine that zTATDN1 is predominantly expressed in eye cells during embryonic development. Knockdown of TATDN1 in zebrafish embryos results in an abnormal cell cycle progression, formation of polyploidy and aberrant chromatin structures. Consequently, the TATDN1-deficient morphants have disordered eye cell layers and significantly smaller eyes compared with the WT control. Altogether, our current studies suggest that zTATDN1 plays an important role in chromosome segregation and eye development in zebrafish. PMID:23187801

  4. The evolution of ecological tolerance in prokaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.; Bauld, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ecological ranges of Archaeobacteria and Eubacteria are constrained by a requirement for liquid water and the physico-chemical stability limits of biomolecules, but within this broad envelope, prokaryotes have evolved adaptations that permit them to tolerate a remarkable spectrum of habitats. Laboratory experiments indicate that prokaryotes can adapt rapidly to novel environmental conditions, yet geological studies suggest early diversification and long-term stasis within the prokaryotic kingdoms. These apparently contradictory perspectives can be reconciled by understanding that, in general, rates and patterns of prokaryotic evolution reflect the developmental history of the Earth's surface environments. Our understanding of modern microbial ecology provides a lens through which our accumulating knowledge of physiology, molecular phylogeny and the Earth's history can be integrated and focussed on the phenomenon of prokaryotic evolution.

  5. The evolution of ecological tolerance in prokaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.; Bauld, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ecological ranges of Archaeobacteria and Eubacteria are constrained by a requirement for liquid water and the physico-chemical stability limits of biomolecules, but within this broad envelope, prokaryotes have evolved adaptations that permit them to tolerate a remarkable spectrum of habitats. Laboratory experiments indicate that prokaryotes can adapt rapidly to novel environmental conditions, yet geological studies suggest early diversification and long-term stasis within the prokaryotic kingdoms. These apparently contradictory perspectives can be reconciled by understanding that, in general, rates and patterns of prokaryotic evolution reflect the developmental history of the Earth's surface environments. Our understanding of modern microbial ecology provides a lens through which our accumulating knowledge of physiology, molecular phylogeny and the Earth's history can be integrated and focussed on the phenomenon of prokaryotic evolution.

  6. Distant horizontal gene transfer is rare for multiple families of prokaryotic insertion sequences.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andreas; de la Chaux, Nicole

    2008-11-01

    Horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes is rampant on short and intermediate evolutionary time scales. It poses a fundamental problem to our ability to reconstruct the evolutionary tree of life. Is it also frequent over long evolutionary distances? To address this question, we analyzed the evolution of 2,091 insertion sequences from all 20 major families in 438 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes. Specifically, we mapped insertion sequence occurrence on a 16S rDNA tree of the genomes we analyzed, and we also constructed phylogenetic trees of the insertion sequence transposase coding sequences. We found only 30 cases of likely horizontal transfer among distantly related prokaryotic clades. Most of these horizontal transfer events are ancient. Only seven events are recent. Almost all of these transfer events occur between pairs of human pathogens or commensals. If true also for other, non-mobile DNA, the rarity of distant horizontal transfer increases the odds of reliable phylogenetic inference from sequence data.

  7. Organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xindan; Montero Llopis, Paula; Rudner, David Z

    2013-03-01

    The bacterial chromosome must be compacted more than 1,000-fold to fit into the compartment in which it resides. How it is condensed, organized and ultimately segregated has been a puzzle for over half a century. Recent advances in live-cell imaging and genome-scale analyses have led to new insights into these problems. We argue that the key feature of compaction is the orderly folding of DNA along adjacent segments and that this organization provides easy and efficient access for protein-DNA transactions and has a central role in driving segregation. Similar principles and common proteins are used in eukaryotes to condense and to resolve sister chromatids at metaphase.

  8. The Role of Residential Segregation in Contemporary School Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenberg, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Inaction to address housing segregation in metropolitan areas has resulted in persistently high levels of residential segregation. As the Supreme Court has recently limited school districts' voluntary integration efforts, this article considers the role of residential segregation in maintaining racially isolated schools, namely what is known about…

  9. Segregation of sperm mitochondria in two- and four-cell embryos of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis: Implications for the mechanism of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cogswell, Andrew T; Kenchington, Ellen L R; Zouros, Eleftherios

    2006-07-01

    Species of the family Mytilidae have 2 mitochondrial genomes, one that is transmitted through the egg and one that is transmitted through the sperm. In the Mytilus edulis species complex (M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and M. trossulus) there is also a strong mother-dependent sex-ratio bias in favor of one or the other sex among progeny from pair matings. In a previous study, we have shown that sperm mitochondria enter the egg and that their behavior during cell division is different depending on whether the egg originated from a female- or male-biased mother. Specifically, in eggs from females that produce mostly or exclusively daughters, sperm mitochondria disperse randomly among cells after egg division. In eggs from females that produce predominantly sons, sperm mitochondria tend to stay together in the same cell. Here, we extend these observations and show that in 2- and 4-cell embryos from male-biased mothers most sperm mitochondria are located near or at the cleavage furrow of the major cell, in contrast to embryos from female-biased mothers where there is no preferential association of sperm mitochondria with the cleavage furrow. This observation provides evidence for an early developmental mechanism through which sperm mitochondria are preferentially channeled into the primordial cells of male embryos, thus making the paternal mitochondrial genome the dominant mtDNA component of the male germ line.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis, genetic diversity and relationships between the recently segregated species of Corynandra and Cleoserrata from the genus Cleome using DNA barcoding and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Asif Shabodin; Patil, Swapnil Mahadeo; Gholave, Avinash Ramchandra; Kadam, Suhas Kishor; Kotibhaskar, Shreya Vijaykumar; Yadav, Shrirang Ramchandra; Govindwar, Sanjay Prabhu

    2016-01-01

    Cleome is the largest genus in the family Cleomaceae and it is known for its various medicinal properties. Recently, some species from the Cleome genus (Cleome viscosa, Cleome chelidonii, Cleome felina and Cleome speciosa) are split into genera Corynandra (Corynandra viscosa, Corynandra chelidonii, Corynandra felina), and Cleoserrata (Cleoserrata speciosa). The objective of this study was to obtain DNA barcodes for these species for their accurate identification and determining phylogenetic relationships. Out of 10 screened barcoding regions, rbcL, matK and ITS1 regions showed higher PCR efficiency and sequencing success. This study added matK, rbcL and ITS1 barcodes for the identification of Corynandra chelidonii, Corynandra felina, Cleome simplicifolia and Cleome aspera species in existing barcode data. Corynandra chelidonii and Corynandra felina species belong to the Corynandra genus, but they are not grouped with the Corynandra viscosa species, however clustered with the Cleome species. Molecular marker analysis showed 100% polymorphism among the studied plant samples. Diversity indices for molecular markers were ranged from He=0.1115-0.1714 and I=0.2268-0.2700, which indicates a significant amount of genetic diversity among studied species. Discrimination of the Cleome and Corynandra species from Cleoserrata speciosa was obtained by two RAPD primers (OPA-4 and RAPD-17) and two ISSR primers (ISSR-1 and ISSR-2). RAPD and ISSR markers are useful for the genetic characterization of these studied species. The present investigation will be helpful to understand the relationships of Cleome lineages with Corynandra and Cleoserrata species.

  11. Eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic chemosensory systems.

    PubMed

    Sbarbati, Andrea; Merigo, Flavia; Osculati, Francesco

    2010-04-01

    In the last decades, microbiologists demonstrated that microorganisms possess chemosensory capabilities and communicate with each other via chemical signals. In parallel, it was demonstrated that solitary eukaryotic chemosensory cells are diffusely located on the mucosae of digestive and respiratory apparatuses. It is now evident that on the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates, two chemoreceptorial systems (i.e. eukaryotic and prokaryotic) coexist in a common microenvironment. To date, it is not known if the two chemosensory systems reciprocally interact and compete for detection of chemical cues. This appears to be a fruitful field of study and future researches must consider that the mucosal epithelia possess more chemosensory capabilities than previously supposed. (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Stygofauna enhance prokaryotic transport in groundwater ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Renee J.; Paterson, James S.; Launer, Elise; Tobe, Shanan S.; Morello, Eliesa; Leijs, Remko; Marri, Shashikanth; Mitchell, James G.

    2016-01-01

    More than 97% of the world’s freshwater reserves are found in aquifers, making groundwater one of the most important resources on the planet. Prokaryotic communities in groundwater underpin the turnover of energy and matter while also maintaining groundwater purity. Thus, knowledge of microbial transport in the subsurface is crucial for maintaining groundwater health. Here, we describe for the first time the importance of stygofauna as vectors for prokaryotes. The “hitch-hiking” prokaryotes associated with stygofauna may be up to 5 orders of magnitude higher in abundance and transported up to 34× faster than bulk groundwater flow. We also demonstrate that prokaryotic diversity associated with stygofauna may be higher than that of the surrounding groundwater. Stygofauna are a newly recognized prokaryotic niche in groundwater ecosystems that have the potential to transport remediating, water purifying and pathogenic prokaryotes. Therefore, stygofauna may influence ecosystem dynamics and health at a microbial level, and at a larger scale could be a new source of prokaryotic diversity in groundwater ecosystems. PMID:27597322

  13. Stygofauna enhance prokaryotic transport in groundwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Smith, Renee J; Paterson, James S; Launer, Elise; Tobe, Shanan S; Morello, Eliesa; Leijs, Remko; Marri, Shashikanth; Mitchell, James G

    2016-09-06

    More than 97% of the world's freshwater reserves are found in aquifers, making groundwater one of the most important resources on the planet. Prokaryotic communities in groundwater underpin the turnover of energy and matter while also maintaining groundwater purity. Thus, knowledge of microbial transport in the subsurface is crucial for maintaining groundwater health. Here, we describe for the first time the importance of stygofauna as vectors for prokaryotes. The "hitch-hiking" prokaryotes associated with stygofauna may be up to 5 orders of magnitude higher in abundance and transported up to 34× faster than bulk groundwater flow. We also demonstrate that prokaryotic diversity associated with stygofauna may be higher than that of the surrounding groundwater. Stygofauna are a newly recognized prokaryotic niche in groundwater ecosystems that have the potential to transport remediating, water purifying and pathogenic prokaryotes. Therefore, stygofauna may influence ecosystem dynamics and health at a microbial level, and at a larger scale could be a new source of prokaryotic diversity in groundwater ecosystems.

  14. Stygofauna enhance prokaryotic transport in groundwater ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Renee J.; Paterson, James S.; Launer, Elise; Tobe, Shanan S.; Morello, Eliesa; Leijs, Remko; Marri, Shashikanth; Mitchell, James G.

    2016-09-06

    More than 97% of the world’s freshwater reserves are found in aquifers, making groundwater one of the most important resources on the planet. Prokaryotic communities in groundwater underpin the turnover of energy and matter while also maintaining groundwater purity. Thus, knowledge of microbial transport in the subsurface is crucial for maintaining groundwater health. Here, we describe for the first time the importance of stygofauna as vectors for prokaryotes. The “hitch-hiking” prokaryotes associated with stygofauna may be up to 5 orders of magnitude higher in abundance and transported up to 34× faster than bulk groundwater flow. We also demonstrate that prokaryotic diversity associated with stygofauna may be higher than that of the surrounding groundwater. Stygofauna are a newly recognized prokaryotic niche in groundwater ecosystems that have the potential to transport remediating, water purifying and pathogenic prokaryotes. Furthermore, stygofauna may influence ecosystem dynamics and health at a microbial level, and at a larger scale could be a new source of prokaryotic diversity in groundwater ecosystems.

  15. Evolution of transcriptional control from prokaryotic beginnings to eukaryotic complexities.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Guan, R J; Pardee, A B

    1999-01-01

    Mechanisms for regulating gene transcription became increasingly complex as organisms evolved. In prokaryotes the relatively simple mechanism of repression is based on a few proteins that bind to specific DNA sequences in a ligand-dependent fashion. In eukaryotes large complexes that include ligand binding proteins regulate transcription. Lower eukaryotes developed an additional level of control based on protein complexes that include modifying enzymes. The DNA/histone complex, in combination with gene-specific transcriptional factors, is the basis of gene regulation in eukaryotes. Higher eukaryotes took regulation a level further by methylating CpGs in promoter sequences of DNA, thereby allowing binding of histone deacetylases and inhibiting transcription. Finally, long-lasting "superrepression" provides another mechanism for coordinate transcriptional regulation of large blocks of genes.

  16. Focus on granular segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen E.; Schröter, Matthias

    2013-03-01

    Ordinary fluids mix themselves through thermal motions, or can be even more efficiently mixed by stirring. In contrast, granular materials such as sand often unmix when they are stirred, shaken or sheared. This granular segregation is both a practical means to separate materials in industry, and a persistent challenge to uniformly mixing them. While segregation phenomena are ubiquitous, a large number of different mechanisms have been identified and the underlying physics remains the subject of much inquiry. Particle size, shape, density and even surface roughness can play significant roles. The aim of this focus issue is to provide a snapshot of the current state of the science, covering a wide range of packing densities and driving mechanisms, from thermal-like dilute systems to dense flows.

  17. Monaural speech segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deliang; Hu, Guoning

    2003-04-01

    Speech segregation from a monaural recording is a primary task of auditory scene analysis, and has proven to be very challenging. We present a multistage model for the task. The model starts with simulated auditory periphery. A subsequent stage computes midlevel auditory representations, including correlograms and cross-channel correlations. The core of the system performs segmentation and grouping in a two-dimensional time-frequency representation that encodes proximity in frequency and time, periodicity, and amplitude modulation (AM). Motivated by psychoacoustic observations, our system employs different mechanisms for handling resolved and unresolved harmonics. For resolved harmonics, our system generates segments-basic components of an auditory scene-based on temporal continuity and cross-channel correlation, and groups them according to periodicity. For unresolved harmonics, the system generates segments based on AM in addition to temporal continuity and groups them according to AM repetition rates. We derive AM repetition rates using sinusoidal modeling and gradient descent. Underlying the segregation process is a pitch contour that is first estimated from speech segregated according to global pitch and then adjusted according to psychoacoustic constraints. The model has been systematically evaluated, and it yields substantially better performance than previous systems.

  18. Systematic survey for novel types of prokaryotic retroelements based on gene neighborhood and protein architecture.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kenji K; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2008-07-01

    Retroelements, elements encoding reverse transcriptase (RT), are ubiquitous in eukaryotes and have a great influence on the evolution of our genome. Detailed information is available on eukaryotic retroelements; however, prokaryotic retroelements are poorly understood. Recently, new types of eukaryotic retroelements were characterized on the basis of their gene composition and their phylogenetic positions. Here we performed a systematic survey to identify novel types of prokaryotic retroelements by analyzing gene neighborhood and protein architecture. We found novel types of gene combination and examined whether they represent actual retroelements. Five monophyletic groups were identified that were distinct from characterized prokaryotic retroelements, showed specific gene combination, were distributed patchily, and included at least 1 example of recent integration. These results strongly indicated the frequent horizontal transfer of these elements. One group encoded DNA polymerase A. A possible function of DNA polymerase A in the life cycle of retroelements is catalyzing second-strand cDNA synthesis, which is DNA polymerization performed using a DNA template not an RNA template. Another group encoded both bacterial primase and carbon-nitrogen hydrolase. Primase is likely to synthesize primers to initiate reverse transcription. Two other groups also encoded carbon-nitrogen hydrolase as a fusion protein with RT. It is difficult to speculate on the function of hydrolase in the life cycle of retroelements. The last group encoded dual RT proteins, which are likely to form heterodimers during replication. The protein sets of these 5 groups of prokaryotic retroelements were completely different from those of eukaryotic retroelements, indicating that the survival constraints of prokaryotic elements were distinct from those of eukaryotic elements. It is likely that these prokaryotic retroelements are maintained as extrachromosomal DNA or RNA or are accidentally integrated

  19. Single prokaryotic cell isolation and total transcript amplification protocol for transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun; McMillan, Ian; Norris, Michael H; Hoang, Tung T

    2015-07-01

    Until recently, transcriptome analyses of single cells have been confined to eukaryotes. The information obtained from single-cell transcripts can provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal gene expression, and it could be even more valuable if expanded to prokaryotic cells. Transcriptome analysis of single prokaryotic cells is a recently developed and powerful tool. Here we describe a procedure that allows amplification of the total transcript of a single prokaryotic cell for in-depth analysis. This is performed by using a laser-capture microdissection instrument for single-cell isolation, followed by reverse transcription via Moloney murine leukemia virus, degradation of chromosomal DNA with McrBC and DpnI restriction enzymes, single-stranded cDNA (ss-cDNA) ligation using T4 polynucleotide kinase and CircLigase, and polymerization of ss-cDNA to double-stranded cDNA (ds-cDNA) by Φ29 polymerase. This procedure takes ∼5 d, and sufficient amounts of ds-cDNA can be obtained from single-cell RNA template for further microarray analysis.

  20. Cospeciation of Psyllids and Their Primary Prokaryotic Endosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    Thao, MyLo L.; Moran, Nancy A.; Abbot, Patrick; Brennan, Eric B.; Burckhardt, Daniel H.; Baumann, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Psyllids are plant sap-feeding insects that harbor prokaryotic endosymbionts in specialized cells within the body cavity. Four-kilobase DNA fragments containing 16S and 23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were amplified from the primary (P) endosymbiont of 32 species of psyllids representing three psyllid families and eight subfamilies. In addition, 0.54-kb fragments of the psyllid nuclear gene wingless were also amplified from 26 species. Phylogenetic trees derived from 16S-23S rDNA and from the host wingless gene are very similar, and tests of compatibility of the data sets show no significant conflict between host and endosymbiont phylogenies. This result is consistent with a single infection of a shared psyllid ancestor and subsequent cospeciation of the host and the endosymbiont. In addition, the phylogenies based on DNA sequences generally agreed with psyllid taxonomy based on morphology. The 3′ end of the 16S rDNA of the P endosymbionts differs from that of other members of the domain Bacteria in the lack of a sequence complementary to the mRNA ribosome binding site. The rate of sequence change in the 16S-23S rDNA of the psyllid P endosymbiont was considerably higher than that of other bacteria, including other fast-evolving insect endosymbionts. The lineage consisting of the P endosymbionts of psyllids was given the designation Candidatus Carsonella (gen. nov.) with a single species, Candidatus Carsonella ruddii (sp. nov.). PMID:10877784

  1. Stygofauna enhance prokaryotic transport in groundwater ecosystems

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Renee J.; Paterson, James S.; Launer, Elise; ...

    2016-09-06

    More than 97% of the world’s freshwater reserves are found in aquifers, making groundwater one of the most important resources on the planet. Prokaryotic communities in groundwater underpin the turnover of energy and matter while also maintaining groundwater purity. Thus, knowledge of microbial transport in the subsurface is crucial for maintaining groundwater health. Here, we describe for the first time the importance of stygofauna as vectors for prokaryotes. The “hitch-hiking” prokaryotes associated with stygofauna may be up to 5 orders of magnitude higher in abundance and transported up to 34× faster than bulk groundwater flow. We also demonstrate that prokaryoticmore » diversity associated with stygofauna may be higher than that of the surrounding groundwater. Stygofauna are a newly recognized prokaryotic niche in groundwater ecosystems that have the potential to transport remediating, water purifying and pathogenic prokaryotes. Furthermore, stygofauna may influence ecosystem dynamics and health at a microbial level, and at a larger scale could be a new source of prokaryotic diversity in groundwater ecosystems.« less

  2. [GTPases of prokaryotic translational apparatus].

    PubMed

    Hauryliuk, V V

    2006-01-01

    Four protein factors, belonging to the GTPase superfamily, participate in bacterial biosynthesis: IF2, EF-G, EF-Tu and RF3. The exact role and mechanism of action of these proteins was of particular interest over the last several decades. Recent advances in structural methods of ribosomal research, especially application of cryoelectron microscopy, provided powerful experimental tools for the investigation of ribosomal dynamics during translation. Simultaneously, progress in the biochemical investigation of translation allowed us to link structural rearrangements occurring in the ribosome to functional changes in the ribosome-bound translational GTPases--GDP/GTP exchange, GTPase activation and its conformational changes. Accumulated data have lead to formulation of current models of mechanisms of translation. More and more facts testify in favor of the idea that the ribosome plays a prominent role both in the nucleotide exchange and in GTPase activation, thus playing the role both of GAP and GEF for RF3, IF2 and EF-G. In our work we attempted to systematize the most important experimental findings and models for mechanisms of GTPases function and regulation in prokaryotic translation.

  3. Patterns of Residential Segregation.

    PubMed

    Louf, Rémi; Barthelemy, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of income shapes the structure and organisation of cities and its understanding has broad societal implications. Despite an abundant literature, many issues remain unclear. In particular, all definitions of segregation are implicitely tied to a single indicator, usually rely on an ambiguous definition of income classes, without any consensus on how to define neighbourhoods and to deal with the polycentric organization of large cities. In this paper, we address all these questions within a unique conceptual framework. We avoid the challenge of providing a direct definition of segregation and instead start from a definition of what segregation is not. This naturally leads to the measure of representation that is able to identify locations where categories are over- or underrepresented. From there, we provide a new measure of exposure that discriminates between situations where categories co-locate or repel one another. We then use this feature to provide an unambiguous, parameter-free method to find meaningful breaks in the income distribution, thus defining classes. Applied to the 2014 American Community Survey, we find 3 emerging classes-low, middle and higher income-out of the original 16 income categories. The higher-income households are proportionally more present in larger cities, while lower-income households are not, invalidating the idea of an increased social polarisation. Finally, using the density-and not the distance to a center which is meaningless in polycentric cities-we find that the richer class is overrepresented in high density zones, especially for larger cities. This suggests that density is a relevant factor for understanding the income structure of cities and might explain some of the differences observed between US and European cities.

  4. Patterns of Residential Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Louf, Rémi; Barthelemy, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of income shapes the structure and organisation of cities and its understanding has broad societal implications. Despite an abundant literature, many issues remain unclear. In particular, all definitions of segregation are implicitely tied to a single indicator, usually rely on an ambiguous definition of income classes, without any consensus on how to define neighbourhoods and to deal with the polycentric organization of large cities. In this paper, we address all these questions within a unique conceptual framework. We avoid the challenge of providing a direct definition of segregation and instead start from a definition of what segregation is not. This naturally leads to the measure of representation that is able to identify locations where categories are over- or underrepresented. From there, we provide a new measure of exposure that discriminates between situations where categories co-locate or repel one another. We then use this feature to provide an unambiguous, parameter-free method to find meaningful breaks in the income distribution, thus defining classes. Applied to the 2014 American Community Survey, we find 3 emerging classes—low, middle and higher income—out of the original 16 income categories. The higher-income households are proportionally more present in larger cities, while lower-income households are not, invalidating the idea of an increased social polarisation. Finally, using the density—and not the distance to a center which is meaningless in polycentric cities—we find that the richer class is overrepresented in high density zones, especially for larger cities. This suggests that density is a relevant factor for understanding the income structure of cities and might explain some of the differences observed between US and European cities. PMID:27315283

  5. Segregation properties of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago, B.X.; Da Costa, L.N. )

    1990-10-01

    Using the recently completed Southern Sky Redshift Survey, in conjunction with measurements of the central surface brightness, the existence of segregation in the way galaxies of different morphology and surface brightness are distributed in space is investigated. Results indicate that there is some evidence that low surface brightness galaxies are more randomly distributed than brighter ones and that this effect is independent of the well-known tendency of early-type galaxies to cluster more strongly than spirals. Presuming that the observed clustering was established at the epoch of galaxy formation, it may provide circumstantial evidence for biased galaxy formation. 24 refs.

  6. Perturbation of mammalian cell division. II. Studies on the isolation and characterization of human mini segregant cells.

    PubMed

    Schor, S L; Johnson, R T; Mullinger, A M

    1975-11-01

    A method is described for the isolation, according to size, of mini segregants produced by the abnormal cleavage of reversibly arrested mitotic HeLa cells. Many of these mini segregants contain small amounts of DNA, as judged by Feulgen staining and chromosome analysis. After fusion with mitotic HeLa cells, the interphase chromosomes of the mini segregants are seen as either monovalent or bivalent prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC), some of which are damaged. A proportion of isolated mini segregants synthesize DNA, RNA and protein. Fusion of mini segregants with interphase HeLa cells gives rise to cells with 'hybrid' karyotypes.

  7. CRISPR-Based Technologies: Prokaryotic Defense Weapons Repurposed

    PubMed Central

    Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary To combat potentially deadly viral infections, prokaryotic microbes enlist small RNA-based adaptive immune systems (CRISPR-Cas systems) that protect through sequence-specific recognition and targeted destruction of viral nucleic acids (either DNA or RNA depending on the system). Here, we summarize rapid progress made in redirecting the nuclease activities of these microbial immune systems to bind and cleave DNA or RNA targets of choice, by reprogramming the small guide RNAs of the various CRISPR-Cas complexes. These studies have demonstrated the potential of Type II CRISPR-Cas systems both as efficient and versatile genome editing tools and as potent and specific regulators of gene expression in a very broad range of cell types (including human) and organisms. Progress is also being made in developing a Type III RNA-targeting CRISPR-Cas system as a novel gene knockdown platform to investigate gene function and modulate gene expression for metabolic engineering in microbes. PMID:24555991

  8. RNA in defense: CRISPRs protect prokaryotes against mobile genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Jore, Matthijs M; Brouns, Stan J J; van der Oost, John

    2012-06-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system in prokaryotes provides resistance against invading viruses and plasmids. Three distinct stages in the mechanism can be recognized. Initially, fragments of invader DNA are integrated as new spacers into the repetitive CRISPR locus. Subsequently, the CRISPR is transcribed and the transcript is cleaved by a Cas protein within the repeats, generating short RNAs (crRNAs) that contain the spacer sequence. Finally, crRNAs guide the Cas protein machinery to a complementary invader target, either DNA or RNA, resulting in inhibition of virus or plasmid proliferation. In this article, we discuss our current understanding of this fascinating adaptive and heritable defense system, and describe functional similarities and differences with RNAi in eukaryotes.

  9. RNA in Defense: CRISPRs Protect Prokaryotes against Mobile Genetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Jore, Matthijs M.; Brouns, Stan J.J.; van der Oost, John

    2012-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system in prokaryotes provides resistance against invading viruses and plasmids. Three distinct stages in the mechanism can be recognized. Initially, fragments of invader DNA are integrated as new spacers into the repetitive CRISPR locus. Subsequently, the CRISPR is transcribed and the transcript is cleaved by a Cas protein within the repeats, generating short RNAs (crRNAs) that contain the spacer sequence. Finally, crRNAs guide the Cas protein machinery to a complementary invader target, either DNA or RNA, resulting in inhibition of virus or plasmid proliferation. In this article, we discuss our current understanding of this fascinating adaptive and heritable defense system, and describe functional similarities and differences with RNAi in eukaryotes. PMID:21441598

  10. In situ PCR for visualization of microscale distribution of specific genes and gene products in prokaryotic communities.

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, R E; Dustman, W A; Garg, R P; Moran, M A

    1995-01-01

    Obtaining information on the genetic capabilities and phylogenetic affinities of individual prokaryotic cells within natural communities is a high priority in the fields of microbial ecology, microbial biogeochemistry, and applied microbiology, among others. A method for prokaryotic in situ PCR (PI-PCR), a technique which will allow single cells within complex mixtures to be identified and characterized genetically, is presented here. The method involves amplification of specific nuclei acid sequences inside intact prokaryotic cells followed by color or fluorescence detection of the localized PCR product via bright-field or epifluorescence microscopy. Prokaryotic DNA and mRNA were both used successfully as targets for PI-PCR. We demonstrate the use of PI-PCR to identify nahA-positive cells in mixtures of bacterial isolates and in model marine bacterial communities. PMID:8526521

  11. Genomics of Bacterial and Archaeal Viruses: Dynamics within the Prokaryotic Virosphere

    PubMed Central

    Krupovic, Mart; Prangishvili, David; Hendrix, Roger W.; Bamford, Dennis H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Prokaryotes, bacteria and archaea, are the most abundant cellular organisms among those sharing the planet Earth with human beings (among others). However, numerous ecological studies have revealed that it is actually prokaryotic viruses that predominate on our planet and outnumber their hosts by at least an order of magnitude. An understanding of how this viral domain is organized and what are the mechanisms governing its evolution is therefore of great interest and importance. The vast majority of characterized prokaryotic viruses belong to the order Caudovirales, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages with tails. Consequently, these viruses have been studied (and reviewed) extensively from both genomic and functional perspectives. However, albeit numerous, tailed phages represent only a minor fraction of the prokaryotic virus diversity. Therefore, the knowledge which has been generated for this viral system does not offer a comprehensive view of the prokaryotic virosphere. In this review, we discuss all families of bacterial and archaeal viruses that contain more than one characterized member and for which evolutionary conclusions can be attempted by use of comparative genomic analysis. We focus on the molecular mechanisms of their genome evolution as well as on the relationships between different viral groups and plasmids. It becomes clear that evolutionary mechanisms shaping the genomes of prokaryotic viruses vary between different families and depend on the type of the nucleic acid, characteristics of the virion structure, as well as the mode of the life cycle. We also point out that horizontal gene transfer is not equally prevalent in different virus families and is not uniformly unrestricted for diverse viral functions. PMID:22126996

  12. Development of a prokaryotic universal primer for simultaneous analysis of Bacteria and Archaea using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shunsuke; Tomita, Junko; Nishioka, Kaori; Hisada, Takayoshi; Nishijima, Miyuki

    2014-01-01

    For the analysis of microbial community structure based on 16S rDNA sequence diversity, sensitive and robust PCR amplification of 16S rDNA is a critical step. To obtain accurate microbial composition data, PCR amplification must be free of bias; however, amplifying all 16S rDNA species with equal efficiency from a sample containing a large variety of microorganisms remains challenging. Here, we designed a universal primer based on the V3-V4 hypervariable region of prokaryotic 16S rDNA for the simultaneous detection of Bacteria and Archaea in fecal samples from crossbred pigs (Landrace × Large white × Duroc) using an Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencer. In-silico analysis showed that the newly designed universal prokaryotic primers matched approximately 98.0% of Bacteria and 94.6% of Archaea rRNA gene sequences in the Ribosomal Database Project database. For each sequencing reaction performed with the prokaryotic universal primer, an average of 69,330 (± 20,482) reads were obtained, of which archaeal rRNA genes comprised approximately 1.2% to 3.2% of all prokaryotic reads. In addition, the detection frequency of Bacteria belonging to the phylum Verrucomicrobia, including members of the classes Verrucomicrobiae and Opitutae, was higher in the NGS analysis using the prokaryotic universal primer than that performed with the bacterial universal primer. Importantly, this new prokaryotic universal primer set had markedly lower bias than that of most previously designed universal primers. Our findings demonstrate that the prokaryotic universal primer set designed in the present study will permit the simultaneous detection of Bacteria and Archaea, and will therefore allow for a more comprehensive understanding of microbial community structures in environmental samples.

  13. Development of a Prokaryotic Universal Primer for Simultaneous Analysis of Bacteria and Archaea Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shunsuke; Tomita, Junko; Nishioka, Kaori; Hisada, Takayoshi; Nishijima, Miyuki

    2014-01-01

    For the analysis of microbial community structure based on 16S rDNA sequence diversity, sensitive and robust PCR amplification of 16S rDNA is a critical step. To obtain accurate microbial composition data, PCR amplification must be free of bias; however, amplifying all 16S rDNA species with equal efficiency from a sample containing a large variety of microorganisms remains challenging. Here, we designed a universal primer based on the V3-V4 hypervariable region of prokaryotic 16S rDNA for the simultaneous detection of Bacteria and Archaea in fecal samples from crossbred pigs (Landrace×Large white×Duroc) using an Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencer. In-silico analysis showed that the newly designed universal prokaryotic primers matched approximately 98.0% of Bacteria and 94.6% of Archaea rRNA gene sequences in the Ribosomal Database Project database. For each sequencing reaction performed with the prokaryotic universal primer, an average of 69,330 (±20,482) reads were obtained, of which archaeal rRNA genes comprised approximately 1.2% to 3.2% of all prokaryotic reads. In addition, the detection frequency of Bacteria belonging to the phylum Verrucomicrobia, including members of the classes Verrucomicrobiae and Opitutae, was higher in the NGS analysis using the prokaryotic universal primer than that performed with the bacterial universal primer. Importantly, this new prokaryotic universal primer set had markedly lower bias than that of most previously designed universal primers. Our findings demonstrate that the prokaryotic universal primer set designed in the present study will permit the simultaneous detection of Bacteria and Archaea, and will therefore allow for a more comprehensive understanding of microbial community structures in environmental samples. PMID:25144201

  14. Death by Segregation: Does the Dimension of Racial Segregation Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tse-Chuan; Matthews, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    The county-level geographic mortality differentials have persisted in the past four decades in the United States (US). Though several socioeconomic factors (e.g., inequality) partially explain this phenomenon, the role of race/ethnic segregation, in general, and the different dimensions of segregation, more specifically, has been underexplored. Focusing on all-cause age-sex standardized US county-level mortality (2004–2008), this study has two substantive goals: (1) to understand whether segregation is a determinant of mortality and if yes, how the relationship between segregation and mortality varies by racial/ethnic dyads (e.g., white/black), and (2) to explore whether different dimensions of segregation (i.e., evenness, exposure, concentration, centralization, and clustering) are associated with mortality. A third goal is methodological: to assess whether spatial autocorrelation influences our understanding of the associations between the dimensions of segregation and mortality. Race/ethnic segregation was found to contribute to the geographic mortality disparities. Moreover, the relationship with mortality differed by both race/ethnic group and the dimension of segregation. Specifically, white/black segregation is positively related to mortality, whereas the segregation between whites and non-black minorities is negatively associated with mortality. Among the five dimensions of segregation, evenness and exposure are more strongly related to mortality than other dimensions. Spatial filtering approaches also identified six unique spatial patterns that significantly affect the spatial distribution of mortality. These patterns offer possible insights that help identify omitted variables related to the persistent patterning of mortality in the US. PMID:26398346

  15. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular chronomics

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, F.; Cornélissen, G.; Faraone, P.; Poeggeler, B.; Hardeland, R.; Katinas, G.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Otsuka, K.; Bakken, E. E.

    2008-01-01

    An impeccable time series, published in 1930, consisting of hourly observations on colony advance in a fluid culture of E. coli, was analyzed by a periodogram and power spectrum in 1961. While the original senior author had emphasized specifically periodicity with no estimate of period length, he welcomed further analyses. After consulting his technician, he knew of no environmental periodicity related to human schedules other than an hourly photography. A periodogram analysis in 1961 showed a 20.75-h period. It was emphasized that “… the circadian period disclosed is not of exactly 24-h length.” Confirmations notwithstanding, a committee ruled out microbial circadian rhythms based on grounds that could have led to a different conclusion, namely first, the inability of some committee members to see (presumably by eyeballing) the rhythms in their own data, and second, what hardly follows, that there were “too many analyses” in the published papers. Our point in dealing with microbes and humans is that analyses are indispensable for quantification and for discovering a biologically novel spectrum of cyclicities, matching physical ones. The scope of circadian organization estimated in 1961 has become broader, including about 7-day, about half-yearly, about-yearly and ex-yearly and decadal periodisms, among others. Microbial circadians have become a field of their own with eyeballing, yet time-microscopy can quantify characteristics with their uncertainties and can assess broad chronomes (time structures) with features beyond circadians. As yet only suggestive differences between eukaryotes and prokaryotes further broaden the perspective and may lead to life’s sites of origin and to new temporal aspects of life’ s development as a chronomic tree by eventual rhythm dating in ontogeny and phylogeny. PMID:16275493

  16. Chromosome Segregation in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, R.; Jha, J; Chattoraj, DK

    2014-01-01

    The study of chromosome segregation is currently one of the most exciting research frontiers in cell biology. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the chromosome segregation process in Vibrio cholerae, based primarily on findings from fluorescence microscopy experiments. This bacterium is of special interest because of its eukaryotic feature of having a divided genome, a feature shared with 10% of known bacteria. We also discuss how the segregation mechanisms of V. cholerae compare with those in other bacteria, and highlight some of the remaining questions regarding the process of bacterial chromosome segregation. PMID:25732338

  17. Polymer segregation under confinement: Influences of macromolecular crowding and the interaction between the polymer and crowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuhao; Yu, Wancheng; Wang, Jiajun; Luo, Kaifu

    2015-10-01

    Entropy driven polymer segregation in confinements as a model for chromosome separation in bacteria has attracted wide attention; however, the effects of macromolecular crowding and the interaction between the binding protein and the newly replicated DNA on the segregation dynamics are not clear. Using Langevin dynamics simulations, we investigate the influences of crowders and the attractive interaction between the polymer and a small number of crowders on segregation of two overlapping polymers under a cylindrical confinement. We find that the segregation time increases with increasing the volume fraction of crowders due to the slower chain diffusion in crowded environments. For a fixed volume fraction of crowders, the segregation time decreases with increasing the size of crowders. Moreover, the attractive interaction between the polymer and a small number of crowders can significantly facilitate the chain segregation. These results are important for understanding the chromosome segregation in living cells.

  18. Two faces of the prokaryote concept.

    PubMed

    Sapp, Jan

    2006-09-01

    Bacteria had remained undefined when, in 1962, Roger Y. Stanier and C.B. van Niel published their famed paper ''The concept of a bacterium.'' The articulation of the prokaryote-eukaryote dichotomy was a vital moment in the history of biology. This article provides a brief overview of the context in which the prokaryote concept was successfully launched in the 1960s, and what it was meant to connote. Two concepts were initially distinguished within the prokaryote-eukaryote dichotomy at that time. One was organizational and referred to comparative cell structure; the other was phylogenetic and referred to a ''natural'' classification. Here, I examine how the two concepts became inseparable; how the prokaryotes came to signify a monophyletic group that preceded the eukaryotes, and how this view remained unquestioned for 15 years, until the birth of molecular evolutionary biology and coherent methods for bacteria phylogenetics based on 16S rRNA. Today, while microbial phylogeneticists generally agree that the prokaryote is a polyphyletic group, there is no agreement on whether the term should be maintained in an organizational sense.

  19. Supramolecular organization in prokaryotic respiratory systems.

    PubMed

    Magalon, Axel; Arias-Cartin, Rodrigo; Walburger, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotes are characterized by an extreme flexibility of their respiratory systems allowing them to cope with various extreme environments. To date, supramolecular organization of respiratory systems appears as a conserved evolutionary feature as supercomplexes have been isolated in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. Most of the yet identified supercomplexes in prokaryotes are involved in aerobic respiration and share similarities with those reported in mitochondria. Supercomplexes likely reflect a snapshot of the cellular respiration in a given cell population. While the exact nature of the determinants for supramolecular organization in prokaryotes is not understood, lipids, proteins, and subcellular localization can be seen as key players. Owing to the well-reported supramolecular organization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in eukaryotes, several hypotheses have been formulated to explain the consequences of such arrangement and can be tested in the context of prokaryotes. Considering the inherent metabolic flexibility of a number of prokaryotes, cellular distribution and composition of the supramolecular assemblies should be studied in regards to environmental signals. This would pave the way to new concepts in cellular respiration.

  20. Evolutionary assembly patterns of prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Press, Maximilian O.; Queitsch, Christine; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary innovation must occur in the context of some genomic background, which limits available evolutionary paths. For example, protein evolution by sequence substitution is constrained by epistasis between residues. In prokaryotes, evolutionary innovation frequently happens by macrogenomic events such as horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Previous work has suggested that HGT can be influenced by ancestral genomic content, yet the extent of such gene-level constraints has not yet been systematically characterized. Here, we evaluated the evolutionary impact of such constraints in prokaryotes, using probabilistic ancestral reconstructions from 634 extant prokaryotic genomes and a novel framework for detecting evolutionary constraints on HGT events. We identified 8228 directional dependencies between genes and demonstrated that many such dependencies reflect known functional relationships, including for example, evolutionary dependencies of the photosynthetic enzyme RuBisCO. Modeling all dependencies as a network, we adapted an approach from graph theory to establish chronological precedence in the acquisition of different genomic functions. Specifically, we demonstrated that specific functions tend to be gained sequentially, suggesting that evolution in prokaryotes is governed by functional assembly patterns. Finally, we showed that these dependencies are universal rather than clade-specific and are often sufficient for predicting whether or not a given ancestral genome will acquire specific genes. Combined, our results indicate that evolutionary innovation via HGT is profoundly constrained by epistasis and historical contingency, similar to the evolution of proteins and phenotypic characters, and suggest that the emergence of specific metabolic and pathological phenotypes in prokaryotes can be predictable from current genomes. PMID:27197212

  1. Single prokaryotic cell isolation and total transcript amplification protocol for transcriptomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yun; McMillan, Ian; Norris, Michael H; Hoang, Tung T.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, transcriptome analyses of single cells have been confined to eukaryotes. The information obtained from single cell transcripts can provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal gene-expression, and could be even more valuable if expanded to prokaryotic cells. Transcriptome analysis of single prokaryotic cells is a recently developed and powerful tool. Here, we describe a procedure that allows amplification of the total transcript of a single prokaryotic cell for in-depth analysis. This is performed by utilizing a laser capture microdissection instrument for single cell isolation, followed by reverse transcription via Moloney Murine Leukemia virus, degradation of chromosomal DNA with McrBC and DpnI restriction enzymes, ss-cDNA ligation using T4 polynucleotide kinase and CircLigase, and polymerization of ss-cDNA to ds-cDNA by ϕ 29 polymerase. This procedure takes ~5 days, and sufficient amounts of ds-cDNA can be obtained from single cell RNA template for further microarray analysis. PMID:26042386

  2. A dual function of the CRISPR-Cas system in bacterial antivirus immunity and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Babu, Mohan; Beloglazova, Natalia; Flick, Robert; Graham, Chris; Skarina, Tatiana; Nocek, Boguslaw; Gagarinova, Alla; Pogoutse, Oxana; Brown, Greg; Binkowski, Andrew; Phanse, Sadhna; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Koonin, Eugene V; Savchenko, Alexei; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack; Edwards, Aled M; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2011-01-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) and the associated proteins (Cas) comprise a system of adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids in prokaryotes. Cas1 is a CRISPR-associated protein that is common to all CRISPR-containing prokaryotes but its function remains obscure. Here we show that the purified Cas1 protein of Escherichia coli (YgbT) exhibits nuclease activity against single-stranded and branched DNAs including Holliday junctions, replication forks and 5'-flaps. The crystal structure of YgbT and site-directed mutagenesis have revealed the potential active site. Genome-wide screens show that YgbT physically and genetically interacts with key components of DNA repair systems, including recB, recC and ruvB. Consistent with these findings, the ygbT deletion strain showed increased sensitivity to DNA damage and impaired chromosomal segregation. Similar phenotypes were observed in strains with deletion of CRISPR clusters, suggesting that the function of YgbT in repair involves interaction with the CRISPRs. These results show that YgbT belongs to a novel, structurally distinct family of nucleases acting on branched DNAs and suggest that, in addition to antiviral immunity, at least some components of the CRISPR-Cas system have a function in DNA repair.

  3. A dual function of the CRISPR-Cas system in bacterial antivirus immunity and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Mohan; Beloglazova, Natalia; Flick, Robert; Graham, Chris; Skarina, Tatiana; Nocek, Boguslaw; Gagarinova, Alla; Pogoutse, Oxana; Brown, Greg; Binkowski, Andrew; Phanse, Sadhna; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Koonin, Eugene V.; Savchenko, Alexei; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack; Edwards, Aled M.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) and the associated proteins (Cas) comprise a system of adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids in prokaryotes. Cas1 is a CRISPR-associated protein that is common to all CRISPR-containing prokaryotes but its function remains obscure. Here we show that the purified Cas1 protein of Escherichia coli (YgbT) exhibits nuclease activity against single-stranded and branched DNAs including Holliday junctions, replication forks, and 5′-flaps. The crystal structure of YgbT and site-directed mutagenesis have revealed the potential active site. Genome-wide screens show that YgbT physically and genetically interacts with key components of DNA repair systems, including recB, recC and ruvB. Consistent with these findings, the ygbT deletion strain showed increased sensitivity to DNA damage and impaired chromosomal segregation. Similar phenotypes were observed in strains with deletion of CRISPR clusters, suggesting that the function of YgbT in repair involves interaction with the CRISPRs. These results show that YgbT belongs to a novel, structurally distinct family of nucleases acting on branched DNAs and suggest that, in addition to antiviral immunity, at least some components of the CRISPR-Cas system have a function in DNA repair. PMID:21219465

  4. Towards understanding the molecular recognition process in prokaryotic zinc-finger domain.

    PubMed

    Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Caso, Jolanda Valentina; D'Abrosca, Gianluca; Diana, Donatella; Malgieri, Gaetano; Baglivo, Ilaria; Isernia, Carla; Pedone, Paolo V; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2015-02-16

    Eukaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger domain is one of the most common and important structural motifs involved in protein-DNA interaction. The recognition motif is characterized by the tetrahedral coordination of a zinc ion by conserved cysteine and histidine residues. We have characterized the prokaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger motif, included in the DNA binding region (Ros87) of Ros protein from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, demonstrating that, although possessing a similar zinc coordination sphere, this domain presents significant differences from its eukaryotic counterpart. Furthermore, basic residues flanking the zinc binding region on either side have been demonstrated, by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) experiments, to be essential for Ros DNA binding. In spite of this wealth of knowledge, the structural details of the mechanism through which the prokaryotic zinc fingers recognize their target genes are still unclear. Here, to gain insights into the molecular DNA recognition process of prokaryotic zinc finger domains we applied a strategy in which we performed molecular docking studies using a combination of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations data. The results demonstrate that the MD ensemble provides a reasonable picture of Ros87 backbone dynamics in solution. The Ros87-DNA model indicates that the interaction involves the first two residue of the first α-helix, and several residues located in the basic regions flanking the zinc finger domain. Interestingly, the prokaryotic zinc finger domain, mainly with the C-terminal tail that is wrapped around the DNA, binds a more extended recognition site than the eukaryotic counterpart. Our analysis demonstrates that the introduction of the protein flexibility in docking studies can improve, in terms of accuracy, the quality of the obtained models and could be particularly useful for protein showing high conformational heterogeneity as well as for computational drug design

  5. Regelation and ice segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    Macroscopic processes can have an important effect on the state of regolith water. The two primary mechanisms responsible for the formation of segregated ice on Earth, thermally induced regelation and hydraulic fracturing, are reviewed while their potential importance on Mars is examined. While regelation is the dominant terrestrial process, it requires a warmer and wetter environment than currently exists on Mars. In this respect, the conditions required for hydraulic fracturing are less demanding. In assessing its potential importance on Mars, it is noted that hydraulic fracturing can produce a localized zone of high pressure water that could readily disrupt an overburden of frozen ground. Such a process, it is concluded, may have triggered the release of groundwater that led to the formation of the major outflow channels.

  6. A Demonstration of Sample Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Mark D.; Brumbach, Stephen B.; Hartman, JudithAnn R.

    2005-01-01

    The demonstration of sample segregation, which is simple, and visually compelling illustrates the importance of sample handling for students studying analytical chemistry and environmental chemistry. The mixture used in this demonstration has two components, which have big particle size, and different colors, which makes the segregation graphic.

  7. Segregation in Michigan Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Charles, Sr.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Summarized in this paper is an examination of district segregation, the concentration of racial and ethnic minority group students in individual buildings within Michigan school districts. State, district, and building are used as units of analysis in showing the extent of racial segregation in Michigan public schools. (EB)

  8. Multilevel Modeling of Social Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leckie, George; Pillinger, Rebecca; Jones, Kelvyn; Goldstein, Harvey

    2012-01-01

    The traditional approach to measuring segregation is based upon descriptive, non-model-based indices. A recently proposed alternative is multilevel modeling. The authors further develop the argument for a multilevel modeling approach by first describing and expanding upon its notable advantages, which include an ability to model segregation at a…

  9. A Demonstration of Sample Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Mark D.; Brumbach, Stephen B.; Hartman, JudithAnn R.

    2005-01-01

    The demonstration of sample segregation, which is simple, and visually compelling illustrates the importance of sample handling for students studying analytical chemistry and environmental chemistry. The mixture used in this demonstration has two components, which have big particle size, and different colors, which makes the segregation graphic.

  10. Dynamics of segregation of polymers in a confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2009-03-01

    Chromosomes are enormous DNA molecules living in the crowded, confined environment of a cell. They carry important genetic information and are stably propagated to new generations through replication. During the replication, two identical DNA molecules are generated and segregate rapidly into opposite pole of the cell. We have used numerical simulation to investigate the effects of confinement on the segregation of two identical self-avoiding chains. Simulation shows the existence of a transition from a mixing state to a demixing state with changes in the confining geometry. Using the blob picture, we construct a free energy function that depends on the distance between the two chains. We describe the dynamics of segregation as a stochastic process driven by this energy function. We will present comparisons of our theoretical results with numerical simulations.

  11. Insights into structural variations and genome rearrangements in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Periwal, Vinita; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Structural variations (SVs) are genomic rearrangements that affect fairly large fragments of DNA. Most of the SVs such as inversions, deletions and translocations have been largely studied in context of genetic diseases in eukaryotes. However, recent studies demonstrate that genome rearrangements can also have profound impact on prokaryotic genomes, leading to altered cell phenotype. In contrast to single-nucleotide variations, SVs provide a much deeper insight into organization of bacterial genomes at a much better resolution. SVs can confer change in gene copy number, creation of new genes, altered gene expression and many other functional consequences. High-throughput technologies have now made it possible to explore SVs at a much refined resolution in bacterial genomes. Through this review, we aim to highlight the importance of the less explored field of SVs in prokaryotic genomes and their impact. We also discuss its potential applicability in the emerging fields of synthetic biology and genome engineering where targeted SVs could serve to create sophisticated and accurate genome editing. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Functional advantages conferred by extracellular prokaryotic membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Manning, Andrew J; Kuehn, Meta J

    2013-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane-derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here, we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane-bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. How crowded is the prokaryotic cytoplasm?

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2013-07-11

    We consider biomacromolecular crowding within the cytoplasm of prokaryotic cells as a two-phase system of 'supercrowded' cytogel and 'dilute' cytosol; we simplify and quantify this model for a coccoid cell over a wide range of biomacromolecular crowding. The key result shows that the supercrowded cytogel extends the vectorial character of the plasma membrane deeper into the cytoplasm by about 20-70 nm. We discuss useful physiological insights that this model gives into the functioning of a prokaryotic cell on the micrometer scale. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence for an early prokaryotic endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Lake, James A

    2009-08-20

    Endosymbioses have dramatically altered eukaryotic life, but are thought to have negligibly affected prokaryotic evolution. Here, by analysing the flows of protein families, I present evidence that the double-membrane, gram-negative prokaryotes were formed as the result of a symbiosis between an ancient actinobacterium and an ancient clostridium. The resulting taxon has been extraordinarily successful, and has profoundly altered the evolution of life by providing endosymbionts necessary for the emergence of eukaryotes and by generating Earth's oxygen atmosphere. Their double-membrane architecture and the observed genome flows into them suggest a common evolutionary mechanism for their origin: an endosymbiosis between a clostridium and actinobacterium.

  15. Highways of gene sharing in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Beiko, Robert G.; Harlow, Timothy J.; Ragan, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The extent to which lateral genetic transfer has shaped microbial genomes has major implications for the emergence of community structures. We have performed a rigorous phylogenetic analysis of >220,000 proteins from genomes of 144 prokaryotes to determine the contribution of gene sharing to current prokaryotic diversity, and to identify “highways” of sharing between lineages. The inferred relationships suggest a pattern of inheritance that is largely vertical, but with notable exceptions among closely related taxa, and among distantly related organisms that live in similar environments. PMID:16176988

  16. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zamariola, Linda; Tiang, Choon Lin; De Storme, Nico; Pawlowski, Wojtek; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved. PMID:24987397

  17. Links between viral and prokaryotic communities throughout the water column in the (sub)tropical Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    De Corte, Daniele; Sintes, Eva; Winter, Christian; Yokokawa, Taichi; Reinthaler, Thomas; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2010-11-01

    Viral and prokaryotic abundance, production and diversity were determined throughout the water column of the subtropical Atlantic Ocean to assess potential variations in the relation between viruses and prokaryotes. Prokaryotic abundance and heterotrophic activity decreased by one and three orders of magnitude, respectively, from the epi- to the abyssopelagic layer. Although the lytic viral production (VP) decreased with depth, lysogenic VP was variable throughout the water column and did not show any trend with depth. The bacterial, archaeal and viral community composition were depth-stratified as determined by the automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, respectively. Generally, the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) did not reveal consistent trends throughout the water column. Viral and prokaryotic abundance were strongly related to heterotrophic prokaryotic production, suggesting similar linkage strength between the viral and prokaryotic communities from the lower epi- to the abyssopelagic layer in the Atlantic Ocean. Strikingly, the prokaryotic and viral parameters exhibited a similar variability throughout the water column down to the abyssopelagic layers, suggesting that the dark ocean is as dynamic a system as is the lower epipelagic layer. It also indicates that viruses are apparently having a similar role for prokaryotic mortality in the dark oceanic realm as in surface waters. The more than twofold increase in bacterial OTUs from 2750 m depth to >5000 m depth and the concurrent decrease in viral OTUs, however, suggests that viruses might exhibit a wider host range in deep waters than in surface waters.

  18. Eukaryotic versus prokaryotic marine picoplankton ecology.

    PubMed

    Massana, Ramon; Logares, Ramiro

    2013-05-01

    Marine microorganisms contribute markedly to global biomass and ecosystem function. They include a diverse collection of organisms differing in cell size and in evolutionary history. In particular, microbes within the picoplankton are similar in size but belong to two drastically different cellular plans, the prokaryotes and the eukaryotes. Compared with larger organisms, prokaryotes and picoeukaryotes share ecological features, such as high specific activity, large and constant abundances, and high dispersal potential. Still, there are some aspects where their different cell organization influences their ecological performance. First, prokaryotes have a huge metabolic versatility and are involved in all biogeochemical cycles, whereas picoeukaryotes are metabolically less flexible but can exploit diverse predatory life strategies due to their phagocytic capacity. Second, sexual reproduction is absent in prokaryotes but may be present in picoeukaryotes, thus determining different evolutionary diversification dynamics and making species limits clearer in picoeukaryotes. Finally, it is plausible that picoeukaryotes are less flexible to enter a reversible state of low metabolic activity, thus picoeukaryote assemblages may have fewer rare species and may be less resilient to environmental change. In summary, lumping together pico-sized microbes may be convenient for some ecological studies, but it is also important to keep in mind their differences.

  19. Surface segregation during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rehn, L.E.; Lam, N.Q.

    1985-10-01

    Gibbsian adsorption is known to alter the surface composition of many alloys. During irradiation, four additional processes that affect the near-surface alloy composition become operative: preferential sputtering, displacement mixing, radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation. Because of the mutual competition of these five processes, near-surface compositional changes in an irradiation environment can be extremely complex. Although ion-beam induced surface compositional changes were noted as long as fifty years ago, it is only during the past several years that individual mechanisms have been clearly identified. In this paper, a simple physical description of each of the processes is given, and selected examples of recent important progress are discussed. With the notable exception of preferential sputtering, it is shown that a reasonable qualitative understanding of the relative contributions from the individual processes under various irradiation conditions has been attained. However, considerably more effort will be required before a quantitative, predictive capability can be achieved. 29 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Centromeric Heterochromatin: The Primordial Segregation Machine

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Kerry S.

    2014-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized domains of heterochromatin that provide the foundation for the kinetochore. Centromeric heterochromatin is characterized by specific histone modifications, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CENP-A), and the enrichment of cohesin, condensin, and topo-isomerase II. Centromere DNA varies orders of magnitude in size from 125 bp (budding yeast) to several megabases (human). In metaphase, sister kinetochores on the surface of replicated chromosomes face away from each other, where they establish microtubule attachment and bi-orientation. Despite the disparity in centromere size, the distance between separated sister kinetochores is remarkably conserved (approximately 1 μm) throughout phylogeny. The centromere functions as a molecular spring that resists microtubule-based extensional forces in mitosis. This review explores the physical properties of DNA in order to understand how the molecular spring is built and how it contributes to the fidelity of chromosome segregation. PMID:25251850

  1. Centromeric heterochromatin: the primordial segregation machine.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Kerry S

    2014-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized domains of heterochromatin that provide the foundation for the kinetochore. Centromeric heterochromatin is characterized by specific histone modifications, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CENP-A), and the enrichment of cohesin, condensin, and topoisomerase II. Centromere DNA varies orders of magnitude in size from 125 bp (budding yeast) to several megabases (human). In metaphase, sister kinetochores on the surface of replicated chromosomes face away from each other, where they establish microtubule attachment and bi-orientation. Despite the disparity in centromere size, the distance between separated sister kinetochores is remarkably conserved (approximately 1 μm) throughout phylogeny. The centromere functions as a molecular spring that resists microtubule-based extensional forces in mitosis. This review explores the physical properties of DNA in order to understand how the molecular spring is built and how it contributes to the fidelity of chromosome segregation.

  2. Are topoisomerases required for mammalian chromosome segregation?

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, A.T.; Perry, P.E.; Slavotinek, A.

    1993-12-31

    Theoretical considerations indicate that topoisomerase II should be involved in chromosome segregation, since newly replicated daughter DNA molecules must be interwined, and an enzyme such as topoisomerase II is needed to disentangle them. It has been shown, using scanning electron microscopy, that regions of centromeric heterochromatin are the last parts of the chromosomes to separate at anaphase. Such regions generally contain highly repetitive, satellite DNAs, whose function is obscure, since they vary extensively, and apparently randomly, in their sequence and average base composition. However, in spite of this compositional variation, it appears that many satellite DNAs show characteristic curvature, which may, rather than a specific nucleotide sequence, be a recognition site for topoisomerase II. Satellite DNA in centromeric heterochromatin might then, regardless of sequence, provide a specific substrate on which topoisomerase II could act in a concerted fashion at the beginning of anaphase to ensure orderly separation of the daughter chromosomes.

  3. Survival and Evolution of CRISPR-Cas System in Prokaryotes and Its Applications.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Muhammad Abu Bakr; Hao, Haihong; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Hussain, Hafiz Iftikhar; Iqbal, Zahid; Ahmed, Saeed; Sattar, Adeel; Iqbal, Mujahid; Li, Jun; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes have developed numerous innate immune mechanisms in order to fend off bacteriophage or plasmid attack. One of these immune systems is clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). CRISPR-associated proteins play a key role in survival of prokaryotes against invaders, as these systems cleave DNA of foreign genetic elements. Beyond providing immunity, these systems have significant impact in altering the bacterial physiology in term of its virulence and pathogenicity, as well as evolution. Also, due to their diverse nature of functionality, cas9 endoribonuclease can be easily reprogrammed with the help of guide RNAs, showing unprecedented potential and significance for gene editing in treating genetic diseases. Here, we also discuss the use of NgAgo-gDNA system in genome editing of human cells.

  4. Survival and Evolution of CRISPR–Cas System in Prokaryotes and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shabbir, Muhammad Abu Bakr; Hao, Haihong; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Hussain, Hafiz Iftikhar; Iqbal, Zahid; Ahmed, Saeed; Sattar, Adeel; Iqbal, Mujahid; Li, Jun; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes have developed numerous innate immune mechanisms in order to fend off bacteriophage or plasmid attack. One of these immune systems is clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). CRISPR-associated proteins play a key role in survival of prokaryotes against invaders, as these systems cleave DNA of foreign genetic elements. Beyond providing immunity, these systems have significant impact in altering the bacterial physiology in term of its virulence and pathogenicity, as well as evolution. Also, due to their diverse nature of functionality, cas9 endoribonuclease can be easily reprogrammed with the help of guide RNAs, showing unprecedented potential and significance for gene editing in treating genetic diseases. Here, we also discuss the use of NgAgo–gDNA system in genome editing of human cells. PMID:27725818

  5. Compaction of bacterial genomic DNA: clarifying the concepts.

    PubMed

    Joyeux, Marc

    2015-09-30

    The unconstrained genomic DNA of bacteria forms a coil, whose volume exceeds 1000 times the volume of the cell. Since prokaryotes lack a membrane-bound nucleus, in sharp contrast with eukaryotes, the DNA may consequently be expected to occupy the whole available volume when constrained to fit in the cell. Still, it has been known for more than half a century that the DNA is localized in a well-defined region of the cell, called the nucleoid, which occupies only 15% to 25% of the total volume. Although this problem has focused the attention of many scientists in recent decades, there is still no certainty concerning the mechanism that enables such a dramatic compaction. The goal of this Topical Review is to take stock of our knowledge on this question by listing all possible compaction mechanisms with the proclaimed desire to clarify the physical principles they are based upon and discuss them in the light of experimental results and the results of simulations based on coarse-grained models. In particular, the fundamental differences between ψ-condensation and segregative phase separation and between the condensation by small and long polycations are highlighted. This review suggests that the importance of certain mechanisms, like supercoiling and the architectural properties of DNA-bridging and DNA-bending nucleoid proteins, may have been overestimated, whereas other mechanisms, like segregative phase separation and the self-association of nucleoid proteins, as well as the possible role of the synergy of two or more mechanisms, may conversely deserve more attention.

  6. Protein Diversity Confers Specificity in Plasmid Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Fothergill, Timothy J. G.; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-01-01

    The ParG segregation protein (8.6 kDa) of multidrug resistance plasmid TP228 is a homodimeric DNA-binding factor. The ParG dimer consists of intertwined C-terminal domains that adopt a ribbon-helix-helix architecture and a pair of flexible, unstructured N-terminal tails. A variety of plasmids possess partition loci with similar organizations to that of TP228, but instead of ParG homologs, these plasmids specify a diversity of unrelated, but similarly sized, partition proteins. These include the proteobacterial pTAR, pVT745, and pB171 plasmids. The ParG analogs of these plasmids were characterized in parallel with the ParG homolog encoded by the pseudomonal plasmid pVS1. Like ParG, the four proteins are dimeric. No heterodimerization was detectable in vivo among the proteins nor with the prototypical ParG protein, suggesting that monomer-monomer interactions are specific among the five proteins. Nevertheless, as with ParG, the ParG analogs all possess significant amounts of unordered amino acid residues, potentially highlighting a common structural link among the proteins. Furthermore, the ParG analogs bind specifically to the DNA regions located upstream of their homologous parF-like genes. These nucleoprotein interactions are largely restricted to cognate protein-DNA pairs. The results reveal that the partition complexes of these and related plasmids have recruited disparate DNA-binding factors that provide a layer of specificity to the macromolecular interactions that mediate plasmid segregation. PMID:15805511

  7. Protein diversity confers specificity in plasmid segregation.

    PubMed

    Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-04-01

    The ParG segregation protein (8.6 kDa) of multidrug resistance plasmid TP228 is a homodimeric DNA-binding factor. The ParG dimer consists of intertwined C-terminal domains that adopt a ribbon-helix-helix architecture and a pair of flexible, unstructured N-terminal tails. A variety of plasmids possess partition loci with similar organizations to that of TP228, but instead of ParG homologs, these plasmids specify a diversity of unrelated, but similarly sized, partition proteins. These include the proteobacterial pTAR, pVT745, and pB171 plasmids. The ParG analogs of these plasmids were characterized in parallel with the ParG homolog encoded by the pseudomonal plasmid pVS1. Like ParG, the four proteins are dimeric. No heterodimerization was detectable in vivo among the proteins nor with the prototypical ParG protein, suggesting that monomer-monomer interactions are specific among the five proteins. Nevertheless, as with ParG, the ParG analogs all possess significant amounts of unordered amino acid residues, potentially highlighting a common structural link among the proteins. Furthermore, the ParG analogs bind specifically to the DNA regions located upstream of their homologous parF-like genes. These nucleoprotein interactions are largely restricted to cognate protein-DNA pairs. The results reveal that the partition complexes of these and related plasmids have recruited disparate DNA-binding factors that provide a layer of specificity to the macromolecular interactions that mediate plasmid segregation.

  8. Temporal and depth-related differences in prokaryotic communities in abyssal sediments associated with particulate organic carbon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeseneder, M. M.; Smith, K. L.; Ruhl, H. A.; Jones, D. O. B.; Witte, U.; Prosser, J. I.

    2012-12-01

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) flux is hypothesized to be the most important parameter influencing activity and biomass of prokaryotic and faunal communities in the abyssal seafloor, but there is little evidence of POC-related changes in community composition of prokaryotes. This hypothesis was tested by 16S rRNA-gene-based analysis of prokaryotic DNA and RNA extracted from abyssal seafloor sediments during periods of low and high POC flux. Fingerprint analysis of prokaryotic communities indicated that approximately 50% of the phylotypes were identical at each sediment horizon, regardless of the temporal variations in POC flux. However, phylotypes were also detected that represented a relatively dynamic component of these communities and were probably strongly influenced by the prevalent POC flux regime. These patterns were also detected in deeper sediment horizons. DNA- and RNA-based community profiles differed, although both approaches had similar community dynamics. Crenarchaeota showed the strongest shift in community composition in response to availability of labile POC, indicating that POC flux may have a more pronounced impact on crenarchaeal communities than on bacterial communities. The high number of phylotypes common to each sample time suggests that both standing stock and active prokaryotic communities are stable.

  9. FtsK actively segregates sister chromosomes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stouf, Mathieu; Meile, Jean-Christophe; Cornet, François

    2013-07-02

    Bacteria use the replication origin-to-terminus polarity of their circular chromosomes to control DNA transactions during the cell cycle. Segregation starts by active migration of the region of origin followed by progressive movement of the rest of the chromosomes. The last steps of segregation have been studied extensively in the case of dimeric sister chromosomes and when chromosome organization is impaired by mutations. In these special cases, the divisome-associated DNA translocase FtsK is required. FtsK pumps chromosomes toward the dif chromosome dimer resolution site using polarity of the FtsK-orienting polar sequence (KOPS) DNA motifs. Assays based on monitoring dif recombination have suggested that FtsK acts only in these special cases and does not act on monomeric chromosomes. Using a two-color system to visualize pairs of chromosome loci in living cells, we show that the spatial resolution of sister loci is accurately ordered from the point of origin to the dif site. Furthermore, ordered segregation in a region ∼200 kb long surrounding dif depended on the oriented translocation activity of FtsK but not on the formation of dimers or their resolution. FtsK-mediated segregation required the MatP protein, which delays segregation of the dif-surrounding region until cell division. We conclude that FtsK segregates the terminus region of sister chromosomes whether they are monomeric or dimeric and does so in an accurate and ordered manner. Our data are consistent with a model in which FtsK acts to release the MatP-mediated cohesion and/or interaction with the division apparatus of the terminus region in a KOPS-oriented manner.

  10. Surface Segregation in Ternary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2000-01-01

    Surface segregation profiles of binary (Cu-Ni, Au-Ni, Cu-Au) and ternary (Cu-Au-Ni) alloys are determined via Monte Carlo-Metropolis computer simulations using the BFS method for alloys for the calculation of the energetics. The behavior of Cu or Au in Ni is contrasted with their behavior when both are present. The interaction between Cu and Au and its effect on the segregation profiles for Cu-Au-Ni alloys is discussed.

  11. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  12. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  13. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs): the hallmark of an ingenious antiviral defense mechanism in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Westra, Edze R; van der Oost, John; Brouns, Stan J J

    2011-04-01

    Many prokaryotes contain the recently discovered defense system against mobile genetic elements. This defense system contains a unique type of repetitive DNA stretches, termed Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs). CRISPRs consist of identical repeated DNA sequences (repeats), interspaced by highly variable sequences referred to as spacers. The spacers originate from either phages or plasmids and comprise the prokaryotes' 'immunological memory'. CRISPR-associated (cas) genes encode conserved proteins that together with CRISPRs make-up the CRISPR/Cas system, responsible for defending the prokaryotic cell against invaders. CRISPR-mediated resistance has been proposed to involve three stages: (i) CRISPR-Adaptation, the invader DNA is encountered by the CRISPR/Cas machinery and an invader-derived short DNA fragment is incorporated in the CRISPR array. (ii) CRISPR-Expression, the CRISPR array is transcribed and the transcript is processed by Cas proteins. (iii) CRISPR-Interference, the invaders' nucleic acid is recognized by complementarity to the crRNA and neutralized. An application of the CRISPR/Cas system is the immunization of industry-relevant prokaryotes (or eukaryotes) against mobile-genetic invasion. In addition, the high variability of the CRISPR spacer content can be exploited for phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. Despite impressive progress during the last couple of years, the elucidation of several fundamental details will be a major challenge in future research.

  14. Sponge Prokaryote Communities in Taiwanese Coral Reef and Shallow Hydrothermal Vent Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Coelho, F J R C; Cleary, D F R; Gomes, N C M; Pólonia, A R M; Huang, Y M; Liu, L-L; de Voogd, N J

    2017-07-11

    Previously, it was believed that the prokaryote communities of typical 'low-microbial abundance' (LMA) or 'non-symbiont harboring' sponges were merely subsets of the prokaryote plankton community. Recent research has, however, shown that these sponges are dominated by particular clades of Proteobacteria or Cyanobacteria. Here, we expand on this research and assess the composition and putative functional profiles of prokaryotic communities from LMA sponges collected in two ecosystems (coral reef and hydrothermal vent) from vicinal islands of Taiwan with distinct physicochemical conditions. Six sponge species identified as Acanthella cavernosa (Bubarida), Echinodictyum asperum, Ptilocaulis spiculifer (Axinellida), Jaspis splendens (Tetractinellida), Stylissa carteri (Scopalinida) and Suberites sp. (Suberitida) were sampled in coral reefs in the Penghu archipelago. One sponge species provisionally identified as Hymeniacidon novo spec. (Suberitida) was sampled in hydrothermal vent habitat. Each sponge was dominated by a limited set of operational taxonomic units which were similar to sequences from organisms previously obtained from other LMA sponges. There was a distinct bacterial community between sponges collected in coral reef and in hydrothermal vents. The putative functional profile revealed that the prokaryote community from sponges collected in hydrothermal vents was significantly enriched for pathways related to DNA replication and repair.

  15. 43 CFR 2461.5 - Segregative effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Segregative effect. 2461.5 Section 2461.5...-Use Classification Procedures § 2461.5 Segregative effect. Segregative effect of classifications and... land to the extent indicated in the notice. (b) The segregative effect of a proposed...

  16. 43 CFR 2461.5 - Segregative effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Segregative effect. 2461.5 Section 2461.5...-Use Classification Procedures § 2461.5 Segregative effect. Segregative effect of classifications and... land to the extent indicated in the notice. (b) The segregative effect of a proposed...

  17. 43 CFR 2461.5 - Segregative effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Segregative effect. 2461.5 Section 2461.5...-Use Classification Procedures § 2461.5 Segregative effect. Segregative effect of classifications and... land to the extent indicated in the notice. (b) The segregative effect of a proposed...

  18. 43 CFR 2461.5 - Segregative effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Segregative effect. 2461.5 Section 2461.5...-Use Classification Procedures § 2461.5 Segregative effect. Segregative effect of classifications and... land to the extent indicated in the notice. (b) The segregative effect of a proposed...

  19. Income Segregation between Schools and School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Ann; Reardon, Sean F.; Jencks, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although trends in the racial segregation of schools are well documented, less is known about trends in income segregation. We use multiple data sources to document trends in income segregation between schools and school districts. Between-district income segregation of families with children enrolled in public school increased by over 15% from…

  20. Income Segregation between Schools and School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Ann; Reardon, Sean F.; Jencks, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although trends in the racial segregation of schools are well documented, less is known about trends in income segregation. We use multiple data sources to document trends in income segregation between schools and school districts. Between-district income segregation of families with children enrolled in public school increased by over 15% from…

  1. Segregation and Poverty Concentration: The Role of Three Segregations

    PubMed Central

    Quillian, Lincoln

    2014-01-01

    A key argument of Massey and Denton’s American Apartheid (1993) is that racial residential segregation and non-white group poverty rates combine interactively to produce spatially concentrated poverty. Despite a compelling theoretical rationale, the empirical tests of this proposition have been negative or mixed. This paper develops a formal decomposition model that expands the Massey model of how segregation, group poverty rates, and other spatial conditions combine to form concentrated poverty. The revised decomposition model allows for income effects on cross-race neighborhood residence and interactive combinations of multiple spatial conditions in the formation of concentrated poverty. Applying the model to data reveals that racial segregation and income segregation within race contribute importantly to poverty concentration, as Massey argued, but that almost equally important for poverty concentration is the disproportionate poverty of the non-group neighbors of blacks and Hispanics. The missing interaction Massey expected in empirical tests can be found with proper accounting for the factors in the expanded model. “Because of racial segregation, a significant share of black America is condemned to experience a social environment where poverty and joblessness are the norm, where a majority of children are born out of wedlock, where most families are on welfare, where educational failure prevails, and where social and physical deterioration abound. Through prolonged exposure to such an environment, black chances for social and economic success are drastically reduced.”--Douglas Massey and Nancy Denton, American Apartheid, p. 2 PMID:24648570

  2. New connections in the prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin network: relationship with the eukaryotic nonsense-mediated RNA decay system.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    Several prokaryotic plasmids maintain themselves in their hosts by means of diverse post-segregational cell killing systems. Recent findings suggest that chromosomally encoded copies of toxins and antitoxins of post-segregational cell killing systems - such as the RelE system - might function as regulatory switches under stress conditions. The RelE toxin cleaves ribosome-associated transcripts, whereas another post-segregational cell killing toxin, ParE, functions as a gyrase inhibitor. Using sequence profile analysis we were able unify the RelE- and ParE-type toxins with several families of small, uncharacterized proteins from diverse bacteria and archaea into a single superfamily. Gene neighborhood analysis showed that the majority of these proteins were encoded by genes in characteristic neighborhoods, in which genes encoding toxins always co-occurred with genes encoding transcription factors that are also antitoxins. The transcription factors accompanying the RelE/ParE superfamily may belong to unrelated or distantly related superfamilies, however. We used this conserved neighborhood template to transitively search genomes and identify novel post-segregational cell killing-related systems. One of these novel systems, observed in several prokaryotes, contained a predicted toxin with a PilT-N terminal (PIN) domain, which is also found in proteins of the eukaryotic nonsense-mediated RNA decay system. These searches also identified novel transcription factors (antitoxins) in post-segregational cell killing systems. Furthermore, the toxin Doc defines a potential metalloenzyme superfamily, with novel representatives in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, that probably acts on nucleic acids. The tightly maintained gene neighborhoods of post-segregational cell killing-related systems appear to have evolved by in situ displacement of genes for toxins or antitoxins by functionally equivalent but evolutionarily unrelated genes. We predict that the novel post-segregational

  3. Segregation dynamics in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Fei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Debris flows are massive flows consisting of mixtures of particles of different sizes and interstitial fluids such as water and mud. In sheared mixtures of different-sized (same density) particles, it is well known that larger particles tend to go up (toward the free surface), and the smaller particles, down, commonly referred to as the "Brazil-nut problem" or "kinetic sieving". When kinetic sieving fluxes are combined with advection in flows, they can give rise to a spectacular range of segregation patterns. These segregation / advection dynamics are recognized as playing a role in the coarsening of a debris flow front (its "snout") and the coarsening of the self-formed channel sides or levees. Since particle size distribution influences the flow dynamics including entrainment of bed materials, modeling segregation dynamics in debris flows is important for modeling the debris flows themselves. In sparser systems, the Brazil-nut segregation is well-modeled using kinetic theory applied to dissipative systems, where an underlying assumption involves random, uncorrelated collisions. In denser systems, where kinetic theory breaks down we have recently developed a new mixture model that demonstrates the segregation fluxes are driven by two effects associated with the kinetic stress or granular temperature (the kinetic energy associated with velocity fluctuations): (1) the difference between the partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses among the species in the mixture and (2) a kinetic stress gradient. Both model frameworks involve the temperature gradient as a driving force for segregation, but kinetic theory sends larger particles toward lower temperatures, and our mixture model sends larger particles away from lower temperatures. Which framework works under what conditions appears to depend on correlations in the flow such as those manifested in clusters and force chains. We discuss the application of each theoretical framework to representing segregation dynamics

  4. Controlling segregation speed of entangled polymers by the shapes: A simple model for eukaryotic chromosome segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yuji; Tachikawa, Masashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2016-10-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the segregation of two overlapping polymers motivated by chromosome segregation in biological cells. We investigate the relationship between polymer shapes and segregation dynamics and show that elongation and compaction make entangled polymers segregate rapidly. This result suggests that eukaryotic chromosomes take such a characteristic rod-shaped structure, which is induced by condensins, to achieve rapid segregation.

  5. New aspects of RNA processing in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena; Klug, Gabriele

    2011-10-01

    The pivotal role of posttranscriptional gene regulation is strongly underlined by genome-wide analyses showing strikingly low correlation between mRNA and protein levels in bacterial and archaeal cells. The stability of an mRNA and its availability for translation contribute to posttranscriptional gene regulation, and are determined by the following factors: i) the cell-specific set of ribonucleases and related proteins, ii) regulatory RNAs, and iii) the sequence and structural features of the RNA molecule itself. High-resolution analyses of whole prokaryotic transcriptomes allow comprehensive mapping of processed transcripts, detection of essentially all expressed regulatory RNAs, and monitoring of the global impact of ribonucleases and other processing factors. This opens new perspectives for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for mRNA decay in prokaryotes.

  6. Prokaryotes Versus Eukaryotes: Who is Hosting Whom?

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms represent the largest component of biodiversity in our world. For millions of years, prokaryotic microorganisms have functioned as a major selective force shaping eukaryotic evolution. Microbes that live inside and on animals outnumber the animals’ actual somatic and germ cells by an estimated 10-fold. Collectively, the intestinal microbiome represents a “forgotten organ,” functioning as an organ inside another that can execute many physiological responsibilities. The nature of primitive eukaryotes was drastically changed due to the association with symbiotic prokaryotes facilitating mutual coevolution of host and microbe. Phytophagous insects have long been used to test theories of evolutionary diversification; moreover, the diversification of a number of phytophagous insect lineages has been linked to mutualisms with microbes. From termites and honey bees to ruminants and mammals, depending on novel biochemistries provided by the prokaryotic microbiome, the association helps to metabolize several nutrients that the host cannot digest and converting these into useful end products (such as short-chain fatty acids), a process, which has huge impact on the biology and homeostasis of metazoans. More importantly, in a direct and/or indirect way, the intestinal microbiota influences the assembly of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, helps to educate immune system, affects the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier, modulates proliferation and differentiation of its epithelial lineages, regulates angiogenesis, and modifies the activity of enteric as well as the central nervous system. Despite these important effects, the mechanisms by which the gut microbial community influences the host’s biology remain almost entirely unknown. Our aim here is to encourage empirical inquiry into the relationship between mutualism and evolutionary diversification between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which encourage us to postulate: who is hosting whom? PMID

  7. Prokaryotes Versus Eukaryotes: Who is Hosting Whom?

    PubMed

    Tellez, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms represent the largest component of biodiversity in our world. For millions of years, prokaryotic microorganisms have functioned as a major selective force shaping eukaryotic evolution. Microbes that live inside and on animals outnumber the animals' actual somatic and germ cells by an estimated 10-fold. Collectively, the intestinal microbiome represents a "forgotten organ," functioning as an organ inside another that can execute many physiological responsibilities. The nature of primitive eukaryotes was drastically changed due to the association with symbiotic prokaryotes facilitating mutual coevolution of host and microbe. Phytophagous insects have long been used to test theories of evolutionary diversification; moreover, the diversification of a number of phytophagous insect lineages has been linked to mutualisms with microbes. From termites and honey bees to ruminants and mammals, depending on novel biochemistries provided by the prokaryotic microbiome, the association helps to metabolize several nutrients that the host cannot digest and converting these into useful end products (such as short-chain fatty acids), a process, which has huge impact on the biology and homeostasis of metazoans. More importantly, in a direct and/or indirect way, the intestinal microbiota influences the assembly of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, helps to educate immune system, affects the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier, modulates proliferation and differentiation of its epithelial lineages, regulates angiogenesis, and modifies the activity of enteric as well as the central nervous system. Despite these important effects, the mechanisms by which the gut microbial community influences the host's biology remain almost entirely unknown. Our aim here is to encourage empirical inquiry into the relationship between mutualism and evolutionary diversification between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which encourage us to postulate: who is hosting whom?

  8. [Cloning and prokaryotic expression of the outer membrane protein gene PorB of Neisseria gonorrhoeae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Han

    2011-07-01

    To construct a fused expression vector of the outer membrane protein gene PorB of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, express the fusion protein in the prokaryotic system, and obtain a gene recombination protein, for the purpose of preparing the ground for further research on the pathopoiesis and immune protective response of PorB. A pair of primers were designed according to the known sequence of the PorB gene, and the PorB gene was amplified by PCR from the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae 29403 and cloned into the prokaryotic expression plasmid pGEX-4T-1 to generate pGEX-4T-PorB recombinants. The recombinant plasmid pGEX4T-PorB was transferred into competent cells E. coli BL21. After confirmed by restriction endonuclease digestion, PCR and DNA sequencing analysis, the recombinant protein was induced to express by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG), and examined by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Restriction endonuclease digestion, PCR amplification and DNA sequencing analysis showed that the PorB gene of 1 047 bp was amplified from Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA, and the recombinant plasmid pGEX-4T-PorB was successfully constructed and highly expressed in E. coli. The prokaryotic expression vector of pGEX-4T-PorB was successfully constructed and efficiently expressed in the prokaryotic system, which has provided a basis for further study on the biological activity of the PorB protein, as well as animal immune experiment and detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and its application as a mucosal immune vaccine.

  9. Dissecting the Molecular Properties of Prokaryotic Flotillins

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Juri Niño; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Flotillins are universally conserved proteins that are present in all kingdoms of life. Recently it was demonstrated that the B. subtilis flotillin YuaG (FloT) has a direct influence on membrane domain formation by orchestrating lipid domains. Thereby it allocates a proper environment for diverse cellular machineries. YuaG creates platforms for signal transduction, processes crucial for biofilm formation, sporulation, competence, secretion, and others. Even though, flotillins are an emerging topic of research in the field of microbiology little is known about the molecular architecture of prokaryotic flotillins. All flotillins share common structural elements and are tethered to the membrane N’- terminally, followed by a so called PHB domain and a flotillin domain. We show here that prokaryotic flotillins are, similarly to eukaryotic flotillins, tethered to the membrane via a hairpin loop. Further it is demonstrated by sedimentation assays that B. subtilis flotillins do not bind to the membrane via their PHB domain contrary to eukaryotic flotillins. Size exclusion chromatography experiments, blue native PAGE and cross linking experiments revealed that B. subtilis YuaG can oligomerize into large clusters via the PHB domain. This illustrates an important difference in the setup of prokaryotic flotillins compared to the organization of eukaryotic flotillins. PMID:25635948

  10. Dissecting the molecular properties of prokaryotic flotillins.

    PubMed

    Bach, Juri Niño; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Flotillins are universally conserved proteins that are present in all kingdoms of life. Recently it was demonstrated that the B. subtilis flotillin YuaG (FloT) has a direct influence on membrane domain formation by orchestrating lipid domains. Thereby it allocates a proper environment for diverse cellular machineries. YuaG creates platforms for signal transduction, processes crucial for biofilm formation, sporulation, competence, secretion, and others. Even though, flotillins are an emerging topic of research in the field of microbiology little is known about the molecular architecture of prokaryotic flotillins. All flotillins share common structural elements and are tethered to the membrane N'- terminally, followed by a so called PHB domain and a flotillin domain. We show here that prokaryotic flotillins are, similarly to eukaryotic flotillins, tethered to the membrane via a hairpin loop. Further it is demonstrated by sedimentation assays that B. subtilis flotillins do not bind to the membrane via their PHB domain contrary to eukaryotic flotillins. Size exclusion chromatography experiments, blue native PAGE and cross linking experiments revealed that B. subtilis YuaG can oligomerize into large clusters via the PHB domain. This illustrates an important difference in the setup of prokaryotic flotillins compared to the organization of eukaryotic flotillins.

  11. A quest for indigenous truffle helper prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Gryndler, Milan; Soukupová, Lucie; Hršelová, Hana; Gryndlerová, Hana; Borovička, Jan; Streiblová, Eva; Jansa, Jan

    2013-06-01

    Tuber aestivum is the most common European truffle with significant commercial exploitation. Its production originates from natural habitats and from artificially inoculated host tree plantations. Formation of Tuber ectomycorrhizae in host seedling roots is often inefficient. One possible reason is the lack of indigenous associative microbes. Here we aimed at metagenetic characterization and cultivation of indigenous prokaryotes associated with T. aestivum in a field transect cutting through the fungus colony margin. Several operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed close association with the T. aestivum in the ectomycorrhizae and in the soil, but there was no overlap between the associative prokaryotes in the two different habitats. Among those positively associated with the ectomycorrhizae, we identified several bacterial genera belonging to Pseudonocardineae. Extensive isolation efforts yielded many cultures of ectomycorrhizae-associative bacteria belonging to Rhizobiales and Streptomycineae, but none belonging to the Pseudonocardineae. The specific unculturable Tuber-associated prokaryotes are likely to play important roles in the biology of these ectomycorrhizal fungi, including modulation of competition with other symbiotic and saprotrophic microbes, facilitation of root penetration and/or accessing mineral nutrients in the soil. However, the ultimate proof of this hypothesis will require isolation of the microbes for metabolic studies, using novel cultivation approaches.

  12. Regional Control of Chromosome Segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lagage, Valentine

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation in bacteria occurs concomitantly with DNA replication, and the duplicated regions containing the replication origin oriC are generally the first to separate and migrate to their final specific location inside the cell. In numerous bacterial species, a three-component partition machinery called the ParABS system is crucial for chromosome segregation. This is the case in the gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, where impairing the ParABS system is very detrimental for growth, as it increases the generation time and leads to the formation of anucleate cells and to oriC mispositioning inside the cell. In this study, we investigate in vivo the ParABS system in P. aeruginosa. Using chromatin immuno-precipitation coupled with high throughput sequencing, we show that ParB binds to four parS site located within 15 kb of oriC in vivo, and that this binding promotes the formation of a high order nucleoprotein complex. We show that one parS site is enough to prevent anucleate cell formation, therefore for correct chromosome segregation. By displacing the parS site from its native position on the chromosome, we demonstrate that parS is the first chromosomal locus to be separated upon DNA replication, which indicates that it is the site of force exertion of the segregation process. We identify a region of approximatively 650 kb surrounding oriC in which the parS site must be positioned for chromosome segregation to proceed correctly, and we called it “competence zone” of the parS site. Mutant strains that have undergone specific genetic rearrangements allow us to propose that the distance between oriC and parS defines this “competence zone”. Implications for the control of chromosome segregation in P. aeruginosa are discussed. PMID:27820816

  13. Image segregation in strabismic amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Dennis M.

    2007-01-01

    Humans with naturally occurring amblyopia show deficits thought to involve mechanisms downstream of V1. These include excessive crowding, abnormal global image processing, spatial sampling and symmetry detection and undercounting. Several recent studies suggest that humans with naturally occurring amblyopia show deficits in global image segregation. The current experiments were designed to study figure-ground segregation in amblyopic observers with documented deficits in crowding, symmetry detection, spatial sampling and counting, using similar stimuli. Observers had to discriminate the orientation of a figure (an “E”-like pattern made up of 17 horizontal Gabor patches), embedded in a 7 by 7 array of Gabor patches. When the 32 “background” patches are vertical, the “E” pops-out, due to segregation by orientation and performance is perfect; however, if the background patches are all, or mostly horizontal, the “E” is camouflaged, and performance is random. Using a method of constant stimuli, we varied the number of “background” patches that were vertical and measured the probability of correct discrimination of the global orientation of the E (up/down/left/right). Surprisingly, amblyopes who showed strong crowding and deficits in symmetry detection and counting, perform normally or very nearly so in this segregation task. I therefore conclude that these deficits are not a consequence of abnormal segregation of figure from background. PMID:17442366

  14. Heats of Segregation and Segregation Profiles of BCC Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.; Bozzolo, Guillermo

    2002-01-01

    The composition of metal alloy surfaces is often different from that of the bulk. Some alloys exhibit surface segregation, where one or more species reside preferentially at or near the surface. A detailed understanding of this behavior is necessary to correctly model such phenomena as adhesion or catalysis. Several phenomenological approaches to the problem have been put forward, falling into two broad categories: Thermodynamic approaches, where the equilibrium distribution of chemical species is computed. Atomistic approaches, where the tendency of a species to segregate is determined by computation of the energies of single atoms of that species in bulk and surface environments.

  15. Evolutionary cell biology of chromosome segregation: insights from trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Akiyoshi, Bungo; Gull, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Faithful transmission of genetic material is essential for the survival of all organisms. Eukaryotic chromosome segregation is driven by the kinetochore that assembles onto centromeric DNA to capture spindle microtubules and govern the movement of chromosomes. Its molecular mechanism has been actively studied in conventional model eukaryotes, such as yeasts, worms, flies and human. However, these organisms are closely related in the evolutionary time scale and it therefore remains unclear whether all eukaryotes use a similar mechanism. The evolutionary origins of the segregation apparatus also remain enigmatic. To gain insights into these questions, it is critical to perform comparative studies. Here, we review our current understanding of the mitotic mechanism in Trypanosoma brucei, an experimentally tractable kinetoplastid parasite that branched early in eukaryotic history. No canonical kinetochore component has been identified, and the design principle of kinetochores might be fundamentally different in kinetoplastids. Furthermore, these organisms do not appear to possess a functional spindle checkpoint that monitors kinetochore–microtubule attachments. With these unique features and the long evolutionary distance from other eukaryotes, understanding the mechanism of chromosome segregation in T. brucei should reveal fundamental requirements for the eukaryotic segregation machinery, and may also provide hints about the origin and evolution of the segregation apparatus. PMID:23635522

  16. Gene set analyses for interpreting microarray experiments on prokaryotic organisms.

    PubMed

    Tintle, Nathan L; Best, Aaron A; DeJongh, Matthew; Van Bruggen, Dirk; Heffron, Fred; Porwollik, Steffen; Taylor, Ronald C

    2008-11-05

    Despite the widespread usage of DNA microarrays, questions remain about how best to interpret the wealth of gene-by-gene transcriptional levels that they measure. Recently, methods have been proposed which use biologically defined sets of genes in interpretation, instead of examining results gene-by-gene. Despite a serious limitation, a method based on Fisher's exact test remains one of the few plausible options for gene set analysis when an experiment has few replicates, as is typically the case for prokaryotes. We extend five methods of gene set analysis from use on experiments with multiple replicates, for use on experiments with few replicates. We then use simulated and real data to compare these methods with each other and with the Fisher's exact test (FET) method. As a result of the simulation we find that a method named MAXMEAN-NR, maintains the nominal rate of false positive findings (type I error rate) while offering good statistical power and robustness to a variety of gene set distributions for set sizes of at least 10. Other methods (ABSSUM-NR or SUM-NR) are shown to be powerful for set sizes less than 10. Analysis of three sets of experimental data shows similar results. Furthermore, the MAXMEAN-NR method is shown to be able to detect biologically relevant sets as significant, when other methods (including FET) cannot. We also find that the popular GSEA-NR method performs poorly when compared to MAXMEAN-NR. MAXMEAN-NR is a method of gene set analysis for experiments with few replicates, as is common for prokaryotes. Results of simulation and real data analysis suggest that the MAXMEAN-NR method offers increased robustness and biological relevance of findings as compared to FET and other methods, while maintaining the nominal type I error rate.

  17. Gene set analyses for interpreting microarray experiments on prokaryotic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Tintle, Nathan L; Best, Aaron A; DeJongh, Matthew; Van Bruggen, Dirk; Heffron, Fred; Porwollik, Steffen; Taylor, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread usage of DNA microarrays, questions remain about how best to interpret the wealth of gene-by-gene transcriptional levels that they measure. Recently, methods have been proposed which use biologically defined sets of genes in interpretation, instead of examining results gene-by-gene. Despite a serious limitation, a method based on Fisher's exact test remains one of the few plausible options for gene set analysis when an experiment has few replicates, as is typically the case for prokaryotes. Results We extend five methods of gene set analysis from use on experiments with multiple replicates, for use on experiments with few replicates. We then use simulated and real data to compare these methods with each other and with the Fisher's exact test (FET) method. As a result of the simulation we find that a method named MAXMEAN-NR, maintains the nominal rate of false positive findings (type I error rate) while offering good statistical power and robustness to a variety of gene set distributions for set sizes of at least 10. Other methods (ABSSUM-NR or SUM-NR) are shown to be powerful for set sizes less than 10. Analysis of three sets of experimental data shows similar results. Furthermore, the MAXMEAN-NR method is shown to be able to detect biologically relevant sets as significant, when other methods (including FET) cannot. We also find that the popular GSEA-NR method performs poorly when compared to MAXMEAN-NR. Conclusion MAXMEAN-NR is a method of gene set analysis for experiments with few replicates, as is common for prokaryotes. Results of simulation and real data analysis suggest that the MAXMEAN-NR method offers increased robustness and biological relevance of findings as compared to FET and other methods, while maintaining the nominal type I error rate. PMID:18986519

  18. Drosophila male germline stem cells do not asymmetrically segregate chromosome strands.

    PubMed

    Yadlapalli, Swathi; Cheng, Jun; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2011-03-15

    Adult stem cells continuously supply differentiated cells throughout the life of organisms. This increases the risk of replicative senescence or neoplastic transformation due to mutations that accumulate over many rounds of DNA replication. The immortal strand hypothesis proposes that stem cells reduce the accumulation of replication-induced mutations by retaining the older template DNA strands. Other models have also been proposed in which stem cells asymmetrically segregate chromosome strands for other reasons, such as retention of epigenetic memories. Recently, the idea has emerged that the mother centrosome, which is stereotypically retained within some asymmetrically dividing stem cells, might be utilized as a means of asymmetrically segregating chromosome strands. We have tested this hypothesis in germline stem cells (GSCs) from Drosophila melanogaster testis, which undergo asymmetric divisions marked by the asymmetric segregation of centrosomes and the acquisition of distinct daughter cell fates (stem cell self-renewal versus differentiation). Using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine labeling combined with direct visualization of GSC-gonialblast (differentiating daughter) pairs, we directly scored the outcome of chromosome strand segregation. Our data show that, in male GSCs in the Drosophila testis, chromosome strands are not asymmetrically segregated, despite asymmetrically segregating centrosomes. Our data demonstrate that asymmetric centrosome segregation in stem cells does not necessarily lead to asymmetric chromosome strand segregation.

  19. Prokaryotic transcription regulators: more than just the helix-turn-helix motif.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Joy L; Brennan, Richard G

    2002-02-01

    Over the past two years, the structures of many prokaryotic transcriptional regulators have been solved, and several of them have revealed the structural mechanism of gene regulation. The crystal structure of BmrR-TPP-DNA reveals a novel mechanism of transcription activation, whereby the drug-bound protein activates the bmr promoter by local DNA unwinding and base pair disruption. Myristoyl-CoA induces FadR by a three-helix pushing mechanism, whereas TetR employs a helical pendulum motion to regulate expression. The structures of AbrB, and DNA complexes of Rob and MuR unveil a novel DNA-binding motif, 'the looped-hinge helix', and new uses of the helix-turn-helix and winged helix motifs in DNA binding.

  20. Effect of storage temperature on prokaryotic cell counts and community composition analysis from fixed and filtered seawater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Christine; Moss, Shaun M.; Azam, Farooq

    2008-06-01

    Marine, pelagic prokaryotes commonly are visualized and enumerated by epifluorescence microscopy after staining with fluorescent, DNA-binding dyes and sample preparation and storage has a major influence on obtaining reliable estimates. However, sampling often takes place in remote locations and the recommended continuous sample storage at -20°C until further sample evaluation is often logistically challenging or infeasible. We investigated the effect of storage temperature on fixed and filtered seawater samples for subsequent enumeration of total prokaryotic cells and community composition analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Prokaryotic abundance in surface seawater was not significantly different after 99 days when filters were stored either at room temperature (RT) or at -20°C. Furthermore, there was no loss in detection rates of phylotypes by FISH from filters stored at RT or -20°C for 28-30 days. We conclude that fixed and filtered seawater samples intended for total prokaryote counts or for FISH may be maintained long-term at room temperature, and this should logistically facilitate diverse studies of prokaryote ecology, biogeography, and the occurrence of human and fish/shellfish pathogens.

  1. Tracking of chromosome dynamics in live Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals that transcription promotes chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is an essential part of the bacterial cell cycle but is poorly characterized in oval-shaped streptococci. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have tracked the dynamics of chromosome segregation in live cells of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our observations show that the chromosome segregation process last for two-thirds of the total cell cycle; the origin region segregates rapidly in the early stages of the cell cycle while nucleoid segregation finishes just before cell division. Previously we have demonstrated that the DNA-binding protein ParB and the condensin SMC promote efficient chromosome segregation, likely by an active mechanism. We now show that in the absence of SMC, cell division can occur over the unsegregated chromosomes. However, neither smc nor parB are essential in S. pneumoniae, suggesting the importance of additional mechanisms. Here we have identified the process of transcription as one of these mechanisms important for chromosome segregation in S. pneumoniae. Transcription inhibitors rifampicin and streptolydigin as well as mutants affected in transcription elongation cause chromosome segregation defects. Together, our results highlight the importance of passive (or indirect) processes such as transcription for chromosome segregation in oval-shaped bacteria.

  2. Coordination of Chromosome Segregation and Cell Division in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, Amy L; Liew, Andrew T F; Kusuma, Kennardy D; Peterson, Elizabeth; Seidel, Lisa; Foster, Simon J; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2017-01-01

    Productive bacterial cell division and survival of progeny requires tight coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division to ensure equal partitioning of DNA. Unlike rod-shaped bacteria that undergo division in one plane, the coccoid human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus divides in three successive orthogonal planes, which requires a different spatial control compared to rod-shaped cells. To gain a better understanding of how this coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division is regulated in S. aureus, we investigated proteins that associate with FtsZ and the divisome. We found that DnaK, a well-known chaperone, interacts with FtsZ, EzrA and DivIVA, and is required for DivIVA stability. Unlike in several rod shaped organisms, DivIVA in S. aureus associates with several components of the divisome, as well as the chromosome segregation protein, SMC. This data, combined with phenotypic analysis of mutants, suggests a novel role for S. aureus DivIVA in ensuring cell division and chromosome segregation are coordinated.

  3. Coordination of Chromosome Segregation and Cell Division in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, Amy L.; Liew, Andrew T. F.; Kusuma, Kennardy D.; Peterson, Elizabeth; Seidel, Lisa; Foster, Simon J.; Harry, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    Productive bacterial cell division and survival of progeny requires tight coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division to ensure equal partitioning of DNA. Unlike rod-shaped bacteria that undergo division in one plane, the coccoid human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus divides in three successive orthogonal planes, which requires a different spatial control compared to rod-shaped cells. To gain a better understanding of how this coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division is regulated in S. aureus, we investigated proteins that associate with FtsZ and the divisome. We found that DnaK, a well-known chaperone, interacts with FtsZ, EzrA and DivIVA, and is required for DivIVA stability. Unlike in several rod shaped organisms, DivIVA in S. aureus associates with several components of the divisome, as well as the chromosome segregation protein, SMC. This data, combined with phenotypic analysis of mutants, suggests a novel role for S. aureus DivIVA in ensuring cell division and chromosome segregation are coordinated. PMID:28878745

  4. Granular Segregation with Anisotropic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Tim

    2005-11-01

    The results from experimental investigations of horizontally vibrated mixtures of anisotropic poppy seeds and long chains of linked spheres will be presented. A critical packing fraction was observed to be required to initiate a transition to segregation. The average size of the resulting patterns was measured and the concentration ratio of the mixtures was varied by changing the number of chains present in the mixtures. A change in the order of the transition, from second to first order with associated hysteresis, was observed as the chain number was reduced. This gave rise to three distinct regions of behaviour: segregated, mixed and a bi-stable state.

  5. Segregated Schools in Segregated Societies: Issues of Safety and Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Madeleine

    2006-01-01

    In segregated societies such as Northern Ireland, schools may become sites of risk rather than sites of learning. This is particularly likely to be the case in interface areas, which are demarcated by peace-lines and other symbolic boundaries. Drawing on maps and focus group discussions with teenagers from interface areas in North Belfast, the…

  6. Segregated Schools in Segregated Societies: Issues of Safety and Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Madeleine

    2006-01-01

    In segregated societies such as Northern Ireland, schools may become sites of risk rather than sites of learning. This is particularly likely to be the case in interface areas, which are demarcated by peace-lines and other symbolic boundaries. Drawing on maps and focus group discussions with teenagers from interface areas in North Belfast, the…

  7. Identification of markers linked to disease-resistance genes by bulked segregant analysis: a rapid method to detect markers in specific genomic regions by using segregating populations.

    PubMed Central

    Michelmore, R W; Paran, I; Kesseli, R V

    1991-01-01

    We developed bulked segregant analysis as a method for rapidly identifying markers linked to any specific gene or genomic region. Two bulked DNA samples are generated from a segregating population from a single cross. Each pool, or bulk, contains individuals that are identical for a particular trait or genomic region but arbitrary at all unlinked regions. The two bulks are therefore genetically dissimilar in the selected region but seemingly heterozygous at all other regions. The two bulks can be made for any genomic region and from any segregating population. The bulks are screened for differences using restriction fragment length polymorphism probes or random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. We have used bulked segregant analysis to identify three random amplified polymorphic DNA markers in lettuce linked to a gene for resistance to downy mildew. We showed that markers can be reliably identified in a 25-centimorgan window on either side of the targeted locus. Bulked segregant analysis has several advantages over the use of near-isogenic lines to identify markers in specific regions of the genome. Genetic walking will be possible by multiple rounds of bulked segregation analysis; each new pair of bulks will differ at a locus identified in the previous round of analysis. This approach will have widespread application both in those species where selfing is possible and in those that are obligatorily outbreeding. Images PMID:1682921

  8. Shifting the genomic gold standard for the prokaryotic species definition.

    PubMed

    Richter, Michael; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2009-11-10

    DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) has been used for nearly 50 years as the gold standard for prokaryotic species circumscriptions at the genomic level. It has been the only taxonomic method that offered a numerical and relatively stable species boundary, and its use has had a paramount influence on how the current classification has been constructed. However, now, in the era of genomics, DDH appears to be an outdated method for classification that needs to be substituted. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) between two genomes seems the most promising method since it mirrors DDH closely. Here we examine the work package JSpecies as a user-friendly, biologist-oriented interface to calculate ANI and the correlation of the tetranucleotide signatures between pairwise genomic comparisons. The results agreed with the use of ANI to substitute DDH, with a narrowed boundary that could be set at approximately 95-96%. In addition, the JSpecies package implemented the tetranucleotide signature correlation index, an alignment-free parameter that generally correlates with ANI and that can be of help in deciding when a given pair of organisms should be classified in the same species. Moreover, for taxonomic purposes, the analyses can be produced by simply randomly sequencing at least 20% of the genome of the query strains rather than obtaining their full sequence.

  9. Prokaryotic diversity in a Tunisian hypersaline lake, Chott El Jerid.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Manel Ben; Karray, Fatma; Mhiri, Najla; Mei, Nan; Quéméneur, Marianne; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Erauso, Gaël; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Alazard, Didier; Sayadi, Sami

    2016-03-01

    Prokaryotic diversity was investigated in a Tunisian salt lake, Chott El Jerid, by quantitative real-time PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting methods targeting the 16S rRNA gene and culture-dependent methods. Two different samples S1-10 and S2-10 were taken from under the salt crust of Chott El Jerid in the dry season. DGGE analysis revealed that bacterial sequences were related to Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, unclassified bacteria, and Deinococcus-Thermus phyla. Anaerobic fermentative and sulfate-reducing bacteria were also detected in this ecosystem. Within the domain archaea, all sequences were affiliated to Euryarchaeota phylum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of bacteria was 5 × 10(6) DNA copies g(-1) whereas archaea varied between 5 × 10(5) and 10(6) DNA copies g(-1) in these samples. Eight anaerobic halophilic fermentative bacterial strains were isolated and affiliated with the species Halanaerobium alcaliphilum, Halanaerobium saccharolyticum, and Sporohalobacter salinus. These data showed an abundant and diverse microbial community detected in the hypersaline thalassohaline environment of Chott El Jerid.

  10. Statistical properties of potential cruciform structures in 37 complete genomes of prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo, Fabrizio; Basile, Salvatore; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2001-03-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of n-tuples inverted repeats allowing the possible existence of cruciform structures in 37 recently sequenced complete genomes of prokaryotic organisms. Cruciform structures are non-B-DNA conformations. The biological role of these non-B-DNA structures is unknown. Our comparative analysis of their occurrence in complete genomes suggests that they should play a relevant biological role in most of prokaryotic organisms. In fact, we detect the presence of a large number of potential cruciform structures in the large majority of the investigated genomes. The number of observed potential cruciform structures cannot be explained with a Markovian model of DNA. Moreover, the large majority of investigated genomes has most of the potential cruciform structures localized in the non-coding regions of DNA. The presence of a so large number of potential cruciform structures in so many different organisms suggests that they must play some biological role. This conclusion is strongly supported by the empirical observation that the potential cruciform structures are preferentially found nearby the end of a coding region. In several bacteria the typical distance of the potential cruciform structures found in the non-coding regions nearby the end of a coding region is ranging from 50 to 75 bp. In the case of Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis a large number of the detected n-tuples occurring in potential cruciform structures coincides with known DNA uptake signal sequences.

  11. [Prokaryotic expression and activity identification of gene recombinant protein of brain-derivedneurotrophic factor precursor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Liang, Xiaomin; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2014-08-19

    To generate the gene recombinant protein of brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor (proBDNF) in prokaryotic cells and investigate its biological activity. Rat-derived cDNA of proBDNF with point mutation was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into plasmid pET-28a for expression in E. coli BL21. Western blot was used to identify the product and DAPI performed to test its effect on apoptosis of PC12 cells. PCR product of recombinant gene was successfully expressed in E. coli. And the product agreed with the target protein in molecular weight and showed reactivity with its specific antibody. Apoptosis of PC12 cells was induced by a certain concentration of recombinant proBDNF. The prokaryotic expression vector has been successfully constructed for recombinant gene of proBDNF. And the product has biological toxicity and it may induce the apoptosis of PC12 cells.

  12. The prokaryotic zinc-finger: structure, function and comparison with the eukaryotic counterpart.

    PubMed

    Malgieri, Gaetano; Palmieri, Maddalena; Russo, Luigi; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V; Isernia, Carla

    2015-12-01

    Classical zinc finger (ZF) domains were thought to be confined to the eukaryotic kingdom until the transcriptional regulator Ros protein was identified in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The Ros Cys2 His2 ZF binds DNA in a peculiar mode and folds in a domain significantly larger than its eukaryotic counterpart consisting of 58 amino acids (the 9-66 region) arranged in a βββαα topology, and stabilized by a conserved, extensive, 15-residue hydrophobic core. The prokaryotic ZF domain, then, shows some intriguing new features that make it interestingly different from its eukaryotic counterpart. This review will focus on the prokaryotic ZFs, summarizing and discussing differences and analogies with the eukaryotic domains and providing important insights into their structure/function relationships.

  13. Subcellular localization of RNA degrading proteins and protein complexes in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena; Roppelt, Verena; Lassek, Christian; Klug, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    The archaeal exosome is a prokaryotic protein complex with RNA processing and degrading activities. Recently it was shown that the exosome is localized at the periphery of the cell in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. This localization is most likely mediated by the archaeal DnaG protein and depends on (direct or indirect) hydrophobic interactions with the membrane. A localization of RNA degrading proteins and protein complexes was also demonstrated in several bacteria. In bacteria a subcellular localization was also shown for substrates of these proteins and protein complexes, i.e. chromosomally encoded mRNAs and a small RNA. Thus, despite the missing compartmentalization, a spatial organization of RNA processing and degradation exists in prokaryotic cells. Recent data suggest that the spatial organization contributes to the temporal regulation of these processes.

  14. [Prokaryotic soluble expression of protein D of Haemophilus influenzae type b].

    PubMed

    Yin, Meng-Meng; Su, Qiu-Dong; Gyo, Min-Zhuo; Cun, Yi-Na; Pu, Yuan-Qian; Jia, Zhi-Yuan; Yang, Jing-Ran; Tang, Yang; Liao, Guo-Yang; Yi, Yao; Bi, Sheng-Li; Li, Wei-Dong

    2013-04-01

    To express the recombinant D protein in prokaryotic expression system solubly and make preparation for producing D-carrier conjugate vaccine next step. The hpd gene fragment removed of signal peptide from genomic DNA of Hib CMCC was inserted into pET43. 1a. The recombinant plasmid was transformed to competent E. coli BL21 (DE3) for expression under induction of IPTG. The expressed recombination protein was precipitated with ammonium sulfate, purified by DEAE anion exchange column chromatography and identified for reactogenicity by Western Blot. The expressed recombination protein, in a soluble form, constained about 50% of total somatic protein and showed specific reaction with the HIB antisera after preliminary purification. The D protein recombined expression plasmid was constructed successfully and expressed D protein in prokaryotic cells in a solube form.

  15. Prokaryotic assemblages in the maritime Antarctic Lake Limnopolar (Byers Peninsula, South Shetland Islands).

    PubMed

    Papale, M; Rizzo, C; Villescusa, J A; Rochera, C; Camacho, A; Michaud, L; Lo Giudice, A

    2017-09-21

    The potentially metabolically active components within the prokaryotic assemblages inhabiting the Antarctic Lake Limnopolar (Byers Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica) were investigated by a polyphasic approach which included culture-dependent and culture-independent methods (based on RNA molecules). Results support previous observations on the Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes dominance, followed by Actinobacteria, in Antarctic lakes. In particular, Alpha-, Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were mainly detected by CARD-FISH and cDNA cloning, whereas Gammaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria dominated within the cultivable fraction. Overall, this study demonstrates the survival potential and physiological heterogeneity of the prokaryotic community in the Lake Limnopolar. The microbial community composition in the lake is affected by external influences (such as marine environment by sea spray and seabird dropping, and microbial mats and mosses of the catchment). However, most external bacteria would be inactive, whereas typical polar taxa dominate the potentially active fraction and are subsidized by external nutrient sources, thus assuming the main biogeochemical roles within the lake.

  16. Subcellular localization of RNA degrading proteins and protein complexes in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Roppelt, Verena; Lassek, Christian; Klug, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    The archaeal exosome is a prokaryotic protein complex with RNA processing and degrading activities. Recently it was shown that the exosome is localized at the periphery of the cell in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. This localization is most likely mediated by the archaeal DnaG protein and depends on (direct or indirect) hydrophobic interactions with the membrane. A localization of RNA degrading proteins and protein complexes was also demonstrated in several bacteria. In bacteria a subcellular localization was also shown for substrates of these proteins and protein complexes, i.e., chromosomally encoded mRNAs and a small RNA. Thus, despite the missing compartmentalization, a spatial organization of RNA processing and degradation exists in prokaryotic cells. Recent data suggest that the spatial organization contributes to the temporal regulation of these processes. PMID:21289488

  17. [Establishment of prokaryotic expression and optimization ox expression conditions of Eleutherococcus senticosus P450 gene].

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Xiu, Le-shan; Li, Fei-fei; Xing, Zhao-bin

    2015-04-01

    According to the sequence of P450 cDNA of Eleutherococcus senticosus, specific primers were designed. Frokaryotic ex pression vector pET30a-P450 was constructed and the prokaryotic expression conditions were optimized. Results showed that the BL21 after being transformed with the recombinant expression vector accumulated the high amount of recombinant protein. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the recombinant protein was about 53 kDa. The recombinant accumulated the highest amount of recombinant protein af ter IPTG (1 mmol x L(-1)) at 27-37 degrees C for 24 h. Consequently P450 gene of E. senticosus could be expressed successfully by prokaryotic expression vector pET30a-P450. Induction temperature, IPTG concentration, medium type and amount of induction time could all influence the expression of target protein, but the impact strength was different.

  18. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  19. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  20. Influence of age of aggregates and prokaryotic abundance on glucose and leucine uptake by heterotrophic marine prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Azúa, Iñigo; Unanue, Marian; Ayo, Begoña; Artolozaga, Itxaso; Iriberri, Juan

    2007-03-01

    The kinetics of glucose and leucine uptake in attached and free-living prokaryotes in two types of microcosms with different nutrient qualities were compared. Microcosm type M1, derived from unaltered seawater, and microcosm type M2, from phytoplankton cultures, clearly expressed different kinetic parameters (Vmax/cell and K' m). In aggregates with low cell densities (M1 microcosm), the attached prokaryotes benefited from attachment as reflected in the higher potential uptake rates, while in aggregates with high cell densities (M2 microcosm) differences in the potential uptake rates of attached and free-living prokaryotes were not evident. The aging process and the chemical changes in aggregates of M2 microcosms were followed for 15-20 days. The results showed that as the aggregates aged and prokaryotic abundance increased, attached prokaryotes decreased their potential uptake rate and their K' m for substrate. This suggests an adaptive response by attached prokaryotes when aggregates undergo quantitative and qualitative impoverishment.

  1. [Cloning of major outer membrane protein gene of Legionella pneumophila and detection of its expression in prokaryotic cell].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Jianping; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Li; Tian, Yu

    2006-04-01

    In this study, the ompS gene, a major outer membrane protein gene of Legionella pneumophila, was obtained from the DNA of Legionella pneumophila by PCR. The gene was cloned into prokaryotic expressional plasmid pUC18 to construct recombinant plasmid. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli strain BL21. The identification was made by means of restriction enzyme analysis, polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing analysis, SDS--polyacrylamine gel electrophoresis analysis and Western blot. The results showed that the ompS gene of 914 bp was amplified from Legionella pneumophila DNA, the recombinant plasmid pLPompS was constructed and its expression in prokaryotic cell was detected successfully.

  2. Gender Segregation: Separate but Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holthouse, David

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, only 11 public schools in the United States had gender-segregated classrooms. As of December 2009, there were more than 550. The movement is based on the hypothesis that hard-wired differences in the ways that male and female brains develop and function in childhood through adolescence require classrooms in which boys and girls are not…

  3. Why Our Schools Are Segregated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2013-01-01

    "Residential segregation's causes are both knowable and known," writes Richard Rothstein. According to Rothstein, those causes are "20th century federal, state, and local policies explicitly designed to separate the races." Even seasoned policymakers are convinced that the residential isolation of low-income black children is…

  4. Why Our Schools Are Segregated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2013-01-01

    "Residential segregation's causes are both knowable and known," writes Richard Rothstein. According to Rothstein, those causes are "20th century federal, state, and local policies explicitly designed to separate the races." Even seasoned policymakers are convinced that the residential isolation of low-income black children is…

  5. Gender Segregation: Separate but Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holthouse, David

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, only 11 public schools in the United States had gender-segregated classrooms. As of December 2009, there were more than 550. The movement is based on the hypothesis that hard-wired differences in the ways that male and female brains develop and function in childhood through adolescence require classrooms in which boys and girls are not…

  6. Segregation--Alias: "Special Education."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weshner, Margaret C.

    School systems are perpetuating racial segregation within integrated schools through intelligence tests and special education classes. Disproportionate numbers of blacks, American Indians, Mexican Americans and Puerto Rican Americans have been placed in classes for the emotionally disturbed or mentally retarded. Suits have been brought against the…

  7. Prokaryotic DNA sequences in patients with chronic idiopathic prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Krieger, J N; Riley, D E; Roberts, M C; Berger, R E

    1996-12-01

    Half of all men experience symptoms of prostatitis at some time in their lives, but the etiology is unknown for more than 90% of patients. Optimal clinical and culture methods were used to select 135 men with chronic prostatitis refractory to multiple previous courses of antimicrobial therapy. The subjects had no evidence of structural or functional lower genitourinary tract abnormalities of bacteriuria or bacterial prostatitis by traditional clinical tests, or of urethritis or urethral pathogens by culture. Specific PCR assays detected Mycoplasma genitalium, Chlamydia trachomatis, or Trichomonas vaginalis in 10 patients (8%). Broad-spectrum PCR tests detected tetracycline resistance-encoding genes, tetM-tetO-tetS, in 25% of patients and 16S rRNA in 77% of subjects. The tetM-tetO-tetS-positive cases constituted a subset of the 16S rRNA-positive cases. Patients with 16S rRNA were more likely to have > or = 1,000 leukocytes per mm3 in their expressed prostatic secretion than men whose prostate biopsy specimens were negative for 16S rRNA (P < 0.001). Based on direct sequencing and repetitive cloning, multiple sources of 16S rRNA were observed in individual patients. Sequences of 29 cloned PCR products revealed 16S rRNAs distinct from those of common skin and gut flora. These findings suggest that the prostate can harbor microorganisms that are not detectable by traditional approaches. These organisms may be associated with inflammation in the expressed prostatic secretions. Molecular methods hold great promise for identifying culture-resistant microorganisms in patients with chronic prostatitis.

  8. Prokaryotic DNA sequences in patients with chronic idiopathic prostatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, J N; Riley, D E; Roberts, M C; Berger, R E

    1996-01-01

    Half of all men experience symptoms of prostatitis at some time in their lives, but the etiology is unknown for more than 90% of patients. Optimal clinical and culture methods were used to select 135 men with chronic prostatitis refractory to multiple previous courses of antimicrobial therapy. The subjects had no evidence of structural or functional lower genitourinary tract abnormalities of bacteriuria or bacterial prostatitis by traditional clinical tests, or of urethritis or urethral pathogens by culture. Specific PCR assays detected Mycoplasma genitalium, Chlamydia trachomatis, or Trichomonas vaginalis in 10 patients (8%). Broad-spectrum PCR tests detected tetracycline resistance-encoding genes, tetM-tetO-tetS, in 25% of patients and 16S rRNA in 77% of subjects. The tetM-tetO-tetS-positive cases constituted a subset of the 16S rRNA-positive cases. Patients with 16S rRNA were more likely to have > or = 1,000 leukocytes per mm3 in their expressed prostatic secretion than men whose prostate biopsy specimens were negative for 16S rRNA (P < 0.001). Based on direct sequencing and repetitive cloning, multiple sources of 16S rRNA were observed in individual patients. Sequences of 29 cloned PCR products revealed 16S rRNAs distinct from those of common skin and gut flora. These findings suggest that the prostate can harbor microorganisms that are not detectable by traditional approaches. These organisms may be associated with inflammation in the expressed prostatic secretions. Molecular methods hold great promise for identifying culture-resistant microorganisms in patients with chronic prostatitis. PMID:8940458

  9. Emerging spatial patterns in Antarctic prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Chun-Wie; Pearce, David A.; Convey, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in knowledge of patterns of biogeography in terrestrial eukaryotic organisms have led to a fundamental paradigm shift in understanding of the controls and history of life on land in Antarctica, and its interactions over the long term with the glaciological and geological processes that have shaped the continent. However, while it has long been recognized that the terrestrial ecosystems of Antarctica are dominated by microbes and their processes, knowledge of microbial diversity and distributions has lagged far behind that of the macroscopic eukaryote organisms. Increasing human contact with and activity in the continent is leading to risks of biological contamination and change in a region whose isolation has protected it for millions of years at least; these risks may be particularly acute for microbial communities which have, as yet, received scant recognition and attention. Even a matter apparently as straightforward as Protected Area designation in Antarctica requires robust biodiversity data which, in most parts of the continent, remain almost completely unavailable. A range of important contributing factors mean that it is now timely to reconsider the state of knowledge of Antarctic terrestrial prokaryotes. Rapid advances in molecular biological approaches are increasingly demonstrating that bacterial diversity in Antarctica may be far greater than previously thought, and that there is overlap in the environmental controls affecting both Antarctic prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities. Bacterial dispersal mechanisms and colonization patterns remain largely unaddressed, although evidence for regional evolutionary differentiation is rapidly accruing and, with this, there is increasing appreciation of patterns in regional bacterial biogeography in this large part of the globe. In this review, we set out to describe the state of knowledge of Antarctic prokaryote diversity patterns, drawing analogy with those of eukaryote groups where appropriate

  10. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of melt segregation effects were studied: (1) evaporative segregation, or segregation due to surface evaporation; and (2) freezing segregation, or segregation due to liquid-solid phase transformation. These segregation effects are closely related. In fact, evaporative segregation always precedes freezing segregation to some degree and must often be studied prior to performing meaningful solidification experiments. This is particularly true since evaporation may cause the melt composition, at least at the critical surface regions or layers to be affected manyfold within seconds so that the surface region or layer melting point and other thermophysical properties, nucleation characteristics, base for undercooling, and critical velocity to avoid constitutional supercooling, may be completely unexpected. An important objective was, therefore, to develop the necessary normal evaporation equations for predicting the compositional changes within specified times at temperature and to correlate these equations with actual experimental data collected from the literature.

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of adult stem cells: Comparison of random and immortal-strand segregation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Sherley, James L.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2005-04-01

    This paper develops a point-mutation model describing the evolutionary dynamics of a population of adult stem cells. Such a model may prove useful for quantitative studies of tissue aging and the emergence of cancer. We consider two modes of chromosome segregation: (1) random segregation, where the daughter chromosomes of a given parent chromosome segregate randomly into the stem cell and its differentiating sister cell and (2) “immortal DNA strand” co-segregation, for which the stem cell retains the daughter chromosomes with the oldest parent strands. Immortal strand co-segregation is a mechanism, originally proposed by [Cairns Nature (London) 255, 197 (1975)], by which stem cells preserve the integrity of their genomes. For random segregation, we develop an ordered strand pair formulation of the dynamics, analogous to the ordered strand pair formalism developed for quasispecies dynamics involving semiconservative replication with imperfect lesion repair (in this context, lesion repair is taken to mean repair of postreplication base-pair mismatches). Interestingly, a similar formulation is possible with immortal strand co-segregation, despite the fact that this segregation mechanism is age dependent. From our model we are able to mathematically show that, when lesion repair is imperfect, then immortal strand co-segregation leads to better preservation of the stem cell lineage than random chromosome segregation. Furthermore, our model allows us to estimate the optimal lesion repair efficiency for preserving an adult stem cell population for a given period of time. For human stem cells, we obtain that mispaired bases still present after replication and cell division should be left untouched, to avoid potentially fixing a mutation in both DNA strands.

  12. Nanoscale Spatial Organization of Prokaryotic Cells Studied by Super-Resolution Optical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, Andrea Lynn

    All cells spatially organize their interiors, and this arrangement is necessary for cell viability. Until recently, it was believed that only eukaryotic cells spatially segregate their components. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that bacteria also assemble their proteins into complex patterns. In eukaryotic cells, spatial organization arises from membrane bound organelles as well as motor transport proteins which can move cargos within the cell. To date, there are no known motor transport proteins in bacteria and most microbes lack membrane bound organelles, so it remains a mystery how bacterial spatial organization emerges. In hind-sight it is not surprising that bacteria also exhibit complex spatial organization considering much of what we have learned about the basic processes that take place in all cells, such as transcription and translation was first discovered in prokaryotic cells. Perhaps the fundamental principles that govern spatial organization in prokaryotic cells may be applicable in eukaryotic cells as well. In addition, bacteria are attractive model organism for spatial organization studies because they are genetically tractable, grow quickly and much biochemical and structural data is known about them. A powerful tool for observing spatial organization in cells is the fluorescence microscope. By specifically tagging a protein of interest with a fluorescent probe, it is possible to examine how proteins organize and dynamically assemble inside cells. A significant disadvantage of this technology is its spatial resolution (approximately 250 nm laterally and 500 nm axially). This limitation on resolution causes closely spaced proteins to look blurred making it difficult to observe the fine structure within the complexes. This resolution limit is especially problematic within small cells such as bacteria. With the recent invention of new optical microscopies, we now can surpass the existing limits of fluorescence imaging. In some cases, we can

  13. 18 CFR 401.113 - Segregable materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Segregable materials. 401.113 Section 401.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... Segregable materials. Any reasonably segregable portion of a record shall be provided to any...

  14. 18 CFR 401.113 - Segregable materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Segregable materials. 401.113 Section 401.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... Segregable materials. Any reasonably segregable portion of a record shall be provided to any...

  15. 18 CFR 401.113 - Segregable materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Segregable materials. 401.113 Section 401.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... Segregable materials. Any reasonably segregable portion of a record shall be provided to any...

  16. 18 CFR 401.113 - Segregable materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Segregable materials. 401.113 Section 401.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... Segregable materials. Any reasonably segregable portion of a record shall be provided to any...

  17. 18 CFR 401.113 - Segregable materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Segregable materials. 401.113 Section 401.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... Segregable materials. Any reasonably segregable portion of a record shall be provided to any...

  18. 36 CFR 254.6 - Segregative effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... segregate the Federal lands by a notation on the public land records. Subject to valid existing rights, the Federal lands shall be segregated from appropriation under the public land laws and mineral laws for a... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.6 Segregative effect. (a) If a proposal is made to exchange Federal...

  19. The Big Disconnect between Segregation and Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdun, Vincene

    2005-01-01

    The hearts and minds of the American people have been won over on the issue of segregation. However, the dilemma is that while an overwhelming majority of Americans would cringe at the idea of a racially segregated America, America remains racially segregated and racial equality is more ideal than real. Even though there is almost no legal…

  20. 36 CFR 254.6 - Segregative effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Segregative effect. 254.6... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.6 Segregative effect. (a) If a proposal is made to exchange Federal lands... segregative effect terminates as follows: (1) Automatically, upon issuance of a patent or other document...

  1. 36 CFR 254.6 - Segregative effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Segregative effect. 254.6... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.6 Segregative effect. (a) If a proposal is made to exchange Federal lands... segregative effect terminates as follows: (1) Automatically, upon issuance of a patent or other document...

  2. 36 CFR 254.6 - Segregative effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Segregative effect. 254.6... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.6 Segregative effect. (a) If a proposal is made to exchange Federal lands... segregative effect terminates as follows: (1) Automatically, upon issuance of a patent or other document...

  3. 36 CFR 254.6 - Segregative effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Segregative effect. 254.6... ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.6 Segregative effect. (a) If a proposal is made to exchange Federal lands... segregative effect terminates as follows: (1) Automatically, upon issuance of a patent or other document...

  4. The Big Disconnect between Segregation and Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdun, Vincene

    2005-01-01

    The hearts and minds of the American people have been won over on the issue of segregation. However, the dilemma is that while an overwhelming majority of Americans would cringe at the idea of a racially segregated America, America remains racially segregated and racial equality is more ideal than real. Even though there is almost no legal…

  5. The Geographic Scale of Metropolitan Racial Segregation

    PubMed Central

    REARDON, SEAN F.; MATTHEWS, STEPHEN A.; O’SULLIVAN, DAVID; LEE, BARRETT A.; FIREBAUGH, GLENN; FARRELL, CHAD R.; BISCHOFF, KENDRA

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses an aspect of racial residential segregation that has been largely ignored in prior work: the issue of geographic scale. In some metropolitan areas, racial groups are segregated over large regions, with predominately white regions, predominately black regions, and so on, whereas in other areas, the separation of racial groups occurs over much shorter distances. Here we develop an approach—featuring the segregation profile and the corresponding macro/micro segregation ratio—that offers a scale-sensitive alternative to standard methodological practice for describing segregation. Using this approach, we measure and describe the geographic scale of racial segregation in the 40 largest U.S. metropolitan areas in 2000. We find considerable heterogeneity in the geographic scale of segregation patterns across both metropolitan areas and racial groups, a heterogeneity that is not evident using conventional “aspatial” segregation measures. Moreover, because the geographic scale of segregation is only modestly correlated with the level of segregation in our sample, we argue that geographic scale represents a distinct dimension of residential segregation. We conclude with a brief discussion of the implications of our findings for investigating the patterns, causes, and consequences of residential segregation at different geographic scales. PMID:18939658

  6. Nonrandom sister chromatid segregation of sex chromosomes in Drosophila male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2013-05-01

    Sister chromatids are the product of DNA replication, which is assumed to be a very precise process. Therefore, sister chromatids should be exact copies of each other. However, reports have indicated that sister chromatids are segregated nonrandomly during cell division, suggesting that sister chromatids are not the same, although their DNA sequences are the same. Researchers have speculated that stem cells may retain template strands to avoid replication-induced mutations. An alternative proposal is that cells may segregate distinct epigenetic information carried on sister chromatids. Recently, we found that Drosophila male germline stem cells segregate sister chromatids of X and Y chromosomes with a strong bias. We discuss this finding in relation to existing models for nonrandom sister chromatid segregation.

  7. Evolutionary dynamics of prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Madan Babu, M; Teichmann, Sarah A; Aravind, L

    2006-04-28

    The structure of complex transcriptional regulatory networks has been studied extensively in certain model organisms. However, the evolutionary dynamics of these networks across organisms, which would reveal important principles of adaptive regulatory changes, are poorly understood. We use the known transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli to analyse the conservation patterns of this network across 175 prokaryotic genomes, and predict components of the regulatory networks for these organisms. We observe that transcription factors are typically less conserved than their target genes and evolve independently of them, with different organisms evolving distinct repertoires of transcription factors responding to specific signals. We show that prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks have evolved principally through widespread tinkering of transcriptional interactions at the local level by embedding orthologous genes in different types of regulatory motifs. Different transcription factors have emerged independently as dominant regulatory hubs in various organisms, suggesting that they have convergently acquired similar network structures approximating a scale-free topology. We note that organisms with similar lifestyles across a wide phylogenetic range tend to conserve equivalent interactions and network motifs. Thus, organism-specific optimal network designs appear to have evolved due to selection for specific transcription factors and transcriptional interactions, allowing responses to prevalent environmental stimuli. The methods for biological network analysis introduced here can be applied generally to study other networks, and these predictions can be used to guide specific experiments.

  8. Prokaryotic Ubiquitin-Like Protein Modification

    PubMed Central

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes form ubiquitin (Ub)-like isopeptide bonds on the lysine residues of proteins by at least two distinct pathways that are reversible and regulated. In mycobacteria, the C-terminal Gln of Pup (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein) is deamidated and isopeptide linked to proteins by a mechanism distinct from ubiquitylation in enzymology yet analogous to ubiquitylation in targeting proteins for destruction by proteasomes. Ub-fold proteins of archaea (SAMPs, small archaeal modifier proteins) and Thermus (TtuB, tRNA-two-thiouridine B) that differ from Ub in amino acid sequence, yet share a common β-grasp fold, also form isopeptide bonds by a mechanism that appears streamlined compared with ubiquitylation. SAMPs and TtuB are found to be members of a small group of Ub-fold proteins that function not only in protein modification but also in sulfur-transfer pathways associated with tRNA thiolation and molybdopterin biosynthesis. These multifunctional Ub-fold proteins are thought to be some of the most ancient of Ub-like protein modifiers. PMID:24995873

  9. Protein Complex Production in Alternative Prokaryotic Hosts.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; López-Estepa, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco J; Vega, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Research for multiprotein expression in nonconventional bacterial and archaeal expression systems aims to exploit particular properties of "alternative" prokaryotic hosts that might make them more efficient than E. coli for particular applications, especially in those areas where more conventional bacterial hosts traditionally do not perform well. Currently, a wide range of products with clinical or industrial application have to be isolated from their native source, often microorganisms whose growth present numerous problems owing to very slow growth phenotypes or because they are unculturable under laboratory conditions. In those cases, transfer of the gene pathway responsible for synthesizing the product of interest into a suitable recombinant host becomes an attractive alternative solution. Despite many efforts dedicated to improving E. coli systems due to low cost, ease of use, and its dominant position as a ubiquitous expression host model, many alternative prokaryotic systems have been developed for heterologous protein expression mostly for biotechnological applications. Continuous research has led to improvements in expression yield through these non-conventional models, including Pseudomonas, Streptomyces and Mycobacterium as alternative bacterial expression hosts. Advantageous properties shared by these systems include low costs, high levels of secreted protein products and their safety of use, with non-pathogenic strains been commercialized. In addition, the use of extremophilic and halotolerant archaea as expression hosts has to be considered as a potential tool for the production of mammalian membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  10. Prokaryotic silicon utilizing microorganisms in the biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    Although a little study has been done to determine the silicon utilizing prokaryotes, our previous experiments indicated that almost all Gram-positive bacteria are silicon utilizing; one of them, Streptococci survived exposure on the lunar surface for a long period in experiment done by others. Our initial experiments with these Gram positive microorganisms showed that there were limited growths of these microorganisms on carbon free silicate medium probably with the help of some carry over carbon and nitrogen during cultivation procedures. However, increase in growth rate after repeated subcultures could not be explained at present. The main groups of prokaryotes which were found silicon utilizing microorganisms were Mycobacterium, Bacillus, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, and Clostridium. In a another previous study by us when silicon level was studied in such grown up cells on carbon "free" silicate medium by electron prove microanalyser, it was found that silicon in cells grown on carbon "free" silicate medium was much higher (24.9%) than those grown on conventional carbon based medium (0.84%). However, these initial findings are encouraging for our future application of this group of organisms on extraterrestrial surfaces for artificial micro-ecosystem formation. It was found that when electropositive elements are less in extraterrestrial situation, then polymerization of silicon-oxygen profusion may occur easily, particularly in carbon and nitrogen paucity in the rocky worlds of the Universe.

  11. Protein acetylation in prokaryotes increases stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qun; Wood, Thomas K

    2011-07-15

    Acetylation of lysine residues is conserved in all three kingdoms; however, its role in prokaryotes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that acetylation enables the reference bacterium Escherichia coli to withstand environmental stress. Specifically, the bacterium reaches higher cell densities and becomes more resistant to heat and oxidative stress when its proteins are acetylated as shown by deletion of the gene encoding acetyltransferase YfiQ and the gene encoding deacetylase CobB as well as by overproducing YfiQ and CobB. Furthermore, we show that the increase in oxidative stress resistance with acetylation is due to the induction of catalase activity through enhanced katG expression. We also found that two-component system proteins CpxA, PhoP, UvrY, and BasR are associated with cell catalase activity and may be responsible as the connection between bacterial acetylation and the stress response. This is the first demonstration of a specific environmental role of acetylation in prokaryotes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Surveying the expanding prokaryotic Rubisco multiverse.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Ramya, Ramaswamy Chettiyan Seetharaman; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    The universal, but catalytically modest, CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco is currently experiencing intense interest by researchers aiming to enhance crop photosynthesis. These efforts are mostly focused on the highly conserved hexadecameric enzyme found in land plants. In comparison, prokaryotic organisms harbor a far greater diversity in Rubisco forms. Recent work towards improving our appreciation of microbial Rubisco properties and harnessing their potential is surveyed. New structural models are providing informative glimpses into catalytic subtleties and diverse oligomeric states. Ongoing characterization is informing us about the conservation of constraints, such as sugar phosphate inhibition and the associated dependence on Rubisco activase helper proteins. Prokaryotic Rubiscos operate under a far wider range of metabolic contexts than the photosynthetic function of higher plant enzymes. Relaxed selection pressures may have resulted in the exploration of a larger volume of sequence space than permitted in organisms performing oxygenic photosynthesis. To tap into the potential of microbial Rubiscos, in vivo selection systems are being used to discover functional metagenomic Rubiscos. Various directed evolution systems to optimize their function have been developed. It is anticipated that this approach will provide access to biotechnologically valuable enzymes that cannot be encountered in the higher plant Rubisco space. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Circadian clock proteins in prokaryotes: hidden rhythms?

    PubMed

    Loza-Correa, Maria; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clock genes are vital features of eukaryotes that have evolved such that organisms can adapt to our planet's rotation in order to anticipate the coming day or night as well as unfavorable seasons. This circadian clock uses oscillation as a timekeeping element. However, circadian clock mechanisms exist also in prokaryotes. The circadian clock of Cyanobacteria is well studied. It is regulated by a cluster of three genes: kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC. In this review, we will discuss the circadian system in cyanobacteria, and provide an overview and updated phylogenetic analysis of prokaryotic organisms that contain the main circadian genes. It is evident that the evolution of the kai genes has been influenced by lateral transfers but further and deeper studies are needed to get an in depth understanding of the exact evolutionary history of these genes. Interestingly, Legionella pneumophila an environmental bacterium and opportunistic human pathogen that parasitizes protozoa in fresh water environments also contains kaiB and kaiC, but their functions are not known. All of the residues described for the biochemical functions of the main pacemaker KaiC in Synechococcus elongatus are also conserved in the L. pneumophila KaiC protein.

  14. Complex polar machinery required for proper chromosome segregation in vegetative and sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Kloosterman, Tomas G.; Lenarcic, Rok; Willis, Clare R.; Roberts, David M.; Hamoen, Leendert W.; Errington, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chromosome segregation is an essential process of cell multiplication. In prokaryotes, segregation starts with the newly replicated sister origins of replication, oriCs, which move apart to defined positions in the cell. We have developed a genetic screen to identify mutants defective in placement of oriC during spore development in the Gram‐positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. In addition to the previously identified proteins Soj and DivIVA, our screen identified several new factors involved in polar recruitment of oriC: a reported regulator of competence ComN, and the regulators of division site selection MinD and MinJ. Previous work implicated Soj as an important regulator of oriC positioning in the cell. Our results suggest a model in which the DivIVA‐interacting proteins ComN and MinJ recruit MinD to the cell pole, and that these proteins work upstream of Soj to enable oriC placement. We show that these proteins form a polar complex, which acts in parallel with but distinct from the sporulation‐specific RacA pathway of oriC placement, and also functions during vegetative growth. Our study further shows that MinD has two distinct cell cycle roles, in cell division and chromosome segregation, and highlights that cell probably use multiple parallel mechanisms to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. PMID:27059541

  15. Biophysical Adaptations of Prokaryotic Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Vien, T N; DeCaen, P G

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the adaptive features found in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These two families are distinct, having diverged early in evolutionary history but maintain a surprising degree of convergence in function. While prokaryotic NaVs are required for growth and motility, eukaryotic NaVs selectively conduct fast electrical currents for short- and long-range signaling across cell membranes in mammalian organs. Current interest in prokaryotic NaVs is stoked by their resolved high-resolution structures and functional features which are reminiscent of eukaryotic NaVs. In this chapter, comparisons between eukaryotic and prokaryotic NaVs are made to highlight the shared and unique aspects of ion selectivity, voltage sensitivity, and pharmacology. Examples of prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV convergent evolution will be discussed within the context of their structural features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stochastic phase segregation on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gera, Prerna; Salac, David

    2017-08-01

    Phase separation and coarsening is a phenomenon commonly seen in binary physical and chemical systems that occur in nature. Often, thermal fluctuations, modelled as stochastic noise, are present in the system and the phase segregation process occurs on a surface. In this work, the segregation process is modelled via the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook model, which is a fourth-order parabolic stochastic system. Coarsening is analysed on two sample surfaces: a unit sphere and a dumbbell. On both surfaces, a statistical analysis of the growth rate is performed, and the influence of noise level and mobility is also investigated. For the spherical interface, it is also shown that a lognormal distribution fits the growth rate well.

  17. A framework for classification of prokaryotic protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Nidhi; Anamika, Krishanpal; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2010-05-26

    Overwhelming majority of the Serine/Threonine protein kinases identified by gleaning archaeal and eubacterial genomes could not be classified into any of the well known Hanks and Hunter subfamilies of protein kinases. This is owing to the development of Hanks and Hunter classification scheme based on eukaryotic protein kinases which are highly divergent from their prokaryotic homologues. A large dataset of prokaryotic Serine/Threonine protein kinases recognized from genomes of prokaryotes have been used to develop a classification framework for prokaryotic Ser/Thr protein kinases. We have used traditional sequence alignment and phylogenetic approaches and clustered the prokaryotic kinases which represent 72 subfamilies with at least 4 members in each. Such a clustering enables classification of prokaryotic Ser/Thr kinases and it can be used as a framework to classify newly identified prokaryotic Ser/Thr kinases. After series of searches in a comprehensive sequence database we recognized that 38 subfamilies of prokaryotic protein kinases are associated to a specific taxonomic level. For example 4, 6 and 3 subfamilies have been identified that are currently specific to phylum proteobacteria, cyanobacteria and actinobacteria respectively. Similarly subfamilies which are specific to an order, sub-order, class, family and genus have also been identified. In addition to these, we also identify organism-diverse subfamilies. Members of these clusters are from organisms of different taxonomic levels, such as archaea, bacteria, eukaryotes and viruses. Interestingly, occurrence of several taxonomic level specific subfamilies of prokaryotic kinases contrasts with classification of eukaryotic protein kinases in which most of the popular subfamilies of eukaryotic protein kinases occur diversely in several eukaryotes. Many prokaryotic Ser/Thr kinases exhibit a wide variety of modular organization which indicates a degree of complexity and protein-protein interactions in the

  18. A Framework for Classification of Prokaryotic Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Nidhi; Anamika, Krishanpal; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2010-01-01

    Background Overwhelming majority of the Serine/Threonine protein kinases identified by gleaning archaeal and eubacterial genomes could not be classified into any of the well known Hanks and Hunter subfamilies of protein kinases. This is owing to the development of Hanks and Hunter classification scheme based on eukaryotic protein kinases which are highly divergent from their prokaryotic homologues. A large dataset of prokaryotic Serine/Threonine protein kinases recognized from genomes of prokaryotes have been used to develop a classification framework for prokaryotic Ser/Thr protein kinases. Methodology/Principal Findings We have used traditional sequence alignment and phylogenetic approaches and clustered the prokaryotic kinases which represent 72 subfamilies with at least 4 members in each. Such a clustering enables classification of prokaryotic Ser/Thr kinases and it can be used as a framework to classify newly identified prokaryotic Ser/Thr kinases. After series of searches in a comprehensive sequence database we recognized that 38 subfamilies of prokaryotic protein kinases are associated to a specific taxonomic level. For example 4, 6 and 3 subfamilies have been identified that are currently specific to phylum proteobacteria, cyanobacteria and actinobacteria respectively. Similarly subfamilies which are specific to an order, sub-order, class, family and genus have also been identified. In addition to these, we also identify organism-diverse subfamilies. Members of these clusters are from organisms of different taxonomic levels, such as archaea, bacteria, eukaryotes and viruses. Conclusion/Significance Interestingly, occurrence of several taxonomic level specific subfamilies of prokaryotic kinases contrasts with classification of eukaryotic protein kinases in which most of the popular subfamilies of eukaryotic protein kinases occur diversely in several eukaryotes. Many prokaryotic Ser/Thr kinases exhibit a wide variety of modular organization which indicates a

  19. Optimal percolation of disordered segregated composites.

    PubMed

    Johner, Niklaus; Grimaldi, Claudio; Maeder, Thomas; Ryser, Peter

    2009-02-01

    We evaluate the percolation threshold values for a realistic model of continuum segregated systems, where random spherical inclusions forbid the percolating objects, modeled by hardcore spherical particles surrounded by penetrable shells, to occupy large regions inside the composite. We find that the percolation threshold is generally a nonmonotonous function of segregation, and that an optimal (i.e., minimum) critical concentration exists well before maximum segregation is reached. We interpret this feature as originating from a competition between reduced available volume effects and enhanced concentrations needed to ensure percolation in the highly segregated regime. The relevance with existing segregated materials is discussed.

  20. [Prokaryotic expression, purification and antigenicity identification of recombinant human survivin protein].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Wang, Wei; Tian, Renli; Xu, Yuanji; Yan, Jinqi; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Jiangping; Yu, Jiyun

    2013-08-01

    To construct a prokaryotic expression plasmid pET28a-survivin, optimize the recombinant protein expression conditions in E.coli, and purify the survivin recombinant protein and identify its antigenicity. Survivin cDNA segment was amplified by PCR and cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET28a(+) to construct the recombinant expression vector pET28a-survivin. The expression vector was transformed into BL21 (DE3) and the fusion protein survivin/His was induced by IPTG. The fusion protein was purified through Ni affinity chromatography. The antigenicity of the purified survivin protein was identified by Western blotting and ELISA. The recombinant expression vector was verified successfully by BamHI and HindIII. The fusion protein induced by IPTG was obtained with Mr; about 24 000. The purity of the purified protein reached 90% by SDS-PAGE analysis. And the antigenicity of the survivin protein was validated by Western blotting and ELISA. The prokaryotic expression plasmid pET28a-survivin was successfully constructed and the survivin protein was expressed and purified in E.coli. The antigenicity of the purified survivin protein was demonstrated desirable.

  1. [Highest level of division in the organism classification. 1. Prokaryotes and eukaryotes].

    PubMed

    Shatalkin, A I

    2004-01-01

    The works on the general classification of all organisms are considered as a convenient opportunity to sum up numerous data obtained in organic world studying. The present stage is characterized by rapid development of the molecular reconstructions that have already caused considerable changes in our classification practice. These changes look especially impressive at studying the organism cellular structure. The great massive of new data allow us to compare Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes on the nucleic acids and especially proteins whose number in Eukaryote cell approaches to several thousands. Basing on the structure of macromolecules one can hypothesize with great certainty about Prokaryote or Eukaryotes origin. The article presents the detailed characteristic of Prokaryotes or Eukaryotes with the emphasis placed on the comparative analysis of biological macromolecules. Among specially considered cellular structures and processes are cell wall, intracellular components, cellular cycle, nucleus, DNA compactness, replication, genome organization, transcription, posttranscriptional modifications, introns, ribosomes and translation, cytoskeleton, mitosis, cytokinesis, cellular organelles, intracellular membranes systems, modes of nutrition, sexual condition. The macromolecular analysis let to carry out the homology of structures and to find out some new connections. It was shown that typology considered as a search for morphological patterns within the biodiversity structure has almost exhausted the subject. It was directed mostly to distinguishing "main" group in contrast with intermediate and aberrant ones, which were considered as minor phenomenon. At present due to macromolecules systematics it is able to estimate the whole diversity of forms including typologically transitive.

  2. Diversity of prokaryotic community at a shallow marine hydrothermal site elucidated by Illumina sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Valeria; Gugliandolo, Concetta; Bunk, Boyke; Overmann, Jörg; Maugeri, Teresa L

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the prokaryotic community structure and composition in an active hydrothermal site, named Black Point, off Panarea Island (Eolian Islands, Italy), we examined sediment and fluid samples, differing in temperature, by a massive parallel sequencing (Illumina) technique targeting the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The used technique enabled us to detect a greater prokaryotic diversity than that until now observed and to reveal also microorganisms occurring at very low abundance (≤0.01 %). Most of sequences were assigned to Bacteria while Archaea were a minor component of the microbial community in both low- and high-temperature samples. Proteobacteria (mainly consisting of Alpha-, Gamma-, and Epsilonproteobacteria) dominated among all samples followed by Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Analyzed DNA obtained from samples taken at different temperatures indicated the presence of members of different dominant genera. The main differences were observed between sediment samples where Rhodovulum and Thiohalospira prevailed at high temperature, while Thalassomonas and Sulfurimonas at low temperature. Chlorobium, Acinetobacter, Sulfurimonas, and Brevundimonas were abundant in both low- and high-temperature fluid samples. Euryarchaeota dominated the archaeal community in all samples. Classes of Euryarchaeota embracing hyperthermophilic members (Thermococci and Thermoplasmata) and of Crenarchaeota (Thermoprotei) were more abundant in high-temperature samples. A great number of sequences referred to Bacteria and Archaea still remained unaffiliated, indicating that Black Point site represents a rich source of so-far uncharted prokaryotic diversity.

  3. Transgressive segregation, adaptation and speciation.

    PubMed

    Rieseberg, L H; Archer, M A; Wayne, R K

    1999-10-01

    The production of extreme or 'transgressive' phenotypes in segregating hybrid populations has been speculated to contribute to niche divergence of hybrid lineages. Here, we assess the frequency of transgressive segregation in hybrid populations, describe its genetic basis and discuss the factors that best predict its occurrence. From a survey of 171 studies that report phenotypic variation in segregating hybrid populations, we show that transgression is the rule rather than the exception. In fact, 155 of the 171 studies (91%) report at least one transgressive trait, and 44% of 1229 traits examined were transgressive. Transgression occurred most frequently in intraspecific crosses involving inbred, domesticated plant populations, and least frequently in interspecific crosses between outbred, wild animal species. Quantitative genetic studies of plant hybrids consistently point to the action of complementary genes as the primary cause of transgression, although overdominance and epistasis also contribute. Complementary genes appear to be common for most traits, with the possible exception of those with a history of disruptive selection. These results lend credence to the view that hybridization may provide the raw material for rapid adaptation and provide a simple explanation for niche divergence and phenotypic novelty often associated with hybrid lineages.

  4. Is Segregation Bad for Your Health?

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Michael R.; Hogue, Carol R.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, racial residential segregation has been observed to vary with health outcomes for African Americans, although only recently has interest increased in the public health literature. Utilizing a systematic review of the health and social science literature, the authors consider the segregation-health association through the lens of 4 questions of interest to epidemiologists: How is segregation best measured? Is the segregation-health association socially or biologically plausible? What evidence is there of segregation-health associations? Is segregation a modifiable risk factor? Thirty-nine identified studies test an association between segregation and health outcomes. The health effects of segregation are relatively consistent, but complex. Isolation segregation is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes and increased mortality for blacks, but several studies report health-protective effects of living in clustered black neighborhoods net of social and economic isolation. The majority of reviewed studies are cross-sectional and use coarse measures of segregation. Future work should extend recent developments in measuring and conceptualizing segregation in a multilevel framework, build upon the findings and challenges in the neighborhood-effects literature, and utilize longitudinal data sources to illuminate opportunities for public health action to reduce racial disparities in disease. PMID:19465747

  5. Current Developments in Prokaryotic Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Goudeau, Danielle; Nath, Nandita; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Malmstrom, Rex

    2014-03-14

    Our approach to prokaryotic single-cell Whole Genome Amplification at the JGI continues to evolve. To increase both the quality and number of single-cell genomes produced, we explore all aspects of the process from cell sorting to sequencing. For example, we now utilize specialized reagents, acoustic liquid handling, and reduced reaction volumes eliminate non-target DNA contamination in WGA reactions. More specifically, we use a cleaner commercial WGA kit from Qiagen that employs a UV decontamination procedure initially developed at the JGI, and we use the Labcyte Echo for tip-less liquid transfer to set up 2uL reactions. Acoustic liquid handling also dramatically reduces reagent costs. In addition, we are exploring new cell lysis methods including treatment with Proteinase K, lysozyme, and other detergents, in order to complement standard alkaline lysis and allow for more efficient disruption of a wider range of cells. Incomplete lysis represents a major hurdle for WGA on some environmental samples, especially rhizosphere, peatland, and other soils. Finding effective lysis strategies that are also compatible with WGA is challenging, and we are currently assessing the impact of various strategies on genome recovery.

  6. Metabolic Design and Control for Production in Prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Keasling, J.D.

    2010-11-10

    Prokaryotic life on earth is manifested by its diversity and omnipresence. These microbes serve as natural sources of a large variety of compounds with the potential to serve the ever growing, medicinal, chemical and transportation needs of the human population. However, commercially viable production of these compounds can be realized only through significant improvement of the native production capacity of natural isolates. The most favorable way to achieve this goal is through the genetic manipulation of metabolic pathways that direct the production of these molecules. While random mutagenesis and screening have dominated the industrial production of such compounds in the past our increased understanding of microbial physiology over the last five decades has shifted this trend towards rational approaches for metabolic design. Major drivers of this trend include recombinant DNA technology, high throughput characterization of macromolecular cellular components, quantitative modeling for metabolic engine ring, targeted combinatorial engineering and synthetic biology. In this chapter we track the evolution of microbial engineering technologies from the black box era of random mutagenesis to the science and engineering-driven era of metabolic design.

  7. Sequence alignment and homology threading reveals prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins similar to lactose permease.

    PubMed

    Kasho, Vladimir N; Smirnova, Irina N; Kaback, H Ronald

    2006-05-12

    Certain prokaryotic transport proteins similar to the lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY) have been identified by BLAST searches from available genomic databanks. These proteins exhibit conservation of amino acid residues that participate in sugar binding and H(+) translocation in LacY. Homology threading of prokaryotic transporters based on the X-ray structure of LacY (PDB ID: 1PV7) and sequence similarities reveals a common overall fold for sugar transporters belonging to the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) and suggest new targets for study. Evolution-based searches for sequence similarities also identify eukaryotic proteins bearing striking resemblance to MFS sugar transporters. Like LacY, the eukaryotic proteins are predicted to have 12 transmembrane domains (TMDs), and many of the irreplaceable residues for sugar binding and H(+) translocation in LacY appear to be largely conserved. The overall size of the eukaryotic homologs is about twice that of prokaryotic permeases with longer N and C termini and loops between TMDs III-IV and VI-VII. The human gene encoding protein FLJ20160 consists of six exons located on more than 60,000 bp of DNA sequences and requires splicing to produce mature mRNA. Cellular localization predictions suggest membrane insertion with possible proteolysis at the N terminus, and expression studies with the human protein FJL20160 demonstrate membrane insertion in both E.coli and Pichia pastoris. Widespread expression of the eukaryotic sugar transport candidates suggests an important role in cellular metabolism, particularly in brain and tumors. Homology is observed in the TMDs of both the eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins that contain residues involved in sugar binding and H(+) translocation in LacY.

  8. Biodiversity of prokaryotic communities associated with the ectoderm of Ectopleura crocea (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa).

    PubMed

    Di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Luna, Gian Marco; Bo, Marzia; Giordano, Giuseppe; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Bavestrello, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    The surface of many marine organisms is colonized by complex communities of microbes, yet our understanding of the diversity and role of host-associated microbes is still limited. We investigated the association between Ectopleura crocea (a colonial hydroid distributed worldwide in temperate waters) and prokaryotic assemblages colonizing the hydranth surface. We used, for the first time on a marine hydroid, a combination of electron and epifluorescence microscopy and 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing to investigate the associated prokaryotic diversity. Dense assemblages of prokaryotes were associated with the hydrant surface. Two microbial morphotypes were observed: one horseshoe-shaped and one fusiform, worm-like. These prokaryotes were observed on the hydrozoan epidermis, but not in the portions covered by the perisarcal exoskeleton, and their abundance was higher in March while decreased in late spring. Molecular analyses showed that assemblages were dominated by Bacteria rather than Archaea. Bacterial assemblages were highly diversified, with up to 113 genera and 570 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), many of which were rare and contributed to <0.4%. The two most abundant OTUs, likely corresponding to the two morphotypes present on the epidermis, were distantly related to Comamonadaceae (genus Delftia) and to Flavobacteriaceae (genus Polaribacter). Epibiontic bacteria were found on E. crocea from different geographic areas but not in other hydroid species in the same areas, suggesting that the host-microbe association is species-specific. This is the first detailed report of bacteria living on the hydrozoan epidermis, and indeed the first study reporting bacteria associated with the epithelium of E. crocea. Our results provide a starting point for future studies aiming at clarifying the role of this peculiar hydrozoan-bacterial association.

  9. Biodiversity of Prokaryotic Communities Associated with the Ectoderm of Ectopleura crocea (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa)

    PubMed Central

    Di Camillo, Cristina Gioia; Luna, Gian Marco; Bo, Marzia; Giordano, Giuseppe; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Bavestrello, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    The surface of many marine organisms is colonized by complex communities of microbes, yet our understanding of the diversity and role of host-associated microbes is still limited. We investigated the association between Ectopleura crocea (a colonial hydroid distributed worldwide in temperate waters) and prokaryotic assemblages colonizing the hydranth surface. We used, for the first time on a marine hydroid, a combination of electron and epifluorescence microscopy and 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing to investigate the associated prokaryotic diversity. Dense assemblages of prokaryotes were associated with the hydrant surface. Two microbial morphotypes were observed: one horseshoe-shaped and one fusiform, worm-like. These prokaryotes were observed on the hydrozoan epidermis, but not in the portions covered by the perisarcal exoskeleton, and their abundance was higher in March while decreased in late spring. Molecular analyses showed that assemblages were dominated by Bacteria rather than Archaea. Bacterial assemblages were highly diversified, with up to 113 genera and 570 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), many of which were rare and contributed to <0.4%. The two most abundant OTUs, likely corresponding to the two morphotypes present on the epidermis, were distantly related to Comamonadaceae (genus Delftia) and to Flavobacteriaceae (genus Polaribacter). Epibiontic bacteria were found on E. crocea from different geographic areas but not in other hydroid species in the same areas, suggesting that the host-microbe association is species-specific. This is the first detailed report of bacteria living on the hydrozoan epidermis, and indeed the first study reporting bacteria associated with the epithelium of E. crocea. Our results provide a starting point for future studies aiming at clarifying the role of this peculiar hydrozoan-bacterial association. PMID:22768172

  10. Subpopulation-proteomics in prokaryotic populations.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Michael; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno; Müller, Susann

    2013-02-01

    Clonal microbial cells do not behave in an identical manner and form subpopulations during cultivation. Besides varying micro-environmental conditions, cell inherent features like cell cycle dependent localization and concentration of regulatory proteins as well as epigenetic properties are well accepted mechanisms creating cell heterogeneity. Another suspected reason is molecular noise on the transcriptional and translational level. A promising tool to unravel reasons for cell heterogeneity is the combination of cell sorting and subpopulation proteomics. This review summarizes recent developments in prokaryotic single-cell analytics and provides a workflow for selection of single cells, low cell number mass spectrometry, and proteomics evaluation. This approach is useful for understanding the dependency of individual cell decisions on inherent protein profiles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

    DOE PAGES

    Garrity, George M.; Parker, Charles T.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2015-11-20

    Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate applicationmore » of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.« less

  12. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, George M.; Parker, Charles T.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2015-11-20

    Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate application of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.

  13. Evolution of thiol protective systems in prokaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, R. C.; Newton, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Biological thiols are essential elements in most aspects of cell function but undergo rapid oxidation to disulfides in the presence of oxygen. The evolution of systems to protect against such oxygen toxicity was essential to the emergence of aerobic life. The protection system used by eukaryotes is based upon glutathione (GSH) and GSH-dependent enzymes but many bacteria lack GSH and apparently use other mechanisms. The objective of this research is to elaborate the thiol protective mechanisms employed by prokaryotes of widely divergent evolutionary origin and to understand why GSH became the central thiol employed in essentially all higher organisms. Thiol-selective fluorescent labeling and HPLC analysis has been used to determine key monothiol components.

  14. Macromolecule diffusion and confinement in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mika, Jacek T; Poolman, Bert

    2011-02-01

    We review recent observations on the mobility of macromolecules and their spatial organization in live bacterial cells. We outline the major fluorescence microscopy-based methods to determine the mobility and thus the diffusion coefficients (D) of molecules, which is not trivial in small cells. The extremely high macromolecule crowding of prokaryotes is used to rationalize the reported lower diffusion coefficients as compared to eukaryotes, and we speculate on the nature of the barriers for diffusion observed for proteins (and mRNAs) in vivo. Building on in vitro experiments and modeling studies, we evaluate the size dependence of diffusion coefficients for macromolecules in vivo, in case of both water-soluble and integral membrane proteins. We comment on the possibilities of anomalous diffusion and provide examples where the macromolecule mobility may be limiting biological processes.

  15. [Thermophilic prokaryotes from deep subterranean habitats].

    PubMed

    Slobodkin, A I; Slobodkina, G B

    2014-01-01

    The deep continental biosphere consists of geologically isolated ecosystems differing in their physicochemical, geological, and trophic parameters. Most of the deep ecosystems exist at elevated temperatures (50-120 degrees C), which favor the development of thermophilic microorganisms. In many cases, indigenous nature of subsurface microorganisms is questionable due to problems of collecting representative and non-contaminated samples. In spite of the numerous studies on the deep biosphere microbial communities, the number of cultivated thermophiles isolated from subsurface environments not associated with petroleum deposits does not exceed 30 species. More than half of the thermophilic species isolated from deep subsurface belong to the Firmicutes. Majority of the underground thermophiles are subsurface strict or facultative anaerobes, with capacity for sulfate and iron reduction are notably widespread. Most thermophilic subsurface microorganisms are organotrophs, although chemolithoautotrophic thermophiles also have been reported. This review deals with the phylogenetic diversity and physiological properties of the cultivated thermophilic prokaryotes isolated from various deep subterranean habitats.

  16. Intracellular minerals and metal deposits in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Edwards, K J; Bazylinski, D A

    2008-06-01

    Thanks to the work of Terrance J. Beveridge and other pioneers in the field of metal-microbe interactions, prokaryotes are well known to sequester metals and other ions intracellularly in various forms. These forms range from poorly ordered deposits of metals to well-ordered mineral crystals. Studies on well-ordered crystalline structures have generally focused on intracellular organelles produced by magnetotactic bacteria that are ubiquitous in terrestrial and marine environments that precipitate Fe(3)O(4) or Fe(3)S(4), Fe-bearing minerals that have magnetic properties and are enclosed in intracellular membranes. In contrast, studies on less-well ordered minerals have focused on Fe-, As-, Mn-, Au-, Se- and Cd-precipitates that occur intracellularly. The biological and environmental function of these particles remains a matter of debate.

  17. Evolution of thiol protective systems in prokaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, R. C.; Newton, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Biological thiols are essential elements in most aspects of cell function but undergo rapid oxidation to disulfides in the presence of oxygen. The evolution of systems to protect against such oxygen toxicity was essential to the emergence of aerobic life. The protection system used by eukaryotes is based upon glutathione (GSH) and GSH-dependent enzymes but many bacteria lack GSH and apparently use other mechanisms. The objective of this research is to elaborate the thiol protective mechanisms employed by prokaryotes of widely divergent evolutionary origin and to understand why GSH became the central thiol employed in essentially all higher organisms. Thiol-selective fluorescent labeling and HPLC analysis has been used to determine key monothiol components.

  18. Magnetite as a prokaryotic biomarker: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Romanek, Christopher S.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2010-06-01

    Over the years, nanometer-sized magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals have been recovered from many modern and ancient environments including sediments and soils and even meteorites. In some cases these crystals have been used as "magnetofossils" for evidence of the past presence of specific microbes. Magnetite nanocrystals can be formed by a number of different biological and inorganic mechanisms resulting in crystals with different physical and magnetic characteristics. Prokaryotes (bacteria) biomineralize magnetite through two methods that differ mechanistically, including: biologically induced mineralization (BIM) and biologically controlled mineralization (BCM). Magnetite nanocrystals produced by BIM are known to be synthesized by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, are deposited external to the cell, and generally are physically indistinguishable from magnetite particles formed inorganically. BCM magnetites, in contrast, are synthesized by the magnetotactic bacteria and some higher organisms and are precipitated intracellularly as membrane-bounded structures called magnetosomes. These magnetites appear to have unique crystal morphologies and a narrow size range leading to their original use as magnetofossils. Because of the discovery of nanometer-sized crystals of magnetite in the Martian meteorite ALH84001, the use of these criteria for the determination of whether magnetite crystals could constitute a prokaryotic biomarker was questioned. Thus, there is currently great debate over what criteria to use in the determination of whether specific magnetite crystals are biogenic or not. In the last decade, additional criteria have been established (e.g., the Magnetite Assay for Biogenicity), and new tools and technologies have been developed to determine the origin of specific types of magnetite crystals.

  19. Detecting uber-operons in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Che, Dongsheng; Li, Guojun; Mao, Fenglou; Wu, Hongwei; Xu, Ying

    2006-01-01

    We present a study on computational identification of uber-operons in a prokaryotic genome, each of which represents a group of operons that are evolutionarily or functionally associated through operons in other (reference) genomes. Uber-operons represent a rich set of footprints of operon evolution, whose full utilization could lead to new and more powerful tools for elucidation of biological pathways and networks than what operons have provided, and a better understanding of prokaryotic genome structures and evolution. Our prediction algorithm predicts uber-operons through identifying groups of functionally or transcriptionally related operons, whose gene sets are conserved across the target and multiple reference genomes. Using this algorithm, we have predicted uber-operons for each of a group of 91 genomes, using the other 90 genomes as references. In particular, we predicted 158 uber-operons in Escherichia coli K12 covering 1830 genes, and found that many of the uber-operons correspond to parts of known regulons or biological pathways or are involved in highly related biological processes based on their Gene Ontology (GO) assignments. For some of the predicted uber-operons that are not parts of known regulons or pathways, our analyses indicate that their genes are highly likely to work together in the same biological processes, suggesting the possibility of new regulons and pathways. We believe that our uber-operon prediction provides a highly useful capability and a rich information source for elucidation of complex biological processes, such as pathways in microbes. All the prediction results are available at our Uber-Operon Database: http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/uber, the first of its kind.

  20. Detecting uber-operons in prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Che, Dongsheng; Li, Guojun; Mao, Fenglou; Wu, Hongwei; Xu, Ying

    2006-01-01

    We present a study on computational identification of uber-operons in a prokaryotic genome, each of which represents a group of operons that are evolutionarily or functionally associated through operons in other (reference) genomes. Uber-operons represent a rich set of footprints of operon evolution, whose full utilization could lead to new and more powerful tools for elucidation of biological pathways and networks than what operons have provided, and a better understanding of prokaryotic genome structures and evolution. Our prediction algorithm predicts uber-operons through identifying groups of functionally or transcriptionally related operons, whose gene sets are conserved across the target and multiple reference genomes. Using this algorithm, we have predicted uber-operons for each of a group of 91 genomes, using the other 90 genomes as references. In particular, we predicted 158 uber-operons in Escherichia coli K12 covering 1830 genes, and found that many of the uber-operons correspond to parts of known regulons or biological pathways or are involved in highly related biological processes based on their Gene Ontology (GO) assignments. For some of the predicted uber-operons that are not parts of known regulons or pathways, our analyses indicate that their genes are highly likely to work together in the same biological processes, suggesting the possibility of new regulons and pathways. We believe that our uber-operon prediction provides a highly useful capability and a rich information source for elucidation of complex biological processes, such as pathways in microbes. All the prediction results are available at our Uber-Operon Database: , the first of its kind. PMID:16682449

  1. Phenotypic alteration and target gene identification using combinatorial libraries of zinc finger proteins in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Soon; Jang, Young-Soon; Lee, Horim; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method with prokaryotic organisms that uses randomized libraries of zinc finger-containing artificial transcription factors to induce phenotypic variations and to identify genes involved in the generation of a specific phenotype of interest. Combining chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and in silico prediction of target DNA binding sequences for the artificial transcription factors, we identified ubiX, whose down-regulation correlates with the thermotolerance phenotype in Escherichia coli. Our results show that randomized libraries of artificial transcription factors are powerful tools for functional genomic studies.

  2. Systematic Transfer of Prokaryotic Sensors and Circuits to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic regulatory proteins respond to diverse signals and represent a rich resource for building synthetic sensors and circuits. The TetR family contains >105 members that use a simple mechanism to respond to stimuli and bind distinct DNA operators. We present a platform that enables the transfer of these regulators to mammalian cells, which is demonstrated using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The repressors are modified to include nuclear localization signals (NLS) and responsive promoters are built by incorporating multiple operators. Activators are also constructed by modifying the protein to include a VP16 domain. Together, this approach yields 15 new regulators that demonstrate 19- to 551-fold induction and retain both the low levels of crosstalk in DNA binding specificity observed between the parent regulators in Escherichia coli, as well as their dynamic range of activity. By taking advantage of the DAPG small molecule sensing mediated by the PhlF repressor, we introduce a new inducible system with 50-fold induction and a threshold of 0.9 μM DAPG, which is comparable to the classic Dox-induced TetR system. A set of NOT gates is constructed from the new repressors and their response function quantified. Finally, the Dox- and DAPG- inducible systems and two new activators are used to build a synthetic enhancer (fuzzy AND gate), requiring the coordination of 5 transcription factors organized into two layers. This work introduces a generic approach for the development of mammalian genetic sensors and circuits to populate a toolbox that can be applied to diverse applications from biomanufacturing to living therapeutics. PMID:25360681

  3. Systematic transfer of prokaryotic sensors and circuits to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Brynne C; Siciliano, Velia; Ghodasara, Amar; Wroblewska, Liliana; Clancy, Kevin; Trefzer, Axel C; Chesnut, Jonathan D; Weiss, Ron; Voigt, Christopher A

    2014-12-19

    Prokaryotic regulatory proteins respond to diverse signals and represent a rich resource for building synthetic sensors and circuits. The TetR family contains >10(5) members that use a simple mechanism to respond to stimuli and bind distinct DNA operators. We present a platform that enables the transfer of these regulators to mammalian cells, which is demonstrated using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The repressors are modified to include nuclear localization signals (NLS) and responsive promoters are built by incorporating multiple operators. Activators are also constructed by modifying the protein to include a VP16 domain. Together, this approach yields 15 new regulators that demonstrate 19- to 551-fold induction and retain both the low levels of crosstalk in DNA binding specificity observed between the parent regulators in Escherichia coli, as well as their dynamic range of activity. By taking advantage of the DAPG small molecule sensing mediated by the PhlF repressor, we introduce a new inducible system with 50-fold induction and a threshold of 0.9 μM DAPG, which is comparable to the classic Dox-induced TetR system. A set of NOT gates is constructed from the new repressors and their response function quantified. Finally, the Dox- and DAPG- inducible systems and two new activators are used to build a synthetic enhancer (fuzzy AND gate), requiring the coordination of 5 transcription factors organized into two layers. This work introduces a generic approach for the development of mammalian genetic sensors and circuits to populate a toolbox that can be applied to diverse applications from biomanufacturing to living therapeutics.

  4. The C-terminal 20 Amino Acids of Drosophila Topoisomerase 2 Are Required for Binding to a BRCA1 C Terminus (BRCT) Domain-containing Protein, Mus101, and Fidelity of DNA Segregation*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-tsung Shane; Wu, Jianhong; Modrich, Paul; Hsieh, Tao-shih

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic topoisomerase 2 (Top2) and one of its interacting partners, topoisomerase IIβ binding protein 1 (TopBP1) are two proteins performing essential cellular functions. We mapped the interacting domains of these two proteins using co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments with truncated or mutant Drosophila Top2 with various Ser-to-Ala substitutions. We discovered that the last 20 amino acids of Top2 represent the key region for binding with Mus101 (the Drosophila homolog of TopBP1) and that phosphorylation of Ser-1428 and Ser-1443 is important for Top2 to interact with the N terminus of Mus101, which contains the BRCT1/2 domains. The interaction between Mus101 and the Top2 C-terminal regulatory domain is phosphorylation-dependent because treatment with phosphatase abolishes their association in pulldown assays. The binding affinity of N-terminal Mus101 with a synthetic phosphorylated peptide spanning the last 25 amino acids of Top2 (with Ser(P)-1428 and Ser(P)-1443) was determined by surface plasmon resonance with a Kd of 0.57 μm. In an in vitro decatenation assay, Mus101 can specifically reduce the decatenation activity of Top2, and dephosphorylation of Top2 attenuates this response. Next, we endeavored to establish a cellular system for testing the biological function of Top2-Mus101 interaction. Top2-silenced S2 cells rescued by Top2Δ20, Top2 with 20 amino acids truncated from the C terminus, developed abnormally high chromosome numbers, which implies that Top2-Mus101 interaction is important for maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:27129233

  5. Sexual segregation in foraging giraffe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mramba, Rosemary Peter; Mahenya, Obeid; Siyaya, Annetjie; Mathisen, Karen Marie; Andreassen, Harry Peter; Skarpe, Christina

    2017-02-01

    Sexual segregation in giraffe is known to vary between savannas. In this study, we compared sexual segregation in giraffe in one nutrient-rich savanna, the Serengeti National Park, one nutrient-poor, Mikumi National Park, and one medium rich savanna, Arusha National Park, (from here on referred to just by name) based on effects of sexual size dimorphism and related hypotheses. Data were collected in the wet and dry seasons, by driving road transects and making visual observations of browsing giraffe. Additional data were collected from literature (plant chemistry; mammal communities). There was a noticeable difference in browsing by females and males and in browsing between the three savannas. Females browsed a higher diversity of tree species in Serengeti whereas males browsed a higher diversity in Arusha, while the diversity of species browsed in Mikumi was high and about the same in both sexes. Females selected for high concentrations of nitrogen and low concentrations of tannins and phenolics compared to males in Serengeti but selection in Mikumi was more complex. Males browsed higher in the canopy than females in all sites, but the browsing height was generally higher in Serengeti than Mikumi and Arusha. Season had an effect on the browsing height independent of sex in Mikumi, where giraffes browsed higher in the dry season compared to the wet season. Males spent more time browsing per tree compared to females in all three sites; however, browsing time in Mikumi was also affected by season, where giraffes had longer browsing bouts in the wet season compared to the dry season. We suggest that sexual differences in forage requirement and in foraging interacts with differences in tree chemistry and in competing herbivore communities between nutrient rich and nutrient poor savanna in shaping the sexual segregation.

  6. [Cloning and expression of the prokaryotic expression vectors of phytoplasma immunodominant membrane protein A and preparation of its antiserum].

    PubMed

    Liang, Nannan; Zhang, Lijun; Zhao, Haiquan; Liu, Zhongjian; Luo, Huanliang; Lin, Yanxing; Liu, Xiaoxiao

    2013-06-01

    To construct the prokaryotic expression vector of phytoplasma immunodominant membrane protein A (IdpA) in prokaryotic cell, express and purify the IdpA and prepare its antiserum. With the recombinant plasmid pMD18-T-IdpA as templates, IdpA gene was amplified by PCR and cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a(+) by endonuclease reaction and T4 DNA ligase reaction. Then the recombinant plasmid pET-28a(+)-IdpA was transformed into E.coli BL21 (DE3). After confirmed by PCR and double enzyme digestion, the recombinant protein IdpA was expressed under IPTG induction and purified. The purified product was used to immunize BALB/c mice to prepare its antiserum. IdpA-specific mouse antiserum was identified by ELISA and Westerrn blotting. The prokaryotic vectors of pET-28a(+)-IdpA were constructed successfully and the recombinant protein IdpA was induced to express stably in the E.coli BL21. The purity of IdpA was up to over 90%. In the BALB/c mice immunized by the purified IdpA, the titre of IdpA-specific antiserum was as high as 1:320 000. The recombinant protein IdpA was expressed successfully in E.coli and the IdpA-specific antiserum was prepared.

  7. Light-dependent segregation of begomoviruses in Asystasia gangetica leaves.

    PubMed

    Wyant, Patricia; Strohmeier, Stephan; Fischer, Alexander; Schäfer, Benjamin; Briddon, Rob W; Krenz, Björn; Jeske, Holger

    2015-01-02

    Asystasia gangetica (Acanthaceae) from tropical Africa and Asia is used as source of food and for medical applications. Plants collected in West Africa in the 1980s with typical geminivirus symptoms showed an unusual symptom segregation that included vein yellowing, curling and mosaic, which were present simultaneously or separately on different leaves of the same plant or on different plants propagated as cuttings from a single plant. Rolling-circle amplification in combination with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis followed by deep sequencing of the RCA products identified two geminiviruses in these plants. One with a bipartite genome, Asystasia begomovirus 1, and the other with a monopartite genome together with its defective DNA, Asystasia begomovirus 2. The relationship between leaf symptoms and virus distribution under different light regimes was investigated, and showed for the first time an unusual segregation of symptoms and viruses, either within a single plant, or even within a leaf.

  8. Reactive oxygen species stimulate mitochondrial allele segregation toward homoplasmy in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Feng; Niu, Rong; Hatakeyama, Hideyuki; Goto, Yu-ichi; Shibata, Takehiko; Yoshida, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria that contain a mixture of mutant and wild-type mitochondrial (mt) DNA copies are heteroplasmic. In humans, homoplasmy is restored during early oogenesis and reprogramming of somatic cells, but the mechanism of mt-allele segregation remains unknown. In budding yeast, homoplasmy is restored by head-to-tail concatemer formation in mother cells by reactive oxygen species (ROS)–induced rolling-circle replication and selective transmission of concatemers to daughter cells, but this mechanism is not obvious in higher eukaryotes. Here, using heteroplasmic m.3243A > G primary fibroblast cells derived from MELAS patients treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), we show that an optimal ROS level promotes mt-allele segregation toward wild-type and mutant mtDNA homoplasmy. Enhanced ROS level reduced the amount of intact mtDNA replication templates but increased linear tandem multimers linked by head-to-tail unit-sized mtDNA (mtDNA concatemers). ROS-triggered mt-allele segregation correlated with mtDNA-concatemer production and enabled transmission of multiple identical mt-genome copies as a single unit. Our results support a mechanism by which mt-allele segregation toward mt-homoplasmy is mediated by concatemers. PMID:27009201

  9. Nanoscale segregation at a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igata, N.

    1996-03-01

    The properties of a surface are fundamentally controlled by the chemical composition of the nanoscale surface layer. Therefore nanoscale segregation at the surface is one of the most important problems in surface science and technology. The chemical analysis of the surface layer and the study of segregation have been developed by various methods, but mainly by AES and TOFAP since 0957-4484/7/1/003/img1. Surface segregation under irradiation is also an urgent problem to be solved and the same methods have been applied. In this paper, the results from TOFAP for segregation both under thermal equilibrium and under irradiation are introduced. As for theoretical aspects, both thermal segregation and segregation under irradiation are interpreted by atomistic theory.

  10. Evolution of prokaryote and eukaryote lines inferred from sequence evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. T.; George, D. G.; Yeh, L.-S.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of prokaryotes and early eukaryotes, including their symbiotic relationships, as inferred from phylogenetic trees of bacterial ferredoxin, 5S ribosomal RNA, ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase large chain, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase polypeptide II.

  11. Evolution of prokaryote and eukaryote lines inferred from sequence evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. T.; George, D. G.; Yeh, L.-S.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of prokaryotes and early eukaryotes, including their symbiotic relationships, as inferred from phylogenetic trees of bacterial ferredoxin, 5S ribosomal RNA, ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase large chain, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase polypeptide II.

  12. PECAS: prokaryotic and eukaryotic classical analysis of secretome.

    PubMed

    Cortazar, Ana R; Oguiza, José A; Aransay, Ana M; Lavín, José L

    2015-12-01

    Full sets of proteins that are transported to the extracellular space, called secretomes, have been studied for a variety of organisms to understand their potential role in crucial metabolic pathways and complex health conditions. However, there is a lack of tools for integrative classical analysis of secretomes that consider all the data sources available nowadays. Thus, PECAS (Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Classical Analysis of Secretome) has been developed to provide a well-established prediction pipeline on secreted proteins for prokaryote and eukaryote species.

  13. Horizontal transfer and evolution of prokaryote transposable elements in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Clément; Cordaux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal transfer (HT) of transposable elements (TEs) plays a key role in prokaryotic evolution, and mounting evidence suggests that it has also had an important impact on eukaryotic evolution. Although many prokaryote-to-prokaryote and eukaryote-to-eukaryote HTs of TEs have been characterized, only few cases have been reported between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we carried out a comprehensive search for all major groups of prokaryotic insertion sequences (ISs) in 430 eukaryote genomes. We uncovered a total of 80 sequences, all deriving from the IS607 family, integrated in the genomes of 14 eukaryote species belonging to four distinct phyla (Amoebozoa, Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes, and Stramenopiles). Given that eukaryote IS607-like sequences are most closely related to cyanobacterial IS607 and that their phylogeny is incongruent with that of their hosts, we conclude that the presence of IS607-like sequences in eukaryotic genomes is the result of several HT events. Selection analyses further suggest that our ability to detect these prokaryote TEs today in eukaryotes is because HT of these sequences occurred recently and/or some IS607 elements were domesticated after HT, giving rise to new eukaryote genes. Supporting the recent age of some of these HTs, we uncovered intact full-length, potentially active IS607 copies in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellani. Overall, our study shows that prokaryote-to-eukaryote HT of TEs occurred at relatively low frequency during recent eukaryote evolution and it sets IS607 as the most widespread TE (being present in prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and viruses).

  14. Molecular fossils of prokaryotes in ancient authigenic minerals: archives of microbial activity in reefs and mounds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindel, Katrin; Birgel, Daniel; Richoz, Sylvain; Westphal, Hildegard; Peckmann, Jörn

    2016-04-01

    Molecular fossils (lipid biomarkers) are commonly used as proxies in organic-rich sediments of various sources, including eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Usually, molecular fossils of organisms transferred from the water column to the sediment are studied to monitor environmental changes (e.g., temperature, pH). Apart from these 'allochthonous' molecular fossils, prokaryotes are active in sediments and mats on the seafloor and leave behind 'autochthonous' molecular fossils in situ. In contrast to many phototrophic organisms, most benthic sedimentary prokaryotes are obtaining their energy from oxidation or reduction of organic or inorganic substrates. A peculiarity of some of the sediment-thriving prokaryotes is their ability to trigger in situ mineral precipitation, often but not only due to metabolic activity, resulting in authigenic rocks (microbialites). During that process, prokaryotes are rapidly entombed in the mineral matrix, where the molecular fossils are protected from early (bio)degradation. In contrast to other organic compounds (DNA, proteins etc.), molecular fossils can be preserved over very long time periods (millions of years). Thus, molecular fossils in authigenic mineral phases are perfectly suitable to trace microbial activity back in time. Among the best examples of molecular fossils, which are preserved in authigenic rocks are various microbialites, forming e.g. in phototrophic microbial mats and at cold seeps. Microbialite formation is reported throughout earth history. We here will focus on reefal microbialites form the Early Triassic and the Holocene. After the End-Permian mass extinction, microbialites covered wide areas on the ocean margins. In microbialites from the Griesbachian in Iran and Turkey (both Neotethys), molecular fossils of cyanobacteria, archaea, anoxygenic phototrophs, and sulphate-reducing bacteria indicate the presence of layered microbial mats on the seafloor, in which carbonate precipitation was induced. In association with

  15. Homolog pairing and segregation in Drosophila meiosis.

    PubMed

    McKee, B D

    2009-01-01

    Pairing of homologous chromosomes is fundamental to their reliable segregation during meiosis I and thus underlies sexual reproduction. In most eukaryotes homolog pairing is confined to prophase of meiosis I and is accompanied by frequent exchanges, known as crossovers, between homologous chromatids. Crossovers give rise to chiasmata, stable interhomolog connectors that are required for bipolar orientation (orientation to opposite poles) of homologs during meiosis I. Drosophila is unique among model eukaryotes in exhibiting regular homolog pairing in mitotic as well as meiotic cells. I review the results of recent molecular studies of pairing in both mitosis and meiosis in Drosophila. These studies show that homolog pairing is continuous between pre-meiotic mitosis and meiosis but that pairing frequencies and patterns are altered during the mitotic-meiotic transition. They also show that, with the exception of X-Y pairing in male meiosis, which is mediated specifically by the 240-bp rDNA spacer repeats, chromosome pairing is not restricted to specific sites in either mitosis or meiosis. Instead, virtually all chromosome regions, both heterochromatic and euchromatic, exhibit autonomous pairing capacity. Mutations that reduce the frequencies of both mitotic and meiotic pairing have been recently described, but no mutations that abolish pairing completely have been discovered, and the genetic control of pairing in Drosophila remains to be elucidated.

  16. Chromosomal rearrangement segregating with adrenoleukodystrophy: A molecular analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sack, G.H. Jr.; Morrell, J.C.; Chen, G.; Chen, W.; Moser, H.W. ); Alpern, M. ); Webster, T.; Caskey, C.T. Baylore College of Medicine, Houston, TX ); Feil, R.P. )

    1993-10-15

    The relationship between X chromosome-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and the red/green color pigment gene cluster on Xq28 was investigated in a large kindred. The DNA in a hemizygous male showed altered restriction fragment sizes compatible with at least a deletion extending from the 5[prime] end of the color pigment genes. Segregation analysis using a DNA probe within the color pigment gene cluster showed significant linkage with adrenoleukodystrophy (logarithm of odds score of 3.19 at [theta] = 0.0). These data demonstrate linkage, rather than association, between a unique molecular rearrangement in the color pigment gene cluster and adrenoleukodystrophy. The DNA changes in this region are thus likely to be helpful for determining the location and identity of the responsible gene. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Linking chromosome duplication and segregation via sister chromatid cohesion.

    PubMed

    Leman, Adam R; Noguchi, Eishi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication during S phase generates two identical copies of each chromosome. Each chromosome is destined for a daughter cell, but each daughter must receive one and only one copy of each chromosome. To ensure accurate chromosome segregation, eukaryotic cells are equipped with a mechanism to pair the chromosomes during chromosome duplication and hold the pairs until a bi-oriented mitotic spindle is formed and the pairs are pulled apart. This mechanism is known as sister chromatid cohesion, and its actions span the entire cell cycle. During G1, before DNA is copied during S phase, proteins termed cohesins are loaded onto DNA. Paired chromosomes are held together through G2 phase, and finally the cohesins are dismantled during mitosis. The processes governing sister chromatid cohesion ensure that newly replicated sisters are held together from the moment they are generated to the metaphase-anaphase transition, when sisters separate.

  18. Segregation as Splitting, Segregation as Joining: Schools, Housing, and the Many Modes of Jim Crow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Highsmith, Andrew R.; Erickson, Ansley T.

    2015-01-01

    Popular understandings of segregation often emphasize the Jim Crow South before the 1954 "Brown" decision and, in many instances, explain continued segregation in schooling as the result of segregated housing patterns. The case of Flint, Michigan, complicates these views, at once illustrating the depth of governmental commitment to…

  19. Segregation as Splitting, Segregation as Joining: Schools, Housing, and the Many Modes of Jim Crow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Highsmith, Andrew R.; Erickson, Ansley T.

    2015-01-01

    Popular understandings of segregation often emphasize the Jim Crow South before the 1954 "Brown" decision and, in many instances, explain continued segregation in schooling as the result of segregated housing patterns. The case of Flint, Michigan, complicates these views, at once illustrating the depth of governmental commitment to…

  20. Restriction-Modification systems interplay causes avoidance of GATC site in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Anna; Rusinov, Ivan; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Spirin, Sergey; Karyagina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Palindromes are frequently underrepresented in prokaryotic genomes. Palindromic 5[Formula: see text]-GATC-3[Formula: see text] site is a recognition site of different Restriction-Modification (R-M) systems, as well as solitary methyltransferase Dam. Classical GATC-specific R-M systems methylate GATC and cleave unmethylated GATC. On the contrary, methyl-directed Type II restriction endonucleases cleave methylated GATC. Methylation of GATC by Dam methyltransferase is involved in the regulation of different cellular processes. The diversity of functions of GATC-recognizing proteins makes GATC sequence a good model for studying the reasons of palindrome avoidance in prokaryotic genomes. In this work, the influence of R-M systems and solitary proteins on the GATC site avoidance is described by a mathematical model. GATC avoidance is strongly associated with the presence of alternate (methyl-directed or classical Type II R-M system) genes in different strains of the same species, as we have shown for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Eubacterium rectale, and Moraxella catarrhalis. We hypothesize that GATC avoidance can result from a DNA exchange between strains with different methylation status of GATC site within the process of natural transformation. If this hypothesis is correct, the GATC avoidance is a sign of a DNA exchange between bacteria with different methylation status in a mixed population.

  1. Prokaryotic diversity, composition structure, and phylogenetic analysis of microbial communities in leachate sediment ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Wu, Weixiang; Chen, Chongjun; Sun, Faqian; Chen, Yingxu

    2011-09-01

    In order to obtain insight into the prokaryotic diversity and community in leachate sediment, a culture-independent DNA-based molecular phylogenetic approach was performed with archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from leachate sediment of an aged landfill. A total of 59 archaeal and 283 bacterial rDNA phylotypes were identified in 425 archaeal and 375 bacterial analyzed clones. All archaeal clones distributed within two archaeal phyla of the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, and well-defined methanogen lineages, especially Methanosaeta spp., are the most numerically dominant species of the archaeal community. Phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial library revealed a variety of pollutant-degrading and biotransforming microorganisms, including 18 distinct phyla. A substantial fraction of bacterial clones showed low levels of similarity with any previously documented sequences and thus might be taxonomically new. Chemical characteristics and phylogenetic inferences indicated that (1) ammonium-utilizing bacteria might form consortia to alleviate or avoid the negative influence of high ammonium concentration on other microorganisms, and (2) members of the Crenarchaeota found in the sediment might be involved in ammonium oxidation. This study is the first to report the composition of the microbial assemblages and phylogenetic characteristics of prokaryotic populations extant in leachate sediment. Additional work on microbial activity and contaminant biodegradation remains to be explored.

  2. Identification of SmtB/ArsR cis elements and proteins in archaea using the Prokaryotic InterGenic Exploration Database (PIGED)

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Michael; Slick, David; Sarto, Mickey J.; Roberts, David; Roberts, Jacqueline; Barber, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial genome sequencing projects have revealed an apparently wide distribution of SmtB/ArsR metal-responsive transcriptional regulators among prokaryotes. Using a position-dependent weight matrix approach, prokaryotic genome sequences were screened for SmtB/ArsR DNA binding sites using data derived from intergenic sequences upstream of orthologous genes encoding these regulators. Sixty SmtB/ArsR operators linked to metal detoxification genes, including nine among various archaeal species, are predicted among 230 annotated and draft prokaryotic genome sequences. Independent multiple sequence alignments of putative operator sites and corresponding winged helix-turn-helix motifs define sequence signatures for the DNA binding activity of this SmtB/ArsR subfamily. Prediction of an archaeal SmtB/ArsR based upon these signature sequences is confirmed using purified Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A protein and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Tools used in this study have been incorporated into a web application, the Prokaryotic InterGenic Exploration Database (PIGED; http://bioinformatics.uwp.edu/~PIGED/home.htm), facilitating comparable studies. Use of this tool and establishment of orthology based on DNA binding signatures holds promise for deciphering potential cellular roles of various archaeal winged helix-turn-helix transcriptional regulators. PMID:16877320

  3. Ion segregation in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hongtao; Li, Jiebo; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Hailong; Zhuang, Wei; Gao, Yi Qin; Zheng, Junrong

    2012-12-13

    Microscopic structures and dynamics of aqueous salt solutions were investigated with the ultrafast vibrational energy exchange method and anisotropy measurements. In KSCN aqueous solutions of various concentrations, the rotational time constants of SCN(-) anions are proportional to the viscosities of the solutions. However, the reorientation dynamics of the water molecules are only slightly affected by the solution viscosity. With the addition of strongly hydrated F(-) anions, the rotations of both SCN(-) anions and water molecules slow down. With the addition of weakly hydrated I(-) anions, only the rotation of SCN(-) anions slows down with that of water molecules unaffected. Vibrational energy exchange measurements show that the separation among SCN(-) anions decreases with the addition of F(-) and increases with the addition of I(-). The series of experiments clearly demonstrate that both structures and dynamics of ion and water are segregated in the strong electrolyte aqueous solutions.

  4. Curvature-induced lipid segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Meng, Qing-Tian; B. Selinger Robin, L.; V. Selinger, Jonathan; Ye, Fang-Fu

    2015-06-01

    We investigate how an externally imposed curvature influences lipid segregation on two-phase-coexistent membranes. We show that the bending-modulus contrast of the two phases and the curvature act together to yield a reduced effective line tension. On largely curved membranes, a state of multiple domains (or rafts) forms due to a mechanism analogous to that causing magnetic-vortex formation in type-II superconductors. We determine the criterion for such a multi-domain state to occur; we then calculate respectively the size of the domains formed on cylindrically and spherically curved membranes. Project supported by the Hundred-Talent Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (FY) and the National Science Foundation of USA via Grant DMR-1106014 (RLBS, JVS).

  5. Replication initiation and DNA topology: The twisted life of the origin.

    PubMed

    Rampakakis, E; Gkogkas, C; Di Paola, D; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M

    2010-05-01

    Genomic propagation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is tightly regulated at the level of initiation, ensuring that the genome is accurately replicated and equally segregated to the daughter cells. Even though replication origins and the proteins that bind onto them (initiator proteins) have diverged throughout the course of evolution, the mechanism of initiation has been conserved, consisting of origin recognition, multi-protein complex assembly, helicase activation and loading of the replicative machinery. Recruitment of the multiprotein initiation complexes onto the replication origins is constrained by the dense packing of the DNA within the nucleus and unusual structures such as knots and supercoils. In this review, we focus on the DNA topological barriers that the multi-protein complexes have to overcome in order to access the replication origins and how the topological state of the origins changes during origin firing. Recent advances in the available methodologies to study DNA topology and their clinical significance are also discussed. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Genomic determinants of protein folding thermodynamics in prokaryotic organisms.

    PubMed

    Bastolla, Ugo; Moya, Andrés; Viguera, Enrique; van Ham, Roeland C H J

    2004-11-05

    Here we investigate how thermodynamic properties of orthologous proteins are influenced by the genomic environment in which they evolve. We performed a comparative computational study of 21 protein families in 73 prokaryotic species and obtained the following main results. (i) Protein stability with respect to the unfolded state and with respect to misfolding are anticorrelated. There appears to be a trade-off between these two properties, which cannot be optimized simultaneously. (ii) Folding thermodynamic parameters are strongly correlated with two genomic features, genome size and G+C composition. In particular, the normalized energy gap, an indicator of folding efficiency in statistical mechanical models of protein folding, is smaller in proteins of organisms with a small genome size and a compositional bias towards A+T. Such genomic features are characteristic for bacteria with an intracellular lifestyle. We interpret these correlations in light of mutation pressure and natural selection. A mutational bias toward A+T at the DNA level translates into a mutational bias toward more hydrophobic (and in general more interactive) proteins, a consequence of the structure of the genetic code. Increased hydrophobicity renders proteins more stable against unfolding but less stable against misfolding. Proteins with high hydrophobicity and low stability against misfolding occur in organisms with reduced genomes, like obligate intracellular bacteria. We argue that they are fixed because these organisms experience weaker purifying selection due to their small effective population sizes. This interpretation is supported by the observation of a high expression level of chaperones in these bacteria. Our results indicate that the mutational spectrum of a genome and the strength of selection significantly influence protein folding thermodynamics.

  7. Sex Segregation in U.S. Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrington, William J.; Troske, Kenneth R.

    1998-01-01

    Data from the Worker-Establishment Characteristics Database demonstrate that (1) interplant sex segregation in U.S. manufacturing is substantial, especially in blue-collar occupations; (2) female managers tend to work in the same plants as female supervisees; and (3) interplant sex segregation accounts for a substantial portion of the male-female…

  8. Arab American Residential Segregation: Differences in Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrillo, Vincent N.

    In order to determine the extent of residential segregation among first or second generation Arabs living in and around Paterson, New Jersey, 286 families were located and interviewed. Field data were combined with statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau Population and Housing Summary Tape File 1-A. It was found that residential segregation was not…

  9. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2010-01-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual’s segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial–ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces. PMID:21643546

  10. Ethnic Segregation in Arizona Charter Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Casey D.; Glass, Gene V.

    1999-01-01

    Addressed whether Arizona charter schools were more ethnically segregated than traditional public schools by studying 55 urban and 57 rural charter schools. Nearly half showed evidence of substantial ethnic segregation, and charter schools were higher in white enrollment than other public schools. (SLD)

  11. High School Socioeconomic Segregation and Student Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palardy, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, this study examines the association between high school socioeconomic segregation and student attainment outcomes and the mechanisms that mediate those relationships. The results show that socioeconomic segregation has a strong association with high school graduation and college enrollment.…

  12. Occupational Segregation by Sex: Trends and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Francine D.; Hendricks, Wallace E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates postwar trends in occupational segregation. Finds segregation increased slightly between 1950-60 as predominantly female clerical/professional jobs increased. Occupation mix changes (1960-70) were neutral in impact, but male inflow into female professions and female inflow into male sales/clerical jobs produced modest segregation…

  13. On the Evolutionary Stability of Mendelian Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Úbeda, Francisco; Haig, David

    2005-01-01

    We present a model of a primary locus subject to viability selection and an unlinked locus that causes sex-specific modification of the segregation ratio at the primary locus. If there is a balanced polymorphism at the primary locus, a population undergoing Mendelian segregation can be invaded by modifier alleles that cause sex-specific biases in the segregation ratio. Even though this effect is particularly strong if reciprocal heterozygotes at the primary locus have distinct viabilities, as might occur with genomic imprinting, it also applies if reciprocal heterozygotes have equal viabilities. The expected outcome of the evolution of sex-specific segregation distorters is all-and-none segregation schemes in which one allele at the primary locus undergoes complete drive in spermatogenesis and the other allele undergoes complete drive in oogenesis. All-and-none segregation results in a population in which all individuals are maximally fit heterozygotes. Unlinked modifiers that alter the segregation ratio are unable to invade such a population. These results raise questions about the reasons for the ubiquity of Mendelian segregation. PMID:15911587

  14. On the evolutionary stability of Mendelian segregation.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, Francisco; Haig, David

    2005-07-01

    We present a model of a primary locus subject to viability selection and an unlinked locus that causes sex-specific modification of the segregation ratio at the primary locus. If there is a balanced polymorphism at the primary locus, a population undergoing Mendelian segregation can be invaded by modifier alleles that cause sex-specific biases in the segregation ratio. Even though this effect is particularly strong if reciprocal heterozygotes at the primary locus have distinct viabilities, as might occur with genomic imprinting, it also applies if reciprocal heterozygotes have equal viabilities. The expected outcome of the evolution of sex-specific segregation distorters is all-and-none segregation schemes in which one allele at the primary locus undergoes complete drive in spermatogenesis and the other allele undergoes complete drive in oogenesis. All-and-none segregation results in a population in which all individuals are maximally fit heterozygotes. Unlinked modifiers that alter the segregation ratio are unable to invade such a population. These results raise questions about the reasons for the ubiquity of Mendelian segregation.

  15. Administrative Segregation for Mentally Ill Inmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Maureen L.

    2007-01-01

    Largely the result of prison officials needing to safely and efficiently manage a volatile inmate population, administrative segregation or supermax facilities are criticized as violating basic human needs, particularly for mentally ill inmates. The present study compared Colorado offenders with mental illness (OMIs) to nonOMIs in segregated and…

  16. Sex Segregation in Undergraduate Engineering Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litzler, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Gender inequality in engineering persists in spite of women reaching parity in college enrollments and degrees granted. To date, no analyses of educational sex segregation have comprehensively examined segregation within one discipline. To move beyond traditional methods of studying the long-standing stratification by field of study in higher…

  17. Losing Ground: School Segregation in Massachuestts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayscue, Jennifer B.; Greenberg, Alyssa

    2013-01-01

    Though once a leader in school integration, Massachusetts has regressed over the last two decades as its students of color have experienced intensifying school segregation. This report investigates trends in school segregation in Massachusetts by examining concentration, exposure, and evenness measures by both race and class. First, the report…

  18. 43 CFR 2091.3-1 - Segregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1719) segregates the lands for a period of 2 years... in a right-of-way application for the generation of electrical energy under 43 CFR subpart 2804 from wind or solar sources. In addition, the Bureau of Land Management may also segregate lands that...

  19. Ethnic Segregation in Arizona Charter Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Casey D.; Glass, Gene V.

    1999-01-01

    Addressed whether Arizona charter schools were more ethnically segregated than traditional public schools by studying 55 urban and 57 rural charter schools. Nearly half showed evidence of substantial ethnic segregation, and charter schools were higher in white enrollment than other public schools. (SLD)

  20. Segregating random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) in Betula alleghaniensis.

    PubMed

    Roy, A; Frascaria, N; Mackay, J; Bousquet, J

    1992-11-01

    Molecular markers are currently being developed for Betula alleghaniensis Britton using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Arbitrarily designed 11-mer primers were tested on three intraspecific controlled crosses for which more than 15 full-sibs were available. Using two of these primers, we were able to genetically characterize a total of nine polymorphic RAPD markers. Segregation of these markers was consistent with a biparental diploid mode of inheritance, and all appeared dominant. RAPDs were valuable in detecting contaminants and, therefore, in assessing the validity of controlled crosses. Limitations of the technique are discussed in relation to the determination of parental genotypes and construction of linkage maps for hardwood species.

  1. A spindle-like apparatus guides bacterial chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Ptacin, Jerod L; Lee, Steven F; Garner, Ethan C; Toro, Esteban; Eckart, Michael; Comolli, Luis R; Moerner, W E; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-08-01

    Until recently, a dedicated mitotic apparatus that segregates newly replicated chromosomes into daughter cells was believed to be unique to eukaryotic cells. Here we demonstrate that the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus segregates its chromosome using a partitioning (Par) apparatus that has surprising similarities to eukaryotic spindles. We show that the C. crescentus ATPase ParA forms linear polymers in vitro and assembles into a narrow linear structure in vivo. The centromere-binding protein ParB binds to and destabilizes ParA structures in vitro. We propose that this ParB-stimulated ParA depolymerization activity moves the centromere to the opposite cell pole through a burnt bridge Brownian ratchet mechanism. Finally, we identify the pole-specific TipN protein as a new component of the Par system that is required to maintain the directionality of DNA transfer towards the new cell pole. Our results elucidate a bacterial chromosome segregation mechanism that features basic operating principles similar to eukaryotic mitotic machines, including a multivalent protein complex at the centromere that stimulates the dynamic disassembly of polymers to move chromosomes into daughter compartments.

  2. Prokaryotic functional diversity in different biogeochemical depth zones in tidal sediments of the Severn Estuary, UK, revealed by stable-isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Webster, Gordon; Rinna, Joachim; Roussel, Erwan G; Fry, John C; Weightman, Andrew J; Parkes, R John

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotope probing of prokaryotic DNA was used to determine active prokaryotes using (13)C-labelled substrates (glucose, acetate, CO(2)) in sediment slurries from different biogeochemical zones of the Severn Estuary, UK. Multiple, low concentrations (5 x 100 microM) of (13)C-substrate additions and short-term incubations (7 days) were used to minimize changes in the prokaryotic community, while achieving significant (13)C-incorporation. Analysis demonstrated clear metabolic activity within all slurries, although neither the net sulphate removal nor CH(4) production occurred in the anaerobic sulphate reduction and methanogenesis zone slurries. Some similarities occurred in the prokaryotic populations that developed in different sediment slurries, particularly in the aerobic and dysaerobic zone slurries with (13)C-glucose, which were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria and Marine Group 1 Archaea, whereas both anaerobic sediment slurries incubated with (13)C-acetate showed incorporation into Epsilonproteobacteria and other bacteria, with the sulphate reduction zone slurry also showing (13)C-acetate utilization by Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group Archaea. The lower potential energy methanogenesis zone slurries were the only conditions where no (13)C-incorporation into Archaea occurred, despite Bacteria being labelled; this was surprising because Archaea have been suggested to be adapted to low-energy conditions. Overall, our results highlight that uncultured prokaryotes play important ecological roles in tidal sediments of the Severn Estuary, providing new metabolic information for novel groups of Archaea and suggesting broader metabolisms for largely uncultivated Bacteria.

  3. Evolutionary constraints of phosphorylation in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gnad, Florian; Forner, Francesca; Zielinska, Dorota F; Birney, Ewan; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Mann, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    High accuracy mass spectrometry has proven to be a powerful technology for the large scale identification of serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation in the living cell. However, despite many described phosphoproteomes, there has been no comparative study of the extent of phosphorylation and its evolutionary conservation in all domains of life. Here we analyze the results of phosphoproteomics studies performed with the same technology in a diverse set of organisms. For the most ancient organisms, the prokaryotes, only a few hundred proteins have been found to be phosphorylated. Applying the same technology to eukaryotic species resulted in the detection of thousands of phosphorylation events. Evolutionary analysis shows that prokaryotic phosphoproteins are preferentially conserved in all living organisms, whereas-site specific phosphorylation is not. Eukaryotic phosphosites are generally more conserved than their non-phosphorylated counterparts (with similar structural constraints) throughout the eukaryotic domain. Yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans are two exceptions, indicating that the majority of phosphorylation events evolved after the divergence of higher eukaryotes from yeast and reflecting the unusually large number of nematode-specific kinases. Mitochondria present an interesting intermediate link between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic domains. Applying the same technology to this organelle yielded 174 phosphorylation sites mapped to 74 proteins. Thus, the mitochondrial phosphoproteome is similarly sparse as the prokaryotic phosphoproteomes. As expected from the endosymbiotic theory, phosphorylated as well as non-phosphorylated mitochondrial proteins are significantly conserved in prokaryotes. However, mitochondrial phosphorylation sites are not conserved throughout prokaryotes, consistent with the notion that serine/threonine phosphorylation in prokaryotes occurred relatively recently in evolution. Thus, the phosphoproteome reflects major events in the

  4. TAC102 Is a Novel Component of the Mitochondrial Genome Segregation Machinery in Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Anneliese; Haenni, Beat; Jakob, Martin; Schnaufer, Achim; Schimanski, Bernd; Zuber, Benoît; Ochsenreiter, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomes show an intriguing organization of their mitochondrial DNA into a catenated network, the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA). While more than 30 proteins involved in kDNA replication have been described, only few components of kDNA segregation machinery are currently known. Electron microscopy studies identified a high-order structure, the tripartite attachment complex (TAC), linking the basal body of the flagellum via the mitochondrial membranes to the kDNA. Here we describe TAC102, a novel core component of the TAC, which is essential for proper kDNA segregation during cell division. Loss of TAC102 leads to mitochondrial genome missegregation but has no impact on proper organelle biogenesis and segregation. The protein is present throughout the cell cycle and is assembled into the newly developing TAC only after the pro-basal body has matured indicating a hierarchy in the assembly process. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the TAC is replicated de novo rather than using a semi-conservative mechanism. Lastly, we demonstrate that TAC102 lacks an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence and requires sequences in the C-terminal part of the protein for its proper localization. PMID:27168148

  5. TAC102 Is a Novel Component of the Mitochondrial Genome Segregation Machinery in Trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Trikin, Roman; Doiron, Nicholas; Hoffmann, Anneliese; Haenni, Beat; Jakob, Martin; Schnaufer, Achim; Schimanski, Bernd; Zuber, Benoît; Ochsenreiter, Torsten

    2016-05-01

    Trypanosomes show an intriguing organization of their mitochondrial DNA into a catenated network, the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA). While more than 30 proteins involved in kDNA replication have been described, only few components of kDNA segregation machinery are currently known. Electron microscopy studies identified a high-order structure, the tripartite attachment complex (TAC), linking the basal body of the flagellum via the mitochondrial membranes to the kDNA. Here we describe TAC102, a novel core component of the TAC, which is essential for proper kDNA segregation during cell division. Loss of TAC102 leads to mitochondrial genome missegregation but has no impact on proper organelle biogenesis and segregation. The protein is present throughout the cell cycle and is assembled into the newly developing TAC only after the pro-basal body has matured indicating a hierarchy in the assembly process. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the TAC is replicated de novo rather than using a semi-conservative mechanism. Lastly, we demonstrate that TAC102 lacks an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence and requires sequences in the C-terminal part of the protein for its proper localization.

  6. The bacterial magnetosome: a unique prokaryotic organelle.

    PubMed

    Lower, Brian H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial magnetosome is a unique prokaryotic organelle comprising magnetic mineral crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer. These inclusions are biomineralized by the magnetotactic bacteria which are ubiquitous, aquatic, motile microorganisms. Magnetosomes cause cells of magnetotactic bacteria to passively align and swim along the Earth's magnetic field lines, as miniature motile compass needles. These specialized compartments consist of a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounding magnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The morphology of these membrane-bound crystals varies by species with a nominal magnetic domain size between 35 and 120 nm. Almost all magnetotactic bacteria arrange their magnetosomes in a chain within the cell there by maximizing the magnetic dipole moment of the cell. It is presumed that magnetotactic bacteria use magnetotaxis in conjunction with chemotaxis to locate and maintain an optimum position for growth and survival based on chemistry, redox and physiology in aquatic habitats with vertical chemical concentration and redox gradients. The biosynthesis of magnetosomes is a complex process that involves several distinct steps including cytoplasmic membrane modifications, iron uptake and transport, initiation of crystallization, crystal maturation and magnetosome chain formation. While many mechanistic details remain unresolved, magnetotactic bacteria appear to contain the genetic determinants for magnetosome biomineralization within their genomes in clusters of genes that make up what is referred to as the magnetosome gene island in some species. In addition, magnetosomes contain a unique set of proteins, not present in other cellular fractions, which control the biomineralization process. Through the development of genetic systems, proteomic and genomic work, and the use of molecular and biochemical tools, the functions of a number of magnetosome membrane proteins have been demonstrated and the molecular

  7. The copper metallome in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Rensing, Christopher; McDevitt, Sylvia Franke

    2013-01-01

    As a trace element copper has an important role in cellular function like many other transition metals. Its ability to undergo redox changes [Cu(I) ↔ Cu(II)] makes copper an ideal cofactor in enzymes catalyzing electron transfers. However, this redox change makes copper dangerous for a cell since it is able to be involved in Fenton-like reactions creating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cu(I) also is a strong soft metal and can attack and destroy iron-sulfur clusters thereby releasing iron which can in turn cause oxidative stress. Therefore, copper homeostasis has to be highly balanced to ensure proper cellular function while avoiding cell damage.Throughout evolution bacteria and archaea have developed a highly regulated balance in copper metabolism. While for many prokaryotes copper uptake seems to be unspecific, others have developed highly sophisticated uptake mechanisms to ensure the availability of sufficient amounts of copper. Within the cytoplasm copper is sequestered by various proteins and molecules, including specific copper chaperones, to prevent cellular damage. Copper-containing proteins are usually located in the cytoplasmic membrane with the catalytic domain facing the periplasm, in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria, or they are secreted, limiting the necessity of copper to accumulate in the cytoplasm. To prevent cellular damage due to excess copper, bacteria and archaea have developed various copper detoxification strategies. In this chapter we attempt to give an overview of the mechanisms employed by bacteria and archaea to handle copper and the importance of the metal for cellular function as well as in the global nutrient cycle.

  8. Kinetoplast morphology and segregation pattern as a marker for cell cycle progression in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Neha; Kumar, Devanand; Rajanala, Kalpana; Saha, Swati

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are typified by uniquely configured mitochondrial DNA--the kinetoplast. The replication timing of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) is closely linked to nuclear S phase, but nuclear and kinetoplast compartments display staggered timing of segregation, post-replication. Kinetoplast division is completed before nuclear division in Trypanosoma species while nuclear division is completed first in Crithidia species. Leishmania donovani is the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, a form of leishmanial infection that is often fatal. Cell cycle related studies in Leishmania are hampered by difficulties in synchronizing these cells. This report examines the replication/segregation pattern and morphology of the kinetoplast in L. donovani with the aim of determining if these traits can be used to assign cell cycle stage to individual cells. By labeling replicating cells with bromodeoxyuridine after synchronization with hydroxyurea, we find that although both nuclear and kDNA initiate replication in early S phase, nuclear division precedes kinetoplast segregation in 80% of the cells. The kinetoplast is roundish/short rod-like in G1 and in early to mid-S phase, but prominently elongated/bilobed in late S phase and early G2/M. These morphological traits and segregation pattern of the kinetoplast can be used as a marker for cell cycle stage in a population of asynchronously growing L. donovani promastigotes, in place of cell synchronization procedures or instead of using antibody staining for cell cycle stage marker proteins.

  9. Mass Segregation in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, J. M.; Joshi, K. J.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.; Rasio, F. A.

    2002-05-01

    We present the results of a new study of mass segregation in two-component star clusters, based on a large number of numerical N-body simulations using our recently developed dynamical Monte Carlo code. Specifically, we follow the dynamical evolution of clusters containing stars with individual masses m1 as well as a tracer population of objects with individual masses m2. We consider both light tracers (μ≡m2/m1<1) and heavy tracers (μ>1) and a variety of King model initial conditions. In all of our simulations we use a realistically large number of stars for globular clusters, N=105, but we ignore the effects of binaries and stellar evolution. For heavy tracers, which could represent stellar remnants such as neutron stars or black holes in a globular cluster, we characterize in a variety of ways the tendency for these objects to concentrate in or near the cluster core. In agreement with simple theoretical arguments, we find that the characteristic time for this mass segregation process varies as 1/μ. For models with very light tracers (μ<~10-2), which could represent free-floating planets or brown dwarfs, we find the expected depletion of light objects in the cluster core but also sometimes a significant enhancement in the halo. That is, for some initial conditions, the number density of light objects in the cluster halo increases over time, in spite of the higher overall evaporation rate of lighter objects through the tidal boundary. Using these results along with a simplified initial mass function, we estimate the optical depth to gravitational microlensing by planetary mass objects or brown dwarfs in typical globular clusters. For some initial conditions, the optical depth in the halo owing to very low mass objects could be much greater than that of luminous stars. If we apply our results to M22, using the recent null detection of Sahu, Anderson, & King, we find an upper limit of ~25% at the 63% confidence level for the current mass fraction of M22 in the

  10. Interaction of articaine hydrochloride with prokaryotic membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Lygre, Henning; Moe, Grete; Nerdal, Willy; Holmsen, Holm

    2009-01-01

    Local anesthetics are the most commonly used drugs in dentistry, with a wide range of effects, including antimicrobial activity. High antimicrobial effects have recently been reported on oral microbes from articaine hydrochloride, revealed by the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration. Additionally, articaine has recently been used as an alkaline component in endodontic materials with a proposed antibacterial activity. However, the detailed mechanisms of action have not been discussed. We determined the Langmuir surface pressure/molecular area isotherms of prokaryotic lipid monolayers, as well as the phospholipid phase transitions, by employing differential scanning calorimetry on unilamellar prokaryotic liposomes (bilayers). Articaine hydrochloride was found to interact with the prokaryotic membrane lipids in both monolayers and bilayers. An increase of the phospholipid molecular area of acidic glycerophospholipids as well as a decrease in phase transition temperature and enthalpy were found with increasing articaine hydrochloride concentration. The thermodynamic changes by adding articaine hydrochloride to prokaryotic membrane lipids are potentially related to the effects observed from antimicrobial peptides resulting from membrane insertion, aggregate composition, pore formation, and lysis. Interaction of articaine hydrochloride with prokaryotic membrane lipids is indicated. Hence, further research is necessary to gain insight into where these compounds exert their effects at the molecular level.

  11. Prokaryotic Argonautes - variations on the RNA interference theme

    PubMed Central

    van der Oost, John; Swarts, Daan C.; Jore, Matthijs M.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) has been a major scientific breakthrough. This RNA-guided RNA interference system plays a crucial role in a wide range of regulatory and defense mechanisms in eukaryotes. The key enzyme of the RNAi system is Argonaute (Ago), an endo-ribonuclease that uses a small RNA guide molecule to specifically target a complementary RNA transcript. Two functional classes of eukaryotic Ago have been described: catalytically active Ago that cleaves RNA targets complementary to its guide, and inactive Ago that uses its guide to bind target RNA to down-regulate translation efficiency. A recent comparative genomics study has revealed that Argonaute-like proteins are also encoded by prokaryotic genomes. Interestingly, there is a lot of variation among these prokaryotic Argonaute (pAgo) proteins with respect to domain architecture: some resemble the eukaryotic Ago (long pAgo) containing a complete or disrupted catalytic site, while others are truncated versions (short pAgo) that generally contain an incomplete catalytic site. Prokaryotic Agos with an incomplete catalytic site often co-occur with (predicted) nucleases. Based on this diversity, and on the fact that homologs of other RNAi-related protein components (such as Dicer nucleases) have never been identified in prokaryotes, it has been predicted that variations on the eukaryotic RNAi theme may occur in prokaryotes. PMID:28357239

  12. Differential response of marine flagellate communities to prokaryotic food quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Corte, D.; Paredes, G.; Sintes, E.; Herndl, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    Marine prokaryotes play a major role in the biogeochemical cycles. The main predators of prokaryotes are heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF). HNF are thus a major link connecting dissolved organic material through prokaryotic grazing to the higher trophic levels. However, little is known about the grazing specificity of HNF on specific prokaryotic taxa. Bacterial and archaeal microbes may have different nutritive values for the HNF communities, thus affecting growth rates and community composition of HNFs. In this study we investigated the influence of prey food quality on Cafeteria roenbergensis and on a natural HNF community isolated in the northern Adriatic Sea. Two Nitrosopumilus maritimus-related strains isolated from the northern Adriatic Sea (Nitrosopumilus adriaticus, Nitrosopumilus piranensis), two Nitrosococcus strains and two fast growing marine Bacteria (Pseudomonas marina and Marinobacter algicola) were fed to the HNFs. The two fast growing bacterial strains resulted in high growth rates of Cafeteria roenbergensis and the mixed HNF community, while the two Nitrosococcus strains did not. Cafeteria roenbergensis fed on N. adriaticus but it did not graze N. piranensis, suggesting that the subtle metabolic and physiological differences between these two closely related thaumarchaeal strains affect the grazing pressure to which they are exposed. Our study also indicates that prokaryotic community composition influences the composition of the HNF community.

  13. P2TF: a comprehensive resource for analysis of prokaryotic transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ortet, Philippe; De Luca, Gilles; Whitworth, David E; Barakat, Mohamed

    2012-11-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) are DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by activating or repressing transcription. Some have housekeeping roles, while others regulate the expression of specific genes in response to environmental change. The majority of TFs are multi-domain proteins, and they can be divided into families according to their domain organisation. There is a need for user-friendly, rigorous and consistent databases to allow researchers to overcome the inherent variability in annotation between genome sequences. P2TF (Predicted Prokaryotic Transcription Factors) is an integrated and comprehensive database relating to transcription factor proteins. The current version of the database contains 372,877 TFs from 1,987 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and 43 metagenomes. The database provides annotation, classification and visualisation of TF genes and their genetic context, providing researchers with a one-stop shop in which to investigate TFs. The P2TF database analyses TFs in both predicted proteomes and reconstituted ORFeomes, recovering approximately 3% more TF proteins than just screening predicted proteomes. Users are able to search the database with sequence or domain architecture queries, and resulting hits can be aligned to investigate evolutionary relationships and conservation of residues. To increase utility, all searches can be filtered by taxonomy, TF genes can be added to the P2TF cart, and gene lists can be exported for external analysis in a variety of formats. P2TF is an open resource for biologists, allowing exploration of all TFs within prokaryotic genomes and metagenomes. The database enables a variety of analyses, and results are presented for user exploration as an interactive web interface, which provides different ways to access and download the data. The database is freely available at http://www.p2tf.org/.

  14. Adaptive role of increased frequency of polypurine tracts in mRNA sequences of thermophilic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Paz, Arnon; Mester, David; Baca, Ivan; Nevo, Eviatar; Korol, Abraham

    2004-03-02

    The mechanism of an organism's adaptation to high temperatures has been investigated intensively in recent years. It was suggested that the macromolecules of thermophilic microorganisms (especially proteins) have structural features that enhance their thermostability. We compared mRNA sequences of 72 fully sequenced prokaryotic proteomes (14 thermophilic and 58 mesophilic species). Although the differences between the percentage of adenine plus guanine content of whole mRNAs of different prokaryotic species are much lower than those of guanine plus cytosine content, the thermophile purine-pyrimidine (R/Y) ratio within their mRNAs is significantly higher than that of the mesophiles. The first and third codon positions of both thermophiles and mesophiles are purine-biased, with the bias more pronounced by the thermophiles. Thermophile mRNAs that display the highest R/Y ratio (1.43-1.69) are those of the ribosomal proteins, histone-like proteins, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunits, and heat-shock proteins. Within mesophilic prokaryotes and five eukaryotic species, the R/Y ratio of the mRNAs of heat-shock proteins is higher than their average over coding part of the genome. Polypurine tracts (R)(n) (with n > or = 5) are much more abundant within the thermophile mRNAs compared with mesophiles. Between two sequential pure-purinic codons of thermophile mRNAs, there is a rather strong tendency for the occurrence of adenine but not guanine tracts. The data suggest that mixed adenine.guanine and polyadenine tracts in mRNAs increase the thermostability beyond the contribution of amino acids encoded by purine tracts, which highlights the importance of ecological stress in the evolution of genome architecture.

  15. P2TF: a comprehensive resource for analysis of prokaryotic transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transcription factors (TFs) are DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by activating or repressing transcription. Some have housekeeping roles, while others regulate the expression of specific genes in response to environmental change. The majority of TFs are multi-domain proteins, and they can be divided into families according to their domain organisation. There is a need for user-friendly, rigorous and consistent databases to allow researchers to overcome the inherent variability in annotation between genome sequences. Description P2TF (Predicted Prokaryotic Transcription Factors) is an integrated and comprehensive database relating to transcription factor proteins. The current version of the database contains 372,877 TFs from 1,987 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and 43 metagenomes. The database provides annotation, classification and visualisation of TF genes and their genetic context, providing researchers with a one-stop shop in which to investigate TFs. The P2TF database analyses TFs in both predicted proteomes and reconstituted ORFeomes, recovering approximately 3% more TF proteins than just screening predicted proteomes. Users are able to search the database with sequence or domain architecture queries, and resulting hits can be aligned to investigate evolutionary relationships and conservation of residues. To increase utility, all searches can be filtered by taxonomy, TF genes can be added to the P2TF cart, and gene lists can be exported for external analysis in a variety of formats. Conclusions P2TF is an open resource for biologists, allowing exploration of all TFs within prokaryotic genomes and metagenomes. The database enables a variety of analyses, and results are presented for user exploration as an interactive web interface, which provides different ways to access and download the data. The database is freely available at http://www.p2tf.org/. PMID:23153078

  16. Process for the physical segregation of minerals

    DOEpatents

    Yingling, Jon C.; Ganguli, Rajive

    2004-01-06

    With highly heterogeneous groups or streams of minerals, physical segregation using online quality measurements is an economically important first stage of the mineral beneficiation process. Segregation enables high quality fractions of the stream to bypass processing, such as cleaning operations, thereby reducing the associated costs and avoiding the yield losses inherent in any downstream separation process. The present invention includes various methods for reliably segregating a mineral stream into at least one fraction meeting desired quality specifications while at the same time maximizing yield of that fraction.

  17. Granular size segregation in underwater sand ripples.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, G; Caps, H; Wesfreid, J-E

    2004-02-01

    We report an experimental study of a binary sand bed under an oscillating water flow. The formation and evolution of ripples is observed. The appearance of a granular segregation is shown to strongly depend on the sand bed preparation. The initial wavelength of the mixture is measured. In the final steady state, a segregation in volume is observed instead of a segregation at the surface as reported before. The correlation between this phenomenon and the fluid flow is emphasised. Finally, different "exotic" patterns and their geophysical implications are presented.

  18. Nuclear geometry and rapid mitosis ensure asymmetric episome segregation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Gehlen, Lutz R; Nagai, Shigeki; Shimada, Kenji; Meister, Peter; Taddei, Angela; Gasser, Susan M

    2011-01-11

    Asymmetric cell division drives the generation of differentiated cells and maintenance of stem cells. In budding yeast, autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) plasmids lacking centromere elements are asymmetrically segregated into the mother cell, where they are thought to contribute to cellular senescence. This phenomenon has been proposed to result from the active retention of plasmids through an interaction with nuclear pores. To investigate the mother-daughter segregation bias of plasmids, we used live-cell imaging to follow the behavior of extrachromosomal DNA. We show that both an excised DNA ring and a centromere-deficient ARS plasmid move freely in the nucleoplasm yet show a strong segregation bias for the mother cell. Computational modeling shows that the geometrical shape of the dividing yeast nucleus and length of mitosis severely restrict the passive diffusion of episomes into daughter nuclei. Predictions based on simulated nuclear division were tested with mutants that extend the length of mitosis. Finally, explaining how various anchors can improve mitotic segregation, we show that plasmid partitioning is improved by tethering the plasmid to segregating structures, such as the nuclear envelope and telomeres. The morphology and brevity of mitotic division in budding yeast impose physical constraints on the diffusion of material into the daughter, obviating the need for a retention mechanism to generate rejuvenated offspring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. RiboDB Database: A Comprehensive Resource for Prokaryotic Systematics.

    PubMed

    Jauffrit, Frédéric; Penel, Simon; Delmotte, Stéphane; Rey, Carine; de Vienne, Damien M; Gouy, Manolo; Charrier, Jean-Philippe; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Brochier-Armanet, Céline

    2016-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) are increasingly used as an alternative to ribosomal rRNA for prokaryotic systematics. However, their routine use is difficult because r-proteins are often not or wrongly annotated in complete genome sequences, and there is currently no dedicated exhaustive database of r-proteins. RiboDB aims at fulfilling this gap. This weekly updated comprehensive database allows the fast and easy retrieval of r-protein sequences from publicly available complete prokaryotic genome sequences. The current version of RiboDB contains 90 r-proteins from 3,750 prokaryotic complete genomes encompassing 38 phyla/major classes and 1,759 different species. RiboDB is accessible at http://ribodb.univ-lyon1.fr and through ACNUC interfaces. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Coevolution of the Organization and Structure of Prokaryotic Genomes.

    PubMed

    Touchon, Marie; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2016-01-04

    The cytoplasm of prokaryotes contains many molecular machines interacting directly with the chromosome. These vital interactions depend on the chromosome structure, as a molecule, and on the genome organization, as a unit of genetic information. Strong selection for the organization of the genetic elements implicated in these interactions drives replicon ploidy, gene distribution, operon conservation, and the formation of replication-associated traits. The genomes of prokaryotes are also very plastic with high rates of horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. The evolutionary conflicts between plasticity and organization lead to the formation of regions with high genetic diversity whose impact on chromosome structure is poorly understood. Prokaryotic genomes are remarkable documents of natural history because they carry the imprint of all of these selective and mutational forces. Their study allows a better understanding of molecular mechanisms, their impact on microbial evolution, and how they can be tinkered in synthetic biology.

  1. Structure-function insights into prokaryotic and eukaryotic translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Myasnikov, Alexander G; Simonetti, Angelita; Marzi, Stefano; Klaholz, Bruno P

    2009-06-01

    Translation initiation is the rate-limiting and most complexly regulated step of protein synthesis in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In the last few years, cryo-electron microscopy has provided several novel insights into the universal process of translation initiation. Structures of prokaryotic 30S and 70S ribosomal initiation complexes with initiator transfer RNA (tRNA), messenger RNA (mRNA), and initiation factors have recently revealed the mechanism of initiator tRNA recruitment to the assembling ribosomal machinery, involving molecular rearrangements of the ribosome and associated factors. First three-dimensional pictures of the particularly complex eukaryotic translation initiation machinery have been obtained, revealing how initiation factors tune the ribosome for recruiting the mRNA. A comparison of the available prokaryotic and eukaryotic structures shows that--besides significant differences--some key ribosomal features are universally conserved.

  2. Predation between prokaryotes and the origin of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Davidov, Yaacov; Jurkevitch, Edouard

    2009-07-01

    Accumulating data suggest that the eukaryotic cell originated from a merger of two prokaryotes, an archaeal host and a bacterial endosymbiont. However, since prokaryotes are unable to perform phagocytosis, the means by which the endosymbiont entered its host is an enigma. We suggest that a predatory or parasitic interaction between prokaryotes provides a reasonable explanation for this conundrum. According to the model presented here, the host in this interaction was an anaerobic archaeon with a periplasm-like space. The predator was a small (facultative) aerobic alpha-proteobacterium, which penetrated and replicated within the host periplasm, and later became the mitochondria. Plausible conditions under which this interaction took place and circumstances that may have led to the contemporary complex eukaryotic cell are discussed.

  3. Energetics and genetics across the prokaryote-eukaryote divide

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background All complex life on Earth is eukaryotic. All eukaryotic cells share a common ancestor that arose just once in four billion years of evolution. Prokaryotes show no tendency to evolve greater morphological complexity, despite their metabolic virtuosity. Here I argue that the eukaryotic cell originated in a unique prokaryotic endosymbiosis, a singular event that transformed the selection pressures acting on both host and endosymbiont. Results The reductive evolution and specialisation of endosymbionts to mitochondria resulted in an extreme genomic asymmetry, in which the residual mitochondrial genomes enabled the expansion of bioenergetic membranes over several orders of magnitude, overcoming the energetic constraints on prokaryotic genome size, and permitting the host cell genome to expand (in principle) over 200,000-fold. This energetic transformation was permissive, not prescriptive; I suggest that the actual increase in early eukaryotic genome size was driven by a heavy early bombardment of genes and introns from the endosymbiont to the host cell, producing a high mutation rate. Unlike prokaryotes, with lower mutation rates and heavy selection pressure to lose genes, early eukaryotes without genome-size limitations could mask mutations by cell fusion and genome duplication, as in allopolyploidy, giving rise to a proto-sexual cell cycle. The side effect was that a large number of shared eukaryotic basal traits accumulated in the same population, a sexual eukaryotic common ancestor, radically different to any known prokaryote. Conclusions The combination of massive bioenergetic expansion, release from genome-size constraints, and high mutation rate favoured a protosexual cell cycle and the accumulation of eukaryotic traits. These factors explain the unique origin of eukaryotes, the absence of true evolutionary intermediates, and the evolution of sex in eukaryotes but not prokaryotes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by: Eugene Koonin, William Martin

  4. Transplantation of prokaryotic two-component signaling pathways into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jonathan; Mailand, Erik; Swaminathan, Krishna Kumar; Schreiber, Joerg; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2014-11-04

    Signaling pathway engineering is a promising route toward synthetic biological circuits. Histidine-aspartate phosphorelays are thought to have evolved in prokaryotes where they form the basis for two-component signaling. Tyrosine-serine-threonine phosphorelays, exemplified by MAP kinase cascades, are predominant in eukaryotes. Recently, a prokaryotic two-component pathway was implemented in a plant species to sense environmental trinitrotoluene. We reasoned that "transplantation" of two-component pathways into mammalian host could provide an orthogonal and diverse toolkit for a variety of signal processing tasks. Here we report that two-component pathways could be partially reconstituted in mammalian cell culture and used for programmable control of gene expression. To enable this reconstitution, coding sequences of histidine kinase (HK) and response regulator (RR) components were codon-optimized for human cells, whereas the RRs were fused with a transactivation domain. Responsive promoters were furnished by fusing DNA binding sites in front of a minimal promoter. We found that coexpression of HKs and their cognate RRs in cultured mammalian cells is necessary and sufficient to strongly induce gene expression even in the absence of pathways' chemical triggers in the medium. Both loss-of-function and constitutive mutants behaved as expected. We further used the two-component signaling pathways to implement two-input logical AND, NOR, and OR gene regulation. Thus, two-component systems can be applied in different capacities in mammalian cells and their components can be used for large-scale synthetic gene circuits.

  5. An epitope tagged mammalian/prokaryotic expression vector with positive selection of cloned inserts.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S; Georgiev, O; Buchert, M; Adams, M T; Moelling, K; Hovens, C M

    1997-09-15

    A dual eukaryotic/prokaryotic expression vector has been developed which combines the features of positive selection for cloned inserts along with the production of an epitope-tagged cDNA insert by transient transfection in mammalian cells as well as high level induced expression in E. coli cells harbouring T7 RNA polymerase. This vector, pZilch, has two MCSs flanking a mutant E. coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase gene, pheS, which when expressed in combination with the phenylalanine analog p-CI-Phe, results in termination of host cell protein synthesis. Cloning of inserts using unique sites in the flanking MCS regions results in loss of the pZilch pheS allele and hence permits growth of colonies harbouring recombinants on p-Cl-Phe plates. Additional features of the vector include an optimal Kozak consensus sequence for high level eukaryotic cell expression and an efficient prokaryotic translation initiation site in frame and downstream from the eukaryotic initiation site. Recombinant proteins can be produced with an N-terminal FLAG epitope which can be removed via a specific protease cleavage site. Flanking T7 and SP6 RNA polymerase promoter sites permit in vitro transcription and translation of cloned inserts. A derivative of the vector has also been constructed enabling nuclear accumulation of the tagged proteins via an SV40 nuclear localisation signal upstream of the 5' MCS.

  6. Capabilities and limitations of DGGE for the analysis of hydrocarbonoclastic prokaryotic communities directly in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Al-Mailem, Dina M; Kansour, Mayada K; Radwan, Samir S

    2017-05-18

    Prokaryotic communities in pristine and oil-contaminated desert soil, seawater, and hypersaline coastal soil were analyzed using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. The former technique was the dilution-plating method. For the latter, total genomic DNA was extracted and the 16S rRNA genes were amplified using a universal bacterial primer pair and primer pairs specific for Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Archaea. The amplicons were resolved using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequenced, and the sequences were compared to those in GenBank. The plating method offered the advantages of capturing the targeted hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms, counting them and providing cultures for further study. However, this technique could not capture more than a total of 15 different prokaryotic taxa. Those taxa belonged predominantly to the genera Alcanivorax, Pseudoxanthomonas, Bosea, Halomonas, and Marinobacter. The individual isolates in culture consumed between 19 and 50% of the available crude oil in 10 days. Although the culture-independent approach revealed much more microbial diversity, it was not problem-free. The subdivision primers exhibited satisfactory specificity, but they failed to capture all the available taxa. The universal bacterial primer pair ignored Actinobacteria altogether, although the primer pair specific for Actinobacteria captured many of them, for example, the genera Geodermatophilus, Streptomyces, Mycobacterium, Pontimonas, Rhodococcus, Blastococcus, Kocuria, and many others. Because most researchers worldwide use universal primers for PCR, this finding should be considered critically to avoid misleading interpretations. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pyrosequencing assessment of prokaryotic and eukaryotic diversity in biofilm communities from a French river

    PubMed Central

    Bricheux, Geneviève; Morin, Loïc; Le Moal, Gwenaël; Coffe, Gérard; Balestrino, Damien; Charbonnel, Nicolas; Bohatier, Jacques; Forestier, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Despite the recent and significant increase in the study of aquatic microbial communities, little is known about the microbial diversity of complex ecosystems such as running waters. This study investigated the biodiversity of biofilm communities formed in a river with 454 Sequencing™. This river has the particularity of integrating both organic and microbiological pollution, as receiver of agricultural pollution in its upstream catchment area and urban pollution through discharges of the wastewater treatment plant of the town of Billom. Different regions of the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene were targeted using nine pairs of primers, either universal or specific for bacteria, eukarya, or archaea. Our aim was to characterize the widest range of rDNA sequences using different sets of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. A first look at reads abundance revealed that a large majority (47–48%) were rare sequences (<5 copies). Prokaryotic phyla represented the species richness, and eukaryotic phyla accounted for a small part. Among the prokaryotic phyla, Proteobacteria (beta and alpha) predominated, followed by Bacteroidetes together with a large number of nonaffiliated bacterial sequences. Bacillariophyta plastids were abundant. The remaining bacterial phyla, Verrucomicrobia and Cyanobacteria, made up the rest of the bulk biodiversity. The most abundant eukaryotic phyla were annelid worms, followed by Diatoms, and Chlorophytes. These latter phyla attest to the abundance of plastids and the importance of photosynthetic activity for the biofilm. These findings highlight the existence and plasticity of multiple trophic levels within these complex biological systems. PMID:23520129

  8. One-component systems dominate signal transduction in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Luke E.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2009-01-01

    Two-component systems that link environmental signals to cellular responses are viewed as the primary mode of signal transduction in prokaryotes. By analyz-ing information encoded by 145 prokaryotic genomes, we found that the majority of signal transduction systems consist of a single protein that contains input and output domains but lacks phosphotransfer domains typical of two-component systems. One-component systems are evolutionarily older, more widely distributed among bacteria and archaea, and display a greater diversity of domains than two-component systems. PMID:15680762

  9. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic integral membrane proteins have similar architecture.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Rajneesh Kumar; Natekar, Girija Arun

    2010-03-01

    Integral membrane proteins constitute a major constituent of lipid bilayer both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The statistical analysis was carried out to determine the bias in amino acid distribution between prokaryotic and eukaryotic integral membrane proteins (pIntMPs and eIntMPs). Our results indicate that both pIntMPs and eIntMPs demonstrate the striking similarity in amino acid distribution in their transmembrane and extramembranous region. pIntMPs have relatively greater functional importance for Gly and Asn in comparison to eIntMPs.

  10. Possible segregation caused by centrifugal titanium casting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Kanatani, M; Nakano, S; Miyakawa, O; Kobayashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The possibility of the segregation under solidification process using a centrifugal casting machine was investigated using an electron probe microanalyzer with elemental distribution map, line analysis and quantitative analysis. When a very small quantity of platinum was added to local molten titanium during the casting process, macroscopic segregation was observed under conditions of density difference of 0.1 g/cm3 at the most, confirming that the centrifugal force of the casting machine is extremely strong. When a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was cast, however, no macroscopic segregation was observed. The centrifugal force of the casting machine examined in the present study hardly results in the body-force segregation in this titanium alloy.

  11. The Distribution of Segregation in Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    A prediction from ecological theory relating the distribution of residential segregation between inner and outer zones of a metropolitan area to conditions of population growth, expansion, etc. was tested using 1960 data on the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area. (JM)

  12. The Distribution of Segregation in Atlanta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    A prediction from ecological theory relating the distribution of residential segregation between inner and outer zones of a metropolitan area to conditions of population growth, expansion, etc. was tested using 1960 data on the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area. (JM)

  13. Mispredicting the hedonic benefits of segregated gains.

    PubMed

    Morewedge, Carey K; Gilbert, Daniel T; Keysar, Boaz; Berkovits, Michael J; Wilson, Timothy D

    2007-11-01

    The hedonic benefit of a gain (e.g., receiving $100) may be increased by segregating it into smaller units that are distributed over time (e.g., receiving $50 on each of 2 days). However, if these units are too small (e.g., receiving 1 cent on each of 10,000 days), they may fall beneath the person's hedonic limen and have no hedonic benefit at all. Do people know where their limens lie? In 6 experiments, participants predicted that the hedonic benefit of a large gain would be increased by segregating it into smaller units, and they were right; but participants also predicted that the hedonic benefit of a small gain would be increased by segregating it into smaller units, and they were wrong. Segregation of small gains decreased rather than increased hedonic benefit. These experiments suggest that people may underestimate the value of the hedonic limen and thus may oversegregate small gains. 2007 APA

  14. Segregation behavior in a stationary vertical zone with converging interfaces - Pressure-induced segregation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. M.; Witt, A. F.; Gatos, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Crystal growth and segregation were investigated in a confined vertical melt zone in which the upper solid-melt interface advanced under destabilizing and the lower interface under stabilizing thermal gradients. A technique reported by Kim et al. (1972) was used in the study. The experimental results are discussed, giving attention to interface morphology and growth rate and questions of dopant segregation. Dopant inhomogeneities formed simultaneously in both advancing interfaces can be explained on the basis of pressure induced segregation effects.

  15. Rapid Mass Segregation in Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen; Vesperini, Enrico; Kruczek, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Several dynamical scenarios have been proposed that can lead to prompt mass segregation on the crossing time scale of a young cluster. They generally rely on cool and/or clumpy initial conditions, and are most relevant to small systems. As a counterpoint, we present a novel dynamical mechanism that can operate in relatively large, homogeneous, cool or cold systems. This mechanism may be important in understanding the assembly of large mass-segregated clusters from smaller clumps.

  16. Segregation physics of a macroscale granular ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhateja, Ashish; Sharma, Ishan; Singh, Jayant K.

    2017-05-01

    New experiments with multigrain mixtures in a laterally shaken, horizontal channel show complete axial segregation of species. The channel consists of multiple concatenated trapeziums, and superficially resembles microratchets wherein asymmetric geometries and potentials transport, and sort, randomly agitated microscopic particles. However, the physics of our macroscale granular ratchet is fundamentally different, as macroscopic segregation is gravity driven. Our observations are not explained by classical granular segregation theories either. Motivated by the experiments, extensive parallelized discrete element simulations reveal that the macroratchet differentiates grains through hierarchical bidirectional segregation over two different time scales: Grains rapidly sort vertically into horizontal bands spanning the channel's length that, subsequently, slowly separate axially, driven by strikingly gentle, average interfacial pressure gradients acting over long distances. At its maximum, the pressure gradient responsible for axial separation was due to a change in height of about two big grain diameters (d =7 mm) over a meter-long channel. The strong directional segregation achieved by the granular macroratchet has practical importance, while identifying the underlying new physics will further our understanding of granular segregation in industrial and geophysical processes.

  17. Transport analogy for segregation and granular rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siying; McCarthy, Joseph J.

    2017-08-01

    Here, we show a direct connection between density-based segregation and granular rheology that can lead to insight into both problems. Our results exhibit a transition in the rate of segregation during simple shear that occurs at I ˜0.5 and mimics a coincident regime change in flow rheology. We propose scaling arguments that support a packing fraction criterion for this transition that can both explain our segregation results as well as unify existing literature studies of granular rheology. By recasting a segregation model in terms of rheological parameters, we establish an approach that not only collapses results for a wide range of conditions, but also yields a direct relationship between the coordination number z and the segregation velocity. Moreover, our approach predicts the precise location of the observed regime change or saturation. This suggests that it is possible to rationally design process operating conditions that lead to significantly lower segregation extents. These observations can have a profound impact on both the study of granular flow or mixing as well as industrial practice.

  18. Segregation isotherms at the surfaces of oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mackrodt, W.C. ); Tasker )

    1989-09-01

    A non-Arrhenius segregation isotherm is derived which includes the change in the heat of segregation with surface coverage due to impurity-impurity interactions. It is shown that a linear dependence of log({ital x{sub s}}) on the reciprocal temperature, where {ital x{sub s}} is the surface atomic ratio, can derive either from a constant heat of segregation, i.e., Arrhenius behavior, or from a heat of segregation that varies as {ital x{sub s}}{sup {minus} 1}. This isotherm is then used to calculate the equilibrium surface coverages of Ca at the {l brace}001{r brace} surface of MgO, Mg at the {l brace}0001{r brace} surface of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y at the {l brace}1012{r brace} and {l brace}1{bar 1}20{r brace} surfaces of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Na at the {l brace}111{r brace} and {l brace}110{r brace} surfaces of Li{sub 2}O from the calculated heats of segregation. Where possible, comparisons are made with experiment. The more useful operational definition of the heat of segregation, namely, that derived from the measured coverage or that defined atomistically and obtained by calculation, is discussed.

  19. Fidelity drive: a mechanism for chaperone proteins to maintain stable mutation rates in prokaryotes over evolutionary time.

    PubMed

    Xue, Julian Z; Kaznatcheev, Artem; Costopoulos, Andre; Guichard, Frederic

    2015-01-07

    We show a mechanism by which chaperone proteins can play a key role in maintaining the long-term evolutionary stability of mutation rates in prokaryotes with perfect genetic linkage. Since chaperones can reduce the phenotypic effects of mutations, higher mutation rate, by affecting chaperones, can increase the phenotypic effects of mutations. This in turn leads to greater mutation effect among the proteins that control mutation repair and DNA replication, resulting in large changes in mutation rate. The converse of this is that when mutation rate is low and chaperones are functioning well, then the rate of change in mutation rate will also be low, leading to low mutation rates being evolutionarily frozen. We show that the strength of this recursion is critical to determining the long-term evolutionary patterns of mutation rate among prokaryotes. If this recursion is weak, then mutation rates can grow without bound, leading to the extinction of the lineage. However, if this recursion is strong, then we can reproduce empirical patterns of prokaryotic mutation rates, where mutation rates remain stable over evolutionary time, and where most mutation rates are low, but with a significant fraction of high mutators.

  20. The diversity of prokaryotic DDE transposases of the mutator superfamily, insertion specificity, and association with conjugation machineries.

    PubMed

    Guérillot, Romain; Siguier, Patricia; Gourbeyre, Edith; Chandler, Michael; Glaser, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are major components of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and play a significant role in their evolution. In this study, we have identified new prokaryotic DDE transposase families related to the eukaryotic Mutator-like transposases. These genes were retrieved by cascade PSI-Blast using as initial query the transposase of the streptococcal integrative and conjugative element (ICE) TnGBS2. By combining secondary structure predictions and protein sequence alignments, we predicted the DDE catalytic triad and the DNA-binding domain recognizing the terminal inverted repeats. Furthermore, we systematically characterized the organization and the insertion specificity of the TEs relying on these prokaryotic Mutator-like transposases (p-MULT) for their mobility. Strikingly, two distant TE families target their integration upstream σA dependent promoters. This allowed us to identify a transposase sequence signature associated with this unique insertion specificity and to show that the dissymmetry between the two inverted repeats is responsible for the orientation of the insertion. Surprisingly, while DDE transposases are generally associated with small and simple transposons such as insertion sequences (ISs), p-MULT encoding TEs show an unprecedented diversity with several families of IS, transposons, and ICEs ranging in size from 1.1 to 52 kb.

  1. Unsupervised statistical discovery of spaced motifs in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hao; Schliekelman, Paul; Mrázek, Jan

    2017-01-05

    DNA sequences contain repetitive motifs which have various functions in the physiology of the organism. A number of methods have been developed for discovery of such sequence motifs with a primary focus on detection of regulatory motifs and particularly transcription factor binding sites. Most motif-finding methods apply probabilistic models to detect motifs characterized by unusually high number of copies of the motif in the analyzed sequences. We present a novel method for detection of pairs of motifs separated by spacers of variable nucleotide sequence but conserved length. Unlike existing methods for motif discovery, the motifs themselves are not required to occur at unusually high frequency but only to exhibit a significant preference to occur at a specific distance from each other. In the present implementation of the method, motifs are represented by pentamers and all pairs of pentamers are evaluated for statistically significant preference for a specific distance. An important step of the algorithm eliminates motif pairs where the spacers separating the two motifs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity; such motif pairs likely arise from duplications of the whole segment including the motifs and the spacer rather than due to selective constraints indicative of a functional importance of the motif pair. The method was used to scan 569 complete prokaryotic genomes for novel sequence motifs. Some motifs detected were previously known but other motifs found in the search appear to be novel. Selected motif pairs were subjected to further investigation and in some cases their possible biological functions were proposed. We present a new motif-finding technique that is applicable to scanning complete genomes for sequence motifs. The results from analysis of 569 genomes suggest that the method detects previously known motifs that are expected to be found as well as new motifs that are unlikely to be discovered by traditional motif-finding methods. We conclude

  2. Gender Segregation in the Spanish Labor Market: An Alternative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Rio, Coral; Alonso-Villar, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study occupational segregation by gender in Spain, which is a country where occupational segregation explains a large part of the gender wage gap. As opposed to previous studies, this paper measures not only overall segregation, but also the segregation of several population subgroups. For this purpose, this paper uses…

  3. Gender Segregation in the Spanish Labor Market: An Alternative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Rio, Coral; Alonso-Villar, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study occupational segregation by gender in Spain, which is a country where occupational segregation explains a large part of the gender wage gap. As opposed to previous studies, this paper measures not only overall segregation, but also the segregation of several population subgroups. For this purpose, this paper uses…

  4. Expression of Prokaryotic Integral Membrane Proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Love, James D

    2017-01-01

    Production of prokaryotic membrane proteins for structural and functional studies in E. coli can be parallelized and miniaturized. All stages from cloning, expression, purification to detergent selection can be investigated using high-throughput techniques to rapidly and economically find tractable targets.

  5. The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family: a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Ferreira, Patricia; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of cellular production of the flavin cofactors, flavin adenine mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide(FAD) will prevent the assembly of a large number of flavoproteins and flavoenzymes involved in key metabolic processes in all types of organisms. The enzymes responsible for FMN and FAD production in prokaryotes and eukaryotes exhibit various structural characteristics to catalyze the same chemistry, a fact that converts the prokaryotic FAD synthetase (FADS) in a potential drug target for the development of inhibitors endowed with anti-pathogenic activity. The first step before searching for selective inhibitors of FADS is to understand the structural and functional mechanisms for the riboflavin kinase and FMN adenylyltransferase activities of the prokaryotic enzyme, and particularly to identify their differential functional characteristics with regard to the enzymes performing similar functions in other organisms, particularly humans. In this paper, an overview of the current knowledge of the structure-function relationships in prokaryotic FADS has been presented, as well as of the state of the art in the use of these enzymes as drug targets.

  6. Calcium binding proteins and calcium signaling in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Delfina C; Guragain, Manita; Patrauchan, Marianna

    2015-03-01

    With the continued increase of genomic information and computational analyses during the recent years, the number of newly discovered calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) in prokaryotic organisms has increased dramatically. These proteins contain sequences that closely resemble a variety of eukaryotic calcium (Ca(2+)) binding motifs including the canonical and pseudo EF-hand motifs, Ca(2+)-binding β-roll, Greek key motif and a novel putative Ca(2+)-binding domain, called the Big domain. Prokaryotic CaBPs have been implicated in diverse cellular activities such as division, development, motility, homeostasis, stress response, secretion, transport, signaling and host-pathogen interactions. However, the majority of these proteins are hypothetical, and only few of them have been studied functionally. The finding of many diverse CaBPs in prokaryotic genomes opens an exciting area of research to explore and define the role of Ca(2+) in organisms other than eukaryotes. This review presents the most recent developments in the field of CaBPs and novel advancements in the role of Ca(2+) in prokaryotes.

  7. Overlapping genes: A significant genomic correlate of prokaryotic growth rates.

    PubMed

    Saha, Deeya; Podder, Soumita; Panda, Arup; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2016-05-15

    Elucidating the genomic features influencing prokaryotic growth rates has always been a study of interest. Previously, it was observed that overlapping genes (OGs) play a crucial role in the prokaryotic genome size reduction. This study is focused to explore whether OGs act as a potential correlate of prokaryotic growth rates. For this purpose, we compiled a dataset of 25 archaeal and 117 eubacterial genomes and analyzed the inter-correlation between the proportion of overlapping regions in these genomes with their growth rates. Here, we observed that the proportion of overlapping region holds a significant negative correlation with generation time in archaeal domain, whereas no correlation was observed in the eubacterial domain. However, after masking the effect of tRNA, rRNA multiplicity and environmental diversity, OGs show an independent effect over growth rates in the eubacterial domain as well as in the archaeal domain. Moreover, the influence of OGs on prokaryotic growth rates provides different delineations in archaeal and eubacterial domains. In archaea, both long overlap frequency (LOF) and short overlap frequency (SOF) influence the growth rates by increasing the degree of operonization. On the contrary, in the case of bacteria, neither SOF nor LOF plays any significant role in achieving faster growth rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The tree and net components of prokaryote evolution.

    PubMed

    Puigbò, Pere; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees of individual genes of prokaryotes (archaea and bacteria) generally have different topologies, largely owing to extensive horizontal gene transfer (HGT), suggesting that the Tree of Life (TOL) should be replaced by a "net of life" as the paradigm of prokaryote evolution. However, trees remain the natural representation of the histories of individual genes given the fundamentally bifurcating process of gene replication. Therefore, although no single tree can fully represent the evolution of prokaryote genomes, the complete picture of evolution will necessarily combine trees and nets. A quantitative measure of the signals of tree and net evolution is derived from an analysis of all quartets of species in all trees of the "Forest of Life" (FOL), which consists of approximately 7,000 phylogenetic trees for prokaryote genes including approximately 100 nearly universal trees (NUTs). Although diverse routes of net-like evolution collectively dominate the FOL, the pattern of tree-like evolution that reflects the consistent topologies of the NUTs is the most prominent coherent trend. We show that the contributions of tree-like and net-like evolutionary processes substantially differ across bacterial and archaeal lineages and between functional classes of genes. Evolutionary simulations indicate that the central tree-like signal cannot be realistically explained by a self-reinforcing pattern of biased HGT.

  9. Tumor malignancy is engaged to prokaryotic homolog toolbox.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Janaina; Guedes, Patrícia G; Lage, Celso Luiz S; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola F; Lage, Claudia de Alencar S

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells display high proliferation rates and survival provided by high glycolysis, chemoresistance and radioresistance, metabolic features that appear to be activated with malignancy, and seemed to have arisen as early in evolution as in unicellular/prokaryotic organisms. Based on these assumptions, we hypothesize that aggressive phenotypes found in malignant cells may be related to acquired unicellular behavior, launched within a tumor when viral and prokaryotic homologs are overexpressed performing likely robust functions. The ensemble of these expressed viral and prokaryotic close homologs in the proteome of a tumor tissue gives them advantage over normal cells. To assess the hypothesis validity, sequences of human proteins involved in apoptosis, energetic metabolism, cell mobility and adhesion, chemo- and radio-resistance were aligned to homologs present in other life forms, excluding all eukaryotes, using PSI-BLAST, with further corroboration from data available in the literature. The analysis revealed that selected sequences of proteins involved in apoptosis and tumor suppression (as p53 and pRB) scored non-significant (E-value>0.001) with prokaryotic homologs; on the other hand, human proteins involved in cellular chemo- and radio-resistance scored highly significant with prokaryotic and viral homologs (as catalase, E-value=zero). We inferred that such upregulated and/or functionally activated proteins in aggressive malignant cells represent a toolbox of modern human homologs evolved from a similar key set that have granted survival of ancient prokaryotes against extremely harsh environments. According to what has been discussed along this analysis, high mutation rates usually hit hotspots in important conserved protein domains, allowing uncontrolled expansion of more resistant, death-evading malignant clones. That is the case of point mutations in key viral proteins affording viruses escape to chemotherapy, and human homologs of such retroviral

  10. Transcriptional regulators of oxidative stress-inducible genes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Storz, G; Polla, B S

    1996-01-01

    It appears that redox regulation is an important mechanism for the control of transcription factor activation. The role of oxidation-reduction is probably determined in part by the structure of the transcription factors. For example, the presence of cysteine residues within the DNA binding sites may sensitize a transcription factor to ROS. The ROS-mediated regulation of transcription factors is specific, some ROS are more efficient than other ROS in activating defined regulators. While the protective antioxidant responses induced by ROS in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are rather conserved (for example, SOD, HSP...), the regulators for these genes do not appear to be conserved. Further studies designed to fully characterize these regulators and understand the subtle mechanisms involved in redox gene regulation are ongoing, and should provide the theoretical basis for clinical approaches using antioxidant therapies in human diseases in which oxidative stress is implicated.

  11. The consequences of base pair composition biases for regulatory network organization in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Otto X; Hogeweg, Paulien

    2009-10-01

    Given the dramatic variation in guanine-cytosine (GC) content observed in prokaryotes, from approximately 20% to approximately 75% GC, one wonders if these extreme biases in base pair composition affect the evolution of transcription factor-binding sites (BS). This letter shows that, along the wide range of GC content variation in bacteria, bacterial BS keep a high frequency of AT bases, roughly independently of the background (BG) base pair composition of intergenic regions. As a result, the equilibrium base pair frequencies of BS depart the most from those of BS DNA in GC-rich genomes. This not only implies a higher specificity but also a higher coding barrier for BS in GC-rich genomes. In accordance, we observe that the average percentage of divergently transcribed regions increases with the GC content of the genome, suggesting the use of a more efficient coding strategy.

  12. Inosine at Different Primer Positions to Study Structure and Diversity of Prokaryotic Populations.

    PubMed

    Ben-Dov, Eitan; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Culture-independent methods, employed to study the diversity and complexity of microbial communities that are based on amplification of rRNA genes with universal primers, include gradient gel electrophoresis (denaturing or temperature), single-strand-conformation polymorphism, restriction fragment length polymorphism, qPCR and high-throughput DNA sequencing. Substituting one or more base(s) within or at the 3'-termi of the universal primers by inosine can overcome some of their shortcomings improving amplification capacity. Universal primer sets do not usually amplify sequences with nucleotide mismatch to the templates, particularly in the last three bases, whereas inosine-modified primers anneal and amplify a variety of rRNA gene sequences. Inosine-containing primers are therefore might be useful to detect more species in diverse prokaryotic populations. The article summarizes the pros and cons of using inosine especially at the 3' termini of universal primers in nucleic acid amplification for the study of microbial diversity.

  13. A galinstan expansion femtosyringe for microinjection of eukaryotic organelles and prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, M; Hibberd, J M; Gray, J C; van Bel, A J

    1999-09-01

    A galinstan expansion femtosyringe enables femtoliter to attoliter samples to be introduced into prokaryotes and subcellular compartments of eukaryotes. The method uses heat-induced expansion of galinstan (a liquid metal alloy of gallium, indium, and tin) within a glass syringe to expel samples through a tip diameter of about 0.1 microm. The narrow tip inflicts less damage than conventional capillaries, and the heat-induced expansion of the galinstan allows fine control over the rate of injection. We demonstrate injection of Lucifer Yellow and Lucifer Yellow-dextran conjugates into cyanobacteria, and into nuclei and chloroplasts of higher organisms. Injection of a plasmid containing the bla gene into the cyanobacterium Phormidium laminosum resulted in transformed ampicillin-resistant cultures. Green fluorescent protein was expressed in attached leaves of tobacco and Vicia faba following injection of DNA containing its gene into individual chloroplasts.

  14. Regulatory Interactions in ProKaryotes from RegTransBase

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dubchak, Inna; Gelfand, Mikhail

    RegTransBase, a manually curated database of regulatory interactions in prokaryotes, captures the knowledge in published scientific literature using a controlled vocabulary. RegTransBase describes a large number of regulatory interactions reported in many organisms and contains various types of experimental data, in particular: the activation or repression of transcription by an identified direct regulator determining the transcriptional regulatory function of a protein (or RNA) directly binding to DNA or RNA mapping or prediction of binding sites for a regulatory protein characterization of regulatory mutations. RegTransBase also contains manually created position weight matrices (PWM) that can be used to identify candidate regulatory sites in over 60 species. (Specialized Interface)

  15. The diversity-generating benefits of a prokaryotic adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    van Houte, Stineke; Ekroth, Alice K E; Broniewski, Jenny M; Chabas, Hélène; Ashby, Ben; Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Gandon, Sylvain; Boots, Mike; Paterson, Steve; Buckling, Angus; Westra, Edze R

    2016-04-21

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems insert spacers derived from viruses and other parasitic DNA elements into CRISPR loci to provide sequence-specific immunity. This frequently results in high within-population spacer diversity, but it is unclear if and why this is important. Here we show that, as a result of this spacer diversity, viruses can no longer evolve to overcome CRISPR-Cas by point mutation, which results in rapid virus extinction. This effect arises from synergy between spacer diversity and the high specificity of infection, which greatly increases overall population resistance. We propose that the resulting short-lived nature of CRISPR-dependent bacteria-virus coevolution has provided strong selection for the evolution of sophisticated virus-encoded anti-CRISPR mechanisms.

  16. The diversity-generating benefits of a prokaryotic adaptive immune system

    PubMed Central

    van Houte, Stineke; Ekroth, Alice K. E.; Broniewski, Jenny M.; Chabas, Hélène; Ashby, Ben; Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Gandon, Sylvain; Boots, Mike; Paterson, Steve; Buckling, Angus; Westra, Edze R.

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems insert spacers derived from viruses and other parasitic DNA elements into CRISPR loci to provide sequence-specific immunity1,2. This frequently results in high within-population spacer diversity3–6, but it is unclear if and why this is important. Here we show that, as a result of this spacer diversity, viruses can no longer evolve to overcome CRISPR-Cas by point mutation, which results in rapid virus extinction. This effect arises from synergy between spacer diversity and the high specificity of infection, which greatly increases overall population resistance. We propose that the resulting short-lived nature of CRISPR-dependent bacteria–virus coevolution has provided strong selection for the evolution of sophisticated virus-encoded anti-CRISPR mechanisms7. PMID:27074511

  17. Gene duplications in prokaryotes can be associated with environmental adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene duplication is a normal evolutionary process. If there is no selective advantage in keeping the duplicated gene, it is usually reduced to a pseudogene and disappears from the genome. However, some paralogs are retained. These gene products are likely to be beneficial to the organism, e.g. in adaptation to new environmental conditions. The aim of our analysis is to investigate the properties of paralog-forming genes in prokaryotes, and to analyse the role of these retained paralogs by relating gene properties to life style of the corresponding prokaryotes. Results Paralogs were identified in a number of prokaryotes, and these paralogs were compared to singletons of persistent orthologs based on functional classification. This showed that the paralogs were associated with for example energy production, cell motility, ion transport, and defence mechanisms. A statistical overrepresentation analysis of gene and protein annotations was based on paralogs of the 200 prokaryotes with the highest fraction of paralog-forming genes. Biclustering of overrepresented gene ontology terms versus species was used to identify clusters of properties associated with clusters of species. The clusters were classified using similarity scores on properties and species to identify interesting clusters, and a subset of clusters were analysed by comparison to literature data. This analysis showed that paralogs often are associated with properties that are important for survival and proliferation of the specific organisms. This includes processes like ion transport, locomotion, chemotaxis and photosynthesis. However, the analysis also showed that the gene ontology terms sometimes were too general, imprecise or even misleading for automatic analysis. Conclusions Properties described by gene ontology terms identified in the overrepresentation analysis are often consistent with individual prokaryote lifestyles and are likely to give a competitive advantage to the organism

  18. Endosymbiotic gene transfer from prokaryotic pangenomes: Inherited chimerism in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chuan; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Roettger, Mayo; Garg, Sriram; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F

    2015-08-18

    Endosymbiotic theory in eukaryotic-cell evolution rests upon a foundation of three cornerstone partners--the plastid (a cyanobacterium), the mitochondrion (a proteobacterium), and its host (an archaeon)--and carries a corollary that, over time, the majority of genes once present in the organelle genomes were relinquished to the chromosomes of the host (endosymbiotic gene transfer). However, notwithstanding eukaryote-specific gene inventions, single-gene phylogenies have never traced eukaryotic genes to three single prokaryotic sources, an issue that hinges crucially upon factors influencing phylogenetic inference. In the age of genomes, single-gene trees, once used to test the predictions of endosymbiotic theory, now spawn new theories that stand to eventually replace endosymbiotic theory with descriptive, gene tree-based variants featuring supernumerary symbionts: prokaryotic partners distinct from the cornerstone trio and whose existence is inferred solely from single-gene trees. We reason that the endosymbiotic ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts brought into the eukaryotic--and plant and algal--lineage a genome-sized sample of genes from the proteobacterial and cyanobacterial pangenomes of their respective day and that, even if molecular phylogeny were artifact-free, sampling prokaryotic pangenomes through endosymbiotic gene transfer would lead to inherited chimerism. Recombination in prokaryotes (transduction, conjugation, transformation) differs from recombination in eukaryotes (sex). Prokaryotic recombination leads to pangenomes, and eukaryotic recombination leads to vertical inheritance. Viewed from the perspective of endosymbiotic theory, the critical transition at the eukaryote origin that allowed escape from Muller's ratchet--the origin of eukaryotic recombination, or sex--might have required surprisingly little evolutionary innovation.

  19. Missing genes in the annotation of prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Warren, Andrew S; Archuleta, Jeremy; Feng, Wu-Chun; Setubal, João Carlos

    2010-03-15

    Protein-coding gene detection in prokaryotic genomes is considered a much simpler problem than in intron-containing eukaryotic genomes. However there have been reports that prokaryotic gene finder programs have problems with small genes (either over-predicting or under-predicting). Therefore the question arises as to whether current genome annotations have systematically missing, small genes. We have developed a high-performance computing methodology to investigate this problem. In this methodology we compare all ORFs larger than or equal to 33 aa from all fully-sequenced prokaryotic replicons. Based on that comparison, and using conservative criteria requiring a minimum taxonomic diversity between conserved ORFs in different genomes, we have discovered 1,153 candidate genes that are missing from current genome annotations. These missing genes are similar only to each other and do not have any strong similarity to gene sequences in public databases, with the implication that these ORFs belong to missing gene families. We also uncovered 38,895 intergenic ORFs, readily identified as putative genes by similarity to currently annotated genes (we call these absent annotations). The vast majority of the missing genes found are small (less than 100 aa). A comparison of select examples with GeneMark, EasyGene and Glimmer predictions yields evidence that some of these genes are escaping detection by these programs. Prokaryotic gene finders and prokaryotic genome annotations require improvement for accurate prediction of small genes. The number of missing gene families found is likely a lower bound on the actual number, due to the conservative criteria used to determine whether an ORF corresponds to a real gene.

  20. Endosymbiotic gene transfer from prokaryotic pangenomes: Inherited chimerism in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Chuan; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Roettger, Mayo; Garg, Sriram; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Endosymbiotic theory in eukaryotic-cell evolution rests upon a foundation of three cornerstone partners—the plastid (a cyanobacterium), the mitochondrion (a proteobacterium), and its host (an archaeon)—and carries a corollary that, over time, the majority of genes once present in the organelle genomes were relinquished to the chromosomes of the host (endosymbiotic gene transfer). However, notwithstanding eukaryote-specific gene inventions, single-gene phylogenies have never traced eukaryotic genes to three single prokaryotic sources, an issue that hinges crucially upon factors influencing phylogenetic inference. In the age of genomes, single-gene trees, once used to test the predictions of endosymbiotic theory, now spawn new theories that stand to eventually replace endosymbiotic theory with descriptive, gene tree-based variants featuring supernumerary symbionts: prokaryotic partners distinct from the cornerstone trio and whose existence is inferred solely from single-gene trees. We reason that the endosymbiotic ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts brought into the eukaryotic—and plant and algal—lineage a genome-sized sample of genes from the proteobacterial and cyanobacterial pangenomes of their respective day and that, even if molecular phylogeny were artifact-free, sampling prokaryotic pangenomes through endosymbiotic gene transfer would lead to inherited chimerism. Recombination in prokaryotes (transduction, conjugation, transformation) differs from recombination in eukaryotes (sex). Prokaryotic recombination leads to pangenomes, and eukaryotic recombination leads to vertical inheritance. Viewed from the perspective of endosymbiotic theory, the critical transition at the eukaryote origin that allowed escape from Muller’s ratchet—the origin of eukaryotic recombination, or sex—might have required surprisingly little evolutionary innovation. PMID:25733873

  1. Global diversity and biogeography of deep-sea pelagic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Guillem; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Benítez-Barrios, Verónica; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Álvarez-Salgado, X Antón; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-03-01

    The deep-sea is the largest biome of the biosphere, and contains more than half of the whole ocean's microbes. Uncovering their general patterns of diversity and community structure at a global scale remains a great challenge, as only fragmentary information of deep-sea microbial diversity exists based on regional-scale studies. Here we report the first globally comprehensive survey of the prokaryotic communities inhabiting the bathypelagic ocean using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. This work identifies the dominant prokaryotes in the pelagic deep ocean and reveals that 50% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belong to previously unknown prokaryotic taxa, most of which are rare and appear in just a few samples. We show that whereas the local richness of communities is comparable to that observed in previous regional studies, the global pool of prokaryotic taxa detected is modest (~3600 OTUs), as a high proportion of OTUs are shared among samples. The water masses appear to act as clear drivers of the geographical distribution of both particle-attached and free-living prokaryotes. In addition, we show that the deep-oceanic basins in which the bathypelagic realm is divided contain different particle-attached (but not free-living) microbial communities. The combination of the aging of the water masses and a lack of complete dispersal are identified as the main drivers for this biogeographical pattern. All together, we identify the potential of the deep ocean as a reservoir of still unknown biological diversity with a higher degree of spatial complexity than hitherto considered.

  2. Top-Down Control of Diesel-Degrading Prokaryotic Communities.

    PubMed

    Sauret, Caroline; Böttjer, Daniela; Talarmin, Agathe; Guigue, Catherine; Conan, Pascal; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Ghiglione, Jean-François

    2015-08-01

    Biostimulation through the addition of inorganic nutrients has been the most widely practiced bioremediation strategy in oil-polluted marine waters. However, little attention has so far been paid to the microbial food web and the impact of top-down control that directly or indirectly influences the success of the bioremediation. We designed a mesocosm experiment using pre-filtered (<50 μm) surface seawater from the Bay of Banyuls-sur-Mer (North-Western Mediterranean Sea) and examined the top-down effect exerted by heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) and virus-like particles (VLP) on prokaryotic abundance, activity and diversity in the presence or absence of diesel fuel. Prokaryotes, HNF and VLP abundances showed a predator-prey succession, with a co-development of HNF and VLP. In the polluted system, we observed a stronger impact of viral lysis on prokaryotic abundances than in the control. Analysis of the diversity revealed that a bloom of Vibrio sp. occurred in the polluted mesocosm. That bloom was rapidly followed by a less abundant and more even community of predation-resistant bacteria, including known hydrocarbon degraders such as Oleispira spp. and Methylophaga spp. and opportunistic bacteria such as Percisivirga spp., Roseobacter spp. and Phaeobacter spp. The shift in prokaryotic dominance in response to viral lysis provided clear evidence of the 'killing the winner' model. Nevertheless, despite clear effects on prokaryotic abundance, activity and diversity, the diesel degradation was not impacted by top-down control. The present study investigates for the first time the functioning of a complex microbial network (including VLP) using a nutrient-based biostimulation strategy and highlights some key processes useful for tailoring bioremediation.

  3. Global diversity and biogeography of deep-sea pelagic prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Guillem; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Benítez-Barrios, Verónica; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Álvarez-Salgado, X Antón; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-01-01

    The deep-sea is the largest biome of the biosphere, and contains more than half of the whole ocean's microbes. Uncovering their general patterns of diversity and community structure at a global scale remains a great challenge, as only fragmentary information of deep-sea microbial diversity exists based on regional-scale studies. Here we report the first globally comprehensive survey of the prokaryotic communities inhabiting the bathypelagic ocean using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. This work identifies the dominant prokaryotes in the pelagic deep ocean and reveals that 50% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belong to previously unknown prokaryotic taxa, most of which are rare and appear in just a few samples. We show that whereas the local richness of communities is comparable to that observed in previous regional studies, the global pool of prokaryotic taxa detected is modest (~3600 OTUs), as a high proportion of OTUs are shared among samples. The water masses appear to act as clear drivers of the geographical distribution of both particle-attached and free-living prokaryotes. In addition, we show that the deep-oceanic basins in which the bathypelagic realm is divided contain different particle-attached (but not free-living) microbial communities. The combination of the aging of the water masses and a lack of complete dispersal are identified as the main drivers for this biogeographical pattern. All together, we identify the potential of the deep ocean as a reservoir of still unknown biological diversity with a higher degree of spatial complexity than hitherto considered. PMID:26251871

  4. Are We Segregated and Satisfied? Segregation and Inequality in Southern California Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucsera, John V.; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve; Orfield, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Southern California is facing a demographic transformation that will become characteristic of the nation as a whole in coming decades. In this research, we present a historical review of the region's attempt to address school inequity, recent enrollment and segregation trends, and an investigation of whether segregation still matters. Our results…

  5. Are We Segregated and Satisfied? Segregation and Inequality in Southern California Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucsera, John V.; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve; Orfield, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Southern California is facing a demographic transformation that will become characteristic of the nation as a whole in coming decades. In this research, we present a historical review of the region's attempt to address school inequity, recent enrollment and segregation trends, and an investigation of whether segregation still matters. Our results…

  6. PePPER: a webserver for prediction of prokaryote promoter elements and regulons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate prediction of DNA motifs that are targets of RNA polymerases, sigma factors and transcription factors (TFs) in prokaryotes is a difficult mission mainly due to as yet undiscovered features in DNA sequences or structures in promoter regions. Improved prediction and comparison algorithms are currently available for identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and their accompanying TFs and regulon members. Results We here extend the current databases of TFs, TFBSs and regulons with our knowledge on Lactococcus lactis and developed a webserver for prediction, mining and visualization of prokaryote promoter elements and regulons via a novel concept. This new approach includes an all-in-one method of data mining for TFs, TFBSs, promoters, and regulons for any bacterial genome via a user-friendly webserver. We demonstrate the power of this method by mining WalRK regulons in Lactococci and Streptococci and, vice versa, use L. lactis regulon data (CodY) to mine closely related species. Conclusions The PePPER webserver offers, besides the all-in-one analysis method, a toolbox for mining for regulons, promoters and TFBSs and accommodates a new L. lactis regulon database in addition to already existing regulon data. Identification of putative regulons and full annotation of intergenic regions in any bacterial genome on the basis of existing knowledge on a related organism can now be performed by biologists and it can be done for a wide range of regulons. On the basis of the PePPER output, biologist can design experiments to further verify the existence and extent of the proposed regulons. The PePPER webserver is freely accessible at http://pepper.molgenrug.nl. PMID:22747501

  7. [Prokaryote diversity in the surface sediment of northern South China Sea].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wu, Houbo; Wang, Guanghua; Xiang, Wenzhou; Yan, Wen

    2013-09-04

    In order to investigate the composition and diversity of prokaryotes in marine surface sediment from site XSCS13 at northern South China Sea. We extracted environment total DNA directly from the sediment and amplified 16S rRNA genes from the total DNA, thereby constructing 16S rRNA clone libraries of both archaea and bacteria. Then we selected positive clones randomly from the library and identified them by the method of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). After that, the unique RFLP pattern corresponded sequences were sequenced, BLAST and then constructed into a phylogenetic tree. Most of the clones were sequences from uncultured microbes. For the Archaea part: the community was mainly comprised of 3 phyla: Crenarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota, among which Crenarchaeota was the dominant class with the percentage of 71%, while Euryarchaeota took the least with only 3 clones. The main group of Crenarchaeota was Marine Group I, taking 61% of all. For the bacteria part, all together 9 phyla were included: 32.6% of Proteobacteria, 3% of Verrucomicrobia, 5.2% of Bacteroidete, 4.44% of Acidobacteria, 6% of Chloroflexi, 3.7% of Firmicute, 5.2% of Planctomycete, 11.1% of Gemmatimonadete and 4.44% of Actinobacteria. Unlike archaea, there's no overwhelming preponderant phylum in bacterium, each phylum was relatively distributed in balanced proportions. Proteobacteria had 3 classes involved: alpha-Proteobacteri, gamma-Proteobacteria and delta-Proteobacteria, and gamma-Proteobacteria stood out with 54.5% of proportion. In addition, over half of all the clones were related to reduction reaction of sulfate and generation of methane. The research indicated that prokaryote diversity in marine surface sediment from site XSCS13 at northern South China Sea was quite plentiful, and a great mass of abundant microbial resources still remained unknown. Furthermore, the community structure of archaea and bacteria showed that the sampling site may be in a cold

  8. Homologous catalytic domains in a rumen fungal xylanase: evidence for gene duplication and prokaryotic origin.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, H J; Hazlewood, G P; Laurie, J I; Orpin, C G; Xue, G P

    1992-08-01

    A cDNA (xynA), encoding xylanase A (XYLA), was isolated from a cDNA library, derived from mRNA extracted from the rumen anaerobic fungus, Neocallimastix patriciarum. Recombinant XYLA, purified from Escherichia coli harbouring xynA, had a M(r) of 53,000 and hydrolysed oat-spelt xylan to xylobiose and xylose. The enzyme did not hydrolyse any cellulosic substrates. The nucleotide sequence of xynA revealed a single open reading frame of 1821 bp coding for a protein of M(r) 66,192. The predicted primary structure of XYLA comprised an N-terminal signal peptide followed by a 225-amino-acid repeated sequence, which was separated from a tandem 40-residue C-terminal repeat by a threonine/proline linker sequence. The large N-terminal reiterated regions consisted of distinct catalytic domains which displayed similar substrate specificities to the full-length enzyme. The reiterated structure of XYLA suggests that the enzyme was derived from an ancestral gene which underwent two discrete duplications. Sequence comparison analysis revealed significant homology between XYLA and bacterial xylanases belonging to cellulase/xylanase family G. One of these homologous enzymes is derived from the rumen bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens. The homology observed between XYLA and a rumen prokaryote xylanase could be a consequence of the horizontal transfer of genes between rumen prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes, either when the organisms were resident in the rumen, or prior to their colonization of the ruminant. It should also be noted that Neocallimastix XYLA is the first example of a xylanase which consists of reiterated sequences. It remains to be established whether this is a common phenomenon in other rumen fungal plant cell wall hydrolases.

  9. Segregated assembly of muscle myosin expressed in nonmuscle cells.

    PubMed

    Moncman, C L; Rindt, H; Robbins, J; Winkelmann, D A

    1993-10-01

    Skeletal muscle myosin cDNAs were expressed in a simian kidney cell line (COS) and a mouse myogenic cell line to investigate the mechanisms controlling early stages of myosin filament assembly. An embryonic chicken muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) cDNA was linked to constitutive promoters from adenovirus or SV40 and transiently expressed in COS cells. These cells accumulate hybrid myosin molecules composed of muscle MHCs and endogenous, nonmuscle, myosin light chains. The muscle myosin is found associated with a Triton insoluble fraction from extracts of the COS cells by immunoprecipitation and is detected in 2.4 +/- 0.8-micron-long filamentous structures distributed throughout the cytoplasm by immunofluorescence microscopy. These structures are shown by immunoelectron microscopy to correspond to loosely organized bundles of 12-16-nm-diameter myosin filaments. The muscle and nonmuscle MHCs are segregated in the transfected cells; the endogenous nonmuscle myosin displays a normal distribution pattern along stress fibers and does not colocalize with the muscle myosin filament bundles. A similar assembly pattern and distribution are observed for expression of the muscle MHC in a myogenic cell line. The myosin assembles into filament bundles, 1.5 +/- 0.6 micron in length, that are distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the undifferentiated myoblasts and segregated from the endogenous nonmuscle myosin. In both cell lines, formation of the myosin filament bundles is dependent on the accumulation of the protein. In contrast to these results, the expression of a truncated MHC that lacks much of the rod domain produces an assembly deficient molecule. The truncated MHC is diffusely distributed throughout the cytoplasm and not associated with cellular stress fibers. These results establish that the information necessary for the segregation of myosin isotypes into distinct cellular structures is contained within the primary structure of the MHC and that other factors are not

  10. Spatially segregated transcription and translation in cells of the endomembrane-containing bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus

    PubMed Central

    Gottshall, Ekaterina Y.; Seebart, Corrine; Gatlin, Jesse C.; Ward, Naomi L.

    2014-01-01

    The dogma of coupled transcription and translation in bacteria has been challenged by recent reports of spatial segregation of these processes within the relatively simple cellular organization of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The bacterial species Gemmata obscuriglobus possesses an extensive endomembrane system. The membranes generate a very convoluted intracellular architecture in which some of the cell’s ribosomes appear to have less direct access to the cell’s nucleoid(s) than others. This observation prompted us to test the hypothesis that a substantial proportion of G. obscuriglobus translation may be spatially segregated from transcription. Using immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy, we showed that translating ribosomes are localized throughout the cell, with a quantitatively greater proportion found in regions distal to nucleoid(s). Our results extend information about the phylogenetic and morphological diversity of bacteria in which the spatial organization of transcription and translation has been studied. These findings also suggest that endomembranes may provide an obstacle to colocated transcription and translation, a role for endomembranes that has not been reported previously for a prokaryotic organism. Our studies of G. obscuriglobus may provide a useful background for consideration of the evolutionary development of eukaryotic cellular complexity and how it led to decoupled processes of gene expression in eukaryotes. PMID:25024214

  11. Spatially segregated transcription and translation in cells of the endomembrane-containing bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus.

    PubMed

    Gottshall, Ekaterina Y; Seebart, Corrine; Gatlin, Jesse C; Ward, Naomi L

    2014-07-29

    The dogma of coupled transcription and translation in bacteria has been challenged by recent reports of spatial segregation of these processes within the relatively simple cellular organization of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The bacterial species Gemmata obscuriglobus possesses an extensive endomembrane system. The membranes generate a very convoluted intracellular architecture in which some of the cell's ribosomes appear to have less direct access to the cell's nucleoid(s) than others. This observation prompted us to test the hypothesis that a substantial proportion of G. obscuriglobus translation may be spatially segregated from transcription. Using immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy, we showed that translating ribosomes are localized throughout the cell, with a quantitatively greater proportion found in regions distal to nucleoid(s). Our results extend information about the phylogenetic and morphological diversity of bacteria in which the spatial organization of transcription and translation has been studied. These findings also suggest that endomembranes may provide an obstacle to colocated transcription and translation, a role for endomembranes that has not been reported previously for a prokaryotic organism. Our studies of G. obscuriglobus may provide a useful background for consideration of the evolutionary development of eukaryotic cellular complexity and how it led to decoupled processes of gene expression in eukaryotes.

  12. A longitudinal study of administrative segregation.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Maureen L; Klebe, Kelli J; Metzner, Jeffrey; Dvoskin, Joel; Fellner, Jamie; Stucker, Alysha

    2013-01-01

    The use of administrative segregation for inmates with and without mental illness has generated considerable criticism. Segregated inmates are locked in single cells for 23 hours per day, are subjected to rigorous security procedures, and have restricted access to programs. In this study, we examined whether inmates in segregation would show greater deterioration over time on psychological symptoms than would comparison offenders. The subjects were male inmates, with and without mental illness, in administrative segregation, general population, or special-needs prison. Subjects completed the Brief Symptom Inventory at regular intervals for one year. Results showed differentiation between groups at the outset and statistically significant but small positive change over time across all groups. All groups showed the same change pattern such that there was not the hypothesized differential change of inmates within administrative segregation. This study advances the empirical research, but replication research is needed to make a better determination of whether and under what conditions harm may or may not occur to inmates in solitary confinement.

  13. Racial Segregation and the American Foreclosure Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Rugh, Jacob S.; Massey, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Although the rise in subprime lending and the ensuing wave of foreclosures was partly a result of market forces that have been well-identified in the literature, in the United States it was also a highly racialized process. We argue that residential segregation created a unique niche of poor minority clients who were differentially marketed risky subprime loans that were in great demand for use in mortgage-backed securities that could be sold on secondary markets. We test this argument by regressing foreclosure actions in the top 100 U.S. metropolitan areas on measures of black, Hispanic, and Asian segregation while controlling for a variety of housing market conditions, including average creditworthiness, the extent of coverage under the Community Reinvestment Act, the degree of zoning regulation, and the overall rate of subprime lending. We find that black residential dissimilarity and spatial isolation are powerful predictors of foreclosures across U.S. metropolitan areas. In order to isolate subprime lending as the causal mechanism whereby segregation influences foreclosures, we estimate a two-stage least squares model that confirms the causal effect of black segregation on the number and rate of foreclosures across metropolitan areas. In the United States segregation was an important contributing cause of the foreclosure crisis, along with overbuilding, risky lending practices, lax regulation, and the bursting of the housing price bubble. PMID:25308973

  14. Continuous utility factor in segregation models.

    PubMed

    Roy, Parna; Sen, Parongama

    2016-02-01

    We consider the constrained Schelling model of social segregation in which the utility factor of agents strictly increases and nonlocal jumps of the agents are allowed. In the present study, the utility factor u is defined in a way such that it can take continuous values and depends on the tolerance threshold as well as the fraction of unlike neighbors. Two models are proposed: in model A the jump probability is determined by the sign of u only, which makes it equivalent to the discrete model. In model B the actual values of u are considered. Model A and model B are shown to differ drastically as far as segregation behavior and phase transitions are concerned. In model A, although segregation can be achieved, the cluster sizes are rather small. Also, a frozen state is obtained in which steady states comprise many unsatisfied agents. In model B, segregated states with much larger cluster sizes are obtained. The correlation function is calculated to show quantitatively that larger clusters occur in model B. Moreover for model B, no frozen states exist even for very low dilution and small tolerance parameter. This is in contrast to the unconstrained discrete model considered earlier where agents can move even when utility remains the same. In addition, we also consider a few other dynamical aspects which have not been studied in segregation models earlier.

  15. Concurrent sound segregation is enhanced in musicians.

    PubMed

    Zendel, Benjamin Rich; Alain, Claude

    2009-08-01

    The ability to segregate simultaneously occurring sounds is fundamental to auditory perception. Many studies have shown that musicians have enhanced auditory perceptual abilities; however, the impact of musical expertise on segregating concurrently occurring sounds is unknown. Therefore, we examined whether long-term musical training can improve listeners' ability to segregate sounds that occur simultaneously. Participants were presented with complex sounds that had either all harmonics in tune or the second harmonic mistuned by 1%, 2%, 4%, 8%, or 16% of its original value. The likelihood of hearing two sounds simultaneously increased with mistuning, and this effect was greater in musicians than nonmusicians. The segregation of the mistuned harmonic from the harmonic series was paralleled by an object-related negativity that was larger and peaked earlier in musicians. It also coincided with a late positive wave referred to as the P400 whose amplitude was larger in musicians than in nonmusicians. The behavioral and electrophysiological effects of musical expertise were specific to processing the mistuned harmonic as the N1, the N1c, and the P2 waves elicited by the tuned stimuli were comparable in both musicians and nonmusicians. These results demonstrate that listeners' ability to segregate concurrent sounds based on harmonicity is modulated by experience and provides a basis for further studies assessing the potential rehabilitative effects of musical training on solving complex scene analysis problems illustrated by the cocktail party example.

  16. Underlying Asymmetry with Particle-Size Segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajjar, Parmesh; van der Vaart, Kasper; Epely-Chauvin, Gael; Andreini, Nicolas; Gray, Nico; Ancey, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Granular media have a natural tendency to self-organise when sheared, with different sized constituents counter-intuitively separating from each other. Not only does the segregation produce a rich diversity of beautiful patterns, but it can also have serious implications in both industrial and geophysical environments. Despite the universal importance, the individual particle dynamics during segregation are still poorly understand, with such an analysis proving to be difficult with conventional techniques such as binning and sidewall observation. This talk will present results of recent experiments that studied particle scale segregation dynamics during oscillatory shear. Refractive index matched scanning allowed examination of the interior of the flow, where it was observed that large and small particles have an underlying asymmetry that is dependant on the local particle concentration. Small particles were seen to segregate faster through regions of many large particles, whilst large particles rise slower through regions of many small particles. The asymmetry is quantified on both bulk and particle length scales, and is shown to have good agreement with a continuum model that uses a cubic segregation flux.

  17. Racial Segregation and the American Foreclosure Crisis.

    PubMed

    Rugh, Jacob S; Massey, Douglas S

    2010-10-01

    Although the rise in subprime lending and the ensuing wave of foreclosures was partly a result of market forces that have been well-identified in the literature, in the United States it was also a highly racialized process. We argue that residential segregation created a unique niche of poor minority clients who were differentially marketed risky subprime loans that were in great demand for use in mortgage-backed securities that could be sold on secondary markets. We test this argument by regressing foreclosure actions in the top 100 U.S. metropolitan areas on measures of black, Hispanic, and Asian segregation while controlling for a variety of housing market conditions, including average creditworthiness, the extent of coverage under the Community Reinvestment Act, the degree of zoning regulation, and the overall rate of subprime lending. We find that black residential dissimilarity and spatial isolation are powerful predictors of foreclosures across U.S. metropolitan areas. In order to isolate subprime lending as the causal mechanism whereby segregation influences foreclosures, we estimate a two-stage least squares model that confirms the causal effect of black segregation on the number and rate of foreclosures across metropolitan areas. In the United States segregation was an important contributing cause of the foreclosure crisis, along with overbuilding, risky lending practices, lax regulation, and the bursting of the housing price bubble.

  18. Viral Regulation of Prokaryotic Carbon Metabolism in a Hypereutrophic Freshwater Reservoir Ecosystem (Villerest, France)

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep Ram, Angia Sriram; Colombet, Jonathan; Perriere, Fanny; Thouvenot, Antoine; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2016-01-01

    The current consensus concerning the viral regulation of prokaryotic carbon metabolism is less well-studied, compared to substrate availability. We explored the seasonal and vertical distribution of viruses and its relative influence on prokaryotic carbon metabolism in a hypereutrophic reservoir, Lake Villerest (France). Flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses to determine viral abundance (VA; range = 6.1–63.5 × 107 ml-1) and viral infection rates of prokaryotes (range = 5.3–32%) respectively suggested that both the parameters varied more significantly with depths than with seasons. Prokaryotic growth efficiency (PGE, considered as a proxy of prokaryotic carbon metabolism) calculated from prokaryotic production and respiration measurements (PGE = prokaryotic production/[prokaryotic production + prokaryotic respiration] × 100) varied from 14 to 80% across seasons and depths. Viruses through selective lyses had antagonistic impacts on PGE by regulating key prokaryotic metabolic processes (i.e., production and respiration). Higher viral lysis accompanied by higher respiration rates and lower PGE in the summer (mean = 22.9 ± 10.3%) than other seasons (mean = 59.1 ± 18.6%), led to significant loss of carbon through bacterial-viral loop and shifted the reservoir system to net heterotrophy. Our data therefore suggests that the putative adverse impact of viruses on the growth efficiency of the prokaryotic community can have strong implications on nutrient flux patterns and on the overall ecosystem metabolism in anthropogenic dominated aquatic systems such as Lake Villerest. PMID:26903963

  19. Viral Regulation of Prokaryotic Carbon Metabolism in a Hypereutrophic Freshwater Reservoir Ecosystem (Villerest, France).

    PubMed

    Pradeep Ram, Angia Sriram; Colombet, Jonathan; Perriere, Fanny; Thouvenot, Antoine; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2016-01-01

    The current consensus concerning the viral regulation of prokaryotic carbon metabolism is less well-studied, compared to substrate availability. We explored the seasonal and vertical distribution of viruses and its relative influence on prokaryotic carbon metabolism in a hypereutrophic reservoir, Lake Villerest (France). Flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses to determine viral abundance (VA; range = 6.1-63.5 × 10(7) ml(-1)) and viral infection rates of prokaryotes (range = 5.3-32%) respectively suggested that both the parameters varied more significantly with depths than with seasons. Prokaryotic growth efficiency (PGE, considered as a proxy of prokaryotic carbon metabolism) calculated from prokaryotic production and respiration measurements (PGE = prokaryotic production/[prokaryotic production + prokaryotic respiration] × 100) varied from 14 to 80% across seasons and depths. Viruses through selective lyses had antagonistic impacts on PGE by regulating key prokaryotic metabolic processes (i.e., production and respiration). Higher viral lysis accompanied by higher respiration rates and lower PGE in the summer (mean = 22.9 ± 10.3%) than other seasons (mean = 59.1 ± 18.6%), led to significant loss of carbon through bacterial-viral loop and shifted the reservoir system to net heterotrophy. Our data therefore suggests that the putative adverse impact of viruses on the growth efficiency of the prokaryotic community can have strong implications on nutrient flux patterns and on the overall ecosystem metabolism in anthropogenic dominated aquatic systems such as Lake Villerest.

  20. The SMC condensin complex is required for origin segregation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xindan; Tang, Olive W; Riley, Eammon P; Rudner, David Z

    2014-02-03

    SMC condensin complexes play a central role in organizing and compacting chromosomes in all domains of life [1, 2]. In the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, cells lacking SMC are viable only during slow growth and display decondensed chromosomes, suggesting that SMC complexes function throughout the genome [3, 4]. Here, we show that rapid inactivation of SMC or its partner protein ScpB during fast growth leads to a failure to resolve newly replicated origins and a complete block to chromosome segregation. Importantly, the loss of origin segregation is not due to an inability to unlink precatenated sister chromosomes by Topoisomerase IV. In support of the idea that ParB-mediated recruitment of SMC complexes to the origin is important for their segregation, cells with reduced levels of SMC that lack ParB are severely impaired in origin resolution. Finally, we demonstrate that origin segregation is a task shared by the condensin complex and the parABS partitioning system. We propose that origin-localized SMC constrains adjacent DNA segments along their lengths, drawing replicated origins in on themselves and away from each other. This SMC-mediated lengthwise condensation, bolstered by the parABS system, drives origin segregation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.