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Sample records for proline-based neuraminidase inhibitor

  1. Neuraminidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The reproduction process of all strains of influenza are dependent on the same enzyme neuraminidase. Pharmaceutical companies have been developing drugs that can inhibit the function of neuraminidase hoping to create an effective weapon against the flu. Researchers from the pharmaceutical industry and from the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography have grown crystals of neuraminidase in space. These improved, space-grown crystals have provided information that have helped design drugs which form a stronger interaction with the enzyme. These drugs inhibit neuraminidase by attaching themselves to the enzyme. Since the drugs are less likely to detach from the enzyme, they are more effective, require smaller dosages, and have fewer side effects. Shown here is a segmented representation of the neuraminidase inhibitor compound sitting inside a cave-like contour of the neuraminidase enzyme surface. This cave-like formation present in every neuraminidase enzyme is the active site crucial to the flu's ability to infect. The space-grown crystals of neuraminidase have provided significant new details about the three-dimensional characteristics of this active site thus allowing researchers to design drugs that fit tighter into the site. Principal Investigator: Dr. Larry DeLucas

  2. Novel Potent Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Serine Protease Inhibitors Derived from Proline-Based Macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin X.; Njoroge, F. George; Arasappan, Ashok; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Yang, Weiying; Parekh, Tejal N.; Pichardo, John; Prongay, Andrew; Cheng, Kuo-Chi; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Yao, Nanhua; Madison, Vincent; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor

    2008-06-30

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease is essential for viral replication. It has been a target of choice for intensive drug discovery research. On the basis of an active pentapeptide inhibitor, 1, we envisioned that macrocyclization from the P2 proline to P3 capping could enhance binding to the backbone Ala156 residue and the S4 pocket. Thus, a number of P2 proline-based macrocyclic {alpha}-ketoamide inhibitors were prepared and investigated in an HCV NS3 serine protease continuous assay (K*{sub i}). The biological activity varied substantially depending on factors such as the ring size, number of amino acid residues, number of methyl substituents, type of heteroatom in the linker, P3 residue, and configuration at the proline C-4 center. The pentapeptide inhibitors were very potent, with the C-terminal acids and amides being the most active ones (24, K*{sub i} = 8 nM). The tetrapeptides and tripeptides were less potent. Sixteen- and seventeen-membered macrocyclic compounds were equally potent, while fifteen-membered analogues were slightly less active. gem-Dimethyl substituents at the linker improved the potency of all inhibitors (the best compound was 45, K*{sub i} = 6 nM). The combination of tert-leucine at P3 and dimethyl substituents at the linker in compound 47 realized a selectivity of 307 against human neutrophil elastase. Compound 45 had an IC{sub 50} of 130 nM in a cellular replicon assay, while IC{sub 50} for 24 was 400 nM. Several compounds had excellent subcutaneous AUC and bioavailability in rats. Although tripeptide compound 40 was 97% orally bioavailable, larger pentapeptides generally had low oral bioavailability. The X-ray crystal structure of compounds 24 and 45 bound to the protease demonstrated the close interaction of the macrocycle with the Ala156 methyl group and S4 pocket. The strategy of macrocyclization has been proved to be successful in improving potency (>20-fold greater than that of 1) and in structural depeptization.

  3. Influenza treatment and prophylaxis with neuraminidase inhibitors: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Amanda; Holodniy, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus is a pathogen that causes morbidity and mortality worldwide. Whereas vaccination is important for prevention of disease, given its limitations, antiviral therapy is at the forefront of treatment and also plays a role in prevention. Currently, two classes of antiviral medications, the adamantanes and the neuraminidase inhibitors, are approved for treatment. Given the resistance patterns of circulating influenza, adamantanes are not recommended. Within the US, two neuraminidase inhibitors are currently approved for both treatment and prevention, while worldwide there are four available. In this review, we will briefly discuss the epidemiology and pathology of influenza and then discuss neuraminidase inhibitors: their mechanism of action, resistance, development, and future applications. PMID:24277988

  4. Resistance to anti-influenza drugs: adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Ho, Hui-Ting; Barr, Ian

    2006-10-01

    Development of effective drugs for the treatment or prevention of epidemic and pandemic influenza is important in order to reduce its impact. Adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors are two classes of anti-influenza drugs available for influenza therapy currently. However, emergence of resistance to these drugs has been detected, which raises concerns regarding their widespread use. In this review, resistance to the adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors will be discussed in relation to both epidemic and pandemic influenza viruses.

  5. Neuraminidase Inhibitors from the Fermentation Broth of Phellinus linteus

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Byung Soon; Lee, Myeong-Seok; Lee, Seung Woong; Lee, In-Kyoung; Seo, Geon-Sik; Choi, Hwa Jung

    2014-01-01

    During a search for neuraminidase inhibitors derived from medicinal fungi, we found that the fermentation broth of Phellinus linteus exhibited potent neuraminidase inhibitory activity. Through bioassay-guided fractionation, two active compounds were purified from the ethyl acetate-soluble portion of the fermentation broth of P. linteus. These structures were identified as inotilone (1) and 4-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3-buten-2-one (2) by spectroscopic methods. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited H1N1 neuraminidase activity with IC50 values of 29.1 and 125.6 µM, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. They also exhibited an antiviral effect in a viral cytopathic effect reduction assay using MDCK cells. These results suggest that compounds 1 and 2 from the culture broth of P. linteus would be good candidates for the prevention and therapeutic strategies towards viral infections. PMID:25071390

  6. Neuraminidase Inhibitors from the Fruiting Body of Phellinus igniarius

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Yul; Kim, Dae-Won; Hwang, Byung Soon; Woo, E-Eum; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Jeong, Kyeong-Woon; Lee, In-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    During our ongoing investigation of neuraminidase inhibitors from medicinal fungi, we found that the fruiting bodies of Phellinus igniarius exhibited significant inhibitory activity against neuraminidase from recombinant H3N2 influenza viruses. Two active compounds were isolated from the methanolic extract of P. igniarius through solvent partitioning and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The active compounds were identified as phelligridins E and G on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and electrospray ionization mass measurements. These compounds inhibited neuraminidases from recombinant rvH1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 influenza viruses, with IC50 values in the range of 0.7~8.1 µM. PMID:27433123

  7. Inhibition of neuraminidase by Ganoderma triterpenoids and implications for neuraminidase inhibitor design

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qinchang; Bang, Tran Hai; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Sawai, Takashi; Sawai, Ken; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors are the dominant antiviral drugs for treating influenza in the clinic. Increasing prevalence of drug resistance makes the discovery of new NA inhibitors a high priority. Thirty-one triterpenoids from the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lingzhi were analyzed in an in vitro NA inhibition assay, leading to the discovery of ganoderic acid T-Q and TR as two inhibitors of H5N1 and H1N1 NAs. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the corresponding triterpenoid structure is a potential scaffold for the design of NA inhibitors. Using these triterpenoids as probes we found, through further in silico docking and interaction analysis, that interactions with the amino-acid residues Arg292 and/or Glu119 of NA are critical for the inhibition of H5N1 and H1N1. These findings should prove valuable for the design and development of NA inhibitors. PMID:26307417

  8. Proline-Based Macrocyclic Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus: Stereoselective Synthesis and Biological Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin X.; Njoroge, F. George; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Prongay, Andrew; Pichardo, John; Madison, Vincent; Buevich, Alexei; Chan, Tze-Ming

    2008-06-30

    Macrocyclization through a Mitsunobu reaction was used to synthesize a 17-membered macrocycle. The bicyclic acetal core was prepared completely diastereoselectively. The macrocyclic peptidomimetic surrogate of the P2-P3 dipeptide moiety was designed to function as a hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 serine protease inhibitor, and the pentapeptide {alpha}-ketoamides derived from the macrocycle were shown to be potent HCV inhibitors.

  9. Discovery and Characterization of Diazenylaryl Sulfonic Acids as Inhibitors of Viral and Bacterial Neuraminidases.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Anja; Richter, Martina; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Xu, Zhongli; Schumann, Lilia; Grienke, Ulrike; Mair, Christina E; Kramer, Christian; Rollinger, Judith M; Liedl, Klaus R; Schmidtke, Michaela; Kirchmair, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Viral neuraminidases are an established drug target to combat influenza. Severe complications observed in influenza patients are primarily caused by secondary infections with e.g., Streptococcus pneumoniae. These bacteria engage in a lethal synergism with influenza A viruses (IAVs) and also express neuraminidases. Therefore, inhibitors with dual activity on viral and bacterial neuraminidases are expected to be advantageous for the treatment of influenza infections. Here we report on the discovery and characterization of diazenylaryl sulfonic acids as dual inhibitors of viral and Streptococcus pneumoniae neuraminidase. The initial hit came from a virtual screening campaign for inhibitors of viral neuraminidases. For the most active compound, 7-[2-[4-[2-[4-[2-(2-hydroxy-3,6-disulfo-1-naphthalenyl)diazenyl]-2-methylphenyl]diazenyl]-2-methylphenyl]diazenyl]-1,3-naphthalenedisulfonic acid (NSC65847; 1), the Ki-values measured in a fluorescence-based assay were lower than 1.5 μM for both viral and pneumococcal neuraminidases. The compound also inhibited N1 virus variants containing neuraminidase inhibitor resistance-conferring substitutions. Via enzyme kinetics and nonlinear regression modeling, 1 was suggested to impair the viral neuraminidases and pneumococcal neuraminidase with a mixed-type inhibition mode. Given its antiviral and antipneumococcal activity, 1 was identified as a starting point for the development of novel, dual-acting anti-infectives.

  10. Discovery and Characterization of Diazenylaryl Sulfonic Acids as Inhibitors of Viral and Bacterial Neuraminidases

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Anja; Richter, Martina; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Xu, Zhongli; Schumann, Lilia; Grienke, Ulrike; Mair, Christina E.; Kramer, Christian; Rollinger, Judith M.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Schmidtke, Michaela; Kirchmair, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Viral neuraminidases are an established drug target to combat influenza. Severe complications observed in influenza patients are primarily caused by secondary infections with e.g., Streptococcus pneumoniae. These bacteria engage in a lethal synergism with influenza A viruses (IAVs) and also express neuraminidases. Therefore, inhibitors with dual activity on viral and bacterial neuraminidases are expected to be advantageous for the treatment of influenza infections. Here we report on the discovery and characterization of diazenylaryl sulfonic acids as dual inhibitors of viral and Streptococcus pneumoniae neuraminidase. The initial hit came from a virtual screening campaign for inhibitors of viral neuraminidases. For the most active compound, 7-[2-[4-[2-[4-[2-(2-hydroxy-3,6-disulfo-1-naphthalenyl)diazenyl]-2-methylphenyl]diazenyl]-2-methylphenyl]diazenyl]-1,3-naphthalenedisulfonic acid (NSC65847; 1), the Ki-values measured in a fluorescence-based assay were lower than 1.5 μM for both viral and pneumococcal neuraminidases. The compound also inhibited N1 virus variants containing neuraminidase inhibitor resistance-conferring substitutions. Via enzyme kinetics and nonlinear regression modeling, 1 was suggested to impair the viral neuraminidases and pneumococcal neuraminidase with a mixed-type inhibition mode. Given its antiviral and antipneumococcal activity, 1 was identified as a starting point for the development of novel, dual-acting anti-infectives. PMID:28261167

  11. Photolabeling of the alpha-neuraminidase/beta-galactosidase complex from human placenta with a photoreactive neuraminidase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, T.G.; Louie, A.; Potier, M. )

    1990-11-30

    Photolabeling of the alpha-neuraminidase/beta-galactosidase complex in human placenta was carried out using the radioactive photoprobe, 9-S-(4-azido-3,5-3H-2-nitrophenyl)-5-acetamido-2,6 anhydro-2,3,5,9- tetradeoxy-9- thio-D-glycero-D-galacto-non-2-enonic acid. Two intensely labeled bands at 61 and 46 kD were detected with autoradiography. Labeling of the 46 kD protein was blocked with the inclusion of the surfactant Triton X-100 in the photolysis mixture, indicating a nonspecific, hydrophobic interaction. The 61 kD protein was protected from labeling only when the neuraminidase inhibitor 2,3 dehydro N-acetyl neuraminic acid (1 mM) was present during photolysis. These results suggest that the neuraminidase activity resides among the proteins in the 61 kD molecular weight range comigrating with the lysosomal beta-galactosidase, under denaturing conditions.

  12. Screening of neuraminidase inhibitors from traditional Chinese medicines by integrating capillary electrophoresis with immobilized enzyme microreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Chen, Zilin

    2014-05-02

    A simple and effective neuraminidase-immobilized capillary microreactor was fabricated by glutaraldehyde cross-linking technology for screening the neuraminidase inhibitors from traditional Chinese medicines. The substrate and product were separated by CE in short-end injection mode within 2 min. Dual-wavelength ultraviolet detection was employed to eliminate the interference from the screened compounds. The parameters relating to the separation efficiency and the activity of immobilized neuraminidase were systematically evaluated. The activity of the immobilized neuraminidase remained 90% after 30 days storage at 4°C. The immobilized NA microreactor could be continuously used for more than 200 runs. The Michaelis-Menten constant of neuraminidase was determined by the microreactor as 136.6 ± 10.8 μM. In addition, six in eighteen natural products were found as potent inhibitors and the inhibition potentials were ranked in the following order: bavachinin>bavachin>baicalein>baicalin>chrysin and vitexin. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations were 59.52 ± 4.12, 65.28 ± 1.07, 44.79 ± 1.21 and 31.62 ± 2.04 for baicalein, baicalin, bavachin and bavachinin, respectively. The results demonstrated that the neuraminidase-immobilized capillary microreactor was a very effective tool for screening neuraminidase inhibitors from traditional Chinese medicines.

  13. Economics of neuraminidase inhibitor stock piling for pandemic influenza, Singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vernon J; Phua, Kai Hong; Chenm, Mark I; Chow, Angela; Ma, Stefan; Goh, Kee Tai; Leo, Yee Sin

    2006-01-01

    We compared strategies for stock piling neuraminidase inhibitors to treat and prevent influenza in Singapore. Cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses, with Monte Carlo simulations, were used to determine economic outcomes. A pandemic in a population of 4.2 million would result in an estimated 525-1,775 deaths, 10,700-38,600 hospitalization days, and economic costs of 0.7 dollars to 2.2 billion Singapore dollars. The treatment-only strategy had optimal economic benefits: stock piles of antiviral agents for 40% of the population would save an estimated 418 lives and 414 million dollars, at a cost of 52.6 million dollars per shelf-life cycle of the stock pile. Prophylaxis was economically beneficial in high-risk subpopulations, which account for 78% of deaths, and in pandemics in which the death rate was >0.6%. Prophylaxis for pandemics with a 5% case-fatality rate would save 50,000 lives and 81 billion dollars. These models can help policymakers weigh the options for pandemic planning.

  14. In vitro generation of neuraminidase inhibitor resistance in A(H5N1) influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Holien, Jessica K; Barr, Ian G

    2009-10-01

    To identify mutations that can arise in highly pathogenic A(H5N1) viruses under neuraminidase inhibitor selective pressure, two antigenically different strains were serially passaged with increasing levels of either oseltamivir or zanamivir. Under oseltamivir pressure, both A(H5N1) viruses developed a H274Y neuraminidase mutation, although in one strain the mutation occurred in combination with an I222M neuraminidase mutation. The H274Y neuraminidase mutation reduced oseltamivir susceptibility significantly (900- to 2,500-fold compared to the wild type). However the dual H274Y/I222M neuraminidase mutation had an even greater impact on resistance, with oseltamivir susceptibility reduced significantly further (8,000-fold compared to the wild type). A similar affect on oseltamivir susceptibility was observed when the dual H274Y/I222M mutations were introduced, by reverse genetics, into a recombinant seasonal human A(H1N1) virus and also when an alternative I222 substitution (I222V) was generated in combination with H274Y in A(H5N1) and A(H1N1) viruses. These viruses remained fully susceptible to zanamivir but demonstrated reduced susceptibility to peramivir. Following passage of the A(H5N1) viruses in the presence of zanamivir, the strains developed a D198G neuraminidase mutation, which reduced susceptibility to both zanamivir and oseltamivir, and also an E119G neuraminidase mutation, which demonstrated significantly reduced zanamivir susceptibility (1,400-fold compared to the wild type). Mutations in hemagglutinin residues implicated in receptor binding were also detected in many of the resistant strains. This study identified the mutations that can arise in A(H5N1) under either oseltamivir or zanamivir selective pressure and the potential for dual neuraminidase mutations to result in dramatically reduced drug susceptibility.

  15. Identification of Selective Nanomolar Inhibitors of the Human Neuraminidase, NEU4

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The human neuraminidase enzymes (hNEU) play important roles in human physiology and pathology. The lack of potent and selective inhibitors toward these enzymes has limited our understanding of their function and the development of therapeutic applications. Here we report the evaluation of a panel of compounds against the four human neuraminidase isoenzymes. Among the compounds tested, we identified the first selective, nanomolar inhibitors of the human neuraminidase 4 enzyme (NEU4). The most potent NEU4 inhibitor (5-acetamido-9-[4-hydroxymethyl[1,2,3]triazol-1-yl]-2,3,5,9-tetradeoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-2-nonulopyranosonic acid) was found to have an inhibitory constant (Ki) of 30 ± 19 nM and was 500-fold selective for its target over the other hNEU isoenzymes tested in vitro (NEU1, NEU2, and NEU3). This is the first report of any inhibitor of hNEU with nanomolar potency, and this confirms that the 2,3-didehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid (DANA) scaffold can be exploited to develop new, potent, and selective inhibitors that target this important family of human enzymes. PMID:24900705

  16. Neuraminidase inhibitor R-125489 - A promising drug for treating influenza virus: Steered molecular dynamics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Binh Khanh; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We study binding affinity of R-125489 and its prodrug CS-8958 to neuraminidase of pathogenic influenza viruses by molecular dynamics simulations. {yields} It is shown that, in agreement with experiments, R-125489 binds to neuraminidase more tightly than CS-8958. {yields} We predict that R-125489 can be used to treat not only wild-type but also tamiflu-resistant N294S, H274Y variants of A/H5N1 virus. {yields} The high correlation between theoretical and experimental data implies that SMD is a very promising tool for drug design. -- Abstract: Two neuraminidase inhibitors, oseltamivir and zanamivir, are important drug treatments for influenza. Oseltamivir-resistant mutants of the influenza virus A/H1N1 and A/H5N1 have emerged, necessitating the development of new long-acting antiviral agents. One such agent is a new neuraminidase inhibitor R-125489 and its prodrug CS-8958. An atomic level understanding of the nature of this antiviral agents binding is still missing. We address this gap in our knowledge by applying steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to different subtypes of seasonal and highly pathogenic influenza viruses. We show that, in agreement with experiments, R-125489 binds to neuraminidase more tightly than CS-8958. Based on results obtained by SMD and the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method, we predict that R-125489 can be used to treat not only wild-type but also tamiflu-resistant N294S, H274Y variants of A/H5N1 virus as its binding affinity does not vary much across these systems. The high correlation level between theoretically determined rupture forces and experimental data on binding energies for the large number of systems studied here implies that SMD is a promising tool for drug design.

  17. Difluorosialic acids, potent novel influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors, induce fewer drug resistance-associated neuraminidase mutations than does oseltamivir.

    PubMed

    Tai, S-H Sheldon; Agafitei, Olga; Gao, Zhizeng; Liggins, Richard; Petric, Martin; Withers, Stephen G; Niikura, Masahiro

    2015-12-02

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), including the most frequently prescribed oral therapeutic oseltamivir, play a critical role in the control of severe influenza virus (IFV) infections. However, recent reports of spread of an oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 pandemic strain in individuals who have never been exposed to oseltamivir highlight an urgent need for new antivirals against NAI-resistant IFVs. Difluorosialic acids (DFSAs) are a novel class of anti-IFV NAIs designed based on the mechanism of action of IFV NA, and distinguished by their covalent inhibition mode and their high structural similarity to the natural substrate, sialic acid. These characteristics should render the development of resistance a less rapid process. In this report, we evaluated the relative propensity of influenza A virus (IFV-A) NA to develop resistance against the DFSA class of inhibitor by passaging IFV-A strains in vitro in the presence of either oseltamivir or a representative DFSA (FeqGuDFSA). All the passage-selected lines gained mutations in hemagglutinin. Among the 12 oseltamivir-resistant passaged lines, five gained NA mutations and four of these were the well-defined H275Y mutation that causes oseltamivir resistance. In contrast, out of 15 DFSA-passaged lines, only 2 lines gained NA mutations. Further, NA inhibition assays indicated that these mutations did not change the sensitivity of NA to DFSA and thus the resistance to DFSA was not conferred by these NA mutations. These results strongly suggest that, compared to oseltamivir, IFV is less prone to development of resistance against DFSAs through NA mutations.

  18. Structural basis for a class of nanomolar influenza A neuraminidase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, Philip S.; Mohan, Sankar; Russell, Rupert J. M.; Bance, Nicole; Niikura, Masahiro; Pinto, B. Mario

    2013-10-01

    The influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is essential for the virus life cycle. The rise of resistance mutations against current antiviral therapies has increased the need for the development of novel inhibitors. Recent efforts have targeted a cavity adjacent to the catalytic site (the 150-cavity) in addition to the primary catalytic subsite in order to increase specificity and reduce the likelihood of resistance. This study details structural and in vitro analyses of a class of inhibitors that bind uniquely in both subsites. Crystal structures of three inhibitors show occupation of the 150-cavity in two distinct and novel binding modes. We believe these are the first nanomolar inhibitors of NA to be characterized in this way. Furthermore, we show that one inhibitor, binding within the catalytic site, offers reduced susceptibility to known resistance mutations via increased flexibility of a pendant pentyloxy group and the ability to pivot about a strong hydrogen-bonding network.

  19. Substrate, inhibitor, or antibody stabilizes the Glu 119 Gly mutant influenza virus neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabudhe, A; Lawrence, L; Epa, V C; Varghese, J N; Colman, P M; McKimm-Breschkin, J L

    1998-07-20

    We have previously reported the isolation and characterization of an influenza virus variant with decreased sensitivity to the neuraminidase-specific inhibitor zanamivir. This variant, which has a mutation in the active site, Glu 119 Gly (E119G), has the same specific activity as the wild-type neuraminidase (NA), but is inherently unstable, as measured by loss of both enzyme activity and NC10 monoclonal antibody reactivity. However, despite the instability of the NA, replication of the virus in liquid culture is not adversely affected. We demonstrate here that in addition to enhanced temperature sensitivity the mutant NA was significantly more sensitive to formaldehyde and to specimen preparation for electron microscopy. Substrate, inhibitor, or monoclonal antibodies stabilized the NA against all methods of denaturation. These results suggest that the instability of the variant is primarily at the level of polypeptide chain folding rather than at the level of association of monomers into tetramers. Furthermore the presence of high levels of substrate, either cell or virus associated, may be sufficient to stabilize the NA during virus replication.

  20. A Novel Potent and Highly Specific Inhibitor against Influenza Viral N1-N9 Neuraminidases: Insight into Neuraminidase-Inhibitor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sriwilaijaroen, Nongluk; Magesh, Sadagopan; Imamura, Akihiro; Ando, Hiromune; Ishida, Hideharu; Sakai, Miho; Ishitsubo, Erika; Hori, Takanori; Moriya, Setsuko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Kuwata, Kazuo; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Kenji; Miyagi, Taeko; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Kiso, Makoto; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-05-26

    People throughout the world continue to be at risk for death from influenza A virus, which is always creating a new variant. Here we present a new effective and specific anti-influenza viral neuraminidase (viNA) inhibitor, 9-cyclopropylcarbonylamino-4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en (cPro-GUN). Like zanamivir, it is highly effective against N1-N9 avian and N1-N2 human viNAs, including H274Y oseltamivir-resistant N1 viNA, due to its C-6 portion still being anchored in the active site, different from the disruption of oseltamivir's C-6 anchoring by H274Y mutation. Unlike zanamivir, no sialidase inhibitory activity has been observed for cPro-GUN against huNeu1-huNeu4 enzymes. Broad efficacy of cPro-GUN against avian and human influenza viruses in cell cultures comparable to its sialidase inhibitory activities makes cPro-GUN ideal for further development for safe therapeutic or prophylactic use against both seasonal and pandemic influenza.

  1. Susceptibility of influenza viruses circulating in Western Saudi Arabia to neuraminidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tolah, Ahmed M.; Azhar, Esam I.; Hashem, Anwar M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the sensitivity of circulating influenza viruses in Western Saudi Arabia to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs); mainly, zanamivir and oseltamivir. Methods: Respiratory samples were collected from patients presenting with respiratory symptoms to King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) between September 2013 and October 2014. All samples were tested prospectively by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for influenza A and B viruses. Positive samples were then inoculated on Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and isolated viruses were examined for their sensitivity to NAIs using fluorescent neuraminidase inhibition assay. Results: Out of 406 tested samples, 25 samples (6.2%) were positive for influenza A/pdmH1N1 virus, one sample (0.25%) was positive for influenza A/H3N2 virus, and 7 samples (1.7%) were positive for influenza B Yamagata-like virus. Screening of isolated influenza A and B viruses (9 out of 33) for their sensitivity to NAIs showed no significant resistance to available NAIs. Conclusion: Our results show that circulating influenza viruses in Jeddah are still sensitive to NAIs. PMID:27052292

  2. Virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza a subtype H5N1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikesit, A. A.; Ardiansah, B.; Handayani, D. M.; Tambunan, U. S. F.; Kerami, D.

    2016-02-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 poses a significant threat to animal and human health worldwide. The number of H5N1 infection in Indonesia is the highest during 2005-2013, with a mortality rate up to 83%. A mutation that occurred in H5N1 strain made it resistant to commercial antiviral agents such as oseltamivir and zanamivir, so the more potent antiviral agent is needed. In this study, virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of H5N1 was conducted. Total 491 flavonoid compound obtained from HerbalDB were screened. Molecular docking was performed using MOE 2008.10. This research resulted in Guajavin B as the best ligand.

  3. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies.

  4. Emergence of H7N9 Influenza A Virus Resistant to Neuraminidase Inhibitors in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Shichinohe, Shintaro; Nakayama, Misako; Igarashi, Manabu; Ishii, Akihiro; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Ishida, Hideaki; Kitagawa, Naoko; Sasamura, Takako; Shiohara, Masanori; Doi, Michiko; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients infected with H7N9 influenza virus has been increasing since 2013. We examined the efficacy of neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors and the efficacy of a vaccine against an H7N9 influenza virus, A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9), isolated from a patient in a cynomolgus macaque model. NA inhibitors (oseltamivir and peramivir) barely reduced the total virus amount because of the emergence of resistant variants with R289K or I219T in NA [residues 289 and 219 in N9 of A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) correspond to 292 and 222 in N2, respectively] in three of the six treated macaques, whereas subcutaneous immunization of an inactivated vaccine derived from A/duck/Mongolia/119/2008 (H7N9) prevented propagation of A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) in all vaccinated macaques. The percentage of macaques in which variant H7N9 viruses with low sensitivity to the NA inhibitors were detected was much higher than that of macaques in which variant H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza virus was detected after treatment with one of the NA inhibitors in our previous study. The virus with R289K in NA was reported in samples from human patients, whereas that with I219T in NA was identified for the first time in this study using macaques, though no variant H7N9 virus was reported in previous studies using mice. Therefore, the macaque model enables prediction of the frequency of emerging H7N9 virus resistant to NA inhibitors in vivo. Since H7N9 strains resistant to NA inhibitors might easily emerge compared to other influenza viruses, monitoring of the emergence of variants is required during treatment of H7N9 influenza virus infection with NA inhibitors. PMID:26055368

  5. Glycosidase inhibitors (castanospermine and swainsonine) and neuraminidase inhibit pokeweed mitogen-induced B cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, T; Kanayama, Y; Nishiura, T; Nakao, H; Yonezawa, T; Tarui, S

    1992-08-01

    Castanospermine (CSP), an inhibitor of alpha-glucosidase, enhanced immunoglobulin (Ig) release in a Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC)-induced lymphocyte culture (Scand. J. Immunol. 1990. 32: 529). In a pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-human lymphocyte culture, unlike the SAC-stimulated system, CSP strongly decreased the number of IgG-, IgA- and IgM-secreting cells as well as that of Ig-bearing cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes treated with swainsonine, a mannosidase II inhibitor, or with neuraminidase also showed a reduced response to PWM. In cross-culture experiments, only a mixture of B cells pretreated with either agent and untreated T cells showed such a suppressive effect. Adhesion was decreased between B cells treated with either agent and untreated T cells, but not between treated T cells and untreated B cells. These results demonstrate that a certain alteration in B cell membrane oligosaccharides inhibited the T cell-B cell adhesion in the PWM culture, leading to an arrest of B cell maturation. Considering that these inhibitors eventually prevent terminal sialic acid addition, the present study provides evidence that sialic acids on B cell surface oligosaccharides play a biological role in the T cell-B cell interaction.

  6. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Adam; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Correia, Vanessa; Besselaar, Terry; Drager-Dayal, Renu; Fry, Alicia; Gregory, Vicky; Gubareva, Larisa; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Lackenby, Angie; Lo, Janice; Odagiri, Takato; Pereyaslov, Dmitriy; Siqueira, Marilda M; Takashita, Emi; Tashiro, Masato; Wang, Dayan; Wong, Sun; Zhang, Wenqing; Daniels, Rod S; Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Emergence of influenza viruses with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) is sporadic, often follows exposure to NAIs, but occasionally occurs in the absence of NAI pressure. The emergence and global spread in 2007/2008 of A(H1N1) influenza viruses showing clinical resistance to oseltamivir due to neuraminidase (NA) H275Y substitution, in the absence of drug pressure, warrants continued vigilance and monitoring for similar viruses. Four World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza and one WHO Collaborating Centre for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza (WHO CCs) tested 11,387 viruses collected by WHO-recognized National Influenza Centres (NIC) between May 2012 and May 2013 to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. The data were evaluated using normalized IC50 fold-changes rather than raw IC50 data. Nearly 90% of the 11,387 viruses were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Only 0.2% (n=27) showed highly reduced inhibition (HRI) against at least one of the four NAIs, usually oseltamivir, while 0.3% (n=39) showed reduced inhibition (RI). NA sequence data, available from the WHO CCs and from sequence databases (n=3661), were screened for amino acid substitutions associated with reduced NAI susceptibility. Those showing HRI were A(H1N1)pdm09 with NA H275Y (n=18), A(H3N2) with NA E119V (n=3) or NA R292K (n=1) and B/Victoria-lineage with NA H273Y (n=2); amino acid position numbering is A subtype and B type specific. Overall, approximately 99% of circulating viruses tested during the 2012-2013 period were sensitive to all four NAIs. Consequently, these drugs remain an appropriate choice for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza virus infections.

  7. Potent and Long-Acting Dimeric Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Are Effective at a Once-Weekly Dosing Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Simon J. F.; Watson, Keith G.; Cameron, Rachel; Chalmers, David K.; Demaine, Derek A.; Fenton, Rob J.; Gower, David; Hamblin, J. Nicole; Hamilton, Stephanie; Hart, Graham J.; Inglis, Graham G. A.; Jin, Betty; Jones, Haydn T.; McConnell, Darryl B.; Mason, Andy M.; Nguyen, Van; Owens, Ian J.; Parry, Nigel; Reece, Phillip A.; Shanahan, Stephen E.; Smith, Donna; Wu, Wen-Yang; Tucker, Simon P.

    2004-01-01

    Dimeric derivatives (compounds 7 to 9) of the influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitor zanamivir (compound 2), which have linking groups of 14 to 18 atoms in length, are approximately 100-fold more potent inhibitors of influenza virus replication in vitro and in vivo than zanamivir. The observed optimum linker length of 18 to 22 Å, together with observations that the dimers cause aggregation of isolated neuraminidase tetramers and whole virus, indicate that the dimers benefit from multivalent binding via intertetramer and intervirion linkages. The outstanding long-lasting protective activities shown by compounds 8 and 9 in mouse influenza infectivity experiments and the extremely long residence times observed in the lungs of rats suggest that a single low dose of a dimer would provide effective treatment and prophylaxis for influenza virus infections. PMID:15561823

  8. Characterization of Neuraminidase Inhibitors in Korean Papaver rhoeas Bee Pollen Contributing to Anti-Influenza Activities In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Kyoung; Hwang, Byung Soon; Kim, Dae-Won; Kim, Ji-Yul; Woo, E-Eum; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Choi, Hwa Jung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2016-04-01

    The active constituents of Korean Papaver rhoeas bee pollen conferring neuraminidase inhibitory activities (H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1) were investigated. Six flavonoids and one alkaloid were isolated and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry data. These included kaempferol-3-sophoroside (1), kaempferol-3-neohesperidoside (2), kaempferol-3-sambubioside (3), kaempferol-3-glucoside (4), quercetin-3-sophoroside (5), luteolin (6), and chelianthifoline (7). All compounds showed neuraminidase inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 10.7 to 151.1 µM. The most potent neuraminidase inhibitor was luteolin, which was the dominant content in the ethyl acetate fraction. All tested compounds displayed noncompetitive inhibition of H3N2 neuraminidase. Furthermore, compounds 1-7 all reduced the severity of virally induced cytopathic effects as determined by the Madin-Darby canine kidney cell-based assay showing antiviral activity with IC50 values ranging from 10.7 to 33.4 µM (zanamivir: 58.3 µM). The active compounds were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the total amount of compounds 1-7 made up about 0.592 g/100 g bee pollen, contributing a rich resource of a natural antiviral product.

  9. Prognosis of hospitalized patients with 2009 H1N1 influenza in Spain: influence of neuraminidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Castilla, Jesús; Godoy, Pere; Martín, Vicente; Soldevila, Nuria; Alonso, Jordi; Astray, Jenaro; Baricot, Maretva; Cantón, Rafael; Castro, Ady; Gónzález-Candelas, Fernando; Mayoral, José María; Quintana, José María; Pumarola, Tomás; Tamames, Sonia; Sáez, Marc; Domínguez, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Background The H1N1 influenza pandemic strain has been associated with a poor prognosis in hospitalized patients. The present report evaluates the factors influencing prognosis. Methods A total of 813 patients hospitalized with H1N1 influenza in 36 hospitals (nationwide) in Spain were analysed. Detailed histories of variables preceding hospital admission were obtained by interview, validating data on medications and vaccine with their attending physicians. Data on treatment and complications during hospital stay were recorded. As definition of poor outcome, the endpoints of death and admission to intensive care were combined; and as a further outcome, length of stay was used. Results The mean age was 38.5 years (SD 22.8 years). There were 10 deaths and 79 admissions to intensive care (combined, 88). The use of neuraminidase inhibitors was reported by 495 patients (60.9%). The variables significantly associated with a poor outcome were diabetes (OR = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.21–4.02), corticosteroid therapy (OR = 3.37, 95% CI = 1.39–8.20) and use of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (OR = 2.68, 95% CI = 1.14–6.36), while the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.34–0.94) was protective. Neuraminidase inhibitors within the first 2 days after the influenza onset reduced hospital stay by a mean of 1.9 days (95% CI = 4.7–6.6). Conclusions The use of neuraminidase inhibitors decreases the length of hospital stay and admission to intensive care and/or death. PMID:22467633

  10. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Besselaar, Terry G; Daniels, Rod S; Ermetal, Burcu; Fry, Alicia; Gubareva, Larisa; Huang, Weijuan; Lackenby, Angie; Lee, Raphael T C; Lo, Janice; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Nguyen, Ha T; Pereyaslov, Dmitriy; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Siqueira, Marilda M; Takashita, Emi; Tashiro, Masato; Tilmanis, Danielle; Wang, Dayan; Zhang, Wenqing; Meijer, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza (WHO CCs) tested 13,312 viruses collected by WHO recognized National Influenza Centres between May 2014 and May 2015 to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. Ninety-four per cent of the viruses tested by the WHO CCs were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Approximately 0.5% (n = 68) of viruses showed either highly reduced inhibition (HRI) or reduced inhibition (RI) (n = 56) against at least one of the four NAIs. Of the twelve viruses with HRI, six were A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, three were A(H3N2) viruses and three were B/Yamagata-lineage viruses. The overall frequency of viruses with RI or HRI by the NAIs was lower than that observed in 2013-14 (1.9%), but similar to the 2012-13 period (0.6%). Based on the current analysis, the NAIs remain an appropriate choice for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza virus infections.

  11. Peramivir: A Novel Intravenous Neuraminidase Inhibitor for Treatment of Acute Influenza Infections

    PubMed Central

    Alame, Malak M.; Massaad, Elie; Zaraket, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Peramivir is a novel cyclopentane neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza virus. It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2014 for treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza in patients 18 years and older. For several months prior to approval, the drug was made clinically available under Emergency Use authorization during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Peramivir is highly effective against human influenza A and B isolates as well as emerging influenza virus strains with pandemic potential. Clinical trials demonstrated that the drug is well-tolerated in adult and pediatric populations. Adverse events are generally mild to moderate and similar in frequency to patients receiving placebo. Common side effects include gastrointestinal disorders and decreased neutrophil counts but are self-limiting. Peramivir is administered as a single-dose via the intravenous route providing a valuable therapeutic alternative for critically ill patients or those unable to tolerate other administration routes. Successful clinical trials and post-marketing data in pediatric populations in Japan support the safety and efficacy of peramivir in this population where administration of other antivirals might not be feasible. PMID:27065996

  12. Increased virulence of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant pandemic H1N1 virus in mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Suk; Hee Baek, Yun; Kim, Eun-Ha; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Semi; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-il; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Decano, Arun G; Lee, Byeong-Jae; Kim, Young-Il; Webby, Richard J; Choi, Young-Ki

    2013-01-01

    Pandemic H1N1 2009 (A[H1N1]pdm09) variants associated with oseltamivir resistance have emerged with a histidine-to-tyrosine substitution in the neuraminidase(NA) at position 274 (H274Y). To determine whether the H274Y variant has increased virulence potential, A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, with or without the H274Y mutation, was adapted by serial lung-to-lung passages in mice. The mouse-adapted H274Y (maCA04H274Y) variants showed increased growth properties and virulence in vitro and in vivo while maintaining high NA inhibitor resistance. Interestingly, most maCA04H274Y and maCA04 viruses acquired common mutations in HA (S183P and D222G) and NP (D101G), while only maCA04H274Y viruses had consensus additional K153E mutation in the HA gene, suggesting a potential association with the H274Y substitution. Collectively, our findings highlight the potential emergence of A(H1N1)pdm09 drug-resistant variants with increased virulence and the need for rapid development of novel antiviral drugs. PMID:23924955

  13. Global update on the susceptibility of human influenza viruses to neuraminidase inhibitors, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Takashita, Emi; Meijer, Adam; Lackenby, Angie; Gubareva, Larisa; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Besselaar, Terry; Fry, Alicia; Gregory, Vicky; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Huang, Weijuan; Lo, Janice; Pereyaslov, Dmitriy; Siqueira, Marilda M; Wang, Dayan; Mak, Gannon C; Zhang, Wenqing; Daniels, Rod S; Hurt, Aeron C; Tashiro, Masato

    2015-05-01

    Four World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centres for Reference and Research on Influenza and one WHO Collaborating Centre for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza (WHO CCs) tested 10,641 viruses collected by WHO-recognized National Influenza Centres between May 2013 and May 2014 to determine 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) data for neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir. In addition, neuraminidase (NA) sequence data, available from the WHO CCs and from sequence databases (n=3206), were screened for amino acid substitutions associated with reduced NAI susceptibility. Ninety-five per cent of the viruses tested by the WHO CCs were from three WHO regions: Western Pacific, the Americas and Europe. Approximately 2% (n=172) showed highly reduced inhibition (HRI) against at least one of the four NAIs, commonly oseltamivir, while 0.3% (n=32) showed reduced inhibition (RI). Those showing HRI were A(H1N1)pdm09 with NA H275Y (n=169), A(H3N2) with NA E119V (n=1), B/Victoria-lineage with NA E117G (n=1) and B/Yamagata-lineage with NA H273Y (n=1); amino acid position numbering is A subtype and B type specific. Although approximately 98% of circulating viruses tested during the 2013-2014 period were sensitive to all four NAIs, a large community cluster of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses with the NA H275Y substitution from patients with no previous exposure to antivirals was detected in Hokkaido, Japan. Significant numbers of A(H1N1)pdm09 NA H275Y viruses were also detected in China and the United States: phylogenetic analyses showed that the Chinese viruses were similar to those from Japan, while the United States viruses clustered separately from those of the Hokkaido outbreak, indicative of multiple resistance-emergence events. Consequently, global surveillance of influenza antiviral susceptibility should be continued from a public health perspective.

  14. In silico modification of oseltamivir as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza A virus subtype H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Rachmania, Rizky Archintya; Parikesit, Arli Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This research focused on the modification of the functional groups of oseltamivir as neuraminidase inhibitor against influenza A virus subtype H1N1. Interactions of three of the best ligands were evaluated in the hydrated state using molecular dynamics simulation at two different temperatures. The docking result showed that AD3BF2D ligand (N-[(1S,6R)-5-amino-5-{[(2R,3S,4S)-3,4-dihydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl) tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]oxy}-4-formylcyclohex-3-en-1-yl]acetamide-3-(1-ethylpropoxy)-1-cyclohexene-1-carboxylate) had better binding energy values than standard oseltamivir. AD3BF2D had several interactions, including hydrogen bonds, with the residues in the catalytic site of neuraminidase as identified by molecular dynamics simulation. The results showed that AD3BF2D ligand can be used as a good candidate for neuraminidase inhibitor to cope with influenza A virus subtype H1N1. PMID:25859271

  15. The effects of neuraminidase inhibitors on the release of oseltamivir-sensitive and oseltamivir-resistant influenza viruses from primary cultures of human tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Mutsuo; Nadine, Lusamba; Kubo, Hiroshi; Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Reiko; Nishimura, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Defining the effects of neuraminidase inhibitors on influenza virus infection may provide important information for the treatment of patients. The effects of neuraminidase inhibitors have been examined using various methods, including viral release from kidney cells. However, the effects of neuraminidase inhibitors on viral release from primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells, which retain functions of the original tissues, have not been studied. The effects of neuraminidase inhibitors on the replication of the pandemic influenza virus [A/Sendai-H/N0633/2009 (H1N1) pdm09] and the seasonal influenza virus [A/Sendai-H/216/2009 (H1N1)] that was isolated during the 2008-2009 season were examined. The virus stocks were generated by infecting tracheal cells with the pandemic or seasonal influenza virus. Four types of inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, laninamivir, and peramivir) reduced pandemic viral titers and concentrations of the cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in supernatants and viral RNA in cells. However, oseltamivir did not reduce seasonal viral titers, cytokine concentrations and viral RNA, and the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of oseltamivir for neuraminidase activity in the seasonal virus was 300-fold higher than that observed for the pandemic influenza virus. The seasonal influenza virus had an oseltamivir-resistant genotype. The magnitude of the IC50 values of the neuraminidase inhibitors for the seasonal influenza virus was inversely related to the magnitude of the inhibitory effects on viral release. These methods for measuring the release of virus and inflammatory cytokines from primary cultures of human tracheal epithelium may provide useful information regarding the effects of neuraminidase inhibitors on influenza viruses.

  16. Discovery of N-substituted oseltamivir derivatives as potent and selective inhibitors of H5N1 influenza neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuanchao; Xu, Dongqing; Huang, Bing; Ma, Xiuli; Qi, Wenbao; Shi, Fangyuan; Liu, Xinyong; Zhang, Yingjie; Xu, Wenfang

    2014-10-23

    To discover group-1-specific neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors that are especially involved in combating the H5N1 virus, two series of oseltamivir derivatives were designed and synthesized by targeting the 150-cavity. Among these, compound 20l was the most potent N1-selective inhibitor, with IC50 values of 0.0019, 0.0038, and 0.0067 μM against NAs from three H5N1 viruses. These values are better than those of oseltamivir carboxylate. Compound 32 was another potent N1-selective inhibitor that exhibited a 12-fold increase in activity against the H274Y mutant relative to oseltamivir carboxylate. Molecular docking studies revealed that the 150-cavity was an auxiliary binding site that may contribute to the high selectivity of these compounds. The present work is a significant breakthrough in the discovery of potent group-1-specific neuraminidase inhibitors, which may be further investigated for the treatment of infection by the H5N1 virus.

  17. Increasing oral absorption of polar neuraminidase inhibitors: a prodrug transporter approach applied to oseltamivir analogue.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak; Varghese Gupta, Sheeba; Dahan, Arik; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Hilfinger, John; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-02-04

    showed that the l-valyl prodrug (P(app) = 1.7 × 10(-6) cm/s) has the potential to be rapidly transported across the epithelial cell apical membrane. Significantly, only the parent drug (GOCarb) appeared in the basolateral compartment, indicating complete activation (hydrolysis) during transport. Intestinal rat jejunal permeability studies showed that l-valyl and l-isoleucyl prodrugs are highly permeable compared to the orally well absorbed metoprolol, while the parent drug had essentially zero permeability in the jejunum, consistent with its known poor low absorption. Prodrugs were rapidly converted to parent in cell homogenates, suggesting their ability to be activated endogenously in the epithelial cell, consistent with the transport studies. Additionally, l-valyl prodrug was found to be a substrate for valacyclovirase (K(m) = 2.37 mM), suggesting a potential cell activation mechanism. Finally we determined the oral bioavailability of our most promising candidate, GOC-l-Val, in mice to be 23% under fed conditions and 48% under fasted conditions. In conclusion, GOC-l-Val prodrug was found to be a very promising antiviral agent for oral delivery. These findings indicate that the carrier-mediated prodrug approach is an excellent strategy for improving oral absorption of polar neuraminidase inhibitors. These promising results demonstrate that the oral peptide transporter-mediated prodrug strategy has enormous promise for improving the oral mucosal cell membrane permeability of polar, poorly absorbed antiviral agents and treating influenza via the oral route of administration.

  18. Structure Optimization of Neuraminidase Inhibitors as Potential Anti-Influenza (H1N1Inhibitors) Agents Using QSAR and Molecular Docking Studies.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Poonam; Bhandari, Shashikant; Sonawane, Bhagyashri; Hole, Asha; Jadhav, Chintamani

    2014-01-01

    The urgent need of neuraminidase inhibitors (NI) has provided an impetus for understanding the structure requisite at molecular level. Our search for selective inhibitors of neuraminidase has led to the identification of pharmacophoric requirements at various positions around acyl thiourea pharmacophore. The main objective of present study is to develop selective NI, with least toxicity and drug like ADMET properties. Electronic, Steric requirements were defined using kohnone nearest neighbour- molecular field analysis (kNN-MFA) model of 3D-QSAR studies. Results generated by QSAR studies showed that model has good internal as well as external predictivity. Such defined requirements were used to generate new chemical entities which exhibit higher promising predicted activities. To check selective binding of designed NCE's docking studies were carried out using the crystal structure of the neuraminidase enzyme having co-crystallized ligand Oseltamivir. Thus, molecular modelling provided a good platform to optimize the acyl thiourea pharmacophore for designing its derivatives having potent anti-viral activity.

  19. Potential New H1N1 Neuraminidase Inhibitors from Ferulic Acid and Vanillin: Molecular Modelling, Synthesis and in Vitro Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hariono, Maywan; Abdullah, Nurshariza; Damodaran, K.V.; Kamarulzaman, Ezatul E.; Mohamed, Nornisah; Hassan, Sharifah Syed; Shamsuddin, Shaharum; Wahab, Habibah A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the computational and experimental efforts in the design and synthesis of novel neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors from ferulic acid and vanillin. Two proposed ferulic acid analogues, MY7 and MY8 were predicted to inhibit H1N1 NA using molecular docking. From these two analogues, we designed, synthesised and evaluated the biological activities of a series of ferulic acid and vanillin derivatives. The enzymatic H1N1 NA inhibition assay showed MY21 (a vanillin derivative) has the lowest IC50 of 50 μM. In contrast, the virus inhibition assay showed MY15, a ferulic acid derivative has the best activity with the EC50 of ~0.95 μM. Modelling studies further suggest that these predicted activities might be due to the interactions with conserved and essential residues of NA with ΔGbind values comparable to those of oseltamivir and zanamivir, the two commercial NA inhibitors. PMID:27995961

  20. Potential New H1N1 Neuraminidase Inhibitors from Ferulic Acid and Vanillin: Molecular Modelling, Synthesis and in Vitro Assay.

    PubMed

    Hariono, Maywan; Abdullah, Nurshariza; Damodaran, K V; Kamarulzaman, Ezatul E; Mohamed, Nornisah; Hassan, Sharifah Syed; Shamsuddin, Shaharum; Wahab, Habibah A

    2016-12-20

    We report the computational and experimental efforts in the design and synthesis of novel neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors from ferulic acid and vanillin. Two proposed ferulic acid analogues, MY7 and MY8 were predicted to inhibit H1N1 NA using molecular docking. From these two analogues, we designed, synthesised and evaluated the biological activities of a series of ferulic acid and vanillin derivatives. The enzymatic H1N1 NA inhibition assay showed MY21 (a vanillin derivative) has the lowest IC50 of 50 μM. In contrast, the virus inhibition assay showed MY15, a ferulic acid derivative has the best activity with the EC50 of ~0.95 μM. Modelling studies further suggest that these predicted activities might be due to the interactions with conserved and essential residues of NA with ΔGbind values comparable to those of oseltamivir and zanamivir, the two commercial NA inhibitors.

  1. Potential New H1N1 Neuraminidase Inhibitors from Ferulic Acid and Vanillin: Molecular Modelling, Synthesis and in Vitro Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariono, Maywan; Abdullah, Nurshariza; Damodaran, K. V.; Kamarulzaman, Ezatul E.; Mohamed, Nornisah; Hassan, Sharifah Syed; Shamsuddin, Shaharum; Wahab, Habibah A.

    2016-12-01

    We report the computational and experimental efforts in the design and synthesis of novel neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors from ferulic acid and vanillin. Two proposed ferulic acid analogues, MY7 and MY8 were predicted to inhibit H1N1 NA using molecular docking. From these two analogues, we designed, synthesised and evaluated the biological activities of a series of ferulic acid and vanillin derivatives. The enzymatic H1N1 NA inhibition assay showed MY21 (a vanillin derivative) has the lowest IC50 of 50 μM. In contrast, the virus inhibition assay showed MY15, a ferulic acid derivative has the best activity with the EC50 of ~0.95 μM. Modelling studies further suggest that these predicted activities might be due to the interactions with conserved and essential residues of NA with ΔGbind values comparable to those of oseltamivir and zanamivir, the two commercial NA inhibitors.

  2. Neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza: a systematic review and meta-analysis of regulatory and mortality data.

    PubMed Central

    Heneghan, Carl J; Onakpoya, Igho; Jones, Mark A; Doshi, Peter; Del Mar, Chris B; Hama, Rokuro; Thompson, Matthew J; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Mahtani, Kamal R; Nunan, David; Howick, Jeremy; Jefferson, Tom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are stockpiled and recommended by public health agencies for treating and preventing seasonal and pandemic influenza. They are used clinically worldwide. OBJECTIVES To (1) describe the potential benefits and harms of NIs for influenza in all age groups by reviewing all clinical study reports (CSRs) of published and unpublished randomised, placebo-controlled trials and regulatory comments; and (2) determine the effect of oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®), Roche) treatment on mortality in patients with 2009A/H1N1 influenza. METHODS We searched trial registries, electronic databases and corresponded with regulators and sponsors to identify randomised trials of NIs. We requested full CSRs and accessed regulators' comments. We included only those trials for which we had CSRs. To examine the effects of oseltamivir on 2009A/H1N1 influenza mortality, we requested individual patient data (IPD) from corresponding authors of all included observational studies. RESULTS Effect of oseltamivir and zanamivir (Relenza®, GlaxoSmithKline) in the prevention and treatment of influenza: Oseltamivir reduced the time to first alleviation of symptoms in adults by 16.8 hours [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.4 to 25.1 hours]. Zanamivir reduced the time to first alleviation of symptoms in adults by 0.60 days (95% CI 0.39 to 0.81 days). Oseltamivir reduced unverified pneumonia in adult treatment [risk difference (RD) 1.00%, 95% CI 0.22% to 1.49%]; similar findings were observed with zanamivir prophylaxis in adults (RD 0.32%, 95% CI 0.09% to 0.41%). Oseltamivir treatment of adults increased the risk of nausea (RD 3.66%, 95% CI 0.90% to 7.39%) and vomiting (RD 4.56%, 95% CI 2.39% to 7.58%). In the treatment of children, oseltamivir induced vomiting (RD 5.34%, 95% CI 1.75% to 10.29%). Both oseltamivir and zanamivir prophylaxis reduced the risk of symptomatic influenza in individuals (oseltamivir RD 3.05%, 95% CI 1.83% to 3.88%; zanamivir RD 1.98%, 95% CI 0.98% to

  3. QSAR analyses on avian influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors using CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Mingyue; Yu, Kunqian; Liu, Hong; Luo, Xiaomin; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang; Jiang, Hualiang

    2006-09-01

    The recent wide spreading of the H5N1 avian influenza virus (AIV) in Asia, Europe and Africa and its ability to cause fatal infections in human has raised serious concerns about a pending global flu pandemic. Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors are currently the only option for treatment or prophylaxis in humans infected with this strain. However, drugs currently on the market often meet with rapidly emerging resistant mutants and only have limited application as inadequate supply of synthetic material. To dig out helpful information for designing potent inhibitors with novel structures against the NA, we used automated docking, CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR methods to investigate the quantitative structure-activity relationship for 126 NA inhibitors (NIs) with great structural diversities and wide range of bioactivities against influenza A virus. Based on the binding conformations discovered via molecular docking into the crystal structure of NA, CoMFA and CoMSIA models were successfully built with the cross-validated q 2 of 0.813 and 0.771, respectively. HQSAR was also carried out as a complementary study in that HQSAR technique does not require 3D information of these compounds and could provide a detailed molecular fragment contribution to the inhibitory activity. These models also show clearly how steric, electrostatic, hydrophobicity, and individual fragments affect the potency of NA inhibitors. In addition, CoMFA and CoMSIA field distributions are found to be in well agreement with the structural characteristics of the corresponding binding sites. Therefore, the final 3D-QSAR models and the information of the inhibitor-enzyme interaction should be useful in developing novel potent NA inhibitors.

  4. Neuraminidase Ribbon Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Ribbons is a program developed at UAB used worldwide to graphically depict complicated protein structures in a simplified format. The program uses sophisticated computer systems to understand the implications of protein structures. The Influenza virus remains a major causative agent for a large number of deaths among the elderly and young children and huge economic losses due to illness. Finding a cure will have a general impact both on the basic research of viral pathologists of fast evolving infectious agents and clinical treatment of influenza virus infection. The reproduction process of all strains of influenza are dependent on the same enzyme neuraminidase. Shown here is a segmented representation of the neuraminidase inhibitor compound sitting inside a cave-like contour of the neuraminidase enzyme surface. This cave-like formation present in every neuraminidase enzyme is the active site crucial to the flu's ability to infect. The space-grown crystals of neuraminidase have provided significant new details about the three-dimensional characteristics of this active site thus allowing researchers to design drugs that fit tighter into the site. Principal Investigator: Dr. Larry DeLucas

  5. Multiple Influenza A (H3N2) Mutations Conferring Resistance to Neuraminidase Inhibitors in a Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Eshaghi, Alireza; Shalhoub, Sarah; Rosenfeld, Paul; Li, Aimin; Higgins, Rachel R.; Stogios, Peter J.; Savchenko, Alexei; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan; Rotstein, Coleman

    2014-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are predisposed to infections caused by influenza virus. Influenza virus may produce considerable morbidity, including protracted illness and prolonged viral shedding in these patients, thus prompting higher doses and prolonged courses of antiviral therapy. This approach may promote the emergence of resistant strains. Characterization of neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor (NAI)-resistant strains of influenza A virus is essential for documenting causes of resistance. In this study, using quantitative real-time PCR along with conventional Sanger sequencing, we identified an NAI-resistant strain of influenza A (H3N2) virus in an immunocompromised patient. In-depth analysis by deep gene sequencing revealed that various known markers of antiviral resistance, including transient R292K and Q136K substitutions and a sustained E119K (N2 numbering) substitution in the NA protein emerged during prolonged antiviral therapy. In addition, a combination of a 4-amino-acid deletion at residues 245 to 248 (Δ245-248) accompanied by the E119V substitution occurred, causing resistance to or reduced inhibition by NAIs (oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir). Resistant variants within a pool of viral quasispecies arose during combined antiviral treatment. More research is needed to understand the interplay of drug resistance mutations, viral fitness, and transmission. PMID:25246391

  6. Identification of Suitable Natural Inhibitor against Influenza A (H1N1) Neuraminidase Protein by Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Maheswata; Jena, Lingaraja; Rath, Surya Narayan

    2016-01-01

    The influenza A (H1N1) virus, also known as swine flu is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality since 2009. There is a need to explore novel anti-viral drugs for overcoming the epidemics. Traditionally, different plant extracts of garlic, ginger, kalmegh, ajwain, green tea, turmeric, menthe, tulsi, etc. have been used as hopeful source of prevention and treatment of human influenza. The H1N1 virus contains an important glycoprotein, known as neuraminidase (NA) that is mainly responsible for initiation of viral infection and is essential for the life cycle of H1N1. It is responsible for sialic acid cleavage from glycans of the infected cell. We employed amino acid sequence of H1N1 NA to predict the tertiary structure using Phyre2 server and validated using ProCheck, ProSA, ProQ, and ERRAT server. Further, the modelled structure was docked with thirteen natural compounds of plant origin using AutoDock4.2. Most of the natural compounds showed effective inhibitory activity against H1N1 NA in binding condition. This study also highlights interaction of these natural inhibitors with amino residues of NA protein. Furthermore, among 13 natural compounds, theaflavin, found in green tea, was observed to inhibit H1N1 NA proteins strongly supported by lowest docking energy. Hence, it may be of interest to consider theaflavin for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation. PMID:27729839

  7. Use of neuraminidase inhibitors in primary health care during pandemic and seasonal influenza between 2009 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Blanchon, Thierry; Geffrier, Félicité; Turbelin, Clément; Daviaud, Isabelle; Laouénan, Cédric; Duval, Xavier; Lambert, Bruno; Hanslik, Thomas; Mosnier, Anne; Leport, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background In a context of controversy about influenza antiviral treatments, this study assessed primary health care physicians’ prescription of neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) in France during pandemic and seasonal influenza between 2009 and 2013. Methods This observational study, using data recorded in three national databases, estimated the rate of NIs’ prescription among influenza like-illness (ILI) patients seen in GPs’ and paediatricians’ consultations, and determined factors associated with this prescription according to a multivariate analysis. NIs’ delivery by pharmacists was also evaluated. Results Rates of NIs’ prescription were estimated to 61.1% among ILI patients with a severe influenza risk factor seen in GPs’ consultation during the A(H1N1)pdm2009 pandemic versus an average rate of 25.9% during the three following seasonal influenza epidemics. Factors associated with NIs’ prescription were a chronic disease in patients under 65 years (OR, 14.85; 95%CI, 13.00–16.97) and in those aged ≥ 65 and older (OR, 7.54; 5.86–9.70), an age 65 years in patients without chronic disease (OR, 1.35; 1.04–1.74), a pregnancy (OR, 10.63; 7.67–15.76), obesity (OR, 4.67; 3.50–6.22), and a consultation during the pandemic A(H1N1)pdm2009 (OR, 3.19; 2.93–3.48). The number of antiviral treatments delivered by pharmacists during the A(H1N1)pdm2009 pandemic was 835 per 100 000 inhabitants, and an average of 275 per 100 000 inhabitants during the three following seasonal influenza epidemics. Conclusions Although physicians seem to follow the recommended indications for NIs in primary health care practice, this study confirms the low rate of NIs prescription to ILI patients with a severe influenza risk factor, especially during seasonal epidemics. PMID:25687219

  8. Design, in silico studies, synthesis and in vitro evaluation of oseltamivir derivatives as inhibitors of neuraminidase from influenza A virus H1N1.

    PubMed

    Neri-Bazán, Rocío M; García-Machorro, Jazmín; Méndez-Luna, David; Tolentino-López, Luis E; Martínez-Ramos, Federico; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia I; Aguilar-Faisal, Leopoldo; Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin A; Trujillo-Ferrara, José G; Fragoso-Vázquez, M Jonathan; Barrón, Blanca L; Correa-Basurto, José

    2017-03-10

    Since the neuraminidase (NA) enzyme of the influenza A virus plays a key role in the process of release of new viral particles from a host cell, it is often a target for new drug design. The emergence of NA mutations, such as H275Y, has led to great resistance against neuraminidase inhibitors, including oseltamivir and zanamivir. Hence, we herein designed a set of derivatives by modifying the amine and/or carboxylic groups of oseltamivir. After being screened for their physicochemical (Lipinski's rule) and toxicological properties, the remaining compounds were submitted to molecular and theoretical studies. The docking simulations provided insights into NA recognition patterns, demonstrating that oseltamivir modified at the carboxylic moiety and coupled with anilines had higher affinity and a better binding pose for NA than the derivatives modified at the amine group. Based on these theoretical studies, the new oseltamivir derivatives may have higher affinity to mutant variants and possibly to other viral subtypes. Accordingly, two compounds were selected for synthesis, which together with their respective intermediates were evaluated for their cytotoxicity and antiviral activities. Their biological activity was then tested in cells infected with the A/Puerto Rico/916/34 (H1N1) influenza virus, and virus yield reduction assays were performed. Additionally, by measuring neuraminidase activity with the neuraminidase assay kit it was found that the compounds produced inhibitory activity on this enzyme. Finally, the infected cells were analysed with atomic force microscopy (AFM), observing morphological changes strongly suggesting that these compounds interfered with cellular release of viral particles.

  9. Anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate induces canine mammary cancer cell aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Santos, Ana L; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness.

  10. Anti-Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Phosphate Induces Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Joana T.; Santos, Ana L.; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  11. CS-8958, a Prodrug of the Novel Neuraminidase Inhibitor R-125489, Demonstrates a Favorable Long-Retention Profile in the Mouse Respiratory Tract▿

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Kumiko; Takahashi, Makoto; Oitate, Masataka; Nakai, Naoko; Takakusa, Hideo; Miura, Shin-ichi; Okazaki, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    CS-8958 is a prodrug of the pharmacologically active form R-125489, a selective neuraminidase inhibitor, and has long-acting anti-influenza virus activity in vivo. In this study, the tissue distribution profiles after a single intranasal administration of CS-8958 (0.5 μmol/kg of body weight) to mice were investigated, focusing especially on the retention of CS-8958 in the respiratory tract by comparing it with R-125489 and a marketed drug, zanamivir. After administration of [14C]CS-8958, radioactivity was retained in the respiratory tract over long periods. At 24 h postdose, the radioactivity concentrations after administration of [14C]CS-8958 were approximately 10-fold higher in both the trachea and the lung than those of [14C]R-125489 and [14C]zanamivir. The [14C]CS-8958-derived radioactivity present in these two tissues consisted both of unchanged CS-8958 and of R-125489 at 1 h postdose, while only R-125489, and no other metabolites, was detected at 24 h postdose. After administration of unlabeled CS-8958, CS-8958 was rapidly eliminated from the lungs, whereas the lung R-125489 concentration reached a maximum at 3 h postdose and gradually declined, with an elimination half-life of 41.4 h. The conversion of CS-8958 to R-125489 was observed in mouse trachea and lung S9 fractions and was inhibited by esterase inhibitors, such as diisopropylfluorophosphate and bis-p-nitrophenylphosphate. These results demonstrated that CS-8958 administered intranasally to mice was efficiently converted to R-125489 by a hydrolase(s) such as carboxylesterase, and then R-125489 was slowly eliminated from the respiratory tract. These data support the finding that CS-8958 has potential as a long-acting neuraminidase inhibitor, leading to significant efficacy as an anti-influenza drug by a single treatment. PMID:19687241

  12. Real time enzyme inhibition assays provide insights into differences in binding of neuraminidase inhibitors to wild type and mutant influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Susan; Mohr, Peter G; Schmidt, Peter M; McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    The influenza neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors zanamivir, oseltamivir and peramivir were all designed based on the knowledge that the transition state analogue of the cleaved sialic acid, 2-deoxy,2,3-dehydro N-acetyl neuraminic acid (DANA) was a weak inhibitor of NA. While DANA bound rapidly to the NA, modifications leading to the improved potency of these new inhibitors also conferred a time dependent or slow binding phenotype. Many mutations in the NA leading to decreased susceptibility result in loss of slow binding, hence this is a phenotypic marker of many but not all resistant NAs. We present here a simplified approach to determine whether an inhibitor is fast or slow binding by extending the endpoint fluorescent enzyme inhibition assay to a real time assay and monitoring the changes in IC(50)s with time. We carried out two reactions, one with a 30 min preincubation with inhibitor and the second without. The enzymatic reaction was started via addition of substrate and IC(50)s were calculated after each 10 min interval up to 60 min. Results showed that without preincubation IC(50)s for the wild type viruses started high and although they decreased continuously over the 60 min reaction time the final IC(50)s remained higher than for pre-incubated samples. These results indicate a slow equilibrium of association and dissociation and are consistent with slow binding of the inhibitors. In contrast, for viruses with decreased susceptibility, preincubation had minimal effect on the IC(50)s, consistent with fast binding. Therefore this modified assay provides additional phenotypic information about the rate of inhibitor binding in addition to the IC(50), and critically demonstrates the differential effect of incubation times on the IC(50) and K(i) values of wild type and mutant viruses for each of the inhibitors.

  13. Efficacy of novel hemagglutinin-neuraminidase inhibitors BCX 2798 and BCX 2855 against human parainfluenza viruses in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alymova, Irina V; Taylor, Garry; Takimoto, Toru; Lin, Tsu-Hsing; Chand, Pooran; Babu, Y Sudhakara; Li, Chenghong; Xiong, Xiaoping; Portner, Allen

    2004-05-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses are important respiratory tract pathogens, especially of children. However, no vaccines or specific therapies for infections caused by these viruses are currently available. In the present study we characterized the efficacy of the novel parainfluenza virus inhibitors BCX 2798 and BCX 2855, which were designed based on the three-dimensional structure of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein. The compounds were highly effective in inhibiting hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) activities and the growth of hPIV-1, hPIV-2, and hPIV-3 in LLC-MK(2) cells. The concentrations required to reduce the activity to 50% of that of a control ranged from 0.1 to 6.0 micro M in HA inhibition assays and from 0.02 to 20 micro M in NA inhibition assays. The concentrations required to inhibit virus replication to 50% of the level of the control ranged from 0.7 to 11.5 micro M. BCX 2798 and BCX 2855 were inactive against influenza virus HA and NA and bacterial NA. In mice infected with a recombinant Sendai virus whose HN gene was replaced with that of hPIV-1 [rSV(hHN)], intranasal administration of BCX 2798 (10 mg/kg per day) and of BCX 2855 (50 mg/kg per day) 4 h before the start of infection resulted in a significant reduction in titers of virus in the lungs and protection from death. Treatment beginning 24 h after the start of infection did not prevent death. Together, our results indicate that BCX 2798 and BCX 2855 are effective inhibitors of parainfluenza virus HN and may limit parainfluenza virus infections in humans.

  14. E119D Neuraminidase Mutation Conferring Pan-Resistance to Neuraminidase Inhibitors in an A(H1N1)pdm09 Isolate From a Stem-Cell Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    L'Huillier, Arnaud G.; Abed, Yacine; Petty, Tom J.; Cordey, Samuel; Thomas, Yves; Bouhy, Xavier; Schibler, Manuel; Simon, Audrey; Chalandon, Yves; van Delden, Christian; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Boquete-Suter, Patricia; Boivin, Guy; Kaiser, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Background. An influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection was diagnosed in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient during conditioning regimen. He was treated with oral oseltamivir, later combined with intravenous zanamivir. The H275Y neuraminidase (NA) mutation was first detected, and an E119D NA mutation was identified during zanamivir therapy. Methods. Recombinant wild-type (WT) E119D and E119D/H275Y A(H1N1)pdm09 NA variants were generated by reverse genetics. Susceptibility to NA inhibitors (NAIs) was evaluated with a fluorometric assay using the 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (MUNANA) substrate. Susceptibility to favipiravir (T-705) was assessed using plaque reduction assays. The NA affinity and velocity values were determined with NA enzymatic studies. Results. We identified an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 E119D mutant that exhibited a marked increase in the 50% inhibitory concentrations against all tested NAIs (827-, 25-, 286-, and 702-fold for zanamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, and laninamivir, respectively). The double E119D/H275Y mutation further increased oseltamivir and peramivir 50% inhibitory concentrations by 790- and >5000-fold, respectively, compared with the WT. The mutant viruses remained susceptible to favipiravir. The NA affinity and velocity values of the E119D variant decreased by 8.1-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, compared with the WT. Conclusions. The actual emergence of a single NA mutation conferring pan-NAI resistance in the clinical setting reinforces the pressing need to develop new anti-influenza strategies. PMID:25985905

  15. Computational modeling and validation studies of 3-D structure of neuraminidase protein of H1N1 influenza A virus and subsequent in silico elucidation of piceid analogues as its potent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Chhedi Lal; Akhtar, Salman; Bajpaib, Preeti; Kandpal, K N; Desai, G S; Tiwari, Ashok K

    2013-01-01

    Emergence of the drug resistant variants of the Influenza A virus in the recent years has aroused a great need for the development of novel neuraminidase inhibitors for controlling the pandemic. The neuraminidase (NA) protein of the influenza virus has been the most potential target for the anti-influenza. However, in the absence of any experimental structure of the drug targeting NA protein of H1N1 influenza A virus as zanamivir and oseltamivir, the comprehensive study of the interaction of the drug molecules with the target protein has been missing. Hence in this study a computational 3-D structure of neuraminidase of H1N1 influenza A virus has been developed using homology modeling technique, and the same was validated for its reliability by ProSA web server in term of energy profile & Z scores and PROCHECK program followed by Ramachandran plot. Further, the developed 3-D model had been employed for docking studies with the class of compounds as Piceid and its analogs. In this context, two novel compounds (ChemBank ID 2110359 and 3075417) were found to be more potent inhibitors of neuraminidase than control drugs as zanamivir and oseltamivir in terms of their robust binding energies, strong inhibition constant (Ki) and better hydrogen bond interactions between the protein-ligand complex. The interaction of these compounds with NA protein has been significantly studied at the molecular level.

  16. Molecular docking and QSAR studies on substituted acyl(thio)urea and thiadiazolo [2,3-alpha] pyrimidine derivatives as potent inhibitors of influenza virus neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaying; Cai, Shaoxi; Mei, Hu; Li, Jian; Yan, Ning; Wang, Qin; Lin, Zhihua; Huo, Danqun

    2010-09-01

    Surflex-Dock was employed to dock 36 thiourea and thiadiazolo [2,3-alpha] pyrimidine derivatives into neuraminidase 1a4g. Molecular docking results showed that hydrogen bonding, electrostatic, and hydrophobic features were important factors affecting inhibitory activities of these neuraminidase inhibitors. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the predicted binding affinity (total scores) and experimental pIC50 values with correlation coefficient r=0.846 and p<0.0001. Hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship, comparative molecular field analysis, and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis were used to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship models. Squared multiple correlation coefficients (r2) of hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship, comparative molecular field analysis, and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis models were 0.899, 0.878, and 0.865, respectively. Squared cross-validated correlation coefficient (q2) of hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship, comparative molecular field analysis, and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis models was in turn 0.628, 0.656, and 0.509. In addition, squared multiple correlation coefficients for test set (r2test) of hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship, comparative molecular field analysis, and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis models were 0.558, 0.667, and 0.566, respectively. The most active sample ID 2 was taken as a template molecule to design new molecules. Based on the comparative molecular field analysis model, new compounds were designed by LeapFrog. Seven new compounds with improved binding energy and predicted activities were finally obtained.

  17. A novel pyrosequencing assay for the detection of neuraminidase inhibitor resistance-conferring mutations among clinical isolates of avian H7N9 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuhua; Fan, Huan; Qi, Xian; Zhu, Zheng; Guo, Xiling; Chen, Yin; Ge, Yiyue; Zhao, Kangchen; Wu, Tao; Li, Yan; Shan, Yunfeng; Zhou, Minghao; Shi, Zhiyang; Wang, Hua; Cui, Lunbiao

    2014-01-22

    A novel reassortant avian influenza A virus (H7N9) emerged in humans in Eastern China in late February 2013. All virus strains were resistant to adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine), but susceptible to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) (oseltamivir and zanamivir). One strain (A/shanghai/1/2013) contained the R294K substitution in the neuraminidase (NA) gene, indicating resistance to oseltamivir. Pyrosequencing has proven to be a useful tool in the surveillance of drug resistance in influenza A viruses. Here, we describe a reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay coupled with pyrosequencing to identify the NA residues E120, H276, and R294 (N9 numbering) of H7N9 viruses. A total of 43 specimens (26 clinical samples and 17 isolates) were tested. Only one isolate containing the E120V heterogenic mutation was detected by pyrosequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. However, this mutation was not detected in the original clinical specimen. Since virus isolation might lead to the selection of variants that might not fully represent the virus population in the clinical specimens, we suggest that using pyrosequencing to detect NAI resistance in H7N9 viruses directly from clinical specimens rather than from cultured isolates. No cross-reactions with other types of influenza virus and respiratory tract viruses were found, and this assay has a sensitivity of 100 copies of synthetic RNA for all three codons. The high sensitivity and specificity of the assay should be sufficient for the detection of positive clinical specimens. In this study, we provide a rapid and reliable method for the characterization of NAI resistance in H7N9 viruses.

  18. Identification of bioactivating enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of laninamivir octanoate, a long-acting neuraminidase inhibitor, in human pulmonary tissue.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kumiko; Ogura, Yuji; Nakai, Daisuke; Watanabe, Mihoko; Munemasa, Toshiko; Oofune, Yuka; Kubota, Kazuishi; Shinagawa, Akira; Izumi, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    Laninamivir octanoate (LO) is an octanoyl ester prodrug of the neuraminidase inhibitor laninamivir. After inhaled administration, LO exhibits clinical efficacy for both treatment and prophylaxis of influenza virus infection, resulting from hydrolytic bioactivation into its pharmacologically active metabolite laninamivir in the pulmonary tissue. In this study, we focused on the identification of LO-hydrolyzing enzymes from human pulmonary tissue extract using proteomic correlation profiling-a technology integration of traditional biochemistry and proteomics. In a single elution step by gel-filtration chromatography, LO-hydrolyzing activity was separated into two distinct peaks, designated as peak I and peak II. By mass spectrometry, 1160 and 1003 proteins were identified and quantitated for peak I and peak II, respectively, and enzyme candidates were ranked based on the correlation coefficient between the enzyme activity and the proteomic profiles. Among proteins with a high correlation value, S-formylglutathione hydrolase (esterase D; ESD) and acyl-protein thioesterase 1 (APT1) were selected as the most likely candidates for peak I and peak II, respectively, which was confirmed by LO-hydrolyzing activity of recombinant proteins. In the case of peak II, LO-hydrolyzing activity was completely inhibited by treatment with a specific APT1 inhibitor, palmostatin B. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that both enzymes were mainly localized in the pulmonary epithelia, a primary site of influenza virus infection. These findings demonstrate that ESD and APT1 are key enzymes responsible for the bioactivation of LO in human pulmonary tissue.

  19. Neuraminidase-resistant hemagglutination inhibitors: acrylamide copolymers containing a C-glycoside of N-acetylneuraminic acid.

    PubMed

    Sparks, M A; Williams, K W; Whitesides, G M

    1993-03-19

    Copolymers consisting of a polyacrylamide backbone with side chains terminated in C-glycosidic analogs of N-acetylneuraminic acid were synthesized by free radical copolymerization of alpha-2-C-[3-[[2-(N-acryloylamino)ethyl]thio]propyl]-N- acetylneuraminic acid (5) with acrylamide. Unlike natural and synthetic polyvalent materials that contain N-acetylneuraminic acid in O-glycosidic form, these C-glycosidic copolymers resist neuraminidase-catalyzed cleavage of the neuraminic acid residue from the copolymer backbone. Examination of these C-glycosidic copolymers in a hemagglutination inhibition assay indicated that they are as effective in vitro as polyvalent O-glycosidic copolymers in inhibiting agglutination of erythrocytes by influenza virus. The minimum value of the inhibition constant, calculated on the basis of the concentration of Neu5Ac groups in solution, is Ki(HAI) approximately 10(-7) M for both copolymers. The inhibitory potency of the C-glycoside-based copolymers becomes more significant at lower concentrations of Neu5Ac moieties in solution than does the inhibitory potency of the O-glycoside-based copolymer.

  20. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase in complex with a non-carbohydrate-based inhibitor, 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjin; Youn, Hyung-Seop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; An, Jun Yop; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Kang, Jung Youn; Ryu, Young Bae; Jin, Mi Sun; Park, Ki Hun; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2017-03-16

    Anti-bacterial and anti-viral neuraminidase agents inhibit neuraminidase activity catalyzing the hydrolysis of terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) from glycoconjugates and help to prevent the host pathogenesis that lead to fatal infectious diseases including influenza, bacteremia, sepsis, and cholera. Emerging antibiotic and drug resistances to commonly used anti-neuraminidase agents such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza) have highlighted the need to develop new anti-neuraminidase drugs. We obtained a serendipitous complex crystal of the catalytic domain of Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase (CpNanICD) with 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid (CHES) as a buffer. Here, we report the crystal structure of CpNanICD in complex with CHES at 1.24 Å resolution. Amphipathic CHES binds to the catalytic site of CpNanICD similar to the substrate (Neu5Ac) binding site. The 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid moiety and cyclohexyl groups of CHES interact with the cluster of three arginine residues and with the hydrophobic pocket of the CpNanICD catalytic site. In addition, a structural comparison with other bacterial and human neuraminidases suggests that CHES could serve as a scaffold for the development of new anti-neuraminidase agents targeting CpNanI.

  1. The in vivo efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors cannot be determined from the decay rates of influenza viral titers observed in treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, John; Dobrovolny, Hana M.; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral therapy is a first line of defence against new influenza strains. Current pandemic preparations involve stock- piling oseltamivir, an oral neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI), so rapidly determining the effectiveness of NAIs against new viral strains is vital for deciding how to use the stockpile. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to extract the drug efficacy of antivirals from the viral decay rate of chronic infections. In the present work, we use a nonlinear mathematical model representing the course of an influenza infection to explore the possibility of extracting NAI drug efficacy using only the observed viral titer decay rates seen in patients. We first show that the effect of a time-varying antiviral concentration can be accurately approximated by a constant efficacy. We derive a relationship relating the true treatment dose and time elapsed between doses to the constant drug dose required to approximate the time- varying dose. Unfortunately, even with the simplification of a constant drug efficacy, we show that the viral decay rate depends not just on drug efficacy, but also on several viral infection parameters, such as infection and production rate, so that it is not possible to extract drug efficacy from viral decay rate alone. PMID:28067324

  2. The Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Is Effective Against A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) Influenza Virus in a Mouse Model of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Burnham, Andrew J.; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Armstrong, Jianling; Guan, Yi; Shu, Yuelong; Peiris, Joseph Malik Sriyal; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. High mortality and uncertainty about the effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) in humans infected with influenza A(H7N9) viruses are public health concerns. Methods. Susceptibility of N9 viruses to NAIs was determined in a fluorescence-based assay. The NAI oseltamivir (5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day) was administered to BALB/c mice twice daily starting 24, 48, or 72 hours after A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) virus challenge. Results. All 12 avian N9 and 3 human H7N9 influenza viruses tested were susceptible to NAIs. Without prior adaptation, A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) caused lethal infection in mice that was restricted to the respiratory tract and resulted in pulmonary edema and acute lung injury with hyaline membrane formation, leading to decreased oxygenation, all characteristics of human acute respiratory distress syndrome. Oseltamivir at 20 and 80 mg/kg protected 80% and 88% of mice when initiated after 24 hours, and the efficacy decreased to 70% and 60%, respectively, when treatment was delayed by 48 hours. Emergence of oseltamivir-resistant variants was not detected. Conclusions. H7N9 viruses are comparable to currently circulating influenza A viruses in susceptibility to NAIs. Based on these animal studies, early treatment is associated with improved outcomes. PMID:24133191

  3. The in vivo efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors cannot be determined from the decay rates of influenza viral titers observed in treated patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, John; Dobrovolny, Hana M.; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral therapy is a first line of defence against new influenza strains. Current pandemic preparations involve stock- piling oseltamivir, an oral neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI), so rapidly determining the effectiveness of NAIs against new viral strains is vital for deciding how to use the stockpile. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to extract the drug efficacy of antivirals from the viral decay rate of chronic infections. In the present work, we use a nonlinear mathematical model representing the course of an influenza infection to explore the possibility of extracting NAI drug efficacy using only the observed viral titer decay rates seen in patients. We first show that the effect of a time-varying antiviral concentration can be accurately approximated by a constant efficacy. We derive a relationship relating the true treatment dose and time elapsed between doses to the constant drug dose required to approximate the time- varying dose. Unfortunately, even with the simplification of a constant drug efficacy, we show that the viral decay rate depends not just on drug efficacy, but also on several viral infection parameters, such as infection and production rate, so that it is not possible to extract drug efficacy from viral decay rate alone.

  4. Post-marketing safety and effectiveness evaluation of the intravenous anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor peramivir (I): a drug use investigation.

    PubMed

    Komeda, Takuji; Ishii, Shingo; Itoh, Yumiko; Ariyasu, Yasuyuki; Sanekata, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Takayoshi; Shimada, Jingoro

    2014-11-01

    Peramivir is the only intravenous formulation among anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitors currently available. Peramivir was approved for manufacturing and marketing in Japan in January 2010. We conducted a drug use investigation of peramivir from October 2010 to February 2012 and evaluated its safety and effectiveness under routine clinical settings. We collected data of 1309 patients from 189 facilities across Japan and examined safety in 1174 patients and effectiveness in 1158 patients. In total, 143 adverse events were observed with an incidence rate of 7.33% (86/1174). Of these, 78 events were adverse drug reactions (ADRs) with an incidence rate of 4.34% (51/1174). The most frequently reported ADRs were diarrhea, vomiting, and nausea, with incidence rates of 1.87% (22/1174), 0.85% (10/1174), and 0.68% (8/1174), respectively. Moreover, no ADR was reported as serious. ADR onset was within 3 days after the start of peramivir administration in 91.0% (71 events) of the 78 ADRs, and ADRs were resolved or improved within 7 days after onset in 96.2% (75 events) of the 78 ADRs. Neither patient characteristics nor treatment factors appeared to significantly affect drug safety. With regard to effectiveness, the median time to alleviation of both influenza symptoms and fever was 3 days, including the first day of administration. The present study demonstrates the safety and effectiveness of peramivir under routine clinical settings.

  5. Post-marketing safety and effectiveness evaluation of the intravenous anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor peramivir. II: a pediatric drug use investigation.

    PubMed

    Komeda, Takuji; Ishii, Shingo; Itoh, Yumiko; Ariyasu, Yasuyuki; Sanekata, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Takayoshi; Shimada, Jingoro

    2015-03-01

    Peramivir is the only intravenous formulation among anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitors currently available. Peramivir was approved for manufacturing and marketing in Japan in January 2010. In October 2010, an additional indication for pediatric use was approved. We conducted a pediatric drug use investigation of peramivir from October 2010 to February 2012 and evaluated its real-world safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients. We collected the data of 1254 peramivir-treated pediatric patients from 161 facilities across Japan and examined the safety in 1199 patients and effectiveness in 1188 patients. In total, 245 adverse events were observed with an incidence rate of 14.01% (168/1199). Of these, 115 events were adverse drug reactions (ADRs) with an incidence rate of 7.67% (92/1199). Common ADRs were diarrhea and abnormal behavior, with incidence rates of 2.50% (30/1199) and 2.25% (27/1199), respectively. Fourteen serious ADRs were observed in 12 patients (1.00%), including 5 cases each of abnormal behavior and neutrophil count decreased. While 87.0% (100 events) of ADRs occurred within 3 days after the initiation of peramivir administration, 87.8% (101 events) resolved or improved within 7 days after onset. Multivariate analyses indicated that the presence or absence of underlying diseases/complications was significantly related to ADR incidence. With regard to effectiveness, the median time to alleviation of both influenza symptoms and fever was 3 days, including the first day of administration. Thus, this study confirms the pediatric safety of peramivir without any concerns about effectiveness under routine clinical settings.

  6. In vitro selection and characterization of influenza A (A/N9) virus variants resistant to a novel neuraminidase inhibitor, A-315675.

    PubMed

    Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Kati, Warren; Carrick, Robert; Steffy, Kevin; Shi, Yan; Montgomery, Debra; Gusick, Nanette; Stoll, Vincent S; Stewart, Kent D; Ng, Teresa I; Maring, Clarence; Kempf, Dale J; Kohlbrenner, William

    2002-06-01

    With the recent introduction of neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors into clinical practice for the treatment of influenza virus infections, considerable attention has been focused on the potential for resistance development and cross-resistance between different agents from this class. A-315675 is a novel influenza virus NA inhibitor that has potent enzyme activity and is highly active in cell culture against a variety of strains of influenza A and B viruses. To further assess the therapeutic potential of this compound, in vitro resistance studies have been conducted and a comparative assessment has been made relative to oseltamivir carboxylate. The development of viral resistance to A-315675 was studied by in vitro serial passage of influenza A/N9 virus strains grown in MDCK cells in the presence of increasing concentrations of A-315675. Parallel passaging experiments were conducted with oseltamivir carboxylate, the active form of a currently marketed oral agent for the treatment of influenza virus infections. Passage experiments with A-315675 identified a variant at passage 8 that was 60-fold less susceptible to the compound. Sequencing of the viral population identified an E119D mutation in the NA gene, but no mutations were observed in the hemagglutinin (HA) gene. However, by passage 10 (2.56 microM A-315675), two mutations (R233K, S339P) in the HA gene appeared in addition to the E119D mutation in the NA gene, resulting in a 310-fold-lower susceptibility to A-315675. Further passaging at higher drug concentrations had no effect on the generation of further NA or HA mutations (20.5 microM A-315675). This P15 virus displayed 355-fold-lower susceptibility to A-315675 and >175-fold-lower susceptibility to zanamivir than did wild-type virus, but it retained a high degree of susceptibility to oseltamivir carboxylate. By comparison, virus variants recovered from passaging against oseltamivir carboxylate (passage 14) harbored an E119V mutation and displayed a 6,000-fold

  7. Modeling the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein.

    PubMed

    Epa, V C

    1997-11-01

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein exhibits neuraminidase activity and has an active site functionally similar to that in influenza neuraminidases. Earlier work identified conserved amino acids among HN sequences and proposed similarity between HN and influenza neuraminidase sequences. In this work we identify the three-dimensional fold and develop a more detailed model for the HN protein, in the process we examine a variety of protein structure prediction methods. We use the known structures of viral and bacterial neuraminidases as controls in testing the success of protein structure prediction and modeling methods, including knowledge-based threading, discrete three-dimensional environmental profiles, hidden Markov models, neural network secondary structure prediction, pattern matching, and hydropathy plots. The results from threading show that the HN protein sequence has a 6 beta-sheet propellor fold and enable us to assign the locations of the individual beta-strands. The three-dimensional environmental profile and hidden Markov model methods were not successful in this work. The model developed in this work helps to understand better the biological function of the HN protein and design inhibitors of the enzyme and serves as an assessment of some protein structure prediction methods, especially after the x-ray crystallographic solution of its structure.

  8. Competitive Fitness of Influenza B Viruses Possessing E119A and H274Y Neuraminidase Inhibitor Resistance–Associated Substitutions in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q.; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Burnham, Andrew J.; Vogel, Peter; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs) are the only antiviral drugs recommended for influenza treatment and prophylaxis. Although NAI-resistant influenza B viruses that could pose a threat to public health have been reported in the field, their fitness is poorly understood. We evaluated in ferrets the pathogenicity and relative fitness of reverse genetics (rg)–generated influenza B/Yamanashi/166/1998-like viruses containing E119A or H274Y NA substitutions (N2 numbering). Ferrets inoculated with NAI-susceptible rg–wild-type (rg-WT) or NAI-resistant (rg-E119A or rg-H274Y) viruses developed mild infections. Growth of rg-E119A virus in the nasal cavities was delayed, but the high titers at 3 days post-inoculation (dpi) were comparable to those of the rg-WT and rg-H274Y viruses (3.6–4.1 log10TCID50/mL). No virus persisted beyond 5 dpi and replication did not extend to the trachea or lungs. Positive virus antigen-staining of the nasal turbinate epithelium was intermittent with the rg-WT and rg-H274Y viruses; whereas antigen-staining for the rg-E119A virus was more diffuse. Virus populations in ferrets coinoculated with NAI-susceptible and -resistant viruses (1:1 mixture) remained heterogeneous at 5 dpi but were predominantly rg-WT (>70%). Although the E119A substitution was associated with delayed replication in ferrets, the H274Y substitution did not measurably affect viral growth properties. These data suggest that rg-H274Y has undiminished fitness in single virus inoculations, but neither rg-E119A nor rg-H274Y gained a fitness advantage over rg-WT in direct competition experiments without antiviral drug pressure. Taken together, our data suggest the following order of relative fitness in a ferret animal model: rg-WT > rg-H274Y > rg-E119A. PMID:27466813

  9. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  10. Supply of neuraminidase inhibitors related to reduced influenza A (H1N1) mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic: summary of an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paula E; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Hubbard, Roderick J; Li, Jiabai; Meyer, Alison E; Stephens, Peter; Mounts, Anthony W; Rolfes, Melissa A; Penn, Charles R

    2013-09-01

    When the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic spread across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010, many WHO Member States used antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Antivirals have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduce morbidity; however, it is unclear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. To assess the association between antivirals and influenza mortality, at an ecologic level, country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were compared to laboratory-confirmed H1N1 deaths (per 100 000 people) from July 2009 to August 2010 in 42 WHO Member States. From this analysis, it was found that each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100 000 people, was associated with a 1·6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period [relative rate (RR) = 0·84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply]. Each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100 000, was associated with a 0·3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0·97 per log increase). While limitations exist in the inference that can be drawn from an ecologic evaluation, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics. This article summarises the original study described previously, which can be accessed through the following citation: Miller PE, Rambachan A, Hubbard RJ, Li J, Meyer AE, et al. (2012) Supply of Neuraminidase Inhibitors Related to Reduced Influenza A (H1N1) Mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic: An Ecological Study. PLoS ONE 7(9): e43491.

  11. Comparison of the clinical symptoms and the effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors for patients with pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 or seasonal H1N1 influenza in the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Naoki; Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Osame; Matsuura, Shinro; Maeda, Tetsunari; Yamauchi, Satoshi; Hirotsu, Nobuo; Nishimura, Mika; Iwaki, Norio; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2011-06-01

    The clinical symptoms and effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAI) have not been adequately compared among pandemic H1N1 2009 patients, seasonal H1N1 patients, and patients with H1N1 with the H275Y mutation. The data of 68 seasonal H1N1 patients in 2007-2008, 193 seasonal H1N1 patients in 2008-2009, and 361 pandemic H1N1 2009 patients diagnosed by PCR who received an NAI were analyzed. The duration of fever (body temperature ≥ 37.5 ºC) after the first dose of NAI and from onset was calculated. The H275Y neuraminidase mutation status was determined for 166 patients. Significantly lower mean age (18.4 ± 13.2 years) and a higher percentage of teenagers (53.7%) were found for pandemic 2009 influenza than for seasonal influenza (P < 0.001). The peak body temperature was equivalent (mean, 39.0 ºC) in the three seasons, and the frequency of symptoms was the same or lower for pandemic influenza compared with seasonal H1N1. None of the 34 analyzed pandemic H1N1 virus isolates contained the H275Y mutation, which was commonly detected in the 2008-2009 season. The duration of fever after the start of oseltamivir therapy was significantly shorter for patients with pandemic (23.0 ± 11.6 h) than with seasonal H1N1 in both the 2008-2009 (49.7 ± 32.3 h) and 2007-2008 seasons (32.0 ± 18.9 h). The mean duration of fever after the first dose of zanamivir was not different among the three seasons (26.9-31.5 h). Clinical symptoms were the same or somewhat milder, and oseltamivir was more effective, for pandemic 2009 than for seasonal H1N1 influenza with or without H275Y mutation.

  12. The I427T neuraminidase (NA) substitution, located outside the NA active site of an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 variant with reduced susceptibility to NA inhibitors, alters NA properties and impairs viral fitness.

    PubMed

    Tu, Véronique; Abed, Yacine; Barbeau, Xavier; Carbonneau, Julie; Fage, Clément; Lagüe, Patrick; Boivin, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of pan neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI)-resistant variants constitutes a serious clinical concern. An influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 variant containing the I427T/Q313R neuraminidase (NA) substitutions was previously identified in a surveillance study. Although these changes are not part of the NA active site, the variant showed reduced susceptibility to many NAIs. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of resistance for the I427T/Q313R substitution and its impact on the NA enzyme and viral fitness. Recombinant wild-type (WT), I427T/Q313R and I427T A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were generated by reverse genetics and tested for their drug susceptibilities, enzymatic properties and replication kinetics in vitro as well as their virulence in mice. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed for NA structural analysis. The I427T substitution, which was responsible for the resistance phenotype observed in the double (I427T/Q313R) mutant, induced 17-, 56-, 7-, and 14-fold increases in IC50 values against oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir and laninamivir, respectively. The I427T substitution alone or combined to Q313R significantly reduced NA affinity. The I427T/Q313R and to a lesser extent I427T recombinant viruses displayed reduced viral titers vs WT in vitro. In experimentally-infected mice, the mortality rates were 62.5%, 0% and 14.3% for the WT, I417T/Q313R and I427T viruses, respectively. There were about 2.5- and 2-Log reductions in mean lung viral titers on day 5 post-infection for the I427T/Q313R and I427T mutants, respectively, compared to WT. Results from simulations revealed that the I427T change indirectly altered the stability of the catalytic R368 residue of the NA enzyme causing its reduced binding to the substrate/inhibitor. This study demonstrates that the I427T/Q313R mutant, not only alters NAI susceptibility but also compromises NA properties and viral fitness, which could explain its infrequent detection in clinic.

  13. Neuraminidase production by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinning; Chang, Barbara J; Mee, Brian J; Riley, Thomas V

    2005-05-20

    In order to characterise neuraminidase activity by Erysipelothrix, 85 isolates of Erysipelothrix spp. from a variety of sources including human clinical, marine and terrestrial animals, and the environment were investigated for neuraminidase production. Neuraminidase activity was detected by a peanut lectin haemagglutination method. The effects of media, incubation conditions and pH on the production and activity of neuraminidase were also investigated. Enzyme activity was detected only in the supernatants of the isolates of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae which had been incubated in cooked meat broth and Todd Hewitt broth supplemented with horse serum after 16 and 36 h incubation at 37 degrees C. The maximum titres were reached at 40 h in cooked meat broth and 56 h in Todd Hewitt broth supplemented with horse serum. All 58 isolates and the type strain (ATCC 19414) of E. rhusiopathiae produced detectable neuraminidase activity with titres between 10 and 320. The optimal pH for the enzyme activity varied among the isolates with a pH between 6.0 and 7.0 covering the highest enzyme activity of the most. There was no statistically significant difference in the level of neuraminidase activity between isolates from different sources (p > 0.05). Neuraminidase activity was not detected in the non-pathogenic Erysipelothrix spp. such as E. tonsillarum. Neuraminidase was detected only in E. rhusiopathiae suggesting its possible role as a virulence factor. Enzyme production and activity were medium and pH dependent. The peanut lectin haemagglutination assay is a simple, rapid and sensitive method and is particularly useful for the analysis of multiple samples.

  14. Antipneumococcal activity of neuraminidase inhibiting artocarpin.

    PubMed

    Walther, E; Richter, M; Xu, Z; Kramer, C; von Grafenstein, S; Kirchmair, J; Grienke, U; Rollinger, J M; Liedl, K R; Slevogt, H; Sauerbrei, A; Saluz, H P; Pfister, W; Schmidtke, M

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a major cause of secondary bacterial pneumonia during influenza epidemics. Neuraminidase (NA) is a virulence factor of both pneumococci and influenza viruses. Bacterial neuraminidases (NAs) are structurally related to viral NA and susceptible to oseltamivir, an inhibitor designed to target viral NA. This prompted us to evaluate the antipneumococcal potential of two NA inhibiting natural compounds, the diarylheptanoid katsumadain A and the isoprenylated flavone artocarpin. Chemiluminescence, fluorescence-, and hemagglutination-based enzyme assays were applied to determine the inhibitory efficiency (IC(50) value) of the tested compounds towards pneumococcal NAs. The mechanism of inhibition was studied via enzyme kinetics with recombinant NanA NA. Unlike oseltamivir, which competes with the natural substrate of NA, artocarpin exhibits a mixed-type inhibition with a Ki value of 9.70 μM. Remarkably, artocarpin was the only NA inhibitor (NAI) for which an inhibitory effect on pneumococcal growth (MIC: 0.99-5.75 μM) and biofilm formation (MBIC: 1.15-2.97 μM) was observable. In addition, we discovered that the bactericidal effect of artocarpin can reduce the viability of pneumococci by a factor of >1000, without obvious harm to lung epithelial cells. This renders artocarpin a promising natural product for further investigations.

  15. Antiviral Drug–Resistant Influenza B Viruses Carrying H134N Substitution in Neuraminidase, Laos, February 2016

    PubMed Central

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Ketmayoon, Pakapak; Sisouk, Thongchanh; Chomlasack, Khampheng; Khanthamaly, Viengphone; Nguyen, Ha Thuy; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Marjuki, Henju; Barnes, John R.; Garten, Rebecca J.; Stevens, James; Wentworth, David E.

    2017-01-01

    In February 2016, three influenza B/Victoria/2/87 lineage viruses exhibiting 4- to 158-fold reduced inhibition by neuraminidase inhibitors were detected in Laos. These viruses had an H134N substitution in the neuraminidase and replicated efficiently in vitro and in ferrets. Current antiviral drugs may be ineffective in controlling infections caused by viruses harboring this mutation. PMID:28322707

  16. Attenuation of TNF-α secretion by L-proline-based cyclic dipeptides produced by culture broth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rukaiyya; Basha, Ameer; Goverdhanam, Ragavendra; Rao, Poorna Chandra; Tanemura, Yuhei; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Begum, Ahil Sajeli

    2015-12-15

    To identify small molecule inhibitors of TNF-α, bioassay- and LC-MS-guided chemical investigation on EtOAc extract of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ABS-36 culture broth (EEPA) was performed, which yielded four proline-based cyclic dipeptides, cyclo(Gly-l-Pro) (1), cyclo(l-Pro-l-Phe) (2), cyclo(trans-4-hydroxy-l-Pro-l-Phe) (3) and cyclo(trans-4-hydroxy-l-Pro-l-Leu) (4). Compounds 1 and 3 exhibited potent inhibition of TNF-α release with IC50 values of 4.5 and 14.2μg/mL, respectively, while EEPA showed IC50 of 38.8μg/mL under lipopolysaccharide treated RAW 264.7 cell ELISA assay. Also, marked attenuation of mRNA-expression of TNF-α was shown by all compounds. In vivo testing in rats of EEPA and chemically synthesized 4 validated significant TNF-α reduction with 51% (500mg/kg) and 79% (50mg/kg), respectively. In addition, all compounds exhibited significant diminution of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA-expression levels and NO production. All samples displayed only weak toxicity to lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 cells.

  17. Catechin inhibition of influenza neuraminidase and its molecular basis with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Müller, Patrick; Downard, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis for the antiviral inhibitory properties of three catechins epigallocatechin gallate, epicatechin gallate and catechin-5-gallate derived from green tea was assessed in terms of their ability to interact with influenza neuraminidase. This was investigated using a molecular based MALDI mass spectrometry approach in conjunction with companion inhibition assays employing confocal microscopy. Together with computational molecular docking, all three catechins were found to bind to influenza neuraminidase in the vicinity of a structurally conserved cavity adjacent to residue 430 that has been suggested to be a secondary sialic acid binding site. In doing so, they were effective inhibitors of the enzyme preventing the release of progeny viruses from host cells at inhibitor concentrations (IC50 values) of between 100 and 173 μM. Importantly, their different binding profiles avoid the limitations of existing neuraminidase inhibitors manifested by the evolution of antiviral resistance strains.

  18. [Influenza A, pregnancy and neuraminidase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Montané, Eva; Lecumberri, Josep; Pedro-Botet, María Luisa

    2011-05-28

    Following the explosion of the influenza A pandemic (H1N1) during the first semester of 2009, oseltamivir and zanamivir were used as the treatment of choice in the absence of rigorous clinical studies demonstrating their efficacy in the treatment and prophylaxis of this disease. Knowledge of seasonal influenza, flu pandemics and particularly the H1N1, which produces more severe infection and a higher mortality rate during pregnancy, led to the use of antiviral treatment despite the scarcity of clinical studies on their efficacy and effectiveness, mainly due to the influence of the media. This study reviewed the experimental and clinical studies performed on the safety of oseltamivir and zanamivir in pregnancy. Likewise, the recommendations made by the different health care and governmental authorities as well as other institutions and scientific and health care organizations on the therapeutic management and prophylaxis of influenza A 2009 in pregnant women were reviewed.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of the complex of 4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en and influenza virus neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Varghese, J N; Epa, V C; Colman, P M

    1995-06-01

    The three-dimensional X-ray structure of a complex of the potent neuraminidase inhibitor 4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en and influenza virus neuraminidase (Subtype N9) has been obtained utilizing diffraction data to 1.8 A resolution. The interactions of the inhibitor, solvent water molecules, and the active site residues have been accurately determined. Six water molecules bound in the native structure have been displaced by the inhibitor, and the active site residues show no significant conformational changes on binding. Sialic acid, the natural substrate, binds in a half-chair conformation that is isosteric to the inhibitor. The conformation of the inhibitor in the active site of the X-ray structure concurs with that obtained by theoretical calculations and validates the structure-based design of the inhibitor. Comparison of known high-resolution structures of neuraminidase subtypes N2, N9, and B shows good structural conservation of the active site protein atoms, but the location of the water molecules in the respective active sites is less conserved. In particular, the environment of the 4-guanidino group of the inhibitor is strongly conserved and is the basis for the antiviral action of the inhibitor across all presently known influenza strains. Differences in the solvent structure in the active site may be related to variation in the affinities of inhibitors to different subtypes of neuraminidase.

  20. Three-dimensional structure of the complex of 4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en and influenza virus neuraminidase.

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, J. N.; Epa, V. C.; Colman, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    The three-dimensional X-ray structure of a complex of the potent neuraminidase inhibitor 4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en and influenza virus neuraminidase (Subtype N9) has been obtained utilizing diffraction data to 1.8 A resolution. The interactions of the inhibitor, solvent water molecules, and the active site residues have been accurately determined. Six water molecules bound in the native structure have been displaced by the inhibitor, and the active site residues show no significant conformational changes on binding. Sialic acid, the natural substrate, binds in a half-chair conformation that is isosteric to the inhibitor. The conformation of the inhibitor in the active site of the X-ray structure concurs with that obtained by theoretical calculations and validates the structure-based design of the inhibitor. Comparison of known high-resolution structures of neuraminidase subtypes N2, N9, and B shows good structural conservation of the active site protein atoms, but the location of the water molecules in the respective active sites is less conserved. In particular, the environment of the 4-guanidino group of the inhibitor is strongly conserved and is the basis for the antiviral action of the inhibitor across all presently known influenza strains. Differences in the solvent structure in the active site may be related to variation in the affinities of inhibitors to different subtypes of neuraminidase. PMID:7549872

  1. A Virtual Screening Approach For Identifying Plants with Anti H5N1 Neuraminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic and occasional drug-resistant influenza strains have highlighted the need to develop novel anti-influenza therapeutics. Here, we report computational and experimental efforts to identify influenza neuraminidase inhibitors from among the 3000 natural compounds in the Malaysian-Plants Natural-Product (NADI) database. These 3000 compounds were first docked into the neuraminidase active site. The five plants with the largest number of top predicted ligands were selected for experimental evaluation. Twelve specific compounds isolated from these five plants were shown to inhibit neuraminidase, including two compounds with IC50 values less than 92 μM. Furthermore, four of the 12 isolated compounds had also been identified in the top 100 compounds from the virtual screen. Together, these results suggest an effective new approach for identifying bioactive plant species that will further the identification of new pharmacologically active compounds from diverse natural-product resources. PMID:25555059

  2. Selective CB2 receptor agonists. Part 2: Structure-activity relationship studies and optimization of proline-based compounds.

    PubMed

    Riether, Doris; Zindell, Renee; Wu, Lifen; Betageri, Raj; Jenkins, James E; Khor, Someina; Berry, Angela K; Hickey, Eugene R; Ermann, Monika; Albrecht, Claudia; Ceci, Angelo; Gemkow, Mark J; Nagaraja, Nelamangala V; Romig, Helmut; Sauer, Achim; Thomson, David S

    2015-02-01

    Through a ligand-based pharmacophore model (S)-proline based compounds were identified as potent cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists with high selectivity over the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). Structure-activity relationship investigations for this compound class lead to oxo-proline compounds 21 and 22 which combine an impressive CB1 selectivity profile with good pharmacokinetic properties. In a streptozotocin induced diabetic neuropathy model, 22 demonstrated a dose-dependent reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia.

  3. Lysosomal sialidase (neuraminidase-1) is targeted to the cell surface in a multiprotein complex that facilitates elastic fiber assembly.

    PubMed

    Hinek, Aleksander; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V; von Itzstein, Mark; Starcher, Barry

    2006-02-10

    We have established previously that the 67-kDa elastin-binding protein (EBP), identical to the spliced variant of beta-galactosidase, acts as a recyclable chaperone that facilitates secretion of tropoelastin. (Hinek, A., Keeley, F. W., and Callahan, J. W. (1995) Exp. Cell Res. 220, 312-324). We now demonstrate that EBP also forms a cell surface-targeted molecular complex with protective protein/cathepsin A and sialidase (neuraminidase-1), and provide evidence that this sialidase activity is a prerequisite for the subsequent release of tropoelastin. We found that treatment with sialidase inhibitors repressed assembly of elastic fibers in cultures of human skin fibroblasts, aortic smooth muscle cells, and ear cartilage chondrocytes and caused impaired elastogenesis in developing chick embryos. Fibroblasts derived from patients with congenital sialidosis (primary deficiency of neuraminidase-1) and galactosialidosis (secondary deficiency of neuraminidase-1) demonstrated impaired elastogenesis, which could be reversed after their transduction with neuraminidase-1 cDNA or after treatment with bacterial sialidase, which has a similar substrate specificity to human neuraminidase-1. We postulate that neuraminidase-1 catalyzes removal of the terminal sialic acids from carbohydrate chains of microfibrillar glycoproteins and other adjacent matrix glycoconjugates, unmasking their penultimate galactosugars. In turn, the exposed galactosugars interact with the galectin domain of EBP, thereby inducing the release of transported tropoelastin molecules and facilitating their subsequent assembly into elastic fibers.

  4. A Beneficiary Role for Neuraminidase in Influenza Virus Penetration through the Respiratory Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyun; Steukers, Lennert; Forier, Katrien; Xiong, Ranhua; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) has a strong tropism for pig respiratory mucosa, which consists of a mucus layer, epithelium, basement membrane and lamina propria. Sialic acids present on the epithelial surface have long been considered to be determinants of influenza virus tropism. However, mucus which is also rich in sialic acids may serve as the first barrier of selection. It was investigated how influenza virus interacts with the mucus to infect epithelial cells. Two techniques were applied to track SIV H1N1 in porcine mucus. The microscopic diffusion of SIV particles in the mucus was analyzed by single particle tracking (SPT), and the macroscopic penetration of SIV through mucus was studied by a virus in-capsule-mucus penetration system, followed by visualizing the translocation of the virions with time by immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, the effects of neuraminidase on SIV getting through or binding to the mucus were studied by using zanamivir, a neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI), and Arthrobacter ureafaciens neuraminidase. The distribution of the diffusion coefficient shows that 70% of SIV particles were entrapped, while the rest diffused freely in the mucus. Additionally, SIV penetrated the porcine mucus with time, reaching a depth of 65 µm at 30 min post virus addition, 2 fold of that at 2 min. Both the microscopic diffusion and macroscopic penetration were largely diminished by NAI, while were clearly increased by the effect of exogenous neuraminidase. Moreover, the exogenous neuraminidase sufficiently prevented the binding of SIV to mucus which was reversely enhanced by effect of NAI. These findings clearly show that the neuraminidase helps SIV move through the mucus, which is important for the virus to reach and infect epithelial cells and eventually become shed into the lumen of the respiratory tract. PMID:25333824

  5. Trypsin inhibitors for the treatment of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Trixi; Simic, Oliver; Skaanderup, Philip R; Namoto, Kenji; Berst, Frederic; Ehrhardt, Claus; Schiering, Nikolaus; Mueller, Irene; Woelcke, Julian

    2016-09-01

    Proline-based trypsin inhibitors occupying the S1-S2-S1' region were identified by an HTS screening campaign. It was discovered that truncation of the P1' moiety and appropriate extension into the S4 region led to highly potent trypsin inhibitors with excellent selectivity against related serine proteases and a favorable hERG profile.

  6. Resistance to Neuraminidase Inhibitors Conferred by an R292K Mutation in a Human Influenza Virus H7N9 Isolate Can Be Masked by a Mixed R/K Viral Population

    PubMed Central

    Yen, H.-L.; McKimm-Breschkin, J. L.; Choy, K.-T.; Wong, D. D. Y.; Cheung, P. P. H.; Zhou, J.; Ng, I. H.; Zhu, H.; Webby, R. J.; Guan, Y.; Webster, R. G.; Peiris, J. S. M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We characterized the A/Shanghai/1/2013 virus isolated from the first confirmed human case of A/H7N9 disease in China. The A/Shanghai/1/2013 isolate contained a mixed population of R (65%; 15/23 clones) and K (35%; 8/23 clones) at neuraminidase (NA) residue 292, as determined by clonal sequencing. A/Shanghai/1/2013 with mixed R/K at residue 292 exhibited a phenotype that is sensitive to zanamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate by the enzyme-based NA inhibition assay. The plaque-purified A/Shanghai/1/2013 with dominant K292 (94%; 15/16 clones) showed sensitivity to zanamivir that had decreased by >30-fold and to oseltamivir carboxylate that had decreased by >100-fold compared to its plaque-purified wild-type counterpart possessing dominant R292 (93%, 14/15 clones). In Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, the plaque-purified A/Shanghai/1/2013-NAK292 virus exhibited no reduction in viral titer under conditions of increasing concentrations of oseltamivir carboxylate (range, 0 to 1,000 µM) whereas the replication of the plaque-purified A/Shanghai/1/2013-NAR292 and the A/Shanghai/2/2013 viruses was completely inhibited at 250 µM and 31.25 µM of oseltamivir carboxylate, respectively. Although the plaque-purified A/Shanghai/1/2013-NAK292 virus exhibited lower NA enzyme activity and a higher Km for 2′-(4-methylumbelliferryl)-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid than the wild-type A/Shanghai/1/2013-NAR292 virus, the A/Shanghai/1/2013-NAK292 virus formed large plaques and replicated efficiently in vitro. Our results confirmed that the NA R292K mutation confers resistance to oseltamivir, peramivir, and zanamivir in the novel human H7N9 viruses. Importantly, detection of the resistance phenotype may be masked in the clinical samples containing a mixed population of R/K at NA residue 292 in the enzyme-based NA inhibition assay. PMID:23860768

  7. Influence of Hofmeister Ions on the Structure of Proline-Based Peptide Models: A Combined Experimental and Molecular Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Bröhl, Andreas; Albrecht, Benjamin; Zhang, Yong; Maginn, Edward; Giernoth, Ralf

    2017-02-23

    The influence of three sodium salts, covering a wide range of the Hofmeister series, on the conformation of three proline-based peptide models in aqueous solution is examined using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The anions preferentially interact with the cis conformers of the peptide models, which is rationalized by the respective electrostatic potential surfaces. These preferred interactions have a strong impact on the thermodynamics of the cis/trans equilibria, leading to a higher population of the cis conformers. In distinct cases, these equilibria are nearly independent of temperature, showing that the salts are also able to stabilize the conformers over wide temperature ranges.

  8. Influenza neuraminidase as a vaccine antigen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neuraminidase protein of influenza viruses is a surface glycoprotein that has enzymatic activity to remove sialic acid, the viral receptor, from both viral and host proteins. The removal of sialic acid from viral proteins plays a key role in the release of the virus from the cell by preventing ...

  9. Neuraminidase inhibitory terpenes from endophytic Cochliobolus sp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gao-Fei; Guo, Zhi-Kai; Wang, Wei; Cui, Jiang-Tao; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Ge, Hui-Ming

    2011-08-01

    The chemical study of endophytic fungus of Cochliobolus led to the isolation of 10 terpenes (1-10), including one new compound named isocochlioquinone B (1). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods, including 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 5-7 showed significant neuraminidase inhibitory activity with IC(50) values of 0.79-1.75 μM.

  10. Combining Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics to Predict the Binding Modes of Flavonoid Derivatives with the Neuraminidase of the 2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shih-Jen; Chong, Fok-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Control of flavonoid derivatives inhibitors release through the inhibition of neuraminidase has been identified as a potential target for the treatment of H1N1 influenza disease. We have employed molecular dynamics simulation techniques to optimize the 2009 H1N1 influenza neuraminidase X-ray crystal structure. Molecular docking of the compounds revealed the possible binding mode. Our molecular dynamics simulations combined with the solvated interaction energies technique was applied to predict the docking models of the inhibitors in the binding pocket of the H1N1 influenza neuraminidase. In the simulations, the correlation of the predicted and experimental binding free energies of all 20 flavonoid derivatives inhibitors is satisfactory, as indicated by R2 = 0.75. PMID:22605992

  11. Mutation-induced loop opening and energetics for binding of tamiflu to influenza N8 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-05-31

    Tamiflu, also known as oseltamivir (OTV), binds to influenza A neuraminidase (H5N1) with very high affinity (0.32 nM). However, this inhibitor binds to other neuraminidases as well. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the mechanism underlying the binding of oseltamivir to N8 neuraminidase (NA) in "open" and "closed" conformations of the 150-loop through molecular dynamics simulations and the popular and well established molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann (MM-PBSA) free energy calculation method. Whereas the closed conformation is stable for wild type N8, it transforms into the open conformation for the mutants Y252H, H274Y, and R292K, indicating that bound to oseltamivir these mutants are preferentially in the open conformation. Our calculations show that the binding of wild type oseltamivir to the closed conformation of N8 neuraminidase is energetically favored compared to the binding to the open conformation. We observe water mediated binding of oseltamivir to the N8 neuraminidase in both conformations which is not seen in the case of binding of the same drug to the H5N1 neuraminidase. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the mechanisms underlying the binding and changes in affinity due to mutations. Considering the mutant N8 variants in the open conformation adopted during the simulations, we observe a significant loss in the size of the total binding free energy for the N8(Y252H)-OTV, N8(H274Y)-OTV, and N8(R292K)-OTV complexes compared to N8(WT)-OTV, mainly due to the decrease in the size of the intermolecular electrostatic energy. For R292K, an unfavorable shift in the van der Waals interactions also contributes to the drug resistance. The mutations cause a significant expansion in the active site cavity, increasing its solvent accessible surface compared to the crystal structures of both the open and closed conformations. Our study underscores the need to consider dynamics in rationalizing the

  12. Zanamivir-resistant influenza viruses with a novel neuraminidase mutation.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Holien, Jessica K; Parker, Michael; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G

    2009-10-01

    The neuraminidase inhibitors zanamivir and oseltamivir are marketed for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza and have been stockpiled by many countries for use in a pandemic. Although recent surveillance has identified a striking increase in the frequency of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) viruses in Europe, the United States, Oceania, and South Africa, to date there have been no reports of significant zanamivir resistance among influenza A (H1N1) viruses or any other human influenza viruses. We investigated the frequency of oseltamivir and zanamivir resistance in circulating seasonal influenza A (H1N1) viruses in Australasia and Southeast Asia. Analysis of 391 influenza A (H1N1) viruses isolated between 2006 and early 2008 from Australasia and Southeast Asia revealed nine viruses (2.3%) that demonstrated markedly reduced zanamivir susceptibility and contained a previously undescribed Gln136Lys (Q136K) neuraminidase mutation. The mutation had no effect on oseltamivir susceptibility but caused approximately a 300-fold and a 70-fold reduction in zanamivir and peramivir susceptibility, respectively. The role of the Q136K mutation in conferring zanamivir resistance was confirmed using reverse genetics. Interestingly, the mutation was not detected in the primary clinical specimens from which these mutant isolates were grown, suggesting that the resistant viruses either occurred in very low proportions in the primary clinical specimens or arose during MDCK cell culture passage. Compared to susceptible influenza A (H1N1) viruses, the Q136K mutant strains displayed greater viral fitness than the wild-type virus in MDCK cells but equivalent infectivity and transmissibility in a ferret model.

  13. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae neuraminidase and its role in pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Abrashev, Ignat; Orozova, Petya

    2006-01-01

    The role of the enzyme neuraminidase in pathogenicity of the bacillus Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae was studied. Different substances with low and high molecular weight were tested as inducers of E. rhusiopathiae neuraminidase biosynthesis. It was found that macromolecular complexes induce the secretion of the enzyme. K(M) values for different substrates showed that the affinity of the E. rhusiopathiae neuraminidase increases in parallel with the enlargement of the molecular weight of glycoproteins. Results from the rabbits skin test confirmed the role of E. rhusiopathiae neuraminidase as a factor of pathogenicity with spreading functions.

  14. Demonstration of neuraminidase activity in Mycoplasma neurolyticum and of neuraminidase proteins in three canine Mycoplasma species.

    PubMed

    Berčič, Rebeka Lucijana; Cizelj, Ivanka; Benčina, Mateja; Narat, Mojca; Bradbury, Janet M; Dovč, Peter; Benčina, Dušan

    2012-03-23

    Neuraminidases are virulence factors in many pathogenic microorganisms. They are present also in some Mycoplasma species that cause disease in birds, dogs and alligators. Thirty-seven Mycoplasma species have been examined previously for neuraminidase (sialidase) activity, whereas many of the species causing disease in man, ruminants, pigs, rodents and other animals have not. In this study neuraminidase enzymatic activity (NEAC) was examined in 45 previously untested Mycoplasma species, including those causing diseases in man, farm animals and laboratory animals. The only species in which NEAC was found was Mycoplasma neurolyticum, specifically, its type strain (Type A(T)) which is capable of inducing neurologic signs in inoculated young mice and rats. The NEAC of washed cells was relatively weak, but it differed even more than 10-fold among cells of cultures derived from individual colonies of M. neurolyticum. A weak NEAC was also detected in the supernatant of the M. neurolyticum broth culture. Canine Mycoplasma spp. with high sialidase activity reported previously, Mycoplasma canis, Mycoplasma cynos and Mycoplasma molare had 100-fold more NEAC than M. neurolyticum, but apparent differences in NEAC levels existed among strains of M. canis and of M. cynos. Zymograms using neuraminidase-specific chromogenic substrate were used to show proteins having NEAC. In M. canis (a field isolate Larissa and the type strain PG14(T)), M. cynos (isolate 896) and M. molare (type strain H542(T)) proteins with NEAC had molecular masses of ∼130kDa, 105kDa and 110kDa, respectively. Identification of these neuraminidases could provide the basis for their molecular characterization.

  15. Neuraminidase-1: A novel therapeutic target in multistage tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Haxho, Fiona; Neufeld, Ronald J.; Szewczuk, Myron R.

    2016-01-01

    Several of the growth factors and their receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and insulin are promising candidate targets for cancer therapy. Indeed, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have been developed to target these growth factors and their receptors, and have demonstrated dramatic initial responses in cancer therapy. Yet, most patients ultimately develop TKI drug resistance and relapse. It is essential in the clinical setting that the targeted therapies are to circumvent multistage tumorigenesis, including genetic mutations at the different growth factor receptors, tumor neovascularization, chemoresistance of tumors, immune-mediated tumorigenesis and the development of tissue invasion and metastasis. Here, we identify a novel receptor signaling platform linked to EGF, NGF, insulin and TOLL-like receptor (TLR) activations, all of which are known to play major roles in tumorigenesis. The importance of these findings signify an innovative and promising entirely new targeted therapy for cancer. The role of mammalian neuraminidase-1 (Neu1) in complex with matrix metalloproteinase-9 and G protein-coupled receptor tethered to RTKs and TLRs is identified as a major target in multistage tumorigenesis. Evidence exposing the link connecting growth factor-binding and immune-mediated tumorigenesis to this novel receptor-signaling paradigm will be reviewed in its current relationship to cancer. PMID:27029067

  16. Site-specific indolation of proline-based peptides via copper(II)-catalyzed oxidative coupling of tertiary amine N-oxides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dengyou; Zhou, Shengbin; Gao, Feng; Liu, Hong

    2015-08-14

    The first site-specific and purely chemical method for modifying proline-based peptides was developed via a convenient, copper-catalyzed oxidative coupling of tertiary amine N-oxides with indoles. This novel approach features high regioselectivity and diastereoselectivity, mild conditions, and compatibility with various functional groups. In addition, a simplified process was realized in one pot and two steps via in situ oxidative coupling of tertiary amine and indoles.

  17. Red cells bound to influenza virus N9 neuraminidase are not released by the N9 neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Air, G M; Laver, W G

    1995-08-01

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) of the N9 subtype also possesses hemagglutinin activity and the hemagglutinating, or hemabsorbing (HB), site is distinct from the catalytic site. Previous results suggested that the NA was binding to sialic acid on the red cell surface, but we now report that the HB receptor is not sensitive to N9 influenza neuraminidase activity. Cell lines that constitutively express N9 or N2 neuraminidase have been used to further investigate the specificity of red blood cell binding to the HB site. The results suggest that the ligand is N-acetylneuraminic acid in a linkage or environment that is not sensitive to influenza virus neuraminidase, but which is released by the broadly specific bacterial sialidases from Micromonospora viridifaciens or Arthrobacter ureafaciens.

  18. Quantitative Predictions of Binding Free Energy Changes in Drug-Resistant Influenza Neuraminidase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-30

    of H5N1 avian influenza neuraminidase suggests new opportunities for drug design. Nature 443: 45–49. 9. Wang MZ, Tai CY, Mende DB (2002) Mechanism by...trajectories thermodynamic-integration free-energy changes for biomolecular systems: determinants of H5N1 avian influenza virus neuraminidase inhibition by...RE, Cheng X, Ivanov I, Xu D, McCammon JA (2009) Characterizing loop dynamics and ligand recognition in human- and avian -type influenza neuraminidases

  19. Neuroinflammation induced by intracerebroventricular injection of microbial neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Granados-Durán, Pablo; López-Ávalos, María D; Grondona, Jesús M; Gómez-Roldán, María Del Carmen; Cifuentes, Manuel; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Alvarez, Martina; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe the facts that took place in the rat brain after a single injection of the enzyme neuraminidase from Clostridium perfringens into the right lateral ventricle. After injection, it diffused through the cerebrospinal fluid of the ipsilateral ventricle and the third ventricle, and about 400 μm into the periventricular brain parenchyma. The expression of ICAM1 in the endothelial cells of the periventricular vessels, IBA1 in microglia, and GFAP in astrocytes notably increased in the regions reached by the injected neuraminidase. The subependymal microglia and the ventricular macrophages begun to express IL1β and some appeared to cross the ependymal layer. After about 4 h of the injection, leukocytes migrated from large venules of the affected choroid plexus, the meninges and the local subependyma, and infiltrated the brain. The invading cells arrived orderly: first neutrophils, then macrophage-monocytes, and last CD8α-positive T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes. Leukocytes in the ventricles and the perivascular zones penetrated the brain parenchyma passing through the ependyma and the glia limitans. Thus, it is likely that a great part of the damage produced by microorganism invading the brain may be due to their neuraminidase content.

  20. Neuroinflammation Induced by Intracerebroventricular Injection of Microbial Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Granados-Durán, Pablo; López-Ávalos, María D.; Grondona, Jesús M.; Gómez-Roldán, María del Carmen; Cifuentes, Manuel; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Alvarez, Martina; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe the facts that took place in the rat brain after a single injection of the enzyme neuraminidase from Clostridium perfringens into the right lateral ventricle. After injection, it diffused through the cerebrospinal fluid of the ipsilateral ventricle and the third ventricle, and about 400 μm into the periventricular brain parenchyma. The expression of ICAM1 in the endothelial cells of the periventricular vessels, IBA1 in microglia, and GFAP in astrocytes notably increased in the regions reached by the injected neuraminidase. The subependymal microglia and the ventricular macrophages begun to express IL1β and some appeared to cross the ependymal layer. After about 4 h of the injection, leukocytes migrated from large venules of the affected choroid plexus, the meninges and the local subependyma, and infiltrated the brain. The invading cells arrived orderly: first neutrophils, then macrophage-monocytes, and last CD8α-positive T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes. Leukocytes in the ventricles and the perivascular zones penetrated the brain parenchyma passing through the ependyma and the glia limitans. Thus, it is likely that a great part of the damage produced by microorganism invading the brain may be due to their neuraminidase content. PMID:25853134

  1. Neuraminidase as an enzymatic marker for detecting airborne Influenza virus and other viruses.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Nathalie; Toulouse, Marie-Josée; Ho, Jim; Li, Dongqing; Duchaine, Caroline

    2017-02-01

    Little information is available regarding the effectiveness of air samplers to collect viruses and regarding the effects of sampling processes on viral integrity. The neuraminidase enzyme is present on the surface of viruses that are of agricultural and medical importance. It has been demonstrated that viruses carrying this enzyme can be detected using commercial substrates without having to process the sample by methods such as RNA extraction. This project aims at evaluating the effects of 3 aerosol-sampling devices on the neuraminidase enzyme activity of airborne viruses. The purified neuraminidase enzymes from Clostridium perfringens, a strain of Influenza A (H1N1) virus, the FluMist influenza vaccine, and the Newcastle disease virus were used as models. The neuraminidase models were aerosolized in aerosol chambers and sampled with 3 different air samplers (SKC BioSampler, 3-piece cassettes with polycarbonate filters, and Coriolis μ) to assess the effect on neuraminidase enzyme activity. Our results demonstrated that Influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus neuraminidase enzymes are resistant to aerosolization and sampling with all air samplers tested. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enzymatic neuraminidase assay is as sensitive as RT-qPCR for detecting low concentrations of Influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus. Therefore, given the sensitivity of the assay and its compatibility with air sampling methods, viruses carrying the neuraminidase enzyme can be rapidly detected from air samples using neuraminidase activity assay without having to preprocess the samples.

  2. Understanding the cross-resistance of oseltamivir to H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A neuraminidase mutations using multidimensional computational analyses.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashona; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2015-01-01

    This study embarks on a comprehensive description of the conformational contributions to resistance of neuraminidase (N1) in H1N1 and H5N1 to oseltamivir, using comparative multiple molecular dynamic simulations. The available data with regard to elucidation of the mechanism of resistance as a result of mutations in H1N1 and H5N1 neuraminidases is not well established. Enhanced post-dynamic analysis, such as principal component analysis, solvent accessible surface area, free binding energy calculations, and radius of gyration were performed to gain a precise insight into the binding mode and origin of resistance of oseltamivir in H1N1 and H5N1 mutants. Three significant features reflecting resistance in the presence of mutations H274Y and I222K, of the protein complexed with the inhibitor are: reduced flexibility of the α-carbon backbone; an improved ΔEele of ~15 (kcal/mol) for H1N1 coupled with an increase in ΔGsol (~13 kcal/mol) from wild-type to mutation; a low binding affinity in comparison with the wild-type of ~2 (kcal/mol) and ~7 (kcal/mol) with respect to each mutation for the H5N1 systems; and reduced hydrophobicity of the overall surface structure due to an impaired hydrogen bonding network. We believe the results of this study will ultimately provide a useful insight into the structural landscape of neuraminidase-associated binding of oseltamivir. Furthermore, the results can be used in the design and development of potent inhibitors of neuraminidases.

  3. A point mutation in influenza B neuraminidase confers resistance to peramivir and loss of slow binding.

    PubMed

    Baum, Ellen Z; Wagaman, Pamela C; Ly, Linh; Turchi, Ignatius; Le, Jianhua; Bucher, Doris; Bush, Karen

    2003-06-01

    The influenza neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors peramivir, oseltamivir, and zanamivir are potent inhibitors of NAs from both influenza A and B strains. In general, these inhibitors are slow, tight binders of NA, exhibiting time-dependent inhibition. A mutant of influenza virus B/Yamagata/16/88 which was resistant to peramivir was generated by passage of the virus in tissue culture, in the presence of increasing concentrations (0.1-120 microM over 15 passages) of the compound. Whereas the wild type (WT) virus was inhibited by peramivir with an EC(50) value of 0.10 microM, virus isolated at passages 3 and 15 displayed EC(50) values of 10 and >50 microM, respectively. Passage 3 virus contained 3 hemagglutinin (HA) mutations, but no NA mutation. Passage 15 (P15R) virus contained an additional 3 HA mutations, plus the NA mutation His273Tyr. The mechanism of inhibition of WT and P15R NA by peramivir was examined in enzyme assays. The WT and P15R NAs displayed IC(50) values of 8.4+/-0.4 and 127+/-16 nM, respectively, for peramivir. Peramivir inhibited the WT enzyme in a time-dependent fashion, with a K(i) value of 0.066+/-0.002nM. In contrast, the P15R enzyme did not display the property of slow binding and was inhibited competitively with a K(i) value of 4.69+/-0.44nM. Molecular modeling suggested that His273 was relatively distant from peramivir (>5A) in the NA active site, but that Tyr273 introduced a repulsive interaction between the enzyme and inhibitor, which may have been responsible for peramivir resistance.

  4. Sialidosis and galactosialidosis: chromosomal assignment of two genes associated with neuraminidase-deficiency disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, O.T.; Henry, W.M.; Haley, L.L.; Byers, M.G.; Eddy, R.L.; Shows, T.B.

    1986-03-01

    The inherited human disorders sialidosis and galactosialidosis are the result of deficiencies of glycoprotein-specific ..cap alpha..-neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18; sialidase) activity. Two genes were determined to be necessary for expression of neuraminidase by using human-mouse somatic cell hybrids segregating human chromosomes. A panel of mouse RAG-human hybrid cells demonstrated a single-gene requirement for human neuraminidase and allowed assignment of this gene to the (pter ..-->.. q23) region of chromosome 10. A second panel of mouse thymidine kinase (TK)-deficient LM/TK/sup -/-human hybrid cells demonstrated that human neuraminidase activity required both chromosomes 10 and 20 to be present. Analysis of human neuraminidase expression in interspecific hybrid cells or polykaryocytes formed from fusion of mouse RAG or LM/TK/sup -/ cell lines with human sialidosis or galactosialidosis fibroblasts indicated that the RAG cell line complemented the galactosialidosis defect, but the LM/TK/sup -/ cell line did not. This eliminates the requirement for this gene in RAG-human hybrid cells and explains the different chromosome requirements of these two hybrid panels. Fusion of LM/TK/sup -/ cell hybrids lacking chromosome 10 or 20 and neuraminidase-deficient fibroblasts confirmed by complementation analysis that the sialidosis disorder results from a mutation on chromosome 10, presumably encoding the neuraminidase structural gene. Galactosialidosis is caused by a mutation in a second gene required for neuraminidase expression located on chromosome 20.

  5. Mutagenesis of Paramyxovirus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Membrane-Proximal Stalk Region Influences Stability, Receptor Binding, and Neuraminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Kim, Lori S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviridae consist of a large family of enveloped, negative-sense, nonsegmented single-stranded RNA viruses that account for a significant number of human and animal diseases. The fusion process for nearly all paramyxoviruses involves the mixing of the host cell plasma membrane and the virus envelope in a pH-independent fashion. Fusion is orchestrated via the concerted action of two surface glycoproteins: an attachment protein called hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN [also called H or G depending on virus type and substrate]), which acts as a receptor binding protein, and a fusion (F) protein, which undergoes a major irreversible refolding process to merge the two membranes. Recent biochemical evidence suggests that receptor binding by HN is dispensable for cell-cell fusion. However, factors that influence the stability and/or conformation of the HN 4-helix bundle (4HB) stalk have not been studied. Here, we used oxidative cross-linking as well as functional assays to investigate the role of the structurally unresolved membrane-proximal stalk region (MPSR) (residues 37 to 58) of HN in the context of headless and full-length HN membrane fusion promotion. Our data suggest that the receptor binding head serves to stabilize the stalk to regulate fusion. Moreover, we found that the MPSR of HN modulates receptor binding and neuraminidase activity without a corresponding regulation of F triggering. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses require two viral membrane glycoproteins, the attachment protein variously called HN, H, or G and the fusion protein (F), to couple host receptor recognition to virus-cell fusion. The HN protein has a globular head that is attached to a membrane-anchored flexible stalk of ∼80 residues and has three activities: receptor binding, neuraminidase, and fusion activation. In this report, we have identified the functional significance of the membrane-proximal stalk region (MPSR) (HN, residues 37 to 56) of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus

  6. Correlation between low neuraminidase blood levels and a predisposition toward family-related breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, R E; Laraja, R D; Imran-Ul-Hag; Saber, A A; Nadkarni, M

    1996-11-01

    It has been shown that high sialic acid levels are often found in conjunction with breast cancer, and these high concentrations are thought to be due to deficiency of the enzyme neuraminidase. The study proposes to elicit a relationship between low levels of blood neuraminidase and a family history of breast cancer. Neuraminidase blood levels were measured in 30 healthy women between the ages of 35 and 65 years with no evidence of a family history of breast cancer (control group), and in 33 healthy women between the ages of 35 to 65 years, all of whom had immediate members of their families with breast cancer (study group). The mean level of the blood neuraminidase was found to be 1.375 units in the control group. On the other hand, the mean level for the study group was 1.256 units. The difference between the two groups is statistically significant, (P value < 0.01). It is important to note that in the study group 20 of the 33 participants, 60.6 per cent, had neuraminidase levels below the mean of the study group, whereas only 3 of the 30, 10 per cent, in the control group had neuraminidase levels below the mean of the study group. Deficiency of the enzyme neuraminidase may suggest an elevated risk for breast cancer.

  7. Neuraminidase inhibitory activities of quaternary isoquinoline alkaloids from Corydalis turtschaninovii rhizome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Young Bae; Lee, Woo Song; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium that causes food poisoning. The neuraminidase (NA) protein of C. perfringens plays a pivotal role in bacterial proliferation and is considered a novel antibacterial drug target. Based on screens for novel NA inhibitors, a 95% EtOH extract of Corydalis turtschaninovii rhizome showed NA inhibitory activity (68% at 30 μg/ml), which resulted in the isolation of 10 isoquinoline alkaloids; namely, palmatine (1), berberine (2), coptisine (3), pseudodehydrocorydaline (4), jatrorrhizine (5), dehydrocorybulbine (6), pseudocoptisine (7), glaucine (8), corydaline (9) and tetrahydrocoptisine (10). Interestingly, seven quaternary isoquinoline alkaloids 1-7 (IC50 = 12.8 ± 1.5 to 65.2 ± 4.5 μM) showed stronger NA inhibitory activity than the tertiary alkaloids 8-10. In addition, highly active compounds 1 and 2 showed reversible non-competitive behavior based on a kinetic study. Molecular docking simulations using the Autodock 4.2 software increased our understanding of receptor-ligand binding of these compounds. In addition, we demonstrated that compounds 1 and 2 suppressed bacterial growth.

  8. Hydration of ligands of influenza virus neuraminidase studied by the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Kana; Watanabe, Chiduru; Okiyama, Yoshio; Mochizuki, Yuji; Fukuzawa, Kaori; Komeiji, Yuto

    2016-09-01

    The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method was applied to quantum chemical calculations of neuramic acid, the natural substrate of the influenza virus neuraminidase, and two of its competitive inhibitors, Oseltamivir (Tamiful(®)) and Zanamivir (Relenza(®)), to investigate their hydrated structures and energetics. Each of the three ligands was immersed in an explicit water solvent, geometry-optimized by classical MM and QM/MM methods, and subjected to FMO calculations with 2-, 3-, and 4-body corrections under several fragmentation options. The important findings were that QM/MM optimization was preferable to obtain reliable hydrated structures of the ligands, that the 3-body correction was important for quantitative evaluation of the solvation energy, and that the dehydration effect was most remarkable near the hydrophobic sections of the ligands. In addition, the hydration energy calculated by the explicit solvent was compared with the hydration free energy calculated by the implicit solvent via the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and the two showed a fairly good correlation. These findings will serve as useful information for rapid drug design.

  9. Plasticity of 150-Loop in Influenza Neuraminidase Explored by Hamiltonian Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Han, Nanyu; Mu, Yuguang

    2013-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) of influenza is a key target for antiviral inhibitors, and the 150-cavity in group-1 NA provides new insight in treating this disease. However, NA of 2009 pandemic influenza (09N1) was found lacking this cavity in a crystal structure. To address the issue of flexibility of the 150-loop, Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations were performed on different groups of NAs. Free energy landscape calculated based on the volume of 150-cavity indicates that 09N1 prefers open forms of 150-loop. The turn A (residues 147–150) of the 150-loop is discovered as the most dynamical motif which induces the inter-conversion of this loop among different conformations. In the turn A, the backbone dynamic of residue 149 is highly related with the shape of 150-loop, thus can function as a marker for the conformation of 150-loop. As a contrast, the closed conformation of 150-loop is more energetically favorable in N2, one of group-2 NAs. The D147-H150 salt bridge is found having no correlation with the conformation of 150-loop. Instead the intimate salt bridge interaction between the 150 and 430 loops in N2 variant contributes the stabilizing factor for the closed form of 150-loop. The clustering analysis elaborates the structural plasticity of the loop. This enhanced sampling simulation provides more information in further structural-based drug discovery on influenza virus. PMID:23593372

  10. Structural and functional studies of Streptococcus pneumoniae neuraminidase B: An intramolecular trans-sialidase.

    PubMed

    Gut, Heinz; King, Samantha J; Walsh, Martin A

    2008-10-15

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae expresses neuraminidase proteins that cleave sialic acids from complex carbohydrates. The pneumococcus genome encodes up to three neuraminidase proteins that have been shown to be important virulence factors. Here, we report the first structure of a neuraminidase from S. pneumoniae: the crystal structure of NanB in complex with its reaction product 2,7-anhydro-Neu5Ac. Our structural data, together with biochemical analysis, establish NanB as an intramolecular trans-sialidase with strict specificity towards alpha2-3 linked sialic acid substrates. In addition, we show that NanB differs in its substrate specificity from the other pneumococcal neuraminidase NanA.

  11. [The effects of complex platinum compounds on the neuraminidase activity of the Sendai virus].

    PubMed

    Repanovici, R; Călinoiu, A; Iliescu, R; Löber, G; Popa, L M

    1989-01-01

    The effect of di- and tetravalent cis-diaminoplatinum chlorides on Sendai virus envelop HN glycoprotein was investigated. The partial inhibition of neuraminidase activity was greater in the case of the divalent platinum complex derivative.

  12. Survey of neuraminidase production by Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Clostridium difficile strains from clinical and nonclinical sources.

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M R; Dodin, A

    1985-01-01

    Neuraminidase production was investigated in 57 Clostridium butyricum strains, 16 Clostridium beijerinckii strains, and 25 Clostridium difficile strains. Neuraminidase activity was found only in C. butyricum strains originating from one human newborn with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, two newborns with hemorrhagic colitis, one infected placenta, and one adult with peritonitis, It was concluded that neuraminidase was not a major virulence factor in C. butyricum strains. PMID:4056013

  13. Substrate specificity of the neuraminidase of different mumps virus strains.

    PubMed

    Klamm, H; Pollex, G

    1984-11-01

    The hydrolysis of neuraminlactose, fetuin, ovomucoid, kappa-caseinglycopeptide and mucine from the bovine submaxillary gland with the neuraminidase (NA) of mumps virus strains Jeryl Lynn, Enders and Berlin 9/76 was investigated to determine the pH-dependence of the reaction with the different substrates. The corresponding curves showed splitting into several peaks with reaction maxima ranging from pH 4.7 to pH 6.7. This occurred probably due to the heterogeneity of the virus samples. The NA of each virus strain had the best reaction affinity to neuraminlactose followed by decreasing affinities to ovomucoid, fetuin and kappa-caseinglycopeptide. The mucine from bovine submaxillary gland was not digested at all. The highest hydrolysis of each substrate was found with the Jeryl Lynn strain, which also possessed the lowest substrate specificity. It was followed by that of strain Enders and finally by isolate Berlin 9/76 which, in turn, had the highest substrate specificity. The lower substrate specificity of mumps virus NA seemed to correlate with a lower degree of its cytopathogenicity for hamster ependyma cells.

  14. Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA): a target for antivirals and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jagadesh, Anitha; Salam, Abdul Ajees Abdul; Mudgal, Piya Paul; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2016-08-01

    Influenza, the most common infectious disease, poses a great threat to human health because of its highly contagious nature and fast transmissibility, often leading to high morbidity and mortality. Effective vaccination strategies may aid in the prevention and control of recurring epidemics and pandemics associated with this infectious disease. However, antigenic shifts and drifts are major concerns with influenza virus, requiring effective global monitoring and updating of vaccines. Current vaccines are standardized primarily based on the amount of hemagglutinin, a major surface antigen, which chiefly constitutes these preparations along with the varying amounts of neuraminidase (NA). Anti-influenza drugs targeting the active site of NA have been in use for more than a decade now. However, NA has not been approved as an effective antigenic component of the influenza vaccine because of standardization issues. Although some studies have suggested that NA antibodies are able to reduce the severity of the disease and induce a long-term and cross-protective immunity, a few major scientific issues need to be addressed prior to launching NA-based vaccines. Interestingly, an increasing number of studies have shown NA to be a promising target for future influenza vaccines. This review is an attempt to consolidate studies that reflect the strength of NA as a suitable vaccine target. The studies discussed in this article highlight NA as a potential influenza vaccine candidate and support taking the process of developing NA vaccines to the next stage.

  15. Mutation effects of neuraminidases and their docking with ligands: a molecular dynamics and free energy calculation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiwei; Yang, Gang; Zhou, Lijun

    2013-11-01

    A systematic study has been performed on neuraminidase (NA) mutations and NA-inhibitor docked complexes, with the aim to understand protein-ligand interactions and design broad-spectrum antiviral drugs with minimal resistances. The catalytic D151 residue is likely to mutate while others are relatively conserved. The NA active-site conformations are altered by mutations, but more alterations do not necessarily result in larger deviations to the binding properties. The effects of all related mutations have been discussed; e.g., for the arginine triad (R118, R292 and R371), it is found that residue R118 plays the most significant role during ligand binding. Generally, the calculated binding free energies agree well with the experimental observations. Susceptibility of influenza virus to NA inhibitors can be reinforced by some mutations; e.g., the binding free energies of ligands with N2 subtype increase from -18.0 to -42.1 kcal mol-1 by the E119D mutation. Mutations of the various NA subtypes often cause similar conformational and binding changes, explaining the occurrence of cross resistances; nonetheless, differences can be detected in some cases that correspond to subtype-specific resistances. For all NA subtypes, the electrostatic contributions are the major driving force for ligand binding and largely responsible for the binding differences between the wild-type and mutated NA proteins.

  16. Characterization of two distinct neuraminidases from avian-origin human-infecting H7N9 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Bi, Yuhai; Vavricka, Christopher J; Sun, Xiaoman; Zhang, Yanfang; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Min; Xiao, Haixia; Qin, Chengfeng; He, Jianhua; Liu, Wenjun; Yan, Jinghua; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F

    2013-12-01

    An epidemic of an avian-origin H7N9 influenza virus has recently emerged in China, infecting 134 patients of which 45 have died. This is the first time that an influenza virus harboring an N9 serotype neuraminidase (NA) has been known to infect humans. H7N9 viruses are divergent and at least two distinct NAs and hemagglutinins (HAs) have been found, respectively, from clinical isolates. The prototypes of these viruses are A/Anhui/1/2013 and A/Shanghai/1/2013. NAs from these two viruses are distinct as the A/Shanghai/1/2013 NA has an R294K substitution that can confer NA inhibitor oseltamivir resistance. Oseltamivir is by far the most commonly used anti-influenza drug due to its potency and high bioavailability. In this study, we show that an R294K substitution results in multidrug resistance with extreme oseltamivir resistance (over 100 000-fold) using protein- and virus-based assays. To determine the molecular basis for the inhibitor resistance, we solved high-resolution crystal structures of NAs from A/Anhui/1/2013 N9 (R294-containing) and A/Shanghai/1/2013 N9 (K294-containing). R294K substitution results in an unfavorable E276 conformation for oseltamivir binding, and consequently loss of inhibitor carboxylate interactions, which compromises the binding of all classical NA ligands/inhibitors. Moreover, we found that R294K substitution results in reduced NA catalytic efficiency along with lower viral fitness. This helps to explain why K294 has predominantly been found in clinical cases of H7N9 infection under the selective pressure of oseltamivir treatment and not in the dominant human-infecting viruses. This implies that oseltamivir can still be efficiently used in the treatment of H7N9 infections.

  17. The discovery of (2R,4R)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N- (2-fluoro-4-(2-oxopyridin-1(2H)-yl)phenyl)-4-methoxypyrrolidine-1,2-dicarboxamide (PD 0348292), an orally efficacious factor Xa inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Bigge, Christopher F; Bryant, John W; Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Chi, Liguo; Cody, Wayne L; Dahring, Tawny; Dudley, Danette A; Filipski, Kevin J; Haarer, Staci; Heemstra, Ron; Janiczek, Nancy; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; McClanahan, Thomas; Peterson, J Thomas; Sahasrabudhe, Vaisheli; Schaum, Robert; Van Huis, Chad A; Welch, Kathleen M; Zhang, Erli; Leadley, Robert J; Edmunds, Jeremy J

    2007-08-01

    Herein, we report the discovery of novel, proline-based factor Xa inhibitors containing a neutral P1 chlorophenyl pharmacophore. Through the additional incorporation of 1-(4-amino-3-fluoro-phenyl)-1H-pyridin-2-one 22, as a P4 pharmacophore, we discovered compound 7 (PD 0348292). This compound is a selective, orally bioavailable, efficacious FXa inhibitor that is currently in phase II clinical trials for the treatment and prevention of thrombotic disorders.

  18. Surveillance of antiviral resistance markers in Argentina: detection of E119V neuraminidase mutation in a post-treatment immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Pontoriero, Andrea; Avaro, Martín; Benedetti, Estefania; Russo, Mara; Czech, Andrea; Periolo, Natalia; Campos, Ana; Zamora, Ana; Baumeister, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Although vaccines are the best means of protection against influenza, neuraminidase inhibitors are currently the main antiviral treatment available to control severe influenza cases. One of the most frequent substitutions in the neuraminidase (NA) protein of influenza A(H3N2) viruses during or soon after oseltamivir administration is E119V mutation. We describe the emergence of a mixed viral population with the E119E/V mutation in the NA protein sequence in a post-treatment influenza sample collected from an immunocompromised patient in Argentina. This substitution was identified by a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol and was confirmed by direct Sanger sequencing of the original sample. In 2014, out of 1140 influenza samples received at the National Influenza Centre, 888 samples (78%) were A(H3N2) strains, 244 (21.3%) were type B strains, and 8 (0.7%) were A(H1N1)pdm09 strains. Out of 888 A(H3N2) samples, 842 were tested for the E119V substitution by quantitative RT-PCR: 841 A(H3N2) samples had the wild-type E119 genotype and in one sample, a mixture of viral E119/ V119 subpopulations was detected. Influenza virus surveillance and antiviral resistance studies can lead to better decisions in health policies and help in medical treatment planning, especially for severe cases and immunocompromised patients. PMID:27849220

  19. Regulation of phagocytosis in macrophages by neuraminidase 1.

    PubMed

    Seyrantepe, Volkan; Iannello, Alexandre; Liang, Feng; Kanshin, Evgeny; Jayanth, Preethi; Samarani, Suzanne; Szewczuk, Myron R; Ahmad, Ali; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2010-01-01

    The differentiation of monocytes into macrophages and dendritic cells is accompanied by induction of cell-surface neuraminidase 1 (Neu1) and cathepsin A (CathA), the latter forming a complex with and activating Neu1. To clarify the biological importance of this phenomenon we have developed the gene-targeted mouse models of a CathA deficiency (CathA(S190A)) and a double CathA/Neu1 deficiency (CathA(S190A-Neo)). Macrophages of CathA(S190A-Neo) mice and their immature dendritic cells showed a significantly reduced capacity to engulf Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and positively and negatively charged polymer beads as well as IgG-opsonized beads and erythrocytes. Properties of the cells derived from CathA(S190A) mice were indistinguishable from those of wild-type controls, suggesting that the absence of Neu1, which results in the increased sialylation of the cell surface proteins, probably affects multiple receptors for phagocytosis. Indeed, treatment of the cells with purified mouse Neu1 reduced surface sialylation and restored phagocytosis. Because Neu1-deficient cells showed reduced internalization of IgG-opsonized sheep erythrocytes whereas binding of the erythrocytes to the cells at 4 degrees C persisted, we speculate that the absence of Neu1 in particular affected transduction of signals from the Fc receptors for immunoglobulin G (FcgammaR). Indeed the macrophages from the Neu1-deficient mice showed increased sialylation and impaired phosphorylation of FcgammaR as well as markedly reduced phosphorylation of Syk kinase in response to treatment with IgG-opsonized beads. Altogether our data suggest that the cell surface Neu1 activates the phagocytosis in macrophages and dendritic cells through desialylation of surface receptors, thus, contributing to their functional integrity.

  20. Neuraminidase Activity and Resistance of 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus to Antiviral Activity in Bronchoalveolar Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ruangrung, Kanyarat; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Maneechotesuwan, Kittipong; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Chakritbudsabong, Warunya; Assawabhumi, Jirawatna; Bhattarakosol, Parvapan; Uiprasertkul, Mongkol; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human bronchoalveolar fluid is known to have anti-influenza activity. It is believed to be a frontline innate defense against the virus. Several antiviral factors, including surfactant protein D, are believed to contribute to the activity. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus was previously shown to be less sensitive to surfactant protein D. Nevertheless, whether different influenza virus strains have different sensitivities to the overall anti-influenza activity of human bronchoalveolar fluid was not known. We compared the sensitivities of 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal H1N1, and seasonal H3N2 influenza virus strains to inhibition by human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. The pandemic and seasonal H1N1 strains showed lower sensitivity to human BAL fluid than the H3N2 strains. The BAL fluid anti-influenza activity could be enhanced by oseltamivir, indicating that the viral neuraminidase (NA) activity could provide resistance to the antiviral defense. In accordance with this finding, the BAL fluid anti-influenza activity was found to be sensitive to sialidase. The oseltamivir resistance mutation H275Y rendered the pandemic H1N1 virus but not the seasonal H1N1 virus more sensitive to BAL fluid. Since only the seasonal H1N1 but not the pandemic H1N1 had compensatory mutations that allowed oseltamivir-resistant strains to maintain NA enzymatic activity and transmission fitness, the resistance to BAL fluid of the drug-resistant seasonal H1N1 virus might play a role in viral fitness. IMPORTANCE Human airway secretion contains anti-influenza activity. Different influenza strains may vary in their susceptibilities to this antiviral activity. Here we show that the 2009 pandemic and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses were less sensitive to human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid than H3N2 seasonal influenza virus. The resistance to the pulmonary innate antiviral activity of the pandemic virus was determined by its neuraminidase (NA) gene, and it was shown that the

  1. Inhibition of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant influenza virus by DAS181, a novel sialidase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Triana-Baltzer, Gallen B; Gubareva, Larisa V; Klimov, Alexander I; Wurtman, David F; Moss, Ronald B; Hedlund, Maria; Larson, Jeffrey L; Belshe, Robert B; Fang, Fang

    2009-11-06

    Antiviral drug resistance for influenza therapies remains a concern due to the high prevalence of H1N1 2009 seasonal influenza isolates which display H274Y associated oseltamivir-resistance. Furthermore, the emergence of novel H1N1 raises the potential that additional reassortments can occur, resulting in drug resistant virus. Thus, additional antiviral approaches are urgently needed. DAS181 (Fludase), a sialidase fusion protein, has been shown to have inhibitory activity against a large number of seasonal influenza strains and a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) strain (H5N1). Here, we examine the in vitro activity of DAS181 against a panel of 2009 oseltamivir-resistant seasonal H1N1 clinical isolates. The activity of DAS181 against nine 2009, two 2007, and two 2004 clinical isolates of seasonal IFV H1N1 was examined using plaque number reduction assay on MDCK cells. DAS181 strongly inhibited all tested isolates. EC50 values remained constant against isolates from 2004, 2007, and 2009, suggesting that there was no change in DAS181 sensitivity over time. As expected, all 2007 and 2009 isolates were resistant to oseltamivir, consistent with the identification of the H274Y mutation in the NA gene of all these isolates. Interestingly, several of the 2007 and 2009 isolates also exhibited reduced sensitivity to zanamivir, and accompanying HA mutations near the sialic acid binding site were observed. DAS181 inhibits IFV that is resistant to NAIs. Thus, DAS181 may offer an alternative therapeutic option for seasonal or pandemic IFVs that become resistant to currently available antiviral drugs.

  2. The Trypanosoma cruzi neuraminidase contains sequences similar to bacterial neuraminidases, YWTD repeats of the low density lipoprotein receptor, and type III modules of fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi expresses a developmentally regulated neuraminidase (TCNA) implicated in parasite invasion of cells. We isolated full- length DNA clones encoding TCNA. Sequence analysis demonstrated an open reading frame coding for a polypeptide of 1,162 amino acids. In the N- terminus there is a cysteine-rich domain containing a stretch of 332 amino acids nearly 30% identical to the Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase, three repeat motifs highly conserved in bacterial and viral neuraminidases, and two segments with similarity to the YWTD repeats found in the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and in other vertebrate and invertebrate proteins. This domain is connected by a structure characteristic of type III modules of fibronectin to a long terminal repeat (LTR) consisting of 44 full length copies of twelve amino acids rich (75%) in serine, threonine, and proline. LTR is unusual in that it contains at least 117 potential phosphorylation sites. At the extreme C-terminus is a hydrophobic segment of 35 amino acids, which could mediate anchorage of TCNA to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkage. This is the first time a protozoan protein has been found to contain a YWTD repeat and a fibronectin type III module. The domain structure of TCNA suggests that the enzyme may have functions additional to its catalytic activity such as in protein-protein interaction, which could play a role in T. cruzi binding to host cells. PMID:1711561

  3. Biochemical characterisation of the neuraminidase pool of the human gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun; Wang, Mao M; Kulinich, Anna; Yao, Hong L; Ma, Hong Y; Martínez, Juana E R; Duan, Xu C; Chen, Huan; Cai, Zhi P; Flitsch, Sabine L; Liu, Li; Voglmeir, Josef

    2015-10-13

    Since the isolation and identification of Akkermansia muciniphila one decade ago, much attention has been drawn to this gut bacterium due to its role in obesity and type 2 diabetes. This report describes the discovery and biochemical characterisation of all four putative neuraminidases annotated in the A. muciniphila genome. Recombinantly expressed candidate genes, which were designated Am0705, Am0707, Am1757 and Am2085, were shown to cover complementary pH ranges between 4.0 and 9.5. Temperature optima of the enzymes lay between 37 and 42 °C. All four enzymes were strongly inhibited by Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), and loss of activity after the addition of EDTA suggests that all neuraminidases, with the exception of Am0707, require divalent metal ions for their catalytic function. Chemoenzymatically synthesised α2,3- and α2,6-linked indoyl-sialosides were utilised to determine the regioselectivity and substrate promiscuity of the neuraminidases towards C5-modifications of sialic acids with N-acetyl-, N-glycolyl-, N-propionyl-, or hydroxyl-groups. The combination of simple purification procedures and good activities of some of the characterised neuraminidases makes them potentially interesting as tools in bioanalytical or industrial applications.

  4. Structural characterization of a protective epitope spanning A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus neuraminidase monomers

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hongquan; Yang, Hua; Shore, David A.; Garten, Rebecca J.; Couzens, Laura; Gao, Jin; Jiang, Lianlian; Carney, Paul J.; Villanueva, Julie; Stevens, James; Eichelberger, Maryna C.

    2015-01-01

    A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza A viruses predominated in the 2013–2014 USA influenza season, and although most of these viruses remain sensitive to Food and Drug Administration-approved neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, alternative therapies are needed. Here we show that monoclonal antibody CD6, selected for binding to the NA of the prototypic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, A/California/07/2009, protects mice against lethal virus challenge. The crystal structure of NA in complex with CD6 Fab reveals a unique epitope, where the heavy-chain complementarity determining regions (HCDRs) 1 and 2 bind one NA monomer, the light-chain CDR2 binds the neighbouring monomer, whereas HCDR3 interacts with both monomers. This 30-amino-acid epitope spans the lateral face of an NA dimer and is conserved among circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. These results suggest that the large, lateral CD6 epitope may be an effective target of antibodies selected for development as therapeutic agents against circulating H1N1 influenza viruses. PMID:25668439

  5. Fusogenic activity of reconstituted newcastle disease virus envelopes: a role for the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein in the fusion process.

    PubMed

    Cobaleda, C; Muñoz-Barroso, I; Sagrera, A; Villar, E

    2002-04-01

    Enveloped viruses, such as newcastle disease virus (NDV), make their entry into the host cell by membrane fusion. In the case of NDV, the fusion step requires both transmembrane hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) viral envelope glycoproteins. The HN protein should show fusion promotion activity. To date, the nature of HN-F interactions is a controversial issue. In this work, we aim to clarify the role of the HN glycoprotein in the membrane fusion step. Four types of reconstituted detergent-free NDV envelopes were used, on differing in their envelope protein contents. Fusion of the different virosomes and erythrocyte ghosts was monitored using the octadecyl rhodamine B chloride assay. Only the reconstituted envelopes having the F protein, even in the absence of HN protein, displayed residual fusion activity. Treatment of such virosomes with denaturing agents affecting the F protein abolished fusion, indicating that the fusion detected was viral protein-dependent. Interestingly, the rate of fusion in the reconstituted systems was similar to that of intact viruses in the presence of the inhibitor of HN sialidase activity 2,3-dehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid. The results show that the residual fusion activity detected in the reconstituted systems was exclusively due to F protein activity, with no contribution from the fusion promotion activity of HN protein.

  6. Deacetylation of sialic acid by esterases potentiates pneumococcal neuraminidase activity for mucin utilization, colonization and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kahya, Hasan F.; Andrew, Peter W.

    2017-01-01

    Pneumococcal neuraminidase is a key enzyme for sequential deglycosylation of host glycans, and plays an important role in host survival, colonization, and pathogenesis of infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. One of the factors that can affect the activity of neuraminidase is the amount and position of acetylation present in its substrate sialic acid. We hypothesised that pneumococcal esterases potentiate neuraminidase activity by removing acetylation from sialic acid, and that will have a major effect on pneumococcal survival on mucin, colonization, and virulence. These hypotheses were tested using isogenic mutants and recombinant esterases in microbiological, biochemical and in vivo assays. We found that pneumococcal esterase activity is encoded by at least four genes, SPD_0534 (EstA) was found to be responsible for the main esterase activity, and the pneumococcal esterases are specific for short acyl chains. Assay of esterase activity by using natural substrates showed that both the Axe and EstA esterases could use acetylated xylan and Bovine Sub-maxillary Mucin (BSM), a highly acetylated substrate, but only EstA was active against tributyrin (triglyceride). Incubation of BSM with either Axe or EstA led to the acetate release in a time and concentration dependent manner, and pre-treatment of BSM with either enzyme increased sialic acid release on subsequent exposure to neuraminidase A. qRT-PCR results showed that the expression level of estA and axe increased when exposed to BSM and in respiratory tissues. Mutation of estA alone or in combination with nanA (codes for neuraminidase A), or the replacement of its putative serine active site to alanine, reduced the pneumococcal ability to utilise BSM as a sole carbon source, sialic acid release, colonization, and virulence in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:28257499

  7. Effect of poly-L-lysine and neuraminidase on the infectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi in cultured HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Gamarro, F; Castanys, S; Ruiz-Perez, L M; Adroher, F J; Osuna, A

    1985-01-01

    The percentage of parasitisation and index of adherence of Trypanosoma cruzi has been studied when host HeLa cells or metacyclic forms were pretreated with neuraminidase or with poly-L-lysine. The percentage of parasitisation was significatively reduced (P less than or equal to 0.001) when cells were pretreated with poly-L-lysine while pretreatment with neuraminidase caused no apparent effects. On the other hand, the adherence of the metacyclic forms pretreated with poly-L-lysine or neuraminidase was significantly higher than that of the control group.

  8. Molecular distribution of amino acid substitutions on neuraminidase from the 2009 (H1N1) human influenza pandemic virus.

    PubMed

    Quiliano, Miguelmiguel; Valdivia-Olarte, Hugo; Olivares, Carlos; Requena, David; Gutiérrez, Andrés H; Reyes-Loyola, Paola; Tolentino-Lopez, Luis E; Sheen, Patricia; Briz, Verónica; Muñoz-Fernández, Maria A; Correa-Basurto, José; Zimic, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    The pandemic influenza AH1N1 (2009) caused an outbreak of human infection that spread to the world. Neuraminidase (NA) is an antigenic surface glycoprotein, which is essential to the influenza infection process, and is the target of anti-flu drugs oseltamivir and zanamivir. Currently, NA inhibitors are the pillar pharmacological strategy against seasonal and global influenza. Although mutations observed after NA-inhibitor treatment are characterized by changes in conserved amino acids of the enzyme catalytic site, it is possible that specific amino acid substitutions (AASs) distant from the active site such as H274Y, could confer oseltamivir or zanamivir resistance. To better understand the molecular distribution pattern of NA AASs, we analyzed NA AASs from all available reported pandemic AH1N1 NA sequences, including those reported from America, Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania, and specifically from Mexico. The molecular distributions of the AASs were obtained at the secondary structure domain level for both the active and catalytic sites, and compared between geographic regions. Our results showed that NA AASs from America, Asia, Europe, Oceania and Mexico followed similar molecular distribution patterns. The compiled data of this study showed that highly conserved amino acids from the NA active site and catalytic site are indeed being affected by mutations. The reported NA AASs follow a similar molecular distribution pattern worldwide. Although most AASs are distributed distantly from the active site, this study shows the emergence of mutations affecting the previously conserved active and catalytic site. A significant number of unique AASs were reported simultaneously on different continents.

  9. Characterizing Loop Dynamics and Ligand Recognition in Human- and Avian-Type Influenza Neuraminidases via Generalized Born Molecular Dynamics and End-Point Free Energy Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, Rommie E; Cheng, Xiaolin; Ivanov, Ivaylo N; Xu, Dong; McCammon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The comparative dynamics and inhibitor binding free energies of group-1 and group-2 pathogenic influenza A subtype neuraminidase (NA) enzymes are of fundamental biological interest and relevant to structure-based drug design studies for antiviral compounds. In this work, we present seven generalized Born molecular dynamics simulations of avian (N1)- and human (N9)-type NAs in order to probe the comparative flexibility of the two subtypes, both with and without the inhibitor oseltamivir bound. The enhanced sampling obtained through the implicit solvent treatment suggests several provocative insights into the dynamics of the two subtypes, including that the group-2 enzymes may exhibit similar motion in the 430-binding site regions but different 150-loop motion. End-point free energy calculations elucidate the contributions to inhibitor binding free energies and suggest that entropic considerations cannot be neglected when comparing across the subtypes. We anticipate the findings presented here will have broad implications for the development of novel antiviral compounds against both seasonal and pandemic influenza strains.

  10. Synthesis of selective inhibitors against V. cholerae sialidase and human cytosolic sialidase NEU2.

    PubMed

    Khedri, Zahra; Li, Yanhong; Cao, Hongzhi; Qu, Jingyao; Yu, Hai; Muthana, Musleh M; Chen, Xi

    2012-08-14

    Sialidases or neuraminidases catalyze the hydrolysis of terminal sialic acid residues from sialyl oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. Despite successes in developing potent inhibitors specifically against influenza virus neuraminidases, the progress in designing and synthesizing selective inhibitors against bacterial and human sialidases has been slow. Guided by sialidase substrate specificity studies and sialidase crystal structural analysis, a number of 2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (DANA or Neu5Ac2en) analogues with modifications at C9 or at both C5 and C9 were synthesized. Inhibition studies of various bacterial sialidases and human cytosolic sialidase NEU2 revealed that Neu5Gc9N(3)2en and Neu5AcN(3)9N(3)2en are selective inhibitors against V. cholerae sialidase and human NEU2, respectively.

  11. Purification and characterization of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase of Porcine rubulavirus LPMV.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Leyva, J; Espinosa, B; Santos, G; Zenteno, R; Hernández, J; Vallejo, V; Zenteno, E

    1999-09-01

    The Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase (HN) from the LPMV strain of Porcine rubulavirus was purified from virions by ultracentrifugation in a continuous 20-60% sucrose gradient and by ion exchange chromatography. The HN is a glycoprotein of 66 kDa constituted by 50.5, 13.3 and 13.6% of non polar, uncharged polar, and charged polar amino acids, respectively. The HN contains 4% of carbohydrates, its glycannic portion is constituted by Man, Gal, GlcNAc, GalNAc, and Neu5Ac in 3:3:4:1:1 molar ratios. The HN possesses hemagglutinating activity in the presence of erythrocytes from several animal species, including human ABO, and treating the erythrocytes with neuraminidase or pronase abolishes this activity. The binding specificity of the purified HN was determined by hapten inhibition assays, indicating that the hemagglutinating activity of the HN is specific for sialic acid and Neu5Acalpha2,3Gal-containing structures.

  12. Structure of the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase from human parainfluenza virus type III.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael C; Borg, Natalie A; Streltsov, Victor A; Pilling, Patricia A; Epa, V Chandana; Varghese, Joseph N; McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L; Colman, Peter M

    2004-01-30

    The three-dimensional structure of the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) from a human parainfluenza virus is described at ca 2.0 A resolution, both in native form and in complex with three substrate analogues. In support of earlier work on the structure of the homologous protein from the avian pathogen Newcastle disease virus (NDV), we observe a dimer of beta-propellers and find no evidence for spatially separated sites performing the receptor-binding and neuraminidase functions of the protein. As with the NDV HN, the active site of the HN of parainfluenza viruses is structurally flexible, suggesting that it may be able to switch between a receptor-binding state and a catalytic state. However, in contrast to the NDV structures, we observe no ligand-induced structural changes that extend beyond the active site and modify the dimer interface.

  13. Domain architecture and oligomerization properties of the paramyxovirus PIV 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ping; Leser, George P; Demeler, Borries; Lamb, Robert A; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2008-09-01

    The mechanism by which the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein couples receptor binding to activation of virus entry remains to be fully understood, but the HN stalk is thought to play an important role in the process. We have characterized ectodomain constructs of the parainfluenza virus 5 HN to understand better the underlying architecture and oligomerization properties that may influence HN functions. The PIV 5 neuraminidase (NA) domain is monomeric whereas the ectodomain forms a well-defined tetramer. The HN stalk also forms tetramers and higher order oligomers with high alpha-helical content. Together, the data indicate that the globular NA domains form weak intersubunit interactions at the end of the HN stalk tetramer, while stabilizing the stalk and overall oligomeric state of the ectodomain. Electron microscopy of the HN ectodomain reveals flexible arrangements of the NA and stalk domains, which may be important for understanding how these two HN domains impact virus entry.

  14. Interaction of bilirubin with human erythrocyte membranes. Bilirubin binding to neuraminidase- and phospholipase-treated membranes.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Aono, S; Semba, R; Kashiwamata, S

    1987-11-15

    Saturable bilirubin binding to human erythrocyte membranes was measured before and after digestion with neuraminidase and phospholipases. Neuraminidase-treated erythrocyte membranes did not show any change in their binding properties, indicating that gangliosides could be excluded as candidates for saturable bilirubin-binding sites on erythrocyte membranes. Although bilirubin-binding properties of the membranes did not change after phospholipase D digestion, either, phospholipase C treatment greatly enhanced bilirubin binding. Thus it is suggested that a negatively charged phosphoric acid moiety of phospholipids on the membrane surface may play a role to prevent a large amount of bilirubin from binding to the membranes. Further saturable bilirubin binding to inside-out sealed erythrocyte membrane vesicles showed values comparable with those of the right-side-out sealed membranes, suggesting that the bilirubin-binding sites may be distributed on both outer and inner surfaces of the membranes, or may exist in the membranes where bilirubin may be accessible from either side.

  15. The quenching effect of flavonoids on 4-methylumbelliferone, a potential pitfall in fluorimetric neuraminidase inhibition assays.

    PubMed

    Kongkamnerd, Jarinrat; Milani, Adelaide; Cattoli, Giovanni; Terregino, Calogero; Capua, Ilaria; Beneduce, Luca; Gallotta, Andrea; Pengo, Paolo; Fassina, Giorgio; Monthakantirat, Orawan; Umehara, Kaoru; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai; Miertus, Stanislav

    2011-08-01

    Many assays aimed to test the inhibitory effects of synthetic molecules, and naturally occurring products on the neuraminidase activity exploit the hydrolysis of 2'-O-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-N-acetylneuraminic acid (4-MUNANA). The amount of the released product, 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), is then measured fluorimetrically. The authors attempted an analysis of the inhibitory properties of 35 naturally occurring flavonoids on neuraminidase N3, where only 29 of them were sufficiently soluble in the assay medium. During the analysis, the authors noticed a strong quenching effect due to the test compounds on the fluorescence of 4-MU. The quenching constants for the flavonoids were determined according to the Stern-Volmer approach. The extent of fluorescence reduction due to quenching and the magnitude of the fluorescence reduction measured in the inhibition assays were comparable: for 11 of 29 compounds, the two values were found to be coincident within the experimental uncertainty. These data were statistically analyzed for correlation by calculating the pertinent Pearson correlation coefficient. Inhibition and quenching were found to be positively correlated (r = 0.71, p(uncorr) = 1.5 × 10(-5)), and the correlation was maintained for the whole set of tested compounds. Altogether, the collected data imply that all of the tested flavonoids could produce false-positive results in the neuraminidase inhibition assay using 4-MUNANA as a substrate.

  16. A surface plasmon resonance assay for measurement of neuraminidase inhibition, sensitivity of wild-type influenza neuraminidase and its H274Y mutant to the antiviral drugs zanamivir and oseltamivir.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Balaji; Fee, Conan J; Fredericks, Rayleen; Watson, Andrew J A; Fairbanks, Antony J; Hall, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Antiviral resistance is currently monitored by a labelled enzymatic assay, which can give inconsistent results because of the short half-life of the labelled product, and variations in assay conditions. In this paper, we describe a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) inhibition assay for measuring the sensitivities of wild-type neuraminidase (WT NA) and the H274Y (histidine 274 tyrosine) NA mutant to antiviral drugs. The two NA isoforms were expressed in High-five™ (Trichoplusia ni) insect cells. A spacer molecule (1,6-hexanediamine (HDA)) was conjugated to the 7-hydroxyl group of zanamivir, and the construct (HDA-zanamivir) was immobilized onto a SPR sensor chip to obtain a final immobilization response of 431 response units. The immobilized HDA-zanamivir comprised a bio-specific ligand for the WT and mutant proteins. The effects of the natural substrate (sialic acid) and two inhibitors (zanamivir and oseltamivir) on NA binding to the immobilized ligand were studied. The processed SPR data was analysed to determine 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50-spr ), using a log dose-response curve fit. Although both NA isoforms had almost identical IC50-spr values for sialic acid (WT = 5.5 nM; H274Y mutant = 3.25 nM) and zanamivir (WT = 2.16 nM; H274Y mutant = 2.42 nM), there were significant differences between the IC50-spr values obtained for the WT (7.7 nM) and H274Y mutant (256 nM) NA in the presence of oseltamivir, indicating that oseltamivir has a reduced affinity for the H274Y mutant. The SPR inhibition assay strategy presented in this work could be applied for the rapid screening of newly emerging variants of NA for their sensitivity to antiviral drugs.

  17. Single-Domain Antibodies Targeting Neuraminidase Protect against an H5N1 Influenza Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Francisco Miguel; Ibañez, Lorena Itatí; Van den Hoecke, Silvie; De Baets, Sarah; Smet, Anouk; Roose, Kenny; Schepens, Bert; Descamps, Francis J.; Fiers, Walter; Muyldermans, Serge

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is an interesting target of small-molecule antiviral drugs. We isolated a set of H5N1 NA-specific single-domain antibodies (N1-VHHm) and evaluated their in vitro and in vivo antiviral potential. Two of them inhibited the NA activity and in vitro replication of clade 1 and 2 H5N1 viruses. We then generated bivalent derivatives of N1-VHHm by two methods. First, we made N1-VHHb by genetically joining two N1-VHHm moieties with a flexible linker. Second, bivalent N1-VHH-Fc proteins were obtained by genetic fusion of the N1-VHHm moiety with the crystallizable region of mouse IgG2a (Fc). The in vitro antiviral potency against H5N1 of both bivalent N1-VHHb formats was 30- to 240-fold higher than that of their monovalent counterparts, with 50% inhibitory concentrations in the low nanomolar range. Moreover, single-dose prophylactic treatment with bivalent N1-VHHb or N1-VHH-Fc protected BALB/c mice against a lethal challenge with H5N1 virus, including an oseltamivir-resistant H5N1 variant. Surprisingly, an N1-VHH-Fc fusion without in vitro NA-inhibitory or antiviral activity also protected mice against an H5N1 challenge. Virus escape selection experiments indicated that one amino acid residue close to the catalytic site is required for N1-VHHm binding. We conclude that single-domain antibodies directed against influenza virus NA protect against H5N1 virus infection, and when engineered with a conventional Fc domain, they can do so in the absence of detectable NA-inhibitory activity. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses are a zoonotic threat. Outbreaks of avian influenza caused by these viruses occur in many parts of the world and are associated with tremendous economic loss, and these viruses can cause very severe disease in humans. In such cases, small-molecule inhibitors of the viral NA are among the few treatment options for patients. However, treatment with such drugs often results in the emergence of resistant viruses

  18. A heterologous neuraminidase subtype strategy for the differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) for avian influenza virus using an alternative neuraminidase inhibition test.

    PubMed

    Avellaneda, Gloria; Sylte, Matt J; Lee, Chang-Won; Suarez, David L

    2010-03-01

    The option of vaccinating poultry against avian influenza (AI) as a control tool is gaining greater acceptance by governments and the poultry industry worldwide. One disadvantage about vaccination with killed whole-virus vaccines is the resulting inability to use common serologic diagnostic tests for surveillance to identify infected flocks. There has been considerable effort to develop a reliable test for the differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). The heterologous neuraminidase (NA) subtype DIVA approach has been used with some success in the field accompanied by an ad hoc serologic test. The traditional NA inhibition (NI) test can be used for all nine NA subtypes, but it is time consuming, and it is not designed to screen large numbers of samples. In this study, a quantitative NI test using MUN (2'-[4-methylumbelliferyl]-alpha-D-Nacetylneuraminic acid sodium salt hydrate) as an NA substrate was investigated as an alternative to the traditional fetuin-based NI test in a heterologous neuraminidase DIVA strategy. Serum NI activity was determined in chickens administered different vaccines containing different H5 and NA subtypes and challenged with a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N2 virus. Prior to challenge, the NI DIVA test clearly discriminated between chickens receiving vaccines containing different antigens (e.g., N8 or N9) from control birds that had no NA antibody. Some birds began to seroconvert 1 wk postchallenge, and 100% of the vaccinated birds had significant levels of N2 NI activity. This activity did not interfere with the presence of vaccine-induced NI activity against N8 or N9 subtypes. The level of N2-specific NI activity continued to increase to the last sampling date, 4 wk postchallenge, indicating the potential use for the heterologous NA-based DIVA strategy in the field.

  19. Analysis of Anti-Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Antibodies in Children, Adults, and the Elderly by ELISA and Enzyme Inhibition: Evidence for Original Antigenic Sin

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Madhusudan; Ermler, Megan E.; Bunduc, Paul; Amanat, Fatima; Izikson, Ruvim; Cox, Manon; Palese, Peter; Eichelberger, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibody responses to influenza virus hemagglutinin provide protection against infection and are well studied. Less is known about the human antibody responses to the second surface glycoprotein, neuraminidase. Here, we assessed human antibody reactivity to a panel of N1, N2, and influenza B virus neuraminidases in different age groups, including children, adults, and the elderly. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), we determined the breadth, magnitude, and isotype distribution of neuraminidase antibody responses to historic, current, and avian strains, as well as to recent isolates to which these individuals have not been exposed. It appears that antibody levels against N1 neuraminidases were lower than those against N2 or B neuraminidases. The anti-neuraminidase antibody levels increased with age and were, in general, highest against strains that circulated during the childhood of the tested individuals, providing evidence for “original antigenic sin.” Titers measured by ELISA correlated well with titers measured by the neuraminidase inhibition assays. However, in the case of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, we found evidence of interference from antibodies binding to the conserved stalk domain of the hemagglutinin. In conclusion, we found that antibodies against the neuraminidase differ in magnitude and breadth between subtypes and age groups in the human population. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00336453, NCT00539981, and NCT00395174.) PMID:28325769

  20. Immunobiological properties of influenza A (H7N9) hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Changsom, Don; Lerdsamran, Hatairat; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Masamae, Wanibtisam; Noisumdaeng, Pirom; Jongkaewwattana, Anan; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2016-10-01

    Recombinant vaccinia viruses harboring the complete hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA) genes from the influenza A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) virus were constructed (rVac-H7 HA and rVac-N9 NA viruses). The HA and NA proteins were expressed in the cytoplasm and on the plasma membrane of thymidine-kinase-negative (TK(-)) cells infected with these recombinant viruses. Only one form of the HA protein was expressed in infected TK(-) cells, with a molecular weight (MW) of 75 kDa, but three forms were found when the culture medium was supplemented with trypsin (MWs of 75, 50 and 27 kDa), which was similar to what was found in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells infected with reverse genetic (rg) influenza viruses carrying HA genes of H7N9 virus origin. One form of hyperglycosylated NA protein with a MW of 75 kDa was produced in rVac-N9-NA-virus-infected TK(-) or MDCK cells. The MW decreased to 55 kDa after deglycosylation. The hyperglycosylated recombinant NA protein demonstrated sialidase activity in a fetuin-based neuraminidase assay. The rVac-H7 HA and rVac-N9 NA viruses elicited significantly higher anti-HA and anti-NA antibody titers in BALB/c mice that were immunized once than in ICR mice. The anti-HA and anti-NA antibodies showed activity against homosubtypic HA or NA, but not against heterosubtypic HA or NA, as determined by hemagglutination-inhibition and microneutralization assays for anti-HA antibodies and neuraminidase-inhibition and replication-inhibition assays for anti-NA antibodies. Taken together, our data demonstrated immunobiological properties of recombinant HA and NA proteins that might be useful for vaccine development.

  1. Sensitivity of molecular docking to induced fit effects in influenza virus neuraminidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Louise; Murray, Christopher W.; Hartshorn, Michael J.; Tickle, Ian J.; Verdonk, Marcel L.

    2002-12-01

    Many proteins undergo small side chain or even backbone movements on binding of different ligands into the same protein structure. This is known as induced fit and is potentially problematic for virtual screening of databases against protein targets. In this report we investigate the limits of the rigid protein approximation used by the docking program, GOLD, through cross-docking using protein structures of influenza neuraminidase. Neuraminidase is known to exhibit small but significant induced fit effects on ligand binding. Some neuraminidase crystal structures caused concern due to the bound ligand conformation and GOLD performed poorly on these complexes. A `clean' set, which contained unique, unambiguous complexes, was defined. For this set, the lowest energy structure was correctly docked (i.e. RMSD < 1.5 Å away from the crystal reference structure) in 84% of proteins, and the most promiscuous protein (1mwe) was able to dock all 15 ligands accurately including those that normally required an induced fit movement. This is considerably better than the 70% success rate seen with GOLD against general validation sets. Inclusion of specific water molecules involved in water-mediated hydrogen bonds did not significantly improve the docking performance for ligands that formed water-mediated contacts but it did prevent docking of ligands that displaced these waters. Our data supports the use of a single protein structure for virtual screening with GOLD in some applications involving induced fit effects, although care must be taken to identify the protein structure that performs best against a wide variety of ligands. The performance of GOLD was significantly better than the GOLD implementation of ChemScore and the reasons for this are discussed. Overall, GOLD has shown itself to be an extremely good, robust docking program for this system.

  2. Truncation and Sequence Shuffling of Segment 6 Generate Replication-Competent Neuraminidase-Negative Influenza H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, Donata; Röhrs, Susanne; Höper, Dirk; Hoffmann, Bernd; Bogs, Jessica; Stech, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses are highly genetically variable and escape from immunogenic pressure by antigenic changes in their surface proteins, referred to as “antigenic drift” and “antigenic shift.” To assess the potential genetic plasticity under strong selection pressure, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 was passaged 50 times in embryonated chicken eggs in the presence of a neutralizing, polyclonal chicken serum. The resulting mutant acquired major alterations in the neuraminidase (NA)-encoding segment. Extensive deletions and rearrangements were detected, in contrast to only 12 amino acid substitutions within all other segments. Interestingly, this new neuraminidase segment resulted from complex sequence shuffling and insertion of a short fragment originating from the PA segment. Characterization of that novel variant revealed a loss of the neuraminidase protein and enzymatic activity, but its replication efficiency remained comparable to that of the wild type. Using reverse genetics, a recombinant virus consisting of the wild-type backbone and the shortened NA segment could be generated; however, generation of this recombinant virus required the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site. Two independent repetitions starting with egg passage 30 in the presence of alternative chicken-derived immune sera selected mutants with similar but different large deletions within the NA segment without any neuraminidase activity, indicating a general mechanism. In chicken, these virus variants were avirulent, even though the HPAIV polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site was still present. Overall, the variants reported here are the first HPAIV H5N1 strains without a functional neuraminidase shown to grow efficiently without any helper factor. These novel HPAIV variants may facilitate future studies shedding light on the role of neuraminidase in virus replication and pathogenicity. PMID:24109212

  3. Changes in the Length of the Neuraminidase Stalk Region Impact H7N9 Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Haixia; Chen, Quanjiao; Wu, Yan; Fu, Lifeng; Quan, Chuansong; Wong, Gary; Liu, Jun; Haywood, Joel; Liu, Yingxia; Zhou, Boping; Yan, Jinghua; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    The neuraminidase stalk of the newly emerged H7N9 influenza virus possesses a 5-amino-acid deletion. This study focuses on characterizing the biological functions of H7N9 with varied neuraminidase stalk lengths. Results indicate that the 5-amino-acid deletion had no impact on virus infectivity or replication in vitro or in vivo compared to that of a virus with a full-length stalk, but enhanced virulence in mice was observed for H7N9 encoding a 19- to 20-amino-acid deletion, suggesting that N9 stalk length impacts virulence in mammals, as N1 stalk length does. PMID:26656694

  4. Sequence diversity of NanA manifests in distinct enzyme kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongli; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Julian E.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing bacterial pneumonia and meningitis. Its surface-associated virulence factor neuraminidase A (NanA) promotes the bacterial colonization by removing the terminal sialyl residues from glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface. The predominant role of NanA in the pathogenesis of pneumococci renders it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Despite the highly conserved activity of NanA, our alignment of the 11 NanAs revealed the evolutionary diversity of this enzyme. The amino acid substitutions we identified, particularly those in the lectin domain and in the insertion domain next to the catalytic centre triggered our special interest. We synthesised the representative NanAs and the mutagenized derivatives from E. coli for enzyme kinetics study and neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility test. Via molecular docking we got a deeper insight into the differences between the two major variants of NanA and their influence on the ligand-target interactions. In addition, our molecular dynamics simulations revealed a prominent intrinsic flexibility of the linker between the active site and the insertion domain, which influences the inhibitor binding. Our findings for the first time associated the primary sequence diversity of NanA with the biochemical properties of the enzyme and with the inhibitory efficiency of neuraminidase inhibitors.

  5. Sequence diversity of NanA manifests in distinct enzyme kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongli; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Julian E.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing bacterial pneumonia and meningitis. Its surface-associated virulence factor neuraminidase A (NanA) promotes the bacterial colonization by removing the terminal sialyl residues from glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface. The predominant role of NanA in the pathogenesis of pneumococci renders it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Despite the highly conserved activity of NanA, our alignment of the 11 NanAs revealed the evolutionary diversity of this enzyme. The amino acid substitutions we identified, particularly those in the lectin domain and in the insertion domain next to the catalytic centre triggered our special interest. We synthesised the representative NanAs and the mutagenized derivatives from E. coli for enzyme kinetics study and neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility test. Via molecular docking we got a deeper insight into the differences between the two major variants of NanA and their influence on the ligand-target interactions. In addition, our molecular dynamics simulations revealed a prominent intrinsic flexibility of the linker between the active site and the insertion domain, which influences the inhibitor binding. Our findings for the first time associated the primary sequence diversity of NanA with the biochemical properties of the enzyme and with the inhibitory efficiency of neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:27125351

  6. Secondary structure prediction of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase from a porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Zenteno-Cuevas, R; Hernández, J; Espinosa, B; Reyes, J; Zenteno, E

    1998-01-01

    The Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase (HN) from 'La Piedad, Michoacan' porcine rubulavirus (LPMV) interacts specifically with NeuAc alpha 2,3 lactose residues on the target cell. In this work we report the secondary structure of this protein, determined with five different theoretical algorithms. Results indicate that the HN protein is organized in: an intracellular region (from amino acid 1 to 25); in a beta-strand transmembrane region (residue 26 to 47), typically hydrophobic, rigid and solvent inaccessible; and extracellular region (48 to 576), which possesses hemagglutinating and neuraminidase activity. The secondary structure in this region is organized in a beta-loop-beta alternated with few alpha-helices. Regions with structural and functional implications were determined by pattern search and multiple alignment of the HN from LPM with 12 rubulaviruses and paramyxoviruses HN sequences. The low diversity observed among the HN sequences evaluated indicates that in general the structural organization of the protein, and in particular its sugar binding domain, is closely related among both genera, thus suggesting that the sugar binding domain is well preserved through evolution.

  7. Structure-function analysis of two variants of mumps virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein.

    PubMed

    Santos-López, Gerardo; Scior, Thomas; Borraz-Argüello, María del Tránsito; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Tapia-Ramírez, José; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2009-02-01

    A point mutation from guanine (G) to adenine (A) at nucleotide position 1081 in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene has been associated with neurovirulence of Urabe AM9 mumps virus vaccine. This mutation corresponds to a glutamic acid (E) to lysine (K) change at position 335 in the HN glycoprotein. We have experimentally demonstrated that two variants of Urabe AM9 strain (HN-A1081 and HN-G1081) differ in neurotropism, sialic acidbinding affinity and neuraminidase activity. In the present study, we performed a structure-function analysis of that amino acid substitution; the structures of HN protein of both Urabe AM9 strain variants were predicted. Based on our analysis, the E/K mutation changes the protein surface properties and to a lesser extent their conformations, which in turn reflects in activity changes. Our modeling results suggest that this E/K interchange does not affect the structure of the sialic acid binding motif; however, the electrostatic surface differs drastically due to an exposed short alpha helix. Consequently, this mutation may affect the accessibility of HN to substrates and membrane receptors of the host cells. Our findings appear to explain the observed differences in neurotropism of these vaccine strains.

  8. Kinetics of Neuraminidase Action on Glycoproteins by 1D and 2D NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barb, Adam W.; Glushka, John N.; Prestegard, James H.

    2011-01-01

    The surfaces of mammalian cells are coated with complex carbohydrates, many terminated with a negatively charged N-acetylneuraminic acid residue. This motif is specifically targeted by pathogens, including influenza viruses and many pathogenic bacteria, to gain entry into the cell. A necessary step in the influenza virus life cycle is the release of viral particles from the cell surface; this is achieved by cleaving N-acetylneuraminic acid from cell surface glycans with a virally-produced neuraminidase. Here we present a laboratory exercise to model this process using a glycoprotein as a glycan carrier and using real time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to monitor N-acetylneuraminic acid release as catalyzed by neuraminidase. A time-resolved two dimensional data processing technique, statistical total correlation spectroscopy (STOCSY), enhances the resolution of the complicated 1D glycoprotein spectrum and isolates characteristic peaks corresponding to substrates and products. This exercise is relatively straightforward and leads students through a wide range of biologically and chemically relevant procedures, including use of NMR spectroscopy, enzymology and data processing techniques. PMID:22058570

  9. Kinetics of Neuraminidase Action on Glycoproteins by 1D and 2D NMR.

    PubMed

    Barb, Adam W; Glushka, John N; Prestegard, James H

    2011-01-01

    The surfaces of mammalian cells are coated with complex carbohydrates, many terminated with a negatively charged N-acetylneuraminic acid residue. This motif is specifically targeted by pathogens, including influenza viruses and many pathogenic bacteria, to gain entry into the cell. A necessary step in the influenza virus life cycle is the release of viral particles from the cell surface; this is achieved by cleaving N-acetylneuraminic acid from cell surface glycans with a virally-produced neuraminidase. Here we present a laboratory exercise to model this process using a glycoprotein as a glycan carrier and using real time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to monitor N-acetylneuraminic acid release as catalyzed by neuraminidase. A time-resolved two dimensional data processing technique, statistical total correlation spectroscopy (STOCSY), enhances the resolution of the complicated 1D glycoprotein spectrum and isolates characteristic peaks corresponding to substrates and products. This exercise is relatively straightforward and leads students through a wide range of biologically and chemically relevant procedures, including use of NMR spectroscopy, enzymology and data processing techniques.

  10. Detection and comparison of neuraminidase activities in human and bovine group B streptococci.

    PubMed

    Ekin, Ismail Hakki; Gurturk, Kemal; Ilhan, Ziya; Ekin, Suat; Borum, Ayse Ebru; Arabaci, Cigdem; Yesilova, Abdullah

    2016-12-01

    Human and bovine group B streptococcus (GBS) isolates were serotyped and amounts of released N-acetylneuraminic acid from N-acetylneuraminyl-lactose by extracellular neuraminidase were colorimetrically assessed. According to serotyping by co-agglutination method, 30 of bovine GBS and 43 of human GBS could be serotyped (ST) by monospecific antisera coated with protein A. The remaining GBS strains were designated as nontypeable (NT). The released N-acetylneuraminic acid was determined in 90.9% of bovine GBS and 47.1% of human GBS isolates. The differences between the total bovine and human GBS isolates were statistically significant (p < 0.001). In comparison with detected N-acetylneuraminic acid level in bovine and human groups, significant decrease was observed in the bovine NT group according to increased human NT (p < 0.01) and bovine ST groups (p < 0.01). However, N-acetylneuraminic acid level in bovine ST and bovine total groups significantly (p < 0.001) increased with respect to the human ST group and human total group. Neuraminidase activity was detected more frequently in bovine GBS isolates. Considerable differentiations were observed between typeable and nontypeable isolates.

  11. A B-lymphoma cell line that forms rosettes with neuraminidase-treated sheep erythrocytes through monoclonal surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Y; Suzuki, S; Mikata, A; Suzuki, H; Kageyama, K; Watanabe, S; Minato, K; Shimoyama, M

    1982-06-01

    Undifferentiated lymphoma from a 39-year-old female became serially xenotransplantable to preirradiated nude mice. The tumor cells (KT) possessed a monoclonal surface immunoglobulin (SIg mu, kappa) and formed rosettes with neuraminidase-treated sheep erythrocytes (SEn). Precise characterizations of the SEn rosette, however, revealed the following facts: (1) Neuraminidase-untreated or 2-aminoethylisothiuronium bromide (AET) treated sheep erythrocytes were not bound to the KT cells. (2) SEn rosettes on the KT cells did not show a temperature dependency. (3) Neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes from man, horse, mouse, and rabbit were not bound to the KT cells. (4) Preincubation of the KT cells with antipolyvalent immunoglobulin or anti-kappa-chain serum abolished the SEn rosette formation. (5) Trypsinization decreased both SEn rosettes and SIg on the KT cells. (6) SEn rosettes on the KT cells were too loose to be separated from nonrosetting cells by a Percoll gradient centrifugation method. Summarizing these results, the monoclonal SIg on the KT cells recognized sheep erythrocyte antigen(s) that were exposed only after the neuraminidase treatment. Therefore, this was considered to be a case with peculiar B-lymphoma cells that bound SEn through their SIg.

  12. Neuraminidase inhibiting antibody responses in pigs differ between influenza A virus N2 lineages and by vaccine type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neuraminidase (NA) protein of influenza A viruses (IAV) has important functional roles in the viral replication cycle. Antibodies specific to NA can reduce viral replication and limit disease severity, but are not routinely measured. We analyzed NA inhibiting (NI) antibody titers in serum and re...

  13. Computational Assay of H7N9 Influenza Neuraminidase Reveals R292K Mutation Reduces Drug Binding Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Christopher J.; Malaisree, Maturos; Long, Ben; McIntosh-Smith, Simon; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of a novel H7N9 avian influenza that infects humans is a serious cause for concern. Of the genome sequences of H7N9 neuraminidase available, one contains a substitution of arginine to lysine at position 292, suggesting a potential for reduced drug binding efficacy. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir bound to H7N9, H7N9-R292K, and a structurally related H11N9 neuraminidase. They show that H7N9 neuraminidase is structurally homologous to H11N9, binding the drugs in identical modes. The simulations reveal that the R292K mutation disrupts drug binding in H7N9 in a comparable manner to that observed experimentally for H11N9-R292K. Absolute binding free energy calculations with the WaterSwap method confirm a reduction in binding affinity. This indicates that the efficacy of antiviral drugs against H7N9-R292K will be reduced. Simulations can assist in predicting disruption of binding caused by mutations in neuraminidase, thereby providing a computational `assay.'

  14. Droplet digital PCR to investigate quasi-species at codons 119 and 275 of the A(H1N1)pdm09 neuraminidase during zanamivir and oseltamivir therapies.

    PubMed

    Abed, Yacine; Carbonneau, Julie; L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Kaiser, Laurent; Boivin, Guy

    2017-04-01

    The H275Y and E119D neuraminidase (NA) mutations constitute important molecular markers of resistance to NA inhibitors in A(H1N1) pdm09 viruses. We used reverse transcriptase-droplet digital PCR amplification (RT-ddPCR) to analyze quasi-species at codons 275 and 119 of the NA in A(H1N1) pdm09 viruses recovered from an immuncompromised patient who received oseltamivir and zanamivir therapies. RT-ddPCR assays detected and quantified H275Y and E119D mutations with an efficiency that was comparable to that of high throughput sequencing (HiSeq 2500 Illumina, San Diego, CA) technology. With its sensitivity and reproducibility, RT-ddPCR could be a reliable method for accurate detection and quantification of major NAI-resistance mutations in clinical settings. J. Med. Virol. 89:737-741, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Neuraminidase-1 contributes significantly to the degradation of neuronal B-series gangliosides but not to the bypass of the catabolic block in Tay-Sachs mouse models.

    PubMed

    Timur, Z K; Akyildiz Demir, S; Marsching, C; Sandhoff, R; Seyrantepe, V

    2015-09-01

    Tay–Sachs disease is a severe lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene coding for α subunit of lysosomal β-Hexosaminidase A enzyme, which converts GM2 to GM3 ganglioside. HexA(−/−) mice, depleted of the β-Hexosaminidase A iso-enzyme, remain asymptomatic up to 1 year of age because of a metabolic bypass by neuraminidase(s). These enzymes remove a sialic acid residue converting GM2 to GA2, which is further degraded by the still intact β-Hexosaminidase B iso-enzyme into lactosylceramide. A previously identified ganglioside metabolizing neuraminidase, Neu4, is abundantly expressed in the mouse brain and has activity against gangliosides like GM2in vitro. Neu4(−/−) mice showed increased GD1a and decreased GM1 ganglioside in the brain suggesting the importance of the Neu4 in ganglioside catabolism. Mice with targeted disruption of both HexA and Neu4 genes showed accumulating GM2 ganglioside and epileptic seizures with 40% penetrance, indicating that the neuraminidase Neu4 is a modulatory gene, but may not be the only neuraminidase contributing to the metabolic bypass in HexA(−/−) mice. Therefore, we elucidated the biological role of neuraminidase-1 in ganglioside degradation in mouse. Analysis of HexA(−/−) Neu1(−/−) and HexA(−/−) Neu4(−/−) Neu1(−/−) mice models showed significant contribution of neuraminidase-1 on B-series ganglioside degradation in the brain. Therefore, we speculate that other neuraminidase/neuraminidases such as Neu2 and/or Neu3 might be also involved in the ganglioside degradation pathway in HexA(−/−) mice.

  16. The inhibition of Clostridium chauvoei (jakari strain) neuraminidase activity by methanolic extracts of the stem barks of Tamarindus indicus and Combretum fragrans.

    PubMed

    Useh, N M; Nok, A J; Ambali, S F; Esievo, K A N

    2004-08-01

    The inhibition of neuraminidase from Clostridium chauvoei (jakari strain) with partially purified methanolic extracts of some plants used in Ethnopharmacological practice was evaluated. Extracts of two medicinal plants, Tamarindus indicus and Combretum fragrans at 100-1000 microg/ml, both significantly reduced the activity of the enzyme in a dose-dependent fashion (P < 0.001). The estimated IC50 values for Tamarindus indicus and Combretum fragrans were 100 and 150 microg/ml respectively. Initial velocity studies conducted, using fetuin as substrate revealed a non-competitive inhibition with the Vmax significantly altered from 500 micromole min(-1) mg(-1) to 240 micromole min(-1) mg(-1) and 340 micromole min(-1) mg(-1) in the presence of Tamarindus indicus and Combretum fragrans respectively. The KM remained unchanged at 0.42 mM. The computed Index of physiological efficiency was reduced from 1.19min(-1) to 0.57min(-1) and 0.75min(-1) with Tamarindus indicus and Combretum fragrans as inhibitors respectively.

  17. Zanamivir-resistant influenza viruses with Q136K or Q136R neuraminidase residue mutations can arise during MDCK cell culture creating challenges for antiviral susceptibility monitoring.

    PubMed

    Little, Karen; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Butler, Jeff; Baas, Chantal; Harrower, Bruce; Mosse, Jenny; Barr, Ian G; Hurt, Aeron C

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of circulating influenza strains for antiviral susceptibility is important to ensure patient treatment guidelines remain appropriate. Influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 virus isolates containing mutations at the Q136 residue of the neuraminidase (NA) that conferred reduced susceptibility to the NA inhibitor (NAI) zanamivir were detected during antiviral susceptibility monitoring. Interestingly, the mutations were not detectable in the viruses from respective clinical specimens, only in the cultured isolates. We showed that variant viruses containing the Q136K and Q136R NA mutations were preferentially selected in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial (MDCK) cells, but were less well supported in MDCK-SIAT1 cells and embryonated eggs. The effect of Q136K, Q136R, Q136H and Q136L substitutions in NA subtypes N1 and N2 on NAI susceptibility and in vitro viral fitness was assessed. This study highlights the challenges that cell culture derived mutations can pose to the NAI susceptibility analysis and interpretation and reaffirms the need to sequence viruses from respective clinical specimens to avoid misdiagnosis. However, we also demonstrate that NA mutations at residue Q136 can confer reduced zanamivir, peramivir or laninamivir susceptibility, and therefore close monitoring of viruses for mutations at this site from patients being treated with these antivirals is important.

  18. Quantification of Influenza Neuraminidase Activity by Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Solano, Maria I; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Williams, Tracie L; Pierce, Carrie L; Gubareva, Larisa V; Mishin, Vasiliy; Barr, John R

    2017-03-07

    Mounting evidence suggests that neuraminidase's functionality extends beyond its classical role in influenza virus infection and that antineuraminidase antibodies offer protective immunity. Therefore, a renewed interest in the development of neuraminidase (NA)-specific methods to characterize the glycoprotein and evaluate potential advantages for NA standardization in influenza vaccines has emerged. NA displays sialidase activity by cleaving off the terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid on α-2,3 or α-2,6 sialic acid containing receptors of host cells. The type and distribution of these sialic acid containing receptors is considered to be an important factor in transmission efficiency of influenza viruses between and among host species. Changes in hemagglutinin (HA) binding and NA specificity in reassortant viruses may be related to the emergence of new and potentially dangerous strains of influenza. Current methods to investigate neuraminidase activity use small derivatized sugars that are poor models for natural glycoprotein receptors and do not provide information on the linkage specificity. Here, a novel approach for rapid and accurate quantification of influenza neuraminidase activity is achieved utilizing ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). Direct LC-MS/MS quantification of NA-released sialic acid provides precise measurement of influenza neuraminidase activity over a range of substrates. The method provides exceptional sensitivity and specificity with a limit of detection of 0.38 μM for sialic acid and the capacity to obtain accurate measurements of specific enzyme activity preference toward α-2,3-sialyllactose linkages, α-2,6-sialyllactose linkages, or whole glycosylated proteins such as fetuin.

  19. Developmental regulation of neuraminidase-sensitive lectin-binding glycoproteins during myogenesis of rat L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, P C; Pena, S D; Guerin, C W

    1984-01-01

    Intact monolayers of L6 myoblasts were treated with neuraminidase, with the aim of selectively removing sialic acid residues of cell-surface glycoproteins. Neuraminidase treatment unmasked binding sites for Ricinus communis agglutinin I and peanut agglutinin, thus allowing the identification of the major binding proteins for these lectins. For Ricinus communis agglutinin I these neuraminidase-sensitive glycoproteins had apparent Mr values of 136000, 115000, 87000, 83000 and 49000. For peanut agglutinin the major neuraminidase-sensitive glycoproteins had apparent Mr values of 200000, 136000, 87000 and 83000. We found highly reproducible, developmentally regulated, changes in the lectin-binding capacity of certain of these glycoproteins as L6 myoblasts differentiated into myotubes. Coincident with myoblast fusion there was a co-ordinate decrease in Ricinus communis agglutinin I binding by glycoproteins of apparent Mr of 136000 and 49000. There was also a co-ordinate shift in mobility of the broad band of glycoprotein, centred at an apparent Mr of 115000 in myoblasts, to a new average apparent Mr of 107000 in mid-fusion cultures and myotube cultures. Peanut agglutinin binding by the major protein of apparent Mr 136000 also decreased at the mid-fusion stage of myogenesis, and was barely detectable in 7-day-old fused cultures. These developmentally regulated changes in neuraminidase-sensitive glycoproteins were all inhibited by growth of myoblasts in 6.4 microM-5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, indicating that they are associated with myoblast differentiation. In contrast, an increase in fibronectin was seen in mid-fusion cultures, which was not inhibited by growth of myoblasts in 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. This initial increase in fibronectin is, therefore, unlikely to be directly related to myoblast fusion or differentiation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6712625

  20. The universal epitope of influenza A viral neuraminidase fundamentally contributes to enzyme activity and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Tracey M; Jaentschke, Bozena; Van Domselaar, Gary; Hashem, Anwar M; Farnsworth, Aaron; Forbes, Nicole E; Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi; He, Runtao; Brown, Earl G; Li, Xuguang

    2013-06-21

    The only universally conserved sequence among all influenza A viral neuraminidases is located between amino acids 222 and 230. However, the potential roles of these amino acids remain largely unknown. Through an array of experimental approaches including mutagenesis, reverse genetics, and growth kinetics, we found that this sequence could markedly affect viral replication. Additional experiments revealed that enzymes with mutations in this region demonstrated substantially decreased catalytic activity, substrate binding, and thermostability. Consistent with viral replication analyses and enzymatic studies, protein modeling suggests that these amino acids could either directly bind to the substrate or contribute to the formation of the active site in the enzyme. Collectively, these findings reveal the essential role of this unique region in enzyme function and viral growth, which provides the basis for evaluating the validity of this sequence as a potential target for antiviral intervention and vaccine development.

  1. Hemagglutination and the closest distance of approach of normal, neuraminidase- and papain-treated erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    van Oss, C J; Absolom, D R

    1984-01-01

    By means of potential energy versus distance diagrams, derived from electrophoretic and surface tension data, the minimum distances of approach of normal (NOR) and of neuraminidase-treated (NEU) and papain-treated (PAP) human erythrocytes could be determined. The minimum distances between the actual cell membranes of two opposing red cells are: 184 A (NOR), 111 A (NEU), and 113 A (PAP), which agrees well with the fact that anti-D (Rho) antibodies of the IgG-class (which have a maximum distance of approximately 120 A between the two antibody-active sites) can hemagglutinate NEU and PAP cells, but are incapable of hemagglutinating normal D (Rho)-positive erythrocytes.

  2. Influenza A virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase act as novel motile machinery

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Shin I.; Naito, Tadasuke; Saito, Mineki

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) membrane proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) are determinants of virus infectivity, transmissibility, pathogenicity, host specificity, and major antigenicity. HA binds to a virus receptor, a sialoglycoprotein or sialoglycolipid, on the host cell and mediates virus attachment to the cell surface. The hydrolytic enzyme NA cleaves sialic acid from viral receptors and accelerates the release of progeny virus from host cells. In this study, we identified a novel function of HA and NA as machinery for viral motility. HAs exchanged binding partner receptors iteratively, generating virus movement on a receptor-coated glass surface instead of a cell surface. The virus movement was also dependent on NA. Virus movement mediated by HA and NA resulted in a three to four-fold increase in virus internalisation by cultured cells. We concluded that cooperation of HA and NA moves IAV particles on a cell surface and enhances virus infection of host cells. PMID:28344335

  3. Radiation inactivation analysis of influenza virus reveals different target sizes for fusion, leakage, and neuraminidase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S.; Jung, C.Y.; Takahashi, M.; Lenard, J.

    1986-10-07

    The size of the functional units responsible for several activities carried out by the influenza virus envelope glycoproteins was determined by radiation inactivation analysis. Neuraminidase activity, which resides in the glycoprotein NA, was inactivated exponentially with an increasing radiation dose, yielding a target size of 94 +/- 5 kilodaltons (kDa), in reasonable agreement with that of the disulfide-bonded dimer (120 kDa). All the other activities studied are properties of the HA glycoprotein and were normalized to the known molecular weight of the neuraminidase dimer. Virus-induced fusion activity was measured by two phospholipid dilution assays: relief of energy transfer between N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)dipalmitoyl-L-alpha- phosphatidylethanolamine (N-NBD-PE) and N-(lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl)-dioleoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylethanolamine (N-Rh-PE) in target liposomes and relief of self-quenching of N-Rh-PE in target liposomes. Radiation inactivation of fusion activity proceeded exponentially with radiation dose, yielding normalized target sizes of 68 +/- 6 kDa by assay i and 70 +/- 4 kDa by assay ii. These values are close to the molecular weight of a single disulfide-bonded (HA1 + HA2) unit (75 kDa), the monomer of the HA trimer. A single monomer is thus inactivated by each radiation event, and each monomer (or some part of it) constitutes a minimal functional unit capable of mediating fusion. Virus-induced leakage of calcein from target liposomes and virus-induced leakage of hemoglobin from erythrocytes (hemolysis) both showed more complex inactivation behavior: a pronounced shoulder was present in both inactivation curves, followed by a steep drop in activity at higher radiation levels.

  4. Molecular Characterizations of Surface Proteins Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase from Recent H5Nx Avian Influenza Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J.; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Guo, Zhu; Chang, Jessie C.; Wentworth, David E.; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Stevens, James; Schultz-Cherry, S.

    2016-04-06

    ABSTRACT

    During 2014, a subclade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks around the world. In late 2014/early 2015, the virus was detected in wild birds in Canada and the United States, and these viruses also gave rise to reassortant progeny, composed of viral RNA segments (vRNAs) from both Eurasian and North American lineages. In particular, viruses were found with N1, N2, and N8 neuraminidase vRNAs, and these are collectively referred to as H5Nx viruses. In the United States, more than 48 million domestic birds have been affected. Here we present a detailed structural and biochemical analysis of the surface antigens of H5N1, H5N2, and H5N8 viruses in addition to those of a recent human H5N6 virus. Our results with recombinant hemagglutinin reveal that these viruses have a strict avian receptor binding preference, while recombinantly expressed neuraminidases are sensitive to FDA-approved and investigational antivirals. Although H5Nx viruses currently pose a low risk to humans, it is important to maintain surveillance of these circulating viruses and to continually assess future changes that may increase their pandemic potential.

    IMPORTANCEThe H5Nx viruses emerging in North America, Europe, and Asia pose a great public health concern. Here we report a molecular and structural study of the major surface proteins of several H5Nx influenza viruses. Our results improve the understanding of these new viruses and provide important information on their receptor preferences and susceptibilities to antivirals, which are central to pandemic risk assessment.

  5. Simultaneous quantification of the viral antigens hemagglutinin and neuraminidase in influenza vaccines by LC-MSE.

    PubMed

    Creskey, Marybeth C; Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi; Girard, Michel; Lorbetskie, Barry; Gravel, Caroline; Farnsworth, Aaron; Li, Xuguang; Smith, Daryl G S; Cyr, Terry D

    2012-07-06

    Current methods for quality control of inactivated influenza vaccines prior to regulatory approval include determining the hemagglutinin (HA) content by single radial immunodiffusion (SRID), verifying neuraminidase (NA) enzymatic activity, and demonstrating that the levels of the contaminant protein ovalbumin are below a set threshold of 1 μg/dose. The SRID assays require the availability of strain-specific reference HA antigens and antibodies, the production of which is a potential rate-limiting step in vaccine development and release, particularly during a pandemic. Immune responses induced by neuraminidase also contribute to protection from infection; however, the amounts of NA antigen in influenza vaccines are currently not quantified or standardized. Here, we report a method for vaccine analysis that yields simultaneous quantification of HA and NA levels much more rapidly than conventional HA quantification techniques, while providing additional valuable information on the total protein content. Enzymatically digested vaccine proteins were analyzed by LC-MS(E), a mass spectrometric technology that allows absolute quantification of analytes, including the HA and NA antigens, other structural influenza proteins and chicken egg proteins associated with the manufacturing process. This method has potential application for increasing the accuracy of reference antigen standards and for validating label claims for HA content in formulated vaccines. It can also be used to monitor NA and chicken egg protein content in order to monitor manufacturing consistency. While this is a useful methodology with potential for broad application, we also discuss herein some of the inherent limitations of this approach and the care and caution that must be taken in its use as a tool for absolute protein quantification. The variations in HA, NA and chicken egg protein concentrations in the vaccines analyzed in this study are indicative of the challenges associated with the current

  6. Molecular Characterizations of Surface Proteins Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase from Recent H5Nx Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J.; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Guo, Zhu; Chang, Jessie C.; Wentworth, David E.; Gubareva, Larisa V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During 2014, a subclade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks around the world. In late 2014/early 2015, the virus was detected in wild birds in Canada and the United States, and these viruses also gave rise to reassortant progeny, composed of viral RNA segments (vRNAs) from both Eurasian and North American lineages. In particular, viruses were found with N1, N2, and N8 neuraminidase vRNAs, and these are collectively referred to as H5Nx viruses. In the United States, more than 48 million domestic birds have been affected. Here we present a detailed structural and biochemical analysis of the surface antigens of H5N1, H5N2, and H5N8 viruses in addition to those of a recent human H5N6 virus. Our results with recombinant hemagglutinin reveal that these viruses have a strict avian receptor binding preference, while recombinantly expressed neuraminidases are sensitive to FDA-approved and investigational antivirals. Although H5Nx viruses currently pose a low risk to humans, it is important to maintain surveillance of these circulating viruses and to continually assess future changes that may increase their pandemic potential. IMPORTANCE The H5Nx viruses emerging in North America, Europe, and Asia pose a great public health concern. Here we report a molecular and structural study of the major surface proteins of several H5Nx influenza viruses. Our results improve the understanding of these new viruses and provide important information on their receptor preferences and susceptibilities to antivirals, which are central to pandemic risk assessment. PMID:27053557

  7. Rapid differentiation of seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza through proteotyping of viral neuraminidase with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwahn, Alexander B; Wong, Jason W H; Downard, Kevin M

    2010-06-01

    Signature peptides of the neuraminidase antigen across all common circulating human subtypes of type A and B influenza are identified through the bioinformatic alignment of translated gene sequences. The detection of these peptides within the high-resolution mass spectra of whole antigen, virus, and vaccine digests enables the strains to be rapidly and directly typed and subtyped. Importantly, unique signature peptides for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza are identified and detected that enable pandemic strains to be rapidly and directly differentiated from seasonal type A (H1N1) influenza strains. The detection of these peptides can enable the origins of the neuraminidase gene to be monitored in the case of reassorted strains.

  8. Analysis of parainfluenza virus-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein mutants that are blocked in internalization and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Robach, Jessica G.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-10-25

    The PIV-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein is a multifunctional protein with sialic acid binding, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activity. HN is internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and degraded. HN lacks internalization signals in its cytoplasmic tail but a single glutamic acid present at residue 37 at the putative transmembrane/ectodomain boundary is critical. We rescued rPIV-5 with mutations E37D or E37K, which have been shown to impair or abolish HN internalization, respectively. These viruses exhibited growth properties similar to wild-type (wt) virus but are impaired for fitness in tissue culture. Biochemical analysis of HN activities showed differences between HN E37D and HN E37K in fusion promotion and incorporation of HN and F into virions. Furthermore, oligomeric analyses indicate that HN E37 mutants perturb the tetrameric organization of HN, probably by destabilizing the dimer-of-dimers interface.

  9. Recent H3N2 Influenza Virus Clinical Isolates Rapidly Acquire Hemagglutinin or Neuraminidase Mutations When Propagated for Antigenic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Benjamin S.; Li, Yang; Hodinka, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to serological testing, influenza viruses are typically propagated in eggs or cell culture. Recent human H3N2 strains bind to cells with low avidity. Here, we isolated nine primary H3N2 viral isolates from respiratory secretions of children. Upon propagation in vitro, five of these isolates acquired hemagglutinin or neuraminidase mutations that increased virus binding to cell surfaces. These mutations can potentially confound serological assays commonly used to identify antigenically novel influenza viruses. PMID:24991002

  10. Influenza A(H7N9) virus acquires resistance-related neuraminidase I222T substitution when infected mallards are exposed to low levels of oseltamivir in water.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Anna; Nykvist, Marie; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Bröjer, Caroline; Waldenström, Jonas; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D

    2015-09-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and new human IAVs often contain gene segments originating from avian IAVs. Treatment options for severe human influenza are principally restricted to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), among which oseltamivir is stockpiled in preparedness for influenza pandemics. There is evolutionary pressure in the environment for resistance development to oseltamivir in avian IAVs, as the active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) passes largely undegraded through sewage treatment to river water where waterfowl reside. In an in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) model, we tested if low-pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus might become resistant if the host was exposed to low levels of OC. Ducks were experimentally infected, and OC was added to their water, after which infection and transmission were maintained by successive introductions of uninfected birds. Daily fecal samples were tested for IAV excretion, genotype, and phenotype. Following mallard exposure to 2.5 μg/liter OC, the resistance-related neuraminidase (NA) I222T substitution, was detected within 2 days during the first passage and was found in all viruses sequenced from subsequently introduced ducks. The substitution generated 8-fold and 2.4-fold increases in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for OC (P < 0.001) and zanamivir (P = 0.016), respectively. We conclude that OC exposure of IAV hosts, in the same concentration magnitude as found in the environment, may result in amino acid substitutions, leading to changed antiviral sensitivity in an IAV subtype that can be highly pathogenic to humans. Prudent use of oseltamivir and resistance surveillance of IAVs in wild birds are warranted.

  11. Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Acquires Resistance-Related Neuraminidase I222T Substitution When Infected Mallards Are Exposed to Low Levels of Oseltamivir in Water

    PubMed Central

    Nykvist, Marie; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Söderström, Hanna; Wille, Michelle; Daggfeldt, Annika; Bröjer, Caroline; Waldenström, Jonas; Olsen, Björn; Järhult, Josef D.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has its natural reservoir in wild waterfowl, and new human IAVs often contain gene segments originating from avian IAVs. Treatment options for severe human influenza are principally restricted to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), among which oseltamivir is stockpiled in preparedness for influenza pandemics. There is evolutionary pressure in the environment for resistance development to oseltamivir in avian IAVs, as the active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) passes largely undegraded through sewage treatment to river water where waterfowl reside. In an in vivo mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) model, we tested if low-pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus might become resistant if the host was exposed to low levels of OC. Ducks were experimentally infected, and OC was added to their water, after which infection and transmission were maintained by successive introductions of uninfected birds. Daily fecal samples were tested for IAV excretion, genotype, and phenotype. Following mallard exposure to 2.5 μg/liter OC, the resistance-related neuraminidase (NA) I222T substitution, was detected within 2 days during the first passage and was found in all viruses sequenced from subsequently introduced ducks. The substitution generated 8-fold and 2.4-fold increases in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for OC (P < 0.001) and zanamivir (P = 0.016), respectively. We conclude that OC exposure of IAV hosts, in the same concentration magnitude as found in the environment, may result in amino acid substitutions, leading to changed antiviral sensitivity in an IAV subtype that can be highly pathogenic to humans. Prudent use of oseltamivir and resistance surveillance of IAVs in wild birds are warranted. PMID:26077257

  12. Neuroblast proliferation on the surface of the adult rat striatal wall after focal ependymal loss by intracerebroventricular injection of neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen Gómez-Roldán, María; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Capilla-González, Vivian; Cifuentes, Manuel; Pérez, Juan; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro

    2008-04-01

    The subventricular zone of the striatal wall of adult rodents is an active neurogenic region for life. Cubic multiciliated ependyma separates the subventricular zone from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and is involved in the control of adult neurogenesis. By injecting neuraminidase from Clostridium perfringens into the right lateral ventricle of the rat, we provoked a partial detachment of the ependyma in the striatal wall. The contralateral ventricle was never affected and was used as the experimental control. Neuraminidase caused widening of the intercellular spaces among some ependymal cells and their subsequent detachment and disintegration in the CSF. Partial ependymal denudation was followed by infiltration of the CSF with macrophages and neutrophils from the local choroid plexus, which ependymal cells never detached after neuraminidase administration. Inflammation extended toward the periventricular parenchyma. The ependymal cells that did not detach and remained in the ventricle wall never proliferated. The lost ependyma was never recovered, and ependymal cells never behaved as neural stem cells. Instead, a scar formed by overlapping astrocytic processes sealed those regions devoid of ependyma. Some ependymal cells at the border of the denudated areas lost contact with the ventricle and became located under the glial layer. Concomitantly with scar formation, some subependymal cells protruded toward the ventricle through the ependymal breaks, proliferated, and formed clusters of rounded ventricular cells that expressed the phenotype of neuroblasts. Ventricular clusters of neuroblasts remained in the ventricle up to 90 days after injection. In the subventricular zone, adult neurogenesis persisted.

  13. Antigenic validation of recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Khulape, S A; Maity, H K; Pathak, D C; Mohan, C Madhan; Dey, S

    2015-09-01

    The outer membrane glycoprotein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is important for virus infection and subsequent immune response by host, and offers target for development of recombinant antigen-based immunoassays and subunit vaccines. In this study, the expression of HN protein of NDV is attempted in yeast expression system. Yeast offers eukaryotic environment for protein processing and posttranslational modifications like glycosylation, in addition to higher growth rate and easy genetic manipulation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be better expression system for HN protein than Pichia pastoris as determined by codon usage analysis. The complete coding  sequence of HN gene was amplified with the histidine tag, cloned in pESC-URA under GAL10 promotor and transformed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant HN (rHN) protein was characterized by western blot, showing glycosylation heterogeneity as observed with other eukaryotic expression systems. The recombinant protein was purified by affinity column purification. The protein could be further used as subunit vaccine.

  14. Structural Characterization of the 1918 Influenza H1N1 Neuraminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Zhu, X.; Dwek, R.A.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-28

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) plays a crucial role in facilitating the spread of newly synthesized virus in the host and is an important target for controlling disease progression. The NA crystal structure from the 1918 'Spanish flu' (A/Brevig Mission/1/18 H1N1) and that of its complex with zanamivir (Relenza) at 1.65-{angstrom} and 1.45-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively, corroborated the successful expression of correctly folded NA tetramers in a baculovirus expression system. An additional cavity adjacent to the substrate-binding site is observed in N1, compared to N2 and N9 NAs, including H5N1. This cavity arises from an open conformation of the 150 loop (Gly147 to Asp151) and appears to be conserved among group 1 NAs (N1, N4, N5, and N8). It closes upon zanamivir binding. Three calcium sites were identified, including a novel site that may be conserved in N1 and N4. Thus, these high-resolution structures, combined with our recombinant expression system, provide new opportunities to augment the limited arsenal of therapeutics against influenza.

  15. Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin Neuraminidase as a Potential Cancer Targeting Agent

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Ali; Yusoff, Khatijah; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with its immunotherapeutic activities and sialic acid binding abilities is a promising cancer adjuvant. The HN was surfaced displayed on Lactococcus lactis and its cancer targeting ability was investigated via attachment to the MDA-MB231 breast cancers. To surface display the HN protein on the bacterial cell wall, HN was fused to N-acetylmuraminidase (AcmA) anchoring motif of L. lactis and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The expressed recombinant fusion proteins were purified and mixed with a culture of L. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum. Immunofluorescence assay showed the binding of the recombinant HN-AcmA protein on the surface of the bacterial cells. The bacterial cells carrying the HN-AcmA protein interacted with the MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Direct and fluorescent microscopy confirmed that L. lactis and Lb. plantarum surface displaying the recombinant HN were attached to the breast cancer MDA-MB231 cells, providing evidence for the potential ability of HN in targeting to cancer cells. PMID:26918060

  16. Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin Neuraminidase as a Potential Cancer Targeting Agent.

    PubMed

    Baradaran, Ali; Yusoff, Khatijah; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with its immunotherapeutic activities and sialic acid binding abilities is a promising cancer adjuvant. The HN was surfaced displayed on Lactococcus lactis and its cancer targeting ability was investigated via attachment to the MDA-MB231 breast cancers. To surface display the HN protein on the bacterial cell wall, HN was fused to N-acetylmuraminidase (AcmA) anchoring motif of L. lactis and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The expressed recombinant fusion proteins were purified and mixed with a culture of L. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum. Immunofluorescence assay showed the binding of the recombinant HN-AcmA protein on the surface of the bacterial cells. The bacterial cells carrying the HN-AcmA protein interacted with the MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Direct and fluorescent microscopy confirmed that L. lactis and Lb. plantarum surface displaying the recombinant HN were attached to the breast cancer MDA-MB231 cells, providing evidence for the potential ability of HN in targeting to cancer cells.

  17. Neuraminidase subtyping of avian influenza viruses with PrimerHunter-designed primers and quadruplicate primer pools.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Khan, Mazhar I; Khan, Mazhar; Măndoiu, Ion; Măndoiu, Ion I

    2013-01-01

    We have previously developed a software package called PrimerHunter to design primers for PCR-based virus subtyping. In this study, 9 pairs of primers were designed with PrimerHunter and successfully used to differentiate the 9 neuraminidase (NA) genes of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in multiple PCR-based assays. Furthermore, primer pools were designed and successfully used to decrease the number of reactions needed for NA subtyping from 9 to 4. The quadruplicate primer-pool method is cost-saving, and was shown to be suitable for the NA subtyping of both cultured AIVs and uncultured AIV swab samples. The primers selected for this study showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in NA subtyping by RT-PCR, SYBR green-based Real-time PCR and Real-time RT-PCR methods. AIV RNA of 2 to 200 copies (varied by NA subtypes) could be detected by these reactions. No unspecific amplification was displayed when detecting RNAs of other avian infectious viruses such as Infectious bronchitis virus, Infectious bursal disease virus and Newcastle disease virus. In summary, this study introduced several sensitive and specific PCR-based assays for NA subtyping of AIVs and also validated again the effectiveness of the PrimerHunter tool for the design of subtyping primers.

  18. Inhibition of Influenza A Virus Infection by Fucoidan Targeting Viral Neuraminidase and Cellular EGFR Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wu, Jiandong; Zhang, Xiaoshuang; Hao, Cui; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Jiao, Guangling; Shan, Xindi; Tai, Wenjing; Yu, Guangli

    2017-01-01

    Development of novel anti-influenza A virus (IAV) drugs with high efficiency and low toxicity is critical for preparedness against influenza outbreaks. Herein, we investigated the anti-IAV activities and mechanisms of fucoidan in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that a fucoidan KW derived from brown algae Kjellmaniella crassifolia effectively blocked IAV infection in vitro with low toxicity. KW possessed broad anti-IAV spectrum and low tendency of induction of viral resistance, superior to the anti-IAV drug amantadine. KW was capable of inactivating virus particles before infection and blocked some stages after adsorption. KW could bind to viral neuraminidase (NA) and inhibit the activity of NA to block the release of IAV. KW also interfered with the activation of EGFR, PKCα, NF-κB, and Akt, and inhibited both IAV endocytosis and EGFR internalization in IAV-infected cells, suggesting that KW may also inhibit cellular EGFR pathway. Moreover, intranasal administration of KW markedly improved survival and decreased viral titers in IAV-infected mice. Therefore, fucoidan KW has the potential to be developed into a novel nasal drop or spray for prevention and treatment of influenza in the future. PMID:28094330

  19. The haemagglutinin gene, but not the neuraminidase gene, of 'Spanish flu' was a recombinant.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, M J; Armstrong, J S; Gibbs, A J

    2001-01-01

    Published analyses of the sequences of three genes from the 1918 Spanish influenza virus have cast doubt on the theory that it came from birds immediately before the pandemic. They showed that the virus was of the H1N1 subtype lineage but more closely related to mammal-infecting strains than any known bird-infecting strain. They provided no evidence that the virus originated by gene reassortment nor that the virus was the direct ancestor of the two lineages of H1N1 viruses currently found in mammals; one that mostly infects human beings, the other pigs. The unusual virulence of the virus and why it produced a pandemic have remained unsolved. We have reanalysed the sequences of the three 1918 genes and found conflicting patterns of relatedness in all three. Various tests showed that the patterns in its haemagglutinin (HA) gene were produced by true recombination between two different parental HA H1 subtype genes, but that the conflicting patterns in its neuraminidase and non-structural-nuclear export proteins genes resulted from selection. The recombination event that produced the 1918 HA gene probably coincided with the start of the pandemic, and may have triggered it. PMID:11779383

  20. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Zhou, Hui; Ethen, Cheryl M; N Reinhold, Vernon

    2016-04-29

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and (3)H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme.

  1. New Insights into Molecular Organization of Human Neuraminidase-1: Transmembrane Topology and Dimerization Ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, Pascal; Baud, Stéphanie; Bocharova, Olga V.; Bocharov, Eduard V.; Kuznetsov, Andrey S.; Kawecki, Charlotte; Bocquet, Olivier; Romier, Beatrice; Gorisse, Laetitia; Ghirardi, Maxime; Duca, Laurent; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Dauchez, Manuel; Efremov, Roman G.; Debelle, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) is a lysosomal sialidase catalyzing the removal of terminal sialic acids from sialyloconjugates. A plasma membrane-bound NEU1 modulating a plethora of receptors by desialylation, has been consistently documented from the last ten years. Despite a growing interest of the scientific community to NEU1, its membrane organization is not understood and current structural and biochemical data cannot account for such membrane localization. By combining molecular biology and biochemical analyses with structural biophysics and computational approaches, we identified here two regions in human NEU1 - segments 139–159 (TM1) and 316–333 (TM2) - as potential transmembrane (TM) domains. In membrane mimicking environments, the corresponding peptides form stable α-helices and TM2 is suited for self-association. This was confirmed with full-size NEU1 by co-immunoprecipitations from membrane preparations and split-ubiquitin yeast two hybrids. The TM2 region was shown to be critical for dimerization since introduction of point mutations within TM2 leads to disruption of NEU1 dimerization and decrease of sialidase activity in membrane. In conclusion, these results bring new insights in the molecular organization of membrane-bound NEU1 and demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of two potential TM domains that may anchor NEU1 in the membrane, control its dimerization and sialidase activity.

  2. New Insights into Molecular Organization of Human Neuraminidase-1: Transmembrane Topology and Dimerization Ability

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Pascal; Baud, Stéphanie; Bocharova, Olga V.; Bocharov, Eduard V.; Kuznetsov, Andrey S.; Kawecki, Charlotte; Bocquet, Olivier; Romier, Beatrice; Gorisse, Laetitia; Ghirardi, Maxime; Duca, Laurent; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Dauchez, Manuel; Efremov, Roman G.; Debelle, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) is a lysosomal sialidase catalyzing the removal of terminal sialic acids from sialyloconjugates. A plasma membrane-bound NEU1 modulating a plethora of receptors by desialylation, has been consistently documented from the last ten years. Despite a growing interest of the scientific community to NEU1, its membrane organization is not understood and current structural and biochemical data cannot account for such membrane localization. By combining molecular biology and biochemical analyses with structural biophysics and computational approaches, we identified here two regions in human NEU1 - segments 139–159 (TM1) and 316–333 (TM2) - as potential transmembrane (TM) domains. In membrane mimicking environments, the corresponding peptides form stable α-helices and TM2 is suited for self-association. This was confirmed with full-size NEU1 by co-immunoprecipitations from membrane preparations and split-ubiquitin yeast two hybrids. The TM2 region was shown to be critical for dimerization since introduction of point mutations within TM2 leads to disruption of NEU1 dimerization and decrease of sialidase activity in membrane. In conclusion, these results bring new insights in the molecular organization of membrane-bound NEU1 and demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of two potential TM domains that may anchor NEU1 in the membrane, control its dimerization and sialidase activity. PMID:27917893

  3. Development of neuraminidase detection using gold nanoparticles boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wahyuni, Wulan T; Ivandini, Tribidasari A; Saepudin, Endang; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2016-03-15

    Gold nanoparticles-modified boron-doped diamond (AuNPs-BDD) electrodes, which were prepared with a self-assembly deposition of AuNPs at amine-terminated boron-doped diamond, were examined for voltammetric detection of neuraminidase (NA). The detection method was performed based on the difference of electrochemical responses of zanamivir at gold surface before and after the reaction with NA in phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 5.5). A linear calibration curve for zanamivir in 0.1 M PBS in the absence of NA was achieved in the concentration range of 1 × 10(-6) to 1 × 10(-5) M (R(2) = 0.99) with an estimated limit of detection (LOD) of 2.29 × 10(-6) M. Furthermore, using its reaction with 1.00 × 10(-5) M zanamivir, a linear calibration curve of NA can be obtained in the concentration range of 0-12 mU (R(2) = 0.99) with an estimated LOD of 0.12 mU. High reproducibility was shown with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.14% (n = 30). These performances could be maintained when the detection was performed in mucin matrix. Comparison performed using gold-modified BDD (Au-BDD) electrodes suggested that the good performance of the detection method is due to the stability of the gold particles position at the BDD surface.

  4. Optimization and comparative characterization of neuraminidase activities from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Klebsiella pneumoniae, Hep-2 cell, sheep kidney and rat liver lysosome

    PubMed Central

    Ghazaei, C; Ahmadi, M; Hosseini Jazani, N

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives The properties of neuraminidase produced by P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 during growth in a defined medium (BHI) was examined and compared with some neuraminidase features of K. pneumoniae in this investigation. Materials and Methods The enzyme was isolated from concentrated culture supernatants of P. aeruginosa which was used in a sensitive fluorometric assay by using 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl) α-D-N acetylneuraminic acid as substrate. Results Neuraminidase production in P. aeruginosa PAO1 paralleled bacterial growth in defined medium (BHI) and was maximal in the late logarithmic phase of growth but decreased during the stationary phase, probably owing to protease production or thermal instability. Highest production of P. aeruginosa PAO1 neuraminidase was in BHI culture media. The neuraminidase of P. aeruginosa PAO1 possessed an optimum temperature of activity at 56°C and the activity was maximal at pH 5. Heating the enzyme to 56°C for 45 min., in the presence of bovine serum albumin destroyed 33.1% of it's activity and addition of Ca+2, EDTA and NANA also decreased activity markedly. Conclusion The results revealed that the highest specific activity is for p. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:22347548

  5. Change in relative mobility of M protein following neuraminidase treatment in patients with multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yuriko; Iijima, Shiro; Fukushima, Kouhei; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Shiba, Kiyoko

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between the relative mobility of M protein in various disease states using cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis. To examine the carbohydrate chain of the M protein, sera from patients with multiple myeloma (MM), various cancers, and benign disease were treated with neuraminidase. The relative mobility in benign disease and MM patient sera following neuraminidase treatment varied among individuals, while that of IgG M protein in sera from cancer patients was from 0.2 to 0.3. Thus, the relative mobility in cancer patients was narrower than in those with MM or benign disease.However, after neuraminidase treatment, there was no significant difference between relative mobility in cancer patient's sera and those in other disease patients.

  6. Methanolic soluble fractions of lingzhi or reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes) extract inhibit neuraminidase activity in Newcastle disease virus (LaSota).

    PubMed

    Shamaki, Bala U; Sandabe, Umar K; Ogbe, Adamu O; Abdulrahman, Fanna I; El-Yuguda, Abdul-Dahiru

    2014-01-01

    The antineuraminidase activity of different organic soluble fractions of Ganoderma lucidum extract was investigated using inhibition of hemagglutination and elution of chicken erythrocytes by Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Fractions of methanol, ethylacetate, and normal butanol (n-butanol) of the G. lucidum were tested against neuraminidase producing NDV as antigen. Different dilutions of the organic soluble fractions inhibited elution of 1% red blood cells by neuraminidase of NDV While the methanolic and n-butanol extracts inhibited neuraminidase activity even at a dilution of 1:16 and that of ethylacetate fraction inhibited even at 1:32 respectively. This finding indicates that G. lucidum has some antineuraminidase activity against NDV and may be exploited in the management of NDV infection.

  7. Cloning, expression and characterization of potential immunogenic recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Romero, Julieta Sandra; Rivera-Benítez, José Francisco; Hernández-Baumgarten, Eliseo; Hernández-Jaúregui, Pablo; Vega, Marco; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Berg, Mikael; Baule, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Blue eye disease caused by Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) is an endemic viral infection of swine causing neurological and respiratory disease in piglets, and reproductive failure in sows and boars. The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of PorPV is the most abundant component in the viral envelope and the main target of the immune response in infected animals. In this study, we expressed the HN-PorPV-recombinant (rHN-PorPV) protein in an Escherichia coli system and analyzed the immune responses in mice. The HN gene was cloned from the reference strain PorPV-La Piedad Michoacan Virus (GenBank accession number BK005918), into the pDual expression vector. The expressed protein was identified at a molecular weight of 61.7 kDa. Three-dimensional modeling showed that the main conformational and functional domains of the rHN-PorPV protein were preserved. The antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed by Western blot with a monoclonal antibody recognizing the HN, and by testing against serum samples from pigs experimentally infected with PorPV. The immunogenicity of the rHN-PorPV protein was tested by inoculation of BALB/c mice with AbISCO-100(®) as adjuvant. Analysis of the humoral immune responses in mice showed an increased level of specific antibodies 14 days after the first immunization, compared to the control group (P < 0.0005). The results show the ability of the rHN-PorPV protein to induce an antibody response in mice. Due to its immunogenic potential, the rHN-PorPV protein will be further evaluated in pig trials for its suitability for prevention and control of blue eye disease.

  8. Computational study of interdependence between hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of pandemic 2009 H1N1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Influenza type A viruses are classified into subtypes based on their two surface proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The HA protein facilitates the viral binding and entering a host cell and the NA protein helps the release of viral progeny from the infected cell. The complementary roles of HA and NA entail their collaboration, which has important implications for viral replication and fitness. The HA protein from early strains of pandemic 2009 H1N1 of swine origin preferentially binds to human type receptors with a weak binding to avian type receptors. This virus caused several human deaths in December 2013 in Texas, USA, which motivated us to investigate the changes of genetic features that might contribute to the surged virulence of the virus. Our time series analysis on the strains of this virus collected from 2009 to 2013 implied that the HA binding preference of this virus in USA, Europe, and Asia has been the characteristic of swine H1N1 virus since 2009. However, its characteristic of seasonal human H1N1 and its binding avidity for avian type receptors both were on steady rise and had a clear increase in 2013 with American strains having the sharpest surge. The first change could enhance the viral transmission and replication in humans and the second could increase its ability to cause infection deep in lungs, which might account for the recent human deaths in Texas. In light of HA and NA coadaptation and evolutionary interactions, we also explored the NA activity of this virus to reveal the functional balance between HA and NA during the course of virus evolution. Finally we identified amino acid substitutions in HA and NA of the virus that were critical for the observed evolution.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of the N8 neuraminidase gene of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Kawaoka, Y; Webster, R G

    1993-04-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the N8 neuraminidase (NA) genes from 18 influenza A viruses, representing equine and avian hosts in different geographic locations, revealed three major lineages: (i) currently circulating equine 2 viruses; (ii) avian viruses isolated in the Eurasian region, including A/Equine/Jilin/1/89, a recent avian-like N8 isolate found in horses in China; and (iii) avian viruses isolated in North America. Comparison of mutation rates indicated that avian N8 genes have evolved more slowly than their equine counterparts. That is, in both avian lineages, 72% of the nucleotide changes were silent in the terminal branches of the phylogenetic tree, whereas in equine 2 viruses, 59% of the nucleotide changes were silent. This suggests greater selective pressure on the NA gene from the mammalian immune system, leading to progressive evolution. Alternatively, the slower mutation rate for avian N8 genes could reflect a selective advantage gained from a longer, continuous span of evolution. The shape of the phylogenetic tree, the evolutionary rate, and the calculated date of origin for the N8 equine 2 virus lineage were comparable to findings for the equine 2 virus hemagglutinin (HA) gene (Bean et al., J. Virol. 66, 1129-1138, 1992). This suggests that both viral membrane glycoproteins of equine 2 viruses have evolved together and have been subjected to similar levels of selective pressure. Several amino acid residues were found to differ among the three host-specific lineages, but they may not be involved in host restriction of the NA, as they are shared by EQ/Jilin/1/89 and viruses of avian origin. The present findings complement detailed structural information on the N2 and N9 subtypes and should prove valuable in understanding future X-ray diffraction studies of N8 crystals.

  10. Glycosylation and surface expression of the influenza virus neuraminidase requires the N-terminal hydrophobic region.

    PubMed Central

    Markoff, L; Lin, B C; Sveda, M M; Lai, C J

    1984-01-01

    A full-length double-stranded DNA copy of an influenza A virus N2 neuraminidase (NA) gene was cloned into the late region of pSV2330, a hybrid expression vector that includes pBR322 plasmid DNA sequences and the simian virus 40 early region and simian virus 40 late region promoters, splice sequences, and transcription termination sites. The protein encoded by the cloned wild-type NA gene was shown to be present in the cytoplasm of fixed cells and at the surface of "live" or unfixed cells by indirect immunofluorescence with N2 monoclonal antibodies. Immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of [35S]methionine-labeled proteins from wild-type vector-infected cells with heterospecific N2 antibody showed that the product of the cloned NA DNA comigrated with glycosylated NA from influenza virus-infected cells, remained associated with internal membranes of cells fractionated into membrane and cytoplasmic fractions, and could form an immunoprecipitable dimer. NA enzymatic activity was detectable after simian virus 40 lysis of vector-infected cells. These properties of the product of the cloned wild-type gene were compared with those of the polypeptides produced by three deletion mutant NA DNAs that were also cloned into the late region of the pSV2330 vector. These mutants lacked 7 (dlk), 21 (dlI), or all 23 amino acids (dlZ) of the amino (N)-terminal variable hydrophobic region that anchors the mature wild-type NA tetrameric structure in the infected cell or influenza viral membrane. Comparison of the phenotypes of these mutants showed that this region in the NA molecule also includes sequences that control translocation of the nascent polypeptide into membrane organelles for glycosylation. Images PMID:6700587

  11. Structure of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 (PIV5) Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase (HN) Ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brett D.; Yuan, Ping; Bose, Sayantan; Kors, Christopher A.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2013-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses cause a wide variety of human and animal diseases. They infect host cells using the coordinated action of two surface glycoproteins, the receptor binding protein (HN, H, or G) and the fusion protein (F). HN binds sialic acid on host cells (hemagglutinin activity) and hydrolyzes these receptors during viral egress (neuraminidase activity, NA). Additionally, receptor binding is thought to induce a conformational change in HN that subsequently triggers major refolding in homotypic F, resulting in fusion of virus and target cell membranes. HN is an oligomeric type II transmembrane protein with a short cytoplasmic domain and a large ectodomain comprising a long helical stalk and large globular head domain containing the enzymatic functions (NA domain). Extensive biochemical characterization has revealed that HN-stalk residues determine F specificity and activation. However, the F/HN interaction and the mechanisms whereby receptor binding regulates F activation are poorly defined. Recently, a structure of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) HN ectodomain revealed the heads (NA domains) in a “4-heads-down” conformation whereby two of the heads form a symmetrical interaction with two sides of the stalk. The interface includes stalk residues implicated in triggering F, and the heads sterically shield these residues from interaction with F (at least on two sides). Here we report the x-ray crystal structure of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN ectodomain in a “2-heads-up/2-heads-down” conformation where two heads (covalent dimers) are in the “down position,” forming a similar interface as observed in the NDV HN ectodomain structure, and two heads are in an “up position.” The structure supports a model in which the heads of HN transition from down to up upon receptor binding thereby releasing steric constraints and facilitating the interaction between critical HN-stalk residues and F. PMID:23950713

  12. Neuraminidase A-Exposed Galactose Promotes Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Formation during Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, Krystle A.; Shenoy, Anukul T.; Milner, Jeffrey; Gilley, Ryan P.; McClure, Erin; Hinojosa, Cecilia A.; Kumar, Nikhil; Daugherty, Sean C.; Tallon, Luke J.; Ott, Sandra; King, Samantha J.; Ferreira, Daniela M.; Gordon, Stephen B.; Tettelin, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the nasopharynx. Herein we show that carbon availability is distinct between the nasopharynx and bloodstream of adult humans: glucose is absent from the nasopharynx, whereas galactose is abundant. We demonstrate that pneumococcal neuraminidase A (NanA), which cleaves terminal sialic acid residues from host glycoproteins, exposed galactose on the surface of septal epithelial cells, thereby increasing its availability during colonization. We observed that S. pneumoniae mutants deficient in NanA and β-galactosidase A (BgaA) failed to form biofilms in vivo despite normal biofilm-forming abilities in vitro. Subsequently, we observed that glucose, sucrose, and fructose were inhibitory for biofilm formation, whereas galactose, lactose, and low concentrations of sialic acid were permissive. Together these findings suggested that the genes involved in biofilm formation were under some form of carbon catabolite repression (CCR), a regulatory network in which genes involved in the uptake and metabolism of less-preferred sugars are silenced during growth with preferred sugars. Supporting this notion, we observed that a mutant deficient in pyruvate oxidase, which converts pyruvate to acetyl-phosphate under non-CCR-inducing growth conditions, was unable to form biofilms. Subsequent comparative transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of planktonic and biofilm-grown pneumococci showed that metabolic pathways involving the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-phosphate and subsequently leading to fatty acid biosynthesis were consistently upregulated during diverse biofilm growth conditions. We conclude that carbon availability in the nasopharynx impacts pneumococcal biofilm formation in vivo. Additionally, biofilm formation involves metabolic pathways not previously appreciated to play an important role. PMID:27481242

  13. Preterm human milk contains a large pool of latent TGF-β, which can be activated by exogenous neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; Blanco, Cynthia L; Frost, Brandy L; Reeves, Aaron A; Jagadeeswaran, Ramasamy; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Safarulla, Azif; Mandal, Partha; Garzon, Steven A; Raj, J Usha; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2013-06-15

    Human milk contains substantial amounts of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, particularly the isoform TGF-β2. We previously showed in preclinical models that enterally administered TGF-β2 can protect against necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), an inflammatory bowel necrosis of premature infants. In this study we hypothesized that premature infants remain at higher risk of NEC than full-term infants, even when they receive their own mother's milk, because preterm human milk contains less bioactive TGF-β than full-term milk. Our objective was to compare TGF-β bioactivity in preterm vs. full-term milk and identify factors that activate milk-borne TGF-β. Mothers who delivered between 23 0/7 and 31 6/7 wk or at ≥37 wk of gestation provided milk samples at serial time points. TGF-β bioactivity and NF-κB signaling were measured using specific reporter cells and in murine intestinal tissue explants. TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, and various TGF-β activators were measured by real-time PCR, enzyme immunoassays, or established enzymatic activity assays. Preterm human milk showed minimal TGF-β bioactivity in the native state but contained a large pool of latent TGF-β. TGF-β2 was the predominant isoform of TGF-β in preterm milk. Using a combination of several in vitro and ex vivo models, we show that neuraminidase is a key regulator of TGF-β bioactivity in human milk. Finally, we show that addition of bacterial neuraminidase to preterm human milk increased TGF-β bioactivity. Preterm milk contains large quantities of TGF-β, but most of it is in an inactive state. Addition of neuraminidase can increase TGF-β bioactivity in preterm milk and enhance its anti-inflammatory effects.

  14. Chimeric neuraminidase and mutant PB1 gene constellation improves growth and yield of H5N1 vaccine candidate virus.

    PubMed

    Plant, Ewan P; Ye, Zhiping

    2015-04-01

    We previously showed that a mutated PB1 gene improved the growth kinetics of a H3N2 influenza reassortant. Here, we showed that the same mutations improved the growth kinetics of a virus containing the A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) haemagglutinin and neuraminidase (NA). Total protein yield and NA activity were increased when a chimeric NA was included. These increases indicated that the synergistic effect was due to the gene constellation containing both the altered PB1 gene and the chimeric NA gene.

  15. An extract from Taxodium distichum targets hemagglutinin- and neuraminidase-related activities of influenza virus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chung-Fan; Chen, Yu-Li; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Ho, Jin-Yuan; Huang, Chun-Hsun; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus remains an emerging virus and causes pandemics with high levels of fatality. After screening different plant extracts with potential anti-influenza activity, a water extract of Taxodium distichum stems (TDSWex) showed excellent activity against influenza viruses. The EC50 of TDSWex was 0.051 ± 0.024 mg/mL against influenza virus A/WSN/33. TDSWex had excellent antiviral efficacy against various strains of human influenza A and B viruses, particularly oseltamivir-resistant clinical isolates and a swine-origin influenza strain. We observed that the synthesis of viral RNA and protein were inhibited in the presence of TDSWex. The results of the time-of-addition assay suggested that TDSWex inhibited viral entry and budding. In the hemagglutination inhibition assay, TDSWex inhibited the hemagglutination of red blood cells, implying that the extract targeted hemagglutin-related functions such as viral entry. In the attachment and penetration assay, TDSWex showed antiviral activity with EC50s of 0.045 ± 0.026 and 0.012 ± 0.003 mg/mL, respectively. In addition, TDSWex blocked neuraminidase activity. We conclude that TDSWex has bimodal activities against both hemagglutinin and neuraminidase during viral replication. PMID:27796330

  16. In-Silico screening of Pleconaril and its novel substituted derivatives with Neuraminidase of H1N1 Influenza strain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuraminidase (NA) is a prominent surface antigen of Influenza viruses, which helps in release of viruses from the host cells after replication. Anti influenza drugs such as Oseltamivir target a highly conserved active site of NA, which comprises of 8 functional residues (R118, D151, R152, R224, E276, R292, R371 and Y406) to restrict viral release from host cells, thus inhibiting its ability to cleave sialic acid residues on the cell membrane. Reports on the emergence of Oseltamivir resistant strains of H1N1 Influenza virus necessitated a search for alternative drug candidates. Pleconaril is a novel antiviral drug being developed by Schering-Plough to treat Picornaviridae infections, and is in its late clinical trials stage. Since, Pleconaril was designed to bind the highly conserved hydrophobic binding site on VP1 protein of Picorna viruses, the ability of Pleconaril and its novel substituted derivatives to bind highly conserved hydrophobic active site of H1N1 Neuraminidase, targeting which oseltamivir has been designed was investigated. Result 310 novel substituted variants of Pleconaril were designed using Chemsketch software and docked into the highly conserved active site of NA using arguslab software. 198 out of 310 Pleconaril variants analyzed for docking with NA active site were proven effective, based on their free binding energy. Conclusion Pleconaril variants with F, Cl, Br, CH3, OH and aromatic ring substitutions were shown to be effective alternatives to Oseltamivir as anti influenza drugs. PMID:22340192

  17. Chemoenzymatic Syntheses of Sialylated Oligosaccharides Containing C5-Modified Neuraminic Acids for Dual Inhibition of Hemagglutinins and Neuraminidases.

    PubMed

    Birikaki, Lémonia; Pradeau, Stéphanie; Armand, Sylvie; Priem, Bernard; Márquez-Domínguez, Luis; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Santos-López, Gerardo; Samain, Eric; Driguez, Hugues; Fort, Sébastien

    2015-07-20

    A fast chemoenzymatic synthesis of sialylated oligosaccharides containing C5-modified neuraminic acids is reported. Analogues of GM3 and GM2 ganglioside saccharidic portions where the acetyl group of NeuNAc has been replaced by a phenylacetyl (PhAc) or a propanoyl (Prop) moiety have been efficiently prepared with metabolically engineered E. coli bacteria. GM3 analogues were either obtained by chemoselective modification of biosynthetic N-acetyl-sialyllactoside (GM3 NAc) or by direct bacterial synthesis using C5-modified neuraminic acid precursors. The latter strategy proved to be very versatile as it led to an efficient synthesis of GM2 analogues. These glycomimetics were assessed against hemagglutinins and sialidases. In particular, the GM3 NPhAc displayed a binding affinity for Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA) similar to that of GM3 NAc, while being resistant to hydrolysis by Vibrio cholerae (VC) neuraminidase. A preliminary study with influenza viruses also confirmed a selective inhibition of N1 neuraminidase by GM3 NPhAc, suggesting potential developments for the detection of flu viruses and for fighting them.

  18. In the Shadow of Hemagglutinin: A Growing Interest in Influenza Viral Neuraminidase and Its Role as a Vaccine Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Krammer, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of vaccine prophylaxis and antiviral therapeutics, the influenza virus continues to have a significant, annual impact on the morbidity and mortality of human beings, highlighting the continued need for research in the field. Current vaccine strategies predominantly focus on raising a humoral response against hemagglutinin (HA)—the more abundant, immunodominant glycoprotein on the surface of the influenza virus. In fact, anti-HA antibodies are often neutralizing, and are used routinely to assess vaccine immunogenicity. Neuraminidase (NA), the other major glycoprotein on the surface of the influenza virus, has historically served as the target for antiviral drug therapy and is much less studied in the context of humoral immunity. Yet, the quest to discern the exact importance of NA-based protection is decades old. Also, while antibodies against the NA glycoprotein fail to prevent infection of the influenza virus, anti-NA immunity has been shown to lessen the severity of disease, decrease viral lung titers in animal models, and reduce viral shedding. Growing evidence is intimating the possible gains of including the NA antigen in vaccine design, such as expanded strain coverage and increased overall immunogenicity of the vaccine. After giving a tour of general influenza virology, this review aims to discuss the influenza A virus neuraminidase while focusing on both the historical and present literature on the use of NA as a possible vaccine antigen. PMID:24960271

  19. Functional balance of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activities accompanies the emergence of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Zhu, Xueyong; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M; Yu, Wenli; Paulson, James C; Wilson, Ian A

    2012-09-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic is the first human pandemic in decades and was of swine origin. Although swine are believed to be an intermediate host in the emergence of new human influenza viruses, there is still little known about the host barriers that keep swine influenza viruses from entering the human population. We surveyed swine progenitors and human viruses from the 2009 pandemic and measured the activities of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), which are the two viral surface proteins that interact with host glycan receptors. A functional balance of these two activities (HA binding and NA cleavage) is found in human viruses but not in the swine progenitors. The human 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus exhibited both low HA avidity for glycan receptors as a result of mutations near the receptor binding site and weak NA enzymatic activity. Thus, a functional match between the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase appears to be necessary for efficient transmission between humans and may be an indicator of the pandemic potential of zoonotic viruses.

  20. Structure of the Ulster Strain Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Reveals Auto-Inhibitory Interactions Associated with Low Virulence

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ping; Paterson, Reay G.; Leser, George P.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2012-09-06

    Paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) plays roles in viral entry and maturation, including binding to sialic acid receptors, activation of the F protein to drive membrane fusion, and enabling virion release during virus budding. HN can thereby directly influence virulence and in a subset of avirulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains, such as NDV Ulster, HN must be proteolytically activated to remove a C-terminal extension not found in other NDV HN proteins. Ulster HN is 616 amino acids long and the 45 amino acid C-terminal extension present in its precursor (HN0) form has to be cleaved to render HN biologically active. Here we show that Ulster HN contains an inter-subunit disulfide bond within the C-terminal extension at residue 596, which regulates HN activities and neuraminidase (NA) domain dimerization. We determined the crystal structure of the dimerized NA domain containing the C-terminal extension, which extends along the outside of the sialidase {beta}-propeller domain and inserts C-terminal residues into the NA domain active site. The C-terminal extension also engages a secondary sialic acid binding site present in NDV HN proteins, which is located at the NA domain dimer interface, that most likely blocks its attachment function. These results clarify how the Ulster HN C-terminal residues lead to an auto-inhibited state of HN, the requirement for proteolytic activation of HN{sub 0} and associated reduced virulence.

  1. Development of a Magnetic Electrochemical Bar Code Array for Point Mutation Detection in the H5N1 Neuraminidase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Krejcova, Ludmila; Hynek, David; Kopel, Pavel; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Adam, Vojtech; Hubalek, Jaromir; Babula, Petr; Trnkova, Libuse; Kizek, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Since its first official detection in the Guangdong province of China in 1996, the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of H5N1 subtype (HPAI H5N1) has reportedly been the cause of outbreaks in birds in more than 60 countries, 24 of which were European. The main issue is still to develop effective antiviral drugs. In this case, single point mutation in the neuraminidase gene, which causes resistance to antiviral drug and is, therefore, subjected to many studies including ours, was observed. In this study, we developed magnetic electrochemical bar code array for detection of single point mutations (mismatches in up to four nucleotides) in H5N1 neuraminidase gene. Paramagnetic particles Dynabeads® with covalently bound oligo (dT)25 were used as a tool for isolation of complementary H5N1 chains (H5N1 Zhejin, China and Aichi). For detection of H5N1 chains, oligonucleotide chains of lengths of 12 (+5 adenine) or 28 (+5 adenine) bp labeled with quantum dots (CdS, ZnS and/or PbS) were used. Individual probes hybridized to target molecules specifically with efficiency higher than 60%. The obtained signals identified mutations present in the sequence. Suggested experimental procedure allows obtaining further information from the redox signals of nucleic acids. Moreover, the used biosensor exhibits sequence specificity and low limits of detection of subnanogram quantities of target nucleic acids. PMID:23860384

  2. An Amino Acid in the Stalk Domain of N1 Neuraminidase Is Critical for Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Mark; Duan, Susu; Wong, Sook-San; Kumar, Gyanendra; Baviskar, Pradyumna; Collin, Emily; Russell, Charles; Barman, Subrata; Hause, Benjamin; Webby, Richard

    2017-01-15

    Neuraminidase (NA) is a sialidase expressed on the surface of influenza A viruses that releases progeny viruses from the surface of infected cells and prevents viruses becoming trapped in mucus. It is a homotetramer, with each monomer consisting of a transmembrane region, a stalk, and a globular head with sialidase activity. We recently characterized two swine viruses of the pandemic H1N1 lineage, A/swine/Virginia/1814-1/2012 (pH1N1low-1) and A/swine/Virginia/1814-2/2012 (pH1N1low-2), with almost undetectable NA enzymatic activity compared to that of the highly homologous A/swine/Pennsylvania/2436/2012 (pH1N1-1) and A/swine/Minnesota/2499/2012 (pH1N1-2) viruses. pH1N1-1 transmitted to aerosol contact ferrets, but pH1N1low-1 did not. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular determinants associated with low NA activity as potential markers of aerosol transmission. We identified the shared unique substitutions M19V, A232V, D248N, and I436V (N1 numbering) in pH1N1low-1 and pH1N1low-2. pH1N1low-1 also had the unique Y66D substitution in the stalk domain, where 66Y was highly conserved in N1 NAs. Restoration of 66Y was critical for the NA activity of pH1N1low-1 NA, although 19M or 248D in conjunction with 66Y was required to recover the level of activity to that of pH1N1 viruses. Studies of NA stability and molecular modeling revealed that 66Y likely stabilized the NA homotetramer. Therefore, 66Y in the stalk domain of N1 NA was critical for the stability of the NA tetramer and, subsequently, for NA enzymatic activity.

  3. Neuraminidase stalk length and additional glycosylation of the hemagglutinin influence the virulence of influenza H5N1 viruses for mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following passage of avian influenza H5 and H7 viruses in poultry, the hemagglutinin (HA) can acquire additional glycosylation sites and the neuraminidase (NA) stalk becomes shorter. We investigated whether these features play a role in the pathogenesis of infection in mammalian hosts. From 1996 t...

  4. Progress of small molecular inhibitors in the development of anti-influenza virus agents

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoai; Wu, Xiuli; Sun, Qizheng; Zhang, Chunhui; Yang, Shengyong; Li, Lin; Jia, Zhiyun

    2017-01-01

    The influenza pandemic is a major threat to human health, and highly aggressive strains such as H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9 have emphasized the need for therapeutic strategies to combat these pathogens. Influenza anti-viral agents, especially active small molecular inhibitors play important roles in controlling pandemics while vaccines are developed. Currently, only a few drugs, which function as influenza neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors and M2 ion channel protein inhibitors, are approved in clinical. However, the acquired resistance against current anti-influenza drugs and the emerging mutations of influenza virus itself remain the major challenging unmet medical needs for influenza treatment. It is highly desirable to identify novel anti-influenza agents. This paper reviews the progress of small molecular inhibitors act as antiviral agents, which include hemagglutinin (HA) inhibitors, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) inhibitors, NA inhibitors and M2 ion channel protein inhibitors etc. Moreover, we also summarize new, recently reported potential targets and discuss strategies for the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs. PMID:28382157

  5. I223R Mutation in Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Neuraminidase Confers Reduced Susceptibility to Oseltamivir and Zanamivir and Enhanced Resistance with H275Y

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Jaoudé, Georges; Scemla, Anne; Ribaud, Patricia; Mercier-Delarue, Séverine; Caro, Valérie; Enouf, Vincent; Simon, François; Molina, Jean-Michel; van der Werf, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Background Resistance of pandemic A(H1N1)2009 (H1N1pdm09) virus to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) has remained limited. A new mutation I223R in the neuraminidase (NA) of H1N1pdm09 virus has been reported along with H275Y in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of I223R on oseltamivir and zanamivir susceptibility. Methods The NA enzymatic characteristics and susceptibility to NAIs of viruses harbouring the mutations I223R and H275Y alone or in combination were analyzed on viruses produced by reverse genetics and on clinical isolates collected from an immunocompromised patient with sustained influenza H1N1pdm09 virus shedding and treated by oseltamivir (days 0–15) and zanamivir (days 15–25 and 70–80). Results Compared with the wild type, the NA of recombinant viruses and clinical isolates with H275Y or I223R mutations had about two-fold reduced affinity for the substrate. The H275Y and I223R isolates showed decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir (246-fold) and oseltamivir and zanamivir (8.9- and 4.9-fold), respectively. Reverse genetics assays confirmed these results and further showed that the double mutation H275Y and I223R conferred enhanced levels of resistance to oseltamivir and zanamivir (6195- and 15.2-fold). In the patient, six days after initiation of oseltamivir therapy, the mutation H275Y conferring oseltamivir resistance and the I223R mutation were detected in the NA. Mutations were detected concomitantly from day 6–69 but molecular cloning did not show any variant harbouring both mutations. Despite cessation of NAI treatment, the mutation I223R persisted along with additional mutations in the NA and the hemagglutinin. Conclusions Reduced susceptibility to both oseltamivir and zanamivir was conferred by the I223R mutation which potentiated resistance to both NAIs when associated with the H275Y mutation in the NA. Concomitant emergence of the I223R and H275Y mutations under oseltamivir treatment underlines

  6. Genome Stability of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Based on Analysis of Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Genes.

    PubMed

    Espínola, Emilio E

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A virus (H1N1), which arose in 2009, constituted the fourth pandemic after the cases of 1918, 1957, and 1968. This new variant was formed by a triple reassortment, with genomic segments from swine, avian, and human influenza origins. The objective of this study was to analyze sequences of hemagglutinin (n=2038) and neuraminidase (n=1273) genes, in order to assess the extent of diversity among circulating 2009-2010 strains, estimate if these genes evolved through positive, negative, or neutral selection models of evolution during the pandemic phase, and analyze the worldwide percentage of detection of important amino acid mutations that could enhance the viral performance, such as transmissibility or resistance to drugs. A continuous surveillance by public health authorities will be critical to monitor the appearance of new influenza variants, especially in animal reservoirs such as swine and birds, in order to prevent the potential animal-human transmission of viruses with pandemic potential.

  7. Angiogenesis Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... inhibitors: current strategies and future prospects. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2010; 60(4):222–243. [PubMed Abstract] Chen HX, Cleck JN. Adverse effects of anticancer agents that target the VEGF pathway. Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology 2009; 6(8):465– ...

  8. Carboxylesterase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, M. Jason; Potter, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Carboxylesterases play major roles in the hydrolysis of numerous therapeutically active compounds. This is, in part, due to the prevalence of the ester moiety in these small molecules. However, the impact these enzymes may play on drug stability and pharmacokinetics is rarely considered prior to molecule development. Therefore, the application of selective inhibitors of this class of proteins may have utility in modulating the metabolism, distribution and toxicity of agents that are subjected to enzyme hydrolysis. Areas covered This review details the development of all such compounds dating back to 1986, but principally focuses on the very recent identification of selective human carboxylesterases inhibitors. Expert opinion The implementation of carboxylesterase inhibitors may significantly revolutionize drug discovery. Such molecules may allow for improved efficacy of compounds inactivated by this class of enzymes and/or reduce the toxicity of agents that are activated by these proteins. Furthermore, since lack of carboxylesterase activity appears to have no obvious biological consequence, these compounds could be applied in combination with virtually any esterified drug. Therefore, inhibitors of these proteins may have utility in altering drug hydrolysis and distribution in vivo. The characteristics, chemical and biological properties, and potential uses of such agents, are discussed here. PMID:21609191

  9. Oseltamivir activity against avian influenza H9N2 strain with different point mutations in their neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Kumosani, Taha; Ahmadieh, Diana; Shaib, Houssam; Hamadeh, Shadi; Jaber, Lina; Harakeh, Steve; Iyer, Archana; Azhar, Esam; Barbour, Elie

    2015-01-01

    The present study has two aims: to optimize the antiviral activity of oseltamivir in chicken embryos against an avian influenza-H9N2 strain (P0) and to apply the optimized protocol for studying the drug susceptibility of 4 H9N2 mutants (M1, M2, M3, and M4). As for the first aim, oseltamivir antiviral activity was monitored upon its delivery into 9-day-old chicken embryo at a concentration of 0.27 mg/100 μl, against 7 doses of the P0 strain, ranging between 1.2 x 10(-5) and 2.0 Hemagglutination (HA) units. Oseltamivir showed its highest efficacy in reduction of viral propagation (95% reduction in HA titer) (P 〈0.05), when the inoculum level contained a minimum HA units of 1.2 x 10(-5). For the second aim of this study, the application of the 1.2 x 10-(5) HA units of the virus in inocula for the evaluation of oseltamivir-antiviral effect against the 4 H9N2 mutants revealed an emergence of a resistant mutant (M1), associated with 2 adjacent point mutations in its neuraminidase (N) amino acid (aa) sequence at positions 46 and 47. The other 3 mutants maintained a variable sensitivity to oseltamivir, resulting in the following reduction in HA titers: M2 (82.9%), M3 (61.5%), and M4 (100.0%). How the point mutations of the neuraminidase sequences affected the susceptibility of H9N2 virus to oseltamivir is still to be determined and deserve further investigations.

  10. Comparison of Serum Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Inhibition Antibodies After 2010–2011 Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccination in Healthcare Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Laguio-Vila, Maryrose R.; Thompson, Mark G.; Reynolds, Sue; Spencer, Sarah M.; Gaglani, Manjusha; Naleway, Allison; Ball, Sarah; Bozeman, Sam; Baker, Steven; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Levine, Min; Katz, Jackie; Fry, Alicia M.; Treanor, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most inactivated influenza vaccines contain purified and standardized hemagglutinin (HA) and residual neuraminidase (NA) antigens. Vaccine-associated HA antibody responses (hemagglutination inhibition [HAI]) are well described, but less is known about the immune response to the NA. Methods. Serum of 1349 healthcare personnel (HCP) electing or declining the 2010–2011 trivalent-inactivated influenza vaccine ([IIV3], containing A/California/7/2009 p(H1N1), A/Perth/16/2009 [H3N2], B/Brisbane/60/2008 strains) were tested for NA-inhibiting (NAI) antibody by a modified lectin-based assay using pseudotyped N1 and N2 influenza A viruses with an irrelevant (H5) HA. Neuraminidase-inhibiting and HAI antibody titers were evaluated approximately 30 days after vaccination and end-of-season for those with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed influenza infection. Results. In 916 HCP (68%) receiving IIV3, a 2-fold increase in N1 and N2 NAI antibody occurred in 63.7% and 47.3%, respectively. Smaller responses occurred in HCP age >50 years and those without prior 2009–2010 IIV3 nor monovalent A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccinations. Forty-four PCR-confirmed influenza infections were observed, primarily affecting those with lower pre-exposure HAI and NAI antibodies. Higher pre-NAI titers correlated with shorter duration of illness for A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections. Conclusions. Trivalent-inactivated influenza vaccine is modestly immunogenic for N1 and N2 antigens in HCP. Vaccines eliciting robust NA immune responses may improve efficacy and reduce influenza-associated morbidity. PMID:25884004

  11. Structure of the Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) ectodomain reveals a four-helix bundle stalk

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ping; Swanson, Kurt A.; Leser, George P.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2014-10-02

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein plays multiple roles in viral entry and egress, including binding to sialic acid receptors, activating the fusion (F) protein to activate membrane fusion and viral entry, and cleaving sialic acid from carbohydrate chains. HN is an oligomeric integral membrane protein consisting of an N-terminal transmembrane domain, a stalk region, and an enzymatically active neuraminidase (NA) domain. Structures of the HN NA domains have been solved previously; however, the structure of the stalk region has remained elusive. The stalk region contains specificity determinants for F interactions and activation, underlying the requirement for homotypic F and HN interactions in viral entry. Mutations of the Newcastle disease virus HN stalk region have been shown to affect both F activation and NA activities, but a structural basis for understanding these dual affects on HN functions has been lacking. Here, we report the structure of the Newcastle disease virus HN ectodomain, revealing dimers of NA domain dimers flanking the N-terminal stalk domain. The stalk forms a parallel tetrameric coiled-coil bundle (4HB) that allows classification of extensive mutational data, providing insight into the functional roles of the stalk region. Mutations that affect both F activation and NA activities map predominantly to the 4HB hydrophobic core, whereas mutations that affect only F-protein activation map primarily to the 4HB surface. Two of four NA domains interact with the 4HB stalk, and residues at this interface in both the stalk and NA domain have been implicated in HN function.

  12. Structure determination of the 1918 H1N1 neuraminidase from a crystal with lattice-translocation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xueyong; Xu, Xiaojin; Wilson, Ian A.

    2008-08-01

    The structure of the 1918 H1N1 neuraminidase was determined to 1.65 Å from crystals with a lattice-translocation defect using uncorrected, as well as corrected, diffraction data. Few examples of macromolecular crystals containing lattice-translocation defects have been published in the literature. Lattice translocation and twinning are believed to be two common but different crystal-growth anomalies. While the successful use of twinned data for structure determination has become relatively routine in recent years, structure determination of crystals with lattice-translocation defects has not often been reported. To date, only four protein crystal structures containing such a crystal defect have been determined, using corrected, but not uncorrected, intensity data. In this report, the crystallization, structure determination and refinement of N1 neuraminidase derived from the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus (18NA) at 1.65 Å resolution are described. The crystal was indexed in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.7, b = 138.5, c = 117.9 Å, and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The lattice-translocation vector in the 18NA crystal was (0, 1/2, 1/2) or its equivalent vector (1/2, 0, 1/2) owing to the C lattice symmetry. Owing to this special lattice-translocation vector in space group C222{sub 1}, structure refinement could be achieved in two different ways: using corrected or uncorrected diffraction data. In the refinement with uncorrected data, a composite model was built to represent the molecules in the translated and untranslated layers, respectively. This composite structure model provided a unique example to examine how the molecules were arranged in the two lattice domains resulting from lattice-translocation defects.

  13. Screening and evaluation of commonly-used anti-influenza Chinese herbal medicines based on anti-neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Zhang, Ding-Kun; Guo, Yu-Ming; Feng, Wu-Wen; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Cong-En; Zhou, Yong-Feng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jia-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Xiao, Xiao-He; Yang, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Anti-influenza Chinese herbal medicines (anti-flu CHMs) have advantages in preventing and treating influenza virus infection. Despite various data on antiviral activities of some anti-flu CHMs have been reported, most of them could not be compared using the standard evaluation methods for antiviral activity. This situation poses an obstacle to a wide application of anti-flu CHMs. Thus, it was necessary to develop an evaluation method to estimate antiviral activities of anti-flu CHMs. In the present study, we searched for anti-flu CHMs, based on clinic usage, to select study objects from commonly-used patented anti-flu Chinese medicines. Then, a neuraminidase-based bioassay, optimized and verified by HPLC method by our research group, was adopted to detect antiviral activities of selected 26 anti-flu CHMs. Finally, eight of these herbs, including Coptidis Rhizoma, Isatidis Folium, Lonicerae Flos, Scutellaria Radix, Cyrtomium Rhizome, Houttuynia Cordata, Gardeniae Fructus, and Chrysanthemi Indici Flos, were shown to have strong antiviral activities with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values being 2.02 to 6.78 mg·mL(-1) (expressed as raw materials). In contrast, the IC50 value of positive control peramivir was 0.38 mg·mL(-1). Considering the extract yields of CHMs, the active component in these herbs may have a stronger antiviral activity than peramivir, suggesting that these herbs could be further researched for active compounds. Moreover, the proposed neuraminidase-based bioassay was high-throughput and simple and could be used for evaluation and screening of anti-flu CHMs as well as for their quality control.

  14. Human parainfluenza virus infection of the airway epithelium: viral hemagglutinin-neuraminidase regulates fusion protein activation and modulates infectivity.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Laura M; Porotto, Matteo; Yokoyama, Christine C; Palmer, Samantha G; Mungall, Bruce A; Greengard, Olga; Niewiesk, Stefan; Moscona, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Three discrete activities of the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein, receptor binding, receptor cleaving (neuraminidase), and triggering of the fusion protein, each affect the promotion of viral fusion and entry. For human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), the effects of specific mutations that alter these functions of the receptor-binding protein have been well characterized using cultured monolayer cells, which have identified steps that are potentially relevant to pathogenesis. In the present study, proposed mechanisms that are relevant to pathogenesis were tested in natural host cell cultures, a model of the human airway epithelium (HAE) in which primary HAE cells are cultured at an air-liquid interface and retain functional properties. Infection of HAE cells with wild-type HPIV3 and variant viruses closely reflects that seen in an animal model, the cotton rat, suggesting that HAE cells provide an ideal system for assessing the interplay of host cell and viral factors in pathogenesis and for screening for inhibitory molecules that would be effective in vivo. Both HN's receptor avidity and the function and timing of F activation by HN require a critical balance for the establishment of ongoing infection in the HAE, and these HN functions independently modulate the production of active virions. Alterations in HN's F-triggering function lead to the release of noninfectious viral particles and a failure of the virus to spread. The finding that the dysregulation of F triggering prohibits successful infection in HAE cells suggests that antiviral strategies targeted to HN's F-triggering activity may have promise in vivo.

  15. Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Pham, Vu Phong; Le, Ha Thi Hong; Nguyen, Ha Truc; Le, Vu Tri; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Ngo et al. (2012) Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 6–10. Surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in 31 pig farms in northern and southern parts of Vietnam was conducted. Six H3N2 influenza A viruses were isolated from a pig farm in southern Vietnam. They were novel genetic reassortants between a triple–reassortant SIV and a human seasonal H3N2 virus. Their hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes were derived from a human virus circulating around 2004–2006 and the remaining genes from a triple‐reassortant SIV that originated in North America. This is the first report describing the isolation of a novel triple‐reassortant SIV in Vietnam. PMID:21668659

  16. Amino Acid 316 of Hemagglutinin and the Neuraminidase Stalk Length Influence Virulence of H9N2 Influenza Virus in Chickens and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yipeng; Tan, Yuanyuan; Wei, Kai; Sun, Honglei; Shi, Yi; Pu, Juan; Yang, Hanchun; Gao, George F.; Yin, Yanbo; Feng, Wenhai; Perez, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    H9N2 influenza viruses with an A316S substitution in hemagglutinin (HA) and a shorter neuraminidase (NA) stalk have become predominant in China. The A316S was shown to increase HA cleavage efficiency when combined with short stalk NA, and the short stalk NA improved NA enzyme activity and release of virus from erythrocytes. Single mutations or combinations of these mutations strengthened the virulence of H9N2 virus in chickens and mice. PMID:23269805

  17. Structure and Mutagenesis of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Stalk Domain Reveals a Four-Helix Bundle and the Role of the Stalk in Fusion Promotion

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sayantan; Welch, Brett D.; Kors, Christopher A.; Yuan, Ping; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2014-10-02

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires the fusion protein (F) and a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], H, or G). The multifunctional HN protein of some paramyxoviruses, besides functioning as the receptor (sialic acid) binding protein (hemagglutinin activity) and the receptor-destroying protein (neuraminidase activity), enhances F activity, presumably by lowering the activation energy required for F to mediate fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Before or upon receptor binding by the HN globular head, F is believed to interact with the HN stalk. Unfortunately, until recently none of the receptor binding protein crystal structures have shown electron density for the stalk domain. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN exists as a noncovalent dimer-of-dimers on the surface of cells, linked by a single disulfide bond in the stalk. Here we present the crystal structure of the PIV5-HN stalk domain at a resolution of 2.65 {angstrom}, revealing a four-helix bundle (4HB) with an upper (N-terminal) straight region and a lower (C-terminal) supercoiled part. The hydrophobic core residues are a mix of an 11-mer repeat and a 3- to 4-heptad repeat. To functionally characterize the role of the HN stalk in F interactions and fusion, we designed mutants along the PIV5-HN stalk that are N-glycosylated to physically disrupt F-HN interactions. By extensive study of receptor binding, neuraminidase activity, oligomerization, and fusion-promoting functions of the mutant proteins, we found a correlation between the position of the N-glycosylation mutants on the stalk structure and their neuraminidase activities as well as their abilities to promote fusion.

  18. Structure and mutagenesis of the parainfluenza virus 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase stalk domain reveals a four-helix bundle and the role of the stalk in fusion promotion.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Welch, Brett D; Kors, Christopher A; Yuan, Ping; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Lamb, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires the fusion protein (F) and a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], H, or G). The multifunctional HN protein of some paramyxoviruses, besides functioning as the receptor (sialic acid) binding protein (hemagglutinin activity) and the receptor-destroying protein (neuraminidase activity), enhances F activity, presumably by lowering the activation energy required for F to mediate fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Before or upon receptor binding by the HN globular head, F is believed to interact with the HN stalk. Unfortunately, until recently none of the receptor binding protein crystal structures have shown electron density for the stalk domain. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN exists as a noncovalent dimer-of-dimers on the surface of cells, linked by a single disulfide bond in the stalk. Here we present the crystal structure of the PIV5-HN stalk domain at a resolution of 2.65 Å, revealing a four-helix bundle (4HB) with an upper (N-terminal) straight region and a lower (C-terminal) supercoiled part. The hydrophobic core residues are a mix of an 11-mer repeat and a 3- to 4-heptad repeat. To functionally characterize the role of the HN stalk in F interactions and fusion, we designed mutants along the PIV5-HN stalk that are N-glycosylated to physically disrupt F-HN interactions. By extensive study of receptor binding, neuraminidase activity, oligomerization, and fusion-promoting functions of the mutant proteins, we found a correlation between the position of the N-glycosylation mutants on the stalk structure and their neuraminidase activities as well as their abilities to promote fusion.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of desialylation of erythrocyte membranes during haemolytic disease and haemolytic uraemic syndrome caused by the in vivo action of microbial neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Seitz, R C; Poschmann, A; Hellwege, H H

    1997-09-01

    Especially in childhood, the in vivo action of microbial neuraminidase may cause haemolytic anaemia or life-threatening haemolytic uraemic syndrome. The exposure of the Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) crypto-antigen and T-antigen polyagglutinability of erythrocytes has been described as the first sign of toxic cleavage of N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) from sialoglycoproteins of cell membranes. This phenomenon may, however, be too unspecific to initiate treatment for toxin elimination. The present study investigated the diagnostic effectiveness of a panel of three monoclonal antibodies (mcabs) for the estimation of the clinical significance of neuraminidase action in vivo. Depending on the amount of Neu5Ac released, the mcabs I-C4, II-Q9 and III-Y12 recognized different epitopes on erythrocyte asialoglycophorin. In 1345 patients, the mcab II-09 detected cleavage of Neu5Ac in 32 children who had T-antigen polyagglutinability and mild to moderate haemolytic anaemia. However, only 10 patients, whose erythrocytes were agglutinated by the mcabs III-Y12 or I-C4, developed severe haemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and finally the life-threatening haemolytic uraemic syndrome (p<0.0002). In conclusion, these mcabs provided an early marker of the in vivo action of neuraminidase. Two different degrees of erythrocyte desialylation, as defined by these mcabs, are suggested to reflect the severity of toxin-associated disease.

  20. A Conformational Restriction in the Influenza A Virus Neuraminidase Binding Site by R152 Results in a Combinational Effect of I222T and H274Y on Oseltamivir Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lan; Cao, Yang; Zhou, Jianfang; Qin, Kun; Zhu, Wenfei; Zhu, Yun; Yang, Lei; Wang, Dayan

    2014-01-01

    The I222K, I222R, and I222T substitutions in neuraminidase (NA) have been found in clinically derived 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 viruses with altered susceptibilities to NA inhibitors (NAIs). The effects of these substitutions, together with the most frequently observed resistance-related substitution, H274Y, on viral fitness and resistance mechanisms were further investigated in this study. Reduced sensitivities to oseltamivir were observed in all three mutants (I222K, I222R, and I222T). Furthermore, the I222K and I222T substitutions had a combinational effect of further increasing resistance in the presence of H274Y, which might result from a conformational restriction in the NA binding site. Of note, by using molecular dynamics simulations, R152, the neighbor of T222, was observed to translate to a position closer to T222, resulting in the narrowing of the binding pocket, which otherwise only subtends the residue substitution of H274Y. Moreover, significantly attenuated NA function and viral growth abilities were found in the I222K+H274Y double mutant, while the I222T+H274Y double mutant exhibited slightly delayed growth but had a peak viral titer similar to that of the wild-type virus in MDCK cells. The relative growth advantage of the I222T mutant versus the I222K mutant and the higher frequency of I222T emerging in N1 subtype influenza viruses raise concerns necessitating close monitoring of the dual substitutions I222T and H274Y. PMID:24366752

  1. Autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent mechanism of intracellular degradation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are highly complex and involve multiple proteins, including the kinases ULK1 and Vps34. The main function of autophagy is the maintenance of cell survival when modifications occur in the cellular environment. During the past decade, extensive studies have greatly improved our knowledge and autophagy has exploded as a research field. This process is now widely implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. In this review, we will summarize the different types of inhibitors that affect the autophagy machinery and provide some potential therapeutic perspectives.

  2. Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) promotes proliferation and migration as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yixue; Yuan, Shengxian; Zhao, Linghao; Wu, Mengchao; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the most malignant cancers worldwide, lacking biomarkers for subtyping and the reliable prognostication. Herein, we report a novel biomarker, NEU1 (neuraminidase 1), is up-regulated in most samples of HCC. The diagnostic value of NEU1 was evaluated by ROC, and the AUC (area under curve) reached 0.87 and 0.96 in two independent datasets, respectively. The survival differences of HCC patients with high or low expression of NEU1 were statistically significant, and a significant correlation between NEU1 expression and clinical information including stage, differentiation, AFP and embolus were observed. NEU1 expression, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were also higher in the portal vein tumor thrombus than tumor tissues. We also measured the proliferation and migration ability of two HCC cell lines following NEU1 interference and over-expression. Migration and proliferation rate were increased in NEU1 high expression groups. Moreover, gene expression studies identified pathways significantly associated with NEU1 expression. Among them, all the genes involved in spliceosomepathway were up regulated in NEU1-high group. In summary, our work identified NEU1 as a novel biomarker for both diagnosis and prognosis in HCC, and one of the most altered pathway of NEU1 is spliceosome. PMID:27602751

  3. Fusion activation by a headless parainfluenza virus 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase stalk suggests a modular mechanism for triggering.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Zokarkar, Aarohi; Welch, Brett D; Leser, George P; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Lamb, Robert A

    2012-09-25

    The Paramyxoviridae family of enveloped viruses enters cells through the concerted action of two viral glycoproteins. The receptor-binding protein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), H, or G, binds its cellular receptor and activates the fusion protein, F, which, through an extensive refolding event, brings viral and cellular membranes together, mediating virus-cell fusion. However, the underlying mechanism of F activation on receptor engagement remains unclear. Current hypotheses propose conformational changes in HN, H, or G propagating from the receptor-binding site in the HN, H, or G globular head to the F-interacting stalk region. We provide evidence that the receptor-binding globular head domain of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 HN protein is entirely dispensable for F activation. Considering together the crystal structures of HN from different paramyxoviruses, varying energy requirements for fusion activation, F activation involving the parainfluenza virus 5 HN stalk domain, and properties of a chimeric paramyxovirus HN protein, we propose a simple model for the activation of paramyxovirus fusion.

  4. Determination of Neuraminidase Kinetic Constants Using Whole Influenza Virus Preparations and Correction for Spectroscopic Interference by a Fluorogenic Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Lévêque, Vincent; Klumpp, Klaus; Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2013-01-01

    The influenza neuraminidase (NA) enzyme cleaves terminal sialic acid residues from cellular receptors, a process required for the release of newly synthesized virions. A balance of NA activity with sialic acid binding affinity of hemagglutinin (HA) is important for optimal virus replication. NA sequence evolution through genetic shift and drift contributes to the continuous modulation of influenza virus fitness and pathogenicity. A simple and reliable method for the determination of kinetic parameters of NA activity could add significant value to global influenza surveillance and provide parameters for the projection of fitness and pathogenicity of emerging virus variants. The use of fluorogenic substrate 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid (MUNANA) and cell- or egg-grown whole influenza virus preparations have been attractive components of NA enzyme activity investigations. We describe important criteria to be addressed when determining Km and Vmax kinetic parameters using this method: (1) determination of the dynamic range of MUNANA and 4-methylumbelliferone product (4-MU) fluorescence for the instrument used; (2) adjustment of reaction conditions to approximate initial rate conditions, i.e. ≤15% of substrate converted during the reaction, with signal-to-noise ratio ≥10; (3) correction for optical interference and inner filter effect caused by increasing concentrations of MUNANA substrate. The results indicate a significant interference of MUNANA with 4-MU fluorescence determination. The criteria proposed enable an improved rapid estimation of NA kinetic parameters and facilitate comparison of data between laboratories. PMID:23977037

  5. Determination of neuraminidase kinetic constants using whole influenza virus preparations and correction for spectroscopic interference by a fluorogenic substrate.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Lévêque, Vincent; Klumpp, Klaus; Webster, Robert G; Govorkova, Elena A

    2013-01-01

    The influenza neuraminidase (NA) enzyme cleaves terminal sialic acid residues from cellular receptors, a process required for the release of newly synthesized virions. A balance of NA activity with sialic acid binding affinity of hemagglutinin (HA) is important for optimal virus replication. NA sequence evolution through genetic shift and drift contributes to the continuous modulation of influenza virus fitness and pathogenicity. A simple and reliable method for the determination of kinetic parameters of NA activity could add significant value to global influenza surveillance and provide parameters for the projection of fitness and pathogenicity of emerging virus variants. The use of fluorogenic substrate 2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid (MUNANA) and cell- or egg-grown whole influenza virus preparations have been attractive components of NA enzyme activity investigations. We describe important criteria to be addressed when determining K(m) and V(max) kinetic parameters using this method: (1) determination of the dynamic range of MUNANA and 4-methylumbelliferone product (4-MU) fluorescence for the instrument used; (2) adjustment of reaction conditions to approximate initial rate conditions, i.e. ≤15% of substrate converted during the reaction, with signal-to-noise ratio ≥10; (3) correction for optical interference and inner filter effect caused by increasing concentrations of MUNANA substrate. The results indicate a significant interference of MUNANA with 4-MU fluorescence determination. The criteria proposed enable an improved rapid estimation of NA kinetic parameters and facilitate comparison of data between laboratories.

  6. Molecular modeling studies demonstrate key mutations that could affect the ligand recognition by influenza AH1N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L; García-Machorro, J; Quiliano, Miguel; Zimic, Mirko; Briz, Verónica; Rojas-Hernández, Saul; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this study was to identify neuraminidase (NA) residue mutants from human influenza AH1N1 using sequences from 1918 to 2012. Multiple alignment studies of complete NA sequences (5732) were performed. Subsequently, the crystallographic structure of the 1918 influenza (PDB ID: 3BEQ-A) was used as a wild-type structure and three-dimensional (3-D) template for homology modeling of the mutated selected NA sequences. The 3-D mutated NAs were refined using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (50 ns). The refined 3-D models were used to perform docking studies using oseltamivir. Multiple sequence alignment studies showed seven representative mutations (A232V, K262R, V263I, T264V, S367L, S369N, and S369K). MD simulations applied to 3-D NAs showed that each NA had different active-site shapes according to structural surface visualization and docking results. Moreover, Cartesian principal component analyses (cPCA) show structural differences among these NA structures caused by mutations. These theoretical results suggest that the selected mutations that are located outside of the active site of NA could affect oseltamivir recognition and could be associated with resistance to oseltamivir.

  7. Structural and functional characterization of neuraminidase-like molecule N10 derived from bat influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Sun, Xiaoman; Li, Zhixin; Liu, Yue; Vavricka, Christopher J; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F

    2012-11-13

    The recent discovery of the unique genome of influenza virus H17N10 in bats raises considerable doubt about the origin and evolution of influenza A viruses. It also identifies a neuraminidase (NA)-like protein, N10, that is highly divergent from the nine other well-established serotypes of influenza A NA (N1-N9). The structural elucidation and functional characterization of influenza NAs have illustrated the complexity of NA structures, thus raising a key question as to whether N10 has a special structure and function. Here the crystal structure of N10, derived from influenza virus A/little yellow-shouldered bat/Guatemala/153/2009 (H17N10), was solved at a resolution of 2.20 Å. Overall, the structure of N10 was found to be similar to that of the other known influenza NA structures. In vitro enzymatic assays demonstrated that N10 lacks canonical NA activity. A detailed structural analysis revealed dramatic alterations of the conserved active site residues that are unfavorable for the binding and cleavage of terminally linked sialic acid receptors. Furthermore, an unusual 150-loop (residues 147-152) was observed to participate in the intermolecular polar interactions between adjacent N10 molecules of the N10 tetramer. Our study of influenza N10 provides insight into the structure and function of the sialidase superfamily and sheds light on the molecular mechanism of bat influenza virus infection.

  8. Sequence analysis of the neuraminidase genes of avian influenza A viruses isolated from live bird markets in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chander, Yogesh; Jindal, Naresh; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Goyal, Sagar M

    2011-08-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) gene of avian influenza viruses isolated from Live Bird Markets (LBMs) on the east coast of the United States was sequenced and analyzed for mutations associated with antiviral resistance. In total, 189 isolates collected from 1994 to 2005 were used in this study. Full length sequences of the NA gene were obtained from 183 of the 189 isolates. Four different lengths of NA gene were observed; 40 isolates had full length (about 1400 nt), 132 isolates had a deletion of 48 nt, 10 isolates had a deletion of 66 nt, and one isolate had a deletion of 72 nt. Amino acid analysis of the sequence data showed point mutations distributed throughout the gene length. None of these deletions was in the catalytic region and most of the mutations were observed in the flanking regions. None of the isolates had mutations which are known to confer antiviral resistance. These results indicate that though NA gene is prone to mutational changes, much of those changes occur outside the catalytic domain.

  9. Surface expression of influenza virus neuraminidase, an amino-terminally anchored viral membrane glycoprotein, in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L V; Compans, R W; Davis, A R; Bos, T J; Nayak, D P

    1985-01-01

    We have investigated the site of surface expression of the neuraminidase (NA) glycoprotein of influenza A virus, which, in contrast to the hemagglutinin, is bound to membranes by hydrophobic residues near the NH2-terminus. Madin-Darby canine kidney or primary African green monkey kidney cells infected with influenza A/WSN/33 virus and subsequently labeled with monoclonal antibody to the NA and then with a colloidal gold- or ferritin-conjugated second antibody exhibited specific labeling of apical surfaces. Using simian virus 40 late expression vectors, we also studied the surface expression of the complete NA gene (SNC) and a truncated NA gene (SN10) in either primary or a polarized continuous line (MA104) of African green monkey kidney cells. The polypeptides encoded by the cloned NA cDNAs were expressed on the surface of both cell types. Analysis of [3H]mannose-labeled polypeptides from recombinant virus-infected MA104 cells showed that the products of cloned NA cDNA comigrated with glycosylated NA from influenza virus-infected cells. Both the complete and the truncated glycoproteins were found to be preferentially expressed on apical plasma membranes, as detected by immunogold labeling. These results indicate that the NA polypeptide contains structural features capable of directing the transport of the protein to apical cell surfaces and the first 10 amino-terminal residues of the NA polypeptide are not involved in this process. Images PMID:3016520

  10. What adaptive changes in hemagglutinin and neuraminidase are necessary for emergence of pandemic influenza virus from its avian precursor?

    PubMed

    Gambaryan, A S; Matrosovich, M N

    2015-07-01

    Wild ducks serve as the primary host for numerous and various influenza type A viruses. Occasionally, viruses from this reservoir can be transferred to other host species and cause outbreaks of influenza in fowl, swine, and horses, as well as result in novel human pandemics. Cellular tropism and range of susceptible host species are determined by interaction between virus and receptor molecules on cells. Here we discuss modern data regarding molecular features underlying interactions of influenza viruses with cellular receptors as well as a role for receptor specificity in interspecies transmission. By analyzing the earliest available pandemic influenza viruses (1918, 1957, 1968, 2009), we found that hemagglutinin reconfigured to recognize 2-6 sialic acid-containing receptors in the human upper airway tract together with altered enzymatic activity of neuraminidase necessary for maintaining functional balance with hemagglutinin are responsible for effective spread of influenza viruses in human populations. Resistance to low pH also contributes to this. Thus, a combination of such parameters makes it possible that influenza viruses give rise to novel pandemics.

  11. Punctuated Evolution of Influenza Virus Neuraminidase (A/H1N1) under Opposing Migration and Vaccination Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus contains two highly variable envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The structure and properties of HA, which is responsible for binding the virus to the cell that is being infected, change significantly when the virus is transmitted from avian or swine species to humans. Here we focus first on the simpler problem of the much smaller human individual evolutionary amino acid mutational changes in NA, which cleaves sialic acid groups and is required for influenza virus replication. Our thermodynamic panorama shows that very small amino acid changes can be monitored very accurately across many historic (1945–2011) Uniprot and NCBI strains using hydropathicity scales to quantify the roughness of water film packages. Quantitative sequential analysis is most effective with the fractal differential hydropathicity scale based on protein self-organized criticality (SOC). Our analysis shows that large-scale vaccination programs have been responsible for a very large convergent reduction in common influenza severity in the last century. Hydropathic analysis is capable of interpreting and even predicting trends of functional changes in mutation prolific viruses directly from amino acid sequences alone. An engineered strain of NA1 is described which could well be significantly less virulent than current circulating strains. PMID:25143953

  12. A monoclonal antibody targeting a highly conserved epitope in influenza B neuraminidase provides protection against drug resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Tracey M; Li, Changgui; Bucher, Doris J; Hashem, Anwar M; Van Domselaar, Gary; Wang, Junzhi; Farnsworth, Aaron; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry; He, Runtao; Brown, Earl G; Hurt, Aeron C; Li, Xuguang

    2013-11-08

    All influenza viral neuraminidases (NA) of both type A and B viruses have only one universally conserved sequence located between amino acids 222-230. A monoclonal antibody against this region has been previously reported to provide broad inhibition against all nine subtypes of influenza A NA; yet its inhibitory effect against influenza B viral NA remained unknown. Here, we report that the monoclonal antibody provides a broad inhibition against various strains of influenza B viruses of both Victoria and Yamagata genetic lineage. Moreover, the growth and NA enzymatic activity of two drug resistant influenza B strains (E117D and D197E) are also inhibited by the antibody even though these two mutations are conformationally proximal to the universal epitope. Collectively, these data suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral NA is exposed sufficiently to allow access by inhibitory antibody during the course of infection; it could represent a potential target for antiviral agents and vaccine-induced immune responses against diverse strains of type B influenza virus.

  13. Characterization of a sialidase (neuraminidase) isolated from Clostridium chauvoei (Jakari strain).

    PubMed

    Useh, N M; Ajanusi, J O; Esievo, K A N; Nok, A J

    2006-01-01

    A sialidase from Clostridium chauvoei (Jakari strain), an indigenous bacterial strain that causes blackleg in Nigerian cattle and other ruminants was isolated and partially purified by chromatography on DEAE cellulose, hydroxyapatite and phenyl agarose columns. The enzyme migrated as a 65-kDa protein after electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gels. It was optimally active at pH 4.5 and 40 degrees C with an activation energy (Ea) of 13.40 kJ mol(-1). It had Km and Vmax values of 170 microM and 200 micromole h(-1) mg(-1) respectively with fetuin as substrate. When sialyllactose (Neu5Ac2,3 lactose) was used as substrate the Km and Vmax values were 8 microM and 5 micromoles min(-1) mg(-1) respectively. The Clostridium chauvoei sialidase cleaved sialic acids from RBC ghosts of sheep, horse, goat, cattle, pig and mice as well as mouse brain cells, albeit at different rates. The enzyme was activated by Ca2+ and Mg2+ and inhibited by the group-specific reagents diethylpyrocarbonate (DEP) and N-ethylmalemide (NEM). The sialidase inhibitors, 2,3 didehydroneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac2,3en) and paranitrophenyl oxamic acid (pNPO) inhibited the enzyme competitively with Ki values of 40 and 30 microM respectively.

  14. Design of new inhibitors for H5N1 avian influenza using a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Woo; Jo, Won Ho

    2008-03-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the treatment of H5N1 avian influenza. One of the most widely used antiviral agents is oseltamivir. However, it has been reported that oseltamivir is not as effective against the neuraminidase subtype N1 as it is against subtypes N2 and N9. In our research we addressed this problem by designing new inhibitors and these altered inhibitor's binding affinities were calculated. In this study, we introduced chemical groups to the existing oseltamivir, so to fit into the newly discovered cavity in the subtype N1. When the binding strengths of the oseltamivir and the newly designed inhibitors for N1 were calculated to examine the drug efficiency through a molecular dynamics simulation, then compared with each other, it was found that one of the designed molecules exhibited a strong binding affinity, with more than twice the binding strength than that of oseltamivir. Since the aforementioned designed inhibitor appears to have the possibility for oral activity according to the criteria of human oral bioavailability, we propose that the inhibitor is a promising antiviral drug for H5N1 avian influenza.

  15. Transforming Growth Factor-β: Activation by Neuraminidase and Role in Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Influenza Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Lindsey A.; O'Brien, Kevin B.; Cline, Troy D.; Jones, Jeremy C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Kelley, Laura A.; Gauldie, Jack; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), a multifunctional cytokine regulating several immunologic processes, is expressed by virtually all cells as a biologically inactive molecule termed latent TGF-β (LTGF-β). We have previously shown that TGF-β activity increases during influenza virus infection in mice and suggested that the neuraminidase (NA) protein mediates this activation. In the current study, we determined the mechanism of activation of LTGF-β by NA from the influenza virus A/Gray Teal/Australia/2/1979 by mobility shift and enzyme inhibition assays. We also investigated whether exogenous TGF-β administered via a replication-deficient adenovirus vector provides protection from H5N1 influenza pathogenesis and whether depletion of TGF-β during virus infection increases morbidity in mice. We found that both the influenza and bacterial NA activate LTGF-β by removing sialic acid motifs from LTGF-β, each NA being specific for the sialic acid linkages cleaved. Further, NA likely activates LTGF-β primarily via its enzymatic activity, but proteases might also play a role in this process. Several influenza A virus subtypes (H1N1, H1N2, H3N2, H5N9, H6N1, and H7N3) except the highly pathogenic H5N1 strains activated LTGF-β in vitro and in vivo. Addition of exogenous TGF-β to H5N1 influenza virus–infected mice delayed mortality and reduced viral titers whereas neutralization of TGF-β during H5N1 and pandemic 2009 H1N1 infection increased morbidity. Together, these data show that microbe-associated NAs can directly activate LTGF-β and that TGF-β plays a pivotal role protecting the host from influenza pathogenesis. PMID:20949074

  16. Structure Determination of the 1918 H1N1 Neuraminidase From a Crystal With Lattice-Translocation Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.; Xu, X.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-28

    Few examples of macromolecular crystals containing lattice-translocation defects have been published in the literature. Lattice translocation and twinning are believed to be two common but different crystal-growth anomalies. While the successful use of twinned data for structure determination has become relatively routine in recent years, structure determination of crystals with lattice-translocation defects has not often been reported. To date, only four protein crystal structures containing such a crystal defect have been determined, using corrected, but not uncorrected, intensity data. In this report, the crystallization, structure determination and refinement of N1 neuraminidase derived from the 1918 H1N1 influenza virus (18NA) at 1.65 {angstrom} resolution are described. The crystal was indexed in space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.7, b = 138.5, c = 117.9 {angstrom}, and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The lattice-translocation vector in the 18NA crystal was (0, 1/2, 1/2) or its equivalent vector (1/2, 0, 1/2) owing to the C lattice symmetry. Owing to this special lattice-translocation vector in space group C222{sub 1}, structure refinement could be achieved in two different ways: using corrected or uncorrected diffraction data. In the refinement with uncorrected data, a composite model was built to represent the molecules in the translated and untranslated layers, respectively. This composite structure model provided a unique example to examine how the molecules were arranged in the two lattice domains resulting from lattice-translocation defects.

  17. Influenza virus neuraminidase contributes to the dextran sulfate-dependent suppressive replication of some influenza A virus strains.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Moriishi, Eiko; Haredy, Ahmad M; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Yamanishi, Koichi; Okamoto, Shigefumi

    2012-12-01

    Dextran sulfate (DS), a negatively charged, sulfated polysaccharide, suppresses the replication of an influenza A virus strain, and this suppression is associated with inhibition of the hemagglutinin (HA)-dependent fusion activity. However, it remains unknown whether the replication of all or just some influenza A virus strains is suppressed by DS, or whether HA is the only target for the replication suppression. In the present study, we found that DS inhibited the replication of some, but not all influenza A virus strains. The suppression in the DS-sensitive strains was dose-dependent and neutralized by diethylaminoethyl-dextran (DD), which has a positive charge. The suppression by DS was observed not only at the initial stage of viral infection, which includes viral attachment and entry, but also at the late stage, which includes virus assembly and release from infected cells. Electron microscopy revealed that the DS induced viral aggregation at the cell surface. The neuraminidase (NA) activity of the strains whose viral replication was inhibited at the late stage was also more suppressed by DS than that of the strains whose replication was not inhibited, and this inhibition of NA activity was also neutralized by adding positively charged DD. Furthermore, we found that replacing the NA gene of a strain in which viral replication was inhibited by DS at the late stage with the NA gene from a strain in which viral replication was not inhibited, eliminated the DS-dependent suppression. These results suggest that the influenza virus NA contributes to the DS-suppressible virus release from infected cells at the late stage, and the suppression may involve the inhibition of NA activity by DS's negative charge.

  18. MiR674 inhibits the neuraminidase-stimulated immune response on dendritic cells via down-regulated Mbnl3.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Chen, Ya T; Xia, Jing; Yang, Qian

    2016-08-02

    Neuraminidase (NA), a structural protein of the H9N2 avian influenza virus (H9N2 AIV), can facilitate viral invasion of the upper airway by cleaving the sialic acid moieties on mucin. Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells whose immune functions, such as presenting antigens and activating lymphocytes, can be regulated by microRNAs. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism of miRNA-induced repression of immune responses in mouse DCs. First, we screened for and verified the miRNAs induced by NA. Then, we showed that, consistent with the H9N2 virus treatment, the viral NA up-regulated the expression of miR-155, miR-674, and miR-499 in DCs; however, unlike H9N2 virus treatment, the presence of NA was associated with reduced expression of miR-181b1. Our results suggest that NA significantly increased DC surface markers CD80 and MHCII and enhanced the ability of activating lymphocytes and secreting cytokines compared with HA, NP and M2. Meanwhile, we found that miR-674 and miR-155 over-expression increased all surface markers of DC. Nevertheless, by inhibiting the expression of miR-674 and miR-155, NA lost the ability to promote DC maturation. Furthermore, we predicted and demonstrated that Pgm2l1, Aldh18a1, Camk1d, and Mbnl3 were the target genes of miR-674. Among them, Mbnl3 interference strongly blocked the mature DCs. Collectively, our data shed new light on the roles of and mechanisms involved in the repression of DCs by miRNAs, which may contribute to efforts to develop a prophylaxis for the influenza virus.

  19. MiR674 inhibits the neuraminidase-stimulated immune response on dendritic cells via down-regulated Mbnl3

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian; Chen, Ya T.; Xia, Jing; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Neuraminidase (NA), a structural protein of the H9N2 avian influenza virus (H9N2 AIV), can facilitate viral invasion of the upper airway by cleaving the sialic acid moieties on mucin. Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells whose immune functions, such as presenting antigens and activating lymphocytes, can be regulated by microRNAs. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism of miRNA-induced repression of immune responses in mouse DCs. First, we screened for and verified the miRNAs induced by NA. Then, we showed that, consistent with the H9N2 virus treatment, the viral NA up-regulated the expression of miR-155, miR-674, and miR-499 in DCs; however, unlike H9N2 virus treatment, the presence of NA was associated with reduced expression of miR-181b1. Our results suggest that NA significantly increased DC surface markers CD80 and MHCII and enhanced the ability of activating lymphocytes and secreting cytokines compared with HA, NP and M2. Meanwhile, we found that miR-674 and miR-155 over-expression increased all surface markers of DC. Nevertheless, by inhibiting the expression of miR-674 and miR-155, NA lost the ability to promote DC maturation. Furthermore, we predicted and demonstrated that Pgm2l1, Aldh18a1, Camk1d, and Mbnl3 were the target genes of miR-674. Among them, Mbnl3 interference strongly blocked the mature DCs. Collectively, our data shed new light on the roles of and mechanisms involved in the repression of DCs by miRNAs, which may contribute to efforts to develop a prophylaxis for the influenza virus. PMID:27285980

  20. Infection of influenza virus neuraminidase-vaccinated mice with homologous influenza virus leads to strong protection against heterologous influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Chang, Haiyan; Liu, Zhihua; Huang, Chaoyang; Liu, Xueying; Zheng, Dan; Fang, Fang; Sun, Bing; Chen, Ze

    2014-12-01

    Vaccination is the best measure to prevent influenza pandemics. Here, we studied the protective effect against heterologous influenza viruses, including A/reassortant/NYMC X-179A (pH1N1), A/Chicken/Henan/12/2004 (H5N1), A/Chicken/Jiangsu/7/2002 (H9N2) and A/Guizhou/54/89×A/PR/8/34 (A/Guizhou-X) (H3N2), in mice first vaccinated with a DNA vaccine of haemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA) of A/PR/8/34 (PR8) and then infected with the homologous virus. We showed that PR8 HA or NA vaccination both protected mice against a lethal dose of the homologous virus; PR8 HA or NA DNA vaccination and then PR8 infection in mice offered poor or excellent protection, respectively, against a second, heterologous influenza virus challenge. In addition, before the second heterologous influenza infection, the highest antibody level against nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix (M1 and M2) proteins was found in the PR8 NA-vaccinated and PR8-infected group. The level of induced cellular immunity against NP and M1 showed a trend consistent with that seen in antibody levels. However, PR8 HA+NA vaccination and then PR8 infection resulted in limited protection against heterologous influenza virus challenge. Results of the present study demonstrated that infection of the homologous influenza virus in mice already immunized with a NA vaccine could provide excellent protection against subsequent infection of a heterologous influenza virus. These findings suggested that NA, a major antigen of influenza virus, could be an important candidate antigen for universal influenza vaccines.

  1. Analysis and assay of oseltamivir-resistant mutants of influenza neuraminidase via direct observation of drug unbinding and rebinding in simulation.

    PubMed

    Woods, Christopher J; Malaisree, Maturos; Long, Benjamin; McIntosh-Smith, Simon; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2013-11-12

    The emergence of influenza drug resistance is a major public health concern. The molecular basis of resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) is investigated using a computational assay involving multiple 500 ns unrestrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of oseltamivir complexed with mutants of H1N1-2009 influenza neuraminidase. The simulations, accelerated using graphics processors (GPUs), and using a fully explicit model of water, are of sufficient length to observe multiple drug unbinding and rebinding events. Drug unbinding occurs during simulations of known oseltamivir-resistant mutants of neuraminidase. Molecular-level rationalizations of drug resistance are revealed by analysis of these unbinding trajectories, with particular emphasis on the dynamics of the mutant residues. The results indicate that MD simulations can predict weakening of binding associated with drug resistance. In addition, visualization and analysis of binding site water molecules reveal their importance in stabilizing the binding mode of the drug. Drug unbinding is accompanied by conformational changes, driven by the mutant residues, which results in flooding of a key pocket containing tightly bound water molecules. This displaces oseltamivir, allowing the tightly bound water molecules to be released into bulk. In addition to the role of water, analysis of the trajectories reveals novel behavior of the structurally important 150-loop. Motion of the loop, which can move between an open and closed conformation, is intimately associated with drug unbinding and rebinding. Opening of the loop occurs coincidentally with drug unbinding, and interactions between oseltamivir and the loop seem to aid in the repositioning of the drug back into an approximation of its original binding mode on rebinding. The similarity of oseltamivir to a transition state analogue for neuraminidase suggests that the dynamics of the loop could play an important functional role in the enzyme, with loop closing aiding in

  2. Reassortment between Avian H5N1 and human influenza viruses is mainly restricted to the matrix and neuraminidase gene segments.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Eefje J A; Bestebroer, Theo M; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Herfst, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses have devastated the poultry industry in many countries of the eastern hemisphere. Occasionally H5N1 viruses cross the species barrier and infect humans, sometimes with a severe clinical outcome. When this happens, there is a chance of reassortment between H5N1 and human influenza viruses. To assess the potential of H5N1 viruses to reassort with contemporary human influenza viruses (H1N1, H3N2 and pandemic H1N1), we used an in vitro selection method to generate reassortant viruses, that contained the H5 hemagglutinin gene, and that have a replication advantage in vitro. We found that the neuraminidase and matrix gene segments of human influenza viruses were preferentially selected by H5 viruses. However, these H5 reassortant viruses did not show a marked increase in replication in MDCK cells and human bronchial epithelial cells. In ferrets, inoculation with a mixture of H5N1-pandemic H1N1 reassortant viruses resulted in outgrowth of reassortant H5 viruses that had incorporated the neuraminidase and matrix gene segment of pandemic 2009 H1N1. This virus was not transmitted via aerosols or respiratory droplets to naïve recipient ferrets. Altogether, these data emphasize the potential of avian H5N1 viruses to reassort with contemporary human influenza viruses. The neuraminidase and matrix gene segments of human influenza viruses showed the highest genetic compatibility with HPAI H5N1 virus.

  3. Microscale Measurements of Michaelis–Menten Constants of Neuraminidase with Nanogel Capillary Electrophoresis for the Determination of the Sialic Acid Linkage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid nanogels enhance the stability and performance of the exoglycosidase enzyme neuraminidase and are used to create a fixed zone of enzyme within a capillary. With nanogels, there is no need to covalently immobilize the enzyme, as it is physically constrained. This enables rapid quantification of Michaelis–Menten constants (KM) for different substrates and ultimately provides a means to quantify the linkage (i.e., 2-3 versus 2-6) of sialic acids. The fixed zone of enzyme is inexpensive and easily positioned in the capillary to support electrophoresis mediated microanalysis using neuraminidase to analyze sialic acid linkages. To circumvent the limitations of diffusion during static incubation, the incubation period is reproducibly achieved by varying the number of forward and reverse passes the substrate makes through the stationary fixed zone using in-capillary electrophoretic mixing. A KM value of 3.3 ± 0.8 mM (Vmax, 2100 ± 200 μM/min) was obtained for 3′-sialyllactose labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid using neuraminidase from Clostridium perfringens that cleaves sialic acid monomers with an α2-3,6,8,9 linkage, which is similar to values reported in the literature that required benchtop analyses. The enzyme cleaves the 2-3 linkage faster than the 2-6, and a KM of 2 ± 1 mM (Vmax, 400 ± 100 μM/min) was obtained for the 6′-sialyllactose substrate. An alternative neuraminidase selective for 2-3 sialic acid linkages generated a KM value of 3 ± 2 mM (Vmax, 900 ± 300 μM/min) for 3′-sialyllactose. With a knowledge of Vmax, the method was applied to a mixture of 2-3 and 2-6 sialyllactose as well as 2-3 and 2-6 sialylated triantennary glycan. Nanogel electrophoresis is an inexpensive, rapid, and simple alternative to current technologies used to distinguish the composition of 3′ and 6′ sialic acid linkages. PMID:27936604

  4. Using common spatial distributions of atoms to relate functionally divergent influenza virus N10 and N11 protein structures to functionally characterized neuraminidase structures, toxin cell entry domains, and non-influenza virus cell entry domains.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Arthur; Weininger, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify the functional correlates of structural and sequence variation in proteins is a critical capability. We related structures of influenza A N10 and N11 proteins that have no established function to structures of proteins with known function by identifying spatially conserved atoms. We identified atoms with common distributed spatial occupancy in PDB structures of N10 protein, N11 protein, an influenza A neuraminidase, an influenza B neuraminidase, and a bacterial neuraminidase. By superposing these spatially conserved atoms, we aligned the structures and associated molecules. We report spatially and sequence invariant residues in the aligned structures. Spatially invariant residues in the N6 and influenza B neuraminidase active sites were found in previously unidentified spatially equivalent sites in the N10 and N11 proteins. We found the corresponding secondary and tertiary structures of the aligned proteins to be largely identical despite significant sequence divergence. We found structural precedent in known non-neuraminidase structures for residues exhibiting structural and sequence divergence in the aligned structures. In N10 protein, we identified staphylococcal enterotoxin I-like domains. In N11 protein, we identified hepatitis E E2S-like domains, SARS spike protein-like domains, and toxin components shared by alpha-bungarotoxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin I, anthrax lethal factor, clostridium botulinum neurotoxin, and clostridium tetanus toxin. The presence of active site components common to the N6, influenza B, and S. pneumoniae neuraminidases in the N10 and N11 proteins, combined with the absence of apparent neuraminidase function, suggests that the role of neuraminidases in H17N10 and H18N11 emerging influenza A viruses may have changed. The presentation of E2S-like, SARS spike protein-like, or toxin-like domains by the N10 and N11 proteins in these emerging viruses may indicate that H17N10 and H18N11 sialidase-facilitated cell

  5. Synthetic Mucus Nanobarriers for Identification of Glycan-Dependent Primary Influenza A Infection Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Current drugs against the influenza A virus (IAV) act by inhibiting viral neuraminidase (NA) enzymes responsible for the release of budding virions from sialoglycans on infected cells. Here, we describe an approach focused on a search for inhibitors that reinforce the protective functions of mucosal barriers that trap viruses en route to the target cells. We have generated mimetics of sialo-glycoproteins that insert into the viral envelope to provide a well-defined mucus-like environment encapsulating the virus. By introducing this barrier, which the virus must breach using its NA enzymes to infect a host cell, into a screening platform, we have been able to identify compounds that provide significant protection against IAV infection. This approach may facilitate the discovery of potent new IAV prophylactics among compounds with NA activities too weak to emerge from traditional drug screens. PMID:27800553

  6. Human parainfluenza type 3 virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA and limited amino acid sequence of the purified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Coligan, J E; Jambou, R C; Venkatesan, S

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of mRNA for the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of human parainfluenza type 3 virus obtained from the corresponding cDNA clone had a single long open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 64,254 daltons consisting of 572 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence was confirmed by limited N-terminal amino acid microsequencing of CNBr cleavage fragments of native HN that was purified by immunoprecipitation. The HN protein is moderately hydrophobic and has four potential sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) of N-glycosylation in the C-terminal half of the molecule. It is devoid of both the N-terminal signal sequence and the C-terminal membrane anchorage domain characteristic of the hemagglutinin of influenza virus and the fusion (F0) protein of the paramyxoviruses. Instead, it has a single prominent hydrophobic region capable of membrane insertion beginning at 32 residues from the N terminus. This N-terminal membrane insertion is similar to that of influenza virus neuraminidase and the recently reported structures of HN proteins of Sendai virus and simian virus 5. Images PMID:3003381

  7. Influenza A H1N1pdm 2009 Virus in Paraguay: Nucleotide Point Mutations in Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Genes are not Associated with Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Espínola, Emilio E; Amarilla, Alberto A; Martínez, Magaly; Aquino, Víctor H; Russomando, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus is associated with upper respiratory tract infections. The fourth influenza pandemic was declared in 2009. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic variability of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus circulating in Paraguay. Nasal swabs were collected from 181 patients with flu symptoms managed at the Hospital of the Medical School in Asunción, Paraguay, between August and October 2009. Virus detection was carried out by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, followed by sequencing of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes, and phylogenetic analysis. H1N1pdm09 was detected in 14.9% (27/181) of the suspected cases. Analysis of 13 samples showed that these viruses the clustered in a single genetic group. Neither the mutation related to exacerbation of disease (D239G in hemagglutinin) nor that related to antiviral resistance (H275Y in neuraminidase), both detected in neighboring countries, were found. This genetic analysis of H1N1pdm09 will help to understand the spread of the disease. PMID:25328558

  8. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  9. Effects of water models on binding affinity: evidence from all-atom simulation of binding of tamiflu to A/H5N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔG(bind) of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔG(bind) is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔG(bind) decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM.

  10. Optimization of an enzyme-linked lectin assay suitable for rapid antigenic characterization of the neuraminidase of human influenza A(H3N2) viruses.

    PubMed

    Westgeest, Kim B; Bestebroer, Theo M; Spronken, Monique I J; Gao, Jin; Couzens, Laura; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Eichelberger, Maryna; Fouchier, Ron A M; de Graaf, Miranda

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies to neuraminidase (NA), the second most abundant surface protein of the influenza virus, contribute to protection against influenza virus infection. Although traditional and miniaturized thiobarbituric acid (TBA) neuraminidase inhibition (NI) assays have been successfully used to characterize the antigenic properties of NA, these methods are cumbersome and not easily amendable to rapid screening. An additional difficulty of the NI assay is the interference by hemagglutinin (HA)-specific antibodies. To prevent interference of HA-specific antibodies, most NI assays are performed with recombinant viruses containing a mismatched HA. However, generation of these viruses is time consuming and unsuitable for large-scale surveillance. The feasibility of using the recently developed enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) to evaluate the antigenic relatedness of NA of wild type A(H3N2) viruses was assessed. Rather than using recombinant viruses, wild type A(H3N2) viruses were used as antigen with ferret sera elicited against recombinant viruses with a mismatched HA. In this study, details of the critical steps that are needed to modify and optimize the NI ELLA in a format that is reproducible, highly sensitive, and useful for influenza virus surveillance to monitor antigenic drift of NA are provided.

  11. Therapeutic targeting of liver cancer with a recombinant DNA vaccine containing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of Newcastle disease virus via apoptotic-dependent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Gang; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Zheng, Tang-Hui; Chen, Xu; Li, Ping; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2016-01-01

    A total of ~38.6 million mortalities occur due to liver cancer annually, worldwide. Although a variety of therapeutic methods are available, the efficacy of treatment at present is extremely limited due to an increased risk of malignancy and inherently poor prognosis of liver cancer. Gene therapy is considered a promising option, and has shown notable potential for the comprehensive therapy of liver cancer, in keeping with advances that have been made in the development of cancer molecular biology. The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic effects of the abilities of the hemagglutinin neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the pro-apoptotic factor apoptin from chicken anaemia virus, and the interferon-γ inducer interleukin-18 (IL-18) in antagonizing liver cancer. Therefore, a recombinant DNA plasmid expressing the three exogenous genes, VP3, IL-18 and hemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN), was constructed. Flow cytometry, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and analysis of caspase-3 activity were performed in H22 cell lines transfected with the recombinant DNA plasmid. In addition, 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were used to establish a H22 hepatoma-bearing mouse model. Mice tumor tissue was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. The results of the present study revealed that the recombinant DNA vaccine containing the VP3, IL-18 and HN genes inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy via the mitochondrial pathway in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27900002

  12. Therapeutic targeting of liver cancer with a recombinant DNA vaccine containing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of Newcastle disease virus via apoptotic-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Gang; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Zheng, Tang-Hui; Chen, Xu; Li, Ping; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2016-11-01

    A total of ~38.6 million mortalities occur due to liver cancer annually, worldwide. Although a variety of therapeutic methods are available, the efficacy of treatment at present is extremely limited due to an increased risk of malignancy and inherently poor prognosis of liver cancer. Gene therapy is considered a promising option, and has shown notable potential for the comprehensive therapy of liver cancer, in keeping with advances that have been made in the development of cancer molecular biology. The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic effects of the abilities of the hemagglutinin neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the pro-apoptotic factor apoptin from chicken anaemia virus, and the interferon-γ inducer interleukin-18 (IL-18) in antagonizing liver cancer. Therefore, a recombinant DNA plasmid expressing the three exogenous genes, VP3, IL-18 and hemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN), was constructed. Flow cytometry, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and analysis of caspase-3 activity were performed in H22 cell lines transfected with the recombinant DNA plasmid. In addition, 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were used to establish a H22 hepatoma-bearing mouse model. Mice tumor tissue was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. The results of the present study revealed that the recombinant DNA vaccine containing the VP3, IL-18 and HN genes inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy via the mitochondrial pathway in vivo and in vitro.

  13. [Drug susceptibility of wild-type and mutant H7N9 neuraminidase to zanamivir and oseltamivir].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan-Nan; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Qing; Guo, Ying

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the drug susceptibility of wild-type and mutant avian influenza A (H7N9) virus neuraminidase (NA) to oseltamivir and zanamivir. Codon optimized DNA of H7N9 (A/ Hangzhou/1/2013) NA was synthesized and constructed into the pcDNA3.1/His vector (NA(H7N9-WT)). Mutant NA(H7N9-H274Y) and NA(H7N9-R292K) plasmids were constructed by directed mutagenesis PCR using NA(H7N9-WT) plasmid as the template followed by sequencing. NA plasmids were transfected into 293T cells and cell lysates containing NAs were collected 48 h post-transfection. Wild-type and mutant NAs were analyzed by Western blotting and their activities were tested by the 4-MUNANA-based assay. All three NAs were expressed and enzymatic activities were confirmed. The effects of oseltamivir and zanamivir on all three NAs were then tested. It showed that the half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of oseltamivir carboxylate on NA(H7N9-WT), NA(H7N9-H274Y) and NA(H7N9-R292K) were 1.6 nM, 15.1 nM, and > 1 000 nM with fold changes of 9 and > 625, respectively. The IC50 values of zanamivir on NA(H7N9-WT), NA(H7N9-H274Y), and NA(H7N9-R292K) were 1.1 nM, 1.4 nM, and 38.0 nM with fold changes of 1.3 and 34, respectively. These results indicated that oseltamivir and zanamivir could significantly inhibit NA(H7N9-WT). NA(H7N9-R292K) showed high-level resistance to both drugs (34-fold and 625-fold) and NA(H7N9-H274Y) was sensitive to both (1.3-fold and 9-fold). These results indicated that both oseltamivir and zanamivir could be used for patients infected with the H7N9 virus. However, when patients carried the H7N9 virus with a NA R292K mutation, other medications would be preferred over oseltamivir or zanamivir.

  14. Detection of Neuraminidase Stalk Motifs Associated with Enhanced N1 Subtype Influenza A Virulence via Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joo Young; Martin, Sharon J.H.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark; Dluhy, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotides corresponding to neuraminidase (NA) stalk motifs that have been associated with enhanced influenza virulence have been identified using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).. 5′-thiolated ssDNA oligonucleotides were immobilized onto a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) coated Au nanoparticles (AuNP). Three synthetic RNA sequences corresponding to specific amino acid deletions in the influenza NA stalk region were attached to the CTAB-modified AuNPs. Two of these sequences were specific to sequences with amino acid deletions associated with increased virulence, and one was a low virulence sequence with no amino acid deletions. Hybridization of synthetic matched and mismatched DNA-RNA complexes were detected based on the intrinsic SERS spectra. In addition, this platform was used to analyze RNA sequences isolated from laboratory grown influenza viruses having the NA stalk motif associated with enhanced virulence, including A/WSN/33/H1N1, A/Anhui/1/2005/H5N, and A/Vietnam/1203/2004/H5N1 strains. Multivariate feature selection methods were employed to determine the specific wavenumbers in the Raman spectra that contributed the most information for class discrimination. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test identified 884 and 1196 wavenumbers as being highly significant in the high and low virulence spectra, respectively (p < 0.01). A post-hoc Tukey Honestly Significance Difference (HSD) test identified the wavenumbers that played a major role in differentiating the DNA-RNA hybrid classes. An estimate of the spectral variability, based on the Wilcoxon rank sum test, found the major source of variation to be predominately between the different classes, and not within the classes, thus confirming that the spectra reflected real class differences and not sampling artifacts. The multivariate classification methods partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and support vector machine discriminant analysis (SVM-DA) were able to

  15. The low-pH stability discovered in neuraminidase of 1918 pandemic influenza A virus enhances virus replication.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Kurebayashi, Yuuki; Ikeya, Kumiko; Mizuno, Takashi; Fukushima, Keijo; Kawamoto, Hiroko; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yasuo; Suzuki, Takashi

    2010-12-09

    The "Spanish" pandemic influenza A virus, which killed more than 20 million worldwide in 1918-19, is one of the serious pathogens in recorded history. Characterization of the 1918 pandemic virus reconstructed by reverse genetics showed that PB1, hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes contributed to the viral replication and virulence of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus. However, the function of the NA gene has remained unknown. Here we show that the avian-like low-pH stability of sialidase activity discovered in the 1918 pandemic virus NA contributes to the viral replication efficiency. We found that deletion of Thr at position 435 or deletion of Gly at position 455 in the 1918 pandemic virus NA was related to the low-pH stability of the sialidase activity in the 1918 pandemic virus NA by comparison with the sequences of other human N1 NAs and sialidase activity of chimeric constructs. Both amino acids were located in or near the amino acid resides that were important for stabilization of the native tetramer structure in a low-pH condition like the N2 NAs of pandemic viruses that emerged in 1957 and 1968. Two reverse-genetic viruses were generated from a genetic background of A/WSN/33 (H1N1) that included low-pH-unstable N1 NA from A/USSR/92/77 (H1N1) and its counterpart N1 NA in which sialidase activity was converted to a low-pH-stable property by a deletion and substitutions of two amino acid residues at position 435 and 455 related to the low-pH stability of the sialidase activity in 1918 NA. The mutant virus that included "Spanish Flu"-like low-pH-stable NA showed remarkable replication in comparison with the mutant virus that included low-pH-unstable N1 NA. Our results suggest that the avian-like low-pH stability of sialidase activity in the 1918 pandemic virus NA contributes to the viral replication efficiency.

  16. Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase containing virus-like particles produced in HEK-293 suspension culture: An effective influenza vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Venereo-Sanchez, Alina; Gilbert, Renald; Simoneau, Melanie; Caron, Antoine; Chahal, Parminder; Chen, Wangxue; Ansorge, Sven; Li, Xuguang; Henry, Olivier; Kamen, Amine

    2016-06-17

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) constitute a promising alternative as influenza vaccine. They are non-replicative particles that mimic the morphology of native viruses which make them more immunogenic than classical subunit vaccines. In this study, we propose HEK-293 cells in suspension culture in serum-free medium as an efficient platform to produce large quantities of VLPs. For this purpose, a stable cell line expressing the main influenza viral antigens hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) (subtype H1N1) under the regulation of a cumate inducible promoter was developed (293HA-NA cells). The production of VLPs was evaluated by transient transfection of plasmids encoding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag or M1 influenza matrix protein. To facilitate the monitoring of VLPs production, Gag was fused to the green fluorescence protein (GFP). The transient transfection of the gag containing plasmid in 293HA-NA cells increased the release of HA and NA seven times more than its counterpart transfected with the M1 encoding plasmid. Consequently, the production of HA-NA containing VLPs using Gag as scaffold was evaluated in a 3-L controlled stirred tank bioreactor. The VLPs secreted in the culture medium were recovered by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose cushion and ultrafiltered by tangential flow filtration. Transmission electron micrographs of final sample revealed the presence of particles with the average typical size (150-200nm) and morphology of HIV-1 immature particles. The concentration of the influenza glycoproteins on the Gag-VLPs was estimated by single radial immunodiffusion and hemagglutination assay for HA and by Dot-Blot for HA and NA. More significantly, intranasal immunization of mice with influenza Gag-VLPs induced strong antigen-specific mucosal and systemic antibody responses and provided full protection against a lethal intranasal challenge with the homologous virus strain. These data suggest that, with further optimization and characterization

  17. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  18. Drug Repurposing Identifies Inhibitors of Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ju; Marathe, Bindumadhav; Govorkova, Elena A; Zheng, Jie J

    2016-03-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor, oseltamivir, is a widely used anti-influenza drug. However, oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses carrying the H275Y NA mutation spontaneously emerged as a result of natural genetic drift and drug treatment. Because H275Y and other potential mutations may generate a future pandemic influenza strain that is oseltamivir-resistant, alternative therapy options are needed. Herein, we show that a structure-based computational method can be used to identify existing drugs that inhibit resistant viruses, thereby providing a first line of pharmaceutical defense against this possible scenario. We identified two drugs, nalidixic acid and dorzolamide, that potently inhibit the NA activity of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 viruses with the H275Y NA mutation at very low concentrations, but have no effect on wild-type H1N1 NA even at a much higher concentration, suggesting that the oseltamivir-resistance mutation itself caused susceptibility to these drugs.

  19. Amino acid determinants conferring stable sialidase activity at low pH for H5N1 influenza A virus neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Nidom, Chairul A; Quynh Le, Mai Thi; Suzuki, Takashi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) and human 1918, 1957, and 1968 pandemic IAVs all have neuraminidases (NAs) that are stable at low pH sialidase activity, yet most human epidemic IAVs do not. We examined the pH stability of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian IAV (HPAI) NAs and identified amino acids responsible for conferring stability at low pH. We found that, unlike other avian viruses, most H5N1 IAVs isolated since 2003 had NAs that were unstable at low pH, similar to human epidemic IAVs. These H5N1 viruses are thus already human virus-like and, therefore, have the frequent infections of humans.

  20. Molecular characterization of chicken-derived genotype VIId Newcastle disease virus isolates in China during 2005-2012 reveals a new length in hemagglutinin-neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Shao, Meng-Yu; Yu, Xiao-Hui; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Guo-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is one of the most important diseases of poultry, and causes severe economic losses in the global poultry industry. Although all Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates belong to a single serotype, significant genetic diversity has been described between different NDV isolates. Here, we report the molecular characterization of 23 virulent genotype VIId NDV isolates of class II circulating in China. Phylogenetic construction and analysis revealed the existence of distinctly genomic and amino acid differences that clearly distinguished these isolates from other typical NDV genotypes and vaccine strains. We also report a new 582-amino-acid hemagglutinin-neuraminidase in genotype VII NDV strains. This is believed to be the first study to investigate systematically the most predominant NDV strains, and provides more information on the genetic nature of genotype VIId NDV of class II circulating in China.

  1. Functional Properties and Genetic Relatedness of the Fusion and Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Proteins of a Mumps Virus-Like Bat Virus

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Nadine; Hoffmann, Markus; Drexler, Jan Felix; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Corman, Victor Max; Sauder, Christian; Rubin, Steven; He, Biao; Örvell, Claes; Drosten, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A bat virus with high phylogenetic relatedness to human mumps virus (MuV) was identified recently at the nucleic acid level. We analyzed the functional activities of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and the fusion (F) proteins of the bat virus (batMuV) and compared them to the respective proteins of a human isolate. Transfected cells expressing the F and HN proteins of batMuV were recognized by antibodies directed against these proteins of human MuV, indicating that both viruses are serologically related. Fusion, hemadsorption, and neuraminidase activities were demonstrated for batMuV, and either bat-derived protein could substitute for its human MuV counterpart in inducing syncytium formation when coexpressed in different mammalian cell lines, including chiropteran cells. Cells expressing batMuV glycoproteins were shown to have lower neuraminidase activity. The syncytia were smaller, and they were present in lower numbers than those observed after coexpression of the corresponding glycoproteins of a clinical isolate of MuV (hMuV). The phenotypic differences in the neuraminidase and fusion activity between the glycoproteins of batMuV and hMuV are explained by differences in the expression level of the HN and F proteins of the two viruses. In the case of the F protein, analysis of chimeric proteins revealed that the signal peptide of the bat MuV fusion protein is responsible for the lower surface expression. These results indicate that the surface glycoproteins of batMuV are serologically and functionally related to those of hMuV, raising the possibility of bats as a reservoir for interspecies transmission. IMPORTANCE The recently described MuV-like bat virus is unique among other recently identified human-like bat-associated viruses because of its high sequence homology (approximately 90% in most genes) to its human counterpart. Although it is not known if humans can be infected by batMuV, the antigenic relatedness between the bat and human forms of

  2. Improved immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus inactivated vaccine following DNA vaccination using Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein genes.

    PubMed

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Ideris, Aini

    2016-03-01

    The present study describes the development of DNA vaccines using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) genes from AF2240 Newcastle disease virus strain, namely pIRES/HN, pIRES/F and pIRES-F/HN. Transient expression analysis of the constructs in Vero cells revealed the successful expression of gene inserts in vitro. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that single vaccination with the constructed plasmid DNA (pDNA) followed by a boost with inactivated vaccine induced a significant difference in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody levels (p < 0.05) elicited by either pIRES/F, pIRES/F+ pIRES/HN or pIRES-F/HN at one week after the booster in specific pathogen free chickens when compared with the inactivated vaccine alone. Taken together, these results indicated that recombinant pDNA could be used to increase the efficacy of the inactivated vaccine immunization procedure.

  3. Simultaneous detection of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of novel influenza A (H7N9) by duplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wu, Tao; Qi, Xian; Ge, Yiyue; Guo, Xiling; Wu, Bin; Yu, Huiyan; Zhu, Yefei; Shi, Zhiyang; Wang, Hua; Cui, Lunbiao; Zhou, Minghao

    2013-12-01

    A novel reassortant influenza A (H7N9) virus emerged recently in China. In this study, a duplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay was developed for the simultaneous detection of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of H7N9 influenza viruses. The sensitivity of the assay was determined to be 10 RNA copies per reaction for both HA and NA genes. No cross-reactivity was observed with other influenza virus subtypes or respiratory tract viruses. One hundred and forty-six clinical and environmental specimens were tested and compared with reference methods and were found to be consistent. The assay is suitable for large-scale screening due to short turnaround times and high specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility.

  4. Antiviral activity of chlorogenic acid against influenza A (H1N1/H3N2) virus and its inhibition of neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yue; Cao, Zeyu; Cao, Liang; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb, rich in chlorogenic acid (CHA), is used for viral upper respiratory tract infection treatment caused by influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, and respiratory syncytial virus, ect in China. It was reported that CHA reduced serum hepatitis B virus level and death rate of influenza virus-infected mice. However, the underlying mechanisms of CHA against the influenza A virus have not been fully elucidated. Here, the antiviral effects and potential mechanisms of CHA against influenza A virus were investigated. CHA revealed inhibitory against A/PuertoRico/8/1934(H1N1) (EC50 = 44.87 μM), A/Beijing/32/92(H3N2) (EC50 = 62.33 μM), and oseltamivir-resistant strains. Time-course analysis showed CHA inhibited influenza virus during the late stage of infectious cycle. Indirect immunofluorescence assay indicated CHA down-regulated the NP protein expression. The inhibition of neuraminidase activity confirmed CHA blocked release of newly formed virus particles from infected cells. Intravenous injection of 100 mg/kg/d CHA possessed effective antiviral activity in mice, conferring 60% and 50% protection from death against H1N1 and H3N2, reducing virus titres and alleviating inflammation in the lungs effectively. These results demonstrate that CHA acts as a neuraminidase blocker to inhibit influenza A virus both in cellular and animal models. Thus, CHA has potential utility in the treatment of the influenza virus infection. PMID:28393840

  5. Filament-Producing Mutants of Influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) Virus Have Higher Neuraminidase Activities than the Spherical Wild-Type

    PubMed Central

    Seladi-Schulman, Jill; Campbell, Patricia J.; Suppiah, Suganthi; Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus exhibits two morphologies – spherical and filamentous. Strains that have been grown extensively in laboratory substrates are comprised predominantly of spherical virions while clinical or low passage isolates produce a mixture of spheres and filamentous virions of varying lengths. The filamentous morphology can be lost upon continued passage in embryonated chicken eggs, a common laboratory substrate for influenza viruses. The fact that the filamentous morphology is maintained in nature but lost in favor of a spherical morphology in ovo suggests that filaments confer a selective advantage within the infected host that is not necessary for growth in laboratory substrates. Indeed, we have recently shown that filament-producing variant viruses are selected upon passage of the spherical laboratory strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) [PR8] in guinea pigs. Toward determining the nature of the selective advantage conferred by filaments, we sought to identify functional differences between spherical and filamentous particles. We compared the wild-type PR8 virus to two previously characterized recombinant PR8 viruses in which single point mutations within M1 confer a filamentous morphology. Our results indicate that these filamentous PR8 mutants have higher neuraminidase activities than the spherical PR8 virus. Conversely, no differences were observed in HAU:PFU or HAU:RNA ratios, binding avidity, sensitivity to immune serum in hemagglutination inhibition assays, or virion stability at elevated temperatures. Based on these results, we propose that the pleomorphic nature of influenza virus particles is important for the optimization of neuraminidase functions in vivo. PMID:25383873

  6. In situ molecular identification of the Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Neuraminidase in patients with severe and fatal infections during a pandemic in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In April 2009, public health surveillance detected an increased number of influenza-like illnesses in Mexico City’s hospitals. The etiological agent was subsequently determined to be a spread of a worldwide novel influenza A (H1N1) triple reassortant. The purpose of the present study was to demonstrate that molecular detection of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 strains is possible in archival material such as paraffin-embedded lung samples. Methods In order to detect A (H1N1) virus sequences in archived biological samples, eight paraffin-embedded lung samples from patients who died of pneumonia and respiratory failure were tested for influenza A (H1N1) Neuraminidase (NA) RNA using in situ RT-PCR. Results We detected NA transcripts in 100% of the previously diagnosed A (H1N1)-positive samples as a cytoplasmic signal. No expression was detected by in situ RT-PCR in two Influenza-like Illness A (H1N1)-negative patients using standard protocols nor in a non-related cervical cell line. In situ relative transcription levels correlated with those obtained when in vitro RT-PCR assays were performed. Partial sequences of the NA gene from A (H1N1)-positive patients were obtained by the in situ RT-PCR-sequencing method. Sequence analysis showed 98% similarity with influenza viruses reported previously in other places. Conclusions We have successfully amplified specific influenza A (H1N1) NA sequences using stored clinical material; results suggest that this strategy could be useful when clinical RNA samples are quantity limited, or when poor quality is obtained. Here, we provide a very sensitive method that specifically detects the neuraminidase viral RNA in lung samples from patients who died from pneumonia caused by Influenza A (H1N1) outbreak in Mexico City. PMID:23327529

  7. Role of R292K mutation in influenza H7N9 neuraminidase toward oseltamivir susceptibility: MD and MM/PB(GB)SA study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanich, Jiraphorn; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Kungwan, Nawee; Hannongbua, Supot

    2016-10-01

    The H7N9 avian influenza virus is a novel re-assortment from at least four different strains of virus. Neuraminidase, which is a glycoprotein on the surface membrane, has been the target for drug treatment. However, some H7N9 strains that have been isolated from patient after drug treatment have a R292K mutation in neuraminidase. This substitution was found to facilitate drug resistance using protein- and virus- assays, in particular it gave a high resistance to the most commonly used drug, oseltamivir. The aim of this research is to understand the source of oseltamivir resistance using MD simulations and the MM/PB(GB)SA binding free energy approaches. Both methods can predict the reduced susceptibility of oseltamivir in good agreement to the IC 50 binding energy, although MM/GBSA underestimates this prediction compared to the MM/PBSA calculation. Electrostatic interaction is the main contribution for oseltamivir binding in terms of both interaction and solvation. We found that the source of the drug resistance is a decrease in the binding interaction combined with the reduction of the dehydration penalty. The smaller K292 mutated residue has a larger binding pocket cavity compared to the wild-type resulting in the loss of drug carboxylate-K292 hydrogen bonding and an increased accessibility for water molecules around the K292 mutated residue. In addition, oseltamivir does not bind well to the R292K mutant complex as shown by the high degree of fluctuation in ligand RMSD during the simulation and the change in angular distribution of bulky side chain groups.

  8. Inhibitors of Pyruvate Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Maurice, Martin St.; Attwood, Paul V.

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to discuss the varied types of inhibitors of biotin-dependent carboxylases, with an emphasis on the inhibitors of pyruvate carboxylase. Some of these inhibitors are physiologically relevant, in that they provide ways of regulating the cellular activities of the enzymes e.g. aspartate and prohibitin inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase. Most of the inhibitors that will be discussed have been used to probe various aspects of the structure and function of these enzymes. They target particular parts of the structure e.g. avidin – biotin, FTP – ATP binding site, oxamate – pyruvate binding site, phosphonoacetate – binding site of the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate. PMID:22180764

  9. Acquired Factor V Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yugo; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Katsura, Toshiaki; Akao, Masaharu; Okuno, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors directed against factor V rarely occur, and the clinical symptoms vary. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with a decreased factor V activity that had decreased to <3 %. We administered vitamin K and 6 units of fresh frozen plasma, but she thereafter developed an intracerebral hemorrhage. It is unclear whether surgery >10 years earlier might have caused the development of a factor V inhibitor. The treatment of acquired factor V inhibitors is mainly the transfusion of platelet concentrates and corticosteroids. Both early detection and the early initiation of the treatment of factor V inhibitor are thus considered to be important. PMID:27746446

  10. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  11. Preclinical activity of VX-787, a first-in-class, orally bioavailable inhibitor of the influenza virus polymerase PB2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Byrn, Randal A; Jones, Steven M; Bennett, Hamilton B; Bral, Chris; Clark, Michael P; Jacobs, Marc D; Kwong, Ann D; Ledeboer, Mark W; Leeman, Joshua R; McNeil, Colleen F; Murcko, Mark A; Nezami, Azin; Perola, Emanuele; Rijnbrand, Rene; Saxena, Kumkum; Tsai, Alice W; Zhou, Yi; Charifson, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    VX-787 is a novel inhibitor of influenza virus replication that blocks the PB2 cap-snatching activity of the influenza viral polymerase complex. Viral genetics and X-ray crystallography studies provide support for the idea that VX-787 occupies the 7-methyl GTP (m(7)GTP) cap-binding site of PB2. VX-787 binds the cap-binding domain of the PB2 subunit with a KD (dissociation constant) of 24 nM as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The cell-based EC50 (the concentration of compound that ensures 50% cell viability of an uninfected control) for VX-787 is 1.6 nM in a cytopathic effect (CPE) assay, with a similar EC50 in a viral RNA replication assay. VX-787 is active against a diverse panel of influenza A virus strains, including H1N1pdm09 and H5N1 strains, as well as strains with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). VX-787 was highly efficacious in both prophylaxis and treatment models of mouse influenza and was superior to the neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, including in delayed-start-to-treat experiments, with 100% survival at up to 96 h postinfection and partial survival in groups where the initiation of therapy was delayed up to 120 h postinfection. At different doses, VX-787 showed a 1-log to >5-log reduction in viral load (relative to vehicle controls) in mouse lungs. Overall, these favorable findings validate the PB2 subunit of the viral polymerase as a drug target for influenza therapy and support the continued development of VX-787 as a novel antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza infection.

  12. Preclinical Activity of VX-787, a First-in-Class, Orally Bioavailable Inhibitor of the Influenza Virus Polymerase PB2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Byrn, Randal A.; Jones, Steven M.; Bennett, Hamilton B.; Bral, Chris; Clark, Michael P.; Jacobs, Marc D.; Kwong, Ann D.; Ledeboer, Mark W.; Leeman, Joshua R.; McNeil, Colleen F.; Murcko, Mark A.; Nezami, Azin; Perola, Emanuele; Rijnbrand, Rene; Saxena, Kumkum; Tsai, Alice W.; Zhou, Yi

    2014-01-01

    VX-787 is a novel inhibitor of influenza virus replication that blocks the PB2 cap-snatching activity of the influenza viral polymerase complex. Viral genetics and X-ray crystallography studies provide support for the idea that VX-787 occupies the 7-methyl GTP (m7GTP) cap-binding site of PB2. VX-787 binds the cap-binding domain of the PB2 subunit with a KD (dissociation constant) of 24 nM as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The cell-based EC50 (the concentration of compound that ensures 50% cell viability of an uninfected control) for VX-787 is 1.6 nM in a cytopathic effect (CPE) assay, with a similar EC50 in a viral RNA replication assay. VX-787 is active against a diverse panel of influenza A virus strains, including H1N1pdm09 and H5N1 strains, as well as strains with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). VX-787 was highly efficacious in both prophylaxis and treatment models of mouse influenza and was superior to the neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, including in delayed-start-to-treat experiments, with 100% survival at up to 96 h postinfection and partial survival in groups where the initiation of therapy was delayed up to 120 h postinfection. At different doses, VX-787 showed a 1-log to >5-log reduction in viral load (relative to vehicle controls) in mouse lungs. Overall, these favorable findings validate the PB2 subunit of the viral polymerase as a drug target for influenza therapy and support the continued development of VX-787 as a novel antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza infection. PMID:25547360

  13. CRYSTALLINE SOYBEAN TRYPSIN INHIBITOR

    PubMed Central

    Kunitz, M.

    1947-01-01

    A study has been made of the general properties of crystalline soybean trypsin inhibitor. The soy inhibitor is a stable protein of the globulin type of a molecular weight of about 24,000. Its isoelectric point is at pH 4.5. It inhibits the proteolytic action approximately of an equal weight of crystalline trypsin by combining with trypsin to form a stable compound. Chymotrypsin is only slightly inhibited by soy inhibitor. The reaction between chymotrypsin and the soy inhibitor consists in the formation of a reversibly dissociable compound. The inhibitor has no effect on pepsin. The inhibiting action of the soybean inhibitor is associated with the native state of the protein molecule. Denaturation of the soy protein by heat or acid or alkali brings about a proportional decrease in its inhibiting action on trypsin. Reversal of denaturation results in a proportional gain in the inhibiting activity. Crystalline soy protein when denatured is readily digestible by pepsin, and less readily by chymotrypsin and by trypsin. Methods are given for measuring trypsin and inhibitor activity and also protein concentration with the aid of spectrophotometric density measurements at 280 mµ. PMID:19873496

  14. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations for protein-ligand complexes: free energies of binding of water molecules in influenza neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Woods, Christopher J; Shaw, Katherine E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2015-01-22

    The applicability of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods for the calculation of absolute binding free energies of conserved water molecules in protein/ligand complexes is demonstrated. Here, we apply QM/MM Monte Carlo simulations to investigate binding of water molecules to influenza neuraminidase. We investigate five different complexes, including those with the drugs oseltamivir and peramivir. We investigate water molecules in two different environments, one more hydrophobic and one hydrophilic. We calculate the free-energy change for perturbation of a QM to MM representation of the bound water molecule. The calculations are performed at the BLYP/aVDZ (QM) and TIP4P (MM) levels of theory, which we have previously demonstrated to be consistent with one another for QM/MM modeling. The results show that the QM to MM perturbation is significant in both environments (greater than 1 kcal mol(-1)) and larger in the more hydrophilic site. Comparison with the same perturbation in bulk water shows that this makes a contribution to binding. The results quantify how electronic polarization differences in different environments affect binding affinity and also demonstrate that extensive, converged QM/MM free-energy simulations, with good levels of QM theory, are now practical for protein/ligand complexes.

  15. Production of an enzymatically active and immunogenic form of ectodomain of Porcine rubulavirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Cerriteño-Sánchez, José Luis; Santos-López, Gerardo; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora Hilda; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Cuevas-Romero, Sandra; Herrera-Camacho, Irma

    2016-04-10

    Blue-eye disease (BED) of swine is a viral disease endemic in Mexico. The etiological agent is a paramyxovirus classified as Porcine rubulavirus (PoRV-LPMV), which exhibits in its envelope the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein, the most immunogenic and a major target for vaccine development. We report in this study the obtaining of ectodomain of PoRV HN (eHN) through the Pichia pastoris expression system. The expression vector (pPICZαB-HN) was integrated by displacement into the yeast chromosome and resulted in a Mut(+) phenotype. Expressed eHN in the P. pastoris X33 strain was recovered from cell-free medium, featuring up to 67 nmol/min/mg after 6 days of expression. eHN was recognized by the serum of infected pigs with strains currently circulating in the Mexican Bajio region. eHN induces antibodies in mice after 28 days of immunization with specific recognition in ELISA test. These antibodies were able to inhibit >80% replication by viral neutralization assays in cell culture. These studies show the obtaining of a protein with similar characteristics to the native HN and which may be a candidate to propose a vaccine or to use the antigen in a serologic diagnostic test.

  16. Permissive changes in the neuraminidase play a dominant role in improving the viral fitness of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) strains.

    PubMed

    Abed, Yacine; Pizzorno, Andrés; Bouhy, Xavier; Boivin, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Permissive neuraminidase (NA) substitutions such as R222Q, V234M and D344N have facilitated the emergence and worldwide spread of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1)-H275Y viruses. However, the potential contribution of genetic changes in other viral segments on viral fitness remains poorly investigated. A series of recombinant A(H1N1)pdm09 and A/WSN/33 7:1 reassortants containing the wild-type (WT) A/Brisbane/59/2007 NA gene or its single (H275Y) and double (H275Y/Q222R, H275Y/M234V and H275Y/N344D) variants were generated and their replicative properties were assessed in vitro. The Q222R reversion substitution significantly reduced viral titers when evaluated in both A(H1N1)pdm09 and A/WSN/33 backgrounds. The permissive role of the R222Q was further confirmed using A/WSN/33 7:1 reassortants containing the NA gene of the oseltamivir-susceptible or oseltamivir-resistant influenza A/Mississippi/03/2001 strains. Therefore, NA permissive substitutions play a dominant role for improving viral replication of oseltamivir-resistant A (H1N1)-H275Y viruses in vitro.

  17. Preparation and diagnostic utility of a hemagglutination inhibition test antigen derived from the baculovirus-expressed hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein gene of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kye, Soo-Jeong; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Park, Mi-Ja; Kim, Saeromi; Seul, Hee-Jung; Kwon, Jun-Hun

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (rHN) protein from Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with hemagglutination (HA) activity was expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda cells using a baculovirus expression system. The rHN protein extracted from infected cells was used as an antigen in a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for the detection and titration of NDV-specific antibodies present in chicken sera. The rHN antigen produced high HA titers of 2(13) per 25 μL, which were similar to those of the NDV antigen produced using chicken eggs, and it remained stable without significant loss of the HA activity for at least 12 weeks at 4°C. The rHN-based HI assay specifically detected NDV antibodies, but not the sera of other avian pathogens, with a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 98.0%, respectively, in known positive and negative chicken sera (n = 430). Compared with an NDV-based HI assay, the rHN-based HI assay had a relative sensitivity and specificity of 96.1% and 95.5%, respectively, when applied to field chicken sera. The HI titers of the rHN-based HI assay were highly correlated with those in an NDV-based HI assay (r = 0.927). Overall, these results indicate that rHN protein provides a useful alternative to NDV antigen in HI assays.

  18. Recombinant infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) H120 vaccine strain expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) protects chickens against IBV and NDV challenge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yingshun; Li, Jianan; Fu, Li; Ji, Gaosheng; Zeng, Fanya; Zhou, Long; Gao, Wenqian; Wang, Hongning

    2016-05-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) and Newcastle disease (ND) are common viral diseases of chickens, which are caused by infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), respectively. Vaccination with live attenuated strains of IBV-H120 and NDV-LaSota are important for the control of IB and ND. However, conventional live attenuated vaccines are expensive and result in the inability to differentiate between infected and vaccinated chickens. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new efficacious vaccines. In this study, using a previously established reverse genetics system, we generated a recombinant IBV virus based on the IBV H120 vaccine strain expressing the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of NDV. The recombinant virus, R-H120-HN/5a, exhibited growth dynamics, pathogenicity and viral titers that were similar to those of the parental IBV H120, but it had acquired hemagglutination activity from NDV. Vaccination of SPF chickens with the R-H120-HN/5a virus induced a humoral response at a level comparable to that of the LaSota/H120 commercial bivalent vaccine and provided significant protection against challenge with virulent IBV and NDV. In summary, the results of this study indicate that the IBV H120 strain could serve as an effective tool for designing vaccines against IB and other infectious diseases, and the generation of IBV R-H120-HN/5a provides a solid foundation for the development of an effective bivalent vaccine against IBV and NDV.

  19. Molecular characterization of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of porcine rubulavirus isolates associated with neurological disorders in fattening and adult pigs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, J I; Santos-López, G; Alonso, R; Doporto, J M; Ramírez-Mendoza, H; Mendoza, S; Hernández, J; Reyes-Leyva, J; Trujillo, M E

    2008-10-01

    "Blue eye disease" is a viral infection of swine endemic in Mexico, which produces fatal encephalitis accompanied by respiratory signs and corneal opacity in suckling piglets. An atypical blue eye disease outbreak presented high rates of neurological signs in fattening and adult pigs from 2000 to 2003. In order to identify the basis of increased neurovirulence, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene of several porcine rubulavirus isolates were sequenced and compared with that of La Piedad Michoacan virus and other isolates that did not produce neurological disorders in weaned pigs. Nine amino acid mutations distinguished the high neurovirulent PAC6-PAC9 viruses, whereas five mutations characterized the low neurovirulent PAC2 and PAC3 viruses. HN protein three-dimensional models showed that the main conformation and functional domains were preserved, although substitutions A223T and A291D occurred in PAC2 and PAC3 viruses, as well as A511K and E514K presented in PAC6-PAC9 viruses considerably modified the properties of the HN protein surface. The increased positive charge of the HN protein of PAC6-PAC9 viruses seems to be associated with their increased neurovirulence.

  20. Proteome Response of Chicken Embryo Fibroblast Cells to Recombinant H5N1 Avian Influenza Viruses with Different Neuraminidase Stalk Lengths

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongtao; Ming, Fan; Huang, Huimin; Guo, Kelei; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin; Zhou, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    The variation on neuraminidase (NA) stalk region of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus results in virulence change in animals. In our previous studies, the special NA stalk-motif of H5N1 viruses has been demonstrated to play a significant role in the high virulence and pathogenicity in chickens. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of viruses with different NA stalk remain poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive characterization of the proteome response of chicken cells to recombinant H5N1 virus with stalk-short NA (rNA-wt) and the stalkless NA mutant virus (rSD20). 208 proteins with differential abundance profiles were identified differentially expressed (DE), and these proteins were mainly related to stress response, transcription regulation, transport, metabolic process, cellular component and cytoskeleton. Through Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA), the significant biological functions of DE proteins represented included Post-Translational Modification, Protein Folding, DNA Replication, Recombination and Repair. It was interesting to find that most DE proteins were involved in the TGF-β mediated functional network. Moreover, the specific DE proteins may play important roles in the innate immune responses and H5N1 virus replication. Our data provide important information regarding the comparable host response to H5N1 influenza virus infection with different NA stalk lengths. PMID:28079188

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of peramivir against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses harboring the neuraminidase H275Y mutation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Kodama, Makoto; Noshi, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryu; Kanazu, Takushi; Nomura, Naoki; Soda, Kosuke; Isoda, Norikazu; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Yamano, Yoshinori; Sato, Akihiko; Kida, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    High morbidity and mortality associated with human cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, including H5N1 influenza virus, have been reported. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antiviral effects of peramivir against HPAI viruses. In neuraminidase (NA) inhibition and virus replication inhibition assays, peramivir showed strong inhibitory activity against H5N1, H7N1 and H7N7 HPAI viruses with sub-nanomolar activity in enzyme assays. In H5N1 viruses containing the NA H275Y mutation, the antiviral activity of peramivir against the variant was lower than that against the wild-type. Evaluation of the in vivo antiviral activity showed that a single intravenous treatment of peramivir (10 mg/kg) prevented lethality in mice infected with wild-type H5N1 virus and also following infection with H5N1 virus with the H275Y mutation after a 5 day administration of peramivir (30 mg/kg). Furthermore, mice injected with peramivir showed low viral titers and low levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs. These results suggest that peramivir has therapeutic activity against HPAI viruses even if the virus harbors the NA H275Y mutation.

  2. An alpha2,6-sialyltransferase cloned from Photobacterium leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119 shows both sialyltransferase and neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Mine, Toshiki; Katayama, Sakurako; Kajiwara, Hitomi; Tsunashima, Masako; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshimitsu; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2010-02-01

    We cloned, expressed, and characterized a novel beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase from Photobacterium leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119. The protein showed 56-96% identity to the marine bacterial alpha2,6-sialyltransferases classified into glycosyltransferase family 80. The sialyltransferase activity of the N-terminal truncated form of the recombinant enzyme was 1477 U/L of Escherichia coli culture. The truncated recombinant enzyme was purified as a single band by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis through 3 column chromatography steps. The enzyme had distinct activity compared with known marine bacterial alpha2,6-sialyltransferases. Although alpha2,6-sialyltransferases cloned from marine bacteria, such as Photobacterium damselae strain JT0160, P. leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-145, and Photobacterium sp. strain JT-ISH-224, show only alpha2,6-sialyltransferase activity, the recombinant enzyme cloned from P. leiognathi strain JT-SHIZ-119 showed both alpha2,6-sialyltransferase and alpha2,6-linkage-specific neuraminidase activity. Our results provide important information toward a comprehensive understanding of the bacterial sialyltransferases belonging to the group 80 glycosyltransferase family in the CAZy database.

  3. Amino acid substitutions in the neuraminidase protein of an H9N2 avian influenza virus affect its airborne transmission in chickens.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Wei, Liangmeng; Yang, Yan; Wang, Bingxiao; Liang, Wei; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu; Gao, Lili; Cai, Yumei; Hou, Peiqiang; Yang, Huili; Wang, Airong; Huang, Rong; Gao, Jing; Chai, Tongjie

    2015-04-18

    Cases of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry are increasing throughout many Eurasian countries, and co-infections with other pathogens have resulted in high morbidity and mortality in poultry. Few studies have investigated the genetic factors of virus airborne transmission which determine the scope of this epidemic. In this study, we used specific-pathogen-free chickens housed in isolators to investigate the airborne transmissibility of five recombinant H9N2 AIV rescued by reverse genetic technology. The results show that airborne transmission of A/Chicken/Shandong/01/2008 (SD01) virus was related to the neuraminidase (NA) gene, and four amino acid mutations (D368E, S370L, E313K and G381D) within the head region of the SD01 NA, reduced virus replication in the respiratory tract of chickens, reduced virus NA activity, and resulted in a loss of airborne transmission ability in chickens. Similarly, reverse mutations of these four amino acids in the NA protein of r01/NASS virus, conferred an airborne transmission ability to the recombinant virus. We conclude that these four NA residues may be significant genetic markers for evaluating potential disease outbreak of H9N2 AIV, and propose that immediate attention should be paid to the airborne transmission of this virus.

  4. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM.

  5. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  6. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  7. A Novel Endonuclease Inhibitor Exhibits Broad-Spectrum Anti-Influenza Virus Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeremy C.; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Lerner, Christian; Kreis, Lukas; Gasser, Rodolfo; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q.; Najera, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Antiviral drugs are important in preventing and controlling influenza, particularly when vaccines are ineffective or unavailable. A single class of antiviral drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), is recommended for treating influenza. The limited therapeutic options and the potential risk of antiviral resistance are driving the search for additional small-molecule inhibitors that act on influenza virus proteins. The acid polymerase (PA) of influenza viruses is a promising target for new antivirals because of its essential role in initiating virus transcription. Here, we characterized a novel compound, RO-7, identified as a putative PA endonuclease inhibitor. RO-7 was effective when added before the cessation of genome replication, reduced polymerase activity in cell-free systems, and decreased relative amounts of viral mRNA and genomic RNA during influenza virus infection. RO-7 specifically inhibited the ability of the PA endonuclease domain to cleave a nucleic acid substrate. RO-7 also inhibited influenza A viruses (seasonal and 2009 pandemic H1N1 and seasonal H3N2) and B viruses (Yamagata and Victoria lineages), zoonotic viruses (H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2), and NAI-resistant variants in plaque reduction, yield reduction, and cell viability assays in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells with nanomolar to submicromolar 50% effective concentrations (EC50s), low toxicity, and favorable selective indices. RO-7 also inhibited influenza virus replication in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Overall, RO-7 exhibits broad-spectrum activity against influenza A and B viruses in multiple in vitro assays, supporting its further characterization and development as a potential antiviral agent for treating influenza. PMID:27381402

  8. Sialidase, receptor-binding and fusion-promotion activities of Newcastle disease virus haemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein: a mutational and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Laura; Muñoz-Barroso, Isabel; Marcos, Fernando; Shnyrov, Valery L; Villar, Enrique

    2004-07-01

    Mutations were generated in residues at the putative catalytic site of the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus Clone 30 strain (Arg498, Glu258, Tyr262, Tyr317 and Ser418) and their effects on its three associated activities were studied. Expression of the mutant proteins at the surface of HeLa cells was similar to that of the wild-type. Sialidase, receptor-binding and fusion-promotion activities were affected to different degrees for all mutants studied. Mutant Arg498Lys lost most of its sialidase activity, although it retained most of the receptor-binding activity, suggesting that, for the former activity, besides the presence of a basic residue, the proximity to the substrate molecule is also important, as Lys is shorter than Arg. Proximity also seems to be important in substrate recognition, since Tyr262Phe retained most of its sialidase activity while Tyr262Ser lost most of it. Also, Ser418Ala displayed most of the wild-type sialidase activity. However, a kinetic and thermodynamic study of the sialidase activity of the Tyr262Ser and Ser418Ala mutants was performed and revealed that the hydroxyl group of these residues also plays an important role in catalysis, since such activity was much less effective than that of the wild-type and these mutations modified their activation energy for sialidase catalysis. The discrepancy of the modifications in sialidase and receptor-binding activities in the mutants analysed does not account for the topological coincidence of the two sites. These results also suggest that the globular head of HN protein may play a role in fusion-promotion activity.

  9. Manipulation of neuraminidase packaging signals and hemagglutinin residues improves the growth of A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) influenza vaccine virus yield in eggs.

    PubMed

    Barman, Subrata; Krylov, Petr S; Turner, Jasmine C; Franks, John; Webster, Robert G; Husain, Matloob; Webby, Richard J

    2017-03-07

    In 2013, a novel avian-origin H7N9 influenza A virus causing severe lower respiratory tract disease in humans emerged in China, with continued sporadic cases. An effective vaccine is needed for this virus in case it acquires transmissibility among humans; however, PR8-based A/Anhui/1/2013 (Anhui/1, H7N9), a WHO-recommended H7N9 candidate vaccine virus (CVV) for vaccine production, does not replicate well in chicken eggs, posing an obstacle to egg-based vaccine production. To address this issue, we explored the possibility that PR8's hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) packaging signals mediate improvement of Anhui/1 CVV yield in eggs. We constructed chimeric HA and NA genes having the coding region of Anhui/1 HA and NA flanked by the 5' and 3' packaging signals of PR8's HA and NA, respectively. The growth of CVVs containing the chimeric HA was not affected, but that of those containing the chimeric NA gene grew in embryonated chicken eggs with a more than 2-fold higher titer than that of WT CVV. Upon 6 passages in eggs further yield increase was achieved although this was not associated with any changes in the chimeric NA gene. The HA of the passaged CVV, did, however, exhibit egg-adaptive mutations and one of them (HA-G218E) improved CVV growth in eggs without significantly changing antigenicity. The HA-G218E substitution and a chimeric NA, thus, combine to provide an Anhui/1 CVV with properties more favorable for vaccine manufacture.

  10. Receptor recognition mechanism of human influenza A H1N1 (1918), avian influenza A H5N1 (2004), and pandemic H1N1 (2009) neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Jongkon, Nipa; Sangma, Chak

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A neuraminidase (NA) is a target for anti-influenza drugs. The function of this enzyme is to cleave a glycosidic linkage of a host cell receptor that links sialic acid (Sia) to galactose (Gal), to allow the virus to leave an infected cell and propagate. The receptor is an oligosaccharide on the host cell surface. There are two types of oligosaccharide receptor; the first, which is found mainly on avian epithelial cell surfaces, links Sia with Gal by an α2,3 glycosidic linkage; in the second, found mainly on human epithelial cell surfaces, linkage is via an α2,6 linkage. Some researchers believe that NAs from different viruses show selectivity for each type of linkage, but there is limited information available to confirm this hypothesis. To see if the linkage type is more specific to any particular NA, a number of NA-receptor complexes of human influenza A H1N1 (1918), avian influenza A H5N1 (2004), and a pandemic strain of H1N1 (2009) were constructed using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the two types of receptor analogues bound to NAs use different mechanisms. Moreover, it was found that a residue unique to avian virus NA is responsible for the recognition of the Siaα2,3Gal receptor, and a residue unique to human virus NA is responsible for the recognition of Siaα2,6Gal. We believe that this finding could explain how NAs of different virus origins always possess some unique residues.

  11. Roles for the cytoplasmic tails of the fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase proteins in budding of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5.

    PubMed

    Waning, David L; Schmitt, Anthony P; Leser, George P; Lamb, Robert A

    2002-09-01

    The efficient release of many enveloped viruses from cells involves the coalescence of viral components at sites of budding on the plasma membrane of infected cells. This coalescence is believed to require interactions between the cytoplasmic tails of surface glycoproteins and the matrix (M) protein. For the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5), the cytoplasmic tail of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein has been shown previously to be important for normal virus budding. To investigate a role for the cytoplasmic tail of the fusion (F) protein in virus assembly and budding, we generated a series of F cytoplasmic tail-truncated recombinant viruses. Analysis of these viruses in tissue culture indicated that the cytoplasmic tail of the F protein was dispensable for normal virus replication and budding. To investigate further the requirements for assembly and budding of SV5, we generated two double-mutant recombinant viruses that lack 8 amino acids of the predicted 17-amino-acid HN protein cytoplasmic tail in combination with truncation of either 10 or 18 amino acids from the predicted 20-amino-acid F protein cytoplasmic tail. Both of the double mutant recombinant viruses displayed a replication defect in tissue culture and a budding defect, the extent of which was dependent on the length of the remaining F cytoplasmic tail. Taken together, this work and our earlier data on virus-like particle formation (A. P. Schmitt, G. P. Leser, D. L. Waning, and R. A. Lamb, J. Virol. 76:3953-3964, 2002) suggest a redundant role for the cytoplasmic tails of the HN and F proteins in virus assembly and budding.

  12. Identification of potential B cell epitope determinants by computer techniques, in hemagglutinin-neuraminidase from the porcine rubulavirus La Piedad Michoacan.

    PubMed

    Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández-Jáuregui, Pablo; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto; Agundis, Concepción; Zenteno, Edgar

    2007-01-01

    Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) from porcine rubulavirus La Piedad Michoacan (RvpLPM) is one of the most antigenic proteins known, and is responsible for virus-host cell interaction. We analyzed the amino acid sequence of HN, using computer-assisted techniques to identify B cell epitopes. From a pool of 18 possible antigenic peptides, we evaluated the antigenicity of the 2 peptides with the highest scores and the 1 with lowest score. Antibodies from RvpLPM-infected pigs recognized the synthesized HN-A, HN-B, and HN-R peptides (optical density [OD]: 0.33 +/- 0.02 for HN-A, 0.20 +/- 0.02 for HN-B, and 0.07 +/- 0.01 for HN-R); bovine serum albumin-coupled HN-A and HN-B induced rabbit anti-RvpLPM antibodies (OD: 0.39 +/- 0.01 for HN-A and 0.35 +/- 0.02 for HN-B). Loop 5 from the outer membrane protein, OmpC, from Salmonella typhi was replaced with HN-B; this protein was then expressed in Escherichia coli UH302. BALB/c mice were challenged intraperitoneally or orogastrically with the fusion protein expressed in E. coli and murine antibodies obtained from both types of administration inhibited virus-hemagglutinating activity, as did the antibodies from RvpLPM-infected swine. These results suggest that HN-A and HN-B are peptides involved in RvpLPM cell carbohydrate recognition, and could therefore be considered potential targets for vaccine and diagnostic procedures development.

  13. Theoretical analysis of the neuraminidase epitope of the Mexican A H1N1 influenza strain, and experimental studies on its interaction with rabbit and human hosts.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Paola Kinara Reyes; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Bello, Martiniano; Rojas-Hernández, S; Zimic, Mirko; Quiliano, Miguel; Briz, Verónica; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Tolentino-López, Luis; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-05-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) epitope from the Mexican AH1N1 influenza virus was identified by using sequences registered at the GenBank during the peak of a pandemic (from April 2009 to October 2010). First, NA protein sequences were submitted for multiple alignment analysis, and their three-dimensional models (3-D) were then built by using homology modeling. The most common sequence (denominated wild-type) and its mutants were submitted to linear and nonlinear epitope predictors, which included the major histocompatibility complex type II (MHC II) and B-cell peptides. The epitope prediction was in accordance with evolutionary behavior and some protein structural properties. The latter included a low NA mutation rate, NA 3-D surface exposure, and the presence of high hindrance side chain residues. After selecting the epitope, docking studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to explore interactions between the epitope and MHC II. Afterward, several experimental assays were performed to validate the theoretical study by using antibodies from humans (infected by pandemic H1N1) and rabbits (epitope vaccination). The results show 119 complete sequences that were grouped into 28 protein sequences according to their identity (one wild-type and 27 representative mutants (1-5 mutations)). The predictors yielded several epitopes, with the best fit being the one located in the C-terminal region. Theoretical methods demonstrated that the selected epitope reached the P4, P6, P7, and P9 pockets of MHC II, whereas the experimental evidence indicates that the epitope is recognized by human antibodies and also by rabbit antibodies immunized with the peptide.

  14. Protection of pigs against pandemic swine origin H1N1 influenza A virus infection by hemagglutinin- or neuraminidase-expressing attenuated pseudorabies virus recombinants.

    PubMed

    Klingbeil, Katharina; Lange, Elke; Blohm, Ulrike; Teifke, Jens P; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2015-03-02

    Influenza is an important respiratory disease of pigs, and may lead to novel human pathogens like the 2009 pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus (SoIV). Therefore, improved influenza vaccines for pigs are required. Recently, we demonstrated that single intranasal immunization with a hemagglutinin (HA)-expressing pseudorabies virus recombinant of vaccine strain Bartha (PrV-Ba) protected pigs from H1N1 SoIV challenge (Klingbeil et al., 2014). Now we investigated enhancement of efficacy by prime-boost vaccination and/or intramuscular administration. Furthermore, a novel PrV-Ba recombinant expressing codon-optimized N1 neuraminidase (NA) was included. In vitro replication of this virus was only slightly affected compared to parental virus. Unlike HA, the abundantly expressed NA was efficiently incorporated into PrV particles. Immunization of pigs with the two PrV recombinants, either singly or in combination, induced B cell proliferation and the expected SoIV-specific antibodies, whose titers increased substantially after boost vaccination. After immunization of animals with either PrV recombinant H1N1 SoIV challenge virus replication was significantly reduced compared to PrV-Ba vaccinated or naïve controls. Protective efficacy of HA-expressing PrV was higher than of NA-expressing PrV, and not significantly enhanced by combination. Despite higher serum antibody titers obtained after intramuscular immunization, transmission of challenge virus to naïve contact animals was only prevented after intranasal prime-boost vaccination with HA-expressing PrV-Ba.

  15. The amino-terminal region of the neuraminidase protein from avian H5N1 influenza virus is important for its biosynthetic transport to the host cell surface.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guomin; Wang, Song; Chi, Xiaojuan; Li, Hua; Wei, Haitao; Zhu, Xiaomei; Chen, Yuhai; Chen, Ji-Long

    2014-12-01

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is a major viral envelope glycoprotein, which plays a critical role in viral infection. Although NA functional domains have been determined previously, the precise role of the amino acids located at the N-terminus of avian H5N1 NA for protein expression and intracellular transport to the host plasma membrane is not fully understood. In the present study, a series of N-terminal truncation or deletion mutants of H5N1 NA were generated and their expression and intracellular trafficking were investigated. Protein expression from mutants NAΔ20, NAΔ35, NAΔ40, NAΔ7-20 and NAΔ7-35 was undetectable by immunoblotting and by performing NA activity assays. Mutants NAΔ6, NAΔ11 and NAΔ15-20 showed a marked decreased in protein expression, whereas mutants NAΔ7-15 and NAΔ15 displayed a slight increase in protein expression, compared with that of the native NA protein. These data suggest that amino acid residues 16-20 are vital for NA protein expression, while amino acids 7-15 might suppress NA protein expression. In deletion mutants NAΔ7-15 and NAΔ15 there was an accumulation of NA protein at the juxta-nuclear region, with reduced expression of NA at the cell surface. Although active Cdc42 could promote transport of wild-type NA to the host cell surface, this member of the Rho family of GTPases failed to regulate transport of mutants NAΔ7-15 and NAΔ15. The results of the study reveal that amino acid residues 7-15 of H5N1 NA are critical for its biosynthetic transport to the host cell surface.

  16. Molecular characterization of partial fusion gene and C-terminus extension length of haemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of recently isolated Newcastle disease virus isolates in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Newcastle disease (ND), caused by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), is a highly contagious disease of birds and has been one of the major causes of economic losses in the poultry industry. Despite routine vaccination programs, sporadic cases have occasionally occurred in the country and remain a constant threat to commercial poultry. Hence, the present study was aimed to characterize NDV isolates obtained from clinical cases in various locations of Malaysia between 2004 and 2007 based on sequence and phylogenetic analysis of partial F gene and C-terminus extension length of HN gene. Results The coding region of eleven NDV isolates fusion (F) gene and carboxyl terminal region of haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene including extensions were amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR and directly sequenced. All the isolates have shown to have non-synonymous to synonymous base substitution rate ranging between 0.081 - 0.264 demonstrating presence of negative selection. Analysis based on F gene showed the characterized isolates possess three different types of protease cleavage site motifs; namely 112RRQKRF117, 112RRRKRF117 and 112GRQGRL117 and appear to show maximum identities with isolates in the region such as cockatoo/14698/90 (Indonesia), Ch/2000 (China), local isolate AF2240 indicating the high similarity of isolates circulating in the South East Asian countries. Meanwhile, one of the isolates resembles commonly used lentogenic vaccine strains. On further characterization of the HN gene, Malaysian isolates had C-terminus extensions of 0, 6 and 11 amino acids. Analysis of the phylogenetic tree revealed that the existence of three genetic groups; namely, genotype II, VII and VIII. Conclusions The study concluded that the occurrence of three types of NDV genotypes and presence of varied carboxyl terminus extension lengths among Malaysian isolates incriminated for sporadic cases. PMID:20691110

  17. Protection against avian influenza H9N2 virus challenge by immunization with hemagglutinin- or neuraminidase-expressing DNA in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Meizhen; Fang Fang; Chen Yan; Wang Hualin; Chen Quanjiao; Chang Haiyan; Wang Fuyan; Wang Hanzhong; Zhang Ran; Chen Ze . E-mail: chenze2005@263.net

    2006-05-19

    Avian influenza viruses of H9N2 subtype are widely spread in avian species. The viruses have recently been transmitted to mammalian species, including humans, accelerating the efforts to devise protective strategies against them. In this study, an avian influenza H9N2 virus strain (A/Chicken/Jiangsu/7/2002), isolated in Jiangsu Province, China, was used to infect BALB/c mice for adaptation. After five lung-to-lung passages, the virus was stably proliferated in a large quantity in the murine lung and caused the deaths of mice. In addition, we explored the protection induced by H9N2 virus hemagglutinin (HA)- and neuraminidase (NA)-expressing DNAs in BALB/c mice. Female BALB/c mice aged 6-8 weeks were immunized once or twice at a 3-week interval with HA-DNA and NA-DNA by electroporation, respectively, each at a dose of 3, 10 or 30 {mu}g. The mice were challenged with a lethal dose (40x LD{sub 5}) of influenza H9N2 virus four weeks after immunization once or one week after immunization twice. The protections of DNA vaccines were evaluated by the serum antibody titers, residual lung virus titers, and survival rates of the mice. The result showed that immunization once with not less than 10 {mu}g or twice with 3 {mu}g HA-DNA or NA-DNA provided effective protection against homologous avian influenza H9N2 virus.

  18. The neuraminidase and matrix genes of the 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 virus cooperate functionally to facilitate efficient replication and transmissibility in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qinfang; Bawa, Bhupinder; Qiao, Chuanling; Qi, Wenbao; Shen, Huigang; Chen, Ying; Ma, Jingqun; Li, Xi; Webby, Richard J.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (pH1N1) contains neuraminidase (NA) and matrix (M) genes from Eurasian avian-like swine influenza viruses (SIVs), with the remaining six genes from North American triple-reassortant SIVs. To characterize the role of the pH1N1 NA and M genes in pathogenesis and transmission, their impact was evaluated in the background of an H1N1 triple-reassortant (tr1930) SIV in which the HA (H3) and NA (N2) of influenza A/swine/Texas/4199-2/98 virus were replaced with those from the classical H1N1 A/swine/Iowa/15/30 (1930) virus. The laboratory-adapted 1930 virus did not shed nor transmit in pigs, but tr1930 was able to shed in infected pigs. The NA, M or both genes of the tr1930 virus were then substituted by those of pH1N1. The resulting virus with both NA and M from pH1N1 grew to significantly higher titre in cell cultures than the viruses with single NA or M from pH1N1. In a pig model, only the virus containing both NA and M from pH1N1 was transmitted to and infected sentinels, whereas the viruses with single NA or M from pH1N1 did not. These results demonstrate that the right combination of NA and M genes is critical for the replication and transmissibility of influenza viruses in pigs. PMID:22337640

  19. Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of influenza B viruses circulating in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during 2010-2011: evolution and sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ghazanfar; Amer, Haitham M; Almajhdi, Fahad N

    2014-06-01

    Influenza viruses are known as continuing threats to human public health every year worldwide. Evolutionary dynamics of influenza B viruses in humans are in a unique progression having two lineages; B/Yam and B/Vic-like viruses, which are circulating simultaneously worldwide. There is a considerable lack of data on influenza B viruses circulating in Saudi Arabia. During the winter-spring season of 2010-2011, 80 nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from hospitalized patients with flu-like symptoms in Riyadh. Screening of samples by one-step RT-PCR identified three (3.8%) influenza B viruses. Sequencing of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes was performed to analyze influenza B viruses circulating in Riyadh as compared to the globally circulating strains. Several common and six unique amino acid substitutions were observed for both HA and NA genes of influenza B Saudi strains. Three unique substitutions (T182A, D196N, and K254R) were identified in HA gene of the B/Yam-like Riyadh strains. In NA gene, a unique common substitution (D53G) was found in all Riyadh strains, while two unique substitutions (L38P, G233R) were recognized only in B/Vic-like Riyadh strains. Riyadh strains were also found to contain N-glycosylation site in HA gene of both B/Vic and B/Yam lineages at positions 197-199 (NET) and 196-198 (NNK/DNK), respectively. The significance of these mutations on the antigenicity of both lineages is discussed herein. The unique changes observed in HA and NA genes of influenza B Riyadh strains support strongly the need for continuous surveillance and monitoring of new evolving strains that might pose threat to the Saudi community.

  20. Thrombin inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, P E; Naylor-Olsen, A M

    1998-08-01

    Recently, iv formulated direct thrombin inhibitors have been shown to be safe and efficacious alternatives to heparin. These results have fueled the hopes for an orally active compound. Such a compound could be a significant advance over warfarin if it had predictable pharmacokinetics and a duration of action sufficient for once or twice a day dosing. In order to develop an orally active compound which meets these criteria, the deficiencies of the prototype inhibitor efegatran have had to be addressed. First, using a combination of structure based design and empirical structure optimization, more selective compounds have been identified by modifying the P1 group or by incorporating different peptidomimetic P2/P3 scaffolds. Secondly, this optimization has resulted in the development of potent and selective non-covalent inhibitors, thus bypassing the liabilities of the serine trap. Thirdly, oral bioavailability has been achieved while maintaining selectivity and efficacy through the incorporation of progressively less basic P1 groups. The duration of action of these compounds remains to be optimized. Other advances in thrombin inhibitor design have included the development of uncharged P1 groups and the discovery of two non-peptide templates.

  1. Cocirculation of Three Hemagglutinin and Two Neuraminidase Subtypes of Avian Influenza Viruses in Huzhou, China, April 2013: Implication for the Origin of the Novel H7N9 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiankang; Wang, Lili; Liu, Jia; Jin, Meihua; Hao, Fangyuan; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhao; Wen, Dong; Wu, Xiaofang; Liu, Guangtao; Ji, Lei; Xu, Deshun; Zhou, Dongming; Leng, Qibin

    2014-01-01

    We detected three avian influenza hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes (H7, H9, and H5) and two neuraminidase (NA) subtypes (N9 and N2), as well as H7N9-related H9N9 reassortant intermediates, cocirculating among poultry in Huzhou, China, during April 2013. The results of our study reveal not only that Huzhou is one of the geographic origins of the novel H7N9 virus but also that cocirculation poses a potential threat to humans in the future. PMID:24623437

  2. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Tajima, Shigeru; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko; Aida, Yoko

    2014-07-18

    Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC50 values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  3. Detection of enzyme inhibitors in crude natural extracts using droplet-based microfluidics coupled to HPLC.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Abraham; Álvarez-Bohórquez, Enrique; Castillero, Eduardo; Olguin, Luis F

    2017-04-04

    Natural product screening for new bioactive compounds can greatly benefit from low reagents consumption and high throughput capacity of droplet-based microfluidic systems. However, the creation of large droplet libraries in which each droplet carries a different compound is a challenging task. A possible solution is to use an HPLC coupled to a droplet generating microfluidic device to sequentially encapsulate the eluting compounds. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of carrying out enzyme inhibiting assays inside nano-liter droplets with the different components of a natural crude extract after being separated by a coupled HPLC column. In the droplet formation zone, the eluted components are mixed with an enzyme and a fluorogenic substrate that permits to follow the enzymatic reaction in the presence of each chromatographic peak and identify those inhibiting the enzyme activity. Using a fractal shape channel design and automated image analysis we were able to identify inhibitors of Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase present in a root extract of the Pelargonium sidoides plant. This work demonstrates the feasibility of bioprofiling a natural crude extract after being separated in HPLC using microfluidic droplets on-line and represents an advance in the miniaturization of natural products screening.

  4. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  5. [SGLT2 inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    SGLT2 is a glucose transporter which plays an important role for reabsorption of urinary glucose depending on the sodium concentration gradient. SGLT2 is mainly present in apical site of S1 segment of renal proximal tubule and accounts for approximately 90% of total urinary glucose reabsorption. SLC5a2, which codes SGLT2, is also known as the causative gene of familial renal glucosuria. SGLT2 inhibitors are attracting attention as newly developed oral anti-diabetic agents which improve glucose intolerance and also have an anti-obese effect by promoting urinary glucose excretion (UGE), which is a different pharmacological effect from other conventional anti-diabetic agents. In this review, we will discuss the effect of SGLT2 inhibitor on the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes.

  6. Development of scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.

    1996-12-01

    During the last fifty years, scale inhibition has gone from an art to a science. Scale inhibition has changed from simple pH adjustment to the use of optimized dose of designer polymers from multiple monomers. The water-treatment industry faces many challenges due to the need to conserve water, availability of only low quality water, increasing environmental regulations of the water discharge, and concern for human safety when using acid. Natural materials such as starch, lignin, tannin, etc., have been replaced with hydrolytically stable organic phosphates and synthetic polymers. Most progress in scale inhibition has come from the use of synergistic mixtures and copolymerizing different functionalities to achieve specific goals. Development of scale inhibitors requires an understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and its inhibition. This paper discusses the historic perspective of scale inhibition and the development of new inhibitors based on the understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and the use of powerful tools like molecular modeling to visualize crystal-inhibitor interactions.

  7. The PA endonuclease inhibitor RO-7 protects mice from lethal challenge with influenza A or B viruses.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremy C; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Vogel, Peter; Gasser, Rodolfo; Najera, Isabel; Govorkova, Elena A

    2017-02-13

    Current influenza treatment relies on a single class of antiviral drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), raising concern over the potential emergence of resistant variants and necessitating the development of novel drugs. In recent years, investigational inhibitors targeting the endonuclease activity of the influenza acidic polymerase (PA) protein have yielded encouraging results, although there are only limited data on their in vivo efficacy. Here, we examined the antiviral potential of the PA endonuclease inhibitor RO-7 in prophylactic and therapeutic regimens in BALB/c mice inoculated with influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1)pdm09 or B/Brisbane/60/2008 viruses, which represent currently circulating antigenic variants. RO-7 was administered to mice intraperitoneally twice daily at dosages of 6, 15, or 30 mg/kg/day for 5 days, starting 4 h before or 24 or 48 h after virus inoculation, and showed no adverse effects. Prophylactic administration completely protected mice from lethal infection by influenza A or B virus. The level of therapeutic protection conferred depended upon the time of treatment initiation and RO-7 dosage, resulting in 60%-100% and 80%-100% survival with influenza A and B viruses, respectively. RO-7 treatment significantly decreased virus titers in the lung and lessened the extent and severity of lung damage. No PA endonuclease-inhibitor resistance was observed in viruses isolated from lungs of RO-7-treated mice, and the viruses remained susceptible to the drug at nanomolar concentrations in phenotypic assays. These in vivo efficacy results further highlight the potential of RO-7 for development as antiviral therapy for influenza A and B virus infections.

  8. Amino acids responsible for the absolute sialidase activity of the influenza A virus neuraminidase: relationship to growth in the duck intestine.

    PubMed

    Kobasa, D; Wells, K; Kawaoka, Y

    2001-12-01

    The 1957 human pandemic strain of influenza A virus contained an avian virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), both of which acquired specificity for the human receptor, N-acetylneuraminic acid linked to galactose of cellular glycoconjugates via an alpha2-6 bond (NeuAcalpha2-6Gal). Although the NA retained considerable specificity for NeuAcalpha2-3Gal, its original substrate in ducks, it lost the ability to support viral growth in the duck intestine, suggesting a growth-restrictive change other than a shift in substrate specificity. To test this possibility, we generated a panel of reassortant viruses that expressed the NA genes of human H2N2 viruses isolated from 1957 to 1968 with all other genes from the avian virus A/duck/Hong Kong/278/78 (H9N2). Only the NA of A/Singapore/1/57 supported efficient viral growth in the intestines of orally inoculated ducks. The growth-supporting capacity of the NA correlated with a high level of enzymatic activity, comparable to that found to be associated with avian virus NAs. The specific activities of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 and A/England/12/62 NAs, which showed greatly restricted abilities to support viral growth in ducks, were only 8 and 5%, respectively, of the NA specific activity for A/Singapore/1/57. Using chimeric constructs based on A/Singapore/1/57 and A/England/12/62 NAs, we localized the determinants of high specific NA activity to a region containing six amino acid substitutions in A/England/12/62: Ser331-->Arg, Asp339-->Asn, Asn367-->Ser, Ser370-->Leu, Asn400-->Ser, and Pro431-->Glu. Five of these six residues (excluding Asn400) were required and sufficient for the full specific activity of the A/Singapore/1/57 NA. Thus, in addition to a change in substrate specificity, a reduction in high specific activity may be required for the adaptation of avian virus NAs to growth in humans. This change is likely needed to maintain an optimal balance between NA activity and the lower affinity shown by human virus HAs

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of the neuraminidase gene of pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus circulating in the South American region.

    PubMed

    Comas, Victoria; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Soñora, Martin; Goñi, Natalia; Pereyra, Silvana; Ifran, Silvana; Moreno, Pilar; Cristina, Juan

    2015-02-02

    Molecular characterization of circulating influenza A viruses (IAV) in all regions of the world is essential to detect mutations potentially involved in increased virulence, anti-viral resistance and immune escape. In order to gain insight into these matters, a phylogenetic analysis of the neuraminidase (NA) gene of 146 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) influenza A virus strains isolated in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay from 2009 to 2013 was performed. Comparison of vaccine strain A/California/7/2009 included in the influenza vaccine recommended for the Southern hemisphere from 2010 through 2013 influenza seasons and strains isolated in South America revealed several amino acid substitutions. Mapping of these substitutions revealed that most of them are located at the surface of the protein and do not interfere with the active site. 3.4% of the strains enrolled in these studies carried the H275Y substitution that confers resistance to oseltamivir. Strains isolated in South America differ from vaccine in two predicted B-cell epitope regions present at positions 102-103 and 351-352 of the NA protein. Moreover, vaccine and strains isolated in Paraguay differ also in an epitope present at position 229. These differences among strains isolated in South America and vaccine strain suggests that these epitopes may not be present in strains isolated in this region. A potential new N-linked glycosylation site was observed in the NA protein of an H1N1pdm IAV strain isolated in Brazil. The results of these studies revealed several genetic and antigenic differences in the NA of H1N1pdm IAV among vaccine and strains circulating in South America. All these findings contribute to our understanding of the course of genetic and antigenic evolution of H1N1pdm IAV populations circulating in the South American region and, consequently, contribute to the study and selection of future and more appropriate vaccines and anti-viral drugs.

  10. Estimating the fitness advantage conferred by permissive neuraminidase mutations in recent oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jeff; Hooper, Kathryn A; Petrie, Stephen; Lee, Raphael; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Reh, Lucia; Guarnaccia, Teagan; Baas, Chantal; Xue, Lumin; Vitesnik, Sophie; Leang, Sook-Kwan; McVernon, Jodie; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G; McCaw, James M; Bloom, Jesse D; Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-04-01

    Oseltamivir is relied upon worldwide as the drug of choice for the treatment of human influenza infection. Surveillance for oseltamivir resistance is routinely performed to ensure the ongoing efficacy of oseltamivir against circulating viruses. Since the emergence of the pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), the proportion of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses that are oseltamivir resistant (OR) has generally been low. However, a cluster of OR A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, encoding the neuraminidase (NA) H275Y oseltamivir resistance mutation, was detected in Australia in 2011 amongst community patients that had not been treated with oseltamivir. Here we combine a competitive mixtures ferret model of influenza infection with a mathematical model to assess the fitness, both within and between hosts, of recent OR A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. In conjunction with data from in vitro analyses of NA expression and activity we demonstrate that contemporary A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are now more capable of acquiring H275Y without compromising their fitness, than earlier A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses circulating in 2009. Furthermore, using reverse engineered viruses we demonstrate that a pair of permissive secondary NA mutations, V241I and N369K, confers robust fitness on recent H275Y A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, which correlated with enhanced surface expression and enzymatic activity of the A(H1N1)pdm09 NA protein. These permissive mutations first emerged in 2010 and are now present in almost all circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. Our findings suggest that recent A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are now more permissive to the acquisition of H275Y than earlier A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, increasing the risk that OR A(H1N1)pdm09 will emerge and spread worldwide.

  11. Novel Ranking System for Identifying Efficacious Anti-Influenza Virus PB2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Colleen F.; Leeman, Joshua R.; Bennett, Hamilton B.; Nti-Addae, Kwame; Huang, Cassey; Germann, Ursula A.; Byrn, Randal A.; Berlioz-Seux, Francoise; Rijnbrand, Rene; Clark, Michael P.; Charifson, Paul S.; Jones, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Through antigenic drift and shifts, influenza virus infections continue to be an annual cause of morbidity in healthy populations and of death among elderly and at-risk patients. The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses such as H5N1 and H7N9 and the rapid spread of the swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus in 2009 demonstrate the continued need for effective therapeutic agents for influenza. While several neuraminidase inhibitors have been developed for the treatment of influenza virus infections, these have shown a limited window for treatment initiation, and resistant variants have been noted in the population. In addition, an older class of antiviral drugs for influenza, the adamantanes, are no longer recommended for treatment due to widespread resistance. There remains a need for new influenza therapeutic agents with improved efficacy as well as an expanded window for the initiation of treatment. Azaindole compounds targeting the influenza A virus PB2 protein and demonstrating excellent in vitro and in vivo properties have been identified. To evaluate the in vivo efficacy of these PB2 inhibitors, we utilized a mouse influenza A virus infection model. In addition to traditional endpoints, i.e., death, morbidity, and body weight loss, we measured lung function using whole-body plethysmography, and we used these data to develop a composite efficacy score that takes compound exposure into account. This model allowed the rapid identification and ranking of molecules relative to each other and to oseltamivir. The ability to identify compounds with enhanced preclinical properties provides an opportunity to develop more-effective treatments for influenza in patients. PMID:26169418

  12. [Tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Membrane receptors with tyrosine kinase activity and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases have emerged as important potential targets in oncology. Starting from basic structures such as anilino-quinazoline, numerous compounds have been synthesised, with the help of tyrosine kinase crystallography, which has allowed to optimise protein-ligand interactions. The catalytic domains of all kinases present similar three-dimensional structures, which explains that it may be difficult to identify molecules having a high specificity for a given tyrosine kinase. Some tyrosine kinase inhibitors are relatively specific for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as géfitinib and erlotinib; other are mainly active against platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the receptor KIT, such as imatinib or nilotinib, and other against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors involved in angiogenesis, such as sunitinib and sorafenib. The oral formulation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors is well accepted by the patients but may generate sometimes compliance problems requiring pharmacokinetic monitoring. This chemical family is in full expansion and several dozens of compounds have entered clinical trials.

  13. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  14. Sequencing of aromatase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bertelli, G

    2005-01-01

    Since the development of the third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), anastrozole, letrozole and exemestane, these agents have been the subject of intensive research to determine their optimal use in advanced breast cancer. Not only have they replaced progestins in second-line therapy and challenged the role of tamoxifen in first-line, but there is also evidence for a lack of cross-resistance between the steroidal and nonsteroidal AIs, meaning that they may be used in sequence to obtain prolonged clinical benefit. Many questions remain, however, as to the best sequence of the two types of AIs and of the other available agents, including tamoxifen and fulvestrant, in different patient groups. PMID:16100523

  15. Sirtuin activators and inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, José M.; Alcaín, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Sirtuins 1-7 (SIRT1-7) belong to the third class of deacetylase enzymes, which are dependent on NAD+ for activity. Sirtuins activity is linked to gene repression, metabolic control, apoptosis and cell survival, DNA repair, development, inflammation, neuroprotection and healthy aging. Because sirtuins modulation could have beneficial effects on human diseases there is a growing interest in the discovery of small molecules modifying their activity. We review here those compounds known to activate or inhibit sirtuins, discussing the data that support the use of sirtuin-based therapies. Almost all sirtuin activators have been described only for SIRT1. Resveratrol is a natural compound which activates SIRT1, and may help in the treatment or prevention of obesity, and in preventing tumorigenesis and the aging-related decline in heart function and neuronal loss. Due to its poor bioavailability, reformulated versions of resveratrol with improved bioavailability have been developed (resVida, Longevinex®, SRT501). Molecules that are structurally unrelated to resveratrol (SRT1720, SRT2104, SRT2379, among others) have been also developed to stimulate sirtuin activities more potently than resveratrol. Sirtuin inhibitors with a wide range of core structures have been identified for SIRT1, SIRT2, SIRT3 and SIRT5 (splitomicin, sirtinol, AGK2, cambinol, suramin, tenovin, salermide, among others). SIRT1 inhibition has been proposed in the treatment of cancer, immunodeficiency virus infections, Fragile X mental retardation syndrome and for preventing or treating parasitic diseases, whereas SIRT2 inhibitors might be useful for the treatment of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22730114

  16. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  17. A new charge-tagged proline-based organocatalyst for mechanistic studies using electrospray mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Willms, J Alexander; Beel, Rita; Schmidt, Martin L; Mundt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary A new 4-hydroxy-L-proline derivative with a charged 1-ethylpyridinium-4-phenoxy substituent has been synthesized with the aim of facilitating mechanistic studies of proline-catalyzed reactions by ESI mass spectrometry. The charged residue ensures a strongly enhanced ESI response compared to neutral unmodified proline. The connection by a rigid linker fixes the position of the charge tag far away from the catalytic center in order to avoid unwanted interactions. The use of a charged catalyst leads to significantly enhanced ESI signal abundances for every catalyst-derived species which are the ones of highest interest present in a reacting solution. The new charged proline catalyst has been tested in the direct asymmetric inverse aldol reaction between aldehydes and diethyl ketomalonate. Two intermediates in accordance with the List–Houk mechanism for enamine catalysis have been detected and characterized by gas-phase fragmentation. In addition, their temporal evolution has been followed using a microreactor continuous-flow technique. PMID:25246962

  18. Gene Mining for Proline Based Signaling Proteins in Cell Wall of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ihsan, Muhammad Z; Ahmad, Samina J N; Shah, Zahid Hussain; Rehman, Hafiz M; Aslam, Zubair; Ahuja, Ishita; Bones, Atle M; Ahmad, Jam N

    2017-01-01

    The cell wall (CW) as a first line of defense against biotic and abiotic stresses is of primary importance in plant biology. The proteins associated with cell walls play a significant role in determining a plant's sustainability to adverse environmental conditions. In this work, the genes encoding cell wall proteins (CWPs) in Arabidopsis were identified and functionally classified using geneMANIA and GENEVESTIGATOR with published microarrays data. This yielded 1605 genes, out of which 58 genes encoded proline-rich proteins (PRPs) and glycine-rich proteins (GRPs). Here, we have focused on the cellular compartmentalization, biological processes, and molecular functioning of proline-rich CWPs along with their expression at different plant developmental stages. The mined genes were categorized into five classes on the basis of the type of PRPs encoded in the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. We review the domain structure and function of each class of protein, many with respect to the developmental stages of the plant. We have then used networks, hierarchical clustering and correlations to analyze co-expression, co-localization, genetic, and physical interactions and shared protein domains of these PRPs. This has given us further insight into these functionally important CWPs and identified a number of potentially new cell-wall related proteins in A. thaliana.

  19. Gene Mining for Proline Based Signaling Proteins in Cell Wall of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Ihsan, Muhammad Z.; Ahmad, Samina J. N.; Shah, Zahid Hussain; Rehman, Hafiz M.; Aslam, Zubair; Ahuja, Ishita; Bones, Atle M.; Ahmad, Jam N.

    2017-01-01

    The cell wall (CW) as a first line of defense against biotic and abiotic stresses is of primary importance in plant biology. The proteins associated with cell walls play a significant role in determining a plant's sustainability to adverse environmental conditions. In this work, the genes encoding cell wall proteins (CWPs) in Arabidopsis were identified and functionally classified using geneMANIA and GENEVESTIGATOR with published microarrays data. This yielded 1605 genes, out of which 58 genes encoded proline-rich proteins (PRPs) and glycine-rich proteins (GRPs). Here, we have focused on the cellular compartmentalization, biological processes, and molecular functioning of proline-rich CWPs along with their expression at different plant developmental stages. The mined genes were categorized into five classes on the basis of the type of PRPs encoded in the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. We review the domain structure and function of each class of protein, many with respect to the developmental stages of the plant. We have then used networks, hierarchical clustering and correlations to analyze co-expression, co-localization, genetic, and physical interactions and shared protein domains of these PRPs. This has given us further insight into these functionally important CWPs and identified a number of potentially new cell-wall related proteins in A. thaliana. PMID:28289422

  20. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  1. Evaluation of the antigenic relatedness and cross-protective immunity of the neuraminidase between human influenza A (H1N1) virus and highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiuhua; Liu, Feng; Zeng, Hui; Sheu, Tiffany; Achenbach, Jenna E; Veguilla, Vic; Gubareva, Larisa V; Garten, Rebecca; Smith, Catherine; Yang, Hua; Stevens, James; Xu, Xiyan; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2014-04-01

    To determine the genetic and antigenic relatedness as well as the cross-protective immunity of human H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza virus neuraminidase (NA), we immunized rabbits with either a baculovirus-expressed recombinant NA from A/Beijing/262/95 (BJ/262) H1N1 or A/Hong Kong/483/97 (HK/483) H5N1 virus. Cross-reactive antibody responses were evaluated by multiple serological assays and cross-protection against H5N1 virus challenge was evaluated in mice. In a neuraminidase inhibition (NI) test, the antisera exhibited substantial inhibition of NA activity of the homologous virus, but failed to inhibit the NA activity of heterologous virus. However, these antisera exhibited low levels of cross-reactivity measured by plaque size reduction, replication inhibition, single radial hemolysis, and ELISA assays. Passive immunization with HK/483 NA-specific antisera significantly reduced virus replication and disease, and afforded almost complete protection against lethal homologous virus challenge in mice. However, passive immunization with BJ/262 (H1N1) NA-specific antisera was ineffective at providing cross-protection against lethal H5N1 virus challenge and only slightly reduced weight loss. Substantial amino acid variation among the NA antigenic sites was observed between BJ/262 and HK/483 virus, which was consistent with the lack of cross-reactive NI activity by the antibody and limited cross-protective immunity in mice. These results show a strong correlation between the lack of cross-protective immunity and low structural similarities of NA from a human seasonal H1N1 virus and an avian H5N1 influenza virus.

  2. Correlation analyses on binding affinity of sialic acid analogues and anti-influenza drugs with human neuraminidase using ab initio MO calculations on their complex structures--LERE-QSAR analysis (IV).

    PubMed

    Hitaoka, Seiji; Matoba, Hiroshi; Harada, Masataka; Yoshida, Tatsusada; Tsuji, Daisuke; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Itoh, Kohji; Chuman, Hiroshi

    2011-10-24

    We carried out full ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations for complexes comprising human neuraminidase-2 (hNEU2) and sialic acid analogues including anti-influenza drugs zanamivir (Relenza) and oseltamivir (Tamiflu) in order to examine the variation in the observed inhibitory activity toward hNEU2 at the atomic and electronic levels. We recently proposed the LERE (linear expression by representative energy terms)-QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) procedure. LERE-QSAR analysis quantitatively revealed that the complex formation is driven by hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interaction of hNEU2 with sialic acid analogues. The most potent inhibitory activity, that of zanamivir, is attributable to the strong electrostatic interaction of a positively charged guanidino group in zanamivir with negatively charged amino acid residues in hNEU2. After we confirmed that the variation in the observed inhibitory activity among sialic acid analogues is excellently reproducible with the LERE-QSAR equation, we examined the reason for the remarkable difference between the inhibitory potencies of oseltamivir as to hNEU2 and influenza A virus neuraminidase-1 (N1-NA). Several amino acid residues in close contact with a positively charged amino group in oseltamivir are different between hNEU2 and N1-NA. FMO-IFIE (interfragment interaction energy) analysis showed that the difference in amino acid residues causes a remarkably large difference between the overall interaction energies of oseltamivir with hNEU2 and N1-NA. The current results will be useful for the development of new anti-influenza drugs with high selectivity and without the risk of adverse side effects.

  3. [ACE inhibitors and the kidney].

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H

    1996-01-01

    Treatment with ACE inhibitors results in kidney protection due to reduction of systemic blood pressure, intraglomerular pressure, an antiproliferative effect, reduction of proteinuria and a lipid-lowering effect in proteinuric patients (secondary due to reduction of protein excretion). Elderly patients with diabetes melitus, coronary heart disease or peripheral vascular occlusion are at risk for deterioration of kidney function due to a high frequency of renal artery stenosis in these patients. In patients with renal insufficiency dose reduction of ACE inhibitors is necessary (exception: fosinopril) but more important is the risk for development of hyperkalemia. Patients at risk for renal artery stenosis and patients pretreated with diuretics should receive a low ACE inhibitor dosage initially ("start low - go slow"). For compliance reasons once daily ACE inhibitor dosage is recommended.

  4. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  5. Peptidomimetic furin inhibitor MI-701 in combination with oseltamivir and ribavirin efficiently blocks propagation of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses and delays high level oseltamivir resistance in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinghui; Hardes, Kornelia; Dahms, Sven O; Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Than, Manuel E; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Antiviral medication is used for the treatment of severe influenza infections, of which the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) are the most effective drugs, approved so far. Here, we investigated the antiviral efficacy of the peptidomimetic furin inhibitor MI-701 in combination with oseltamivir carboxylate and ribavirin against the infection of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) that are activated by the host protease furin. Cell cultures infected with the strains A/Thailand/1(KAN-1)/2004 (H5N1) and A/FPV/Rostock/1934 (H7N1) were treated with each agent alone, or in double and triple combinations. MI-701 alone achieved a concentration-dependent reduction of virus propagation. Double treatment of MI-701 with oseltamivir carboxylate and triple combination with ribavirin showed synergistic inhibition and a pronounced delay of virus propagation. MI-701 resistant mutants were not observed. Emergence of NA mutation H275Y conferring high oseltamivir resistance was significantly delayed in the presence of MI-701. Our data indicate that combination with a potent furin inhibitor significantly enhances the therapeutic efficacy of conventional antivirals drugs against HPAIV infection.

  6. The NEU1-selective sialidase inhibitor, C9-butyl-amide-DANA, blocks sialidase activity and NEU1-mediated bioactivities in human lung in vitro and murine lung in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sang W; Liu, Anguo; Liu, Zhenguo; Cross, Alan S; Verceles, Avelino C; Magesh, Sadagopan; Kommagalla, Yadagiri; Kona, Chandrababunaidu; Ando, Hiromune; Luzina, Irina G; Atamas, Sergei P; Piepenbrink, Kurt H; Sundberg, Eric J; Guang, Wei; Ishida, Hideharu; Lillehoj, Erik P; Goldblum, Simeon E

    2016-08-01

    Neuraminidase-1 (NEU1) is the predominant sialidase expressed in human airway epithelia and lung microvascular endothelia where it mediates multiple biological processes. We tested whether the NEU1-selective sialidase inhibitor, C9-butyl-amide-2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (C9-BA-DANA), inhibits one or more established NEU1-mediated bioactivities in human lung cells. We established the IC50 values of C9-BA-DANA for total sialidase activity in human airway epithelia, lung microvascular endothelia and lung fibroblasts to be 3.74 µM, 13.0 µM and 4.82 µM, respectively. In human airway epithelia, C9-BA-DANA dose-dependently inhibited flagellin-induced, NEU1-mediated mucin-1 ectodomain desialylation, adhesiveness for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and shedding. In lung microvascular endothelia, C9-BA-DANA reversed NEU1-driven restraint of cell migration into a wound and disruption of capillary-like tube formation. NEU1 and its chaperone/transport protein, protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA), were differentially expressed in these same cells. Normalized NEU1 protein expression correlated with total sialidase activity whereas PPCA expression did not. In contrast to eukaryotic sialidases, C9-BA-DANA exerted far less inhibitory activity for three selected bacterial neuraminidases (IC50 > 800 µM). Structural modeling of the four human sialidases and three bacterial neuraminidases revealed a loop between the seventh and eighth strands of the β-propeller fold, that in NEU1, was substantially shorter than that seen in the six other enzymes. Predicted steric hindrance between this loop and C9-BA-DANA could explain its selectivity for NEU1. Finally, pretreatment of mice with C9-BA-DANA completely protected against flagellin-induced increases in lung sialidase activity. Our combined data indicate that C9-BA-DANA inhibits endogenous and ectopically expressed sialidase activity and established NEU1-mediated bioactivities in human airway epithelia, lung microvascular

  7. Inhibitors of pig kidney trehalase.

    PubMed

    Kyosseva, S V; Kyossev, Z N; Elbein, A D

    1995-02-01

    Trehazolin, a new trehalase inhibitor isolated from the culture broth of Micromonospora, was reported to be a highly specific inhibitor for porcine and silk worm trehalases with IC50 values of 5.5 x 10(-9) and 3.7 x 10(-9) M, respectively (O. Ando, H. Satake, K. Itoi, A. Sato, M. Nakajima, S. Takashi, H. Haruyama, Y. Ohkuma, T. Kinoshita, and R. Enokita (1991) J. Antibiot. 44, 1165-1168). We also found that trehazolin is a very powerful and quite specific inhibitor against purified pig kidney trehalase, giving an IC50 value of 1.9 x 10(-8) M. Lineweaver-Burk plots showed that this compound was a competitive inhibitor of the trehalase. However, even at concentrations of 200 micrograms/ml, trehazolin did not inhibit the rat intestinal maltase or sucrase, yeast alpha-glucosidase or almond beta-glucosidase. Validoxylamine A and validamycin A, two other trehalase inhibitors, showed potent competitive inhibition against purified pig kidney trehalase, with IC50 values of 2.4 x 10(-9) and 2.5 x 10(-4) M, respectively. On the other hand, validoxylamine A was almost inactive against rat intestinal sucrase and maltase, with some inhibition being observed at millimolar concentration. A number of other glucosidase inhibitors, such as MDL 25637, castanospermine, and deoxynojirimycin were also tested against the purified trehalase and showed reasonable inhibitory activity.

  8. Identification of small molecule inhibitors for influenza a virus using in silico and in vitro approaches

    PubMed Central

    Makau, Juliann Nzembi; Watanabe, Ken; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Mizuta, Satoshi; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses have acquired resistance to approved neuraminidase-targeting drugs, increasing the need for new drug targets for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs. Nucleoprotein (NP) is an attractive target since it has an indispensable role in virus replication and its amino acid sequence is well conserved. In this study, we aimed to identify new inhibitors of the NP using a structure-based drug discovery algorithm, named Nagasaki University Docking Engine (NUDE), which has been established especially for the Destination for GPU Intensive Machine (DEGIMA) supercomputer. The hit compounds that showed high binding scores during in silico screening were subsequently evaluated for anti-influenza virus effects using a cell-based assay. A 4-hydroxyquinolinone compound, designated as NUD-1, was found to inhibit the replication of influenza virus in cultured cells. Analysis of binding between NUD-1 and NP using surface plasmon resonance assay and fragment molecular orbital calculations confirmed that NUD-1 binds to NP and could interfere with NP-NP interactions essential for virus replication. Time-of-addition experiments showed that the compound inhibited the mid-stage of infection, corresponding to assembly of the NP and other viral proteins. Moreover, NUD-1 was also effective against various types of influenza A viruses including a clinical isolate of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza with a 50% inhibitory concentration range of 1.8–2.1 μM. Our data demonstrate that the combined use of NUDE system followed by the cell-based assay is useful to obtain lead compounds for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs. PMID:28273150

  9. Identification of small molecule inhibitors for influenza a virus using in silico and in vitro approaches.

    PubMed

    Makau, Juliann Nzembi; Watanabe, Ken; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Mizuta, Satoshi; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses have acquired resistance to approved neuraminidase-targeting drugs, increasing the need for new drug targets for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs. Nucleoprotein (NP) is an attractive target since it has an indispensable role in virus replication and its amino acid sequence is well conserved. In this study, we aimed to identify new inhibitors of the NP using a structure-based drug discovery algorithm, named Nagasaki University Docking Engine (NUDE), which has been established especially for the Destination for GPU Intensive Machine (DEGIMA) supercomputer. The hit compounds that showed high binding scores during in silico screening were subsequently evaluated for anti-influenza virus effects using a cell-based assay. A 4-hydroxyquinolinone compound, designated as NUD-1, was found to inhibit the replication of influenza virus in cultured cells. Analysis of binding between NUD-1 and NP using surface plasmon resonance assay and fragment molecular orbital calculations confirmed that NUD-1 binds to NP and could interfere with NP-NP interactions essential for virus replication. Time-of-addition experiments showed that the compound inhibited the mid-stage of infection, corresponding to assembly of the NP and other viral proteins. Moreover, NUD-1 was also effective against various types of influenza A viruses including a clinical isolate of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza with a 50% inhibitory concentration range of 1.8-2.1 μM. Our data demonstrate that the combined use of NUDE system followed by the cell-based assay is useful to obtain lead compounds for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs.

  10. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Tajima, Shigeru; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko; Aida, Yoko

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC{sub 50} values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  11. Engineering trypsin for inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Batt, Anna R; St Germain, Commodore P; Gokey, Trevor; Guliaev, Anton B; Baird, Teaster

    2015-09-01

    The development of effective protease therapeutics requires that the proteases be more resistant to naturally occurring inhibitors while maintaining catalytic activity. A key step in developing inhibitor resistance is the identification of key residues in protease-inhibitor interaction. Given that majority of the protease therapeutics currently in use are trypsin-fold, trypsin itself serves as an ideal model for studying protease-inhibitor interaction. To test the importance of several trypsin-inhibitor interactions on the prime-side binding interface, we created four trypsin single variants Y39A, Y39F, K60A, and K60V and report biochemical sensitivity against bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and M84R ecotin. All variants retained catalytic activity against small, commercially available peptide substrates [kcat /KM  = (1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(7) M(-1 ) s(-1) . Compared with wild-type, the K60A and K60V variants showed increased sensitivity to BPTI but less sensitivity to ecotin. The Y39A variant was less sensitive to BPTI and ecotin while the Y39F variant was more sensitive to both. The relative binding free energies between BPTI complexes with WT, Y39F, and Y39A were calculated based on 3.5 µs combined explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The BPTI:Y39F complex resulted in the lowest binding energy, while BPTI:Y39A resulted in the highest. Simulations of Y39F revealed increased conformational rearrangement of F39, which allowed formation of a new hydrogen bond between BPTI R17 and H40 of the variant. All together, these data suggest that positions 39 and 60 are key for inhibitor binding to trypsin, and likely more trypsin-fold proteases.

  12. [New anticoagulants - direct thrombin inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Brand, B; Graf, L

    2012-11-01

    Direct thrombin-inhibitors inactivate not only free but also fibrin-bound thrombin. The group of parenteral direct thrombin-inhibitors includes the recombinant hirudins lepirudin and desirudin, the synthetic hirudin bivalirudin, and the small molecule argatroban. All these compounds do not interact with PF4/heparin-antibodies. Therefore, argatroban as well as bivalirudin are currently used to treat heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). The oral direct thrombin-inhibitor dabigatran etexilate is already licensed in many countries for the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran etexilate reveals a stable and predictable effect that allows a medication without dose adjustment or monitoring. The substance shows only few interactions with other drugs but strong inhibitors of p-glycoprotein can increase plasma levels of dabigatran substantially. After oral intake, the prodrug dabigatran etexilate is cleaved by esterase-mediated hydrolyses to the active compound dabigatran. Elimination of dabigatran is predominantly renal. Safety and efficacy of dabigatran etexilate were tested in an extensive clinical study program. Non-inferiority compared to current standard treatments was shown for prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic events after total knee and hip replacement, for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation, and for treatment of acute venous thromboembolism. In daily practice, Dabigatran etexilate competes against the new direct factor Xa-inhibitors. In the absence of direct comparative clinical trials, it is not yet clear if one class of substances has distinct advantages over the other.

  13. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  14. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  15. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  16. An environmentally friendly scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, J.B.; Brown, J.M.

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a method of inhibiting the formation of scales such as barium and strontium sulfate in low pH aqueous systems, and calcium carbonate in systems containing high concentrations of dissolved iron. The solution, chemically, involves treating the aqueous system with an inhibitor designed to replace organic-phosphonates. Typical low pH aqueous systems where the inhibitor is particularly useful are oilfield produced-water, resin bed water softeners that form scale during low pH, acid regeneration operations. Downhole applications are recommended where high concentrations of dissolved iron are present in the produced water. This new approach to inhibition replaces typical organic phosphonates and polymers with a non-toxic, biodegradable scale inhibitor that performs in harsh environments.

  17. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  18. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  19. STAT inhibitors for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) proteins are a family of cytoplasmic transcription factors consisting of 7 members, STAT1 to STAT6, including STAT5a and STAT5b. STAT proteins are thought to be ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy since cancer cells are more dependent on the STAT activity than their normal counterparts. Inhibitors targeting STAT3 and STAT5 have been developed. These included peptidomimetics, small molecule inhibitors and oligonucleotides. This review summarized advances in preclinical and clinical development of these compounds. PMID:24308725

  20. [Kinase inhibitors against hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Tojo, Arinobu

    2014-06-01

    Dysregulation of protein phosphorylation, especially on tyrosine residues, plays a crucial role in development and progression of hematological malignancies. Since remarkable success in imatinib therapy of CML and Ph+ALL, extensive efforts have made to explore candidate molecular targets and next breakthrough drugs. Now that next generation ABL kinase inhibitors are available for CML, the therapeutic algorithm has been revolutionized. As for AML and lymphoid malignancies, many kinase inhibitors targeting FLT3, BTK and aurora-A are on early and late clinical trials, and a number of promising drugs including ibrutinib are picked up for further evaluation.

  1. EGFR inhibitors and autophagy in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Hu, Yun-Feng; Feng, Xie-Min; Tian, Tao; Guo, Ya-Huan; Ma, Jun-Wei; Nan, Ke-Jun; Zhang, Hong-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor treatment is a strategy for cancer therapy. However, innate and acquired resistance is a major obstacle of the efficacy. Autophagy is a self-digesting process in cells, which is considered to be associated with anti-cancer drug resistance. The activation of EGFR can regulate autophagy through multiple signal pathways. EGFR inhibitors can induce autophagy, but the specific function of the induction of autophagy by EGFR inhibitors remains biphasic. On the one hand, autophagy induced by EGFR inhibitors acts as a cytoprotective response in cancer cells, and autophagy inhibitors can enhance the cytotoxic effects of EGFR inhibitors. On the other hand, a high level of autophagy after treatment of EGFR inhibitors can also result in autophagic cell death lacking features of apoptosis, and the combination of EGFR inhibitors with an autophagy inducer might be beneficial. Thus, autophagy regulation represents a promising approach for improving the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in the treatment of cancer patients.

  2. A 3D-RISM/RISM study of the oseltamivir binding efficiency with the wild-type and resistance-associated mutant forms of the viral influenza B neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Phanich, Jiraphorn; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Sindhikara, Daniel; Phongphanphanee, Saree; Yoshida, Norio; Hirata, Fumio; Kungwan, Nawee; Hannongbua, Supot

    2016-01-01

    The binding affinity of oseltamivir to the influenza B neuraminidase and to its variants with three single substitutions, E119G, R152K, and D198N, is investigated by the MM/3D-RISM method. The binding affinity or the binding free energy of ligand to receptor was found to be determined by a subtle balance of two major contributions that largely cancel out each other: the ligand-receptor interactions and the dehydration free energy. The theoretical results of the binding affinity of the drug to the mutants reproduced the observed trend in the resistivity, measured by IC50 ; the high-level resistance of E119G and R152K, and the low-level resistance of D198N. For E119G and R152K, reduction of the direct drug-target interaction, especially at the mutated residue, is the main source of high-level oseltamivir resistance. This phenomenon, however, is not found in the D198N strain, which is located in the framework of the active-site.

  3. Effects of high fat and high carbohydrate diets on liver pyruvate dehydrogenase and its activation by a chemical mediator released from insulin-treated liver particulate fraction: effect of neuraminidase treatment on the chemical mediator activity.

    PubMed

    Begum, N; Tepperman, H M; Tepperman, J

    1983-01-01

    Rats were fed a high fat diet or a high glucose diet for 5-7 days. Basal pyruvate dehydrogenase activity (both the active form and the total enzyme activity) was decreased in liver homogenates from fat diet-adapted rats as compared to those fed the glucose diet. Supernatants from insulin-exposed liver particulate fractions from fat-fed rats showed decreased stimulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity as compared to those from glucose-fed rats. There was no difference in the response of the mitochondria from the two groups when they were stimulated by supernatants from insulin-treated liver particulate fractions from stock diet-fed rats. Liver particulate fractions from fat-fed rats showed decreased generation of the chemical activator in response to Concanavalin A and trypsin stimulation. This suggests that fat feeding results in a decrease in membrane protease substrate availability. Treatment of the insulin mediator with neuraminidase and beta-D-galactosidase resulted in inactivation of the mediator. Presence of exogenous enzyme substrates during enzyme digestion protected the mediator from inactivation, suggesting that carbohydrate residues are important in the action of the insulin mediator. This fat diet-induced decrease in the generation of a chemical mediator of insulin action may result from 1) a decrease in insulin binding, shown earlier; 2) a decrease in the amount of protease substrate; and 3) an alteration in its carbohydrate composition, which is important in its ability to activate pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  4. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  5. Benzimidazole derivatives as kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, Laura; Roberti, Marinella; Bottegoni, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Benzimidazole is a common kinase inhibitor scaffold and benzimidazole-based compounds interact with enzymes by multiple binding modes. In some cases, the benzimidazole acts as part of the hinge-binding motif, in others it has a scaffolding role without evidence for direct hinge binding. Several of these compounds are ATP-competitive inhibitors and show high selectivity by exploiting unique structural properties that distinguish one kinase from the majority of other kinases. However, the high specificity for a single target is not always sufficient. Thus another approach, called multi-target therapy, has been developed over the last few years. The simultaneous inhibition of various kinases may be useful because the disease is attacked at several relevant targets. Moreover, if a kinase becomes drug-resistant, a multitargeted drug can act on the other kinases. Some benzimidazole derivatives are multi-target inhibitors. In this article benzimidazole inhibitors are reported with their mechanisms of action, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and biological properties.

  6. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  7. Azidoblebbistatin, a photoreactive myosin inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Képiró, Miklós; Várkuti, Boglárka H.; Bodor, Andrea; Hegyi, György; Drahos, László; Kovács, Mihály; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2012-01-01

    Photoreactive compounds are important tools in life sciences that allow precisely timed covalent crosslinking of ligands and targets. Using a unique technique we have synthesized azidoblebbistatin, which is a derivative of blebbistatin, the most widely used myosin inhibitor. Without UV irradiation azidoblebbistatin exhibits identical inhibitory properties to those of blebbistatin. Using UV irradiation, azidoblebbistatin can be covalently crosslinked to myosin, which greatly enhances its in vitro and in vivo effectiveness. Photo-crosslinking also eliminates limitations associated with the relatively low myosin affinity and water solubility of blebbistatin. The wavelength used for photo-crosslinking is not toxic for cells and tissues, which confers a great advantage in in vivo tests. Because the crosslink results in an irreversible association of the inhibitor to myosin and the irradiation eliminates the residual activity of unbound inhibitor molecules, azidoblebbistatin has a great potential to become a highly effective tool in both structural studies of actomyosin contractility and the investigation of cellular and physiological functions of myosin II. We used azidoblebbistatin to identify previously unknown low-affinity targets of the inhibitor (EC50 ≥ 50 μM) in Dictyostelium discoideum, while the strongest interactant was found to be myosin II (EC50 = 5 μM). Our results demonstrate that azidoblebbistatin, and potentially other azidated drugs, can become highly useful tools for the identification of strong- and weak-binding cellular targets and the determination of the apparent binding affinities in in vivo conditions. PMID:22647605

  8. Inhibitor Discovery by Convolution ABPP.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Hong, Tram Ngoc; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2017-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) has emerged as a powerful proteomic approach to study the active proteins in their native environment by using chemical probes that label active site residues in proteins. Traditionally, ABPP is classified as either comparative or competitive ABPP. In this protocol, we describe a simple method called convolution ABPP, which takes benefit from both the competitive and comparative ABPP. Convolution ABPP allows one to detect if a reduced signal observed during comparative ABPP could be due to the presence of inhibitors. In convolution ABPP, the proteomes are analyzed by comparing labeling intensities in two mixed proteomes that were labeled either before or after mixing. A reduction of labeling in the mix-and-label sample when compared to the label-and-mix sample indicates the presence of an inhibitor excess in one of the proteomes. This method is broadly applicable to detect inhibitors in proteomes against any proteome containing protein activities of interest. As a proof of concept, we applied convolution ABPP to analyze secreted proteomes from Pseudomonas syringae-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves to display the presence of a beta-galactosidase inhibitor.

  9. Cathepsin D inhibitor from Vicia sativa L.

    PubMed

    Roszkowska-Jakimiec, W; Bańkowska, A

    1998-01-01

    Specific inhibitor of cathepsin D has been shown in the extract of Vicia sativa L. seeds. This inhibitor does not inhibit the activity of other aspartic proteases. Also it does not inhibit the activity of cysteine proteases and serine proteases.

  10. Targeting a cluster of arginine residues of neuraminidase to avoid oseltamivir resistance in influenza A (H1N1): a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gema, L Ramírez-Salinas; Tolentino-Lopez, L E; Martínez-Ramos, F; Padilla-Martínez, I; García-Machorro, J; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-01-01

    Following the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in Mexico and around the world in 2009, the numbers of oseltamivir-resistant clinical cases have increased through a mechanism that remains unclear. In this work, we focus on studying the mutated NA structures ADA71175 (GenBank) and 3CKZ (PDB ID). Recently crystallized NA (PDB ID: 3NSS) was used as a wild-type structure and template to construct the three-dimensional (3D) structure of ADA71175. Then, the NA mutants and 3NSS natives as well as their refined monomer structures as determined through MD simulations (snapshots at 50 ns) were used as models to perform a docking study using a set of aryl-oseltamivir derivatives. These aryl-oseltamivir derivatives have better recognition properties than oseltamivir because of cation-π interactions with a cluster of Arg residues (118, 292, and 371) at the binding site. This cluster of Arg residues represents a potential binding site for aryl-oseltamivir derivatives that are potentially new NA inhibitors.

  11. Small-molecule arginase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ivanenkov, Yan A; Chufarova, Nina V

    2014-01-01

    Arginase is an enzyme that metabolizes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea. In addition to its fundamental role in the hepatic ornithine cycle, it also influences the immune systems in humans and mice. Arginase participates in many inflammatory disorders by decreasing the synthesis of nitric oxide and inducing fibrosis and tissue regeneration. L-arginine deficiency, which is modulated by myeloid cell arginase, suppresses T-cell immune response. This mechanism plays a fundamental role in inflammation-associated immunosuppression. Pathogens can synthesize their own arginase to elude immune reaction. Small-molecule arginase inhibitors are currently described as promising therapeutics for the treatment of several diseases, including allergic asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, cardiovascular diseases (atherosclerosis and hypertension), diseases associated with pathogens (e.g., Helicobacter pylori, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Salmonella), cancer and induced or spontaneous immune disorders. This article summarizes recent patents in the area of arginase inhibitors and discusses their properties.

  12. Salicylanilide Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D.; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P.; Ferriera, Leandra R.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Welsh, William J.; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose anti-apicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles. PMID:22970937

  13. Salicylanilide inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P; Ferreira, Leandra R; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patricia J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Welsh, William J; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-10-11

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose antiapicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles.

  14. Recent progress on fucosyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Merino, Pedro; Tejero, Tomás; Delso, Ignacio; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Gómez-SanJuan, Asier; Sádaba, David

    2012-12-01

    Fucosyltransferases (FucTs) are enzymes that transfer L-fucose from GDP-fucose to a glycoside or a peptide. They have important roles in a variety of diseases including cancer and autoimmune disorders, viral and bacterial infections and inflammatory processes, and thus they represent important drug targets for the development of agents for the treatment of such disorders. This review highlights recent developments regarding carbohydrate mimics as inhibitors of FucTs. The most recent and relevant synthetic strategies are described.

  15. Nelfinavir: fourth protease inhibitor approved.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to nelfinavir in both adult and pediatric formulations. Agouron, the manufacturer, used innovative computerized drug design techniques to discover, design, and refine the nelfinavir molecule. Nelfinavir is marketed under the trade name Viracept, and costs $5,000 per year. Early clinical trials find it to be as powerful as the other protease inhibitors, but with a different resistance profile. The drug has relatively few drug indications; however, several compounds have been contraindicated.

  16. Voglibose: An Alpha Glucosidase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Dabhi, Ajay S.; Bhatt, Nikita R.; Shah, Mohit J.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a morbid disease worldwide, with increasing incidence as time passes. It has macro-vascular and micro-vascular complications. The main cause of these complications is poorly controlled postprandial hyperglycaemia. Alpha glucosidase inhibitors, namely acarbose, voglibose and miglitol, are available for therapy. Voglibose is well tolerated and effective in comparable doses among these drugs. This article highlights the important features of voglibose. PMID:24551718

  17. Kinase Inhibitors from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Skropeta, Danielle; Pastro, Natalie; Zivanovic, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinases play a critical role in cell regulation and their deregulation is a contributing factor in an increasing list of diseases including cancer. Marine sponges have yielded over 70 novel compounds to date that exhibit significant inhibitory activity towards a range of protein kinases. These compounds, which belong to diverse structural classes, are reviewed herein, and ordered based upon the kinase that they inhibit. Relevant synthetic studies on the marine natural product kinase inhibitors have also been included. PMID:22073013

  18. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported.

  19. Substituted androstanes as aromatase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levina, Inna S.

    1998-11-01

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationships of inhibitors of steroid aromatase which catalyses the last stage of a multistep biotransformation of cholesterol into estrogens, viz., aromatisation of C19-steroids into C18-phenolic steroids, are discussed. Compounds of the androstane series which are structurally related to the natural substrate, viz., androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, are the subjects of consideration. The review encompasses problems of synthesis of various substituted androstanes and their aromatase-inhibiting activities and structural requirements for selective specific aromatase inhibitors based on in vitro and in vivo structure-activity studies of compounds synthesised, their biological properties and the results of clinical trials. Special attention is paid to practical applications of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of hormone-dependent mammary and ovarian tumours as well as benign prostatic tumours. In writing this report, the author has used all the information currently available in the chemical, biochemical, endocrinological and medicinal literature as well as in patents. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  20. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Risk and Prevention Aromatase Inhibitors for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  1. Investigating the selectivity of metalloenzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Day, Joshua A; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-10-24

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY), was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe(3+) from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe(3+) from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity.

  2. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mutation Project (CHAMP) mutation list: a new online resource. Human Mutation. 2012; E2382-E2392. Li T, Miller CH, Payne AB, Hooper CW. The CDC Hemophilia B mutation project mutation list: a new online resource. Molecular Genetics and Genomic Medicine. 2013; 1(4): ...

  3. Full conversion of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase specificity of the parainfluenza virus 5 fusion protein by replacement of 21 amino acids in its head region with those of the simian virus 41 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Tsurudome, Masato; Nakahashi, Mito; Matsushima, Yoshiaki; Ito, Morihiro; Nishio, Machiko; Kawano, Mitsuo; Komada, Hiroshi; Nosaka, Tetsuya

    2013-08-01

    For most parainfluenza viruses, a virus type-specific interaction between the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) proteins is a prerequisite for mediating virus-cell fusion and cell-cell fusion. The molecular basis of this functional interaction is still obscure partly because it is unknown which region of the F protein is responsible for the physical interaction with the HN protein. Our previous cell-cell fusion assay using the chimeric F proteins of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) and simian virus 41 (SV41) indicated that replacement of two domains in the head region of the PIV5 F protein with the SV41 F counterparts bestowed on the PIV5 F protein the ability to induce cell-cell fusion on coexpression with the SV41 HN protein while retaining its ability to induce fusion with the PIV5 HN protein. In the study presented here, we furthered the chimeric analysis of the F proteins of PIV5 and SV41, finding that the PIV5 F protein could be converted to an SV41 HN-specific chimeric F protein by replacing five domains in the head region with the SV41 F counterparts. The five SV41 F-protein-derived domains of this chimera were then divided into 16 segments; 9 out of 16 proved to be not involved in determining its specificity for the SV41 HN protein. Finally, mutational analyses of a chimeric F protein, which harbored seven SV41 F-protein-derived segments, revealed that replacement of at most 21 amino acids of the PIV5 F protein with the SV41 F-protein counterparts was enough to convert its HN protein specificity.

  4. SYBR green-based real-time reverse transcription-PCR for typing and subtyping of all hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of avian influenza viruses and comparison to standard serological subtyping tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsukamoto, K.; Javier, P.C.; Shishido, M.; Noguchi, D.; Pearce, J.; Kang, H.-M.; Jeong, O.M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Nakanishi, K.; Ashizawa, T.

    2012-01-01

    Continuing outbreaks of H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV) infections of wild birds and poultry worldwide emphasize the need for global surveillance of wild birds. To support the future surveillance activities, we developed a SYBR green-based, real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) for detecting nucleoprotein (NP) genes and subtyping 16 hemagglutinin (HA) and 9 neuraminidase (NA) genes simultaneously. Primers were improved by focusing on Eurasian or North American lineage genes; the number of mixed-base positions per primer was set to five or fewer, and the concentration of each primer set was optimized empirically. Also, 30 cycles of amplification of 1:10 dilutions of cDNAs from cultured viruses effectively reduced minor cross- or nonspecific reactions. Under these conditions, 346 HA and 345 NA genes of 349 AIVs were detected, with average sensitivities of NP, HA, and NA genes of 10 1.5, 10 2.3, and 10 3.1 50% egg infective doses, respectively. Utility of rRT-PCR for subtyping AIVs was compared with that of current standard serological tests by using 104 recent migratory duck virus isolates. As a result, all HA genes and 99% of the NA genes were genetically subtyped, while only 45% of HA genes and 74% of NA genes were serologically subtyped. Additionally, direct subtyping of AIVs in fecal samples was possible by 40 cycles of amplification: approximately 70% of HA and NA genes of NP gene-positive samples were successfully subtyped. This validation study indicates that rRT-PCR with optimized primers and reaction conditions is a powerful tool for subtyping varied AIVs in clinical and cultured samples. Copyright ?? 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. A real-time TaqMan RT-PCR method for neuraminidase type 1 (N1) gene detection of H5N1 Eurasian strains of avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Agüero, Montserrat; Sánchez, Azucena; San Miguel, Elena; Gómez-Tejedor, Concepción; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel

    2007-03-01

    This work describes the development of a real-time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR) procedure for detection of the N1 gene from avian influenza virus (AIV), based on the use of specific primers and a TaqMan-MGB (minor groove binder) probe. Nucleotide sequences of the neuraminidase type 1 gene from a collection of H5N1 Eurasian strains of AIV were aligned using ClustalW software. Conserved regions were located and used to design specific primers and a TaqMan-MGB probe using Primer Express software. A one-step RRT-PCR method was optimized using RNA from the Turkey 2005 H5N1 strain of AIV and can be completed in about 2 hr once the RNA is extracted from the sample. The specificity of the assay was assessed with non-N1 AIV strains, another related avian virus, and different avian tissue samples from healthy animals. Sensitivity was determined using 10-fold serial dilutions of the H5N1 Turkey 2005 strain and was compared with the generic RRT-PCR detection method, targeted at the matrix protein gene of AIV, commonly used at the Spanish AIV National Reference Laboratory. The N1 detection method proved to be even more sensitive than the generic (matrix-based) method, allowing a very quick confirmation (or discarding) of any Eurasian N1 strain when a positive result was obtained with the matrix RRT-PCR assay. Combined with RRT-PCR tests for general detection of AIV and H5 typing in use at the NRL, the procedure here described allows characterizing of any H5N1 Eurasian AIV strain in a field sample within a working day.

  6. Neuraminidase Receptor Binding Variants of Human Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses Resulting from Substitution of Aspartic Acid 151 in the Catalytic Site: a Role in Virus Attachment?▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi Pu; Gregory, Victoria; Collins, Patrick; Kloess, Johannes; Wharton, Stephen; Cattle, Nicholas; Lackenby, Angie; Daniels, Rodney; Hay, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the receptor binding characteristics of human H3N2 viruses have been evident from changes in the agglutination of different red blood cells (RBCs) and the reduced growth capacity of recently isolated viruses, particularly in embryonated eggs. An additional peculiarity of viruses circulating in 2005 to 2009 has been the poor inhibition of hemagglutination by postinfection ferret antisera for many viruses isolated in MDCK cells, including homologous reference viruses. This was shown not to be due to an antigenic change in hemagglutinin (HA) but was shown to be the result of a mutation in aspartic acid 151 of neuraminidase (NA) to glycine, asparagine, or alanine, which caused an oseltamivir-sensitive agglutination of RBCs. The D151G substitution was shown to cause a change in the specificity of NA such that it acquired the capacity to bind receptors, which were refractory to enzymatic cleavage, without altering its ability to remove receptors for HA. Thus, the inhibition of NA-dependent agglutination by the inclusion of oseltamivir carboxylate in the assay was effective in restoring the anti-HA specificity of the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay for monitoring antigenic changes in HA. Since the NA-dependent binding activity did not affect virus neutralization, and virus populations in clinical specimens possessed, at most, low levels of the “151 mutant,” the biological significance of this feature of NA in, for example, immune evasion is unclear. It is apparent, however, that an important role of aspartic acid 151 in the activity of NA may be to restrict the specificity of the NA interaction and its receptor-destroying activity to complement that of HA receptor binding. PMID:20410266

  7. MMP Inhibitors on Dentin Stability

    PubMed Central

    Montagner, A.F.; Sarkis-Onofre, R.; Pereira-Cenci, T.; Cenci, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature for in vitro and ex vivo studies that evaluated the effect of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors during the adhesive procedure on the immediate and long-term resin-dentin bond strength. The search was conducted in 6 databases with no publication year or language limits, following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. From 1,336 potentially eligible studies, 48 were selected for full-text analysis, and 30 were included for review, with 17 considered in the meta-analysis. Two reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted the data, and assessed the risk of bias. Pooled effect estimates were expressed as the weighted mean difference between groups. The most used MMP inhibitor was chlorhexidine (CHX). Immediate bond strength results showed no difference between 2% CHX and control; however, a difference was found between 0.2% CHX and control at baseline. After aging, CHX presented higher bond strength values compared to control groups (p < .05). However, this was not observed for longer periods of aging. High heterogeneity was found in some comparisons, especially for the water storage aging subgroup. Subgroup analyses showed that self-etching and etch-and-rinse adhesives are benefited by the CHX use. From the studies included, only 1 presented low risk of bias, while the others showed medium or high risk of bias. The use of MMP inhibitors did not affect the immediate bond strength overall, while it influenced the aged bond strength. Aging procedures influenced bond strength values of the dentin adhesion stability. PMID:24935066

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs): multitargeted anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Ververis, Katherine; Hiong, Alison; Karagiannis, Tom C; Licciardi, Paul V

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of therapeutics with potential as anticancer drugs. The rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors (and other chromatin-modifying agents) as anticancer therapies arose from the understanding that in addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes such as dysregulation of HDAC enzymes can alter phenotype and gene expression, disturb homeostasis, and contribute to neoplastic growth. The family of HDAC inhibitors is large and diverse. It includes a range of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds that differ in terms of structure, function, and specificity. HDAC inhibitors have multiple cell type-specific effects in vitro and in vivo, such as growth arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in malignant cells. HDAC inhibitors have the potential to be used as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Currently, there are two HDAC inhibitors that have received approval from the US FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, Zolinza) and depsipeptide (romidepsin, Istodax). More recently, depsipeptide has also gained FDA approval for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Many more clinical trials assessing the effects of various HDAC inhibitors on hematological and solid malignancies are currently being conducted. Despite the proven anticancer effects of particular HDAC inhibitors against certain cancers, many aspects of HDAC enzymes and HDAC inhibitors are still not fully understood. Increasing our understanding of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, their targets and mechanisms of action will be critical for the advancement of these drugs, especially to facilitate the rational design of HDAC inhibitors that are effective as antineoplastic agents. This review will discuss the use of HDAC inhibitors as multitargeted therapies for malignancy. Further, we outline the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors while

  9. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  10. Techniques for Screening Translation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Sergiev, Petr V.

    2016-01-01

    The machinery of translation is one of the most common targets of antibiotics. The development and screening of new antibiotics usually proceeds by testing antimicrobial activity followed by laborious studies of the mechanism of action. High-throughput methods for new antibiotic screening based on antimicrobial activity have become routine; however, identification of molecular targets is usually a challenge. Therefore, it is highly beneficial to combine primary screening with the identification of the mechanism of action. In this review, we describe a collection of methods for screening translation inhibitors, with a special emphasis on methods which can be performed in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27348012

  11. Natural products as aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Balunas, Marcy J; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2008-08-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein.

  12. C1 inhibitor: quantification and purification.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Dobó, József

    2014-01-01

    C1 inhibitor is a multipotent serpin capable of inhibiting the classical and the lectin pathways of complement, the fibrinolytic system, and contact/kinin system of coagulation. Deficiency of C1 inhibitor manifest as hereditary angioedema (HAE), an autosomal dominant hereditary disease. Measuring the C1 inhibitor level is of vital importance for the diagnosis of HAE and also for monitoring patients receiving C1 inhibitor for therapy. Determination of the antigenic C1 inhibitor level by the radial immunodiffusion (RID) technique is described in detail in this chapter. The presented purification method of plasma C1 inhibitor is primarily based on its high carbohydrate content and its affinity to the lectin jacalin.

  13. Tubulin inhibitors: a patent survey.

    PubMed

    Nepali, Kunal; Ojha, Ritu; Sharma, Sahil; Bedi, Preet M S; Dhar, Kanaya L

    2014-05-01

    Tubulin is one of the most useful and strategic molecular targets for anticancer drugs. The dynamic process of microtubule assembly and disassembly can be blocked by various agents that bind to distinct sites in the β-tubulin subunit. By interfering with microtubule function in vitro, these agents arrest cells in mitosis, eventually leading to cell death, by both apoptosis and necrosis. So far, three binding domains have been identified a) the colchicine site close to the α/β interface, b) the area where the vinca alkaloids bind, and c) the taxane-binding pocket. This review compiles the patent literature up to 2013 and offers a detailed account of all the advances on Tubulin inhibitors (lead molecules) along with in depth knowledge about the number of novel scaffolds, modified analogs and derivatives of the lead molecules. Colchicine binding site remains the most explored site indicated by the patent survey as majority of the patents revolves around phenstatin and combretastatin based molecules where the key structural feature for tubulin inhibition is an appropriate arrangement of the two aromatic rings at an appropriate distance and optimal dihedral angle maximizing interactions with tubulin. A brief account of promising tubulin inhibitors in stages of clinical development and some strategies for the development of potent molecules overcoming the problem of drug resistance have also been discussed.

  14. Aromatase inhibitors and bone loss.

    PubMed

    Perez, Edith A; Weilbaecher, Katherine

    2006-08-01

    The aromatase inhibitors (AIs) anastrozole (Arimidex), letrozole (Femara), and exemestane (Aromasin) are significantly more effective than the selective estrogen-receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen in preventing recurrence in estrogen receptor-positive early breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors are likely to replace SERMs as first-line adjuvant therapy for many patients. However, AIs are associated with significantly more osteoporotic fractures and greater bone mineral loss. As antiresorptive agents, oral and intravenous bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax), risedronate (Actonel), ibandronate (Boniva), pamidronate (Aredia), and zoledronic acid (Zometa) have efficacy in preventing postmenopausal osteoporosis, cancer treatment-related bone loss, or skeletal complications of metastatic disease. Clinical practice guidelines recommend baseline and annual follow-up bone density monitoring for all patients initiating AI therapy. Bisphosphonate therapy should be prescribed for patients with osteoporosis (T score < -2.5) and considered on an individual basis for those with osteopenia (T score < -1). Modifiable lifestyle behaviors including adequate calcium and vitamin D intake, weight-bearing exercise, and smoking cessation should be addressed. Adverse events associated with bisphosphonates include gastrointestinal toxicity, renal toxicity, and osteonecrosis of the jaw. These safety concerns should be balanced with the potential of bisphosphonates to minimize or prevent the debilitating effects of AI-associated bone loss in patients with early, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  15. Plant Biofilm Inhibitors to Discover Biofilm Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-08

    REPORT Final Report for Plant Biofilm Inhibitors to Discover Biofilm Genes 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: To control biofilms , we have...synthesized the natural biofilm inhibitor (5Z)-4-bromo-5-(bromomethylene) -3-butyl-2(5H)-furanone from the red alga Delisea pulchra and determined that...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS biofilms , biofilm inhibitors Thomas K. Wood Texas Engineering

  16. [Development of new antiatherosclerotic agents--ACAT inhibitors and CETP inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, A; Horiuchi, S

    1999-12-01

    Development of new antiatherosclerotic agents were reviewed focusing on ACAT inhibitors and CETP inhibitors. ACAT inhibitors enhance intracellular degradation of VLDL in hepatocytes. Cholesterol absorption in small intestine is inhibited by ACAT inhibitors. Thus, ACAT inhibitors reduce plasma cholesterol levels. In atherosclerotic lesions, ACAT inhibitors suppress foam cell formation (cholesteryl ester accumulation) in macrophages. Since ACAT inhibitors have multiple anti-atherogenic effects, they are considered future drugs controlling hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. CETP inhibitors are expected to increase HDL and decrease LDL. Although the patients with CETP deficiency show high level of HDL, recent studies showed that they are not necessarily resistant to atherosclerosis. The strategy to inhibit CETP for suppressing atherosclerosis has not been established.

  17. An Integrated Model of RAF Inhibitor Action Predicts Inhibitor Activity against Oncogenic BRAF Signaling.

    PubMed

    Karoulia, Zoi; Wu, Yang; Ahmed, Tamer A; Xin, Qisheng; Bollard, Julien; Krepler, Clemens; Wu, Xuewei; Zhang, Chao; Bollag, Gideon; Herlyn, Meenhard; Fagin, James A; Lujambio, Amaia; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Poulikakos, Poulikos I

    2016-09-12

    The complex biochemical effects of RAF inhibitors account for both the effectiveness and mechanisms of resistance to these drugs, but a unified mechanistic model has been lacking. Here we show that RAF inhibitors exert their effects via two distinct allosteric mechanisms. Drug resistance due to dimerization is determined by the position of the αC helix stabilized by inhibitor, whereas inhibitor-induced RAF priming and dimerization are the result of inhibitor-induced formation of the RAF/RAS-GTP complex. The biochemical effect of RAF inhibitor in cells is the combined outcome of the two mechanisms. Therapeutic strategies including αC-helix-IN inhibitors are more effective in multiple mutant BRAF-driven tumor models, including colorectal and thyroid BRAF(V600E) cancers, in which first-generation RAF inhibitors have been ineffective.

  18. Quorum sensing inhibitors: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vipin Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Excessive and indiscriminate use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections has lead to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Most infectious diseases are caused by bacteria which proliferate within quorum sensing (QS) mediated biofilms. Efforts to disrupt biofilms have enabled the identification of bioactive molecules produced by prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These molecules act primarily by quenching the QS system. The phenomenon is also termed as quorum quenching (QQ). In addition, synthetic compounds have also been found to be effective in QQ. This review focuses primarily on natural and synthetic quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) with the potential for treating bacterial infections. It has been opined that the most versatile prokaryotes to produce QSI are likely to be those, which are generally regarded as safe. Among the eukaryotes, certain legumes and traditional medicinal plants are likely to act as QSIs. Such findings are likely to lead to efficient treatments with much lower doses of drugs especially antibiotics than required at present.

  19. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors and progeria.

    PubMed

    Meta, Margarita; Yang, Shao H; Bergo, Martin O; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G

    2006-10-01

    Genetic mutations that lead to an accumulation of farnesyl-prelamin A cause progeroid syndromes, including Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. It seemed possible that the farnesylated form of prelamin A might be toxic to mammalian cells, accounting for all the disease phenotypes that are characteristic of progeria. This concept led to the hypothesis that protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) might ameliorate the disease phenotypes of progeria in mouse models. Thus far, two different mouse models of progeria have been examined. In both models, FTIs improved progeria-like disease phenotypes. Here, prelamin A post-translational processing is discussed and several mutations underlying human progeroid syndromes are described. In addition, recent data showing that FTIs ameliorate disease phenotypes in a pair of mouse models of progeria are discussed.

  20. Macrocyclic Inhibitors of Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Victoria A.; Singh, Erinprit K.; Nazarova, Lidia A.; Alexander, Leslie D.; McAlpine, Shelli R.

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are a family of highly conserved proteins, whose expression increases in response to stresses that may threaten cell survival. Over the past decade, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has emerged as a potential therapeutic target for cancer as it plays a vital role in normal cell maturation and acts as a molecular chaperone for proper folding, assembly, and stabilization of many oncogenic proteins. To date, a majority of Hsp90 inhibitors that have been discovered are macrocycles. The relatively rigid conformation provided by the macrocyclic scaffold allows for a selective interaction with a biological target such as Hsp90. This review highlights the discovery and development of nine macro-cycles that inhibit the function of Hsp90, detailing their potency and the client proteins affected by Hsp90 inhibition. PMID:20536417

  1. Quinolone-based HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Gopalan; Kilambi, Narasimhan; Rathinasamy, Suresh; Rajendran, Praveen; Narayanan, Shridhar; Rajagopal, Sridharan

    2014-08-01

    HDAC inhibitors emerged as promising drug candidates in combating wide variety of cancers. At present, two of the compounds SAHA and Romidepsin were approved by FDA for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and many are in various clinical phases. A new quinolone cap structure was explored with hydroxamic acid as zinc-binding group (ZBG). The pan HDAC inhibitory and antiproliferative activities against three human cancer cell lines HCT-116 (colon), NCI-H460 (lung) and U251 (glioblastoma) of the compounds (4a-4w) were evaluated. Introduction of heterocyclic amines in CAP region increased the enzyme inhibitory and antiproliferative activities and few of the compounds tested are metabolically stable in both MLM and HLM.

  2. Checkpoint inhibitors in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jezeršek Novaković, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is unusual among cancers in that it consists of a small number of malignant Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in a sea of immune system cells, including T cells. Most of these T cells are reversibly inactivated in different ways and their reactivation may induce a very strong immune response to cancer cells. One way of reactivation of T cells is with antibodies blocking the CTLA-4 and especially with antibodies directed against PD-1 or the PD-L1 ligand thereby reversing the tumor-induced downregulation of T-cell function and augmenting antitumor immune activity at the priming (CTLA-4) or tissue effector (PD-1) phase. Immune checkpoint inhibitors have been evidenced as an additional treatment option with substantial effectiveness and acceptable toxicity in heavily pretreated patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma. Particularly, PD-1 blockade with nivolumab and pembrolizumab has demonstrated significant single-agent activity in this select population.

  3. Glycine Transporters and Their Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Robert; Kerr, Jennifer; Walker, Glenn; Wishart, Grant

    Glycine plays a ubiquitous role in many biological processes. In the central nervous system it serves as an important neurotransmitter acting as an agonist at strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and as an essential co-agonist with glutamate at the NMDA receptor complex. Control of glycine concentrations in the vicinity of these receptors is mediated by the specific glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Inhibition of these transporters has been postulated to be of potential benefit in several therapeutic indications including schizophrenia and pain. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of glycine transporters and focus on recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors.

  4. Natural Products as Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating also the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein. PMID:18690828

  5. Loratadine analogues as MAGL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayendra Z; Ahenkorah, Stephen; Vaara, Miia; Staszewski, Marek; Adams, Yahaya; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Parkkari, Teija; Savinainen, Juha R; Walczyński, Krzysztof; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Nevalainen, Tapio J

    2015-04-01

    Compound 12a (JZP-361) acted as a potent and reversible inhibitor of human recombinant MAGL (hMAGL, IC50=46 nM), and was found to have almost 150-fold higher selectivity over human recombinant fatty acid amide hydrolase (hFAAH, IC50=7.24 μM) and 35-fold higher selectivity over human α/β-hydrolase-6 (hABHD6, IC50=1.79 μM). Additionally, compound 12a retained H1 antagonistic affinity (pA2=6.81) but did not show cannabinoid receptor activity, when tested at concentrations ⩽ 10 μM. Hence, compound 12a represents a novel dual-acting pharmacological tool possessing both MAGL-inhibitory and antihistaminergic activities.

  6. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  7. Discovery of novel heterocyclic factor VIIa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rai, Roopa; Kolesnikov, Aleksandr; Sprengeler, Paul A; Torkelson, Steven; Ton, Tony; Katz, Bradley A; Yu, Christine; Hendrix, John; Shrader, William D; Stephens, Robin; Cabuslay, Ronnell; Sanford, Ellen; Young, Wendy B

    2006-04-15

    Structure-activity relationships and binding mode of novel heterocyclic factor VIIa inhibitors will be described. In these inhibitors, a highly basic 5-amidinoindole moiety has been successfully replaced with a less basic 5-aminopyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridine scaffold.

  8. Rust inhibitor and oil composition containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Bialy, J.J.; Cullen, W.P.; Dorn, P.; Nebzydoski, J.W.; Sung, R.L.

    1981-04-21

    A rust inhibitor comprising the reaction product of a hydrocarbylsuccinic anhydride in which the hydrocarbyl radical has from about 6 to 30 carbon atoms and an aminotriazole is provided. The rust inhibitor is effective in motor fuel and lubricating oil compositions.

  9. Exploring the scaffold universe of kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-08

    The scaffold concept was applied to systematically determine, analyze, and compare core structures of kinase inhibitors. From publicly available inhibitors of the human kinome, scaffolds and cyclic skeletons were systematically extracted and organized taking activity data, structural relationships, and retrosynthetic criteria into account. Scaffold coverage varied greatly across the kinome, and many scaffolds representing compounds with different activity profiles were identified. The majority of kinase inhibitor scaffolds were involved in well-defined yet distinct structural relationships, which had different consequences on compound activity. Scaffolds exclusively representing highly potent compounds were identified as well as structurally analogous scaffolds with very different degrees of promiscuity. Scaffold relationships presented herein suggest a variety of hypotheses for inhibitor design. Our detailed organization of the kinase inhibitor scaffold universe with respect to different activity and structural criteria, all scaffolds, and the original compound data assembled for our analysis are made freely available.

  10. A Spider-Derived Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor That Acts as a Plasmin Inhibitor and an Elastase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hu; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Zou, Feng Ming; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Je, Yeon Ho; Li, Jianhong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-01-01

    Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors are involved in various physiological processes, such as ion channel blocking, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. While spider-derived Kunitz-type proteins show activity in trypsin or chymotrypsin inhibition and K+ channel blocking, no additional role for these proteins has been elucidated. In this study, we identified the first spider (Araneus ventricosus) Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (AvKTI) that acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor. AvKTI possesses a Kunitz domain consisting of a 57-amino-acid mature peptide that displays features consistent with Kunitz-type inhibitors, including six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 lysine residue. Recombinant AvKTI, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, showed a dual inhibitory activity against trypsin (Ki 7.34 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki 37.75 nM), defining a role for AvKTI as a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. Additionally, AvKTI showed no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, or tissue plasminogen activator; however, AvKTI inhibited plasmin (Ki 4.89 nM) and neutrophil elastase (Ki 169.07 nM), indicating that it acts as an antifibrinolytic factor and an antielastolytic factor. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AvKTI acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor and also provide a novel view of the functions of a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. PMID:23308198

  11. Designing Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Present-day rational drug design approaches are based on exploiting unique features of the target biomolecules, small- or macromolecule drug candidates, and physical forces that govern their interactions. The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems” once again demonstrated the importance of the tailored drug discovery that reduces the role of the trial and error approach to a minimum. The “rational drug design” term is rather comprehensive as it includes all contemporary methods of drug discovery where serendipity and screening are substituted by the information-guided search for new and existing compounds. Successful implementation of these innovative drug discovery approaches is inevitably preceded by learning the physics, chemistry, and physiology of functioning of biological structures under normal and pathological conditions. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the recent rational drug design approaches to discover inhibitors of anthrax toxin. Some of the examples include small-molecule and peptide-based post-exposure therapeutic agents as well as several polyvalent compounds. The review also directs the reader to the vast literature on the recognized advances and future possibilities in the field. Expert opinion Existing options to combat anthrax toxin lethality are limited. With the only anthrax toxin inhibiting therapy (PA-targeting with a monoclonal antibody, raxibacumab) approved to treat inhalational anthrax, in our view, the situation is still insecure. The FDA’s animal rule for drug approval, which clears compounds without validated efficacy studies on humans, creates a high level of uncertainty, especially when a well-characterized animal model does not exist. Besides, unlike PA, which is known to be unstable, LF remains active in cells and in animal tissues for days. Therefore, the effectiveness of the post-exposure treatment of the individuals

  12. Current use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in urology

    PubMed Central

    Hakky, Tariq Said; Jain, Lakshay

    2015-01-01

    The causes of male erectile dysfunction (ED) are quite variable and are now commonly divided into etiologies such as ischemia, smooth muscle damage, or altered blood flow. Although varying rates of ED have been reported in literature, the number of men with ED is projected to increase worldwide by 2025 to approximately 322 million. Since the introduction of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, there has been a paradigm shift in the treatment of ED because PDE5 inhibitors address a broad spectrum of etiologies for ED. Today, the American Urological Association recommends the use of three PDE5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil, and vardenafil) as a first-line therapy for the treatment of ED. This review evaluates the pharmacological mechanism of PDE5 inhibitors along with the impact and use of sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil, and avanafil. By increasing intracellular cGMP levels, PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to be effective in the treatment of ED. Through their effects on other cellular signaling pathways, PDE5 inhibitors have the potential for treating other urologic conditions as well. The use of PDE5 inhibitors can also be combined to produce a synergistic effect in conditions such as male hypogonadism and benign prostatic hyperplasia in addition to ED. PMID:26328208

  13. Leflunomide, a Reversible Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél

    2016-01-01

    A screening study aimed at identifying inhibitors of the enzyme, monoamine oxidase (MAO), among clinically used drugs have indicated that the antirheumatic drug, leflunomide, is an inhibitor of both MAO isoforms. Leflunomide inhibits human MAO-A and MAO-B and exhibits IC50 values of 19.1 μM and 13.7 μM, respectively. The corresponding Ki values are 17.7 μM (MAO-A) and 10.1 μM (MAO-B). Dialyses of mixtures of the MAO enzymes and leflunomide show that inhibition of the MAOs by leflunomide is reversible. The principal metabolite of leflunomide, teriflunomide (A77 1726), in contrast is not an MAO inhibitor. This study concludes that, although leflunomide is only moderately potent as an MAO inhibitor, isoxazole derivatives may represent a general class of MAO inhibitors and this heterocycle may find application in MAO inhibitor design. In this respect, MAO inhibitors are used in the clinic for the treatment of depressive illness and Parkinson's disease, and are under investigation as therapy for certain types of cancer, Alzheimer's disease and age-related impairment of cardiac function.

  14. Nonpeptide Macrocyclic Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Oyelere, Adegboyega K.; Chen, Po C.; Guerrant, William; Mwakwari, Sandra C.; Hood, Rebecca; Zhang, Yunzhe; Fan, Yuhong

    2009-01-01

    Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) hold great promise in cancer therapy due to their demonstrated ability to arrest proliferation of nearly all transformed cell types. Of the several structurally distinct small molecules HDACi reported, macrocyclic depsipeptides have the most complex recognition cap-group moieties and present an excellent opportunity for the modulation of the biological activities of HDACi. Unfortunately, the structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies for this class of compounds have been impaired largely because most macrocyclic HDACi known to date are comprised of complex peptide macrocycles. In addition to retaining the pharmacologically disadvantaged peptidyl-backbone, they offer only limited opportunity for side-chain modifications. Here we report the discovery of a new class of macrocyclic HDACi based on the macrolide antibiotics skeletons. SAR studies revealed that these compounds displayed both linker-length and macrolide-type dependent HDAC inhibition activities with IC50 in low nanomolar range. In addition, these nonpeptide macrocyclic HDACi are more selective against HDAC 1 and 2 relative to HDAC 8, another class I HDAC isoform, hence have sub-class HDAC isoform selectivity. PMID:19093884

  15. Inhibitors of specific ceramide synthases.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Susanne; Hartmann, Daniela; Fuchs, Sina; Birod, Kerstin; Ferreiròs, Nerea; Schreiber, Yannick; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Geisslinger, Gerd; Grösch, Sabine; Stark, Holger

    2012-02-01

    Ceramide synthases (CerSs) are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of ceramides and display a group of at least six different isoenzymes (CerS1-6). Ceramides itself are bioactive molecules. Ceramides with different N-acyl side chains (C(14:0)-Cer - C(26:0)-Cer) possess distinct roles in cell signaling. Therefore, the selective inhibition of specific CerSs which are responsible for the formation of a specific ceramide holds promise for a number of new clinical treatment strategies, e.g., cancer. Here, we identified four of hitherto unknown functional inhibitors of CerSs derived from the FTY720 (Fingolimod) lead structure and showed their inhibitory effectiveness by two in vitro CerS activity assays. Additionally, we tested the substances in two cell lines (HCT-116 and HeLa) with different ceramide patterns. In summary, the in vitro activity assays revealed out that ST1058 and ST1074 preferentially inhibit CerS2 and CerS4, while ST1072 inhibits most potently CerS4 and CerS6. Importantly, ST1060 inhibits predominately CerS2. First structure-activity relationships and the potential biological impact of these compounds are discussed.

  16. COMT inhibitors and liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Watkins, P

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the issue of hepatotoxicity with the use of the catechol-O-methly transferase (COMT) inhibitors tolcapone and entacapone. Neither drug caused hepatotoxicity in preclinical toxicity testing. However, in clinical trials of tolcapone, liver chemistry tests were elevated more than 3 times above the upper limit of normal in approximately 1% of patients who took the 100 mg dose and in approximately 3% of patients who took the 200 mg dose. These observations led to the recommendation that periodic monitoring of liver function be performed. Post-marketing surveillance studies noted 3 instances of acute liver failure with death after 60,000 patients had received tolcapone for a total of 40,000 patient-years. For this reason, the drug was withdrawn from the market in Europe and Canada, and a black box warning issued in the United States. In contrast, clinical trials with entacapone demonstrated no increase in liver enzymes above those observed with placebo. Further, no instances of acute liver failure or death attributed to the drug have been observed in post-marketing surveillance studies. Consequently, liver monitoring is not required with this agent. These data demonstrate that tolcapone is associated with a risk of hepatotoxicity but that no such risk has been detected with entacapone.

  17. Pharmacology of Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jai Moo; Sachs, George

    2010-01-01

    The gastric H,K-ATPase is the primary target for the treatment of acid-related diseases. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are weak bases composed of two moieties, a substituted pyridine with a primary pKa of about 4.0, which allows selective accumulation in the secretory canaliculus of the parietal cell, and a benzimidazole with a second pKa of about 1.0. PPIs are acid-activated prodrugs that convert to sulfenic acids or sulfenamides that react covalently with one or more cysteines accessible from the luminal surface of the ATPase. Because of covalent binding, their inhibitory effects last much longer than their plasma half-life. However, the short half-life of the drug in the blood and the requirement for acid activation impair their efficacy in acid suppression, particularly at night. PPIs with longer half-life promise to improve acid suppression. All PPIs give excellent healing of peptic ulcers and produce good results in reflux esophagitis. PPIs combined with antibiotics eradicate Helicobacter pylori. PMID:19006606

  18. Migrating corrosion inhibitor protection of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bjegovic, D.; Miksic, B.

    1999-11-01

    Migrating corrosion inhibitors (MCI) were developed to protect steel rebar from corrosion in concrete. They were designed to be incorporated as an admixture during concrete batching or used for surface impregnation of existing concrete structures. Two investigations are summarized. One studied the effectiveness of MCIs as a corrosion inhibitor for steel rebar when used as an admixture in fresh concrete mix. The other is a long-term study of MCI concrete impregnation that chronicles corrosion rates of rebar in concrete specimens. Based on data from each study, it was concluded that migrating corrosion inhibitors are compatible with concrete and effectively delay the onset of corrosion.

  19. Uptake of L-tri-iodothyronine by isolated rat liver cells. A process partially inhibited by metabolic inhibitors; attempts to distinguish between uptake and binding to intracellular proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Eckel, J; Rao, G S; Rao, M L; Breuer, H

    1979-01-01

    1. Rat liver cells obtained by dispersion with collagenase were used to investigate the mode of entry of L-tri-iodothyronine into the cell. 2. The hormone was taken up very rapidly at 23 degrees C; the linear phase of uptake lasted for up to approx. 20 s. 3. A plot of the initial rates of uptake against different concentrations of L-tri-iodothyronine yielded a sigmoidal curve. The Eadie--Hofstee plot (v/[S]2 versus v) yielded two straight lines. The uptake component with an apparent Kt value of 86 +/- 15 pM was designated as system I, and the second uptake component with an apparent Kt of 726 +/- 11 pM as system II. The Hill plot for system I was not linear; the apparent Hill coefficient for system II was calculated to be 2.1.4. Uptake of L-tri-iodothyronine by system I was higher at pH 6.4 than at pH 7.4; system II was relatively insensitive to changes in the pH of the external medium. 5. Both systems exhibited a transition temperature at about 16 degrees C in the Arrhenius plot. The activation energies of the two systems below and above 16 degrees C were 72.8 and 47.7 and 54.4 and 33.1 J/mol respectively. 6. Inhibitors of cellular energy reduced the uptake by system I to a larger extent than that by system II. 7. Replacement of Na+ in the external medium by either K+ or choline led to uptake that followed normal Michaelis--Menten kinetics. 8. Thiol-group-blocking agents reduced the uptake of the hormone by both systems. 9. Treatment of liver cells with beta-glucosidase, Pronase and neuraminidase led to a decrease in the uptake of L-tri-iodothyronine by system I, whereas uptake by system II was decreased after treatment with phospholipase A2, beta-galactosidase. Pronase and neuraminidase. 10. The stereoisomer D-tri-iodothyronine (100--3000 pM) did not affect system I, but uptake by system II decreased with increasing concentration of D-tri-iodothyronine. Reverse L-tri-iodothyronine (2--100 pM) and L-thyroxine (100--3000 pM) did not influence uptake by either

  20. Aromatase inhibitors: possible future applications.

    PubMed

    Karaer, Oznur; Oruç, Semra; Koyuncu, Faik Mümtaz

    2004-08-01

    In premenopausal women ovaries are the major sites of estrogen production, while in postmenopausal women estrogen is produced by aromatization of ovarian and adrenal androgens in extragonadal sites, mostly in adipose tissue. Aromatase is a cytochrome P450 hemoprotein-containing enzyme complex that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the conversion of androstenedione and testosterone to estrone and estradiol (E2). Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have been developed primarily for use in either natural or surgical postmenopausal patients. In premenopausal women, the ovary can overcome the estrogen blockade by reflex increments of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), so AIs must be combined with a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist to prevent the reflex LH and FSH increments. In advanced hormone-dependent breast cancer treatment, AIs have been shown to be superior to tamoxifen. Preliminary evidence also suggests superiority in the adjuvant, neoadjuvant settings and also for breast cancer prevention. AIs have been used in infertility and can increase ovulation rate. Reducing FSH dose, estrogen levels, improving response to FSH, implantation rates, and developing multiple follicles that can be used in in vitro maturation procedures are potential areas that AIs might be used in in assisted reproductive technologies (ART), besides simple ovulation induction. AIs are reported to be successful in treatment of endometriosis, an estrogen-dependent process. The use of AIs in gynecomastia, puberte precox, leiomyoma uteri, some estrogen-dependent cancers (ovarian), endometrial cancer and male infertility are reported; some of the results are promising but more clinical trials are needed. AIs are predicted to become the gold standard in the treatment of estrogen-dependent diseases in reproductive medicine in the near future.

  1. Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Tripuraneni, Naga Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) is a member of the phosphodiesterase family of proteins that plays a critical role in regulating intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by controlling its rate of degradation. It has been demonstrated that this isoform is involved in the orchestra of events which includes inflammation, schizophrenia, cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, contractility of the myocardium, and psoriatic arthritis. Phosphodiesterase 4B has constituted an interesting target for drug development. In recent years, a number of PDE4B inhibitors have been developed for their use as therapeutic agents. In this review, an up-to-date status of the inhibitors investigated for the inhibition of PDE4B has been given so that this rich source of structural information of presently known PDE4B inhibitors could be helpful in generating a selective and potent inhibitor of PDE4B. PMID:25853062

  2. Musical hallucinations treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blom, Jan Dirk; Coebergh, Jan Adriaan F; Lauw, René; Sommer, Iris E C

    2015-01-01

    Musical hallucinations are relatively rare auditory percepts which, due to their intrusive nature and the accompanying fear of impending mental decline, tend to cause significant distress and impairment. Although their etiology and pathophysiology appear to be heterogeneous and no evidence-based treatment methods are available, case reports indicate that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may yield positive results in patients with comorbid hearing loss. We present two female patients (aged 76 and 78 years) both of whom suffered from hearing impairment and practically incessant musical hallucinations. Both patients were successfully treated with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Based on these two case descriptions and an overview of studies describing the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in similar patients, we discuss possible mechanisms and propose further research on the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for musical hallucinations experienced in concordance with hearing loss.

  3. Musical Hallucinations Treated with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Jan Dirk; Coebergh, Jan Adriaan F.; Lauw, René; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Musical hallucinations are relatively rare auditory percepts which, due to their intrusive nature and the accompanying fear of impending mental decline, tend to cause significant distress and impairment. Although their etiology and pathophysiology appear to be heterogeneous and no evidence-based treatment methods are available, case reports indicate that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may yield positive results in patients with comorbid hearing loss. We present two female patients (aged 76 and 78 years) both of whom suffered from hearing impairment and practically incessant musical hallucinations. Both patients were successfully treated with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Based on these two case descriptions and an overview of studies describing the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in similar patients, we discuss possible mechanisms and propose further research on the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for musical hallucinations experienced in concordance with hearing loss. PMID:25904872

  4. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J; Zhou, Pei

    2016-02-25

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC--an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target--access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics.

  5. Polyaspartate scale inhibitors -- Biodegradable alternatives to polyacrylates

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, R.J.; Low, K.C.; Shannon, J.E.

    1996-12-01

    Polyaspartates are highly biodegradable alternatives to polyacrylate based scale inhibitors. This paper presents laboratory testing data on polyaspartate inhibitors of calcium and barium mineral scales. The optimum molecular weight for polyaspartate inhibitors of calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate and barium sulfate mineral scales was determined to be between 1,000 and 4,000 Mw (weight average molecular weight as calculated by Size Exclusion Chromatography). For inhibition of calcium carbonate and barium sulfate, polyaspartates in the range of 3,000-4,000 Mw were most effective. For calcium sulfate inhibition, the optimum molecular weight lies in the 1,000 to 2,000 Mw range. Biodegradability data (OECD 301B Ready Biodegradability) on polyaspartates of a variety of molecular weights is also presented which demonstrates the high biodegradability of this class of mineral scale inhibitors.

  6. Lipoxygenase inhibitors derived from marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hideyuki; Kagawa, Yoshio; Konno, Remi; Kim, Sang Moo; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2014-03-01

    The solvent extracts from the algae Sargassum thunbergii (Sargassaceae) and Odonthalia corymbifera (Rhodomelaceae) were subjected to soybean lipoxygenase inhibitory screening. Two hydrophobic inhibitors were obtained from the extracts of S. thunbergii through inhibitory assay-guided fractionation. The inhibitors were identified as known exo-methylenic alkapolyenes (6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)-1,6,9,12,15-henicosapentaene (1) and (6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z,18Z)-1,6,9,12,15,18-henicosahexaene (2). The alkapolyenes 1 and 2 showed higher inhibitory activity than the known inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). Pheophytin a (3) was obtained from the extract of O. corymbifera. The inhibitor 3 also showed higher inhibitory activity than NDGA. This is the first report on lipoxygenase inhibition of exo-methylenic alkapolyenes and a chlorophyll a-related substance.

  7. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J.; Zhou, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC—an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target—access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics. PMID:26912110

  8. Inhibitors of Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Meet Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a “cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system. PMID:24893223

  9. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase.

  10. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  11. 2,4-Diaminopyrimidine MK2 inhibitors. Part I: Observation of an unexpected inhibitor binding mode

    SciTech Connect

    Argiriadi, Maria A.; Ericsson, Anna M.; Harris, Christopher M.; Banach, David L.; Borhani, David W.; Calderwood, David J.; Demers, Megan D.; DiMauro, Jennifer; Dixon, Richard W.; Hardman, Jennifer; Kwak, Silvia; Li, Biqin; Mankovich, John A.; Marcotte, Douglas; Mullen, Kelly D.; Ni, Baofu; Pietras, M.; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Sousa, Silvino; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Wang, L.; Xiang, T.; Talanian, R.V.

    2010-09-17

    MK2 is a Ser/Thr kinase of significant interest as an anti-inflammatory drug discovery target. Here we describe the development of in vitro tools for the identification and characterization of MK2 inhibitors, including validation of inhibitor interactions with the crystallography construct and determination of the unique binding mode of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine inhibitors in the MK2 active site.

  12. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Allison B.; Turk, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LF-inhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and high-throughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection. PMID:27072692

  13. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Targeting Bacterial Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Desai, Janish; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ke; Malwal, Satish R; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-10-06

    We synthesized potential inhibitors of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), or undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP), and tested them in bacterial cell growth and enzyme inhibition assays. The most active compounds were found to be bisphosphonates with electron-withdrawing aryl-alkyl side chains which inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) at ∼1-4 μg mL(-1) levels. They were found to be potent inhibitors of FPPS; cell growth was partially "rescued" by the addition of farnesol or overexpression of FPPS, and there was synergistic activity with known isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway inhibitors. Lipophilic hydroxyalkyl phosphonic acids inhibited UPPS and UPPP at micromolar levels; they were active (∼2-6 μg mL(-1) ) against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative organisms, and again exhibited synergistic activity with cell wall biosynthesis inhibitors, but only indifferent effects with other inhibitors. The results are of interest because they describe novel inhibitors of FPPS, UPPS, and UPPP with cell growth inhibitory activities as low as ∼1-2 μg mL(-1) .

  14. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Qian, Kun; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zheng, Y. George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arginine methylation is an abundant posttranslational modification occurring in mammalian cells and catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). Misregulation and aberrant expression of PRMTs are associated with various disease states, notably cancer. PRMTs are prominent therapeutic targets in drug discovery. Areas covered The authors provide an updated review of the research on the development of chemical modulators for PRMTs. Great efforts are seen in screening and designing potent and selective PRMT inhibitors, and a number of micromolar and submicromolar inhibitors have been obtained for key PRMT enzymes such as PRMT1, CARM1, and PRMT5. The authors provide a focus on their chemical structures, mechanism of action, and pharmacological activities. Pros and cons of each type of inhibitors are also discussed. Expert opinion Several key challenging issues exist in PRMT inhibitor discovery. Structural mechanisms of many PRMT inhibitors remain unclear. There lacks consistency in potency data due to divergence of assay methods and conditions. Physiologically relevant cellular assays are warranted. Substantial engagements are needed to investigate pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the new PRMT inhibitors in pertinent disease models. Discovery and evaluation of potent, isoform-selective, cell-permeable and in vivo-active PRMT modulators will continue to be an active arena of research in years ahead. PMID:26789238

  15. Discovery of Novel Haloalkane Dehalogenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Buryska, Tomas; Daniel, Lukas; Kunka, Antonin; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases (HLDs) have recently been discovered in a number of bacteria, including symbionts and pathogens of both plants and humans. However, the biological roles of HLDs in these organisms are unclear. The development of efficient HLD inhibitors serving as molecular probes to explore their function would represent an important step toward a better understanding of these interesting enzymes. Here we report the identification of inhibitors for this enzyme family using two different approaches. The first builds on the structures of the enzymes' known substrates and led to the discovery of less potent nonspecific HLD inhibitors. The second approach involved the virtual screening of 150,000 potential inhibitors against the crystal structure of an HLD from the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The best inhibitor exhibited high specificity for the target structure, with an inhibition constant of 3 μM and a molecular architecture that clearly differs from those of all known HLD substrates. The new inhibitors will be used to study the natural functions of HLDs in bacteria, to probe their mechanisms, and to achieve their stabilization. PMID:26773086

  16. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  17. Potent pyrrolidine- and piperidine-based BACE-1 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Iserloh, U.; Wu, Y.; Cumming, J.N.; Pan, J.; Wang, L.Y.; Stamford, A.W.; Kennedy, M.E.; Kuvelkar, R.; Chen, X.; Parker, E.M.; Strickland, C.; Voigt, J.

    2008-08-18

    Based on lead compound 1 identified from the patent literature, we developed novel patentable BACE-1 inhibitors by introducing a cyclic amine scaffold. Extensive SAR studies on both pyrrolidines and piperidines ultimately led to inhibitor 2f, one of the most potent inhibitors synthesized to date. The discovery and development of novel BACE-1 inhibitors incorporating a cyclic amine scaffold is described.

  18. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Inhibitors which appeared promising in previous tests and additional inhibitors including several proprietary products were evaluated. Evaluation of the inhibitors was based on corrosion protection afforded an aluminum-mild steel-copper-stainless steel assembly in a hot corrosive water. Of the inhibitors tested two were found to be effective and show promise for protecting multimetallic solar heating systems.

  19. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H + ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. - Highlights: • Co-treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors induces synergistic cell death • EGFR TKIs enhance cell sensitivity to vATPase inhibitors via Hif-1α downregulation • Co-treatment of these inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC.

  20. Intervention for hyperlipidemia associated with protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Melroe, N H; Kopaczewski, J; Henry, K; Huebsch, J

    1999-01-01

    In the past 3 years, treatment for HIV infection has significantly improved the prognosis for HIV-infected persons. The administration of protease inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection has had a significant role in the reduction of AIDS-related complications. Recent findings have indicated that protease inhibitors may significantly increase lipids to levels that pose a health risk that may be greater than the illness itself. This article reviews the initial findings of a study that investigated the impact of interventions for the treatment of protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia. The purpose of the study was to determine if initiation of interventions based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Guidelines would be effective in lowering protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia without disrupting the effectiveness of the HIV therapy. A total of 45 HIV-infected individuals who were taking a protease inhibitor and had abnormally elevated lipids were enrolled into this study. Mean serum cholesterol level prior to initiation of a protease inhibitor regimen was 170 mg/dl as compared to a mean cholesterol at time of enrollment of 289 mg/dl and triglycerides of 879 mg/dl. Interventions included diet and exercise and the prescription of gemfibrozil alone or in combination with atorvatstatin. During the course of the study, overall intervention significantly reduced serum cholesterol level to 201 mg/dl (p. 01) over a study period of ten months. Case studies of five medical events related to hyperlipidemia are included. Currently, 26 participants continue in the study. Sixteen participants discontinued protease inhibitor therapy during the course of the study and thus ended their participation.

  1. SGLT2 Inhibitors and the Diabetic Kidney.

    PubMed

    Fioretto, Paola; Zambon, Alberto; Rossato, Marco; Busetto, Luca; Vettor, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Blood glucose and blood pressure control reduce the risk of developing this complication; however, once DN is established, it is only possible to slow progression. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, the most recent glucose-lowering oral agents, may have the potential to exert nephroprotection not only through improving glycemic control but also through glucose-independent effects, such as blood pressure-lowering and direct renal effects. It is important to consider, however, that in patients with impaired renal function, given their mode of action, SGLT2 inhibitors are less effective in lowering blood glucose. In patients with high cardiovascular risk, the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin lowered the rate of cardiovascular events, especially cardiovascular death, and substantially reduced important renal outcomes. Such benefits on DN could derive from effects beyond glycemia. Glomerular hyperfiltration is a potential risk factor for DN. In addition to the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, renal tubular factors, including SGLT2, contribute to glomerular hyperfiltration in diabetes. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule, causing, through tubuloglomerular feedback, afferent arteriole vasoconstriction and reduction in hyperfiltration. Experimental studies showed that SGLT2 inhibitors reduced hyperfiltration and decreased inflammatory and fibrotic responses of proximal tubular cells. SGLT2 inhibitors reduced glomerular hyperfiltration in patients with type 1 diabetes, and in patients with type 2 diabetes, they caused transient acute reductions in glomerular filtration rate, followed by a progressive recovery and stabilization of renal function. Interestingly, recent studies consistently demonstrated a reduction in albuminuria. Although these data are promising, only dedicated renal outcome trials will clarify whether

  2. Three Decades of β-Lactamase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Sarah M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Since the introduction of penicillin, β-lactam antibiotics have been the antimicrobial agents of choice. Unfortunately, the efficacy of these life-saving antibiotics is significantly threatened by bacterial β-lactamases. β-Lactamases are now responsible for resistance to penicillins, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams, and carbapenems. In order to overcome β-lactamase-mediated resistance, β-lactamase inhibitors (clavulanate, sulbactam, and tazobactam) were introduced into clinical practice. These inhibitors greatly enhance the efficacy of their partner β-lactams (amoxicillin, ampicillin, piperacillin, and ticarcillin) in the treatment of serious Enterobacteriaceae and penicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. However, selective pressure from excess antibiotic use accelerated the emergence of resistance to β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. Furthermore, the prevalence of clinically relevant β-lactamases from other classes that are resistant to inhibition is rapidly increasing. There is an urgent need for effective inhibitors that can restore the activity of β-lactams. Here, we review the catalytic mechanisms of each β-lactamase class. We then discuss approaches for circumventing β-lactamase-mediated resistance, including properties and characteristics of mechanism-based inactivators. We next highlight the mechanisms of action and salient clinical and microbiological features of β-lactamase inhibitors. We also emphasize their therapeutic applications. We close by focusing on novel compounds and the chemical features of these agents that may contribute to a “second generation” of inhibitors. The goal for the next 3 decades will be to design inhibitors that will be effective for more than a single class of β-lactamases. PMID:20065329

  3. Trypsin Inhibitor in Mung Bean Cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Chrispeels, Maarten J.; Baumgartner, Bruno

    1978-01-01

    Trypsin inhibitor was purified to homogeneity from seeds of the mung bean (Vigna radiata [L.] Wilczek). The protease inhibitor has the following properties: inhibitory activity toward trypsin, but not toward chymotrypsin; isoelectric point at pH 5.05; molecular weight of 11,000 to 12,000 (sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis) or 14,000 (gel filtration); immunological cross-reactivity against extracts of black gram and black-eyed pea, but not against soybean; no inhibitory activity against vicilin peptidohydrolase, the principal endopeptidase in the cotyledons of mung bean seedlings. The trypsin inhibitor content of the cotyledons declines in the course of seedling growth and the presence of an inactivating factor can be demonstrated by incubating crude extracts in the presence of β-mercaptoethanol. This inactivating factor may be a protease as vicilin peptidohydrolase rapidly inactivates the trypsin inhibitor. Removal of trypsin inhibitory activity from crude extracts by means of a trypsin affinity column does not result in an enhancement of protease activity in the extracts. The intracellular localization of trypsin inhibitor was determined by fractionation of crude extracts on isopycnic sucrose gradients and by cytochemistry with fluorescent antibodies. Both methods indicate that trypsin inhibitor is associated with the cytoplasm and not with the protein bodies where reserve protein hydrolysis occurs. No convincing evidence was obtained which indicates that the catabolism of trypsin inhibitor during germination and seedling growth is causally related to the onset of reserve protein breakdown. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9 PMID:16660348

  4. Polyphenol oxidase inhibitor(s) from German cockroach (Blattella germanica) extract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An extract from German cockroach appears effective in inhibiting browning on apples and potatoes. Successful identification of inhibitor(s) of PPO from German cockroach would be useful to the fruit and vegetable segments of the food industry, due to the losses they incur from enzymatic browning. Ide...

  5. Management of protease inhibitor-associated hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Penzak, Scott R; Chuck, Susan K

    2002-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated serum levels of triglycerides and reduced levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, has been recognized in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It is thought that elevated levels of circulating cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-alpha, may alter lipid metabolism in patients with HIV infection. Protease inhibitors, such as saquinavir, indinavir and ritonavir, have been found to decrease mortality and improve quality of life in patients with HIV infection. However, these drugs have been associated with a syndrome of fat redistribution, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. Elevations in serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, along with dyslipidemia that typically occurs in patients with HIV infection, may predispose patients to complications such as premature atherosclerosis and pancreatitis. It has been estimated that hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia occur in greater than 50% of protease inhibitor recipients after 2 years of therapy, and that the risk of developing hyperlipidemia increases with the duration of treatment with protease inhibitors. In general, treatment of hyperlipidemia should follow National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines; efforts should be made to modify/control coronary heart disease risk factors (i.e. smoking; hypertension; diabetes mellitus) and maximize lifestyle modifications, primarily dietary intervention and exercise, in these patients. Where indicated, treatment usually consists of either pravastatin or atorvastatin for patients with elevated serum levels of LDL-C and/or total cholesterol. Atorvastatin is more potent in lowering serum total cholesterol and triglycerides compared with other hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, but it is also associated with more drug interactions compared with pravastatin. Simvastatin

  6. Rapid Release of Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, David L.; Yang, Wen-Kuang; Foard, Donald E.; Lin, K.-T. -Davis

    1978-01-01

    Specific antisera were prepared against the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor and four other trypsin inhibitors of low molecular weight isolated from soybeans (Glycine max L. cv. Tracy). These antisera were used to detect the presence and amount of the inhibitors in: (a) seeds and protein extracts of soybean meal; (b) seedlings; and (c) the water surrounding the seeds and roots of seedlings. Lectin activities in seeds, seedlings, and water were also determined at the same time as the protease inhibitor activities. By competitive inhibition of immunoprecipitation, the combined five low molecular weight protease inhibitors were found to constitute the following percentages of proteins (w/w): 6.3% in defatted soybean meal; 8.1% of the protein extracted from the meal by a buffer of pH 8.6; 8.3, 14.7, 15.2, 16.1, 17.2, and 18.9% of the protein in a lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, respectively; 8.2% in a lyophilisate of water in which roots of seedlings grew for 20 days; 1.5% in cotyledons; and less than 0.1% in epicotyls, hypocotyls, and roots of 12-day-old seedlings. Hemagglutination activities, expressed as the lowest amount of protein required to give a positive agglutination of 0.2 ml of 2% rabbit red blood cells, were as follows: purified soybean lectin, 0.08 μg; lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, 10, 2.5, 5, 5, and 2.5 μg, respectively; lyophilisate of water in which roots grew for 20 days, 5 μg; 12-day-old cotyledons, roots, epicotyls, and hypocotyls, 12.5, 100, >1,000, and >500 μg, respectively. The results indicate that a large amount of protease inhibitors as well as lectins are released from seeds during the first 8 hours of imbibition. Neither lima bean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 10,000) nor Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 21,500) showed competitive inhibition in tests with antisera against low molecular weight soybean protease inhibitors

  7. Inhibitors in LPE growth of garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roode, W. H.; Robertson, J. M.

    1983-09-01

    The growth rate of LPE growth garnets can be reduced considerably by the addition of small amounts of group II oxides. This effect can be helpful for the controlled growth of very thin garnet films for sub-micron bubbles and optical devices. The largest effect was found with the addition of Mg 2+ and Ca 2+, resulting in a maximum decrease of the growth rate of approximately 70%. A semi-empirical formula was used to describe the growth rate as a function of the dipping temperature. The change in the growth rate on the addition of the inhibitor ion at constant temperature was found to be proportional to ( aMO)/( aMO+2 Ln 2O 3), where M is a group II element, Ln 2O 2 is the sum of the yttrium and RE oxides in the melt, and a is the inhibitor factor. The value of the inhibitor factor depends on both the inhibitor ion as well as the composition of the garnet. The lowering of the growth rate on the addition of an inhibitor ion is explained by the introduction of an extra growth resistance due to the charge compensation mechanism of the divalent ions. The influence of the different charge compensation possibilities in the garnet system is examined and the relative importance of these possibilities for charge compensation is discussed.

  8. Inactivation of plasminogen activator inhibitor by oxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, D.A.; Loskutoff, D.J.

    1986-10-21

    The rapidly acting plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) purified from cultured bovine endothelial cells (BAEs) was inactivated during iodination with chloramine T and other oxidizing iodination systems. Inactivation was observed in the absence of iodine, suggesting that the loss of activity resulted from the oxidizing conditions employed. In an attempt to further study the nature of this inactivation, the PAI was treated with chloramine T under conditions that specifically oxidize methionine and cystein residues. Both PAI inhibitory activity and the ability of the PAI to form complexes with tissue-type PA were decreased in a dose-dependent manner by such treatment. PAI activity was measured with the lysis of /sup 125/I-labelled fibrin. The reductase is a DTT-dependent enzyme that specifically converts methionine sulfoxide to methionine. Little activity was restored by either the reductase or DTT alone. These results indicate that the oxidation of at least one critical methionine residue is responsible for the loss of PAI activity upon iodination. In this respect, the BAE PAI resembles ..cap alpha../sub 1/-protease inhibitor, a well-characterized elastase inhibitor that also is inactivated by oxidants. Both inhibitors are members of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily (Serpins), and both have a methionine residue in their reactive center.

  9. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined.

  10. Evolutionary mechanisms acting on proteinase inhibitor variability.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T

    2005-11-01

    The interaction of proteinase inhibitors produced, in most cases, by host organisms and the invasive proteinases of pathogens or parasites or the dietary proteinases of predators, results in an evolutionary 'arms race' of rapid and ongoing change in both interacting proteins. The importance of these interactions in pathogenicity and predation is indicated by the high level and diversity of observable evolutionary activity that has been found. At the initial level of evolutionary change, recruitment of other functional protein-folding families has occurred, with the more recent evolution of one class of proteinase inhibitor from another, using the same mechanism and proteinase contact residues. The combination of different inhibitor domains into a single molecule is also observed. The basis from which variation is possible is shown by the high rate of retention of gene duplication events and by the associated process of inhibitory domain multiplication. At this level of reorganization, mutually exclusive splicing is also observed. Finally, the major mechanism by which variation is achieved rapidly is hypervariation of contact residues, an almost ubiquitous feature of proteinase inhibitors. The diversity of evolutionary mechanisms in a single class of proteins is unlikely to be common, because few systems are under similar pressure to create variation. Proteinase inhibitors are therefore a potential model system in which to study basic evolutionary process such as functional diversification.

  11. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  12. Tyrosinase inhibitors from terrestrial and marine resources.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a multifunctional copper-containing enzyme widely distributed in plants and animals, which catalyzes both the hydroxylation of tyrosine into o-diphenols and the oxidation of o-diphenols into o-quinones. Tyrosinase is known to be a key enzyme for melanin biosynthesis in plants and animals. Tyrosinase inhibitors, therefore, can be clinically useful for the treatment of some dermatological disorders associated with melanin hyperpigmentation. They also find uses in cosmetics for whitening and depigmentation after sunburn. This review describes 236 compounds obtained from terrestrial and marine plants, animals, microorganisms and macrofungi which have been shown to inhibit tyrosinase. The mechanism of action of tyrosinase, together with the mode of action of inhibitors is described. The relative activities of the different compounds are recorded. The literature on plant-origin inhibitors is extensive, and their chemistry and biological activity have been intensively reviewed. This review will therefore be deliberately cover new classes of inhibitors from terrestrial and marine plants, animals, microorganisms and macrofungi, as well as the traditional classes. The present paper summarizes and discusses the scientific results on the discovery of natural tyrosinase inhibitors.

  13. Programmed death 1 immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Meghna S; Hoffner, Brianna; Winkelmann, Jennifer L; Abbott, Maura E; Hamid, Omid; Carvajal, Richard D

    2015-12-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is an immune checkpoint that provides inhibitory signals to the immune system in order to modulate the activity of T cells in peripheral tissues and maintain self-tolerance in the setting of infection and inflammation. In cancer, the immune checkpoints are exploited so that the tumor cells are able to evade the immune system. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are a type of cancer immunotherapy that targets pathways such as PD-1 in order to reinvigorate and enhance the immune response against tumor cells. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved 2 PD-1 inhibitors, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, and several others are under investigation. Although PD-1 inhibitors have demonstrated activity in many different types of malignancies, FDA approval has been granted only in melanoma and in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Identifying biomarkers that can predict response to PD-1 inhibitors is critical to maximizing the benefit of these agents. Future directions for PD-1 inhibitors include investigation of combination therapies, use in malignancies other than melanoma and NSCLC, and refinement of biomarkers.

  14. Progress towards clinically useful aldosterone synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the high degree of similarity between aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) and cortisol synthase (CYP11B1), the design of selective inhibitors of one or the other of these two enzymes was, at one time, thought to be impossible. Through development of novel enzyme screening assays and significant medicinal chemistry efforts, highly potent inhibitors of CYP11B2 have been identified with selectivities approaching 1000-fold between the two enzymes. Many of these molecules also possess selectivity against other steroidogenic cytochromes P450 (e.g. CYP17A1 and CYP19A1) as well as hepatic drug metabolizing P450s. Though not as well developed or explored, inhibitors of CYP11B1, with selectivities approaching 50-fold, have also been identified. The therapeutic benefits of affecting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been well established with the therapeutically useful angiotensin-converting enzymes inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. Data regarding the additional benefits of an aldosterone synthase inhibitor (ASi) are beginning to emerge from animal models and human clinical trials. Despite great promise and much progress, additional challenges still exist in the path towards development of a therapeutically useful ASi.

  15. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  16. Development and Characterization of Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Bo; Fonseca, Fabiana N.; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    Although many proteasome inhibitors have been either synthesized or identified from natural sources, the development of more sophisticated, selective proteasome inhibitors is important for a detailed understanding of proteasome function. We have found that antitumor natural product epoxomicin and eponemycin, both of which are linear peptides containing a α,β-epoxyketone pharmacophore, target proteasome for their antitumor activity. Structural studies of the proteasome–epoxomicin complex revealed that the unique specificity of the natural product toward proteasome is due to the α,β-epoxyketone pharmacophore, which forms an unusual six-membered morpholino ring with the amino terminal catalytic Thr-1 of the 20S proteasome. Thus, we believe that a facile synthetic approach for α,β-epoxyketone linear peptides provides a unique opportunity to develop proteasome inhibitors with novel activities. In this chapter, we discuss the detailed synthetic procedure of the α′,β′-epoxyketone natural product epoxomicin and its derivatives. PMID:16338383

  17. Novel pseudosymmetric inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, A.; Roesel, J.; Gruetter, M.; Tintelnot-Blomley, M.; Alteri, E.; Bold, G.; Lang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Taking into account the unique C-2 symmetric nature of the HIV-1 protease homodimer, the authors have designed and synthesized novel inhibitors featuring an almost symmetric structure. Compounds containing the easily accessible Phe[CH(OH)CH{sub 2}N(NH)]Cha dipeptide isostere as a nonhydrolyzable replacement of the scissile amide bond of the natural substrate are potent inhibitors in vitro with IC{sub 50} values of 9 to 50 nM. The antiviral activity depends mainly on the nature of the anylated valine residues linked to the dipeptide mimic. In this series, CGP 53820 combines both high potency and excellent specificity. Its predicted symmetric binding pattern is illustrated by the X-ray structure analysis performed with the corresponding enzyme-inhibitor complex.

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: promise or peril?

    PubMed Central

    Mengle-Gaw, Laurel J; Schwartz, Benjamin D

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of two isoforms of the cyclooxygenase enzyme, COX-1 and COX-2, and the development of COX-2-specific inhibitors as anti-inflammatories and analgesics have offered great promise that the therapeutic benefits of NSAIDs could be optimized through inhibition of COX-2, while minimizing their adverse side effect profile associated with inhibition of COX-1. While COX-2 specific inhibitors have proven to be efficacious in a variety of inflammatory conditions, exposure of large numbers of patients to these drugs in postmarketing studies have uncovered potential safety concerns that raise questions about the benefit/risk ratio of COX-2-specific NSAIDs compared to conventional NSAIDs. This article reviews the efficacy and safety profiles of COX-2-specific inhibitors, comparing them with conventional NSDAIDs. PMID:12467519

  19. Computational inhibitor design against malaria plasmepsins.

    PubMed

    Bjelic, S; Nervall, M; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, H; Ersmark, K; Hallberg, A; Aqvist, J

    2007-09-01

    Plasmepsins are aspartic proteases involved in the degradation of the host cell hemoglobin that is used as a food source by the malaria parasite. Plasmepsins are highly promising as drug targets, especially when combined with the inhibition of falcipains that are also involved in hemoglobin catabolism. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of plasmepsins I-IV in view of the interest in transition state mimetics as potential compounds for lead development. Inhibitor development against plasmepsin II as well as relevant crystal structures are summarized in order to give an overview of the field. Application of computational techniques, especially binding affinity prediction by the linear interaction energy method, in the development of malarial plasmepsin inhibitors has been highly successful and is discussed in detail. Homology modeling and molecular docking have been useful in the current inhibitor design project, and the combination of such methods with binding free energy calculations is analyzed.

  20. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors and diabetes therapy.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Christopher H S

    2008-01-01

    Current type 2 diabetes therapies are mainly targeted at stimulating pancreatic beta-cell secretion and reducing insulin resistance. A number of alternative therapies are currently being developed to take advantage of the actions of the incretin hormones Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide (GIP). These hormones are released from the small intestine in response to nutrient ingestion and stimulate insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. One approach to potentiating their actions is based on inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), the major enzyme responsible for degrading the incretins in vivo. DPP IV exhibits characteristics that have allowed the development of specific orally administered inhibitors with proven efficacy in improving glucose tolerance in animal models of diabetes. A number of clinical trials have demonstrated that DPP IV inhibitors are effective in improving glucose disposal and reducing hemoglobin A1c levels in type 2 diabetic patients and one inhibitor, sitagliptin, is now in therapeutic use, with others likely to receive FDA approval in the near future. Studies aimed at elucidating the mode of action of the inhibitors are still ongoing. Both enhancement of insulin secretion and reduction in glucagon secretion, resulting from the blockade of incretin degradation, are believed to play important roles in DPP IV inhibitor action. Preclinical studies indicate that increased levels of incretins improve beta-cell secretory function and exert effects on beta-cell mitogenesis and survival that can preserve beta-cell mass. Roles for other hormones, neuropeptides and cytokines in DPP IV inhibitor-medicated responses are also possible.

  1. Gerosuppression by pan-mTOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Leontieva, Olga V.; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin slows organismal aging and delays age-related diseases, extending lifespan in numerous species. In cells, rapamycin and other rapalogs such as everolimus suppress geroconversion from quiescence to senescence. Rapamycin inhibits some, but not all, activities of mTOR. Recently we and others demonstrated that pan-mTOR inhibitors, known also as dual mTORC1/C2 inhibitors, suppress senescent phenotype. As a continuation of these studies, here we investigated in detail a panel of pan-mTOR inhibitors, to determine their optimal gerosuppressive concentrations. During geroconversion, cells become hypertrophic and flat, accumulate lysosomes (SA-beta-Gal staining) and lipids (Oil Red staining) and lose their re-proliferative potential (RPP). We determined optimal gerosuppressive concentrations: Torin1 (30 nM), Torin 2 (30 nM), AZD8055 (100 nM), PP242 (300 nM), both KU-006379 and GSK1059615 (1000 nM). These agents decreased senescence-associated hypertrophy with IC50s: 20, 18, 15, 200 and 400 nM, respectively. Preservation of RPP by pan-mTOR inhibitors was associated with inhibition of the pS6K/pS6 axis. Inhibition of rapamycin-insensitive functions of mTOR further contributed to anti-hypertrophic and cytostatic effects. Torin 1 and PP242 were more “rapamycin-like” than Torin 2 and AZD8055. Pan-mTOR inhibitors were superior to rapamycin in suppressing hypertrophy, senescent morphology, Oil Red O staining and in increasing so-called “chronological life span (CLS)”. We suggest that, at doses lower than anti-cancer concentrations, pan-mTOR inhibitors can be developed as anti-aging drugs. PMID:28077803

  2. Therapeutic potential of monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Melinda M; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-03-19

    Marijuana and aspirin have been used for millennia to treat a wide range of maladies including pain and inflammation. Both cannabinoids, like marijuana, that exert anti-inflammatory action through stimulating cannabinoid receptors, and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, like aspirin, that suppress pro-inflammatory eicosanoid production have shown beneficial outcomes in mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Both cannabinoids and COX inhibitors, however, have untoward effects that discourage their chronic usage, including cognitive deficits and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered that the serine hydrolase monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) links the endocannabinoid and eicosanoid systems together through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) to provide the major arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pools for pro-inflammatory eicosanoid synthesis in specific tissues. Studies in recent years have shown that MAGL inhibitors elicit anti-nociceptive, anxiolytic, and anti-emetic responses and attenuate precipitated withdrawal symptoms in addiction paradigms through enhancing endocannabinoid signaling. MAGL inhibitors have also been shown to exert anti-inflammatory action in the brain and protect against neurodegeneration through lowering eicosanoid production. In cancer, MAGL inhibitors have been shown to have anti-cancer properties not only through modulating the endocannabinoid-eicosanoid network, but also by controlling fatty acid release for the synthesis of protumorigenic signaling lipids. Thus, MAGL serves as a critical node in simultaneously coordinating multiple lipid signaling pathways in both physiological and disease contexts. This review will discuss the diverse (patho)physiological roles of MAGL and the therapeutic potential of MAGL inhibitors in treating a vast array of complex human diseases.

  3. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The design, development and clinical success of HIV protease inhibitors represent one of the most remarkable achievements of molecular medicine. This review describes all nine currently available FDA-approved protease inhibitors, discusses their pharmacokinetic properties, off-target activities, side-effects, and resistance profiles. The compounds in the various stages of clinical development are also introduced, as well as alternative approaches, aiming at other functional domains of HIV PR. The potential of these novel compounds to open new way to the rational drug design of human viruses is critically assessed. PMID:21994591

  4. Seminal and colostral protease inhibitors on leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Veselský, L; Cechová, D; Hruban, V; Klaudy, J

    1982-01-01

    For detection of protease inhibitors from cow colostrum (CTI) and bull seminal plasma (BUSI I and BUSI II) on the surface of leukocytes, immunological methods were used. An agglutination and an immunofluorescence test demonstrated components on the surface of bovine, porcine and ovine granulocytes and lymphocytes which were immunologically identical with the protease inhibitors isolated from cow colostrum and bull seminal plasma. When antisera against (CTI, BUSI and BUSI II were absorbed by bovine and porcine liver, kidney and spleen homogenate or by bovine and porcine granulocytes or lymphocytes, the immunological tests were negative.

  5. Presence of aromatase inhibitors in cycads.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M T; Itzhak, Y; Puett, D

    1995-07-28

    Cycads, the most primitive of the living gymnosperms, have been used and continue to be used for food and medicinal purposes by many cultures, although toxins must be removed before ingestion. In our quest to identify tropical plants that contain inhibitors of the cytochrome P-450 aromatase and thus may be efficacious in treating estrogen-dependent tumors, we have screened extracts from 5 species of cycad folia encompassing 3 genera: Cycas cairnsiana F. Muell., Cycas revoluta Thunb., Cycas rumphii Miq., Dioon spinulosum Dyer and Encephalartos ferox Bertol. All extracts were found to contain inhibitors of the human enzyme.

  6. Small molecule inhibitors of ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Picazo, Edwige; Giordanetto, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Ebola viruses are extremely virulent and highly transmissible. They are responsible for sporadic outbreaks of severe hemorrhagic fevers with human mortality rates of up to 90%. No prophylactic or therapeutic treatments in the form of vaccine, biologicals or small molecule, currently exist. Yet, a wealth of antiviral research on ebola virus is being generated and potential inhibitors have been identified in biological screening and medicinal chemistry programs. Here, we detail the state-of-the-art in small molecule inhibitors of ebola virus infection, with >60 examples, including approved drugs, compounds currently in clinical trials, and more exploratory leads, and summarize the associated in vitro and in vivo evidence for their effectiveness.

  7. Diphenylpyrazoles as Replication Protein A inhibitors

    DOE PAGES

    Waterson, Alex G.; Kennedy, J. Phillip; Patrone, James D.; ...

    2014-11-11

    Replication Protein A is the primary eukaryotic ssDNA binding protein that has a central role in initiating the cellular response to DNA damage. RPA recruits multiple proteins to sites of DNA damage via the N-terminal domain of the 70 kDa subunit (RPA70N). Here we describe the optimization of a diphenylpyrazole carboxylic acid series of inhibitors of these RPA–protein interactions. Lastly, we evaluated substituents on the aromatic rings as well as the type and geometry of the linkers used to combine fragments, ultimately leading to submicromolar inhibitors of RPA70N protein–protein interactions.

  8. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bork, Konrad

    2013-11-01

    Until recently it was assumed that hereditary angioedema was a disease that results exclusively from a genetic deficiency of the C1 inhibitor. In 2000, families with hereditary angioedema, normal C1 inhibitor activity, and protein in plasma were described. Since then, numerous patients and families with that condition have been reported. Most of the patients were women. In many of the affected women, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy containing estrogens, and pregnancies triggered the clinical symptoms. In some families mutations in the coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) gene were detected.

  9. Identification of potent, selective KDM5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Victor S; Bellon, Steven F; Harmange, Jean-Christophe; LeBlanc, Yves; Poy, Florence; Odate, Shobu; Buker, Shane; Lan, Fei; Arora, Shilpi; Williamson, Kaylyn E; Sandy, Peter; Cummings, Richard T; Bailey, Christopher M; Bergeron, Louise; Mao, Weifeng; Gustafson, Amy; Liu, Yichin; VanderPorten, Erica; Audia, James E; Trojer, Patrick; Albrecht, Brian K

    2016-09-01

    This communication describes the identification and optimization of a series of pan-KDM5 inhibitors derived from compound 1, a hit initially identified against KDM4C. Compound 1 was optimized to afford compound 20, a 10nM inhibitor of KDM5A. Compound 20 is highly selective for the KDM5 enzymes versus other histone lysine demethylases and demonstrates activity in a cellular assay measuring the increase in global histone 3 lysine 4 tri-methylation (H3K4me3). In addition compound 20 has good ADME properties, excellent mouse PK, and is a suitable starting point for further optimization.

  10. Antiviral cytokines induce hepatic expression of the granzyme B inhibitors, proteinase inhibitor 9 and serine proteinase inhibitor 6.

    PubMed

    Barrie, Mahmoud B; Stout, Heather W; Abougergi, Marwan S; Miller, Bonnie C; Thiele, Dwain L

    2004-05-15

    Expression of the granzyme B inhibitors, human proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI-9), or the murine orthologue, serine proteinase inhibitor 6 (SPI-6), confers resistance to CTL or NK killing by perforin- and granzyme-dependent effector mechanisms. In light of prior studies indicating that virally infected hepatocytes are selectively resistant to this CTL effector mechanism, the present studies investigated PI-9 and SPI-6 expression in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells in response to adenoviral infection and to cytokines produced during antiviral immune responses. Neither PI-9 nor SPI-6 expression was detected by immunoblotting in uninfected murine or human hepatocytes. Similarly, human Huh-7 hepatoma cells were found to express only very low levels of PI-9 relative to levels detected in perforin- and granzyme-resistant CTL or lymphokine-activated killer cells. Following in vivo adenoviral infection or in vitro culture with IFN-alphabeta or IFN-gamma, SPI-6 expression was induced in murine hepatocytes. Similarly, after culture with IFN-alpha, induction of PI-9 mRNA and protein expression was observed in human hepatocytes and Huh-7 cells. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha also induced 4- to 10-fold higher levels of PI-9 mRNA expression in Huh-7 cells, whereas levels of mRNA encoding a related serine proteinase inhibitor, proteinase inhibitor 8, were unaffected by culture of Huh-7 cells with IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, or TNF-alpha. These findings indicate that cytokines that promote antiviral cytopathic responses also regulate expression of the cytoprotective molecules, PI-9 and SPI-6, in hepatocytes that are potential targets of CTL and NK effector mechanisms.

  11. The Use of Inhibitors of Mechanosensitive Ion Channels as Local Inhibitors of Peripheral Pain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    currents are more closely associated with  nociception .  Although the current associated with the two main types of  pain  are not restricted to a...Mechanosensitive Ion Channels as Local Inhibitors of Peripheral Pain . PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Frederick Sachs CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: State...The Use of Inhibitors of Mechanosensitive Ion Channels as Local Inhibitors of 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Peripheral Pain . 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11

  12. [Application of process engineering to remove lignocellulose fermentation inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Xia, Menglei; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Fermentation inhibitors are toxic to cells, which is one of the bottlenecks for lignocellulose bio-refinery process. How to remove those inhibitors serves a key role in the bioconversion of lignocellulose. This article reviews the sources and the types of the inhibitors, especially the updated removal strategies including physical methods, chemical methods, biological methods and inhibitor-tolerant strain construction strategies. Based on these, we introduce a new bio-refinery model named "fractional conversion", which reduces the production of inhibitors at pretreatment stage, and a novel in situ detoxification method named "fermentation promoter exploitation technology". This review could provide new research ideas on the removal of fermentation inhibitors.

  13. Aurora kinase inhibitors as anticancer molecules.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sen, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases are important regulators of mitosis that are frequently over expressed in human cancers and have been implicated in oncogenic transformation including development of chromosomal instability in cancer cells. In humans, among the three members of the kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, only Aurora-A and -B are expressed at detectable levels in all somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division and have been characterized in greater detail for their involvement in cellular pathways relevant to the development of cancer associated phenotypes. Aurora-A and -B are being investigated as potential targets for anticancer therapy. Development of inhibitors against Aurora kinases as anticancer molecules gained attention because of the facts that aberrant expression of these kinases leads to chromosomal instability and derangement of multiple tumor suppressor and oncoprotein regulated pathways. Preclinical studies and early phase I and II clinical trials of multiple Aurora kinase inhibitors as targeted anticancer drugs have provided encouraging results. This article discusses functional involvement of Aurora kinase-A and -B in the regulation of cancer relevant cellular phenotypes together with findings on some of the better characterized Aurora kinase inhibitors in modulating the functional interactions of Aurora kinases. Future possibilities about developing next generation Aurora kinase inhibitors and their clinical utility as anticancer therapeutic drugs are also discussed.

  14. Investigational protease inhibitors as antiretroviral therapies

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Narasimha M.; Patters, Benjamin J.; Rao, PSS; Cory, Theodore J.; Kumar, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) has tremendously improved the life expectancy of the HIV-infected population over the past three decades. Protease inhibitors have been one of the major classes of drugs in HAART regimens that are effective in treating HIV. However, the emergence of resistance and cross-resistance against protease inhibitors encourages researchers to develop new PIs with broad-spectrum activity, as well as novel means of enhancing the efficacy of existing PIs. Areas covered In this article we discuss recent advances in HIV protease inhibitor (PI) development, focusing on both investigational and experimental agents. We also include a section on pharmacokinetic booster drugs for improved bioavailability of protease inhibitors. Further, we discuss novel drug delivery systems using a variety of nanocarriers for the delivery of PIs across the blood-brain barrier to treat the HIV in the brain. Expert opinion We discuss our opinion on the promises and challenges on the development of novel investigational and experimental PIs that are less toxic and more effective in combating drug-resistance. Further, we discuss the future of novel nanocarriers that have been developed to deliver PIs to the brain cells. Although these are promising findings, many challenges need to be overcome prior to making them a viable option. PMID:27415449

  15. FAAH inhibitors in the limelight, but regrettably

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Christophe; Dubray, Claude; Dualé, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. This short review focuses on the recent drug development of FAAH inhibitors, as recent serious adverse events have been reported in a phase I study with a compound of this class. The authors overview the potential interest in targeting FAAH inhibition, the current programs, and the available information on the recent dramatic events. PMID:27191771

  16. Polyphenolic Compounds as Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Tina; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and its associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart diseases are a major challenge for our society. An important target for the treatment of obesity includes the development of inhibitors of nutrient digestion and absorption. Inhibition of pancreatic lipase and the associated reduction of lipid absorption is an attractive approach for the discovery of potent agents. Currently, the only clinically approved pharmacologic agent as pancreatic lipase inhibitor is Orlistat. However, its usage is compromised by unpleasant gastrointestinal adverse reactions (oily stools, oily spotting, flatulence). The use of botanical materials as a potential source of new drugs is of increasing importance and application. Natural products that are interesting for obesity treatment are generally considered to have less toxic and side effects than totally synthetic drugs. One of the most important sources of potential pancreatic lipase inhibitors represents the class of polyphenols. This article summarizes most studied subclasses of polyphenols including flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids and lignans with pancreatic lipase inhibitory effects. A structural comparison of potent inhibitors shows an increased inhibitory effect depending on number and position of phenolic hydroxyl groups, degree of polymerization and elimination of glycosylation during digestion.

  17. [Mechanisms and efficacy of SGLT2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Shiba, Teruo

    2015-03-01

    SGLT2 is a low affinity, high capacity glucose co-transporter, almost exclusively expressed in the kidney cortex. Inhibition of SGLT2 has been shown to increase the daily 50g or more urinary glucose excretion, as compared to placebo, leading to a reduction in blood glucose levels and indicated only for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In Japan 6 species of SGLT2 inhibitors have already been sold and reported to results in a decrease of FPG by 14.4 to 45.8 (mg/dL), in a reduction of HbA1c by 0.35 to 1.24% and in loss of body weight by 1.29 to 2.50(kg). There is less effect of the SGLT2 inhibitor in diabetic subjects with renal impairment and the reduction in HbA1c and FPG will be approximately half of the average in those with 30 ≤ eGFR ≤ 59. The position of SGLT2 inhibitors would be considered as the drug administered in combination or add-on therapy when the young obese type 2 diabetics without renal impairment has not yet reached to the glycemic target with other drugs although in AACE consensus statement of 2013, it has been shelved for inexperienced use with respect to the positioning of the SGLT2 inhibitors.

  18. Shark cartilage contains inhibitors of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, A; Langer, R

    1983-09-16

    Shark cartilage contains a substance that strongly inhibits the growth of new blood vessels toward solid tumors, thereby restricting tumor growth. The abundance of this factor in shark cartilage, in contrast to cartilage from mammalian sources, may make sharks an ideal source of the inhibitor and may help to explain the rarity of neoplasms in these animals.

  19. Subtilisin protein inhibitor from potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Revina, T A; Speranskaya, A S; Kladnitskaya, G V; Shevelev, A B; Valueva, T A

    2004-10-01

    A protein with molecular weight of 21 kD denoted as PKSI has been isolated from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Istrinskii). The isolation procedure includes precipitation with (NH4)2SO4, gel chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and ion-exchange chromatography on CM-Sepharose CL-6B. The protein effectively inhibits the activity of subtilisin Carlsberg (Ki = 1.67 +/- 0.2 nM) by stoichiometric complexing with the enzyme at the molar ratio of 1 : 1. The inhibitor has no effect on trypsin, chymotrypsin, and the cysteine proteinase papain. The N-terminal sequence of the protein consists of 19 amino acid residues and is highly homologous to sequences of the known inhibitors from group C of the subfamily of potato Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitors (PKPIs-C). By cloning PCR products from the genomic DNA of potato, a gene denoted as PKPI-C2 was isolated and sequenced. The N-terminal sequence (residues from 15 to 33) of the protein encoded by the PKPI-C2 gene is identical to the N-terminal sequence (residues from 1 to 19) of the isolated protein PKSI. Thus, the inhibitor PKSI is very likely encoded by this gene.

  20. Phenyltriazolinones as potent factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quan, Mimi L; Pinto, Donald J P; Rossi, Karen A; Sheriff, Steven; Alexander, Richard S; Amparo, Eugene; Kish, Kevin; Knabb, Robert M; Luettgen, Joseph M; Morin, Paul; Smallwood, Angela; Woerner, Francis J; Wexler, Ruth R

    2010-02-15

    We have discovered that phenyltriazolinone is a novel and potent P1 moiety for coagulation factor Xa. X-ray structures of the inhibitors with a phenyltriazolinone in the P1 position revealed that the side chain of Asp189 has reoriented resulting in a novel S1 binding pocket which is larger in size to accommodate the phenyltriazolinone P1 substrate.

  1. Inhibition of HIV-1 by fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eggink, Dirk; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W

    2010-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) is responsible for entry of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into cells by mediating attachment to target cells and subsequent membrane fusion. Env consists of three gp120 subunits that mediate receptor and co-receptor attachment and three gp41 subunits responsible for membrane fusion. Several steps of the entry process can serve as drug targets. Receptor antagonists prevent attachment of gp120 to the receptor or co-receptor and conformational changes within gp41 required for membrane fusion can be inhibited by fusion inhibitors. Enfuvirtide (T20, Fuzeon) is a peptide based on the gp41 sequence and is the only approved fusion inhibitor. It prevents membrane fusion by competitively binding to gp41 and blocking the formation of the post-fusion structure. New generations of T20-like peptides have been developed with improved potency and stability. Besides T20 and derivatives, other fusion inhibitors have been developed that target different domains of gp41. Here we discuss the development of fusion inhibitors, their mode of action and their potential for incorporation in future drug regimens.

  2. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  3. Fused thiophene derivatives as MEK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Laing, Victoria E; Brookings, Daniel C; Carbery, Rachel J; Simorte, Jose Gascon; Hutchings, Martin C; Langham, Barry J; Lowe, Martin A; Allen, Rodger A; Fetterman, Joanne R; Turner, James; Meier, Christoph; Kennedy, Jeff; Merriman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A number of novel fused thiophene derivatives have been prepared and identified as potent inhibitors of MEK. The SAR data of selected examples and the in vivo profiling of compound 13 h demonstrates the functional activity of this class of compounds in HT-29 PK/PD models.

  4. [Safety of the proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa Espinoza, Teodoro Julio

    2011-01-01

    Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI) are consumed by millions of people around the world, either by prescription or self-medication, some medications of this group are Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. PPIs have been associated with hypergastrinemia, rebound acid hypersecretion, malabsorption, osteoporosis and infections. This is an updated review of clinical pharmacology aspects of IPBS, with emphasis on safety aspects.

  5. [Letter: Ovulation inhibitors and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Mehnert, H

    1975-11-14

    Juvenile diabetes mellitus is discussed as a contraindication for treatment with ovulation inhibitors. It is held that the risks of oral contraception must be balanced with the risks of pregnancy in each individual case. The advantages and disadvantages of sterilization and of other methods of birth control must also be weighed. No general rule can be given; each case must be considered individually.

  6. Aurora Kinase inhibitors as Anticancer Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sen, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases are important regulators of mitosis that are frequently over expressed in human cancers and have been implicated in oncogenic transformation including development of chromosomal instability in cancer cells. In humans, among the three members of the kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, only Aurora-A and -B are expressed in detectable levels in somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division and have been characterized in greater detail for their involvement in cellular pathways relevant to the development of cancer associated phenotypes. Aurora-A and -B are being investigated as potential targets for anticancer therapy. Development of inhibitors against Aurora kinases as anticancer molecules gained attention because of the facts that aberrant expression of these kinases lead to chromosomal instability and derangement of multiple tumor suppressor and oncoprotein regulated pathways. Pre-clinical studies and early phase I and II clinical trials of multiple Aurora kinase inhibitors as targeted anticancer drugs have provided encouraging results. This article discusses functional involvement of Aurora kinase-A and -B in the regulation of cancer relevant cellular phenotypes together with findings on some of the better characterized Aurora kinase inhibitors in modulating the functional interactions of Aurora kinases. Future possibilities about developing next generation Aurora kinase inhibitors and their clinical utility as anticancer therapeutic drugs are also discussed. PMID:20863917

  7. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  8. [Clinical cases of acquired coagulation inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Hino, M; Ota, K; Akahori, M; Hirai, M; Inoue, T; Mugitani, A; Tatsumi, N

    2000-12-01

    The acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are classified into alloantibodies, which appear in association with supplementary treatment for congenital coagulation factor deficiency, and autoantibodies, which are spontaneously produced. We report here 2 cases of acquired factor VIII inhibitor and 1 case of factor V inhibitor. Case 1: A 52-year-old woman noted swelling of the right parotid region in March 1988. Though contrast examination was scheduled, she was admitted for detailed examination due to a markedly prolonged coagulation time. An APTT correction test suggested that decreased factor VIII activity was due to the presence of an inhibitor. Since antinuclear antibody and SS-A antibody were positive and infiltration by lymphocytes in the salivary gland acini in a lip biopsy specimen was detected, Sjögren's syndrome was diagnosed. Case 2: A 33-year-old woman had normal delivery of her second child in February 1998. In June 1998, she suffered slight contusion in the left lower limb. The affected site became swollen and painful, making walking difficult. Since both upper limbs became markedly swollen after 1 week, she visited our hospital. Prolonged APTT and a marked decrease in factor VIII activity were observed. Factor VIII inhibitor titer was high at 19 Bethesda units. Case 3: A 64-year-old man had had asymptomatic macroscopic hematuria since the beginning of August 1998 but was placed under observation since no abnormal findings were observed on various imaging tests. However, he was admitted to Osaka City General Medical Center because of vesicular tamponade. Factor V activity was markedly decreased to 1.0%. PT correction test suggested that decreased factor V activity was due to the presence of an inhibitor. The underlying disease could not be determined in this case. In patients with acquired coagulation inhibitors, bleeding symptoms are reported to be mild in many cases, and severe bleeding is rare. However, cases of death without severe bleeding or

  9. DNA Methyltransferases Inhibitors from Natural Sources.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, Clemens; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the methylation at cytosine-C5 mainly in a CpG dinucleotide context. Although DNA methylation is essential for fundamental processes like embryonic development or differentiation, aberrant expression and/or activities of DNMTs are involved in several pathologies, from neurodegeneration to cancer. DNMTs inhibition can arrest tumor growth, cells invasiveness and induce differentiation, whereas their increased expression is shown in numerous cancer types. Moreover, hypermethylated promoters of tumor suppressor genes lead to their silencing. Hence, the use of specific inhibitors of DNMT might reactivate those genes and stop or even reverse the aberrant cell processes. To date, the only approved DNMTs inhibitors for therapy belong to the nucleoside-based family of drugs, but they display relevant side effects as well as high chemical instability. Thus, there is a keen interest actually exists to develop novel, potent and safe inhibitors possessing a nonnucleoside structure. Increasing literature evidence is highlighting that natural sources could help the researchers to achieve this goal. Indeed, several polyphenols, flavonoids, antraquinones, and others are described able to inhibit DNMTs activity and/or expression, thus decreasing the methylation/silencing of different genes involved in tumorigenesis. These events can lead to re-expression of such genes and to cell death in diverse cancer cell lines. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (1) and laccaic acid A (11) resulted the most effective DNMT1 inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, acting as competitive inhibitors. Compound 1 and 11 both displayed gene demethylation and re-activation in several cancers. However, all of the natural compounds described in this review showed important results, from gene reactivation to cell growth inhibition. Moreover, some of them displayed interesting activity even in rodent cancer models and very recently entered clinical trials.

  10. Cost of care of haemophilia with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, M N D; Di Minno, G; Di Capua, M; Cerbone, A M; Coppola, A

    2010-01-01

    In Western countries, the treatment of patients with inhibitors is presently the most challenging and serious issue in haemophilia management, direct costs of clotting factor concentrates accounting for >98% of the highest economic burden absorbed for the healthcare of patients in this setting. Being designed to address questions of resource allocation and effectiveness, decision models are the golden standard to reliably assess the overall economic implications of haemophilia with inhibitors in terms of mortality, bleeding-related morbidity, and severity of arthropathy. However, presently, most data analyses stem from retrospective short-term evaluations, that only allow for the analysis of direct health costs. In the setting of chronic diseases, the cost-utility analysis, that takes into account the beneficial effects of a given treatment/healthcare intervention in terms of health-related quality of life, is likely to be the most appropriate approach. To calculate net benefits, the quality adjusted life year, that significantly reflects such health gain, has to be compared with specific economic impacts. Differences in data sources, in medical practice and/or in healthcare systems and costs, imply that most current pharmacoeconomic analyses are confined to a narrow healthcare payer perspective. Long-term/lifetime prospective or observational studies, devoted to a careful definition of when to start a treatment; of regimens (dose and type of product) to employ, and of inhibitor population (children/adults, low-responding/high responding inhibitors) to study, are thus urgently needed to allow for newer insights, based on reliable data sources into resource allocation, effectiveness and cost-utility analysis in the treatment of haemophiliacs with inhibitors.

  11. Noncovalent inhibitors of human 20S and 26S proteasome based on trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1.

    PubMed

    Dębowski, Dawid; Cichorek, Mirosława; Lubos, Marta; Wójcik, Sławomir; Łęgowska, Anna; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Sunflower trypsin inhibitor (SFTI-1) is recognized as an attractive scaffold to designed potent inhibitors of various proteases. We have recently found that its analogues inhibit noncovalently both human and yeast 20S proteasomes. Here, a set of novel and more potent in vitro inhibitors is presented. The inhibitory potency of the peptides was assessed with human 20S proteasome in the presence or absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and with human 26 proteasome. Their antiproliferative action against tumor (human melanoma cells A375) and normal cells (46 BR.1N human fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes) was determined. The selected fluoresceine-labeled inhibitors were able to internalize into A375 cells and were sometimes present as foci in the cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 685-696, 2016.

  12. Neuroprotective Tri- and Tetracyclic BChE Inhibitors Releasing Reversible Inhibitors upon Carbamate Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tri- and tetracyclic nitrogen-bridgehead compounds were designed and synthesized to yield micromolar cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors. Structure–activity relationships identified potent compounds with butyrylcholinesterase selectivity. These compounds were selected as starting points for the design and synthesis of carbamate-based (pseudo)irreversible inhibitors. Compounds with superior inhibitory activity and selectivity were obtained and kinetically characterized also with regard to the velocity of enzyme carbamoylation. Structural elements were identified and introduced that additionally showed neuroprotective properties on a hippocampal neuronal cell line (HT-22) after glutamate-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. We have identified potent and selective pseudoirreversible butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors that release reversible inhibitors with neuroprotective properties after carbamate transfer to the active site of cholinesterases. PMID:24900407

  13. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A; Gray, Nathanael S

    2014-11-11

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a "DFG-out" covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket.

  14. ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Halasi, Marianna; Wang, Ming; Chavan, Tanmay S; Gaponenko, Vadim; Hay, Nissim; Gartel, Andrei L

    2013-09-01

    NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) is commonly used to identify and test ROS (reactive oxygen species) inducers, and to inhibit ROS. In the present study, we identified inhibition of proteasome inhibitors as a novel activity of NAC. Both NAC and catalase, another known scavenger of ROS, similarly inhibited ROS levels and apoptosis associated with H₂O₂. However, only NAC, and not catalase or another ROS scavenger Trolox, was able to prevent effects linked to proteasome inhibition, such as protein stabilization, apoptosis and accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. These observations suggest that NAC has a dual activity as an inhibitor of ROS and proteasome inhibitors. Recently, NAC was used as a ROS inhibitor to functionally characterize a novel anticancer compound, piperlongumine, leading to its description as a ROS inducer. In contrast, our own experiments showed that this compound depicts features of proteasome inhibitors including suppression of FOXM1 (Forkhead box protein M1), stabilization of cellular proteins, induction of ROS-independent apoptosis and enhanced accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. In addition, NAC, but not catalase or Trolox, interfered with the activity of piperlongumine, further supporting that piperlongumine is a proteasome inhibitor. Most importantly, we showed that NAC, but not other ROS scavengers, directly binds to proteasome inhibitors. To our knowledge, NAC is the first known compound that directly interacts with and antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that, as a result of the dual nature of NAC, data interpretation might not be straightforward when NAC is utilized as an antioxidant to demonstrate ROS involvement in drug-induced apoptosis.

  15. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R.; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G.; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S.; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a “DFG-out” covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:25349422

  16. The Use of Inhibitors of Mechanosensitive Ion Channels as Local Inhibitors of Peripheral Pain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Mechanosensitive Ion Channels as Local Inhibitors of Peripheral Pain PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Frederick Sachs, Ph.D...NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0125 Peripheral Pain 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Frederick Sachs, Thomas Suchyna, Phillip...mechanically sensitive excitatory ion channels (MSC) in the pathology of chronic pain , and the use of a small peptide inhibitor of these channels called GsMTx4

  17. Screening for Inhibitors of Essential Leishmania Glucose Transporters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    4 Introduction: Leishmania are parasitic protozoa that cause devastating diseases throughout much of the tropical and subtropical...inhibitors was dem inhibitor of PfHT. . Introduction Parasitic protozoa such as Leishmania species, Trypanosoma rucei, and Plasmodium falciparum, the

  18. Effervescent Cationic Film Forming Corrosion Inhibitor Material and Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-24

    corrosion 13 inhibitor material into the water to form a solution that coats 14 the exposed aluminum surfaces of the weapon with a cation film of 15 the corrosion inhibitor material. 14 OD~ ODV DATE:W

  19. SGLT2 inhibitors: molecular design and potential differences in effect.

    PubMed

    Isaji, Masayuki

    2011-03-01

    The physiological and pathological handling of glucose via sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) in the kidneys has been evolving, and SGLT2 inhibitors have been focused upon as a novel drug for treating diabetes. SGLT2 inhibitors enhance renal glucose excretion by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. Consequently, SGLT2 inhibitors reduce plasma glucose insulin independently and improve insulin resistance in diabetes. To date, various SGLT2 inhibitors have been developed and evaluated in clinical studies. The potency and positioning of SGLT2 inhibitors as an antidiabetic drug are dependent on their characteristic profile, which induces selectivity, efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and safety. This profile decides which SGLT2 inhibitors can be expected for application of the theoretical concept of reducing renal glucose reabsorption for the treatment of diabetes. I review the structure and advancing profile of various SGLT2 inhibitors, comparing their similarities and differences, and discuss the expected SGLT2 inhibitors for an emerging category of antidiabetic drugs.

  20. Comparative study on the protease inhibitors from fish eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustadi; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    The protease inhibitor was purified from five different fish eggs. The molecular weights of Pacific herring, chum salmon, pond smelt, glassfish, and Alaska pollock egg protease inhibitors were 120, 89, 84.5, 17, and l6.8kDa, respectively. The specific inhibitory activity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor was the highest followed by those of Pacific herring and Alaska pollock in order. The specific inhibitory activity and purity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor were 19.70 Umg-1 protein and 164.70 folds of purification, respectively. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was reasonably stable at 50-65°C and pH 8, which was more stable at high temperature and pH than protease inhibitors from the other fish species. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was noncompetitive with inhibitor constant ( K i) of 4.44 nmolL-1.

  1. DNA-linked Inhibitor Antibody Assay (DIANA) for sensitive and selective enzyme detection and inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    Navrátil, Václav; Schimer, Jiří; Tykvart, Jan; Knedlík, Tomáš; Vik, Viktor; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Human diseases are often diagnosed by determining levels of relevant enzymes and treated by enzyme inhibitors. We describe an assay suitable for both ultrasensitive enzyme quantification and quantitative inhibitor screening with unpurified enzymes. In the DNA-linked Inhibitor ANtibody Assay (DIANA), the target enzyme is captured by an immobilized antibody, probed with a small-molecule inhibitor attached to a reporter DNA and detected by quantitative PCR. We validate the approach using the putative cancer markers prostate-specific membrane antigen and carbonic anhydrase IX. We show that DIANA has a linear range of up to six logs and it selectively detects zeptomoles of targets in complex biological samples. DIANA's wide dynamic range permits determination of target enzyme inhibition constants using a single inhibitor concentration. DIANA also enables quantitative screening of small-molecule enzyme inhibitors using microliters of human blood serum containing picograms of target enzyme. DIANA's performance characteristics make it a superior tool for disease detection and drug discovery. PMID:27679479

  2. Materials Evaluation. Part II. Development of Corrosion Inhibitors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    and Identify by block number) A borax -nitrite based inhibitor has been developed for incorporation into the Air Force Rinse Facility at MacDill Air...Block 20 inhibitors has been tested and a borax -nitrite based formulation developed which inhibits the corrosion of several ferrous and nonferrous...alternatives to chromates, one such alternative being a borax -nitrite based inhibitor. The value of borax nitrite as a corrosion inhibitor has long been

  3. Development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, K; Asyifah, M R; Shao, F; Zhang, D

    2014-06-01

    The HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein 41 (gp41) is crucial in the HIV-1 infection process, therefore gp41 has emerged as an attractive target for drug design against AIDS. During the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been made on developing inhibitors that can prevent the HIV-1 entry process via suppressing functional gp41. In this review, the development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41 including peptide inhibitors, small molecule inhibitors, vaccines and neutralized antibodies will be discussed.

  4. Botulinum neurotoxin A protease: discovery of natural product exosite inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Silhár, Peter; Capková, Katerina; Salzameda, Nicholas T; Barbieri, Joseph T; Hixon, Mark S; Janda, Kim D

    2010-03-10

    A new mechanistic class of BoNT/A zinc metalloprotease inhibitors, from Echinacea, exemplified by the natural product d-chicoric acid (I1) is disclosed. A detailed evaluation of chicoric acid's mechanism of inhibition reveals that the inhibitor binds to an exosite, displays noncompetitive partial inhibition, and is synergistic with a competitive active site inhibitor when used in combination. Other components found in Echinacea, I3 and I4, were also inhibitors of the protease.

  5. Inhibitor analysis for a solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabony, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A study of potential corrosion inhibitors for the NASA solar heating and cooling system which uses aluminum solar panels is provided. Research consisted of testing using a dynamic corrosion system, along with an economic analysis of proposed corrosion inhibitors. Very good progress was made in finding a suitable inhibitor for the system.

  6. P3 SAR exploration of biphenyl carbamate based Legumain inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Catherine; Bouazzaoui, Samira; Gaddale, Kishore; D'Costa, Zenobia; Templeman, Amy; O'Rourke, Martin; Young, Andrew; Scott, Christopher; Harrison, Tim; Mullan, Paul; Williams, Rich

    2014-06-01

    This Letter describes the further development and SAR exploration of a novel series of Legumain inhibitors. Based upon a previously identified Legumain inhibitor from our group, we explored the SAR of the carbamate phenyl ring system to probe the P3 pocket of the enzyme. This led to the identification of a sub-nanomolar inhibitor of Legumain.

  7. Development of fucosyltransferase and fucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhijay; Lin, Yu-Nong; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2013-05-21

    L-Fucose-containing glycoconjugates are essential for a myriad of physiological and pathological activities, such as inflammation, bacterial and viral infections, tumor metastasis, and genetic disorders. Fucosyltransferases and fucosidases, the main enzymes involved in the incorporation and cleavage of L-fucose residues, respectively, represent captivating targets for therapeutic treatment and diagnosis. We herein review the important breakthroughs in the development of fucosyltransferase and fucosidase inhibitors. To demonstrate how the synthesized small molecules interact with the target enzymes, i.e. delineation of the structure-activity relationship, we cover the reaction mechanisms and resolved X-ray crystal structures, discuss how this information guides the design of enzyme inhibitors, and explain how the molecules were optimized to achieve satisfying potency and selectivity.

  8. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS ‘Driver mutations’ are essential for carcinogenesis as well as tumor progression as they confer a selective growth advantage to cancer cells. Identification of driver mutations in growth related protein kinases, especially tyrosine kinases have led to clinical development of an array of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in various malignancies, including lung cancer. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinases have proven to be of meaningful clinical benefit, while inhibition of several other tyrosine kinases have been of limited clinical benefit, thus far. An improved understanding of tyrosine kinase biology has also led to faster drug development, identification of resistance mechanisms and ways to overcome resistance. In this review, we discuss the clinical data supporting the use and practical aspects of management of patients on epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:22520981

  9. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target. PMID:23859210

  10. Simplified captopril analogues as NDM-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ningning; Xu, Yintong; Xia, Qiang; Bai, Cuigai; Wang, Taiyi; Wang, Lei; He, Dingdi; Xie, Nannan; Li, Lixin; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Hong-Gang; Xu, Feng; Yang, Cheng; Zhang, Quan; Yin, Zheng; Guo, Yu; Chen, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Captopril is a New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) inhibitor with an IC50 value of 7.9μM. It is composed of two units: a 3-mercapto-2-methylpropanoyl fragment and a proline residue. In this study, we synthesized simple amide derivatives of 3-mercapto-2-methylpropanoic acid, and then tested them as NDM-1 inhibitors in order to identify the pharmacophore for NDM-1 inhibition. We found that the lead compound 22 had an IC50 value of 1.0μM. Further structure simplification provided compounds 31 and 32, which had IC50 values of 15 and 10μM, respectively. As compound 32 is a clinically used antidote for metal poisoning, it has great potential to be repurposed to treat bacterial infections.

  11. Protein synthesis inhibitor from potato tuber

    SciTech Connect

    Romaen, R. )

    1989-04-01

    A protein fraction capable of inhibit in vitro protein synthesis was found in potato tubers in fresh and wounded tissue. Inhibitor activity from fresh tissue decays with wounding. Inhibition activity was detected absorbed to ribsomal fraction and cytosol of potato tuber tissue by a partially reconstituted in vitro system from potato tuber and wheat germ. Adsorbed ribosomal fraction was more suitable of purification. This fraction was washed from ribosomes with 0.3M KCl, concentrated with ammonium sulfate precipitation and purified through sephadex G100 and sephadex G-75 columns chromatography. After 61 fold purification adsorbed protein fraction can inhibit germination of maize, wheat and sesame seeds, as well as {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into protein by imbibed maize embryos. Inhibition activity was lost by temperature, alkali and protease-K hydrolysis. Preliminar analysis could not show presence of reductor sugars. Physiological role of this inhibitor in relation to rest and active tissue remains to be studied.

  12. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-07-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target.

  13. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Benefit/Risk Balance.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-10-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycemia by increasing urinary glucose excretion. They have been evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes trea