Science.gov

Sample records for prolonged knee-extensor exercise

  1. Soreness-related changes in three-dimensional running biomechanics following eccentric knee extensor exercise.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Max R; Peel, Shelby A; Schilling, Brian K; Melcher, Dan A; Bloomer, Richard J

    2017-06-01

    Runners often experience delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), especially of the knee extensors, following prolonged running. Sagittal knee joint biomechanics are altered in the presence of knee extensor DOMS but it is unclear how muscle soreness affects lower limb biomechanics in other planes of motion. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of knee extensor DOMS on three-dimensional (3D) lower limb biomechanics during running. Thirty-three healthy men (25.8 ± 6.8 years; 84.1 ± 9.2 kg; 1.77 ± 0.07 m) completed an isolated eccentric knee extensor damaging protocol to elicit DOMS. Biomechanics of over-ground running at a set speed of 3.35 m s(-1)±5% were measured before eccentric exercise (baseline) and, 24 h and 48 h following exercise in the presence of knee extensor DOMS. Knee flexion ROM was reduced at 48 h (P = 0.01; d = 0.26), and peak knee extensor moment was reduced at 24 h (P = 0.001; d = 0.49) and 48 h (P < 0.001; d = 0.68) compared to baseline. Frontal and transverse plane biomechanics were unaffected by the presence of DOMS (P > 0.05). Peak positive ankle and knee joint powers and, peak negative knee joint power were all reduced from baseline to 24 h and 48 h (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that knee extensor DOMS greatly influences sagittal knee joint angular kinetics and, reduces sagittal power production at the ankle joint. However, knee extensor DOMS does not affect frontal and transverse plane lower limb joint biomechanics during running.

  2. Effects of 4 weeks preoperative exercise on knee extensor strength after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Kyung; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Won Hah

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] After an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction, quadriceps muscle weakness and disruption of proprioceptive function are common. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 4 weeks preoperative exercise intervention on knee strength power and function post-surgery. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty male patients (27.8±5.7 age), scheduled for reconstruction surgery, were randomly assigned to two groups, the preoperative exercise group (n=40) and a no preoperative exercise group (n=40). The preoperative exercise group participated in a 4-week preoperative and 12-week post-operative programs, while the no preoperative exercise group participated only in the 12-week postoperative exercise program. Isokinetic measured of quadriceps strength were obtained at 4 weeks before and 3 months after surgery. [Results] The knee extensor strength deficits measured at 60°/s and 180°/s was significantly lower in the preoperative exercise group compared with the no preoperative exercise group. At 3 months after surgery, the extensor strength deficit was 28.5±9.0% at 60°/sec and 23.3±9.0% at 180°/sec in the preoperative exercise group, whereas the no preoperative exercise group showed extensor strength deficits of 36.5±10.7% and 27.9±12.6% at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, respectively. The preoperative exercise group demonstrated significant improvement the single-leg hop distance. [Conclusion] Four week preoperative exercise may produce many positive effects post reconstruction surgery, including faster recovery of knee extensor strength and function, as measured by single-leg hop ability. PMID:26504270

  3. Effect of temperature on skeletal muscle energy turnover during dynamic knee-extensor exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, R A; Krustrup, P; Kjaer, M; Mohr, M; Ball, D; Bangsbo, J

    2006-07-01

    The present study examined the effect of elevated temperature on muscle energy turnover during dynamic exercise. Nine male subjects performed 10 min of dynamic knee-extensor exercise at an intensity of 43 W (SD 10) and a frequency of 60 contractions per minute. Exercise was performed under normal (C) and elevated muscle temperature (HT) through passive heating. Thigh oxygen uptake (V(O2)) was determined from measurements of thigh blood flow and femoral arterial-venous differences for oxygen content. Anaerobic energy turnover was estimated from measurements of lactate release as well as muscle lactate accumulation and phosphocreatine utilization based on analysis of muscle biopsies obtained before and after each exercise. At the start of exercise, muscle temperature was 34.5 degrees C (SD 1.7) in C compared with 37.2 degrees C (SD 0.5) during HT (P < 0.05). Thigh V(O2) after 3 min was 0.52 l/min (SD 0.11) in C and 0.63 l/min (SD 0.13) in HT, and at the end of exercise it was 0.60 l/min (SD 0.14) and 0.61 l/min (SD 0.10) in C and HT, respectively (not significant). Total lactate release was the same between the two temperature conditions, as was muscle lactate accumulation and PCr utilization. Total ATP production (aerobic + anaerobic) was the same between each temperature condition [505.0 mmol/kg (SD 107.2) vs. 527.1 mmol/kg (SD 117.6); C and HT, respectively]. In conclusion, within the range of temperatures studied, passively increasing muscle temperature before exercise has no effect on muscle energy turnover during dynamic exercise.

  4. Difference in the magnitude of muscle damage between elbow flexors and knee extensors eccentric exercises

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga; Akova, Bedrettin; Yazici, Zeynep; Sekir, Ufuk; Gür, Hakan; Ozarda, Yesim

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in the magnitude of muscle damage between maximal eccentric exercises of the elbow flexors (EF) and knee extensors (KE). Twelve sedentary male volunteers participated in the study. Range of motion (ROM), isometric peak torque (IPT), delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS), creatine kinase activity (CK), and myoglobin concentration (Mb) were evaluated before, immediately after, and on the 1st , 2nd, 3rd , and 7th days following exercise. Total work (TW) during exercises was recorded and corrected by muscle volume (TWc). TWc was greater (p < 0.01) for EF [24 (2) joule·cm-3] than for KE [7 (0.4) joule·cm-3]. Increases in CK on the 2nd , 3rd , and 7th days (p < 0.01) and increases in Mb on the 1st , 2nd , 3rd , and 7th days were significantly (p<0.01) larger for EF than for KE. The decline in IPT was greater (p < 0.05- 0.01) for EF at all test occasions compared with KE. The results of this study demonstrate that the magnitude of muscle damage is greater and the recovery is slower following maximal eccentric exercise of the EF than of the KE for sedentary males. Key points The magnitude of muscle damage is greater and the recovery is slower following maximal eccentric exercise of the EF than of the KE for sedentary males. This may be because of the higher total eccentric work per muscle unit in elbow flexors. PMID:24150563

  5. Recruitment of fibre types and quadriceps muscle portions during repeated, intense knee-extensor exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Krustrup, Peter; Söderlund, Karin; Mohr, Magni; González-Alonso, José; Bangsbo, Jens

    2004-10-01

    To investigate recruitment of slow-twitch (ST) and fast-twitch (FT) muscle fibres, as well as the involvement of the various quadriceps femoris muscle portions during repeated, intense, one-legged knee-extensor exercise, 12 healthy male subjects performed two 3-min exercise bouts at approximately 110% maximum thigh O2 consumption (EX1 and EX2) separated by 6 min rest. Single-fibre metabolites were determined in successive muscle biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle (n = 6) and intra-muscular temperatures were continuously measured at six quadriceps muscle sites (n = 6). Creatine phosphate (CP) had decreased (P < 0.05) by 27, 73 and 88% in ST fibres and 25, 71 and 89% in FT fibres after 15 and 180 s of EX1 and after 180 s of EX2, respectively. CP was below resting mean-1 SD in 15, 46, 84 and 100% of the ST fibres and 9, 48, 85 and 100% of the FT fibres at rest, after 15 and 180 s of EX1 and after 180 s of EX2, respectively. A significant muscle temperature increase (deltaTm) occurred within 2-4 s at all quadriceps muscle sites. DeltaTm varied less than 10% between sites during EX1, but was 23% higher (P < 0.05) in the vastus lateralis than in the rectus femoris muscle during EX2. DeltaTm in the vastus lateralis was 101 and 109% of the mean quadriceps value during EX1 and EX2, respectively. We conclude that both fibre types and all quadriceps muscle portions are recruited at the onset of intense knee-extensor exercise, that essentially all quadriceps muscle fibres are activated during repeated intense exercise and that metabolic measurements in the vastus lateralis muscle provide a good indication of the whole-quadriceps muscle metabolism during repeated, intense, one-legged knee-extensor exercise.

  6. Heterogeneous recruitment of quadriceps muscle portions and fibre types during moderate intensity knee-extensor exercise: effect of thigh occlusion.

    PubMed

    Krustrup, P; Söderlund, K; Relu, M U; Ferguson, R A; Bangsbo, J

    2009-08-01

    The involvement of quadriceps femoris muscle portions and fibre type recruitment was studied during submaximal knee-extensor exercise without and with thigh occlusion (OCC) and compared with responses during intense exercise. Six healthy male subjects performed 90-s of moderate exercise without (MOD; 29+/-4 W) and with thigh OCC, and moderate exercise followed by 90-s of intense exercise (HI; 65+/-8 W). Temperatures were continuously measured in m. vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) and rectus femoris (RF) and successive muscle biopsies were obtained from VL. During MOD, muscle temperature increase (DeltaT(m)) in RF was 0.52+/-0.09 degrees C, which was 57% and 73% higher (P<0.05) than in VL and VM, respectively. During OCC, DeltaT(m) in RF was 0.39+/-0.05 degrees C, which was not different from VM but 54% higher (P<0.05) than in VL. After MOD, muscle CP in slow twitch (ST) and fast twitch (FT) fibres was 81% and 91% of resting levels, respectively, with lower (P<0.05) values after OCC (15% and 22%) and HI (24% and 13%). After MOD, OCC and HI, a total of 48%, 93% and 96% of the ST fibres had CP levels below mean-1 SD, respectively, with corresponding values for FT fibres being 41%, 89% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, a heterogeneous recruitment of the quadriceps muscle portions and muscle fibres was observed during submaximal knee-extensor exercise, whereas recruitment pattern was homogenous during intense exercise. Thigh OCC caused an altered recruitment of fibres and muscle portions, suggesting a significant afferent response affecting the activation of fibres in the contracting muscles.

  7. Low-intensity eccentric contractions attenuate muscle damage induced by subsequent maximal eccentric exercise of the knee extensors in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Trevor C; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Huang, Guan-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Tseng, Kou-Wei; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated whether low-intensity eccentric contractions of the knee extensors would attenuate the magnitude of muscle damage induced by maximal eccentric exercise of the same muscle performed 7 days later using elderly individuals. Healthy older men (66.4 ± 4.6 years) were assigned to control or experimental (Exp) group (n = 13 per group). The control group performed six sets of ten maximal eccentric contractions (MaxECC) of the knee extensors of non-dominant leg. The Exp group performed six sets of ten low-intensity eccentric contractions of the knee extensors on a leg extension machine by lowering a weight of 10 % maximal voluntary isometric knee extension strength (10 %ECC) 7 days prior to MaxECC. Changes in maximal voluntary isokinetic concentric torque (MVC-CON), angle at peak torque, range of motion (ROM), upper thigh circumference, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity and myoglobin (Mb) concentration and B-mode ultrasound echo-intensity before and for 5 days after MaxECC were compared between groups by a mixed factor ANOVA. No significant changes in any variables were observed following 10 %ECC. Following MaxECC, all variables changed significantly, and changes in all variables except for angle at peak torque were significantly different between groups. MVC-CON and ROM decreased smaller and recovered faster (P < 0.05) for Exp than control group, and changes in other variables were smaller (P < 0.05) for Exp group compared with control group. These results suggest that preconditioning knee extensor muscles with low-intensity eccentric contractions was effective for attenuating muscle damage induced by subsequent MaxECC of the knee extensors for elderly individuals.

  8. Protective effect by maximal isometric contractions against maximal eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuo-Wei; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Lin, Ming-Ju; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Nosaka, Kazunori; Chen, Trevor C

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) performed before maximal eccentric contractions (MaxEC) would attenuate muscle damage of the knee extensors. Untrained men were placed to an experimental group that performed 6 sets of 10 MVIC at 90° knee flexion 2 weeks before 6 sets of 10 MaxEC or a control group that performed MaxEC only (n = 13/group). Changes in muscle damage markers were assessed before to 5 days after each exercise. Small but significant changes in maximal voluntary concentric contraction torque, range of motion (ROM) and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were evident at immediately to 2 days post-MVIC (p < 0.05), but other variables (e.g. thigh girth, myoglobin concentration, B-mode echo intensity) did not change significantly. Changes in all variables after MaxEC were smaller (p < 0.05) by 45% (soreness)-67% (CK) for the experimental than the control group. These results suggest that MVIC conferred potent protective effect against MaxEC-induced muscle damage.

  9. Muscle damage and adaptation after the second bout of eccentric exercise of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Hassan, E S

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the muscles ability to adapt to eccentric exercise by the changes in serum myoglobin (Mb), creatine kinase (CK) activity and muscle soreness. The study involved 54 healthy young men from the 23± 2yr age group. These were distributed as subjects for three types of experiments with 18 men in each. Subjects performed 300 maximal eccentric exercises. In experiment I, after performing the first bout of exercise, they were split into three subgroups to perform the second bout after a period of 4, 6, and 8 weeks (WK), respectively. In experiment II, performed the second exercise after a period of 2, 3, and 5 wk, respectively. In experiment III, they performed four exercise bouts spaced 1 wk apart. in experiment II a significant (P<0.05) decrease in muscle soreness, serum Mb and CK was found on exercise bout 2. In experiment III, serum CK, Mb and muscle soreness responses were highest following bout 1. It was concluded that performance of a single exercise bout had a prophylactic effect on muscle soreness and serum protein responses that lasts approximately 2 wk, with the greatest adaptation occurring after one bout.

  10. Downhill walking training with and without exercise-induced muscle damage similarly increase knee extensor strength.

    PubMed

    Maeo, Sumiaki; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    This study examined whether avoiding or experiencing exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) influences strength gain after downhill walking training. Healthy young males performed treadmill downhill walking (gradient: -28%, velocity: 5 km · h(-1) and load: 10% of body mass) 1 session per week for four weeks using either a ramp-up protocol (n = 16), where exercise duration was gradually increased from 10 to 30, 50 and 70 min over four sessions, or a constant protocol (n = 14), where exercise duration was 40 min for all four sessions. Indirect markers of EIMD were measured throughout the training period. Maximal knee extension torque in eccentric (-1.05 rad·s(-1)), isometric and concentric (1.05 rad·s(-1)) conditions were measured at pre- and post-training. The ramp-up group showed no indications of EIMD throughout the training period (e.g., plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity: always <185 U · L(-1)) while EIMD was evident after the first session in the constant group (CK: peak 485 U · L(-1)). Both groups significantly increased maximal knee extension torque in all conditions with greater gains in eccentric (ramp-up: +19%, constant: +21%) than isometric (+16%, +15%) and concentric (+12%, +10%) strength without any significant group-difference. The current results suggest that EIMD can be avoided by the ramp-up protocol and is not a major determinant of training-induced strength gain.

  11. The susceptibility of the knee extensors to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage is not affected by leg dominance but by exercise order.

    PubMed

    Hody, S; Rogister, B; Leprince, P; Laglaine, T; Croisier, J-L

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were first to compare the response of dominant and non-dominant legs to eccentric exercise and second, to examine whether there is an effect of exercise order on the magnitude of symptoms associated with intense eccentric protocols. Eighteen young men performed three sets of 30 maximal eccentric isokinetic (60° s(-1)) contractions of the knee extensors (range of motion, ROM: 0°-100°, 0 = full extension) using either dominant or non-dominant leg. They repeated a similar eccentric bout using the contralateral leg 6 weeks later. The sequence of leg's use was allocated to create equally balanced groups. Four indirect markers of muscle damage including subjective pain intensity, maximal isometric strength, muscle stiffness and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were measured before and 24 h after exercise. All markers changed significantly following the eccentric bout performed either by dominant or non-dominant legs, but no significant difference was observed between legs. Interestingly, the comparison between the first and second eccentric bouts revealed that muscle soreness (-42%, P<0.001), CK activity (-62%, P<0.05) and strength loss (-54%, P<0.01) were significantly lower after the second bout. This study suggests that leg dominance does not influence the magnitude of exercise-induced muscle damage and supports for the first time the existence of a contralateral protection against exercise-induced muscle damage in the lower limbs. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Influence of acetaminophen and ibuprofen on in vivo patellar tendon adaptations to knee extensor resistance exercise in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, C. C.; Dickinson, J. M.; LeMoine, J. K.; Haus, J. M.; Weinheimer, E. M.; Hollon, C. J.; Aagaard, P.; Magnusson, S. P.

    2011-01-01

    Millions of older individuals consume acetaminophen or ibuprofen daily and these same individuals are encouraged to participate in resistance training. Several in vitro studies suggest that cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drugs can alter tendon metabolism and may influence adaptations to resistance training. Thirty-six individuals were randomly assigned to a placebo (67 ± 2 yr old), acetaminophen (64 ± 1 yr old; 4,000 mg/day), or ibuprofen (64 ± 1 yr old; 1,200 mg/day) group in a double-blind manner and completed 12 wk of knee extensor resistance training. Before and after training in vivo patellar tendon properties were assessed with MRI [cross-sectional area (CSA) and signal intensity] and ultrasonography of patellar tendon deformation coupled with force measurements to obtain stiffness, modulus, stress, and strain. Mean patellar tendon CSA was unchanged (P > 0.05) with training in the placebo group, and this response was not influenced with ibuprofen consumption. Mean tendon CSA increased with training in the acetaminophen group (3%, P < 0.05), primarily due to increases in the mid (7%, P < 0.05) and distal (8%, P < 0.05) tendon regions. Correspondingly, tendon signal intensity increased with training in the acetaminophen group at the mid (13%, P < 0.05) and distal (15%, P = 0.07) regions. When normalized to pretraining force levels, patellar tendon deformation and strain decreased 11% (P < 0.05) and stiffness, modulus, and stress were unchanged (P > 0.05) with training in the placebo group. These responses were generally uninfluenced by ibuprofen consumption. In the acetaminophen group, tendon deformation and strain increased 20% (P < 0.05) and stiffness (−17%, P < 0.05) and modulus (−20%, P < 0.05) decreased with training. These data suggest that 3 mo of knee extensor resistance training in older adults induces modest changes in the mechanical properties of the patellar tendon. Over-the-counter doses of acetaminophen, but not ibuprofen, have a strong

  13. Infusion of ATP increases leg oxygen delivery but not oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense knee-extensor exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Christensen, Peter M; Mortensen, Stefan P; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined whether an increase in leg blood flow and oxygen delivery at the onset of intense exercise would speed the rate of rise in leg oxygen uptake. Nine healthy men (25 ± 1 years old, mean ± SEM) performed one-leg knee-extensor exercise (62 ± 3 W, 86 ± 3% of incremental test peak power) for 4 min during a control setting (CON) and with infusion of ATP into the femoral artery in order to increase blood flow before and during exercise. In the presence of ATP, femoral arterial blood flow and O2 delivery were higher (P < 0.001) at the onset of exercise and throughout exercise (femoral arterial blood flow after 10 s, 5.1 ± 0.5 versus 2.7 ± 0.3 l min(-1); after 45 s, 6.0 ± 0.5 versus 4.1 ± 0.4 l min(-1); after 90 s, 6.6 ± 0.6 versus 4.5 ± 0.4 l min(-1); and after 240 s, 7.0 ± 0.6 versus 5.1 ± 0.3 l min(-1) in ATP and CON conditions, respectively). Leg oxygen uptake was not different in ATP and CON conditions during the first 20 s of exercise but was lower (P < 0.05) in the ATP compared with CON conditions after 30 s and until the end of exercise (30 s, 436 ± 42 versus 549 ± 45 ml min(-1); and 240 s, 705 ± 31 versus 814 ± 59 ml min(-1) in ATP and CON, respectively). Lactate release was lower after 60, 120 and 180 s of exercise with ATP infusion. These results suggest that O2 delivery is not limiting the rise in skeletal muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense exercise.

  14. Muscle metabolism and activation heterogeneity by combined 31P chemical shift and T2 imaging, and pulmonary O2 uptake during incremental knee-extensor exercise.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Howe, Franklyn A; Whipp, Brian J; Ward, Susan A; McIntyre, Dominick J; Ladroue, Christophe; Griffiths, John R; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2013-09-01

    The integration of skeletal muscle substrate depletion, metabolite accumulation, and fatigue during large muscle-mass exercise is not well understood. Measurement of intramuscular energy store degradation and metabolite accumulation is confounded by muscle heterogeneity. Therefore, to characterize regional metabolic distribution in the locomotor muscles, we combined 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chemical shift imaging, and T2-weighted imaging with pulmonary oxygen uptake during bilateral knee-extension exercise to intolerance. Six men completed incremental tests for the following: (1) unlocalized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and (2) spatial determination of 31P metabolism and activation. The relationship of pulmonary oxygen uptake to whole quadriceps phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]) was inversely linear, and three of four knee-extensor muscles showed activation as assessed by change in T2. The largest changes in [PCr], [inorganic phosphate] ([Pi]) and pH occurred in rectus femoris, but no voxel (72 cm3) showed complete PCr depletion at exercise cessation. The most metabolically active voxel reached 11 ± 9 mM [PCr] (resting, 29 ± 1 mM), 23 ± 11 mM [Pi] (resting, 7 ± 1 mM), and a pH of 6.64 ± 0.29 (resting, 7.08 ± 0.03). However, the distribution of 31P metabolites and pH varied widely between voxels, and the intervoxel coefficient of variation increased between rest (∼10%) and exercise intolerance (∼30-60%). Therefore, the limit of tolerance was attained with wide heterogeneity in substrate depletion and fatigue-related metabolite accumulation, with extreme metabolic perturbation isolated to only a small volume of active muscle (<5%). Regional intramuscular disturbances are thus likely an important requisite for exercise intolerance. How these signals integrate to limit muscle power production, while regional "recruitable muscle" energy stores are presumably still available, remains uncertain.

  15. Muscle metabolism and activation heterogeneity by combined 31P chemical shift and T2 imaging, and pulmonary O2 uptake during incremental knee-extensor exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T.; Howe, Franklyn A.; Whipp, Brian J.; Ward, Susan A.; McIntyre, Dominick J.; Ladroue, Christophe; Griffiths, John R.; Kemp, Graham J.

    2013-01-01

    The integration of skeletal muscle substrate depletion, metabolite accumulation, and fatigue during large muscle-mass exercise is not well understood. Measurement of intramuscular energy store degradation and metabolite accumulation is confounded by muscle heterogeneity. Therefore, to characterize regional metabolic distribution in the locomotor muscles, we combined 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chemical shift imaging, and T2-weighted imaging with pulmonary oxygen uptake during bilateral knee-extension exercise to intolerance. Six men completed incremental tests for the following: 1) unlocalized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and 2) spatial determination of 31P metabolism and activation. The relationship of pulmonary oxygen uptake to whole quadriceps phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]) was inversely linear, and three of four knee-extensor muscles showed activation as assessed by change in T2. The largest changes in [PCr], [inorganic phosphate] ([Pi]) and pH occurred in rectus femoris, but no voxel (72 cm3) showed complete PCr depletion at exercise cessation. The most metabolically active voxel reached 11 ± 9 mM [PCr] (resting, 29 ± 1 mM), 23 ± 11 mM [Pi] (resting, 7 ± 1 mM), and a pH of 6.64 ± 0.29 (resting, 7.08 ± 0.03). However, the distribution of 31P metabolites and pH varied widely between voxels, and the intervoxel coefficient of variation increased between rest (∼10%) and exercise intolerance (∼30–60%). Therefore, the limit of tolerance was attained with wide heterogeneity in substrate depletion and fatigue-related metabolite accumulation, with extreme metabolic perturbation isolated to only a small volume of active muscle (<5%). Regional intramuscular disturbances are thus likely an important requisite for exercise intolerance. How these signals integrate to limit muscle power production, while regional “recruitable muscle” energy stores are presumably still available, remains uncertain. PMID:23813534

  16. Independent effect of type 2 diabetes beyond characteristic comorbidities and medications on immediate but not continued knee extensor exercise hyperemia

    PubMed Central

    Poitras, Veronica J.; Bentley, Robert F.; Hopkins-Rosseel, Diana H.; LaHaye, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that type 2 diabetes (T2D), when present in the characteristic constellation of comorbidities (obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia) and medications, slows the dynamic adjustment of exercising muscle perfusion and blunts the steady state relative to that of controls matched for age, body mass index, fitness, comorbidities, and non-T2D medications. Thirteen persons with T2D and 11 who served as controls performed rhythmic single-leg isometric quadriceps exercise (rest-to-6 kg and 6-to-12 kg transitions, 5 min at each intensity). Measurements included leg blood flow (LBF, femoral artery ultrasound), mean arterial pressure (MAP, finger photoplethysmography), and leg vascular conductance (LVK, calculated). Dynamics were quantified using mean response time (MRT). Measures of amplitude were also used to compare response adjustment: the change from baseline to 1) the peak initial response (greatest 1-s average in the first 10 s; ΔLBFPIR, ΔLVKPIR) and 2) the on-transient (average from curve fit at 15, 45, and 75 s; ΔLBFON, ΔLVKON). ΔLBFPIR was significantly blunted in T2D vs. control individuals (P = 0.037); this was due to a tendency for reduced ΔLVKPIR (P = 0.063). In contrast, the overall response speed was not different between groups (MRT P = 0.856, ΔLBFON P = 0.150) nor was the change from baseline to steady state (P = 0.204). ΔLBFPIR, ΔLBFON, and LBF MRT did not differ between rest-to-6 kg and 6-to-12 kg workload transitions (all P > 0.05). Despite a transient amplitude impairment at the onset of exercise, there is no robust or consistent effect of T2D on top of the comorbidities and medications typical of this population on the overall dynamic adjustment of LBF, or the steady-state levels achieved during low- or moderate-intensity exercise. PMID:26048976

  17. A study on muscle activity and ratio of the knee extensor depending on the types of squat exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Park, Joon-Su; Choi, Hyun; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Kwon, Hye-Min; Moon, Young-Jun

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] For preventing the patellofemoral pain syndrome, this study aims to suggest a proper squat method, which presents selective muscle activity of Vastus Medialis Oblique and muscle activity ratios of Vastus Medialis Oblique/Vastus Lateralis by applying squat that is a representative weight bearing exercise method in various ways depending on the surface conditions and knee bending angles. [Subjects and Methods] An isometric squat that was accompanied by hip adduction, depending on the surface condition and the knee joint flexion angle, was performed by 24 healthy students. The muscle activity and the ratio of muscle activity were measured. [Results] In a comparison of muscle activity depending on the knee joint flexion angle on a weight-bearing surface, the vastus medialis oblique showed a significant difference at 15° and 60°. Meanwhile, in a comparison of the muscle activity ratio between the vastus medialis oblique and the vastus lateralis depending on the knee joint flexion angle on a weight-bearing surface, significant differences were observed at 15° and 60°. [Conclusion] An efficient squat exercise posture for preventing the patellofemoral pain syndrome is to increase the knee joint bending angle on a stable surface. But it would be efficient for patients with difficulties in bending the knee joint to keep a knee joint bending angle of 15 degrees or less on an unstable surface. It is considered that in future, diverse studies on selective Vastus Medialis Oblique strengthening exercise methods would be needed after applying them to patients with the patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:28210036

  18. A study on muscle activity and ratio of the knee extensor depending on the types of squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Park, Joon-Su; Choi, Hyun; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Kwon, Hye-Min; Moon, Young-Jun

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] For preventing the patellofemoral pain syndrome, this study aims to suggest a proper squat method, which presents selective muscle activity of Vastus Medialis Oblique and muscle activity ratios of Vastus Medialis Oblique/Vastus Lateralis by applying squat that is a representative weight bearing exercise method in various ways depending on the surface conditions and knee bending angles. [Subjects and Methods] An isometric squat that was accompanied by hip adduction, depending on the surface condition and the knee joint flexion angle, was performed by 24 healthy students. The muscle activity and the ratio of muscle activity were measured. [Results] In a comparison of muscle activity depending on the knee joint flexion angle on a weight-bearing surface, the vastus medialis oblique showed a significant difference at 15° and 60°. Meanwhile, in a comparison of the muscle activity ratio between the vastus medialis oblique and the vastus lateralis depending on the knee joint flexion angle on a weight-bearing surface, significant differences were observed at 15° and 60°. [Conclusion] An efficient squat exercise posture for preventing the patellofemoral pain syndrome is to increase the knee joint bending angle on a stable surface. But it would be efficient for patients with difficulties in bending the knee joint to keep a knee joint bending angle of 15 degrees or less on an unstable surface. It is considered that in future, diverse studies on selective Vastus Medialis Oblique strengthening exercise methods would be needed after applying them to patients with the patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  19. Effects of prolonged vibration to vastus intermedius muscle on force steadiness of knee extensor muscles during isometric force-matching task.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Ando, Ryosuke; Akima, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Afferent inputs from Ia fibers in muscle spindles are essential for the control of force and prolonged vibration has been applied to muscle-tendon units to manipulate the synaptic input from Ia afferents onto α-motor neurons. The vastus intermedius (VI) reportedly provides the highest contribution to the low-level knee extension torque among the individual synergists of quadriceps femoris (QF). The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of prolonged vibration to the VI on force steadiness of the QF. Nine healthy men (25.1±4.3years) performed submaximal force-matching task of isometric knee extension for 15s before and after mechanical vibration to the superficial region of VI for 30min. Target forces were 2.5%, 10%, and 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and force steadiness was determined by the coefficient of variation (CV) of force. After the prolonged VI vibration, the CV of force at 2.5%MVC was significantly increased, but CVs at 10% and 30%MVCs were not significantly changed. The present study concluded that application of prolonged vibration to the VI increased force fluctuations of the QF during a very low-level force-matching task.

  20. Intensity-dependent alterations in the excitability of cortical and spinal projections to the knee extensors during isometric and locomotor exercise

    PubMed Central

    Weavil, J. C.; Sidhu, S. K.; Mangum, T. S.; Richardson, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of exercise intensity and associated central motor drive in determining corticomotoneuronal excitability. Ten participants performed a series of nonfatiguing (3 s) isometric single-leg knee extensions (ISO; 10–100% of maximal voluntary contractions, MVC) and cycling bouts (30–160% peak aerobic capacity, Wpeak). At various exercise intensities, electrical potentials were evoked in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) via transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor-evoked potentials, MEP), and electrical stimulation of both the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary evoked potentials, CMEP) and the femoral nerve (maximal M-waves, Mmax). Whereas Mmax remained unchanged in both muscles (P > 0.40), voluntary electromyographic activity (EMG) increased in an exercise intensity-dependent manner for ISO and cycling exercise in VL and RF (both P < 0.001). During ISO exercise, MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased in VL and RF until a plateau was reached at ∼75% MVC; further increases in contraction intensity did not cause additional changes (P > 0.35). During cycling exercise, VL-MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼65% until a plateau was reached at Wpeak. In contrast, RF MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼110% throughout the tested cycling intensities without the occurrence of a plateau. Furthermore, alterations in EMG below the plateau influenced corticomotoneuronal excitability similarly between exercise modalities. In both exercise modalities, the MEP-to-CMEP ratio did not change with exercise intensity (P > 0.22). In conclusion, increases in exercise intensity and EMG facilitates the corticomotoneuronal pathway similarly in isometric knee extension and locomotor exercise until a plateau occurs at a submaximal exercise intensity. This facilitation appears to be primarily mediated by increases in excitability of the motoneuron pool. PMID:25876651

  1. Intensity-dependent alterations in the excitability of cortical and spinal projections to the knee extensors during isometric and locomotor exercise.

    PubMed

    Weavil, J C; Sidhu, S K; Mangum, T S; Richardson, R S; Amann, M

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the role of exercise intensity and associated central motor drive in determining corticomotoneuronal excitability. Ten participants performed a series of nonfatiguing (3 s) isometric single-leg knee extensions (ISO; 10-100% of maximal voluntary contractions, MVC) and cycling bouts (30-160% peak aerobic capacity, W peak). At various exercise intensities, electrical potentials were evoked in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) via transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor-evoked potentials, MEP), and electrical stimulation of both the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary evoked potentials, CMEP) and the femoral nerve (maximal M-waves, M max). Whereas M max remained unchanged in both muscles (P > 0.40), voluntary electromyographic activity (EMG) increased in an exercise intensity-dependent manner for ISO and cycling exercise in VL and RF (both P < 0.001). During ISO exercise, MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased in VL and RF until a plateau was reached at ∼ 75% MVC; further increases in contraction intensity did not cause additional changes (P > 0.35). During cycling exercise, VL-MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼ 65% until a plateau was reached at W peak. In contrast, RF MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼ 110% throughout the tested cycling intensities without the occurrence of a plateau. Furthermore, alterations in EMG below the plateau influenced corticomotoneuronal excitability similarly between exercise modalities. In both exercise modalities, the MEP-to-CMEP ratio did not change with exercise intensity (P > 0.22). In conclusion, increases in exercise intensity and EMG facilitates the corticomotoneuronal pathway similarly in isometric knee extension and locomotor exercise until a plateau occurs at a submaximal exercise intensity. This facilitation appears to be primarily mediated by increases in excitability of the motoneuron pool.

  2. Effect of low-level laser therapy on muscle adaptation to knee extensor eccentric training.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Freire, Bruno Bolla; Franke, Rodrigo de Azevedo; Geremia, Jeam Marcel; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2015-03-01

    Eccentric training has been popularized for physical conditioning and prevention/rehabilitation of musculoskeletal disorders, especially due to the expressive responses in terms of muscular strength gain. In view of evidence that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is able to increase exercise performance and accelerate post-exercise recovery, the aim of this study was to verify the effect of LLLT on hypertrophy and strengthening of knee extensor muscles submitted to eccentric training. Thirty healthy male subjects were randomized into three groups: Control Group (CG), Training Group (TG) and Training + LLLT Group (TLG). CG received no intervention, while TG and TLG were engaged on an 8-week knee extensor isokinetic eccentric training program. Only subjects from TLG were treated with LLLT (wavelength = 810 nm; power output = 200 mW; total dosage = 240 J) before each training session. Knee extensor muscle thickness and peak torque were assessed through ultrasonography and isokinetic dynamometry, respectively. CG presented no changes in any variable throughout the study, while eccentric training led to significant increases in muscle thickness and peak torque in TG and TLG. Subjects from TLG reached significantly higher percent changes compared to subjects from TG for sum of muscles' thicknesses (15.4 vs. 9.4%), isometric peak torque (20.5 vs. 13.7%), and eccentric peak torque (32.2 vs. 20.0%). LLLT applied before eccentric training sessions seems to improve the hypertrophic response and muscular strength gain in healthy subjects.

  3. A Short Submaximal Test to Determine the Fatigue Threshold of Knee Extensors in Young Men.

    PubMed

    De Ruiter, Cornelis J; Hamacher, Philipp; Wolfs, Bart G A

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a fatigue threshold obtained during submaximal repetitive isometric knee extensor contractions was related to V˙O2max measured during cycling and to exercise endurance. However, test duration is quite long (20-30 min in young people) to be of practical and possibly clinical use. The purpose of the present study was to test the day-to-day reliability of a newly developed short test that assessed the fatigue threshold during a submaximal test with the knee extensors. Fifteen healthy young males were tested three times, once using the original long protocol (5-min blocks of repetitive unilateral isometric knee extensor contractions with stepwise (5% MVC) increases of force) and twice using a new shorter protocol. In the latter, force increased by 2% MVC every 30 s, starting at 15% MVC (all contractions were 3 s on, 2 s off). The fatigue threshold was defined as the force where the EMG/force ratio started to increase and, compared with the force, at which deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration ([HHb]) increased steeply (HHb threshold). The EMG/force threshold during the short trials was reached after 3.9 ± 1.5 min of submaximal exercise and similar (P > 0.05) between days. The EMG/force threshold showed good reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.87, SEM = 2.2%) and did not differ between (P > 0.05) the short (31.1% ± 7.6% MVC) and long tests (30.5% ± 6.2% MVC), with a significant relation (r = 0.71) between both tests. Similar results (P > 0.05) were found for the HHb threshold. In young healthy men, a fatigue threshold can be detected during repetitive isometric knee extensor contractions using a short submaximal test, which may be suitable for untrained or frail people and patients.

  4. Alterations of neuromuscular function after prolonged running, cycling and skiing exercises.

    PubMed

    Millet, Guillaume Y; Lepers, Romuald

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that impairment of performance resulting from muscle fatigue differs according to the types of contraction involved, the muscular groups tested and the exercise duration/intensity. Depending on these variables, strength loss with fatigue can originate from several sites from the motor cortex through to contractile elements. This has been termed 'task dependency of muscle fatigue'. Only recently have studies focused on the origin of muscle fatigue after prolonged exercise lasting 30 minutes to several hours. Central fatigue has been shown to contribute to muscle fatigue during long-distance running by using different methods such as the twitch interpolation technique, the ratio of the electromyogram (EMG) signal during maximal voluntary contraction normalised to the M-wave amplitude or the comparison of the forces achieved with voluntary- and electrically-evoked contractions. Some central activation deficit has also been observed for knee extensor muscles in cycling but central fatigue after activities inducing low muscular damage was attenuated compared with running. While supraspinal fatigue cannot be ruled out, it can be suggested that spinal adaptation, such as inhibition from type III and IV group afferents or disfacilitation from muscle spindles, contributes to the reduced neural drive after prolonged exercise. It has been shown that after a 30 km run, individuals with the greatest knee extensor muscle strength loss experienced a significant activation deficit. However, central fatigue alone cannot explain the entire strength loss after prolonged exercise. Alterations of neuromuscular propagation, excitation-contraction coupling failure and modifications of the intrinsic capability of force production may also be involved. Electrically-evoked contractions and associated EMG can help to characterise peripheral fatigue. The purpose of this review is to further examine the central and peripheral mechanisms contributing to strength loss after

  5. Knee extensor fatigue threshold is related to whole-body VO2max.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Cornelis J; Maas, Ellen A; Wesseling, Mariska G H; de Haan, Arnold

    2012-07-01

    Above a given exercise intensity, rapid muscle fatigue will occur. We explored the possibility of assessing torque threshold for peripheral fatigue during single-legged repetitive isometric knee extensor exercise. We hypothesized this fatigue threshold to be related to the general aerobic fitness level and the so-called "critical torque" (CT) established with a recently validated 5-min all-out test. Seventeen healthy men (VO(2max) = 44.7-69.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) performed six submaximal (20%-55% maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]) 5-min bouts of 60 repetitive contractions (3-s on, 2-s off). Torque was changed between bouts in steps of 5% MVC to estimate the highest intensity (fatigue threshold) at which average changes in rsEMG, EMG median power frequency, and tissue deoxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy) of the three superficial knee extensor muscles were still <5%, signifying steady-state exercise with minimal peripheral fatigue. On another occasion, one bout was performed in an all-out manner with end-test torque representing CT. Fatigue threshold (40.0% ± 8.1% MVC) was related (r(2) = 0.57, P < 0.05) to CT (53.1% ± 10.0% MVC), but it was consistently lower (P < 0.05) and only fatigue threshold was significantly related to VO(2max) (r(2) = 0.68), and the first (r(2) = 0.45) and second (r(2) = 0.63) ventilatory threshold obtained during cycle ergometry. Performing submaximal bouts of knee extensor contractions, while monitoring EMG and deoxygenation, seems a feasible manner to estimate an aerobic capacity-related exercise intensity of peripheral fatigue onset. This test may be used to evaluate changes in endurance capacity of single muscle groups, without the necessity for all-out testing, which could be problematic with frail subjects.

  6. Time course of neuromuscular alterations during a prolonged running exercise.

    PubMed

    Place, Nicolas; Lepers, Romuald; Deley, Gaëlle; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the time course of contractile and neural alterations of knee extensor (KE) muscles during a long-duration running exercise. Nine well-trained triathletes and endurance runners sustained 55% of their maximal aerobic velocity (MAV) on a motorized treadmill for a period of 5 h. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), maximal voluntary activation level (%VA), and electrically evoked contractions (single and tetanic stimulations) of KE muscles were evaluated before, after each hour of exercise during short (10 min) interruptions, and at the end of the 5-h period. Oxygen uptake was also measured at regular intervals during the exercise. Reductions of MVC and %VA were significant after the 4th hour of exercise and reached -28% (P < 0.001) and -16% (P < 0.01) respectively at the end of the exercise. The reduction in MVC was highly correlated with the decline of %VA (r = 0.98, P < 0.001). M-wave was also altered after the fourth hour of exercise (P < 0.05) in both vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles. Peak twitch was potentiated at the end of the exercise (+18%, P = 0.01); 20- and 80-Hz maximal tetanic forces were not altered by the exercise. Oxygen uptake increased linearly during the running period (+18% at 5 h, P < 0.001). These findings suggest that KE maximal voluntary force generating capability is depressed in the final stages of a 5-h running exercise. Central activation failure and alterations in muscle action potential transmission were important mechanisms contributing to the impairment of the neuromuscular function during prolonged running.

  7. Muscle oxygenation of superficial and deep regions in knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles during repeated isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Kubo, K

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in muscle oxygenation of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles during repeated muscle contractions under the same condition. In addition, we compared changes in muscle oxygenation between superficial and deep regions of both muscles. Eleven healthy males participated in this study. During repeated knee extensions and plantar flexions (50 repetitions at 50% of the isometric maximum voluntary contraction for 3 s with 3 s relaxations), blood volume and oxygen saturation (StO₂) of the vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius muscles (superficial and deep region of each muscle) were measured using near infrared spectroscopy. The decrement of StO₂at the end of exercises was greater in plantar flexor muscle than in knee extensor muscle (P<0.001). For both muscles, the decrement of StO₂at the end of exercises was greater in the deep region than in the superficial one (both P<0.001). These results suggested that the oxygen utilization of plantar flexor muscle and deep regions of each muscle were higher than that of knee extensor muscle and superficial regions of each muscle.

  8. Bilateral Knee Extensor Fatigue Modulates Force and Responsiveness of the Corticospinal Pathway in the Non-fatigued, Dominant Elbow Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Šambaher, Nemanja; Aboodarda, Saied Jalal; Behm, David George

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced fatigue affects muscle performance and modulates corticospinal excitability in non-exercised muscles. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of bilateral knee extensor fatigue on dominant elbow flexor (EF) maximal voluntary force production and corticospinal excitability. Transcranial magnetic, transmastoid electrical and brachial plexus electrical stimulation (BPES) were used to investigate corticospinal, spinal, and muscle excitability of the dominant EF before and after a bilateral knee extensor fatiguing protocol or time matched rest period (control). For both sessions three stimuli were delivered every 1.5 s during the three pre-test time points and during the 1st, 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th post-test 5 s EF isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). In both conditions, overall, EF MVC force (p < 0.001) decreased progressively from repetition #1 to #12 during the post-test MVC protocol. EF MVC force (p < 0.001, ES = 0.9, Δ10.3%) decrements were more pronounced in the knee extensor fatigue intervention condition. In addition, there were no significant differences between conditions for biceps brachii electromyographic (EMG) activity (p = 0.43), motor evoked potentials (MEPs) amplitude (p = 0.908) or MEP silent period (SP; p = 0.776). However, the fatigue condition exhibited a lower MEP/cervicomedullary MEP (CMEP) ratio (p = 0.042, ES = 2.5, Δ25%) and a trend toward higher CMEP values (p = 0.08, ES = 0.5, Δ20.4%). These findings suggest that bilateral knee extensor fatigue can impair performance and modulate corticospinal excitability of the EF. PMID:26869902

  9. Reliability of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measurements in persons with late effects of polio.

    PubMed

    Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt; Lexell, Jan

    2010-06-01

    To assess the reliability of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measurements in persons with late effects of polio. A test-retest reliability study. Thirty men and women (mean age 63 (standard deviation 6.4) years) with verified late effects of polio. Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength in both lower limbs were measured twice 7 days apart using a Biodex dynamometer (isokinetic concentric contractions at 60 degrees /sec and isometric contractions with knee flexion angle 90 degrees) and a Leg Extension/Curl Rehab exercise machine with pneumatic resistance (HUR) (isotonic contractions). Reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC1,1), the mean difference between the test sessions (d) together with the 95% confidence intervals for d, the standard error of measurement (SEM and SEM%), the smallest real difference (SRD and SRD%) and Bland-Altman graphs. Test-retest agreements were high, (ICC1,1 0.93-0.99) and measurement errors generally small. The SEM% was 4-14% and the SRD% 11-39%, with the highest values for the isokinetic measurements. Knee muscle strength can be measured reliably and can be used to detect real changes after an intervention for a group of persons with late effects of polio, whereas the values may be too high for single individuals or to detect smaller short-term changes over time for a group of individuals.

  10. Time course of neuromuscular adaptations to knee extensor eccentric training.

    PubMed

    Baroni, B M; Rodrigues, R; Franke, R A; Geremia, J M; Rassier, D E; Vaz, M A

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the chronology of neural and morphological adaptations to knee extensor eccentric training and their contribution to strength gains in isometric, concentric and eccentric muscle actions. 20 male healthy subjects performed a 12-week eccentric training program on an isokinetic dynamometer, and neuromuscular evaluations of knee extensors were performed every 4 weeks. After 12 training weeks, significant increases were observed for: isometric (24%), concentric (15%) and eccentric (29%) torques; isometric (29%) and eccentric (33%) electromyographic activity; muscle thickness (10%) and anatomical cross-sectional area (19%). Eccentric and isometric torques increased progressively until the end of the program. Concentric torque and muscle mass parameters increased until the eighth training week, but did not change from this point to the twelfth training week. Eccentric and isometric activation increased at 4 and 8 training weeks, respectively, while no change was found in concentric activation. These results suggest that: 1) the relative increment in concentric strength was minor and does not relate to neural effects; 2) eccentric and isometric strength gains up to 8 training weeks are explained by the increased neural activation and muscle mass, whereas the increments in the last 4 training weeks seem to be associated with other mechanisms.

  11. Effects of whole-body vibration and resistance training on knee extensors muscular performance.

    PubMed

    Artero, E G; Espada-Fuentes, J C; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, J; Román, A; Gómez-López, P J; Gutiérrez, A

    2012-04-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) is being promoted as an efficient complement to resistance training. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week program of WBV in combination with resistance training on knee extensors muscular performance. A group of 29 young adults (25 men, 4 women; age 21.8 ± 1.5) performed a WBV plus resistance training program (WBV + RES) or an identical exercise program in absence of vibration (placebo plus resistance training, PL + RES). Participants were evaluated for anthropometry, muscle strength (half-squat three repetition maximum, 3RM), knee extensors isokinetic dynamometry (180° and 60° s(-1)) and counter-movement jump (CMJ). After the intervention, percent body fat significantly decreased 2.1% only in WBV + RES (P < 0.001), while muscle mass significantly increased in both groups (P < 0.01): 2.2 and 2.8 kg in PL + RES and WBV + RES, respectively. No significant differences were observed in isokinetic strength or CMJ, and 3RM significantly increased in both groups (P < 0.001): 64.2 kg (52% of baseline) in PL + RES, and 46.9 kg (43%) in WBV + RES. The addition of WBV to resistance training during 8 weeks, in recreationally active young adults, did not result in a larger muscular performance improvement compared to an identical exercise program in absence of vibration. Muscle mass also seemed to be equally affected with or without vibration, yet body fat could be exclusively decreased by WBV. Further research is required to clarify whether WBV, as a complement to resistance training, produces additional specific benefits.

  12. Comparison of Recovery Strategies on Maximal Force-Generating Capacity and Electromyographic Activity Level of the Knee Extensor Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Zarrouk, Nidhal; Rebai, Haithem; Yahia, Abdelmoneem; Souissi, Nizar; Hug, François; Dogui, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Context: With regard to intermittent training exercise, the effects of the mode of recovery on subsequent performance are equivocal. Objective: To compare the effects of 3 types of recovery intervention on peak torque (PT) and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the knee extensor muscles after fatiguing isokinetic intermittent concentric exercise. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eight elite judo players (age = 18.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 180 ± 3 cm, mass = 77.0 ± 4.2 kg). Interventions : Participants completed 3 randomized sessions within 7 days. Each session consisted of 5 sets of 10 concentric knee extensions at 80% PT at 120°/s, with 3 minutes of recovery between sets. Recovery interventions were passive, active, and electromyostimulation. The PT and maximal EMG activity were recorded simultaneously while participants performed isokinetic dynamometer trials before and 3 minutes after the resistance exercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): The PT and maximal EMG activity from the knee extensors were quantified at isokinetic velocities of 60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s, with 5 repetitions at each velocity. Results: The reduction in PT observed after electromyo-stimulation was less than that seen after passive (P < .001) or active recovery (P < .001). The reduction in PT was less after passive recovery than after active recovery (P < .001). The maximal EMG activity level observed after electromyostimulation was higher than that seen after active recovery (P < .05). Conclusions: Electromyostimulation was an effective recovery tool in decreasing neuromuscular fatigue after high-intensity, intermittent isokinetic concentric exercise for the knee extensor muscles. Also, active recovery induced the greatest amount of neuromuscular fatigue. PMID:21944070

  13. Effect of graded hypoxia on supraspinal contributions to fatigue with unilateral knee-extensor contractions.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Stuart; Ross, Emma Z; Romer, Lee M

    2010-12-01

    Supraspinal fatigue, defined as an exercise-induced decline in force caused by suboptimal output from the motor cortex, accounts for over one-quarter of the force loss after fatiguing contractions of the knee extensors in normoxia. We tested the hypothesis that the relative contribution of supraspinal fatigue would be elevated with increasing severities of acute hypoxia. On separate days, 11 healthy men performed sets of intermittent, isometric, quadriceps contractions at 60% maximal voluntary contraction to task failure in normoxia (inspired O(2) fraction/arterial O(2) saturation = 0.21/98%), mild hypoxia (0.16/93%), moderate hypoxia (0.13/85%), and severe hypoxia (0.10/74%). Electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve was performed to assess neuromuscular transmission and contractile properties of muscle fibers. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered to the motor cortex to quantify corticospinal excitability and voluntary activation. After 10 min of breathing the test gas, neuromuscular function and cortical voluntary activation prefatigue were unaffected in any condition. The fatigue protocol resulted in ∼ 30% declines in maximal voluntary contraction force in all conditions, despite differences in time-to-task failure (24.7 min in normoxia vs. 15.9 min in severe hypoxia, P < 0.05). Potentiated quadriceps twitch force declined in all conditions, but the decline in severe hypoxia was less than that in normoxia (P < 0.05). Cortical voluntary activation also declined in all conditions, but the deficit in severe hypoxia exceeded that in normoxia (P < 0.05). The additional central fatigue in severe hypoxia was not due to altered corticospinal excitability, as electromyographic responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation were unchanged. Results indicate that peripheral mechanisms of fatigue contribute relatively more to the reduction in force-generating capacity of the knee extensors following submaximal intermittent isometric contractions in normoxia

  14. Maximal anaerobic performance of the knee extensor muscles during growth.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, C; Lagassé, P; Bouchard, C; Simoneau, J A

    1991-09-01

    The extent of the growth changes in maximal work output during 10 s (MWO10), 30 s (MWO30), and 90 s (MWO90) of maximal repetitive knee flexions and extensions assessed on a modified Hydra-Gym machine was investigated in 84 boys and 83 girls, 9-19 yr of age. Body weight, fat mass and fat free mass by underwater weighing, and thigh volume and cross-sectional area were also determined. No difference was observed in the absolute MWO10, MWO30, and MWO90 between girls and boys at 9 and 11 yr of age. However, significant differences appeared between genders from 13 yr of age onward, anaerobic performances of the knee extensor muscles of girls representing about 75% or even less of those of boys. The analysis of variance revealed that maximal work ouput during the three knee extension tests was significantly greater in males as well as in females from 9 to 18 yr, regardless how performance was related to morphological characteristics. Performance in absolute values or expressed per unit of body weight, fat free mass, and thigh cross-sectional area for the MWO10, MWO30, and MWO90 tests were almost always significantly lower in both genders when performances of the 9-yr-old group were compared with those of the 13-yr-old group or older groups. Improvement in maximal work output during the 10-s, 30-s, or 90-s knee extension tests with age occurred mainly between 9 and 15 yr in both genders. The results of the present study show that there are gender differences in predominantly anaerobic performances during growth and reveal that increase in muscle mass does not appear to be the only factor responsible for the age-related increment in the anaerobic working capacity of the knee extensor muscles.

  15. Knee Extensor Electromyographic Activity-to-Work Ratio is Greater With Isotonic Than Isokinetic Contractions.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Randy J.; Westwood, Kevin C.

    2001-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether isotonic or isokinetic contractions produced greater electromyographic (EMG) activity per unit of work during isotonic and isokinetic knee-extension exercise. DESIGN AND SETTING: Subjects performed three 3-second maximal voluntary isometric contractions of the dominant knee extensors for EMG normalization. Exercise testing performed on the Biodex System 3 Dynamometer involved 10 isokinetic contractions at 180 degrees.s(-1) and 10 isotonic contractions with the resistance set at 50% of the previously recorded maximal voluntary isometric contraction. SUBJECTS: Recreationally active college students (10 men and 11 women). MEASUREMENTS: Surface EMG signals were collected from the vastus medialis and lateralis muscles and then integrated (IEMG) over the concentric phase of each repetition for both exercises. The IEMG was divided by the total work performed during the concentric phase for each exercise (IEMG/W). RESULTS: We analyzed the IEMG/W data using a 1-between (sex), 2-within (exercise and muscle) repeated-measures analysis of variance. There was a significant main effect for exercise, with the isotonic IEMG/W value being significantly greater than the isokinetic IEMG/W value. Additionally, the IEMG/W relationship did not appear to be affected by sex or individual muscle tested. CONCLUSIONS: Per unit of work performed, the isotonic contractions resulted in greater motor unit recruitment or an increased rate of firing, or both. This finding may have implications for the early phase of rehabilitation, when goals include complete motor unit recruitment of injured or atrophied muscles.

  16. Knee Extensor Electromyographic Activity-to-Work Ratio is Greater With Isotonic Than Isokinetic Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Kevin C.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether isotonic or isokinetic contractions produced greater electromyographic (EMG) activity per unit of work during isotonic and isokinetic knee-extension exercise. Design and Setting: Subjects performed three 3-second maximal voluntary isometric contractions of the dominant knee extensors for EMG normalization. Exercise testing performed on the Biodex System 3 Dynamometer involved 10 isokinetic contractions at 180°·s−1 and 10 isotonic contractions with the resistance set at 50% of the previously recorded maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Subjects: Recreationally active college students (10 men and 11 women). Measurements: Surface EMG signals were collected from the vastus medialis and lateralis muscles and then integrated (IEMG) over the concentric phase of each repetition for both exercises. The IEMG was divided by the total work performed during the concentric phase for each exercise (IEMG/W). Results: We analyzed the IEMG/W data using a 1-between (sex), 2-within (exercise and muscle) repeated-measures analysis of variance. There was a significant main effect for exercise, with the isotonic IEMG/W value being significantly greater than the isokinetic IEMG/W value. Additionally, the IEMG/W relationship did not appear to be affected by sex or individual muscle tested. Conclusions: Per unit of work performed, the isotonic contractions resulted in greater motor unit recruitment or an increased rate of firing, or both. This finding may have implications for the early phase of rehabilitation, when goals include complete motor unit recruitment of injured or atrophied muscles. PMID:12937480

  17. Simultaneous Knee Extensor Muscle Action Induces an Increase in Voluntary Force Generation of Plantar Flexor Muscles.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito; Shioda, Kohei; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2017-02-01

    Suzuki, T, Shioda, K, Kinugasa, R, and Fukashiro, S. Simultaneous knee extensor muscle action induces an increase in voluntary force generation of plantar flexor muscles. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 365-371, 2017-Maximum activation of the plantar flexor muscles is required for various sporting activities that involve simultaneous plantar flexion and knee extension. During a multi-joint movement, activation of the plantar flexor muscles is affected by the activity of the knee extensor muscles. We hypothesized that coactivation of the plantar flexor muscles and knee extensor muscles would result in a higher plantar flexion torque. To test this hypothesis, 8 male volunteers performed maximum voluntary isometric action of the plantar flexor muscles with and without isometric action of the knee extensor muscles. Surface electromyographic data were collected from 8 muscles of the right lower limb. Voluntary activation of the triceps surae muscles, evaluated using the interpolated twitch technique, significantly increased by 6.4 percentage points with intentional knee extensor action (p = 0.0491). This finding is in line with a significant increase in the average rectified value of the electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, fibularis longus, and soleus muscles (p = 0.013, 0.010, and 0.045, respectively). The resultant plantar flexion torque also significantly increased by 11.5% of the predetermined maximum (p = 0.031). These results suggest that higher plantar flexor activation coupled with knee extensor activation facilitates force generation during a multi-joint task.

  18. High-intensity knee extensor training restores skeletal muscle function in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Brønstad, Eivind; Rognmo, Oivind; Tjonna, Arnt Erik; Dedichen, Hans Henrich; Kirkeby-Garstad, Idar; Håberg, Asta K; Bjørk Ingul, Charlotte; Wisløff, Ulrik; Steinshamn, Sigurd

    2012-11-01

    Improving reduced skeletal muscle function is important for optimising exercise tolerance and quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. By applying high-intensity training to a small muscle group, we hypothesised a normalisation of muscle function. Seven patients with COPD performed 6 weeks (3 days·week(-1)) of high-intensity interval aerobic knee extensor exercise training. Five age-matched healthy individuals served as a reference group. Muscle oxygen uptake and mitochondrial respiration of the vastus lateralis muscle were measured before and after the 6-week training programme. Initial peak work and maximal mitochondrial respiration were reduced in COPD patients and improved significantly after the training programme. Peak power and maximal mitochondrial respiration in vastus lateralis muscle increased to the level of the control subjects and were mainly mediated via improved complex I respiration. Furthermore, when normalised to citrate synthase activity, no difference in maximal respiration was found either after the intervention or compared to controls, suggesting normal functioning mitochondrial complexes. The present study shows that high-intensity training of a restricted muscle group is highly effective in restoring skeletal muscle function in COPD patients.

  19. Neuromuscular function following prolonged intense self-paced exercise in hot climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Périard, Julien D; Cramer, Matthew N; Chapman, Phillip G; Caillaud, Corinne; Thompson, Martin W

    2011-08-01

    Muscle weakness following constant load exercise under heat stress has been associated with hyperthermia-induced central fatigue. However, evidence of central fatigue influencing intense self-paced exercise in the heat is lacking. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate force production capacity and central nervous system drive in skeletal muscle pre- and post-cycle ergometer exercise in hot and cool conditions. Nine trained male cyclists performed a 20-s maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) prior to (control) and following a 40-km time trial in hot (35°C) and cool (20°C) conditions. MVC force production and voluntary activation of the knee extensors was evaluated via percutaneous tetanic stimulation. In the cool condition, rectal temperature increased to 39.0°C and reached 39.8°C in the heat (P < 0.01). Following exercise in the hot and cool conditions, peak force declined by ~90 and ~99 N, respectively, compared with control (P < 0.01). Mean force decreased by 15% (hot) and 14% (cool) (P < 0.01 vs. control). Voluntary activation during the post-exercise MVC declined to 93.7% (hot) and 93.9% (cool) (P < 0.05 vs. control). The post-exercise decline in voluntary activation represented ~20% of the decrease in mean force production in both conditions. Therefore, the additional increase in rectal temperature did not exacerbate the loss of force production following self-paced exercise in the heat. The impairment in force production indicates that the fatigue exhibited by the quadriceps is mainly of peripheral origin and a consequence of the prolonged contractile activity associated with exercise.

  20. The Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Pilot Project: Effects on Knee Extensor and Plantar Flexor Muscle Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Haddad, F.; Lee, S.; Baker, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the effects of artificial gravity (2.5 g) on skeletal muscle strength and key anabolic/catabolic markers known to regulate muscle mass. Two groups of subjects were selected for study: 1) a 21 day-bed rest (BR) control (C) group (N=7); and 2) an AG group (N=8), which was exposed to 21 days of bed-rest plus daily 1 hr exposures to AG (2.5 g). This particular experiment was part of an integrated AG Pilot Project sponsored by NASA/Johnson Space Center. The in vivo torque-velocity relationships of the knee extensors and plantar flexors of the ankle were determined pre and post treatment. Also, pre- and post treatment biopsy samples were obtained from both the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles and were used, in part, for a series of analyses on gene expression (mRNA abundance) of key factors implicated in the anabolic versus catabolic state of the muscle. Post/Pre toque-velocity determinations revealed greater decrements in knee extensor performance in the C versus AG group (P less than 0.04). The plantar flexor muscle group of the AG subjects actually demonstrated a net gain in torque-velocity relationship; whereas, in the C group the overall post/pre responses declined (AG vs C; P less than 0.001). Measurements of muscle fiber cross-sectional area (for both muscles) demonstrated a loss of approx. 20% in the C group while no losses were evident in the AG group. RT-PCR analyses of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated that markers of growth and cytoskeletal integrity (IGF-1, IGF-1 BP4, mechano growth factor, total RNA, and pro-collagen 3a) were higher in the AG group, whereas catabolic markers (myostatin and atrogen) were elevated in the C group. Importantly, these patterns were seen in both muscles. Based on these observations we conclude that paradigms of AG have the potential to maintain the functional, biochemical, and structural homeostasis of skeletal muscle in the face of chronic unloading states. These findings also

  1. The Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Pilot Project: Effects on Knee Extensor and Plantar Flexor Muscle Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Haddad, F.; Lee, S.; Baker, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the effects of artificial gravity (2.5 g) on skeletal muscle strength and key anabolic/catabolic markers known to regulate muscle mass. Two groups of subjects were selected for study: 1) a 21 day-bed rest (BR) control (C) group (N=7); and 2) an AG group (N=8), which was exposed to 21 days of bed-rest plus daily 1 hr exposures to AG (2.5 g). This particular experiment was part of an integrated AG Pilot Project sponsored by NASA/Johnson Space Center. The in vivo torque-velocity relationships of the knee extensors and plantar flexors of the ankle were determined pre and post treatment. Also, pre- and post treatment biopsy samples were obtained from both the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles and were used, in part, for a series of analyses on gene expression (mRNA abundance) of key factors implicated in the anabolic versus catabolic state of the muscle. Post/Pre toque-velocity determinations revealed greater decrements in knee extensor performance in the C versus AG group (P less than 0.04). The plantar flexor muscle group of the AG subjects actually demonstrated a net gain in torque-velocity relationship; whereas, in the C group the overall post/pre responses declined (AG vs C; P less than 0.001). Measurements of muscle fiber cross-sectional area (for both muscles) demonstrated a loss of approx. 20% in the C group while no losses were evident in the AG group. RT-PCR analyses of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated that markers of growth and cytoskeletal integrity (IGF-1, IGF-1 BP4, mechano growth factor, total RNA, and pro-collagen 3a) were higher in the AG group, whereas catabolic markers (myostatin and atrogen) were elevated in the C group. Importantly, these patterns were seen in both muscles. Based on these observations we conclude that paradigms of AG have the potential to maintain the functional, biochemical, and structural homeostasis of skeletal muscle in the face of chronic unloading states. These findings also

  2. Superior Effects of Eccentric to Concentric Knee Extensor Resistance Training on Physical Fitness, Insulin Sensitivity and Lipid Profiles of Elderly Men.

    PubMed

    Chen, Trevor Chung-Ching; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Huang, Guan-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Tseng, Kuo-Wei; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that eccentric training of knee extensors is effective for improving blood insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles to a greater extent than concentric training in young women. However, it is not known whether this is also the case for elderly individuals. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that eccentric training of the knee extensors would improve physical function and health parameters (e.g., blood lipid profiles) of older adults better than concentric training. Healthy elderly men (60-76 years) were assigned to either eccentric training or concentric training group (n = 13/group), and performed 30-60 eccentric or concentric contractions of knee extensors once a week. The intensity was progressively increased over 12 weeks from 10 to 100% of maximal concentric strength for eccentric training and from 50 to 100% for concentric training. Outcome measures were taken before and 4 days after the training period. The results showed that no sings of muscle damage were observed after any sessions. Functional physical fitness (e.g., 30-s chair stand) and maximal concentric contraction strength of the knee extensors increased greater (P ≤ 0.05) after eccentric training than concentric training. Homeostasis model assessment, oral glucose tolerance test and whole blood glycosylated hemoglobin showed improvement of insulin sensitivity only after eccentric training (P ≤ 0.05). Greater (P ≤ 0.05) decreases in fasting triacylglycerols, total, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterols were evident after eccentric training than concentric training, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterols increased only after eccentric training. These results support the hypothesis and suggest that it is better to focus on eccentric contractions in exercise medicine.

  3. Superior Effects of Eccentric to Concentric Knee Extensor Resistance Training on Physical Fitness, Insulin Sensitivity and Lipid Profiles of Elderly Men

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Trevor Chung-Ching; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Huang, Guan-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Tseng, Kuo-Wei; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that eccentric training of knee extensors is effective for improving blood insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles to a greater extent than concentric training in young women. However, it is not known whether this is also the case for elderly individuals. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that eccentric training of the knee extensors would improve physical function and health parameters (e.g., blood lipid profiles) of older adults better than concentric training. Healthy elderly men (60–76 years) were assigned to either eccentric training or concentric training group (n = 13/group), and performed 30–60 eccentric or concentric contractions of knee extensors once a week. The intensity was progressively increased over 12 weeks from 10 to 100% of maximal concentric strength for eccentric training and from 50 to 100% for concentric training. Outcome measures were taken before and 4 days after the training period. The results showed that no sings of muscle damage were observed after any sessions. Functional physical fitness (e.g., 30-s chair stand) and maximal concentric contraction strength of the knee extensors increased greater (P ≤ 0.05) after eccentric training than concentric training. Homeostasis model assessment, oral glucose tolerance test and whole blood glycosylated hemoglobin showed improvement of insulin sensitivity only after eccentric training (P ≤ 0.05). Greater (P ≤ 0.05) decreases in fasting triacylglycerols, total, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterols were evident after eccentric training than concentric training, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterols increased only after eccentric training. These results support the hypothesis and suggest that it is better to focus on eccentric contractions in exercise medicine. PMID:28443029

  4. Functional imaging of muscle oxygenation and oxygen consumption in the knee extensor muscles during isometric contractions by spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kek, Khai Jun; Miyakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we showed that exercise type- and intensity-dependent regional differences in muscle oxygenation and oxygen consumption rate (Vo II) of the knee extensor muscles could be imaged in real time with a multi-channel spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SR-NIRS) imaging device. Healthy subjects performed isometric knee extension exercise for 30 s (without- or with-leg-press action) at different exercise intensities [10%, 40% and 70% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)]. "Separation-type" probes were attached to the skin over the major knee extensor muscles: vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM). Placement of the probes enabled simultaneously measurement of 12 sites over a skin area of about 30 cm2 (temporal resolution = 0.25 s). Local Vo II of each muscle, resting Vo II (Vo II, rest) and recovery Vo II (Vo II, rec ), were determined with arterial occlusion before the start and after the end of contraction, respectively. There was no significant difference between the values of Vo II rest, in the muscles. However, during knee extension exercise without-leg-press action, Vo II rec, value of the RF was significantly greater than the values of the VL and VM at all exercise intensities. In contrast, during exercise with-leg-press action, Vo II rec, values of the RF and VM were greater than those of the VL, especially during exercise at 40% and 70% MVC. In summary, the regional differences in muscle oxygenation and Vo II of the knee extensor muscles, probably due to the differences in relative contributions of muscles to exercise and in muscle architecture, were imaged using SR-NIRS.

  5. The Relationship Between Spasticity and Muscle Volume of the Knee Extensors in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Samuel R.; Prosser, Laura A.; Lee, Samuel C. K.; Lauer, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between spasticity and muscle volume in children with cerebral palsy (CP), using isokinetic dynamometry and magnetic resonance imaging. Methods A retrospective sample of 8 children with diplegic CP was analyzed. One set of 10 passive knee flexion movements was completed at a velocity of 180° per second with concurrent surface electromyography of the medial hamstrings (MH) and vastus lateralis (VL) to assess knee extensor spasticity. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure maximum cross-sectional area and muscle volume of the quadriceps femoris. Results The quadriceps femoris muscle volume was positively correlated with MH reflex activity, VL reflex activity, MH/VL co-contraction, and peak knee extensor passive torque (P < .05). Conclusion The present findings suggest that higher levels of knee extensor muscle spasticity are associated with greater quadriceps muscle volume in children with spastic diplegic CP. PMID:22466388

  6. Tennis in hot and cool conditions decreases the rapid muscle torque production capacity of the knee extensors but not of the plantar flexors

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Olivier; Racinais, Sébastien; Périard, Julien D

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the time course of changes in rapid muscle force/torque production capacity and neuromuscular activity of lower limb muscles in response to prolonged (∼2 h) match-play tennis under heat stress. Methods The rates of torque development (RTD) and electromyographic activity (EMG; ie, root mean square) rise were recorded from 0 to 30, –50, –100 and –200 ms during brief (3–5 s) explosive maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE) and plantar flexors (PF), along with the peak RTD within the entirety of the torque-time curve. These values were recorded in 12 male tennis players before (prematch) and after (postmatch, 24 and 48 h) match-play in HOT (∼37°C) and COOL (∼22°C) conditions. Results The postmatch core temperature was greater in the HOT (∼39.4°C) vs COOL (∼38.7°C) condition (p<0.05). Reductions in KE RTD occurred within the 0–200 ms epoch after contraction onset postmatch and at 24 h, compared with prematch, independent of environmental conditions (p<0.05). A similar reduction in the KE peak RTD was also observed postmatch relative to prematch (p<0.05). No differences in KE RTD values were observed after normalisation to MVC torque. Furthermore, the rate of KE EMG activity rise remained unchanged. Conversely, the PF contractile RTD and rate of EMG activity rise were unaffected by the exercise or environmental conditions. Conclusions In the KE, a reduction in maximal torque production capacity following prolonged match-play tennis appears to account for the decrease in the rate of torque development, independent of environmental conditions, while remaining unchanged in the PF. PMID:24668381

  7. Improved knee extensor strength with resistance training associates with muscle specific miRNAs in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María L; Marsh, Anthony P; Leng, Iris; Nicklas, Barbara J; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-02-01

    Regular exercise, particularly resistance training (RT), is the only therapy known to consistently improve muscle strength and quality (force per unit of mass) in older persons, but there is considerable variability in responsiveness to training. Identifying sensitive diagnostic biomarkers of responsiveness to RT may inform the design of a more efficient exercise regimen to improve muscle strength in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We quantified six muscle specific miRNAs (miR-1, -133a, -133b, -206, -208b and -499) in both muscle tissue and blood plasma, and their relationship with knee extensor strength in seven older (age=70.5 ± 2.5 years) adults before and after 5 months of RT. MiRNAs differentially responded to RT; muscle miR-133b decreased, while all plasma miRNAs tended to increase. Percent changes in knee extensor strength with RT showed strong positive correlations with percent changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 and with percent changes in plasma and plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio. Baseline level of plasma or plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio further predicts muscle response to RT, while changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, and -206 may correlate with muscle TNNT1 gene alternative splicing in response to RT. Our results indicate that RT alters muscle specific miRNAs in muscle and plasma, and that these changes account for some of the variation in strength responses to RT in older adults.

  8. Improved Knee Extensor Strength with Resistance Training Associates with Muscle Specific miRNAs in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María L.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Leng, Iris; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise, particularly resistance training (RT), is the only therapy known to consistently improve muscle strength and quality (force per unit of mass) in older persons, but there is considerable variability in responsiveness to training. Identifying sensitive diagnostic biomarkers of responsiveness to RT may inform the design of a more efficient exercise regimen to improve muscle strength in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. We quantified six muscle specific miRNAs (miR-1, -133a, -133b, -206, -208b and -499) in both muscle tissue and blood plasma, and their relationship with knee extensor strength in seven older (age = 70.5 ± 2.5 years) adults before and after 5 months of RT. MiRNAs differentially responded to RT; muscle miR-133b decreased, while all plasma miRNAs tended to increase. Percent changes in knee extensor strength with RT showed strong positive correlations with percent changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, -206 and with percent changes in plasma and plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio. Baseline level of plasma or plasma/muscle miR-499 ratio further predicts muscle response to RT, while changes in muscle miR-133a, -133b, -206 may correlate with muscle TNNT1gene alternative splicing in response to RT. Our results indicate that RT alters muscle specific miRNAs in muscle and plasma, and that these changes account for some of the variation in strength responses to RT in older adults. PMID:25560803

  9. The Effect of Visual Impairment on the Strength of Children's Hip and Knee Extensors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, L.; Ng, G. Y.

    1997-01-01

    A test of 32 children's hip and knee extensors found that children born blind or with low vision are at risk of developing weak lower-limb extensors, with congenitally blind children at greatest risk. After correcting for lean body weight, the differences between sighted children and those with low vision were insignificant. Results support the…

  10. Tendon properties and muscle architecture for knee extensors and plantar flexors in boys and men.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Teshima, Takanori; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro; Hirose, Norikazu; Tsunoda, Naoya

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the elastic properties and size of tendinous structures and muscle architecture for knee extensors and plantar flexors in boys and men. Twenty-two early pubescent boys (9.6-12.7yrs) and 23 young adult men (19.8-26.2yrs) participated in this study. The maximal strain and thickness of tendinous structures for knee extensors and plantar flexors were measured using ultrasonography. In addition, the fascicle lengths of vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius muscles were measured. The maximal strain of tendinous structures for plantar flexors was significantly greater in boys than in men, while there was no difference in the maximal strain for knee extensors between the two groups. The relative thickness (to body mass(1/3)) of Achilles tendon was significantly greater in boys than in men, although there was no difference in that of patellar tendon between the two groups. The relative fascicle length (to limb length) of vastus lateralis muscle was significantly lower in boys than in men, although there was no difference in that of medial gastrocnemius muscle between the two groups. These results suggest that the amount of changes in the elastic properties and sizes of tendinous structures and in the fascicle lengths from early pubescence to maturity is different for different muscle groups (in particular, the knee extensors and the plantar flexors). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic demand and muscle damage induced by eccentric cycling of knee extensor and flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Peñailillo, Luis; Guzmán, Nicolás; Cangas, José; Reyes, Alvaro; Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the metabolic demand and extent of muscle damage of eccentric cycling targeting knee flexor (FLEX) and knee extensor (EXT) muscles. Eight sedentary men (23.3 ± 0.7 y) underwent two eccentric cycling sessions (EXT and FLEX) of 30 min each, at 60% of the maximum power output. Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (HR) and rated perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during cycling. Countermovement and squat jumps (CMJ and SJ), muscle flexibility, muscle soreness and pain pressure threshold (PPT) of knee extensor and flexor muscles were measured before, immediately after and 1-4 days after cycling. FLEX showed greater VO2 (+23%), HR (+14%) and RPE (+18%) than EXT. CMJ and SJ performance decreased similarly after cycling. Muscle soreness increased more after EXT than FLEX and PPT decreased in knee extensor muscles after EXT and decreased in knee flexor muscles after FLEX. Greater loss of muscle flexibility in knee flexor muscles after FLEX was observed. Eccentric cycling of knee flexor muscles is metabolically more demanding than that of knee extensors, however muscle damage induced is similar. Knee flexors experienced greater loss of muscle flexibility possibly due to increased muscle stiffness following eccentric contractions.

  12. The Effect of Visual Impairment on the Strength of Children's Hip and Knee Extensors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, L.; Ng, G. Y.

    1997-01-01

    A test of 32 children's hip and knee extensors found that children born blind or with low vision are at risk of developing weak lower-limb extensors, with congenitally blind children at greatest risk. After correcting for lean body weight, the differences between sighted children and those with low vision were insignificant. Results support the…

  13. Strength Deficit of Knee Extensor Muscles of Individuals with Down Syndrome from Childhood to Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cioni, M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The isokinetic strength of the knee extensor muscles of both limbs was evaluated in 25 children and adolescents with Down's syndrome. The Down's syndrome subjects were significantly weaker than control groups with average intelligence and with non-Down's syndrome mental retardation. Results suggested a dysfunction of the neuromuscular system,…

  14. Angle- and gender-specific quadriceps femoris muscle recruitment and knee extensor torque.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, Danny M; Salfetnikov, Yuliya; Campy, Robert M; Coelho, Alan J

    2004-11-01

    The objectives were to examine knee angle-, and gender-specific knee extensor torque output and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle recruitment during maximal effort, voluntary contractions. Fourteen young adult men and 15 young adult women performed three isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), in a random order, with the knee at 0 degrees (terminal extension), 10 degrees, 30 degrees, 50 degrees, 70 degrees, and 90 degrees flexion. Knee extensor peak torque (PT), and average torque (AT) were expressed in absolute (N m), relative (N m kg(-1)) and allometric-modeled (N m kg(-n)) units. Vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF) muscle EMG signals were full-wave rectified and integrated over the middle 3 s of each contraction, averaged over the three trials at each knee angle, and normalized to the activity recorded at 0 degrees. Muscle recruitment efficiency was calculated as the ratio of the normalized EMG of each muscle to the allometric-modeled average torque (normalized to the values at 0 degrees flexion), and expressed as a percent. Men generated significantly greater knee extensor PT and AT than women in absolute, relative and allometric-modeled units. Absolute and relative PT and AT were significantly highest at 70 degrees, while allometric-modeled values were observed to increase significantly across knee joint angles 10-90 degrees. VM EMG was significantly greater than the VL and RF muscles across all angles, and followed a similar pattern to absolute knee extensor torque. Recruitment efficiency improved across knee joint angles 10-90 degrees and was highest for the VL muscle. VM recruitment efficiency improved more than the VL and RF muscles across 70-90 degrees flexion. The findings demonstrate angle-, and gender-specific responses of knee extensor torque to maximal-effort contractions, while superficial QF muscle recruitment was most efficient at 90 degrees, and less dependent on gender.

  15. Hip-Extensor Strength, Trunk Posture, and Use of the Knee-Extensor Muscles During Running.

    PubMed

    Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Powers, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    Diminished hip-muscle performance has been proposed to contribute to various knee injuries. To determine the association between hip-extensor muscle strength and sagittal-plane trunk posture and the relationships among hip-extensor muscle strength and hip- and knee-extensor work during running. Descriptive laboratory study. Musculoskeletal biomechanical laboratory. A total of 40 asymptomatic recreational runners, 20 men (age = 27.1 ± 7.0 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.69 m, mass = 71.1 ± 8.2 kg) and 20 women (age = 26.2 ± 5.8 years, height = 1.65 ± 0.74 m, mass = 60.6 ± 6.6 kg), participated. Maximum isometric strength of the hip extensors was assessed using a dynamometer. Sagittal-plane trunk posture (calculated relative to the global vertical axis) and hip- and knee-extensor work (sum of energy absorption and generation) during the stance phase of running were quantified while participants ran over ground at a controlled speed of 3.4 m/s. We used Pearson product moment correlations to examine the relationships among hip-extensor strength, mean sagittal-plane trunk-flexion angle, hip-extensor work, and knee-extensor work. Hip-extensor strength was correlated positively with trunk-flexion angle (r = 0.55, P < .001) and hip-extensor work (r = 0.46, P = .003). It was correlated inversely with knee-extensor work (r = -0.39, P = .01). All the correlations remained after adjusting for sex. Our findings suggest that runners with hip-extensor weakness used a more upright trunk posture. This strategy led to an overreliance on the knee extensors and may contribute to overuse running injuries at the knee.

  16. Chronic knee extensor mechanism lesions in total knee arthroplasty: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    COTTINO, UMBERTO; DELEDDA, DAVIDE; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BLONNA, DAVIDE; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Knee extensor mechanism rupture is a serious complication of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Its prevalence ranges from 1 to 10% and it is commonly observed as a chronic multifactorial pathology with the patellar tendon as the most common site of rupture. Knee extensor mechanism reconstruction can be performed using allogenic or synthetic grafts. In the literature it is still not clear whether one of these techniques is superior to the other and the choice is usually tailored to the patient case by case. Allografts allow better restoration of the anatomical landmarks, whereas the mesh technique is more reproducible and the graft does not elongate over time. Allografts carry an increased risk of infection compared with synthetic reconstructions, while the mesh technique is cheaper and more readily available. In this paper, we review the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of this pathology, drawing on the most recent literature. PMID:27900308

  17. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY ON TENDON RUPTURES OF THE KNEE EXTENSOR MECHANISM AT A LEVEL 1 HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    Pires e Albuquerque, Rodrigo; Prado, Juliano; Hara, Rafael; Ferreira, Evaldo; Schiavo, Leonardo; Giordano, Vincenzo; Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro do; Barretto, João Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to review the epidemiological aspects of tendon ruptures of the knee extensor apparatus at a level 1 hospital. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 76 lesions of the knee extensor apparatus that were treated surgically at the Miguel Couto Municipal Hospital between March 2004 and March 2011. We took into consideration age, sex, trauma mechanism, anatomical classification of the lesion, affected side, comorbidities and associated lesions. Results: Among the patients studied, 68 were male and the mean age was 36 years. Regarding the trauma mechanism, 62 lesions occurred due to direct trauma; the right side was affected in 21 cases; eight presented comorbidities and four presented associated lesions. Conclusion: The majority of the patients were male, at an economically active age (young people), and were victims of direct trauma. Ruptures of the patellar ligament were the most frequent lesions. Associated lesions were rare and comorbidities were infrequent in our sample. PMID:27047890

  18. The effects of knee extensor eccentric training on functional tests in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Santos, Heleodório H; Avila, Mariana A; Hanashiro, Daniela N; Camargo, Paula R; Salvini, Tania F

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that eccentric training increases muscle strength and promotes greater neural activation, and therefore has been used in the recovery of knee extensors. The hypothesis of this study was that there would be a strong correlation between knee extensor torque and functional tests. To investigate the relationship between knee extensor peak torque and functional tests of agility (runs) and propulsion (hop for distance) after short-term isokinetic eccentric training. Twenty healthy and active male undergraduate students (age 22.5 ± 2.1 years; height 1.72 ± 0.10 m; weight 67.8 ± 9.5 kg; body mass index: 22.5 ± 2.0 kg/m²), with no abnormalities or history of injury of the limbs, performed an isokinetic assessment of the knee extensors and flexors and also functional tests before and after isokinetic training, which consisted of 3 sets of 10 MVECs at 30º/s, with 3 minutes of rest between sets, twice a week for 6 weeks. The eccentric training increased the extensor peak torque (16, 27 and 17%; P<0.01) and decreased the H/Q ratio (10, 20 and 13%; P<0.01) for the isometric and eccentric modes at 30°/s and 120°/s, respectively. It also decreased the time in two of the five agility tests (carioca and pivot diagonal; P<0.01), and increased the distance in the hop tests, for both dominant and non-dominant limbs (P<0.01). Although the eccentric training led to an increase in extensor peak torques as well as an improvement in most of the functional tests, the hypothesis that a strong correlation would be observed between peak torques and functional tests was not confirmed. Article registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) under the number 12607000590460.

  19. Angle specificity of the knee extensor age-related profile in young female athletes.

    PubMed

    Rousanoglou, E N; Boudolos, K D

    2008-01-01

    The angle specificity of the knee extensor age-related profile was examined in young females (13-19 yr). Twenty-one track & field jumpers, 20 volleyball players and 20 non-active females were separated into the youngest and the oldest age categories, based on the official competitive age categories. The maximum knee extensor isometric torque (T MAX) was measured at 9 knee angles. The relationships between T MAX at the peak of the torque-angle curve and at the other knee angles (angle-angle relationships) were expressed by R2 (%). Statistics included two-way ANOVA for age category differences and curve fitting to R2 joint angle trend lines. Differences between age categories were significant for the volleyball players and the non-active females (p < 0.05). Age category had an angle specific impact on angle-angle relationships in the athletes, with the youngest ones demonstrating greater R2 decrease at the more extended, or more flexed, knee angles. Significant quadratic R2 joint angle trend lines were found in all track & field jumpers (p < 0.05) and, in the youngest only volleyball players (p < 0.05), but not in the non-active females (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the knee extensor profiles of young female athletes show an age-related angle specificity that should be accounted for when treating athletes within the age range examined.

  20. Effects of 17-day spaceflight on knee extensor muscle function and size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, Per A.; Berg, Hans E.; Bring, Daniel; Evans, Harlan J.; LeBlanc, Adrian D.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally held that space travelers experience muscle dysfunction and atrophy during exposure to microgravity. However, observations are scarce and reports somewhat inconsistent with regard to the time course, specificity and magnitude of such changes. Hence, we examined four male astronauts (group mean approximately 43 years, 86 kg and 183 cm) before and after a 17-day spaceflight (Space Transport System-78). Knee extensor muscle function was measured during maximal bilateral voluntary isometric and iso-inertial concentric, and eccentric actions. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the knee extensor and flexor, and gluteal muscle groups was assessed by means of magnetic resonance imaging. The decrease in strength (P<0.05) across different muscle actions after spaceflight amounted to 10%. Eight ambulatory men, examined on two occasions 20 days apart, showed unchanged (P>0.05) muscle strength. CSA of the knee extensor and gluteal muscles, each decreased (P<0.05) by 8%. Knee flexor muscle CSA showed no significant (P>0.05) change. The magnitude of these changes concord with earlier results from ground-based studies of similar duration. The results of this study, however, do contrast with the findings of no decrease in maximal voluntary ankle plantar flexor force previously reported in the same crew.

  1. Effects of 17-day spaceflight on knee extensor muscle function and size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, Per A.; Berg, Hans E.; Bring, Daniel; Evans, Harlan J.; LeBlanc, Adrian D.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally held that space travelers experience muscle dysfunction and atrophy during exposure to microgravity. However, observations are scarce and reports somewhat inconsistent with regard to the time course, specificity and magnitude of such changes. Hence, we examined four male astronauts (group mean approximately 43 years, 86 kg and 183 cm) before and after a 17-day spaceflight (Space Transport System-78). Knee extensor muscle function was measured during maximal bilateral voluntary isometric and iso-inertial concentric, and eccentric actions. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the knee extensor and flexor, and gluteal muscle groups was assessed by means of magnetic resonance imaging. The decrease in strength (P<0.05) across different muscle actions after spaceflight amounted to 10%. Eight ambulatory men, examined on two occasions 20 days apart, showed unchanged (P>0.05) muscle strength. CSA of the knee extensor and gluteal muscles, each decreased (P<0.05) by 8%. Knee flexor muscle CSA showed no significant (P>0.05) change. The magnitude of these changes concord with earlier results from ground-based studies of similar duration. The results of this study, however, do contrast with the findings of no decrease in maximal voluntary ankle plantar flexor force previously reported in the same crew.

  2. Interaction of fibre type, potentiation and fatigue in human knee extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Hamada, T; Sale, D G; MacDougall, J D; Tarnopolsky, M A

    2003-06-01

    To examine the effect of fibre type on potentiation and fatigue. Young men (n = 4 per group) with a predominance of type I [61.4 +/- 6.9% (SD), group I (GI)] or type II [71.8 +/- 9.2%, group II (GII)] fibres in vastus lateralis, performed a fatigue protocol of sixteen 5-s maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs) of the right knee extensors. Maximal twitches and corresponding muscle action potentials (M-waves) were evoked before the first MVC, during the 3-s rest period after each MVC and at intervals during the 5-min recovery period after the last MVC. Group II [49.3 +/- 2.6% (SE)] had a greater decrease in MVC force than GI (22.8 +/- 6.2%) during the fatigue protocol. Group II (126.4 +/- 13.6%) showed greater twitch force potentiation early in the fatigue protocol than GI (38.2 +/- 2.3%), but greater depression at the end (33.7 +/- 13.7% vs.17.4 +/- 3.4%). Twitch time-to-peak torque (TPT) and half relaxation time (HRT) initially decreased but then increased as the fatigue protocol progressed; GII had a greater increase in HRT. During a 5-min recovery period twitch force increased above the prefatigue level and remained so until the end of the recovery period; the pattern was similar in GI and GII. Twitch TPT and HRT remained elevated during recovery. M-wave area increased throughout the fatigue protocol and the first part of recovery before returning to baseline values in GII, whereas there were no significant changes in GI. The interaction between potentiation and fatigue was amplified in GII early in the fatigue protocol with concurrently greater twitch and M-wave potentiation, and greater MVC force decrease and HRT increase. Late in the protocol, GII had a greater decrease in twitch and MVC force combined with greater M-wave potentiation. It is concluded that fibre type distribution influences potentiation and fatigue of the twitch, and potentiation of the M-wave during fatiguing exercise.

  3. The acute response of practical occlusion in the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, Jeremy P; Kearney, Monica L; Thrower, Austin D; Collins, Sean; Pujol, Thomas J

    2010-10-01

    Training at low intensities with moderate vascular occlusion results in increased muscle hypertrophy, strength, and endurance. Elastic knee wraps, applied to the proximal portion of the target muscle, might elicit a stimulus similar to the KAATSU Master Apparatus. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that intermittently occluding the leg extensors with elastic knee wraps would increase whole-blood lactate (WBL) over control (CON). Twelve healthy men and women participated in this study (age 21.2 ± 0.35 years, height 168.9 ± 2.60 cm, and body mass 71.2 ± 4.16 kg). One repetition maximum (1RM) testing for the leg extensors was performed on a leg extension machine for the first trial, followed by occlusion (OCC) and CON trials. Four sets of leg extension exercise (30-15-15-15) were completed with 150-second rest between sets at 30% 1RM. Whole-blood lactate, heart rate (HR), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPEs) were measured after every set of exercise and 3 minutes postexercise. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance with statistical significance set at p ≤ 0.05. Whole-blood lactate increased in response to exercise (p = 0.01) but was not different between groups (OCC 6.28 ± 0.66 vs. CON 5.35 ± 0.36 mmol·L, p = 0.051). Heart rate (OCC 128.86 ± 4.37 vs. CON 119.72 ± 4.10 b·min⁻¹) was higher with OCC from sets 2-4 (p ≤ 0.03), with no difference 3 minutes postexercise (p = 0.29). Rating of perceived exertion was higher with OCC after every set (OCC 15.10 ± 0.31 vs. CON 12.16 ± 0.50, p = 0.01). In conclusion, no differences exist for WBL between groups, although there was a trend for higher levels with OCC. The current protocol for practical occlusion did not significantly increase metabolic stress more than normal low-intensity exercise. This study does not support the use of knee wraps as a mode of blood-flow restriction.

  4. Carotid Baroreflex Function During Prolonged Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.

    1999-01-01

    Astronauts are often required to work (exercise) at moderate to high intensities for extended periods while performing extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Although the physiologic responses associated with prolonged exercise have been documented, the mechanisms involved in blood pressure regulation under these conditions have not yet been fully elucidated. An understanding of this issue is pertinent to the ability of humans to perform work in microgravity and complies with the emphasis of NASA's Space Physiology and Countermeasures Program. Prolonged exercise at a constant workload is know to result in a progressive decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) concomitant with a decrease in stroke volume and a compensatory increase in heart rate. The continuous decrease in MAP during the exercise, which is related to the thermoregulatory redistribution of circulating blood volume to the cutaneous circulation, raises the question as to whether there is a loss of baroreflex regulation of arterial blood pressure. We propose that with prolongation of the exercise to 60 minutes, progressive increases on central command reflect a progressive upward resetting of the carotid baroreflex (CBR) such that the operating point of the CBR is shifted to a pressure below the threshold of the reflex rendering it ineffectual in correcting the downward drift in MAP. In order to test this hypothesis, experiments have been designed to uncouple the global hemodynamic response to prolonged exercise from the central command mediated response via: (1) continuous maintenance of cardiac filling volume by intravenous infusion of a dextran solution; and (2) whole body surface cooling to counteract thermoregulatory cutaneous vasodialation. As the type of work (exercise) performed by astronauts is inherently arm and upper body dependent, we will also examine the physiologic responses to prolonged leg cycling and arm ergometry exercise in the supine positions with and without level lower body negative

  5. Carotid Baroreflex Function During Prolonged Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.

    1999-01-01

    Astronauts are often required to work (exercise) at moderate to high intensities for extended periods while performing extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Although the physiologic responses associated with prolonged exercise have been documented, the mechanisms involved in blood pressure regulation under these conditions have not yet been fully elucidated. An understanding of this issue is pertinent to the ability of humans to perform work in microgravity and complies with the emphasis of NASA's Space Physiology and Countermeasures Program. Prolonged exercise at a constant workload is know to result in a progressive decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) concomitant with a decrease in stroke volume and a compensatory increase in heart rate. The continuous decrease in MAP during the exercise, which is related to the thermoregulatory redistribution of circulating blood volume to the cutaneous circulation, raises the question as to whether there is a loss of baroreflex regulation of arterial blood pressure. We propose that with prolongation of the exercise to 60 minutes, progressive increases on central command reflect a progressive upward resetting of the carotid baroreflex (CBR) such that the operating point of the CBR is shifted to a pressure below the threshold of the reflex rendering it ineffectual in correcting the downward drift in MAP. In order to test this hypothesis, experiments have been designed to uncouple the global hemodynamic response to prolonged exercise from the central command mediated response via: (1) continuous maintenance of cardiac filling volume by intravenous infusion of a dextran solution; and (2) whole body surface cooling to counteract thermoregulatory cutaneous vasodialation. As the type of work (exercise) performed by astronauts is inherently arm and upper body dependent, we will also examine the physiologic responses to prolonged leg cycling and arm ergometry exercise in the supine positions with and without level lower body negative

  6. Exercise Thermoregulation After Prolonged Wakefulness,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    temperature threshold for initiation of eccrine sweating and cutaneous vasodilation during exercise (15,15,17). It has also been suggested, in two widely...Local control of eccrine sweat gland function. Fed. Proc. 32:1583-1587, 1983. 4. Piorica, V., B.A. Higgins, P.F. lampietro, M.T. Lategola and A.W...reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP cutaneous blood flow, sleep loss, sweating , wakefulness 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on

  7. Effect of Preactivation on Torque Enhancement by the Stretch-Shortening Cycle in Knee Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Misaki, Jun; Isaka, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    The stretch-shortening cycle is one of the most interesting topics in the field of sport sciences, because the performance of human movement is enhanced by the stretch-shortening cycle (eccentric contraction). The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the influence of preactivation on the torque enhancement by stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. Twelve men participated in this study. The following three conditions were conducted for knee extensors: (1) concentric contraction without preactivation (CON), (2) concentric contraction with eccentric preactivation (ECC), and (3) concentric contraction with isometric preactivation (ISO). Muscle contractions were evoked by electrical stimulation to discard the influence of neural activity. The range of motion of the knee joint was set from 80 to 140 degrees (full extension = 180 degrees). Angular velocities of the concentric and eccentric contractions were set at 180 and 90 degrees/s, respectively. In the concentric contraction phase, joint torques were recorded at 85, 95, and 105 degrees, and they were compared among the three conditions. In the early phase (85 degrees) of concentric contraction, the joint torque was larger in the ECC and ISO conditions than in the CON condition. However, these clear differences disappeared in the later phase (105 degrees) of concentric contraction. The results showed that joint torque was clearly different among the three conditions in the early phase whereas this difference disappeared in the later phase. Thus, preactivation, which is prominent in the early phase of contractions, plays an important role in torque enhancement by the stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. PMID:27414804

  8. Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Resistance Training on Knee Extensor/Flexor Muscles.

    PubMed

    Pantović, Milan; Popović, Boris; Madić, Dejan; Obradović, Jelena

    2015-07-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has recently drawn a lot of attention as means for strengthening of voluntary muscle contraction both in sport and rehabilitation. NMES training increases maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force output through neural adaptations. On the other hand, positive effects of resistance training (RT) on muscle strength are well known. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of a 5-week program of NMES compared to RT program of same duration. Sample of 15 students' of faculty of sport and physical education (age 22 ± 2) were randomized in two groups: NMES (N = 7) and RT (N = 8). NMES group performed NMES superimposed over voluntary muscle contraction, RT group performed resistance training with submaximal loads. Subjects were evaluated for knee isokinetic dynamometry on both sides (60° and 180° s). After intervention no significant difference between groups were observed in isokinetic dynamometry (p = 0.177). However, applying pair sample t test within each group revealed that peak torque increased in NMES-group (p = 0.002 for right knee extensors muscles, p = 0.003 for left, respectively, at 60° and p = 0.004 for left knee extensors muscles, at angular velocity 180°). In RT group (p = 0.033 for right knee extensors muscles, p = 0.029 for right knee flexor muscles, at angular velocity 60°). Our results indicate that NMES has equal potential if not in some way better than classical RT having in mind that overload on locomotor apparatus during NMES is minimal and force of muscle contraction is equal on both sides, for enhancement of knee muscles concentric peak torque.

  9. Acute Effects of Kinesio Taping on Knee Extensor Peak Torque and Stretch Reflex in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Simon S.; Yeung, Ella W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kinesio Tex tape (KT) is used to prevent and treat sports-related injuries and to enhance muscle performance. It has been proposed that the direction of taping may either facilitate or inhibit the muscle by having different effects on cutaneous receptors that modulate excitability of the motor neurons. This study had 2 goals. First, we wished to determine if KT application affects muscle performance and if the method of application facilitates or inhibits muscle performance. This was assessed by measuring isokinetic knee extension peak torque in the knee extensor. Second, we assessed neurological effects of taping on the excitability of the motor neurons by measuring the reflex latency and action potential by electromyography (EMG) in the patellar reflex. The study was a single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial with 28 healthy volunteers with no history of knee injuries. Participants received facilitative KT treatment, inhibitory KT treatment, or Hypafix taping of the knee extensor. There were significant differences in the peak torque between 3 treatments (F(2,54) = 4.873, P < 0.01). Post hoc analysis revealed that facilitative KT treatment resulted in higher knee extensor peak torque performance than inhibitory KT treatment (P = 0.036, effect size 0.26). There were, however, no significant differences in the reflex latency (F(2,54) = 2.84, P = 0.067) nor in the EMG values (F(2,54) = 0.18, P = 0.837) in the patellar reflex between the 3 taping applications. The findings suggest that the direction of KT application over the muscle has specific effects on muscle performance. Given the magnitude of effect is small, interpretation of clinical significance should be considered with caution. The underlying mechanism warrants further investigation. PMID:26825916

  10. Acute Effects of Kinesio Taping on Knee Extensor Peak Torque and Stretch Reflex in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Simon S; Yeung, Ella W

    2016-01-01

    Kinesio Tex tape (KT) is used to prevent and treat sports-related injuries and to enhance muscle performance. It has been proposed that the direction of taping may either facilitate or inhibit the muscle by having different effects on cutaneous receptors that modulate excitability of the motor neurons. This study had 2 goals. First, we wished to determine if KT application affects muscle performance and if the method of application facilitates or inhibits muscle performance. This was assessed by measuring isokinetic knee extension peak torque in the knee extensor. Second, we assessed neurological effects of taping on the excitability of the motor neurons by measuring the reflex latency and action potential by electromyography (EMG) in the patellar reflex. The study was a single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial with 28 healthy volunteers with no history of knee injuries. Participants received facilitative KT treatment, inhibitory KT treatment, or Hypafix taping of the knee extensor. There were significant differences in the peak torque between 3 treatments (F(2,54) = 4.873, P < 0.01). Post hoc analysis revealed that facilitative KT treatment resulted in higher knee extensor peak torque performance than inhibitory KT treatment (P = 0.036, effect size 0.26). There were, however, no significant differences in the reflex latency (F(2,54) = 2.84, P = 0.067) nor in the EMG values (F(2,54) = 0.18, P = 0.837) in the patellar reflex between the 3 taping applications. The findings suggest that the direction of KT application over the muscle has specific effects on muscle performance. Given the magnitude of effect is small, interpretation of clinical significance should be considered with caution. The underlying mechanism warrants further investigation.

  11. Separate and combined effects of time of day and verbal instruction on knee extensor neuromuscular adjustments.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Hamdi; Girard, Olivier; Lajili, Hanene

    2017-09-05

    We examined time of day and verbal instruction separate and combined effects on knee extensor neuromuscular adjustments, with special reference to rapid muscle force production capacity. Ten healthy male participants performed four experimental trials in counterbalanced order: morning-"hard-and-fast" instruction, evening-"hard-and-fast" instruction, morning-"fast" instruction and evening-"fast" instruction. During each experimental trial, neuromuscular performance was assessed from the completion of six maximal isometric voluntary contractions (rest = 2 minutes) of the knee extensors with concomitant quadriceps surface EMG recordings. For each contraction, we determined maximal voluntary force (Fmax), maximal rate of force development (RFDmax) and associated maximal electromechanical delay (EMDmax) and maximal rate of muscle activation (RMAmax). Globally, oral temperature (+2.2%), Fmax (+4.9%) and accompanying median frequency (+6.6%) / mean power frequency (+6.0%) as well as RFDmax (+13.5%) and RMAmax (+15.5%) were significantly higher in the evening than morning (p < 0.05). Conversely, evening in reference to morning values were lower for EMDmax (-4.3%, p < 0.05). Compared to a "hard-and-fast" instruction, RFDmax (+30.6%) and corresponding RMS activity (+18.6%) were globally higher using a "fast" instruction (p < 0.05), irrespectively of the time of day. There was no significant interaction effect of time of day and verbal instruction on any parameter, except for EMDmax (p = 0.028). Despite diurnal variation in maximal or explosive force production of knee extensors and associated neuromuscular parameters, these adjustments occurred essentially independently of the verbal instruction provided.

  12. A Novel Two-Velocity Method for Elaborate Isokinetic Testing of Knee Extensors.

    PubMed

    Grbic, Vladimir; Djuric, Sasa; Knezevic, Olivera M; Mirkov, Dragan M; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Jaric, Slobodan

    2017-09-01

    Single outcomes of standard isokinetic dynamometry tests do not discern between various muscle mechanical capacities. In this study, we aimed to (1) evaluate the shape and strength of the force-velocity relationship of knee extensors, as observed in isokinetic tests conducted at a wide range of angular velocities, and (2) explore the concurrent validity of a simple 2-velocity method. Thirteen physically active females were tested for both the peak and averaged knee extensor concentric force exerted at the angular velocities of 30°-240°/s recorded in the 90°-170° range of knee extension. The results revealed strong (0.960knee extensors and, if supported by further research, other muscles. This brief and fatigue-free testing procedure could discern between muscle force, velocity, and power-producing capacities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. High Altitude Increases Alteration in Maximal Torque but Not in Rapid Torque Development in Knee Extensors after Repeated Treadmill Sprinting

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Olivier; Brocherie, Franck; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed knee extensor neuromuscular adjustments following repeated treadmill sprints in different normobaric hypoxia conditions, with special reference to rapid muscle torque production capacity. Thirteen team- and racquet-sport athletes undertook 8 × 5-s “all-out” sprints (passive recovery = 25 s) on a non-motorized treadmill in normoxia (NM; FiO2 = 20.9%), at low (LA; FiO2 = 16.8%) and high (HA; FiO2 = 13.3%) normobaric hypoxia (simulated altitudes of ~1800 m and ~3600 m, respectively). Explosive (~1 s; “fast” instruction) and maximal (~5 s; “hard” instruction) voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE), with concurrent electromyographic (EMG) activity recordings of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles, were performed before and 1-min post-exercise. Rate of torque development (RTD) and EMG (i.e., Root Mean Square or RMS) rise from 0 to 30, −50, −100, and −200 ms were recorded, and were also normalized to maximal torque and EMG values, respectively. Distance covered during the first 5-s sprint was similar (P > 0.05) in all conditions. A larger (P < 0.05) sprint decrement score and a shorter (P < 0.05) cumulated distance covered over the eight sprints occurred in HA (−8 ± 4% and 178 ± 11 m) but not in LA (−7 ± 3% and 181 ± 10 m) compared to NM (−5 ± 2% and 183 ± 9 m). Compared to NM (−9 ± 7%), a larger (P < 0.05) reduction in MVC torque occurred post-exercise in HA (−14 ± 9%) but not in LA (-12 ± 7%), with no difference between NM and LA (P > 0.05). Irrespectively of condition (P > 0.05), peak RTD (−6 ± 11%; P < 0.05), and normalized peak RMS activity for VL (−8 ± 11%; P = 0.07) and RF (−14 ± 11%; P < 0.01) muscles were reduced post-exercise, whereas reductions (P < 0.05) in absolute RTD occurred within the 0–100 (−8 ± 9%) and 0–200 ms (−10 ± 8%) epochs after contraction onset. After normalization to MVC torque, there was no difference in RTD values

  14. Manipulation of knee extensor force using percutaneous electrical myostimulation during eccentric actions: effects on indices of muscle damage in humans.

    PubMed

    Child, R B; Brown, S J; Day, S H; Saxton, J M; Donnelly, A E

    1998-10-01

    Percutaneous electrical myostimulation (PES) was used to manipulate the force produced by the knee extensor muscles during eccentric exercise, thereby providing a model to investigate the role of force in muscle damage. Two eccentric exercise bouts of equal work were performed by nine subjects, using fixed voltage PES at 20 Hz (to produce moderate muscle forces) and 100 Hz (to produce high muscle forces). Muscle contractility, serum creatine kinase activity (CK) and muscle soreness (MS) were evaluated before, and up to 14 days after exercise. Data are presented as means+/-SEM, and were analysed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-tests and Wilcoxon tests. Peak forces were higher during the 100 Hz bout than the 20 Hz bout for repetitions 1 (472+/-60 vs 237+/-23 Newtons), 10 (381+/-26 vs 233+/-26 Newtons), 20 (310+/-24 vs 218+/-24 Newtons), all p < 0.01, t-test and 30 (297+/-27 vs 204+/-21 Newtons), p < 0.05, t-test. Following the 100 Hz bout, maximum voluntary contractile force (MVC) was lower (p<0.01, ANOVA), and CK was higher (p<0.0001, ANOVA) than after the 20 Hz bout. Subjects also reported greater MS on days 2 to 6 (p<0.05, Wilcoxon test) following the 100 Hz bout. Despite a decline in the stimulated 20:100 Hz tetanic force ratio after each bout (p<0.01, ANOVA) there was no difference between bouts (p>0.05, ANOVA). The higher rise in CK and MS after the 100 Hz bout, together with the greater deficit in MVC, suggest that in humans, muscle force is a contributing factor to muscle injury during eccentric actions.

  15. Knee extensor strength and body weight in adolescent men and the risk of knee osteoarthritis by middle age.

    PubMed

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Timpka, Simon; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Ageberg, Eva; Englund, Martin

    2017-10-01

    To assess the extent to which knee extensor strength and weight in adolescence are associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by middle age. We studied a cohort of 40 121 men who at age 18 years in 1969/1970 underwent mandatory conscription in Sweden. We retrieved data on isometric knee extensor strength, weight, height, smoking, alcohol consumption, parental education and adult occupation from Swedish registries. We identified participants diagnosed with knee OA or knee injury from 1987 to 2010 through the National Patient Register. We estimated the HR of knee OA using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional regression model. To assess the influence of adult knee injury and occupation, we performed a formal mediation analysis. The mean (SD) knee extensor strength was 234 (47) Nm, the mean (SD) weight was 66 (9.3) kg. During 24 years (median) of follow-up starting at the age of 35 years, 2049 persons were diagnosed with knee OA. The adjusted HR (95% CI) of incident knee OA was 1.12 (1.06 to 1.18) for each SD of knee extensor strength and 1.18 (1.15 to 1.21) per 5 kg of body weight. Fifteen per cent of the increase in OA risk due to higher knee extensor strength could be attributed to knee injury and adult occupation. Higher knee extensor strength in adolescent men was associated with increased risk of knee OA by middle age, challenging the current tenet of low muscle strength being a risk factor for OA. We confirmed higher weight to be a strong risk factor for knee OA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. The effects of imagery training on fast isometric knee extensor torque development.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Cornelis J; Hutter, Vana; Icke, Chris; Groen, Bart; Gemmink, Anne; Smilde, Hiltsje; de Haan, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that imagery training would improve the fast onset of neuromuscular activation and thereby fast knee extensor isometric torque development. Forty young healthy participants, not involved in strength training, were assigned to one of four groups: physical training, imagery training, placebo training or control. The three training groups had three 15 min sessions per week for 4 weeks, with a 90 ° knee angle but were tested also at 120 °. At 90 ° knee angle, maximal torque increased (-8%) similarly in all three training groups. The torque-time integral (contractile impulse) over the first 40 ms after torque onset (TTI40) increased (P < 0.05) after physical training (by -100%), but only at 90 °. This increase was significantly different from the delta values (change pre to post) in the control and placebo groups, whereas delta values in the imagery group were similar to those in the placebo group. The increases in TTI40 following physical training were related (r (2) = 0.81, P < 0.05) to significant increases of knee extensor rectified surface EMG at torque onset (EMG40). In conclusion, only physical training led to a knee angle specific increase of contractile impulse that was significantly different from placebo and controls and that was related to improved onset of neuromuscular activation.

  17. Reliability of Contractile Properties of the Knee Extensor Muscles in Individuals with Post-Polio Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Voorn, Eric L.; Brehm, Merel A.; Beelen, Anita; de Haan, Arnold; Nollet, Frans; Gerrits, Karin H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the reliability of contractile properties of the knee extensor muscles in 23 individuals with post-polio syndrome (PPS) and 18 age-matched healthy individuals. Methods Contractile properties of the knee extensors were assessed from repeated electrically evoked contractions on 2 separate days, with the use of a fixed dynamometer. Reliability was determined for fatigue resistance, rate of torque development (MRTD), and early and late relaxation time (RT50 and RT25), using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM, expressed as % of the mean). Results In both groups, reliability for fatigue resistance was good, with high ICCs (>0.90) and small SEM values (PPS: 7.1%, healthy individuals: 7.0%). Reliability for contractile speed indices varied, with the best values found for RT50 (ICCs>0.82, SEM values <2.8%). We found no systematic differences between test and retest occasions, except for RT50 in healthy subjects (p = 0.016). Conclusions In PPS and healthy individuals, the reliability of fatigue resistance, as obtained from electrically evoked contractions is high. The reliability of contractile speed is only moderate, except for RT50 in PPS, demonstrating high reliability. Significance This was the first study to examine the reliability of electrically evoked contractile properties in individuals with PPS. Our results demonstrate its potential to study mechanisms underlying muscle fatigue in PPS and to evaluate changes in contractile properties over time in response to interventions or from natural course. PMID:25019943

  18. Obtaining reliable measurements of knee extensor torque produced during maximal voluntary contractions: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kues, J M; Rothstein, J M; Lamb, R L

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a protocol that could be used to obtain reliable measurements of knee extensor torque produced during maximal voluntary contractions. On each of 3 days, 10 subjects performed six consecutive maximal voluntary contractions, in the same randomized order, for each of the following 10 conditions: concentric isokinetic contractions at velocities of 30 degrees, 90 degrees, 120 degrees, and 180 degrees/s; eccentric isokinetic contractions at velocities of 30 degrees, 90 degrees, 120 degrees, and 180 degrees/s; and isometric contractions at 40 and 60 degrees of knee flexion. The peak torques produced were examined to determine on which day and during which contraction subjects produced the greatest torques for each condition. This information was used to develop a practice protocol. Fifteen different subjects were tested following this protocol. Subjects participated in two practice sessions, a test session, and a retest session. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to determine the degree of agreement between torques for the test and retest sessions. The ICCs ranged from .87 to .98. The protocol developed appears to be useful for obtaining reliable measurements of knee extensor torque.

  19. Hip and knee extensor moments predict vertical jump height in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Brent, Jensen L; Hewett, Timothy E

    2009-07-01

    Biomechanical factors, such as hip and knee extensor moments, related to drop jump (DJ) performance have not been investigated in adolescent girls. The purpose of this study was to determine the key independent biomechanical variables that predict overall vertical jump performance in adolescent girls. Sixteen high school adolescent girls from club-sponsored and high school-sponsored volleyball teams performed DJ at 3 different drop heights (15, 30, and 45 cm). A motion analysis system consisting of 10 digital cameras and a force platform was used to calculate vertical jump height, joint angles, and joint moments during the tasks. A multiple linear regression was used to determine the biomechanical parameters that were best predictive of vertical jump height at each box drop distance. The 2 predictor variables in all 3 models were knee and hip extensor moments. The models predicted 82.9, 81.9, and 88% of the vertical jump height variance in the 15, 30, and 45 cm trials, respectively. The results of the investigation indicate that knee and hip joint moments are the main contributors to vertical jump height during the DJ in adolescent girls. Strength and conditioning specialists attempting to improve vertical jump performance should target power and strength training to the hip and knee extensors in their athletes.

  20. HIP AND KNEE EXTENSOR MOMENTS PREDICT VERTICAL JUMP HEIGHT IN ADOLESCENT GIRLS

    PubMed Central

    FORD, KEVIN R.; MYER, GREGORY D.; BRENT, JENSEN L.; HEWETT, TIMOTHY E.

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical factors, such as hip and knee extensor moments, related to drop jump (DJ) performance have not been investigated in adolescent girls. The purpose of this study was to determine the key independent biomechanical variables that predict overall vertical jump performance in adolescent girls. Sixteen high school adolescent girls from club–sponsored and high school–sponsored volleyball teams performed DJ at 3 different drop heights (15, 30, and 45 cm). A motion analysis system consisting of 10 digital cameras and a force platform was used to calculate vertical jump height, joint angles, and joint moments during the tasks. A multiple linear regression was used to determine the biomechanical parameters that were best predictive of vertical jump height at each box drop distance. The 2 predictor variables in all 3 models were knee and hip extensor moments. The models predicted 82.9, 81.9, and 88% of the vertical jump height variance in the 15, 30, and 45 cm trials, respectively. The results of the investigation indicate that knee and hip joint moments are the main contributors to vertical jump height during the DJ in adolescent girls. Strength and conditioning specialists attempting to improve vertical jump performance should target power and strength training to the hip and knee extensors in their athletes. PMID:19528842

  1. Brain glycogen decreases during prolonged exercise

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Okamoto, Masahiro; Ichitani, Yukio; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Brain glycogen could be a critical energy source for brain activity when the glucose supply from the blood is inadequate (hypoglycaemia). Although untested, it is hypothesized that during prolonged exhaustive exercise that induces hypoglycaemia and muscular glycogen depletion, the resultant hypoglycaemia may cause a decrease in brain glycogen. Here, we tested this hypothesis and also investigated the possible involvement of brain monoamines with the reduced levels of brain glycogen. For this purpose, we exercised male Wistar rats on a treadmill for different durations (30–120 min) at moderate intensity (20 m min−1) and measured their brain glycogen levels using high-power microwave irradiation (10 kW). At the end of 30 and 60 min of running, the brain glycogen levels remained unchanged from resting levels, but liver and muscle glycogen decreased. After 120 min of running, the glycogen levels decreased significantly by ∼37–60% in five discrete brain loci (the cerebellum 60%, cortex 48%, hippocampus 43%, brainstem 37% and hypothalamus 34%) compared to those of the sedentary control. The brain glycogen levels in all five regions after running were positively correlated with the respective blood and brain glucose levels. Further, in the cortex, the levels of methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), potential involved in degradation of the brain glycogen, increased during prolonged exercise and negatively correlated with the glycogen levels. These results support the hypothesis that brain glycogen could decrease with prolonged exhaustive exercise. Increased monoamines together with hypoglycaemia should be associated with the development of decreased brain glycogen, suggesting a new clue towards the understanding of central fatigue during prolonged exercise. PMID:21521757

  2. Less indication of muscle damage in the second than initial electrical muscle stimulation bout consisting of isometric contractions of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; McGuigan, Michael R; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2010-03-01

    This study compared the first and second exercise bouts consisting of electrically evoked isometric contractions for muscle damage profile. Nine healthy men (31 +/- 4 years) had two electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) bouts separated by 2 weeks. The knee extensors of one leg were stimulated by biphasic rectangular pulses (75 Hz, 400 mus, on-off ratio 5-15 s) at the knee joint angle of 100 degrees (0 degrees , full extension) to induce 40 isometric contractions, while the current amplitude was increased to maintain maximal force generation. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque of the knee extensors at 100 degrees , muscle soreness, pressure pain threshold and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were used as indirect markers of muscle damage, and measured before and 1, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after EMS bout, and the changes over time were compared between bouts. The torque produced during exercise was approximately 30% of MVC, and no significant difference between bouts was evident for the changes in peak and average torque over 40 contractions. MVC decreased significantly (P < 0.05) by 26% immediately and 1 h after both bouts, but the recovery was significantly (P < 0.05) faster after the second bout (100% at 96 h) compared with the first bout (81% at 96 h). Development of muscle soreness and tenderness, and increases in plasma CK activity were significantly (P < 0.05) smaller after the second than the first bout. These results show that changes in muscle damage markers were attenuated in the second EMS bout compared with the initial EMS bout.

  3. The re-establishment of the normal blood lactate response to exercise in humans after prolonged acclimatization to altitude

    PubMed Central

    van Hall, G; Calbet, J A L; Søndergaard, H; Saltin, B

    2001-01-01

    One to five weeks of chronic exposure to hypoxia has been shown to reduce peak blood lactate concentration compared to acute exposure to hypoxia during exercise, the high altitude ‘lactate paradox’. However, we hypothesize that a sufficiently long exposure to hypoxia would result in a blood lactate and net lactate release from the active leg to an extent similar to that observed in acute hypoxia, independent of work intensity. Six Danish lowlanders (25–26 years) were studied during graded incremental bicycle exercise under four conditions: at sea level breathing either ambient air (0 m normoxia) or a low-oxygen gas mixture (10 % O2 in N2, 0 m acute hypoxia) and after 9 weeks of acclimatization to 5260 m breathing either ambient air (5260 m chronic hypoxia) or a normoxic gas mixture (47 % O2 in N2, 5260 m acute normoxia). In addition, one-leg knee-extensor exercise was performed during 5260 m chronic hypoxia and 5260 m acute normoxia. During incremental bicycle exercise, the arterial lactate concentrations were similar at sub-maximal work at 0 m acute hypoxia and 5260 m chronic hypoxia but higher compared to both 0 m normoxia and 5260 m acute normoxia. However, peak lactate concentration was similar under all conditions (10.0 ± 1.3, 10.7 ± 2.0, 10.9 ± 2.3 and 11.0 ± 1.0 mmol l−1) at 0 m normoxia, 0 m acute hypoxia, 5260 m chronic hypoxia and 5260 m acute normoxia, respectively. Despite a similar lactate concentration at sub-maximal and maximal workload, the net lactate release from the leg was lower during 0 m acute hypoxia (peak 8.4 ± 1.6 mmol min−1) than at 5260 m chronic hypoxia (peak 12.8 ± 2.2 mmol min−1). The same was observed for 0 m normoxia (peak 8.9 ± 2.0 mmol min−1) compared to 5260 m acute normoxia (peak 12.6 ± 3.6 mmol min−1). Exercise after acclimatization with a small muscle mass (one-leg knee-extensor) elicited similar lactate concentrations (peak 4.4 ± 0.2 vs. 3.9 ± 0.3 mmol l−1) and net lactate release (peak 16.4 ± 1

  4. No Critical Peripheral Fatigue Threshold during Intermittent Isometric Time to Task Failure Test with the Knee Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Froyd, Christian; Beltrami, Fernando G.; Millet, Guillaume Y.; Noakes, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    critical peripheral fatigue threshold during intermittent isometric exercise to task failure with the knee extensors. PMID:28066260

  5. Diaphragmatic energetics during prolonged exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Manohar, M; Hassan, A S

    1991-08-01

    The present study was carried out to examine diaphragmatic O2 extraction and lactate and ammonia production during prolonged exhaustive exercise. Experiments were performed on nine healthy exercise-conditioned ponies in which catheters had been implanted in the phrenic vein previously. Blood-gas variables and lactate and ammonia concentrations were determined on simultaneously obtained arterial and phrenic-venous blood samples at rest and during 30 min of exertion at 15 mph + 7% grade (heart rate, 200 beats/min; approximately 90% of maximum). Arterial O2 tension and saturation were maintained near resting value but CO2 tension decreased markedly with exercise, and because of increased hemoglobin concentration, arterial O2 content rose. Concomitantly, phrenic venous O2 tension, saturation and content decreased markedly (23.6 +/- 1 mm Hg, 24.5 +/- 2%, 5.2 +/- 0.3 ml/dl at 3 min of exertion) and significant fluctuations did not occur as exercise duration progressed to 30 min. Diaphragmatic arteriovenous O2 content difference and O2 extraction rose from 4 +/- 0.3 to 16 +/- 0.5 ml/dl and from 30 +/- 3 to 75 +/- 1% at 3 min of exercise, and significant deviations did not occur as exercise duration progressed. Arterial lactate and ammonia levels increased during exercise, indicating their release from working limb muscles. Phrenic-venous values of lactate and ammonia did not exceed arterial values. Ponies sweated profusely and were unable to keep up with the belt speed in the last 4 to 5 min of exercise. Constancy of phrenic arteriovenous O2 content difference in exercise indicated ability to adjust perfusion in diaphragm so as to adequately meet its O2 needs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Sit-to-Stand Movement in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: Relationship with Knee Extensor Torque and Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, Adriana Neves; Pavao, Silvia Leticia; Santiago, Paulo Roberto Pereira; Salvini, Tania de Fatima; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between sit-to-stand (STS) movement, knee extensor torque and social participation in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven spastic hemiplegic CP patients (8.0 plus or minus 2.2 years), classified by the Gross Motor Function Classification System as I and II, and 18 typical children (8.4 plus or…

  7. Sit-to-Stand Movement in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: Relationship with Knee Extensor Torque and Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, Adriana Neves; Pavao, Silvia Leticia; Santiago, Paulo Roberto Pereira; Salvini, Tania de Fatima; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between sit-to-stand (STS) movement, knee extensor torque and social participation in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven spastic hemiplegic CP patients (8.0 plus or minus 2.2 years), classified by the Gross Motor Function Classification System as I and II, and 18 typical children (8.4 plus or…

  8. Fatigue resistance of the knee extensor muscles is not reduced in post-polio syndrome.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Eric L; Beelen, Anita; Gerrits, Karin H L; Nollet, Frans; de Haan, Arnold

    2013-11-01

    The present study investigated whether intrinsic fatigability of the muscle fibers is reduced in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS). This may contribute to the muscle fatigue complaints reported by patients with PPS. For this purpose, we assessed contractile properties and fatigue resistance of the knee extensor muscles using repeated isometric electrically evoked contractions in 38 patients with PPS and 19 age-matched healthy subjects. To determine whether any difference in fatigue resistance between both groups could be attributed to differences in aerobic capacity of the muscle fibers, 9 patients with PPS and 11 healthy subjects performed the same protocol under arterial occlusion. Results showed that fatigue resistance of patients with PPS was comparable to that in controls, both in the situation with intact circulation and with occluded blood flow. Together, our findings suggest that there are no differences in contractile properties and aerobic muscle capacity that may account for the increased muscle fatigue perceived in PPS.

  9. β-alanine supplementation improves isometric endurance of the knee extensor muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We examined the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on isometric endurance of the knee extensors at 45% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Methods Thirteen males (age 23 ± 6 y; height 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass 81.0 ± 10.5 kg), matched for pre-supplementation isometric endurance, were allocated to either a placebo (n = 6) or β-alanine (n = 7; 6.4 g·d-1 over 4 weeks) supplementation group. Participants completed an isometric knee extension test (IKET) to fatigue, at an intensity of 45% MVIC, before and after supplementation. In addition, two habituation tests were completed in the week prior to the pre-supplementation test and a further practice test was completed in the week prior to the post-supplementation test. MVIC force, IKET hold-time, and impulse generated were recorded. Results IKET hold-time increased by 9.7 ± 9.4 s (13.2%) and impulse by 3.7 ± 1.3 kN·s-1 (13.9%) following β-alanine supplementation. These changes were significantly greater than those in the placebo group (IKET: t(11) = 2.9, p ≤0.05; impulse: t(11) = 3.1, p ≤ 0.05). There were no significant changes in MVIC force in either group. Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g·d-1 improved endurance capacity of the knee extensors at 45% MVIC, which most likely results from improved pH regulation within the muscle cell as a result of elevated muscle carnosine levels. PMID:22697405

  10. Influence of patellar position on the knee extensor mechanism in normal and crouched walking.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Rachel L; Brandon, Scott C E; Smith, Colin R; Novacheck, Tom F; Schwartz, Michael H; Thelen, Darryl G

    2017-01-25

    Patella alta is common in cerebral palsy, especially in patients with crouch gait. Correction of patella alta has been advocated in the treatment of crouch, however the appropriate degree of correction and the implications for knee extensor function remain unclear. Therefore, the goal of this study was to assess the impact of patellar position on quadriceps and patellar tendon forces during normal and crouch gait. To this end, a lower extremity musculoskeletal model with a novel 12 degree of freedom knee joint was used to simulate normal gait in a healthy child, as well as mild (23 deg min knee flexion in stance), moderate (41 deg), and severe (67 deg) crouch gait in three children with cerebral palsy. The simulations revealed that quadriceps and patellar tendon forces increase dramatically with crouch, and are modulated by patellar position. For example with a normal patellar tendon position, peak patellar tendon forces were 0.7 times body weight in normal walking, but reached 2.2, 3.2 and 5.4 times body weight in mild, moderate and severe crouch. Moderate patella alta acted to reduce quadriceps and patellar tendon loads in crouch gait, due to an enhancement of the patellar tendon moment arms with alta in a flexed knee. In contrast, patella baja reduced the patellar tendon moment arm in a flexed knee and thus induced an increase in the patellar tendon loads needed to walk in crouch. Functionally, these results suggest that patella baja could also compromise knee extensor function for other flexed knee activities such as chair rise and stair climbing. The findings are important to consider when using surgical approaches for correcting patella alta in children who exhibit crouch gait patterns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mental fatigue induced by prolonged self-regulation does not exacerbate central fatigue during subsequent whole-body endurance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M.; Rozand, Vianney; Lepers, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the mental fatigue induced by prolonged self-regulation increases perception of effort and reduces performance during subsequent endurance exercise. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying these negative effects of mental fatigue are unclear. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental fatigue exacerbates central fatigue induced by whole-body endurance exercise. Twelve subjects performed 30 min of either an incongruent Stroop task to induce a condition of mental fatigue or a congruent Stroop task (control condition) in a random and counterbalanced order. Both cognitive tasks (CTs) were followed by a whole-body endurance task (ET) consisting of 6 min of cycling exercise at 80% of peak power output measured during a preliminary incremental test. Neuromuscular function of the knee extensors was assessed before and after CT, and after ET. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured during ET. Both CTs did not induce any decrease in maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque (p = 0.194). During ET, mentally fatigued subjects reported higher RPE (mental fatigue 13.9 ± 3.0, control 13.3 ± 3.2, p = 0.044). ET induced a similar decrease in MVC torque (mental fatigue –17 ± 15%, control –15 ± 11%, p = 0.001), maximal voluntary activation level (mental fatigue –6 ± 9%, control –6 ± 7%, p = 0.013) and resting twitch (mental fatigue –30 ± 14%, control –32 ± 10%, p < 0.001) in both conditions. These findings reject our hypothesis and confirm previous findings that mental fatigue does not reduce the capacity of the central nervous system to recruit the working muscles. The negative effect of mental fatigue on perception of effort does not reflect a greater development of either central or peripheral fatigue. Consequently, mentally fatigued subjects are still able to perform maximal exercise, but they are experiencing an altered performance during submaximal exercise due to higher

  12. Intra-articular knee injuries in patients with knee extensor mechanism ruptures.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Bart; Cherney, Stuart; Penna, James

    2008-07-01

    The knee extensor mechanism is composed of the quadriceps tendon, patella and patellar tendon. Rupture of either the quadriceps tendon or patella tendon is a rare but significant injury. The purpose of our study is to determine if there are any associated injuries with these ruptures necessitating the need for further evaluation such as MRI or arthroscopy. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with ruptures of the knee extensor mechanism who required operative repair at our institution over the last 10 years. We reviewed the chart for any documented associated injury. The type and incidence of associated injuries were recorded. We further divided these patients into two groups: low energy indirect mechanism or high-energy direct impact mechanism. Sixty-four patients met our requirements for inclusion in this study. Thirty-three patients with patellar tendon ruptures and thirty-one patients with quadriceps tendon ruptures were included. Ten out of 33 (30%) patients with a patellar tendon rupture had an associated injury. Four out of 25 (16%) patients with patellar tendon ruptures in the low energy mechanism category had an associated injury. Six out of 8 (75%) patients with a high-energy direct impact patellar tendon rupture had an associated injury. Three out of 31 (10%) patients with quadriceps tendon rupture had an associated injury. The most common associated injuries in the patellar tendon rupture patients were anterior cruciate ligament tears (18%) and medial meniscus tears (18%). We found almost one-third of all patients with a patellar tendon rupture had an associated intra-articular knee injury. We found 10% of patients with quadriceps tendon rupture had an associated intra-articular knee injury. We also found an even higher incidence of associated injuries in patients with high-energy direct impact mechanism patellar tendon ruptures (75%). The most common associated injuries in patients with patellar tendon ruptures were tears of the anterior cruciate

  13. Effects of knee extensor muscle strength on the incidence of osteopenia and osteoporosis after 6 years.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yasumoto; Takemura, Marie; Harada, Atsushi; Ando, Fujiko; Shimokata, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    The association of knee extensor muscle strength with bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported in cross-sectional epidemiological studies, but it remains unclear whether or not this is the case with longitudinal change. Thus, we investigated whether or not the knee extension strength can predict the incidence of osteopenia or osteoporosis after 6 years, then compared the difference between sexes. Subjects were 1255 community-dwelling Japanese men and menopaused women, aged 40-81 years. BMD of lumbar spine and femoral neck was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry twice at 6-year intervals. Subjects were divided into three groups, normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis, depending on their young adult mean BMD % value. In the cross-sectional analysis the correlations between the knee extension strength and BMD of the two regions were examined, using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Longitudinal analyses were then conducted to determine the odds ratio, controlled for age and BMI, given that those who were normal in the initial stage developed osteopenia or osteoporosis after 6 years, for every 1 SD decrease in knee extension strength, as well as those who first had normal or osteopenia and then developed osteoporosis. Cross-sectional analysis showed a statistically significant relation between knee extensor muscle strength and BMD at both the lumbar spine (p = 0.02) and the femoral neck (p < 0.0001) only in men. The longitudinal analysis showed the significant effect of muscle strength on the loss of femoral neck BMD from normal to osteopenia or osteoporosis both in men (OR 1.84, 95 % CI 1.36-2.48, p < 0.0001) and in women (OR 1.29, 95 % CI 1.002-1.65, p < 0.05), as well as on the loss of spinal BMD from normal or osteopenia to osteoporosis only in men (OR 2.97, 95 % CI 1.07-8.23, p < 0.05). The results suggest the importance of knee extension strength to maintain the bone health of the proximal femur and spine in aging particularly in men.

  14. Open, combat-related loss, or disruption of the knee extensor mechanism: treatment strategies, classification, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Romney C; Wilson, Kevin W; Bojescul, John A; Mickel, Timothy J; Gordon, Wade T; Potter, Benjamin K

    2014-11-01

    To report the outcomes of repair or reconstruction of high-energy, open knee extensor disruption or loss due to combat-related injuries. Retrospective review. Tertiary (Level/Role V) Military Treatment Facility. Fourteen consecutive patients who sustained 17 complex, open knee extensor mechanism injuries during combat operations between March 2003 and May 2012. Primary repair or staged allograft extensor reconstruction after serial debridement and closure or soft tissue coverage. Final knee range of motion, extensor lag, ambulatory ability and assist devices, and complications requiring reoperation or salvage procedure. The open knee extensor mechanism injuries required a mean of 11 procedures per injury. At a mean final follow-up of 39 months (range, 12-89 months), all patients achieved regular community ambulation, with 36% requiring assist devices due to concomitant or bilateral injuries. Average knee flexion was 92 degrees, and 35% of extremities had an extensor lag >10 degrees; however, 6 of 9 extremities with allograft reconstructions had extensor lags of <10 degrees, and 5 had no extensor lag. The presence of a major periarticular or patellar fracture was significantly associated with the knee requiring a subsequent extensor mechanism allograft reconstruction procedure. One extremity each underwent knee arthrodesis or transfemoral amputation due to severe infection. High-energy, open knee extensor mechanism injuries are severe and rarely occur in isolation, but limb salvage is generally successful after multiple procedures. Patients who required staged allograft reconstruction, despite high complication rates, generally had favorable results. Therapeutic level IV. See instructions for authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  15. Validity and reliability of an instrumented leg-extension machine for measuring isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Caroline; Haupenthal, Alessandro; Jacomel, Gabriel Fernandes; Fontana, Heiliane de Brito; Santos, Daniela Pacheco dos; Scoz, Robson Dias; Roesler, Helio

    2015-05-20

    Isometric muscle strength of knee extensors has been assessed for estimating performance, evaluating progress during physical training, and investigating the relationship between isometric and dynamic/functional performance. To assess the validity and reliability of an adapted leg-extension machine for measuring isometric knee extensor force. Validity (concurrent approach) and reliability (test and test-retest approach) study. University laboratory. 70 healthy men and women aged between 20 and 30 y (39 in the validity study and 31 in the reliability study). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values calculated for the maximum voluntary isometric torque of knee extensors at 30°, 60°, and 90°, measured with the prototype and with an isokinetic dynamometer (ICC2,1, validity study) and measured with the prototype in test and retest sessions, scheduled from 48 h to 72 h apart (ICC1,1, reliability study). In the validity analysis, the prototype showed good agreement for measurements at 30° (ICC2,1 = .75, SEM = 18.2 Nm) and excellent agreement for measurements at 60° (ICC2,1 = .93, SEM = 9.6 Nm) and at 90° (ICC2,1 = .94, SEM = 8.9 Nm). Regarding the reliability analysis, between-days' ICC1,1 were good to excellent, ranging from .88 to .93. Standard error of measurement and minimal detectable difference based on test-retest ranged from 11.7 Nm to 18.1 Nm and 32.5 Nm to 50.1 Nm, respectively, for the 3 analyzed knee angles. The analysis of validity and repeatability of the prototype for measuring isometric muscle strength has shown to be good or excellent, depending on the knee joint angle analyzed. The new instrument, which presents a relative low cost and easiness of transportation when compared with an isokinetic dynamometer, is valid and provides consistent data concerning isometric strength of knee extensors and, for this reason, can be used for practical, clinical, and research purposes.

  16. Comparison of elasticity of human tendon and aponeurosis in knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2005-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the elasticity of tendon and aponeurosis in human knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo and to examine whether the maximal strain of tendon was correlated to that of aponeurosis. The elongation of tendon and aponeurosis during isometric knee extension (n = 23) and ankle plantar flexion (n = 22), respectively, were determined using a real-time ultrasonic apparatus, while the participants performed ramp isometric contractions up to voluntary maximum. To calculate the strain values from the measured elongation, we measured the respective length of tendon and aponeurosis. For the knee extensors, the maximal strain of aponeurosis (12.1 +/- 2.8 %) was significantly greater than that of the patella tendon (8.3 +/- 2.4 %), p < 0.001. On the contrary, the maximal strain of Achilles tendon (5.9 +/- 1.4 %) was significantly greater than that of aponeurosis in ankle plantar flexors (2.7 +/- 1.4 %), p < 0.001. Furthermore, for both knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors there was no significant correlation between maximal strain of tendon and aponeurosis. These results would be important for understanding the different roles of tendon and aponeurosis during human movements and for more accurate muscle modeling.

  17. Pulmonary diffusion limitation after prolonged strenuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Manier, G; Moinard, J; Téchoueyres, P; Varène, N; Guénard, H

    1991-02-01

    To determine the effect of strenuous prolonged exercise on alveolo-capillary membrane diffusing capacity, 11 marathon runners aged 37 +/- 7 years (mean +/- SD) were studied before and during early recovery (28 +/- 14 min) from a marathon race. Lung capillary blood volume (Vc) and the alveolo-capillary diffusing capacity (Dm) were determined in a one-step maneuver by simultaneous measurements of CO and NO lung transfer (DLCO and DLNO, respectively) using the single breath, breath-holding method. After the race, both DLCO and DLNO were significantly decreased in all subjects (-10.9 +/- 4.8%, P less than 10(-4) and -29.0 +/- 11.1%, P less than 10(-4), respectively). The mean value of the derived DmCO decreased by -29.3 +/- 11.1%, whereas Vc had not entirely returned to control resting value. Although these results do not indicate the detailed mechanism involved, interstitial lung fluid was suspected to accumulate, particularly in alveoli, during the race. We concluded that the high overall work load and the extended duration of the exercise both contributed to a transient change in the structure of the alveolo-capillary membrane thereby affecting the diffusing capacity of the alveolo-capillary membrane.

  18. Severe COPD Alters Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity During Knee Extensors Fatiguing Contraction.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Coratella, Giuseppe; Dardanello, Davide; Rinaldo, Nicoletta; Lanza, Massimo; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV), as a sign of fatigue during knee extensor contraction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as compared with healthy controls. Eleven male patients (5 with severe and 6 with moderate COPD; age 67 ± 5 years) and 11 age-matched healthy male controls (age 65 ± 4 years) volunteered for the study. CV was obtained by multichannel surface electromyography (EMG) from the vastus lateralis (VL) and medialis (VM) of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, 30-second duration knee extension at 70% of maximal voluntary contraction. The decline in CV in both the VL and VM was steeper in the severe COPD patients than in healthy controls (for VL: severe COPD vs. controls -0.45 ± 0.07%/s; p < 0.001, and for VM: severe COPD vs. controls -0.54 ± 0.09%/s, p < 0.001). No difference in CV decline was found between the moderate COPD patients and the healthy controls. These findings suggest that severe COPD may impair muscle functions, leading to greater muscular fatigue, as expressed by CV changes. The results may be due to a greater involvement of anaerobic metabolism and a shift towards fatigable type II fibers in the muscle composition of the severe COPD patients.

  19. Agonist and antagonist muscle activation during maximal and submaximal isokinetic fatigue tests of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Hassani, A; Patikas, D; Bassa, E; Hatzikotoulas, K; Kellis, E; Kotzamanidis, C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in electromyographic activity of agonist and antagonist knee musculature between a maximal and a submaximal isokinetic fatigue protocol. Fourteen healthy males (age: 24.3+/-2.5 years) performed 25 maximal (MIFP) and 60 submaximal (SIFP) isokinetic concentric efforts of the knee extensors at 60 degrees s(-1), across a 90 degrees range of motion. The two protocols were performed a week apart. The EMG activity of vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) were recorded using surface electrodes. The peak torque (PT) and average EMG (aEMG) were expressed as percentages of pre-fatigue maximal value. One-way analysis of variance indicated a significant (p<0.05) decline of PT during the maximal (45.7%) and submaximal (46.8%) protocols. During the maximal test, the VM and VL aEMG initially increased and then decreased. In contrast, VM and VL aEMG continuously increased during submaximal testing (p<0.05). The antagonist (BF) aEMG remained constant during maximal test but it increased significantly and then declined during the submaximal testing. The above results indicate that agonist and antagonist activity depends on the intensity of the selected isokinetic fatigue test.

  20. Sex Differences in Neuromuscular Fatigability of the Knee Extensors Post-Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kirking, Meghan; Berrios Barillas, Reivian; Nelson, Philip Andrew; Hunter, Sandra Kay; Hyngstrom, Allison

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Despite the implications of optimizing strength training post-stroke, little is known about the differences in fatigability between men and women with chronic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine the sex differences in knee extensor muscle fatigability and potential mechanisms in individuals with stroke. Methods: Eighteen participants (10 men, eight women) with chronic stroke (≥6 months) and 23 (12 men, 11 women) nonstroke controls participated in the study. Participants performed an intermittent isometric contraction task (6 s contraction, 3 s rest) at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque until failure to maintain the target torque. Electromyography was used to determine muscle activation and contractile properties were assessed with electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscles. Results: Individuals with stroke had a briefer task duration (greater fatigability) than nonstroke individuals (24.1 ± 17 min vs. 34.9 ± 16 min). Men were more fatigable than women for both nonstroke controls and individuals with stroke (17.9 ± 9 min vs. 41.6 ± 15 min). Individuals with stroke had less fatigue-related changes in muscle contractile properties and women with stroke differed in their muscle activation strategy during the fatiguing contractions. Conclusions: Men and women fatigue differently post-stroke and this may be due to the way they neurally activate muscle groups. PMID:28085089

  1. Effect of lower limb massage on electromyography and force production of the knee extensors

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, A M; Watt, J M; Watt, V; Galloway, S D R

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of massage on force production and neuromuscular recruitment. Methods Ten healthy male subjects performed isokinetic concentric contractions on the knee extensors at speeds of 60, 120, 180, and 240°/s. These contractions were performed before and after a 30 minute intervention of either rest in the supine position or lower limb massage. Electromyography (EMG) and force data were captured during the contractions. Results The change in isokinetic mean force due to the intervention showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) at 60°/s and a trend for a decrease (p  =  0.08) at 120°/s as a result of massage compared with passive rest. However, there were no corresponding differences in any of the EMG data. A reduction in force production was shown at 60°/s with no corresponding alteration in neuromuscular activity. Conclusions The results suggests that motor unit recruitment and muscle fibre conduction velocity are not responsible for the observed reductions in force. Although experimental confirmation is necessary, a possible explanation is that massage induced force loss by influencing “muscle architecture”. However, it is possible that the differences were only found at 60°/s because it was the first contraction after massage. Therefore muscle tension and architecture after massage and the duration of any massage effect need to be examined. PMID:16431996

  2. Isokinetic Evaluation of Knee Extensor/Flexor Muscle Strength in Behcet's Patients.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Bekir; Emre, Sinan; Sahin, Nilay; Karincaoglu, Yelda; Dogan, Erdal; Baysal, Ozlem; Ersoy, Yuksel; Altay, Zuhal

    2014-08-24

    Background: Behçet's disease (BD) is an idiopathic, multisystemic, progressive disease. The purpose of this study is to compare the knee flexor and extensor isokinetic muscle strengths of Behcet's patients with that of healthy subjects. Methods: Twenty-five (13 male and 12 female) patients with BD and 25 (15 male and 10 female) healthy individuals were included in the study. Velocities of 90°/sec, 120°/sec, and 150°/sec were used for the isokinetic muscle strength testing. Patients with active inflammatory knee arthritis were excluded. Peak torque (Nm) and peak torque adjusted to body weight (%) were taken into consideration for comparison between study groups. Results: Compared to healthy controls, there was a statistically significant decrease in both the bilateral knee extensor and flexor muscle isokinetic peak torques(Nm) as well as the peak torques adjusted to body weight (%) at velocities of 90°/sec, 120°/sec and 150°/sec in patients with BD (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the agonist-antagonist ratio of the isokinetic peak torques of knee muscles between the two groups. Conclusion: In light of these findings, we have concluded that both knee flexor and extensor isokinetic muscle strengths are lower in BD. We therefore recommend careful monitoring of patients with BD in terms of muscle strength.

  3. Isokinetic Evaluation of Knee Extensor/Flexor Muscle Strength in Behcet's Patients.

    PubMed

    Durmus, B; Emre, S; Sahin, N; Karincaoglu, Y; Dogan, E; Baysal, O; Ersoy, Y; Altay, Z

    2015-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is an idiopathic, multisystemic, progressive disease. The purpose of this study is to compare the knee flexor and extensor isokinetic muscle strengths of Behcet's patients with that of healthy subjects. Twenty-five (13 male and 12 female) patients with BD and 25 (15 male and 10 female) healthy individuals were included in the study. Velocities of 90°/sec, 120°/sec, and 150°/sec were used for the isokinetic muscle strength testing. Patients with active inflammatory knee arthritis were excluded. Peak torque (Nm) and peak torque adjusted to body weight (%) were taken into consideration for comparison between study groups. Compared to healthy controls, there was a statistically significant decrease in both the bilateral knee extensor and flexor muscle isokinetic peak torques(Nm) as well as the peak torques adjusted to body weight (%) at velocities of 90°/sec, 120°/sec and 150°/sec in patients with BD (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the agonist-antagonist ratio of the isokinetic peak torques of knee muscles between the two groups. In light of these findings, we have concluded that both knee flexor and extensor isokinetic muscle strengths are lower in BD. We therefore recommend careful monitoring of patients with BD in terms of muscle strength.

  4. Effects of endurance training on the maximal voluntary activation level of the knee extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Zghal, F; Martin, V; Thorkani, A; Arnal, P J; Tabka, Z; Cottin, F

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neural adaptations to endurance training, and more specifically the adaptation of the cortical voluntary activation of the knee extensor (KE) muscles. Sixteen sedentary men were randomly allocated into an endurance training (n = 8) or a control group (n = 8). All subjects performed a maximal aerobic speed test (MAS) before and immediately after the training period. Training lasted 8 weeks and was based on endurance running. During Pre- and Post-training testing sessions, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured and voluntary activation (VA) was calculated via peripheral nerve (PNS) and transcranial magnetic stimulations (TMS) superimposed to MVC. Electromyographic activity (EMG) of the KE muscles was also measured during MVC, PNS (M-wave) and TMS (motor evoked potentials-MEP). The cortical silent period following TMS was also assessed. Despite a significant improvement in endurance running performance, as suggested by the increase of MAS in the training group (Pre 15.4 ± 1.6 vs. Post 16.4 ± 1.6 km·h(-1)), endurance training did not affect MVC or VA as measured with PNS and TMS. Similarly, the EMG of KE muscles during MVC did not show any significant changes. Furthermore, the MEP amplitude and the duration of the silent period also remained unchanged after endurance training. The present study suggests an 8-week endurance-training program does not generate adaptations of neural factors in sedentary subjects.

  5. Functional and morphological adaptations to aging in knee extensor muscles of physically active men.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Geremia, Jeam Marcel; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Borges, Marcelo Krás; Jinha, Azim; Herzog, Walter; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2013-10-01

    It is not known if a physically active lifestyle, without systematic training, is sufficient to combat age-related muscle and strength loss. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate if the maintenance of a physically active lifestyle prevents muscle impairments due to aging. To address this issue, we evaluated 33 healthy men with similar physical activity levels (IPAQ = 2) across a large range of ages. Functional (torque-angle and torque-velocity relations) and morphological (vastus lateralis muscle architecture) properties of the knee extensor muscles were assessed and compared between three age groups: young adults (30 ± 6 y), middle-aged subjects (50 ± 7 y) and elderly subjects (69 ± 5 y). Isometric peak torques were significantly lower (30% to 36%) in elderly group subjects compared with the young adults. Concentric peak torques were significantly lower in the middle aged (18% to 32%) and elderly group (40% to 53%) compared with the young adults. Vastus lateralis thickness and fascicles lengths were significantly smaller in the elderly group subjects (15.8 ± 3.9 mm; 99.1 ± 25.8 mm) compared with the young adults (19.8 ± 3.6 mm; 152.1 ± 42.0 mm). These findings suggest that a physically active lifestyle, without systematic training, is not sufficient to avoid loss of strength and muscle mass with aging.

  6. Effect of lower limb massage on electromyography and force production of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A M; Watt, J M; Watt, V; Galloway, S D R

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of massage on force production and neuromuscular recruitment. Ten healthy male subjects performed isokinetic concentric contractions on the knee extensors at speeds of 60, 120, 180, and 240 degrees /s. These contractions were performed before and after a 30 minute intervention of either rest in the supine position or lower limb massage. Electromyography (EMG) and force data were captured during the contractions. The change in isokinetic mean force due to the intervention showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) at 60 degrees /s and a trend for a decrease (p = 0.08) at 120 degrees /s as a result of massage compared with passive rest. However, there were no corresponding differences in any of the EMG data. A reduction in force production was shown at 60 degrees /s with no corresponding alteration in neuromuscular activity. The results suggests that motor unit recruitment and muscle fibre conduction velocity are not responsible for the observed reductions in force. Although experimental confirmation is necessary, a possible explanation is that massage induced force loss by influencing "muscle architecture". However, it is possible that the differences were only found at 60 degrees /s because it was the first contraction after massage. Therefore muscle tension and architecture after massage and the duration of any massage effect need to be examined.

  7. Fatigue reduces the complexity of knee extensor torque fluctuations during maximal and submaximal intermittent isometric contractions in man

    PubMed Central

    Pethick, Jamie; Winter, Samantha L; Burnley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular fatigue increases the amplitude of fluctuations in torque output during isometric contractions, but the effect of fatigue on the temporal structure, or complexity, of these fluctuations is not known. We hypothesised that fatigue would result in a loss of temporal complexity and a change in fractal scaling of the torque signal during isometric knee extensor exercise. Eleven healthy participants performed a maximal test (5 min of intermittent maximal voluntary contractions, MVCs), and a submaximal test (contractions at a target of 40% MVC performed until task failure), each with a 60% duty factor (6 s contraction, 4 s rest). Torque and surface EMG signals were sampled continuously. Complexity and fractal scaling of torque were quantified by calculating approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn) and the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) scaling exponent α. Fresh submaximal contractions were more complex than maximal contractions (mean ± SEM, submaximal vs. maximal: ApEn 0.65 ± 0.09 vs. 0.15 ± 0.02; SampEn 0.62 ± 0.09 vs. 0.14 ± 0.02; DFA α 1.35 ± 0.04 vs. 1.55 ± 0.03; all P < 0.005). Fatigue reduced the complexity of submaximal contractions (ApEn to 0.24 ± 0.05; SampEn to 0.22 ± 0.04; DFA α to 1.55 ± 0.03; all P < 0.005) and maximal contractions (ApEn to 0.10 ± 0.02; SampEn to 0.10 ± 0.02; DFA α to 1.63 ± 0.02; all P < 0.01). This loss of complexity and shift towards Brownian-like noise suggests that as well as reducing the capacity to produce torque, fatigue reduces the neuromuscular system's adaptability to external perturbations. PMID:25664928

  8. Acute effects of kinesio taping on knee extensor peak torque and electromyographic activity after exhaustive isometric knee extension in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Simon S; Yeung, Ella W; Sakunkaruna, Yosawin; Mingsoongnern, Sutida; Hung, Wing Y; Fan, Yun L; Iao, Heng C

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of Kinesio Tex tape and its method of application, Kinesio Taping (KT) on knee extensor performance before and after an exhaustive isometric knee extension exercise. Single-blinded, randomized control trial. Centre for Sports Training and Rehabilitation at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Twenty-six healthy volunteers with no history of knee injuries. Subjects were randomized to either the KT or sham taping group. The effects of KT on the neuromuscular performance of the knee extensors were measured before and after KT application, and immediately and 5 and 10 minutes after an exhaustive isometric knee extension exercise. Within-group analyses revealed a significant effect of time on the peak torque in isometric knee extension (F2.73,65.44 = 24.5, P < 0.001), but no significant group (F2.73,65.44 = 2.13, P = 0.11) or interaction (F1,24 = 0.59, P = 0.45) effect. A significant time effect (F2.52,60.14 = 3.75, P = 0.02) and a significant time × group interaction (F1,24 = 4.59, P = 0.04) was found for the rate of peak torque development. Post hoc comparisons revealed significantly higher rates in the intervention group (F1,24 = 4.594, P = 0.04) over all 5 tests. No significant effects of time (F4,96 = 0.88, P = 0.48; F2.56,61.35 = 2.75, P = 0.06), group (F4,96 = 0.56, P = 0.69; F2.56,61.35 = 1.16, P = 0.33), or time × group interaction (F1,24 = 2.77, P = 0.11; F1,24 = 0.20, P = 0.66) were found for either the electromechanical delay or electromyographic results, respectively. The present study suggests that KT shortens the time required to generate peak torque during isometric knee extension, which has important implications for sports performances that require the rapid generation of peak muscular force. Kinesio taping is commonly seen in the sports arena. The popularity is presumably due to the general belief in its injury prevention and enhancement of muscle performance. The results of the present findings suggested that KT shortens the

  9. Knee extensor and flexor muscle power explains stair ascension time in patients with unilateral late-stage knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, Anu M; Pöyhönen, Tapani; Manninen, Mikko; Heinonen, Ari; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2015-02-01

    To determine the extent of asymmetrical deficits in knee extensor and flexor muscles, and to examine whether asymmetrical muscle deficits are associated with mobility limitations in persons with late-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). Cross-sectional. Research laboratory. A clinical sample (N=56; age range, 50-75y) of eligible persons with late-stage knee OA awaiting knee replacement. Not applicable. Knee extensor and flexor power and torque assessed isokinetically; thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) assessed by computed tomography; mobility limitation assessed by walking speed and stair ascension time; and pain assessed with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire. The asymmetrical deficits in knee extensor and flexor power and torque were between 18% and 29% (P<.001). Regarding the thigh muscle CSA, the asymmetrical deficit was 4% (P<.001). Larger asymmetrical knee extensor power deficits and weaker knee extensor and flexor power on the contralateral side were associated with slower stair ascension times. Moreover, weaker knee extensor and flexor power on the ipsilateral side were associated with slower stair ascension times. Greater knee pain in the OA joint was independently associated with slower stair ascending time in both models. The knee extensor and flexor muscle power of both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides and the pain in the OA knee were independently associated with stair ascension times. These results highlight the importance of assessing muscle power on both sides and knee pain in the prevention of mobility limitations in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of isometric resistance training on stretch reflex induced tremor in the knee extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Durbaba, Rade; Cassidy, Angela; Budini, Francesco; Macaluso, Andrea

    2013-06-15

    This study examines the effect of 4 wk of high-intensity isometric resistance training on induced tremor in knee extensor muscles. Fourteen healthy volunteers were assigned to either the training group (n = 7) or the nontraining control group (n = 7). Induced tremor was assessed by measuring force fluctuations during anisometric contractions against spring loading, whose compliance was varied to allow for preferential activation of the short or long latency stretch reflex components. Effects of high-intensity isometric resistance training on induced tremor was assessed under two contraction conditions: relative force matching, where the relative level of activity was equal for both pre- and post-training sessions, set at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and absolute force matching, where the level of activity was set to 30% pretrained MVC. The training group experienced a 26.5% increase in MVC in contrast to the 0.8% for the control group. For relative force-matching contractions, induced tremor amplitude and frequency did not change in either the training or control group. During absolute force-matching contractions, induced tremor amplitude was decreased by 37.5% and 31.6% for the short and long components, respectively, with no accompanying change in frequency, for the training group. No change in either measure was observed in the control group for absolute force-matching contractions. The results are consistent with high-intensity isometric resistance training induced neural changes leading to increased strength, coupled with realignment of stretch reflex automatic gain compensation to the new maximal force output. Also, previous reported reductions in anisometric tremor following strength training may partly be due to changed stretch reflex behavior.

  11. Isometric knee-extensor torque development and jump height in volleyball players.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, C J; Vermeulen, Gido; Toussaint, Huub M; de Haan, Arnold

    2007-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the contribution of the intrinsic muscle properties and muscle activation of the knee extensors to the maximal rate of unilateral isometric torque development and to relate both factors to maximal bilateral jumping performance in experienced jumpers. On the basis of previous studies, we hypothesized that maximal rate of torque development during maximal effort isometric contractions and jump height would depend on the subjects' ability for maximal muscle activation rather than on the muscle's contractile properties. Eleven male elite volleyball players (20 +/- 2 yr, means +/- SD) performed squat jumps starting from a 120 degrees knee angle (SJ120; full extension = 180 degrees ) and countermovement jumps. In addition, maximal voluntary and electrically evoked unilateral isometric knee-extension torque development (120 degrees angle) was obtained. Torque time integral for the first 40 ms after torque onset (TTI40) and (time to) maximal rate of torque development (MRTD) were calculated. Muscle activation was quantified using surface EMG. Voluntary TTI40 was significantly related to the preceding EMG (r2 = 0.83) and negatively related to the time to MRTD (r2 = 0.64). Voluntary MRTD and TTI40 were not related to their respective values obtained during electrical stimulation (r2 < 0.04). Only electrically evoked MRTD was significantly related to jump height (e.g., r2 = 0.70 for SJ120). As expected initial maximal voluntary isometric torque development correlated with muscle activation and not with muscle contractile speed. However, unexpectedly, only the latter could predict jump performance in skilled jumpers.

  12. Hip Abductor and Knee Extensor Muscle Strength of Children with and without Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mercer, V S; Lewis, C L

    2001-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to 1) determine test-retest reliability of hand-held dynamometer measurements of right hip abductor and knee extensor muscle strength in children with Down syndrome (DS), 2) identify differences in isometric muscle strength between children with DS and peers who are developing typically, and 3) determine the relationship between various anthropometric and demographic variables and isometric muscle strength. Seventeen children with DS between the ages of seven and 15 years and a comparison group of 17 age- and gender-matched peers who were developing typically participated in the study. A hand-held dynamometer was used to measure peak force during maximal isometric right hip abduction and knee extension at two test sessions approximately one week apart. Peak torque values were calculated by multiplying peak force measurements by the appropriate segment lengths. Anthropometric measurements were obtained, and a questionnaire was used to measure habitual physical activity levels. Test-retest reliability was high, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.89 to 0.95. Children with DS had significantly lower mean peak torque values for hip abduction and knee extension than children in the comparison group. Regression analyses indicated that weight, body mass index, height, activity level, and gender were significant predictors of peak torque production for the sample as a whole. Hand-held dynamometry can be used to obtain reliable measurements of isometric muscle strength in children with DS. Anthropometric characteristics and activity levels may play a role in peak torque production in children with and without DS.

  13. The effect of open kinetic chain knee extensor resistance training at different training loads on anterior knee laxity in the uninjured.

    PubMed

    Barcellona, Massimo G; Morrissey, Matthew C

    2016-04-01

    The commonly used open kinetic chain knee extensor (OKCKE) exercise loads the sagittal restraints to knee anterior tibial translation. To investigate the effect of different loads of OKCKE resistance training on anterior knee laxity (AKL) in the uninjured knee. non-clinical trial. Randomization into one of three supervised training groups occurred with training 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Subjects in the LOW and HIGH groups performed OKCKE resistance training at loads of 2 sets of 20 repetition maximum (RM) and 20 sets of 2RM, respectively. Subjects in the isokinetic training group (ISOK) performed isokinetic OKCKE resistance training using 2 sets of 20 maximal efforts. AKL was measured using the KT2000 arthrometer with concurrent measurement of lateral hamstrings muscle activity at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Twenty six subjects participated (LOW n = 9, HIGH n = 10, ISOK n = 7). The main finding from this study is that a 12-week OKCKE resistance training programme at loads of 20 sets of 2RM, leads to an increase in manual maximal AKL. OKCKE resistance training at high loads (20 sets of 2RM) increases AKL while low load OKCKE resistance training (2 sets of 20RM) and isokinetic OKCKE resistance training at 2 sets of 20RM does not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Association Between Knee Extensor Force Steadiness, Force Accuracy, and Mobility in Older Adults Who Have Fallen.

    PubMed

    Chung-Hoon, Kaiwi; Tracy, Brian L; Dibble, Leland E; Marcus, Robin L; Burgess, Paul; LaStayo, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    Older adults often experience limited mobility, lower extremity muscle weakness, and increased fall risk. Furthermore, when older adults perform tasks that require control of submaximal force, impairments in their ability to maintain steady and accurate force output have been reported. Such problems may be related to deteriorating levels of mobility, particularly in older adults who have fallen. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an association exists between muscle force steadiness (MFS) or muscle force accuracy (MFA) of the knee extensors and mobility in older adults who have fallen. Twenty older adults ((Equation is included in full-text article.)= 77.5 ± 7 years, 5 males and 15 females) with 2 or more comorbid conditions and who experienced a fall in the past year underwent assessment of maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the knee extensors. A submaximal target force of 50% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction was used to determine concentric and eccentric (ECC) steadiness (the fluctuations in force production) and accuracy (the average distance of the mean force from the target force) measures. Mobility was indicated by the 6-minute walk test, the Timed Up and Go, stair ascent, and stair descent tests. Correlation analysis was used to assess the relationship between measures of muscle force control and mobility. The correlations between muscle force steadiness and mobility were not significant (P > .05) for either contraction type. However, MFA during ECC contractions only was correlated significantly with all measures of mobility-6 minute walk test (r = -0.48; P = .03), Timed Up and Go (r = 0.68; P = .01), stair ascent (r = 0.60; P = .01), and stair descent (r = 0.75; P < .01). The identification of the relationship between ECC MFA and mobility in older adults who have fallen is novel. Although the correlations are not causal, these relationships suggest that inaccurate force output during ECC contractions of the knee

  15. Comparison of Electro-Myo Stimulation to lsokinetic Training in Increasing -Power of the Knee Extensor Mechanism *.

    PubMed

    Halback, J; Straus, D

    1980-01-01

    A clinical study of six individuals was set up to compare an Electro-Myo stimulation protocol to an isokinetic protocol. The objective of the study was to see which was more effective in increasing power in the knee extensor mechanism. Results of the study showed that isokinetics were superior to Electro-Myo stimulation in increasing power. One question that remained unanswered in the testing was whether a higher faradic current, if tolerated, would be more efficient in increasing the power of a muscle group than would isokinetics. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1980;2(1):20-24.

  16. Comparative assessment of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measured using a hand-held vs. isokinetic dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Muff, Guillaume; Dufour, Stéphane; Meyer, Alain; Severac, François; Favret, Fabrice; Geny, Bernard; Lecocq, Jehan; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] To compare measurements of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength performed using a hand-held dynamometer and an isokinetic dynamometer in apparently healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult volunteers underwent knee muscle strength evaluation using an isokinetic or a hand-held dynamometer. [Results] Strong positive correlations were found between the 2 methods, with correlation coefficients r ranging from 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-0.86) to 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75-0.94), depending on the muscle group and the isokinetic evaluation mode. The reproducibility of the hand-held dynamometer findings was good, judged by a coefficient of variation of 3.2-4.2%. However, the correlation between the 2 methods for the assessment of flexor/extensor ratios ranged from -0.04 to 0.46. [Conclusion] Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength recorded with a hand-held dynamometer is reproducible and significantly correlated with the isokinetic values, indicating that this method may in some cases be a useful replacement for isokinetic strength measurement. However, for strength ratio assessment, and when judged against the isokinetic standard, a hand-held dynamometer is not a valid option.

  17. Reliability of measurements of knee extensor muscle strength using a pull-type hand-held dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Terumi

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliabilities of measurements of knee extensor muscle strength using a pull-type hand-held dynamometer (HHD). [Subjects] Fifty-four healthy adults (35 males; average age, 23 years) participated in this study. [Methods] Knee extensor muscle strength of each leg was measured three times using the HHD. To examine the intra- and inter-examiner reliabilities, measurements were performed by two examiners, a physical therapist and a physical therapy student. [Results] The intra-examiner reliabilities, ICC (1, 1) and ICC (1, 3) ranged from 0.94-0.99. The inter-examiner reliabilities, ICC (2, 1) and ICC (3, 1) ranged from 0.90-0.92 for the right leg, and 0.88-0.90 for the left leg. Neither constant nor proportional errors were found by Bland-Altman analysis. [Conclusion] Intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliabilities were acceptable, indicating that muscle strength can be measured with the pull-type HHD without dependence on skill of measurement. Pain was not caused by measurements with the pull-type HHD.

  18. Comparative assessment of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measured using a hand-held vs. isokinetic dynamometer

    PubMed Central

    Muff, Guillaume; Dufour, Stéphane; Meyer, Alain; Severac, François; Favret, Fabrice; Geny, Bernard; Lecocq, Jehan; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare measurements of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength performed using a hand-held dynamometer and an isokinetic dynamometer in apparently healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult volunteers underwent knee muscle strength evaluation using an isokinetic or a hand-held dynamometer. [Results] Strong positive correlations were found between the 2 methods, with correlation coefficients r ranging from 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48−0.86) to 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75−0.94), depending on the muscle group and the isokinetic evaluation mode. The reproducibility of the hand-held dynamometer findings was good, judged by a coefficient of variation of 3.2–4.2%. However, the correlation between the 2 methods for the assessment of flexor/extensor ratios ranged from −0.04 to 0.46. [Conclusion] Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength recorded with a hand-held dynamometer is reproducible and significantly correlated with the isokinetic values, indicating that this method may in some cases be a useful replacement for isokinetic strength measurement. However, for strength ratio assessment, and when judged against the isokinetic standard, a hand-held dynamometer is not a valid option. PMID:27799667

  19. Relationship of body composition, knee extensor strength, and standing balance to lumbar bone mineral density in postmenopausal females

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsub; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate correlations between lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) and general characteristics of postmenopausal females, including body composition, knee extensor strength, standing balance, and femur BMD. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 40 postmenopausal females (55.6 ± 4.6 years) who were caregivers or guardians of patients in the K hospital were included in the study. The weight, height, body composition, left and right knee extensor strength, standing balance, femur BMD, and lumbar BMD measurements of the subjects were obtained. [Results] The effect of measurement variables on lumbar BMD was examined. Increases in age and menopausal duration were observed to significantly increase lumbar BMD, whereas an increase in height was found to significantly decrease lumbar BMD. An increase in soft lean mass, skeletal muscle mass, fat-free mass, and femur BMD was also associated with significantly decreased lumbar BMD. [Conclusion] Age, menopausal duration, soft lean mass, skeletal muscle mass, and fat-free mass were factors that decreased lumbar BMD in menopausal females. This study is expected to provide basic knowledge for osteoporosis prevention and treatment programs for postmenopausal females. PMID:27512276

  20. Early strength response of the knee extensors during eight weeks of resistive training after unilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mark D; Brown, Lee E; Whitehurst, Michael

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the early history of knee extensor torque production before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), explore the relationship between strength assessments, and describe an 8-week resistive-training protocol. Thirty-eight individuals (19 men, 19 women) with unilateral TKA volunteered to participate in this repeated-measures study. For this group, the mean age was 72.23 +/- 5.34 years; height was 168.00 +/- 8.57 cm; and weight was 79.42 +/- 14.57 kg. Torque production of the knee extensors was assessed isokinetically at 60 and 180 degrees .s(-1) before surgery, 30 days after unilateral TKA (+30), and 60 days after unilateral TKA (+60). Torque production was significantly different between limbs at both 60 and 180 degrees .s(-1) (p < 0.0125) before surgery. Torque production was lower at +30 compared with before surgery at both 60 and 180 degrees .s(-1) (p < 0.002). By +60, torque production was greater than at +30 at both 60 and 180 degrees .s(-1) (p < 0.002).

  1. Effects Of Exercise During Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, S.; Berry, P; Cohen, M.; Danelis, J.; Deroshia, C.; Greenleaf, J.; Harris, B.; Keil, L.; Bernauer, E.; Bond, M.; hide

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiment to investigate effects of isotonic and isokinetic leg exercises in counteracting effects of bed rest upon physical and mental conditions of subjects. Data taken on capacity for work, endurance and strength, tolerance to sitting up, equilibrium, posture, gait, atrophy, mineralization and density of bones, endocrine analyses concerning vasoactivity and fluid and electrolyte balances, intermediary metabolism of muscles, mood, and performance.

  2. The association between knee extensor force steadiness, force accuracy and mobility in older adults who have fallen

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Hoon, Kaiwi; Tracy, Brian L.; Dibble, Leland E.; Marcus, Robin L.; Burgess, Paul; LaStayo, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Older adults often experience impaired mobility, lower extremity muscle weakness, and increased fall risk. Furthermore, when older adults perform tasks that require control of submaximal force, impairments in their ability to maintain steady and accurate force output has been reported. Such problems may be related to deteriorating levels of mobility, particularly in older adults who have fallen. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether an association exists between muscle force steadiness (MFS) or muscle force accuracy (MFA) of the knee extensors and mobility in older adults who have fallen. Methods Twenty older adults (x̄ = 77.5 ± 7yrs, 5 males and 15 females) with 2 or more co-morbid conditions and who experienced a fall in the past year underwent assessment of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the knee extensors. A submaximal target force of 50% of their MVIC was used to determine concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) steadiness (the fluctuations in force production) and accuracy (the average distance of the mean force from the target force) measures. Mobility was indicated by the 6 minute walk test (6MWT), the timed up and go (TUG), stair ascent (StA), and stair descent (StD) tests. Correlation analysis was used to assess the relation between measures of muscle force control and mobility. Results The correlations between MFS and mobility were not significant (p>0.05) for either contraction type. However, MFA during ECC contractions only, were correlated significantly with all measures of mobility: 6MWT (r=−0.48, p=0.03), TUG (r=0.68, p=0.01), StA (r=0.60, p=0.01), StD (r=0.75, p<0.01). Conclusion The identification of the relationship between ECC MFA and mobility in older adults who have fallen is novel. While the correlations are not causal, these relationships suggest inaccurate force output during ECC contractions of the knee extensors is linked to impaired mobility. PMID:25695470

  3. Twitch potentiation induced by stimulated and voluntary isometric contractions at various torque levels in human knee extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Naokazu; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of twitch potentiation (TP) after stimulated or voluntary contractions at identical intensities for the human knee extensor muscles. Isometric knee extensions of 10 s were performed at 20%, 40%, and 60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque level, through percutaneous electrical stimulation of the quadriceps at 80 Hz or voluntary contraction. Twitch responses were evoked by stimulating the femoral nerve percutaneously with supramaximal intensity. The extent of TP after the stimulated contraction was greater than that after the voluntary contraction at the 20% MVC torque level, whereas a stimulated contraction induced a smaller extent of TP than did a voluntary contraction at contraction intensities higher than 40% MVC. We suggest that this contraction intensity dependence of differences in TP after stimulated and voluntary isometric conditioning contractions is responsible for differences in the recruitment pattern of motor units during the conditioning contractions.

  4. Effect of sleep deprivation on tolerance of prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Martin, B J

    1981-01-01

    Acute loss of sleep produces few apparent physiological effects at rest. Nevertheless, many anecdotes suggest that adequate sleep is essential for optimum endurance athletic performance. To investigate this question, heavy exercise performance after 36 h without sleep was compared with that after normal sleep in eight subjects. During prolonged treadmill walking at about 80% of the VO2 max, sleep loss reduced work time to exhaustion by an average of 11% (p = 0.05). This decrease occurred despite doubling monetary incentives for subjects during work after sleeplessness. Subjects appeared to fall into "resistant" and "susceptible" categories: four showed less than a 5% change in performance after sleep loss, while four others showed decrements in exercise tolerance ranging from 15 to 40%. During the walk, sleep loss resulted in significantly greater perceived exertion (p less than 0.05), even though exercise heart rate and metabolic rate (VO2 and VCO2) were unchanged. Minute ventilation was significantly elevated during exercise after sleep loss ( p less than 0.05). Sleep loss failed to alter the continuous slow rises in VE and heart rate that occurred as work was prolonged. These findings suggest that the psychological effects of acute sleep loss may contribute to decreased tolerance of prolonged heavy exercise.

  5. Skeletal muscle water and electrolytes following prolonged dehydrating exercise.

    PubMed

    Mora-Rodríguez, R; Fernández-Elías, V E; Hamouti, N; Ortega, J F

    2015-06-01

    We studied if dehydrating exercise would reduce muscle water (H2Omuscle ) and affect muscle electrolyte concentrations. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were collected prior, immediately after, and 1 and 4 h after prolonged dehydrating exercise (150 min at 33 ± 1 °C, 25% ± 2% humidity) on nine endurance-trained cyclists (VO2max  = 54.4 ± 1.05 mL/kg/min). Plasma volume (PV) changes and fluid shifts between compartments (Cl(-) method) were measured. Exercise dehydrated subjects 4.7% ± 0.3% of body mass by losing 2.75 ± 0.15 L of water and reducing PV 18.4% ± 1% below pre-exercise values (P < 0.05). Right after exercise H2Omuscle remained at pre-exercise values (i.e., 398 ± 6 mL/100 g dw muscle(-1)) but declined 13% ± 2% (342 ± 12 mL/100 g dw muscle(-1); P < 0.05) after 1 h of supine rest. At that time, PV recovered toward pre-exercise levels. The Cl(-) method corroborated the shift of fluid between extracellular and intracellular compartments. After 4 h of recovery, PV returned to pre-exercise values; however, H2Omuscle remained reduced at the same level. Muscle Na(+) and K(+) increased (P < 0.05) in response to the H2Omuscle reductions. Our findings suggest that active skeletal muscle does not show a net loss of H2O during prolonged dehydrating exercise. However, during the first hour of recovery H2Omuscle decreases seemly to restore PV and thus cardiovascular stability.

  6. The impact of obesity on physiological responses during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Eijsvogels, T M H; Veltmeijer, M T W; Schreuder, T H A; Poelkens, F; Thijssen, D H J; Hopman, M T E

    2011-11-01

    Prolonged, moderate-intensity exercise training is routinely prescribed to subjects with obesity. In the general population, this type of exercise can lead to fluid and sodium imbalance. However, little is known whether obesity alters the risk of fluid and sodium imbalances. This study examined physiological responses, such as core body temperature, fluid and sodium balance, in lean (BMI<25), overweight (2530) subjects during prolonged moderate-intensity exercise. A total of 93 volunteers (24-80 years), stratified for BMI, participated in the Nijmegen Marches and walked 30-50 km at a self-selected pace. Heart rate and core body temperature were recorded every 5 km. Subjects reported fluid intake, while urine output was measured and sweat rate was calculated. Baseline and post-exercise plasma sodium levels were determined, and urinary specific gravity levels were assessed before and after exercise. BMI groups did not differ in training status preceding the experiment. Exercise duration (8 h 41 ± 1 h 36 min) and intensity (72 ± 9% HR(max)) were comparable across groups, whereas obese subjects tended to have a higher maximum core body temperature than lean controls (P=0.06). Obese subjects demonstrated a significantly higher fluid intake (P<0.001) and sweat rate (P<0.001), but lower urine output (P<0.05) compared with lean subjects. In addition, higher urine specific gravity levels were observed in obese versus lean subjects after exercise (P<0.05). Furthermore, plasma-sodium concentration did not change in lean subjects after exercise, whereas plasma-sodium levels increased significantly (P<0.001) in overweight and obese subjects. Also, overweight and obese subjects demonstrated a significantly larger decrease in body mass after exercise than lean controls (P<0.05). Obese subjects demonstrate a larger deviation in markers of fluid and sodium balance than their lean counterparts during prolonged moderate-intensity exercise. These findings

  7. Exercise as a countermeasure for physiological adaptation to prolonged spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1996-01-01

    Exercise represents the primary countermeasure used during spaceflight to maintain or restore maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max), musculoskeletal structure, and orthostatic function. However, no single exercise or combination of prescriptions has proven entirely effective in restoring cardiovascular and musculoskeletal functions to preflight levels following prolonged spaceflight. As human spaceflight exposures increase in duration, assessment and development of various effective exercise-based protective procedures become paramount. This must involve improvement in specific countermeasure prescription as well as development of additional approaches that will allow space travelers greater flexibility and medical safety during long flights. Effective exercise prescription will be based on identification of basic physiological stimuli that maintain normal function in terrestrial gravity and understanding of how specific combinations of exercise characteristics e.g., duration, frequency, intensity, mode) can mimic these stimuli and affect the overall process of adaptation to microgravity. This can be accomplished only with greater emphasis of research on ground-based experiments. Future attention must be directed to improving exercise compliance while minimizing both crew time and the impact of the exercise on life-support resources.

  8. Exercise as a countermeasure for physiological adaptation to prolonged spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1996-01-01

    Exercise represents the primary countermeasure used during spaceflight to maintain or restore maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max), musculoskeletal structure, and orthostatic function. However, no single exercise or combination of prescriptions has proven entirely effective in restoring cardiovascular and musculoskeletal functions to preflight levels following prolonged spaceflight. As human spaceflight exposures increase in duration, assessment and development of various effective exercise-based protective procedures become paramount. This must involve improvement in specific countermeasure prescription as well as development of additional approaches that will allow space travelers greater flexibility and medical safety during long flights. Effective exercise prescription will be based on identification of basic physiological stimuli that maintain normal function in terrestrial gravity and understanding of how specific combinations of exercise characteristics e.g., duration, frequency, intensity, mode) can mimic these stimuli and affect the overall process of adaptation to microgravity. This can be accomplished only with greater emphasis of research on ground-based experiments. Future attention must be directed to improving exercise compliance while minimizing both crew time and the impact of the exercise on life-support resources.

  9. Effects of strength training program on hip extensors and knee extensors strength of lower limb in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Aye, Thanda; Thein, Soe; Hlaing, Thaingi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether strength training programs for hip extensors and knee extensors improve gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy in Myanmar. [Subjects and Methods] Forty children (25 boys and 15 girls, mean age: 6.07 ± 2.74 years) from National Rehabilitation Hospital, Yangon, Myanmar, who had been diagnosed with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy, Gross Motor Classification System I and II participated in a 6-week strength training program (45 minutes per day, 3 days per week) on hip and knee extensors. Assessment was made, before and after intervention, of the amount of training weight in pounds, as well as Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) dimensions D (standing) and E (walking, running, jumping). [Results] All scores had increased significantly after the strength-training program. [Conclusion] A simple method of strength-training program for hip and knee extensors might lead to improved muscle strength and gross motor function in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

  10. Effects of strength training program on hip extensors and knee extensors strength of lower limb in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Aye, Thanda; Thein, Soe; Hlaing, Thaingi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether strength training programs for hip extensors and knee extensors improve gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy in Myanmar. [Subjects and Methods] Forty children (25 boys and 15 girls, mean age: 6.07 ± 2.74 years) from National Rehabilitation Hospital, Yangon, Myanmar, who had been diagnosed with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy, Gross Motor Classification System I and II participated in a 6-week strength training program (45 minutes per day, 3 days per week) on hip and knee extensors. Assessment was made, before and after intervention, of the amount of training weight in pounds, as well as Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) dimensions D (standing) and E (walking, running, jumping). [Results] All scores had increased significantly after the strength-training program. [Conclusion] A simple method of strength-training program for hip and knee extensors might lead to improved muscle strength and gross motor function in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. PMID:27065561

  11. Speed, not magnitude, of knee extensor torque production is associated with self-reported knee function early after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chao-Jung; Indelicato, Peter A; Moser, Michael W; Vandenborne, Krista; Chmielewski, Terese L

    2015-11-01

    To examine the magnitude and speed of knee extensor torque production at the initiation of advanced anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction rehabilitation and the associations with self-reported knee function. Twenty-eight subjects who were 12 weeks post-ACL reconstruction and 28 age- and sex-matched physically active controls participated in this study. Knee extensor torque was assessed bilaterally with an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°/s. The variables of interest were peak torque, average rate of torque development, time to peak torque and quadriceps symmetry index. Knee function was assessed with the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (IKDC-SKF). Peak torque and average rate of torque development were lower on the surgical side compared to the non-surgical side and controls. Quadriceps symmetry index was lower in subjects with ACL reconstruction compared to controls. On the surgical side, average rate of torque development was positively correlated with IKDC-SKF score (r = 0.379) while time to peak torque was negatively correlated with IKDC-SKF score (r = -0.407). At the initiation of advanced ACL reconstruction rehabilitation, the surgical side displayed deficits in peak torque and average rate of torque development. A higher rate of torque development and shorter time to peak torque were associated with better self-reported knee function. The results suggest that the rate of torque development should be addressed during advanced ACL reconstruction rehabilitation and faster knee extensor torque generation may lead to better knee function. III.

  12. [Isokinetic evaluation of the muscular strength and balance of knee extensor and flexor apparatus of taekwondo athletes].

    PubMed

    Martínez Hernández, Luis Enrique; Pegueros Pérez, Andrea; Ortiz Alvarado, Alfonso; Del Villar Morales, Ariadna; Flores, Víctor H; Pineda Villaseñor, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Lower limb strength and muscular balance are important attributes in the practice of Taekwondo. To assess through isokinetic dynamometry the muscular strength and balance of knee extensor and flexor apparatus of elite Taekwondo athletes and to compare with recreational-type athletes. The maximum torque, the angle of maximum torque, maximum torque work, total work of the series, average power, and flexor and extensor muscle apparatus balance of the knees were obtained. A total of 32 knees were studied. Significantly higher values in peak torque and total work of the series were present in the group of TKD athletes in the extensor muscles, while the maximum torque angle of extensor and flexor muscles was higher in controls. We found a muscular imbalance due to flexor muscle strength deficit in both groups. Higher levels of muscular strength and an imbalance between the knee flexor and extensor muscle groups characterized the predominant motor gesture of TKD athletes. These results are useful in the design and implementation of training programs, to optimize the value of muscular strength and muscle balance in TKD athletes directed to promote optimal athletic performance and prevent sport-related injuries.

  13. Relationships between contraction properties of knee extensor muscles and fasting IGF-1 and adipocytokines in physically active postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, Toivo; Pääsuke, Mati; Kums, Tatjana; Gapeyeva, Helena; Ereline, Jaan; Saar, Meeli; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to find possible relationships between insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), adipocytokines (leptin and adiponectin) and twitch contraction (TC) characteristics of the knee extensor (KE) muscles in healthy physically active postmenopausal women (n = 28, 64-78 years old). We hypothesized that IGF-1 is related at least to isometric TC peak torque (Pt) as the highest value of isometric torque production and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, and there will not be any relationships between TC characteristics and leptin and adiponectin. During the measurement of MVC torque and twitch contractile properties of KE muscles, the subjects sat in a custom-made dynamometric chair with the knee and hip angles equal to 90 degrees and 100 degrees, respectively. To assess the contractile properties of the KE muscles, electrically evoked isometric twitch was elicited by percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Serum leptin, adiponectin, IGF-1, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and insulin were determined. There were a very few significant relationships between the measured muscle contractile parameters and fasting blood hormones. TC Pt correlated significantly with IGFBP-3 (r = 0.652, P = 0.001) and insulin (r = 0.495, P = 0.007). In conclusion, this study suggests that only TC peak torque correlated positively with serum fasting IGFBP-3 and insulin concentration. Adipocytokines leptin and adiponectin not correlated significantly with measured strength parameters in physically active postmenopausal women.

  14. Isometric knee extensor fatigue following a Wingate test: peripheral and central mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-del-Olmo, M; Rodriguez, F A; Marquez, G; Iglesias, X; Marina, M; Benitez, A; Vallejo, L; Acero, R M

    2013-02-01

    Central and peripheral fatigue have been explored during and after running or cycling exercises. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with a short maximal cycling exercise (30 s Wingate test) have not been investigated. In this study, 10 volunteer subjects performed several isometric voluntary contractions using the leg muscle extensors before and after two bouts of cycling at 25% of maximal power output and two bouts of Wingate tests. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical motor nerve stimulation (NM) were applied at rest and during the voluntary contractions. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), twitch amplitude evoked by electrical nerve stimulation, M wave and motor potential evoked by TMS (MEP) were recorded. MVC, VA and twitch amplitude evoked at rest by NM decreased significantly after the first and second Wingate tests, indicating central and peripheral fatigue. MVC and VA, but not the twitch amplitude evoked by NM, recovered before the second Wingate test. These results suggest that the Wingate test results in a decrease in MVC associated with peripheral and central fatigue. While the peripheral fatigue is associated with an intramuscular impairment, the central fatigue seems to be the main reason for the Wingate test-induced impairment of MVC. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. REDUCED RATE OF KNEE EXTENSOR TORQUE DEVELOPMENT IN OLDER ADULTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS IS ASSOCIATED WITH INTRINSIC MUSCLE CONTRACTILE DEFICITS

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Damien M.; Tourville, Timothy W.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Ades, Philip A.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer; Beynnon, Bruce D.; Toth, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of knee osteoarthritis on the rate of torque development (RTD) of the knee extensors in older adults with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA; n=15) and recreationally-active controls (n=15) of similar age, sex and health status, as well as the relationship between RTD and the size and contractility of single muscle fibers. OA participants had lower RTD when expressed in absolute terms (Nm/ms). There were sex differences in peak RTD (P<0.05), with greater RTD in men, but no group by sex interaction effects for any variables. The lower RTD in OA versus controls was not explained by variation between groups in the fiber type admixture of the muscle, and was mitigated when RTD was normalized to peak torque (PT). In knee OA volunteers, we found strong correlations between the RTD expressed relative to PT and the velocity of contraction of single myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and IIA/X muscle fibers (r=0.652 and 0.862; both P<0.05) and power output of MHC I fibers (r=0.642; P<0.05). In controls, RTD relative to PT was related to fiber cross-sectional area of MHC IIA/X fibers (r=0.707; P<0.05), but not measures of single fiber contractile performance. To our knowledge, these results represent the first demonstration that variation in whole muscle contractile kinetics in patients with advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults is related, in part, to the size and function of single muscle fibers. PMID:26343257

  16. Neuromuscular adjustments of the knee extensors and plantar flexors following match-play tennis in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Périard, Julien D; Girard, Olivier; Racinais, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study tested the hypothesis that impairments in lower limb maximal strength and voluntary activation (VA) are exacerbated following match-play tennis in hot compared with cool conditions. Methods Torque and VA were evaluated during brief (5 s) and sustained (20 s) maximal voluntary isometric contractions of the knee extensors (KE) and plantar flexors (PF) in 12 male tennis players before (pre) and after (post, 24 h and 48 h) ∼115 min of play in hot (∼37°C) and cool (∼22°C) conditions. Results Rectal temperature was higher following play in hot than in cool (∼39.2 vs ∼38.5°C; p<0.05). Torque production decreased from prematch to postmatch during the brief and sustained contractions in hot (KE: ∼22%; PF: ∼13%) and cool (KE: ∼9%, PF: ∼7%) (p<0.05). KE strength losses in hot were greater than in cool (p<0.05) and persisted for 24 h (p<0.05). Postmatch brief and sustained KE VA was lower in hot than in cool (p<0.05), in which VA was maintained. PF VA was maintained throughout the protocol. Peak twitch torque and maximum rates of torque development and relaxation in the KE and PF were equally reduced postmatch relative to prematch in hot and cool conditions (p<0.05), and were restored near baseline within 24 h. Conclusions Neuromuscular system integrity of the lower limbs is compromised immediately following match-play tennis in hot and cool conditions due to the development of peripheral fatigue. The larger and persistent KE strength losses observed under heat stress are associated with greater levels of central fatigue especially during sustained contractions. PMID:24668379

  17. Influence of length-restricted strength training on athlete's power-load curves of knee extensors and flexors.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Boris; Kleinöder, Heinz; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated whether different length-restricted strength training regimens affect voluntary explosive concentric power-load curves of the quadriceps femoris (QF) and hamstring (HAM) muscles. Thirty-two athletes were divided into 3 different training groups (G1-G3): G1 performed isometric training at knee joint angles corresponding to long muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length for QF and HAM; G2 conducted concentric-eccentric contraction cycles that were restricted to a knee joint range of motion corresponding to predominantly long MTU length for QF and HAM; and G3 combined the protocols of G1 and G2. Knee joint angle-dependent power-load curves during maximal voluntary explosive concentric knee extensions and flexions were measured for loads corresponding to 40, 60, and 80% of individual 1 repetition maximum at 5 different occasions: 2 times before, after 5 and 8 weeks of training, and 4 weeks post training. Power values of each subject were normalized to the largest value produced at any knee joint position (percent maximum). Obtained by curve fitting, the optimal knee joint angle for power production of QF and HAM remained unaltered throughout the course of the study for all testing loads and training groups. Therefore, different strength training regimens with a common restriction to long MTU lengths failed to induce length-dependent alterations in athlete's voluntary concentric power-load curves of knee extensors and flexors. The approach to develop strength training programs that induce systematic shifts in length-dependent power production of QF and HAM is of direct practical relevance for athletic activities such as cycling, ice skating, and skiing. However, restricting the muscle excursion range during loading seems to be an inappropriate trigger to cause length-dependent alterations in athlete's voluntary concentric power-load curves.

  18. Low-intensity eccentric contractions of the knee extensors and flexors protect against muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min-Ju; Chen, Trevor Chung-Ching; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Wu, Bo-Han; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the magnitude and duration of the protective effect of low-intensity eccentric contractions (LowEC) against damage induced by maximal eccentric contractions (MaxEC) of the knee flexors (KF) and extensors (KE). Young men were assigned to 8 experimental groups and 2 control groups (n = 13/group); the experimental groups performed LowEC of KF or KE 2 days (2d), 1 week (1wk), 2 weeks (2wk), or 3 weeks (3wk) before MaxEC, while the control groups performed MaxEC of KF or KE without LowEC. The 2d, 1wk, 2wk, and 3wk groups performed 30 LowEC of KF or 60 LowEC of KE with a load of 10% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction strength on a resistance-training machine, and all groups performed 30 MaxEC of KF or 60 MaxEC of KE on an isokinetic dynamometer. Several muscle damage markers were measured from before to 2 days after exercise (LowEC) or from before to 5 days after exercise (MaxEC). No significant changes in any variables were evident after LowEC. The changes in all variables after MaxEC were smaller (P < 0.05) for the 2d and 1wk groups (e.g., peak creatine kinase activity: 1002 ± 501 IU/L; peak muscle soreness: 13 ± 5 mm) than for the control group (peak creatine kinase activity: 3005 ± 983 IU/L; peak muscle soreness 28 ± 6 mm) for both KE and KF. There were no significant differences between the 2d and 1wk groups or among the 2wk, 3wk, and control groups. These results show that LowEC provided 30%-66% protection against damage induced by MaxEC of KF and KE, and the protective effect lasted 1 week.

  19. Alteration of muscle function after electrical stimulation bout of knee extensors and flexors.

    PubMed

    Vanderthommen, Marc; Triffaux, Mylène; Demoulin, Christophe; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to study the effects on muscle function of an electrical stimulation bout applied unilaterally on thigh muscles in healthy male volunteers. One group (ES group, n = 10) received consecutively 100 isometric contractions of quadriceps and 100 isometric contractions of hamstrings (on-off ratio 6-6 s) induced by neuromuscular electrical stimulations (NMES). Changes in muscle torque, muscle soreness (0-10 VAS), muscle stiffness and serum creatine kinase (CK) activity were assessed before the NMES exercise (pre-ex) as well as 24h (d+1), 48h (d+2) and 120h (d+5) after the bout. A second group (control group, n = 10) were submitted to the same test battery than the ES group and with the same time-frame. The between-group comparison indicated a significant increase in VAS scores and in serum levels of CK only in the ES group. In the ES group, changes were more pronounced in hamstrings than in quadriceps and peaked at d+2 (quadriceps VAS scores = 2.20 ± 1.55 a.u. (0 at pre-ex); hamstrings VAS scores = 3.15 ± 2.14 a.u. (0 at pre-ex); hip flexion angle = 62 ± 5° (75 ± 6° at pre-ex); CK activity = 3021 ± 2693 IU·l(-1) (136 ± 50 IU·l(-1) at pre-ex)). The results of the present study suggested the occurrence of muscle damage that could have been induced by the peculiar muscle recruitment in NMES and the resulting overrated mechanical stress. The sensitivity to the damaging effects of NMES appeared higher in the hamstrings than in quadriceps muscles.

  20. Alteration of Muscle Function After Electrical Stimulation Bout of Knee Extensors and Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Vanderthommen, Marc; Triffaux, Mylène; Demoulin, Christophe; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to study the effects on muscle function of an electrical stimulation bout applied unilaterally on thigh muscles in healthy male volunteers. One group (ES group, n = 10) received consecutively 100 isometric contractions of quadriceps and 100 isometric contractions of hamstrings (on-off ratio 6-6 s) induced by neuromuscular electrical stimulations (NMES). Changes in muscle torque, muscle soreness (0-10 VAS), muscle stiffness and serum creatine kinase (CK) activity were assessed before the NMES exercise (pre-ex) as well as 24h (d+1), 48h (d+2) and 120h (d+5) after the bout. A second group (control group, n = 10) were submitted to the same test battery than the ES group and with the same time-frame. The between-group comparison indicated a significant increase in VAS scores and in serum levels of CK only in the ES group. In the ES group, changes were more pronounced in hamstrings than in quadriceps and peaked at d+2 (quadriceps VAS scores = 2.20 ± 1.55 a.u. (0 at pre-ex); hamstrings VAS scores = 3.15 ± 2.14 a.u. (0 at pre-ex); hip flexion angle = 62 ± 5° (75 ± 6° at pre-ex); CK activity = 3021 ± 2693 IU·l-1 (136 ± 50 IU·l-1 at pre-ex)). The results of the present study suggested the occurrence of muscle damage that could have been induced by the peculiar muscle recruitment in NMES and the resulting overrated mechanical stress. The sensitivity to the damaging effects of NMES appeared higher in the hamstrings than in quadriceps muscles. Key points A stimulation bout of quadriceps and hamstrings that reflects usual application of NMES, increases indirect markers of muscle damage (muscle soreness, muscle weakness and stiffness and serum CK activity). The occurrence of muscle damage could have been induced by the peculiar muscle recruitment in NMES and the resulting overrated mechanical stress. The sensitivity to the damaging effects of NMES appears higher in the hamstrings than in quadriceps muscles. PMID:24150067

  1. Electromechanical delay of the knee extensor muscles is not altered after harvesting the patellar tendon as a graft for ACL reconstruction: implications for sports performance.

    PubMed

    Georgoulis, A D; Ristanis, S; Papadonikolakis, A; Tsepis, E; Moebius, U; Moraiti, C; Stergiou, N

    2005-09-01

    Although the scar tissue, which heals the donor site defect, has different elasticity from the neighbouring patellar tissue, it remains unclear if this scar tissue can lead to the changes of the electromechanical delay (EMD) of the knee extensor muscles. If such changes do exist, they can possibly affect both the utilization of the stored energy in the series elastic component, as well as the optimal performance of the knee joint movement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of harvesting the patellar tendon during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the associated patellar tendon scar tissue development on the EMD of the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM) muscles. Seventeen patients who underwent an ACL reconstruction using the medial third of the patellar tendon were divided in two groups based upon their post-operative time interval. Maximal voluntary contraction from the knee extensors, surface EMG activity, and ultrasonographic measurements of the patellar tendon cross-section area were obtained from both knees. Our results revealed that no significant changes for the maximal voluntary contraction of the knee extensors and for the EMD of the RF and the VM muscles due to patellar scar tissue development after harvesting the tendon for ACL reconstruction. The EMD, as a component of the stretch reflex, is important for the utilization of the stored energy in the series elastic component and thus, optimal sports performance. However, from our results, it can be implied that the ACL reconstruction using a patellar tendon graft would not impair sports performance as far as EMD is concerned.

  2. Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the knee extensor muscles on muscle soreness and different serum parameters in young male athletes: preliminary data

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, Carina; Szekeres, Thomas; Keilani, Mohammad; Fialka‐Moser, Veronika; Crevenna, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on muscle soreness and on a variety of serum parameters during and after NMES of knee extensor muscles of young, well trained subjects over a study period of 96 h. Methods Five male cyclists were included in this clinical observation. NMES (biphasic, asymmetric impulses) was applied through surface electrodes to both knee extensor muscles of each subject for 30 min. To determine changes in serum concentration of muscle proteins, blood samples were drawn at defined measure points before and after NMES. Muscle soreness was evaluated using a visual analogue scale at all measure points. Results There was a maximum (p<0.05) for “muscle pain” during stimulation but no significant changes could be detected after the stimulation period. Serum creatine kinase showed a peak with a significant increase (p<0.05) 24 h after NMES. Serum lactate levels only increased slightly (p = 0.08) during NMES. Conclusions Although the changes of blood parameters measured in the present work correspond to those reported in the literature on eccentric strength training, no delayed onset muscle pain could be detected. Further studies should be carried out, also investigating different stimulation protocols in non‐trained healthy subjects and in patients with less muscle mass. PMID:18037643

  3. Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the knee extensor muscles on muscle soreness and different serum parameters in young male athletes: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Carina; Szekeres, Thomas; Keilani, Mohammad; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Crevenna, Richard

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on muscle soreness and on a variety of serum parameters during and after NMES of knee extensor muscles of young, well trained subjects over a study period of 96 h. Five male cyclists were included in this clinical observation. NMES (biphasic, asymmetric impulses) was applied through surface electrodes to both knee extensor muscles of each subject for 30 min. To determine changes in serum concentration of muscle proteins, blood samples were drawn at defined measure points before and after NMES. Muscle soreness was evaluated using a visual analogue scale at all measure points. There was a maximum (p<0.05) for "muscle pain" during stimulation but no significant changes could be detected after the stimulation period. Serum creatine kinase showed a peak with a significant increase (p<0.05) 24 h after NMES. Serum lactate levels only increased slightly (p = 0.08) during NMES. Although the changes of blood parameters measured in the present work correspond to those reported in the literature on eccentric strength training, no delayed onset muscle pain could be detected. Further studies should be carried out, also investigating different stimulation protocols in non-trained healthy subjects and in patients with less muscle mass.

  4. The influence of loading intensity on muscle-tendon unit behavior during maximal knee extensor stretch shortening cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Earp, Jacob E; Newton, Robert U; Cormie, Prue; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Tendon stiffness increases as the magnitude and rate of loading increases, according to its viscoelastic properties. Thus, under some loading conditions tendons should become exceptionally stiff and act almost as rigid force transducers. Nonetheless, observations of tendon behavior during multi-joint sprinting and jumping tasks have shown that tendon strain increases whilst muscle strain decreases as the loading intensity increases. The purpose of the current study was to examine the influence of external loading intensity on muscle-tendon unit (MTU) behavior during a high-speed single-joint, stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) knee extension task. Eighteen men (n = 9) and women (n = 9) performed single-leg, maximum intensity SSC knee extensions at loads of 20, 60 and 90% of their one repetition maximum. Vastus lateralis fascicle length (L(f)) and velocity (v(f)) as well as MTU (L(MTU)) and tendinous tissue (L(t)) length were measured using high-speed ultrasonography (96 Hz). Patellar tendon force (F(t)) and rate of force development (RFDt) were estimated using inverse dynamics. Results showed that as loading intensity increased, concentric joint velocity and shortening v f decreased whilst F t and RFDt increased, but no significant differences were observed in eccentric joint velocity or peak L(MTU) or L(f). In addition, the tendon lengthened significantly less at the end of the eccentric phase at heavier loads. This is the first observation that tendon strain decreases significantly during a SSC movement as loading intensity increases in vivo, resulting in a shift in the tendon acting as a power amplifier at light loads to a more rigid force transducer at heavy loads.

  5. Artificial gravity as a countermeasure to microgravity: a pilot study examining the effects on knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Caiozzo, V J; Haddad, F; Lee, S; Baker, M; Paloski, William; Baldwin, K M

    2009-07-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the effects of artificial gravity (AG) on skeletal muscle strength and key anabolic/catabolic markers known to regulate muscle mass. Two groups of subjects were selected for study: 1) a 21 day-bed rest (BR) group (n = 7) and 2) an AG group (n = 8), which was subjected to 21 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt bed rest plus daily 1-h exposures to AG (2.5 G at the feet). Centrifugation was produced using a short-arm centrifuge with the foot plate approximately 220 cm from the center of rotation. The torque-velocity relationships of the knee extensors and plantar flexors of the ankle were determined pre- and posttreatment. Muscle biopsy samples obtained from the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles were used for a series of gene expression analyses (mRNA abundance) of key factors implicated in the anabolic vs. catabolic state of the muscle. Post/pre torque-velocity determinations revealed greater decrements in knee extensor performance in the BR vs. AG group (P < 0.04). The plantar flexors of the AG subjects actually demonstrated a net gain in the torque-velocity relationship, whereas in the BR group, the responses declined (AG vs. BR, P < 0.001). Muscle fiber cross-sectional area decreased by approximately 20% in the BR group, whereas no losses were evident in the AG group. RT-PCR analyses of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated that markers of growth and cytoskeletal integrity were higher in the AG group, whereas catabolic markers were elevated in the BR group. Importantly, these patterns were seen in both muscles. We conclude that paradigms of AG have the potential to maintain the functional, biochemical, and structural homeostasis of skeletal muscle in the face of chronic unloading.

  6. Influence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the fluctuation of the submaximal isometric torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andressa; Mello, Marco T.; Serrão, Paula R.; Luz, Roberta P.; Bittencourt, Lia R.; Mattiello, Stela M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) alters the fluctuation of submaximal isometric torque of the knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis (OA). METHOD: The study included 60 male volunteers, aged 40 to 70 years, divided into four groups: Group 1 (G1) - Control (n=15): without OA and without OSA; Group 2 (G2) (n=15): with OA and without OSA; Group 3 (G3) (n=15): without OA and with OSA; and Group 4 (G4) (n=15) with OA and with OSA. Five patients underwent maximal isometric contractions of 10 seconds duration each, with the knee at 60° of flexion to determine peak torque at 60°. To evaluate the fluctuation of torque, 5 submaximal isometric contractions (50% of maximum peak torque) of 10 seconds each, which were calculated from the standard deviation of torque and coefficient of variation, were performed. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between groups for maximum peak torque, while G4 showed a lower value compared with G1 (p=0.005). Additionally, for the average torque exerted, G4 showed a lower value compared to the G1 (p=0.036). However, no differences were found between the groups for the standard deviation (p=0.844) and the coefficient of variation (p=0.143). CONCLUSION: The authors concluded that OSA did not change the parameters of the fluctuation of isometric submaximal torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade OA. PMID:26443974

  7. Influence of preliminary exercise training on muscle damage indices in rats after one bout of prolonged treadmill exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Ju; Kim, Young Mi; Hwangbo, Kak; Kim, Young Mi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise on muscle damage indices in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Two groups of rats were trained in either moderate- or high-intensity treadmill running for 4 weeks. Subsequently, the concentrations of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were examined following a single bout of prolonged (3-h) intensive exercise. [Subjects and Methods] The study included forty 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 150–180 g each. The aerobic exercise group was divided into high-intensity (28 m/min) and moderate-intensity (15 m/min) subgroups. Both subgroups were trained for 35 min daily for 6 days per week (excluding Sunday) over a 4-week period. Following training, the high- and moderate-intensity exercise groups and a non-exercise group performed one bout of prolonged (3-h) treadmill exercise for 3 hours at a speed of 15 m/min. [Results] Creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels differed significantly among the groups. [Conclusion] The preliminary exercise groups showed lower muscle damage and inflammatory response levels than the non-exercise group after the bout of prolonged intensive exercise. PMID:27390433

  8. Fatigue associated with prolonged graded running.

    PubMed

    Giandolini, Marlene; Vernillo, Gianluca; Samozino, Pierre; Horvais, Nicolas; Edwards, W Brent; Morin, Jean-Benoît; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2016-10-01

    Scientific experiments on running mainly consider level running. However, the magnitude and etiology of fatigue depend on the exercise under consideration, particularly the predominant type of contraction, which differs between level, uphill, and downhill running. The purpose of this review is to comprehensively summarize the neurophysiological and biomechanical changes due to fatigue in graded running. When comparing prolonged hilly running (i.e., a combination of uphill and downhill running) to level running, it is found that (1) the general shape of the neuromuscular fatigue-exercise duration curve as well as the etiology of fatigue in knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles are similar and (2) the biomechanical consequences are also relatively comparable, suggesting that duration rather than elevation changes affects neuromuscular function and running patterns. However, 'pure' uphill or downhill running has several fatigue-related intrinsic features compared with the level running. Downhill running induces severe lower limb tissue damage, indirectly evidenced by massive increases in plasma creatine kinase/myoglobin concentration or inflammatory markers. In addition, low-frequency fatigue (i.e., excitation-contraction coupling failure) is systematically observed after downhill running, although it has also been found in high-intensity uphill running for different reasons. Indeed, low-frequency fatigue in downhill running is attributed to mechanical stress at the interface sarcoplasmic reticulum/T-tubule, while the inorganic phosphate accumulation probably plays a central role in intense uphill running. Other fatigue-related specificities of graded running such as strategies to minimize the deleterious effects of downhill running on muscle function, the difference of energy cost versus heat storage or muscle activity changes in downhill, level, and uphill running are also discussed.

  9. Effect of blood volume in resting muscle on heart rate upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takehide; Matsuura, Ryouta; Arimitsu, Takuma; Yunoki, Takahiro; Yano, Tokuo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the increase in blood volume in resting muscle during moderately prolonged exercise is related to heart rate (HR) upward drift. Eight healthy men completed both arm-cranking moderately prolonged exercise (APE) and leg-pedaling moderately prolonged exercise (LPE) for 30 min. Exercise intensity was 120 bpm of HR that was determined by ramp incremental exercise. During both APE and LPE, HR significantly increased from 3 to 30 min (from 108±9.3 to 119±12 bpm and from 112±8.9 to 122±11 bpm, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between HR in APE and that in LPE. Oxygen uptake was maintained throughout the two exercises. Skin blood flow, deep temperature, and total Hb (blood volume) in resting muscle continuously increased for 30 min of exercise during both APE and LPE. During both APE and LPE, there was a significant positive correlation between total Hb and deep temperature in all subjects. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between HR and total Hb (in seven out of eight subjects) during LPE. However, during APE, there was no positive correlation between HR and total Hb (r=0.391). These findings suggest that an increase of blood pooling in resting muscle could be proposed as one of the mechanisms underlying HR upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

  10. The effect of estrogen on muscle damage biomarkers following prolonged aerobic exercise in eumenorrheic women

    PubMed Central

    Walz, E; Lane, AR; Pebole, M; Hackney, AC

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the influence of estrogen (E2) on muscle damage biomarkers [skeletal muscle - creatine kinase (CK); cardiac muscle - CK-MB] responses to prolonged aerobic exercise. Eumenorrheic women (n=10) who were physically active completed two 60-minute treadmill running sessions at ∼60-65% maximal intensity during low E2 (midfollicular menstrual phase) and high E2 (midluteal menstrual phase) hormonal conditions. Blood samples were collected prior to exercise (following supine rest), immediately post-, 30 min post-, and 24 hours post-exercise to determine changes in muscle biomarkers. Resting blood samples confirmed appropriate E2 hormonal levels Total CK concentrations increased following exercise and at 24 hours post-exercise were higher in the midfollicular low E2 phase (p<0.001). However, CK-MB concentrations were unaffected by E2 level or exercise (p=0.442) resulting in the ratio of CK-MB to total CK being consistently low in subject responses (i.e., indicative of skeletal muscle damage). Elevated E2 levels reduce the CK responses of skeletal muscle, but had no effect on CK-MB responses following prolonged aerobic exercise. These findings support earlier work showing elevated E2 is protective of skeletal muscle from exercise-induced damage associated with prolonged aerobic exercise. PMID:26424921

  11. The effect of estrogen on muscle damage biomarkers following prolonged aerobic exercise in eumenorrheic women.

    PubMed

    Williams, T; Walz, E; Lane, A R; Pebole, M; Hackney, A C

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed the influence of estrogen (E2) on muscle damage biomarkers [skeletal muscle - creatine kinase (CK); cardiac muscle - CK-MB] responses to prolonged aerobic exercise. Eumenorrheic women (n=10) who were physically active completed two 60-minute treadmill running sessions at ∼60-65% maximal intensity during low E2 (midfollicular menstrual phase) and high E2 (midluteal menstrual phase) hormonal conditions. Blood samples were collected prior to exercise (following supine rest), immediately post-, 30 min post-, and 24 hours post-exercise to determine changes in muscle biomarkers. Resting blood samples confirmed appropriate E2 hormonal levels Total CK concentrations increased following exercise and at 24 hours post-exercise were higher in the midfollicular low E2 phase (p<0.001). However, CK-MB concentrations were unaffected by E2 level or exercise (p=0.442) resulting in the ratio of CK-MB to total CK being consistently low in subject responses (i.e., indicative of skeletal muscle damage). Elevated E2 levels reduce the CK responses of skeletal muscle, but had no effect on CK-MB responses following prolonged aerobic exercise. These findings support earlier work showing elevated E2 is protective of skeletal muscle from exercise-induced damage associated with prolonged aerobic exercise.

  12. Lack of skeletal muscle IL-6 influences hepatic glucose metabolism in mice during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Bertholdt, Lærke; Gudiksen, Anders; Schwartz, Camilla L; Knudsen, Jakob G; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2017-04-01

    The liver is essential in maintaining and regulating glucose homeostasis during prolonged exercise. IL-6 has been shown to be secreted from skeletal muscle during exercise and has been suggested to signal to the liver. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of skeletal muscle IL-6 on hepatic glucose regulation and substrate choice during prolonged exercise. Skeletal muscle-specific IL-6 knockout (IL-6 MKO) mice (age, 12-14 wk) and littermate lox/lox (Control) mice were either rested (Rest) or completed a single bout of exercise for 10, 60, or 120 min, and the liver was quickly obtained. Hepatic IL-6 mRNA was higher at 60 min of exercise, and hepatic signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 was higher at 120 min of exercise than at rest in both genotypes. Hepatic glycogen was higher in IL-6 MKO mice than control mice at rest, but decreased similarly during exercise in the two genotypes, and hepatic glucose content was lower in IL-6 MKO than control mice at 120 min of exercise. Hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA and protein increased in both genotypes at 120 min of exercise, whereas hepatic glucose 6 phosphatase protein remained unchanged. Furthermore, IL-6 MKO mice had higher hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)(Ser232) and PDH(Ser300) phosphorylation than control mice at rest. In conclusion, hepatic gluconeogenic capacity in mice is increased during prolonged exercise independent of muscle IL-6. Furthermore, Skeletal muscle IL-6 influences hepatic substrate regulation at rest and hepatic glucose metabolism during prolonged exercise, seemingly independent of IL-6 signaling in the liver. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Sex difference in age-related changes in knee extensor strength and power production during a 10-times-repeated sit-to-stand task in Japanese elderly.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Naoko; Shimomitsu, Teruichi; Kawanishi, Masashi; Fukunaga, Tetsuo; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2015-11-14

    For middle-aged and elderly women, age-related decline in an index representing power production during STS task (STS-PI), calculated by using an equation reported previously, has been shown to be greater than that in the force generation capability of lower extremity. Whether this is specific to women remains unclear. This study examined how the age-related changes in knee extensor strength and power production during STS differ between Japanese men and women aged 65 years or older. The time taken for a 10-times-repeated STS test (STS time) and force developed during maximal voluntary isometric knee extension (KE-F) were determined in Japanese younger-old (262 men and 285 women) aged 65-74 years and older-old (96 men and 89 women) aged 75-90 years. STS-PI was calculated using the following equation: STS-PI = (body height - 0.4) × body mass × 10/STS time. KE-F and STS-PI were significantly greater in the younger-old than in the older-old group (p < 0.0001) and in men than in women (p < 0.0001). STS-PI and KE-F, expressed as the percentages of the mean value of the corresponding variable for the younger-old group (%STS-PI and %KE-F, respectively), were negatively correlated to chronological age in both men (r = -0.386 and r = -0.269, respectively, p < 0.0001) and women (r = -0.504 and r = -0.294, respectively, p < 0.0001). Regression slopes in the relationship between age and %KE-F were not significantly different between men (-1.521) and women (-1.618). However, regression slope in the relationship between age and %STS-PI was significantly steeper in women (-3.108) than in men (-2.170) (p < 0.05). In OOG, %KE-F had no significant effect of sex, but %STS-PI was significantly lower in women than in men (p < 0.001). In Japanese men and women aged 65 years or over, age-related loss in power production during STS is steeper in women than in men, with greater magnitude than that in knee extensor strength. This suggests a higher priority of improving power

  14. CD56(dim)CD16(high) and CD56(bright)CD16(-) cell percentages associated with maximum knee extensor strength and incidence of death in elderly.

    PubMed

    Senpuku, Hidenobu; Miyazaki, Hideo; Yoshihara, Akihiro; Yoneda, Saori; Narisawa, Naoki; Kawarai, Taketo; Nakagawa, Naoki; Miyachi, Motohiko; Tada, Akio; Yoshida, Goichiro; Shimada, Mieko; Ohashi, Masaharu; Nishimuta, Mamoru; Kimura, Yasuo; Yoshitake, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Physical fitness is an indicator of systemic well-being in humans. Little is known about the role of physical fitness for maintaining systemic health in the elderly. Here, we study elderly subjects to determine the relationships between physical fitness and CD56 and CD16 surface NK cell markers on peripheral blood lymphocytes, as well as to analyze the relationship between the surface markers and incidence of death. We selected 253 independent elderly subjects (122 female; 131 male) who were 79-80 years old. Subjects having a higher proportion of CD56(dim)CD16(high) within CD56(+)CD16(+) cells, or ration of CD56(dim)CD16(high) and CD56(dim)CD16(-) cells had a significant positive correlation with maximum bilateral knee extensor strength/weight (kg) (r = 0.425; P < 0.0001 or r = 0.323; P < 0.0001). In contrast, an increased proportion of CD56(bright)CD16(-) cells within lymphocyte significantly negatively correlated with the maximum bilateral knee extensor strength/weight (kg) (r = -0.290; P = 0.0004); and these subjects had a significantly lower mortality during the 5 years following measurement of death. Therefore, we found that a synergistic effect of the right and left leg muscle strength was associated with proportion of matured NK and NKT cells and induced a low proportion of CD56(bright)CD16(-) cells within lymphocyte. Moreover, the low proportion of CD56(bright)CD16(-) cells was associated with incidence of death. In conclusion, measurements of physical fitness, the proportion of CD56(dim)CD16(high) within CD56(+)CD16(+) cells, the ratio of CD56(dim)CD56(high) and CD56(dim)CD16(-) cells, and the proportion of CD56(bright)C16(-) cells in lymphocytes are important indicators to check elderly health.

  15. Muscle pump in the vastus lateralis in the supine position in light prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Yano, T; Lian, C S; Afroundeh, R; Shirakawa, K; Yunoki, T

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the muscle pump in the supine position is attenuated during light prolonged exercise. After rest for 5 min, constant-load exercise with 50% of peak oxygen uptake (VO2) determined by incremental exercises in the supine position was performed for 60 min with a pedaling rate of 60 rpm. Total hemoglobin and myoglobin (total Hb) in the vastus lateralis was determined by using a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. The instrument was operating at 2 Hz. VO2, heart rate (HR), mean blood pressure (MBP) and muscle deep temperature (Tm) were measured in the constant-load exercise. After an increase at the onset of exercise, VO2 showed a steady state, HR showed a significant gradual increase and MBP significantly decreased. After an increase until 20 min of exercise, Tm showed a steady state. Level of total Hb increased until 20 min and showed a steady state in all subjects. Average Tm was significantly related to average total Hb (r=0.978). Total Hb oscillated, but its oscillation occasionally disappeared. Peak amplitude of oscillation in total Hb for 30 s after the start of exercise was significantly higher than that for 1 min before the end of exercise. The results suggest that the muscle pump operates in light exercise but is attenuated in the vastus lateralis in the supine position at the late phase of prolonged exercise.

  16. Can a wearable strain sensor based on a carbon nanotube network be an alternative to an isokinetic dynamometer for the measurement of knee-extensor muscle strength?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlikaya, Ruhan; Ege, Yavuz; Pündük, Zekine; Slobodian, Petr; Meriç, Gökhan

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to find out whether a wearable strain sensor including thermoplastic polyurethane composite with a multi-walled carbon nanotube network could be a viable alternative to an isokinetic dynamometer for the measurement of knee-extensor muscle strength. For the first time, the voltage-torque and angle-time relations of the sensor were determined to allow a comparison between the angle-dependent torque changes of the dynamometer and the sensor. This comparison suggested that the torque-angle relations of the dynamometer and the sensor did not have the same characteristics. In this regard, the sensor may be used in the torque measurements due to the moderate correlation between the torque values determined via the isokinetic dynamometer and the sensor and due to the significant difference between low and high torque values of the sensor. By the same token, the torque-angle graph of the sensor may be more informative than that of the dynamometer in evaluation of knee problems.

  17. Forearm training attenuates sympathetic responses to prolonged rhythmic forearm exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinoway, L.; Shenberger, J.; Leaman, G.; Zelis, R.; Gray, K.; Baily, R.; Leuenberger, U.

    1996-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that nonfatiguing rhythmic forearm exercise at 25% maximal voluntary contraction (12 2-s contractions/min) evokes sympathoexcitation without significant engagement of metabolite-sensitive muscle afferents (B.A. Batman, J.C. Hardy, U.A. Leuenberger, M.B. Smith, Q.X. Yang and L.I. Sinoway. J. Appl. Physiol. 76: 1077-1081, 1994). This is in contrast to the sympathetic nervous system responses observed during fatiguing static forearm exercise where metabolite-sensitive afferents are the key determinants of sympathetic activation. In this report we examined whether forearm exercise training would attenuate sympathetic nervous system responses to rhythmic forearm exercise. We measured heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography), plasma norepinephrine (NE), and NE spillover and clearance (tritiated NE kinetics) during nonfatiguing rhythmic forearm exercise before and after a 4-wk unilateral forearm training paradigm. Training had no effect on forearm mass, maximal voluntary contraction, or heart rate but did attenuate the increase in MAP (increase in MAP: from 15.2 +/- 1.8 before training to 11.4 +/- 1.4 mmHg after training; P < 0.017), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (increase in bursts: from 10.8 +/- 1.4 before training to 6.2 +/- 1.1 bursts/min after training; P < 0.030), and the NE spillover (increases in arterial spillover: from 1.3 +/- 0.2 before training to 0.6 +/- 0.2 nmol.min-1.m-2 after training, P < 0.014; increase in venous spillover: from 2.0 +/- 0.6 before training to 1.0 +/- 0.5 nmol.min-1.m-2 after training, P < 0.037) seen in response to exercise performed by the trained forearm. Thus forearm training reduces sympathetic responses during a nonfatiguing rhythmic handgrip paradigm that does not engage muscle metaboreceptors. We speculate that this effect is due to a conditioning-induced reduction in mechanically sensitive muscle afferent discharge.

  18. Effects of milk ingestion on prolonged exercise capacity in young, healthy men.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason K W; Maughan, Ronald J; Shirreffs, Susan M; Watson, Phillip

    2008-04-01

    The effects of fluid intake during prolonged exercise have been extensively studied but at present there exists little information on the effects of milk-based drinks on the response to prolonged exercise. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of milk-based drinks on exercise capacity. Eight healthy males (age 24 +/- 4 y, height 1.76 +/- 0.04 m, mass 68.9 +/- 9.5 kg, body fat 12.5 +/- 2.4%, peak oxygen consumption 4.3 +/- 0.6 L/min) exercised to volitional exhaustion at 70% peak oxygen consumption on four occasions. Subjects ingested 1.5 mL/kg body mass of plain water, a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution, low-fat (0.1%) milk, or low-fat (0.1%) milk with added glucose before and every 10 min during exercise. The effect of the drink on exercise capacity and the cardiovascular, metabolic, and thermoregulatory responses to prolonged exercise were examined. Exercise time to exhaustion was not significantly influenced by the drink ingested (P = 0.19), but there was a tendency for subjects to exercise longer when the carbohydrate-electrolyte (110.6, range 82.0-222.7 min), milk (103.3, range 85.7-228.5 min), or milk plus glucose (102.8, range 74.3-167.1 min) was ingested compared with water (93.3, range 82.4-192.3 min). The solution ingested did not influence the cardiovascular, metabolic, or thermoregulatory response to exercise. The results of this study suggest that although the low-fat milk-based fluids did not enhance exercise capacity over that seen with the ingestion of plain water, the effect was comparable to that observed with a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage.

  19. Space physiology VI: exercise, artificial gravity, and countermeasure development for prolonged space flight.

    PubMed

    Hargens, Alan R; Bhattacharya, Roshmi; Schneider, Suzanne M

    2013-09-01

    When applied individually, exercise countermeasures employed to date do not fully protect the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems during prolonged spaceflight. Recent ground-based research suggests that it is necessary to perform exercise countermeasures within some form of artificial gravity to prevent microgravity deconditioning. In this regard, it is important to provide normal foot-ward loading and intravascular hydrostatic-pressure gradients to maintain musculoskeletal and cardiovascular function. Aerobic exercise within a centrifuge restores cardiovascular function, while aerobic exercise within lower body negative pressure restores cardiovascular function and helps protect the musculoskeletal system. Resistive exercise with vibration stimulation may increase the effectiveness of resistive exercise by preserving muscle function, allowing lower intensity exercises, and possibly reducing risk of loss of vision during prolonged spaceflight. Inexpensive methods to induce artificial gravity alone (to counteract head-ward fluid shifts) and exercise during artificial gravity (for example, by short-arm centrifuge or exercise within lower body negative pressure) should be developed further and evaluated as multi-system countermeasures.

  20. High altitude, prolonged exercise, and the athlete biological passport.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Yorck O; Garvican, Laura A; Christian, Ryan; Lobigs, Louisa M; Qi, Jiliang; Fan, Rongyun; He, Yingying; Wang, Hailing; Gore, Christopher J; Ma, Fuhai

    2015-01-01

    The Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) detects blood doping in athletes through longitudinal monitoring of erythropoietic markers. Mathematical algorithms are used to define individual reference ranges for these markers for each athlete. It is unclear if altitude and exercise can affect the variables included in these calculations in a way that the changes might be mistaken for blood manipulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the simultaneous strenuous exercise and low to high altitude exposure on the calculation algorithms of the ABP. 14 sea level (SL) and 11 altitude native (ALT) highly trained athletes participated in a 14-day cycling stage race taking place at an average altitude of 2496 m above sea level (min. 1014 m, max. 4120 m), race distances ranged between 96 and 227 km per day. ABP blood measures were taken on days -1,3,6,10,14 (SL) and -1,9,15 (ALT) of the race. Four results from three samples of two different SL athletes exceeded the individual limits at the 99% specificity threshold and one value at 99.9%. In ALT, three results from three samples of three different athletes were beyond the individual limits at 99%, one at 99.9%. The variations could be explained by the expected physiological reaction to exercise and altitude. In summary, the abnormalities observed in the haematological ABP´s of well-trained athletes during extensive exercise at altitude are limited and in line with expected physiological changes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Mitochondrial oxidative function in human saponin-skinned muscle fibres: effects of prolonged exercise

    PubMed Central

    Tonkonogi, Michail; Harris, Beorn; Sahlin, Kent

    1998-01-01

    The influence of prolonged exhaustive exercise on mitochondrial oxidative function was investigated in ten men. Muscle biopsies were taken before and after exercise and mitochondrial respiration investigated in fibre bundles made permeable by pretreatment with saponin. After exercise, respiration in the absence of ADP increased by 18 % (P < 0.01), but respiration at suboptimal ADP concentration (0.1 mM) and maximal ADP-stimulated respiration (1 mM ADP) remained unchanged. In the presence of creatine (20 mM), mitochondrial affinity for ADP increased markedly and respiration at suboptimal ADP concentration (0.1 mM) was similar (pre-exercise) or higher (post-exercise; P < 0.05) than with 1 mM ADP alone. The increase in respiratory rate with creatine was correlated to the relative type I fibre area (r = 0.84). Creatine-stimulated respiration increased after prolonged exercise (P < 0.01). The respiratory control index (6.8 ± 0.4, mean ± s.e.m.) and the ratio between respiration at 0.1 and 1 mM ADP (ADP sensitivity index, 0.63 ± 0.03) were not changed after exercise. The sensitivity index was negatively correlated to the relative type I fibre area (r = −0.86). The influence of exercise on muscle oxidative function has for the first time been investigated with the skinned-fibre technique. It is concluded that maximal mitochondrial oxidative power is intact or improved after prolonged exercise, while uncoupled respiration is increased. The latter finding may contribute to the elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption. The finding that the sensitivity of mitochondrial respiration for ADP and creatine are related to fibre-type composition indicates intrinsic differences in the control of mitochondrial respiration between fibres. PMID:9625884

  2. Plasma cell-free mitochondrial DNA declines in response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Shockett, Penny E; Khanal, Januka; Sitaula, Alina; Oglesby, Christopher; Meachum, William A; Castracane, V Daniel; Kraemer, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    Increased plasma cell-free mitochondrial DNA (cf-mDNA), a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) produced by cellular injury, contributes to neutrophil activation/inflammation in trauma patients and arises in cancer and autoimmunity. To further understand relationships between cf-mDNA released by tissue injury, inflammation, and health benefits of exercise, we examined cf-mDNA response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise. Seven healthy moderately trained young men (age = 22.4 ± 1.2) completed a treadmill exercise trial for 90 min at 60% VO2 max and a resting control trial. Blood was sampled immediately prior to exercise (0 min = baseline), during (+18, +54 min), immediately after (+90 min), and after recovery (R40). Plasma was analyzed for cf-mDNA, IL-6, and lactate. A significant difference in cf-mDNA response was observed between exercise and control trials, with cf-mDNA levels reduced during exercise at +54 and +90 (with or without plasma volume shift correction). Declines in cf-mDNA were accompanied by increased lactate and followed by an increase in IL-6, suggesting a temporal association with muscle stress and inflammatory processes. Our novel finding of cf-mDNA decline with prolonged moderate treadmill exercise provides evidence for increased clearance from or reduced release of cf-mDNA into the blood with prolonged exercise. These studies contrast with previous investigations involving exhaustive short-term treadmill exercise, in which no change in cf-mDNA levels were reported, and contribute to our understanding of differences between exercise- and trauma-induced inflammation. We propose that transient declines in cf-mDNA may induce health benefits, by reducing systemic inflammation. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  3. Plasma glucose levels after prolonged strenuous exercise correlate inversely with glycemic response to food consumed before exercise.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D E; Brotherhood, J R; Miller, J B

    1994-12-01

    It was hypothesized that slowly digested carbohydrates, that is, low glycemic index (GI) foods, eaten before prolonged strenuous exercise would increase the blood glucose concentration toward the end of exercise. Six trained cyclists pedaled on a cycle ergometer at 65-70% VO2max 60 min after ingestion of each of four test meals: a low-GI and a high-GI powdered food and a low-GI and a high-GI breakfast cereal, all providing 1 g of available carbohydrate per kilogram of body mass. Plasma glucose levels after more that 90 min of exercise were found to correlate inversely with the observed GI of the foods (p < .01). Free fatty acid levels during the last hour of exercise also correlated inversely with the GI (p < .05). The findings suggest that the slow digestion of carbohydrate in the prevent food favors higher concentrations of fuels in the blood toward the end of exercise.

  4. Effect of fluid ingestion on neuromuscular function during prolonged cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Vallier, J-M; Grego, F; Basset, F; Lepers, R; Bernard, T; Brisswalter, J

    2005-04-01

    To investigate the effects of fluid ingestion on neuromuscular function during prolonged cycling exercise. Eight well trained subjects exercised for 180 minutes in a moderate environment at a workload requiring approximately 60% maximal oxygen uptake. Two conditions, fluid (F) and no fluid (NF) ingestion, were investigated. During maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC), prolonged cycling exercise reduced (p<0.05) the maximal force generating capacity of quadriceps muscles (after three hours of cycling) and root mean square (RMS) values (after two hours of cycling) with no difference between the two conditions despite greater body weight loss (p<0.05) in NF. The mean power frequency (MPF) for vastus lateralis muscle was reduced (p<0.05) and the rate of force development (RFD) was increased (p<0.05) only during NF. During cycling exercise, integrated electromyographic activity and perceived exertion were increased in both conditions (p<0.05) with no significant effect of fluid ingestion. The results suggest that fluid ingestion did not prevent the previously reported decrease in maximal force with exercise duration, but seems to have a positive effect on some indicators of neuromuscular fatigue such as mean power frequency and rate of force development during maximal voluntary contraction. Further investigations are needed to assess the effect of change in hydration on neural mechanisms linked to the development of muscular fatigue during prolonged exercise.

  5. Carbohydrate ingestion during prolonged high-intensity intermittent exercise: impact on affect and perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Backhouse, S H; Ali, A; Biddle, S J H; Williams, C

    2007-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of ingesting a carbohydrate (CHO) solution on affective states and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during prolonged intermittent high-intensity exercise. Seventeen male soccer players completed a prolonged intermittent high-intensity exercise protocol for 90 min on two occasions, separated by at least 7 days. Participants consumed either a 6.4% CHO (0.6 g/kg body mass (BM)/h) or an artificially sweetened placebo (PLA) solution immediately before (8 mL/kg BM) and every 15 min (3 mL/kg BM) during exercise in a double-blind, counterbalanced design. Pleasure-displeasure, perceived activation, RPE and plasma glucose concentration was assessed. The results showed that compared with the CHO trial, perceived activation were lower in the placebo trial during the last 30 min of exercise and this was accompanied by lowered plasma glucose concentrations. In the CHO trial, RPE was maintained in the last 30 min of exercise but carried on increasing in the PLA trial. Therefore, CHO ingestion during prolonged high-intensity exercise appears to elicit an enhanced perceived activation profile that may impact upon task persistence and performance. This finding is in addition to the physiological and metabolic benefits of the exogenous energy supply.

  6. Glycemic control during consecutive days with prolonged walking exercise in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Jan-Willem; Eijsvogels, Thijs M; Nyakayiru, Jean; Schreuder, Tim H A; Hopman, Maria T; Thijssen, Dick H; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-07-01

    Despite its general benefits for health, exercise complicates the maintenance of stable blood glucose concentrations in individuals with type 1 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to examine changes in food intake, insulin administration, and 24-h glycemic control in response to consecutive days with prolonged walking exercise (∼8h daily) in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Ten individuals with type 1 diabetes participating in the worlds' largest walking event were recruited for this observational study. Simultaneous measurements of 24-h glycemic control (continuous glucose monitoring), insulin administration and food intake were performed during a non-walking day (control) and during three subsequent days with prolonged walking exercise (daily distance 40 or 50km). Despite an increase in daily energy (31±18%; p<0.01) and carbohydrate (82±71g; p<0.01) intake during walking days, subjects lowered their insulin administration by 26±16% relative to the control day (p<0.01). Average 24-h blood glucose concentrations, the prevalence of hyperglycemia (blood glucose >10 mmol/L) and hypoglycemia (blood glucose <3.9mmol/L) did not differ between the control day and walking days (p>0.05 for all variables). The prolonged walking exercise was associated with a modest increase in glycemic variability compared with the control day (p<0.05). Prolonged walking exercise allows for profound reductions in daily insulin administration in persons with type 1 diabetes, despite large increments in energy and carbohydrate intake. When taking such adjustments into account, prolonged moderate-intensity exercise does not necessarily impair 24-h glycemic control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. No effect of menstrual cycle phase on glucose and glucoregulatory endocrine responses to prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Robert R; Francois, Michelle; Webb, Nancy Dardis; Worley, Jennifer R; Rogers, Sharon N; Norman, Reid L; Shah, Urvi; Castracane, V Daniel; Daniel Castracane, V

    2013-09-01

    Prolonged exercise requires increased utilization of blood glucose and adjustment of glucoregulatory hormones. Estrogen can reduce hepatic gluconeogenesis which could affect insulin concentrations. Amylin is co-secreted with insulin and controls influx of glucose into the blood. To determine the effect of menstrual cycle stage on glucose, leptin, and pancreatic hormone responses to prolonged (90 min) exercise. Five healthy, eumenorrheic women (24.6 ± 5.1 years; 67.4 ± 1 kg) were monitored for 3 months to determine menstrual cycle length. Subjects completed a preliminary session to determine exercise workloads and, in a fasted condition, completed two randomized 90-min treadmill exercise trials at 60 % VO2max during the early follicular (EFX) and mid-luteal phase (MLX) of their menstrual cycle. Blood samples were analyzed for glucose, insulin, C-peptide, amylin, glucagon, leptin, and cortisol concentrations at rest (-30 and 0 min), during exercise (18, 36, 54, 72, and 90 min) and after 20 min of recovery. No changes in amylin, leptin, or cortisol occurred for EFX and MLX trials. A significant (p < 0.05) time effect occurred for glucose, insulin, and glucagon with reduced insulin across the exercise trial and increases in glucose and glucagon later in the trial, but there were no differences between the EFX and MLX trials. Menstrual cycle stage does not affect glucose, insulin, C-peptide, amylin, glucagon, cortisol, and leptin responses to prolonged exercise; however, the exercise reduces insulin and increases glucose and glucagon concentrations. This is the first study to determine acute effects of exercise on amylin and other glucoregulatory hormone responses in women.

  8. Carbohydrate vs protein supplementation for recovery of neuromuscular function following prolonged load carriage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study examined the effect of carbohydrate and whey protein supplements on recovery of neuromuscular function after prolonged load carriage. Methods Ten male participants (body mass: 81.5 ± 10.5 kg, age: 28 ± 9 years, O2max: 55.0 ± 5.5 ml·kg-1·min-1) completed three treadmill walking tests (2 hr, 6.5 km·h-1), carrying a 25 kg backpack consuming 500 ml of either: (1) Placebo (flavoured water) [PLA], (2) 6.4% Carbohydrate Solution [CHO] or (3) 7.0% Whey Protein Solution [PRO]. For three days after load carriage, participants consumed two 500 ml supplement boluses. Muscle performance was measured before and at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h after load carriage, during voluntary and electrically stimulated contractions. Results Isometric knee extension force decreased immediately after load carriage with no difference between conditions. During recovery, isometric force returned to pre-exercise values at 48 h for CHO and PRO but at 72 h for PLA. Voluntary activation decreased immediately after load carriage and returned to pre-exercise values at 24 h in all conditions (P = 0.086). During recovery, there were no differences between conditions for the change in isokinetic peak torque. Following reductions immediately after load carriage, knee extensor and flexor peak torque (60°·s-1) recovered to pre-exercise values at 72 h. Trunk extensor and flexor peak torque (15°·s-1) recovered to pre-exercise values at 24 h (P = 0.091) and 48 h (P = 0.177), respectively. Conclusion Recovery of neuromuscular function after prolonged load carriage is improved with either carbohydrate or whey protein supplementation for isometric contractions but not for isokinetic contractions. PMID:20157419

  9. Effects of coca chewing on hormonal and metabolic responses during prolonged submaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Favier, R; Caceres, E; Koubi, H; Sempore, B; Sauvain, M; Spielvogel, H

    1996-02-01

    The effects of coca chewing on prolonged submaximal exercise responses were investigated in chronic coca chewers and compared with a group of nonchewers. At rest, coca chewing during a 1-h period was followed by a significant increase in blood glucose, free fatty acid, and norepinephrine concentrations and a significant reduction in insulin plasma level. During prolonged (1-h) submaximal (65-70% peak O2 uptake) exercise, chewers displayed a significantly greater adrenergic activation (as evidenced by a higher level of plasma epinephrine) and an increased use of fat (as evidenced by a lower respiratory exchange ratio). The gradual increase in oxygen uptake (O2 drift) commonly observed during prolonged exercise was blunted in coca chewers. This blunting in O2 drift is not related to coca-induced changes in ventilatory or lactate responses to exercise but could possible be related to an enhanced glucose utilization by chewers during the late phase of exercise. The present results provide experimental evidence of the physiological effects of coca chewing that could explain the better ability of coca users to sustain strenuous work for an extended period of time.

  10. Validity and inter-day reliability of a free-oscillation test to measure knee extensor and knee flexor musculo-articular stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Watsford, Mark; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and inter-day reliability of musculo-articular stiffness (MAS) in the knee-extensor (KE) and knee-flexor (KF) muscle groups, measured with a free-oscillation technique. Fourteen participants were measured, on two occasions, for KE and KF maximal isometric voluntary contraction, rate of torque development (RTD) and electromechanical delay (EMD), along with MAS using multiple sub-maximal loads relative to the individual's maximal voluntary contraction (MAS(%MVC)). Furthermore, 18 participants were tested for MAS using one fixed assessment load for each muscle group (MAS(FL)) during a separate series of tests on three occasions. MAS(%MVC) was significantly increased as load increased both in KE and in KF (p<0.01) fitting a curvilinear relationship as depicted in similar studies. Validity was demonstrated relating MAS(%MVC) to RTD (r=0.51-0.71, p<0.05) and to EMD (r=-0.56 to -0.67, p<0.05). While MAS(%MVC) reliability (ICC=0.62-0.89; CV=8.1-13.1%) was questionable to acceptable, MAS(FL) exhibited good to excellent reliability (ICC=0.81-0.94; CV=3.7-6.5%). No significant systematic bias was detected for any of the variables considered. The assessment of KE and KF MAS using the free-oscillation technique appears to be valid and reliable, with the use of MAS(FL) yielding higher reliability than the use of MAS(%MVC). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of carbohydrate and prolonged exercise on affect and perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Backhouse, Susan H; Bishop, Nicolette C; Biddle, Stuart J H; Williams, Clyde

    2005-10-01

    It has been reported that perceptions of exertion are attenuated during prolonged cycle exercise, following CHO ingestion. However, no studies to date have examined the influence of such feedings on psychological affect during prolonged exercise, even though affect and perceived exertion are different constructs. To examine the influence of regular CHO beverage ingestion on affect (pleasure-displeasure) and perceived exertion during prolonged cycle exercise. In a randomized, double-blind, counterbalanced design, nine endurance trained males cycled for 2 h at 70% VO2max on two occasions, separated by 1 wk. On each occasion, they consumed either a water placebo (PLA) or a 6.4% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHO) immediately before they cycled (5 mL x kg(-1) body mass) and every 15 min thereafter (2 mL x kg(-1) body mass). Pleasure-displeasure was assessed before, during, and after the prolonged bout of cycling. During exercise, reported pleasure initially improved and was subsequently maintained in the CHO trial, in contrast to a decline reported in the PLA trial. Ratings of pleasure-displeasure were more positive during recovery in the CHO trial compared with the PLA trial (P < 0.05) and the only significant increase (P < 0.05) in pleasure occurred 15 min postexercise in the CHO trial only. RPE increased (P < 0.05) over the course of the bout of cycling and was lower (P < 0.05) 75 min into exercise in the CHO trial. Immediately postexercise, plasma glucose concentration was higher in the CHO compared with the PLA trial (P < 0.05). A main effect of trial was found for plasma cortisol concentration, with higher values reported in PLA trial. Results suggest that CHO ingestion enhanced feelings of pleasure during and following prolonged cycling and highlighted the importance of assessing not only "what," but also "how" a person feels.

  12. Effect of Prolonged Moderate Exercise on the Changes of Nonneuronal Cells in Early Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Barbara; Guida, Francesca; Furiano, Anna; Donniacuo, Maria; Luongo, Livio; Gritti, Giulia; Urbanek, Konrad; Messina, Giovanni; Maione, Sabatino; Rossi, Francesco; de Novellis, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of death in developed countries and it is characterized by several associated symptomatologies and poor quality of life. Recent data showed a possible interaction between infarction and brain inflammation and activity. Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of exercise training on deterioration in cardiac function after MI. In this study we analyzed in sedentary and trained rats the microglia and astrocytes 48 hours after MI in PVN, thalamus, prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus through immunofluorescence approach. We found significant changes in specific microglia phenotypes in the brain areas analyzed together with astrocytes activation. Prolonged exercise normalized these morphological changes of microglia and astrocytes in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus but not in the PVN. Our data suggest that there is an early brain reaction to myocardial infarction induction, involving nonneuronal cells, that is attenuated by the prolonged exercise.

  13. Effect of Prolonged Moderate Exercise on the Changes of Nonneuronal Cells in Early Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Barbara; Furiano, Anna; Donniacuo, Maria; Gritti, Giulia; Urbanek, Konrad; Maione, Sabatino; Rossi, Francesco; de Novellis, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of death in developed countries and it is characterized by several associated symptomatologies and poor quality of life. Recent data showed a possible interaction between infarction and brain inflammation and activity. Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of exercise training on deterioration in cardiac function after MI. In this study we analyzed in sedentary and trained rats the microglia and astrocytes 48 hours after MI in PVN, thalamus, prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus through immunofluorescence approach. We found significant changes in specific microglia phenotypes in the brain areas analyzed together with astrocytes activation. Prolonged exercise normalized these morphological changes of microglia and astrocytes in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus but not in the PVN. Our data suggest that there is an early brain reaction to myocardial infarction induction, involving nonneuronal cells, that is attenuated by the prolonged exercise. PMID:26266053

  14. Lack of Skeletal Muscle IL-6 Affects Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Activity at Rest and during Prolonged Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gudiksen, Anders; Schwartz, Camilla Lindgren; Bertholdt, Lærke; Joensen, Ella; Knudsen, Jakob G.; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) plays a key role in the regulation of skeletal muscle substrate utilization. IL-6 is produced in skeletal muscle during exercise in a duration dependent manner and has been reported to increase whole body fatty acid oxidation, muscle glucose uptake and decrease PDHa activity in skeletal muscle of fed mice. The aim of the present study was to examine whether muscle IL-6 contributes to exercise-induced PDH regulation in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle-specific IL-6 knockout (IL-6 MKO) mice and floxed littermate controls (control) completed a single bout of treadmill exercise for 10, 60 or 120 min, with rested mice of each genotype serving as basal controls. The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was overall higher (P<0.05) in IL-6 MKO than control mice during the 120 min of treadmill exercise, while RER decreased during exercise independent of genotype. AMPK and ACC phosphorylation also increased with exercise independent of genotype. PDHa activity was in control mice higher (P<0.05) at 10 and 60 min of exercise than at rest but remained unchanged in IL-6 MKO mice. In addition, PDHa activity was higher (P<0.05) in IL-6 MKO than control mice at rest and 60 min of exercise. Neither PDH phosphorylation nor acetylation could explain the genotype differences in PDHa activity. Together, this provides evidence that skeletal muscle IL-6 contributes to the regulation of PDH at rest and during prolonged exercise and suggests that muscle IL-6 normally dampens carbohydrate utilization during prolonged exercise via effects on PDH. PMID:27327080

  15. The differential effects of prolonged exercise upon executive function and cerebral oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Gavin D; Davranche, Karen; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Perrey, Stephane; Radel, Rémi

    2017-04-01

    The acute-exercise effects upon cognitive functions are varied and dependent upon exercise duration and intensity, and the type of cognitive tasks assessed. The hypofrontality hypothesis assumes that prolonged exercise, at physiologically challenging intensities, is detrimental to executive functions due to cerebral perturbations (indicated by reduced prefrontal activity). The present study aimed to test this hypothesis by measuring oxygenation in prefrontal and motor regions using near-infrared spectroscopy during two executive tasks (flanker task and 2-back task) performed while cycling for 60min at a very low intensity and an intensity above the ventilatory threshold. Findings revealed that, compared to very low intensity, physiologically challenging exercise (i) shortened reaction time in the flanker task, (ii) impaired performance in the 2-back task, and (iii) initially increased oxygenation in prefrontal, but not motor regions, which then became stable in both regions over time. Therefore, during prolonged exercise, not only is the intensity of exercise assessed important, but also the nature of the cognitive processes involved in the task. In contrast to the hypofrontality hypothesis, no inverse pattern of oxygenation between prefrontal and motor regions was observed, and prefrontal oxygenation was maintained over time. The present results go against the hypofrontality hypothesis.

  16. Does moderate hypoxia alter working memory and executive function during prolonged exercise?

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Takaaki; Sudo, Mizuki; Higaki, Yasuki; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ando, Soichi

    2015-02-01

    It has been suggested that acute exercise improves cognitive function. However, little is known about how exercise under hypoxia affects cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to determine if hypoxia alters working memory and executive function during prolonged exercise. Sixteen participants performed cognitive tasks at rest and during exercise under normoxia and hypoxia [fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2)=0.15, corresponding to an altitude of approximately 2600 m]. The level of hypoxia was moderate. We used a combination of Spatial Delayed Response (Spatial DR) task and Go/No-Go (GNG) task, where spatial working memory and executive function are required. Working memory was assessed by the accuracy of the Spatial DR task, and executive function was assessed by the accuracy and reaction time in the GNG task. The participants cycled an ergometer for 30 min under normoxia and moderate hypoxia while keeping their heart rate (HR) at 140 beats/min. They performed the cognitive tasks 5 min and 23 min after their HR reached 140 beats/min. Moderate hypoxia did not alter the accuracy of the Spatial DR (P=0.38) and GNG tasks (P=0.14). In contrast, reaction time in the GNG task significantly decreased during exercise relative to rest under normoxia and moderate hypoxia (P=0.02). These results suggest that moderate hypoxia and resultant biological processes did not provide sufficient stress to impair working memory and executive function during prolonged exercise. The beneficial effects on speed of response appear to persist during prolonged exercise under moderate hypoxia.

  17. Liver glycogen metabolism during and after prolonged endurance-type exercise.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Javier T; Fuchs, Cas J; Betts, James A; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-09-01

    Carbohydrate and fat are the main substrates utilized during prolonged endurance-type exercise. The relative contribution of each is determined primarily by the intensity and duration of exercise, along with individual training and nutritional status. During moderate- to high-intensity exercise, carbohydrate represents the main substrate source. Because endogenous carbohydrate stores (primarily in liver and muscle) are relatively small, endurance-type exercise performance/capacity is often limited by endogenous carbohydrate availability. Much exercise metabolism research to date has focused on muscle glycogen utilization, with little attention paid to the contribution of liver glycogen. (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy permits direct, noninvasive measurements of liver glycogen content and has increased understanding of the relevance of liver glycogen during exercise. In contrast to muscle, endurance-trained athletes do not exhibit elevated basal liver glycogen concentrations. However, there is evidence that liver glycogenolysis may be lower in endurance-trained athletes compared with untrained controls during moderate- to high-intensity exercise. Therefore, liver glycogen sparing in an endurance-trained state may account partly for training-induced performance/capacity adaptations during prolonged (>90 min) exercise. Ingestion of carbohydrate at a relatively high rate (>1.5 g/min) can prevent liver glycogen depletion during moderate-intensity exercise independent of the type of carbohydrate (e.g., glucose vs. sucrose) ingested. To minimize gastrointestinal discomfort, it is recommended to ingest specific combinations or types of carbohydrates (glucose plus fructose and/or sucrose). By coingesting glucose with either galactose or fructose, postexercise liver glycogen repletion rates can be doubled. There are currently no guidelines for carbohydrate ingestion to maximize liver glycogen repletion. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Isometric strength and steadiness adaptations of the knee extensor muscles to level and downhill treadmill walking in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gault, Mandy Lucinda; Willems, Mark Elizabeth Theodorus

    2013-04-01

    An ageing related decline in muscle strength and steadiness decreases quality of life and increases the risk for falls. Downhill treadmill walking (DTW) may enhance muscle strength and steadiness in older adults. Eighteen healthy older adults (age: 67 ± 4, body mass: 75 ± 14 kg) completed 12-weeks of level treadmill walking (LTW, 0 %, n = 8) or DTW (-10 %, n = 10) (30 min, 3 days per week) at a self-selected walking speed (re-adjusted in week 4 and 8). Maximal voluntary isometric force (MVIF) and electromyography (EMG) of the m. quadriceps femoris (QF) were measured at baseline, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Steadiness of submaximal (5, 10 and 20 % MVIF) isometric contractions (i.e. coefficient of variation of the force signal) and EMG of QF were measured at baseline and 12 weeks. Baseline MVIF of LTW (340 ± 112 N) and DTW (368 ± 128 N) increased equally by 14 ± 6 and 5 ± 6 % (p < 0.05). Steadiness at 5 %MVIF improved following 12 weeks of LTW (baseline: 0.04 ± 0.01; 12 weeks: 0.03 ± 0.01) and DTW (baseline: 0.04 ± 0.02; 12 weeks: 0.03 ± 0.01 (p < 0.05). EMG root mean square of m. vastus lateralis during MVIF increased by 38 % following 12 weeks of LTW only (p < 0.05). The potential implications for an exercise modality, such as DTW, with a lower oxygen demand, to improve muscle strength could serve as a rehabilitative countermeasure for older adults.

  19. The effects of ingesting polylactate or glucose polymer drinks during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Fahey, T D; Larsen, J D; Brooks, G A; Colvin, W; Henderson, S; Lary, D

    1991-09-01

    Five trained, fasted male cyclists rode a cycle ergometer three times at 50% of VO2max for 180 min. Using a balanced order, double-blind procedure, subjects were given either a solution containing polylactate (PL: 80% polylactate, 20% sodium lactate, in 7% solution with water), glucose polymer (GP: multidextrin in 7% solution with water), or control (C: water sweetened with aspartame) 5 min before exercise and at 20-min intervals during exercise. Venous blood samples were taken at rest and at 20-min intervals during exercise. In general, PL and GP rendered similar results except that pH and bicarbonate (HCO3-) were higher in PL. There were no differences between treatments in perceived exertion, sodium, potassium, chloride, lactate, heart rate, oxygen consumption, rectal temperature, or selected skin temperatures. These data show that polylactate may help maintain blood glucose and enhance blood buffering capacity during prolonged exercise and could be a useful component in an athletic fluid replacement beverage.

  20. Concluding remarks: nutritional strategies to support the adaptive response to prolonged exercise training.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Luc J C; Tipton, Kevin D

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition plays a key role in allowing the numerous training hours to be translated into useful adaptive responses of various tissues in the individual athlete. Research over the last decade has shown many examples of the impact of dietary interventions to modulate the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged exercise training. Proper nutritional coaching should be applied throughout both training and competition, each with their specific requirements regarding nutrient provision. Such dietary support will improve exercise training efficiency and, as such, further increase performance capacity. Here, we provide an overview on the properties of various nutritional interventions that may be useful to support the adaptive response to exercise training and competition and, as such, to augment exercise training efficiency.

  1. Muscle ultrastructural changes from exhaustive exercise performed after prolonged restricted activity and retraining in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Philpott, D.; Pohoska, E.; Olszewska, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of exhaustive treadmill exercise on ultrastructural changes in the quadriceps femoris muscle was studied in 7 normal, healthy dogs, before and after restricted activity (RA), and following a subsequent 2 month treadmill exercise retraining period for the 5 mo group. Mean time to exhaustion in the 2 mo group decreased from 177 + or - 22 min before to 90 + or - 32 min after RA. Retraining increased tolerance to 219 + or - 73 min; 24 pct. above the before RA and 143 pct. above the after RA time. After RA exhaustion time in the 5 mo group was 25 and 45 min. Before RA, pre-exercise muscle structure was normal and post exercise there was only slight swelling of mitochondria. After RA, pre-exercise, numerous glycogen granules and lipid droplets appeared in the muscle fibers, mitochondria were smaller, and sarcoplasmic reticulum channels widened; post exercise these changes were accentuated and some areas were devoid of glycogen, and there was fiber degradation. After 5 mo RA pre-exercise there were more pronounced changes; mitochondria were very small and dense, there were many lipid droplets, myofibrils were often separated, and the fibers appeared edematous and degenerating; post exercise the sarcoplasmic reticulum was swollen, no glycogen was present, and there was marked swelling and deformation of mitochondria. After retraining, both pre-exercise and post exercise there was still evidence of fiber degeneration. Thus, susceptibility of active skeletal muscle structures and subcellular elements, e.g., mitochondria, to the action of damaging factors occurring during exhaustive exercise is enhanced considerably by prolonged disuse.

  2. Carbohydrate supplementation does not blunt the prolonged exercise-induced reduction of in vivo immunity.

    PubMed

    Davison, Glen; Kehaya, Corinna; Diment, Bethany C; Walsh, Neil P

    2016-06-01

    Carbohydrate (CHO) supplementation during prolonged exercise is widely acknowledged to blunt in vitro immunoendocrine responses, but no study has investigated in vivo immunity. To determine the effect of CHO supplementation during prolonged exercise on in vivo immune induction using experimental contact hypersensitivity with the novel antigen diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP). In a double-blind design, 32 subjects were randomly assigned to 120 min of treadmill exercise at 60 % [Formula: see text] with CHO (Ex-CHO) or placebo (Ex-PLA) supplementation. Responses were also compared to 16 resting control (CON) subjects from a previous study (for additional comparison with a resting non-exercise condition). Standardised diets (24 h pre-trial) and breakfasts (3.5 h pre-trial) were provided. Subjects received a primary DPCP exposure (sensitisation) 20 min after trial completion, and exactly 28 days later the strength of immune reactivity was quantified by magnitude of the cutaneous response (skin-fold thickness and erythema) to a low dose-series DPCP challenge. Stress hormones and leucocyte trafficking were also monitored. CHO supplementation blunted the cortisol and leucocyte trafficking responses, but there was no difference (P > 0.05) between Ex-CHO and Ex-PLA in the in vivo immune responses (e.g. both ~46 % lower than CON for skin-fold response). CHO supplementation does not influence the decrease in in vivo immunity seen after prolonged exercise. The effects with more stressful (or fasted) exercise remain to be determined. However, there appears to be no benefit under the conditions of the present study, which have practical relevance to what many athletes do in training or competition.

  3. The effects of oral glutamine supplementation on athletes after prolonged, exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Castell, L M; Newsholme, E A

    1997-01-01

    Athletes undergoing intense, prolonged training or participating in endurance races suffer an increased risk of infection due to apparent immunosuppression. Glutamine is an important fuel for some cells of the immune system and may have specific immunostimulatory effects. The plasma glutamine concentration is lower after prolonged, exhaustive exercise: this may contribute to impairment of the immune system at a time when the athlete may be exposed to opportunistic infections. The effects of feeding glutamine was investigated both at rest in sedentary controls and after exhaustive exercise in middle-distance, marathon and ultra-marathon runners, and elite rowers, in training and competition. Questionnaires established the incidence of infection for 7 d after exercise: infection levels were highest in marathon and ultra-marathon runners, and in elite male rowers after intensive training. Plasma glutamine levels were decreased by approximately 20% 1 h after marathon running. A marked increase in numbers of white blood cells occurred immediately after exhaustive exercise, followed by a decrease in the numbers of lymphocytes. The provision of oral glutamine after exercise appeared to have a beneficial effect on the level of subsequent infections. In addition, the ratio of T-helper/T-suppressor cells appeared to be increased in samples from those who received glutamine, compared with placebo.

  4. Prolonged exercise following diuretic-induced hypohydration: effects on cardiovascular and thermal strain.

    PubMed

    Roy, B D; Green, H J; Burnett, M E

    2000-07-01

    To examine the role of a reduction in plasma volume (PV) on the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses to submaximal exercise, ten untrained males (VO2 peak = 3.96 +/- 0.14 L x min(-1); mean +/- SE) performed 60 min of cycle exercise at -61% of VO2 peak while on a diuretic (DIU) and under control (CON) conditions. Participants consumed either Novotriamazide (100 mg triameterene + 50 mg hydrochlorothiazide, a diuretic) or a placebo, in random order, for 4 days prior to the exercise. Diuretic resulted in a calculated 14.6% reduction (P < 0.05) in resting PV. Heart rate was higher (P < 0.05) at rest and throughout exercise for DIU compared with CON. No differences were observed for cardiac output (Qc) and stroke volume (SV) at rest for the two conditions, but during exercise both Qc and SV were lower (P < 0.05) with DIU. Exercise VO2 (L x min(-1)) for CON and DIU at 30 min (2.39 +/- 0.09 vs 2.43 +/- 0.08) and 60 min (2.56 +/- 0.08 vs 2.53 +/- 0.12) were similar between conditions. Whole body a-vO2 difference was significantly greater (P < 0.05) for DIU both at rest and during exercise as compared with CON. Rectal temperature (Tre) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) during DIU from 15 min to the end of exercise. Blood concentrations of norepinephrine were higher (P < 0.05) with DIU compared to CON at 15 min of exercise and beyond. For blood epinephrine, no differences were observed between DIU and CON. These results suggest that reductions in PV led to greater circulating concentrations of norepinephrine which likely resulted from increased cardiac and thermoregulatory stresses. In addition, reductions in PV do not appear to increase cardiovascular instability during prolonged dynamic exercise.

  5. Plasma leptin and energy expenditure during prolonged, moderate intensity, treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Zaccaria, M; Ermolao, A; Brugin, E; Bergamin, M

    2013-06-01

    Current literature shows conflicting results regarding the possible direct role of exercise on leptin concentrations, mainly because of a non-homogeneous level of energy expenditure (EE) and the lack of standardization of energy balance. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of exercise duration and its corresponding EE on leptin levels, during prolonged treadmill exercise, in a well-controlled laboratory setting. Seven young trained males underwent a 4-h treadmill exercise. The starting intensity was set at 65% of maximal oxygen consumption. At the start of the test and throughout the exercise, venous blood samples were drawn for the assays of leptin, glucose, free fatty acids (FFA), cortisol, epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE). Hourly and total EE was monitored with gas analysis. Plasma leptin levels decreased from 1.10±0.15 to 0.85±0.26 μg/l (p<0.01) at the end of the exercise, reaching a significant reduction already after the second hour. FFA and cortisol showed a progressive significant increase, while glucose did not significantly change throughout the test. Plasma E and NE significantly increased at all sampling times compared to basal values (48.1±30.3 to 352.3±187.7 pg/ml, p<0.001 and 238.1±118.9 to 1798.7±413.5 pg/ml, p<0.001). The random-effects model for panel data analysis showed negative correlation between leptin, NE and the values of progressive EE (r2=0.745, p<0.05). Our data demonstrate that, during a prolonged moderate intensity exercise, leptin decrease is significantly related to the total EE. Further, NE concentrations seem to play an important role in the inhibition of leptin secretion.

  6. Muscle blood flow is reduced with dehydration during prolonged exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José; Calbet, José A L; Nielsen, Bodil

    1998-01-01

    The present study examined whether the blood flow to exercising muscles becomes reduced when cardiac output and systemic vascular conductance decline with dehydration during prolonged exercise in the heat. A secondary aim was to determine whether the upward drift in oxygen consumption (V̇O2) during prolonged exercise is confined to the active muscles.Seven euhydrated, endurance-trained cyclists performed two bicycle exercise trials in the heat (35 °C; 40–50% relative humidity; 61 ± 2% of maximal V̇O2), separated by 1 week. During the first trial (dehydration trial, DE), they bicycled until volitional exhaustion (135 ± 4 min, mean ± s.e.m.), while developing progressive dehydration and hyperthermia (3.9 ± 0.3% body weight loss; 39.7 ± 0.2 °C oesophageal temperature, Toes). In the second trial (control trial), they bicycled for the same period of time while maintaining euhydration by ingesting fluids and stabilizing Toes at 38.2 ± 0.1 °C after 30 min exercise.In both trials, cardiac output, leg blood flow (LBF), vascular conductance and V̇O2 were similar after 20 min exercise. During the 20 min-exhaustion period of DE, cardiac output, LBF and systemic vascular conductance declined significantly (8–14%; P < 0.05) yet muscle vascular conductance was unaltered. In contrast, during the same period of control, all these cardiovascular variables tended to increase. After 135 ± 4 min of DE, the 2.0 ± 0.6 l min−1 lower blood flow to the exercising legs accounted for approximately two-thirds of the reduction in cardiac output. Blood flow to the skin also declined markedly as forearm blood flow was 39 ± 8% (P < 0.05) lower in DE vs. control after 135 ± 4 min.In both trials, whole body V̇O2 and leg V̇O2 increased in parallel and were similar throughout exercise. The reduced leg blood flow in DE was accompanied by an even greater increase in femoral arterial-venous O2 (a-vO2) difference.It is concluded that blood flow to the exercising muscles declines

  7. Prolonged exercise potentiates sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake in rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Stavrianeas, Stasinos; Spangenburg, Espen; Batts, Tim; Williams, Jay H; Klug, Gary A

    2003-03-01

    The effects of a single bout of prolonged treadmill exercise [mean=81 (13) min] on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release, uptake and ATPase activity were determined in the costal region of rat diaphragm (D) and red gastrocnemius (RG). Glycogen depletion measurements made immediately following exercise suggested that treadmill running substantially recruited the fibers throughout both muscles. SR Ca(2+) ATPase activity, measured in isolated SR vesicles, decreased in the RG by 33% but remained unchanged in D in response to the exercise bout. This effect in RG was matched by a 37% decline in Ca(2+) uptake and a 28% depression in Ca(2+) release when measured in muscle homogenates. Conversely, Ca(2+) uptake increased between 157% and 263% in the D in the absence of any change in Ca(2+) release. These data show that the attenuation of SR function that has been consistently observed in limb muscle over the last several decades is absent in diaphragm despite the fact that its fibers appear to experience sufficient activity to deplete their glycogen. In fact, the large increase in Ca(2+) uptake in D shows that prolonged activity actually potentiates the ability of SR vesicles to sequester Ca(2+) in the absence of any increase in energy cost. Thus, it appears necessary to re-evaluate the role of exercise in regulating Ca(2+) sequestration by the SR as different muscles may respond in ways that are dictated by their function.

  8. Plasma protein changes in horse after prolonged physical exercise: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Scoppetta, Fausto; Tartaglia, Micaela; Renzone, Giovanni; Avellini, Luca; Gaiti, Alberto; Scaloni, Andrea; Chiaradia, Elisabetta

    2012-07-19

    Physical exercise induces various stress responses and metabolic adaptations that have not yet been completely elucidated. Novel biomarkers are needed in sport veterinary medicine to monitor training levels and to detect subclinical conditions that can develop into exercise-related diseases. In this study, protein modifications in horse plasma induced by prolonged, aerobic physical exercise were investigated by using a proteomic approach based on 2-DE and combined mass spectrometry procedures. Thirty-eight protein spots, associated with expression products of 13 genes, showed significant quantitative changes; spots identified as membrane Cu amine oxidase, α-1 antitrypsin, α-1 antitrypsin-related protein, caeruloplasmin, α-2 macroglobulin and complement factor C4 were augmented in relative abundance after the race, while haptoglobin β chain, apolipoprotein A-I, transthyretin, retinol binding protein 4, fibrinogen γ chain, complement factor B and albumin fragments were reduced. These results indicate that prolonged physical exercise affects plasma proteins involved in pathways related to inflammation, coagulation, immune modulation, oxidant/antioxidant activity and cellular and vascular damage, with consequent effects on whole horse metabolism.

  9. The effect of carbohydrate ingestion on plasma interleukin-6, hepcidin and iron concentrations following prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Robson-Ansley, Paula; Walshe, Ian; Ward, Douglas

    2011-02-01

    The aim of our study was twofold, firstly to examine the relationship between plasma concentrations of IL-6, hepcidin and iron following prolonged exercise and secondly, to assess the effect of carbohydrate ingestion on circulating hepcidin concentration post-exercise. The study was a randomised double-blind cross-over design, with participants consuming either a carbohydrate (CHO) or an isovolumetric placebo drink throughout the trial. Nine healthy, trained males completed a treadmill run at 60% vVO(2max) for 120 min followed by a 5 km time trial. Plasma concentrations of both IL-6 and hepcidin significantly increased post-exercise following both trials (p<.05) and returned to baseline by 24 h post (p>.05). A positive correlation between hepcidin and IL-6 was demonstrated immediately following exercise during PLA while there was a trend for a moderate correlation during CHO (PLA trial rho=0.81, p<0.001; CHO trial rho=0.36, p=0.07). Plasma iron was unaffected immediately post-exercise but significantly reduced by 24 h post-exercise compared to baseline. CHO ingestion significantly reduced post-exercise IL-6 (p<.05) but this had no effect on plasma hepcidin or iron concentration. Our data demonstrate CHO supplementation does not alter the rapid hepcidin response associated with exercise and does not prevent a subsequent fall in plasma iron concentration. This finding adds further support to the theory that an exercise-induced, up-regulation of hepcidin activity is a mechanism causing iron deficiency in endurance athletes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Muscle metabolite accumulation following maximal exercise. A comparison between short-term and prolonged kayak performance.

    PubMed

    Tesch, P A; Karlsson, J

    1984-01-01

    Five elite flatwater kayak paddlers were studied during indoor simulated 500 and 10,000-m races, with performance times of 2 and 45 min, respectively. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the midportion of m. deltoideus immediately pre and post exercise. Concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CP), glucose, glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P), glycogen, and lactate were subsequently determined. Short term exercise resulted in statistically significant increases in glucose (P less than 0.001), G-6-P (P less than 0.05) and lactate (P less than 0.01) concentration concomitant with decreased CP (P less than 0.05) and glycogen (P less than 0.01). Following prolonged exercise, a non-significant elevation in glucose and a reduction (P less than 0.01) in glycogen were demonstrated. Evidently the metabolic demands for kayak competitions at 500 and 10,000 m are different. Thus, the energy contribution from glycolytic precursors and the anaerobic component is of greater relative importance in short distances than in exercise of long duration. A generalization of the findings to other athletic events of varying distances is proposed. The present data on arm-exercise is consistent with previous findings obtained in connection with leg exercises.

  11. Effects of mode and carbohydrate on the granulocyte and monocyte response to intensive, prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D C; Nehlsen-Cannarella, S L; Fagoaga, O R; Henson, D A; Utter, A; Davis, J M; Williams, F; Butterworth, D E

    1998-04-01

    The influence of exercise mode and 6% carbohydrate (C) vs. placebo (P) beverage ingestion on granulocyte and monocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst activity (GMPOB) after prolonged and intensive exertion was measured in 10 triathletes. The triathletes acted as their own controls and ran or cycled for 2.5 h at approximately 75% maximal O2 uptake, ingesting C or P (4 total sessions, random order, with beverages administered in double-blind fashion). During the 2. 5-h exercise bouts, C or P (4 ml/kg) was ingested every 15 min. Five blood samples were collected (15 min before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 1.5, 3, and 6 h after exercise). The pattern of change over time for GMPOB was significantly different between C and P conditions (P exercise mode) was associated with higher plasma levels of glucose and insulin, lower plasma levels of cortisol and growth hormone, and lower blood neutrophil and monocyte cell counts. These data indicate that C vs. P ingestion is associated with higher plasma glucose levels, an attenuated cortisol response, and lower GMPOB.

  12. Salivary IgA responses to prolonged intensive exercise following caffeine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Nicolette C; Walker, Gary J; Scanlon, Gabriella A; Richards, Stephen; Rogers, Eleanor

    2006-03-01

    Prolonged, intensive exercise is associated with a reduction in concentration and secretion of salivary IgA (s-IgA). Saliva composition and secretion are under autonomic nervous system control, and caffeine ingestion, a widespread practice among athletes for its ergogenic properties, is associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activation. Therefore, this study investigated the influence of caffeine ingestion on s-IgA responses to prolonged, intensive exercise. In a randomized crossover design, 11 endurance-trained males cycled for 90 min at 70% VO2peak on two occasions, having ingested 6 mg x kg(-1) body mass of caffeine (CAF) or placebo (PLA) 1 h before exercise. Whole, unstimulated saliva samples were collected before treatment (baseline), preexercise, after 45 min of exercise (midexercise), immediately postexercise, and 1 h postexercise. Venous blood samples were collected from a subset of six of these subjects at baseline, preexercise, postexercise, and 1 h postexercise. An initial pilot study found that caffeine ingestion had no effect on s-IgA concentration, secretion rate, or saliva flow rate at rest. Serum caffeine concentration was higher on CAF than PLA at preexercise, postexercise, and 1 h postexercise (P < 0.001). Plasma epinephrine concentration was higher on CAF than PLA at pre- and postexercise (P < 0.05). s-IgA concentration was higher on CAF than PLA at mid- and postexercise (P < 0.01), and s-IgA secretion rate was higher on CAF than PLA at midexercise only (P < 0.02). Caffeine ingestion did not affect saliva flow rate. Saliva alpha-amylase activity and secretion rate were higher on CAF than PLA (main effect for trial, P < 0.05). These findings suggest that caffeine ingestion before intensive exercise is associated with elevated s-IgA responses during exercise, which may be related to increases in sympathetic activation.

  13. Interaction of hyperthermia and heart rate on stroke volume during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Trinity, Joel D; Pahnke, Matthew D; Lee, Joshua F; Coyle, Edward F

    2010-09-01

    People who become hyperthermic during exercise display large increases in heart rate (HR) and reductions in stroke volume (SV). It is not clear if the reduction in SV is due primarily to hyperthermia or if it is a secondary effect of an elevation in HR reducing ventricular filling. In the present study, the upward drift of HR during prolonged exercise was prevented by a very small dose of the β1-adrenoreceptor blocker (atenolol; βB), thus allowing SV to be compared at a given HR during normothermia and hyperthermia. Eleven men cycled for 60 min at 57% of peak O2 uptake after receiving placebo control (PL) or a low dose (0.2 mg/kg) of βB. Hyperthermia was induced by reducing heat dissipation during exercise. Four experimental conditions were studied: normothermia-PL, normothermia-βB, hyperthermia-PL, and hyperthermia-βB. Hyperthermia increased skin and core temperature by 4.3 degrees C and 0.8 degrees C (P<0.01), respectively. βB prevented HR elevation with hyperthermia: HR values were similar at minute 60 during normothermia-PL and hyperthermia-βB (155±11 and 154±13 beats/min, respectively, P=0.82). However, SV was increased by 7% during the final 20 min of exercise during hyperthermia-βB compared with normothermia-PL (treatment×time interaction, P=0.03). In conclusion, when matched for HR, mild hyperthermia increased SV during exercise. Furthermore, the reduction in SV throughout prolonged exercise under normothermic and mildly hyperthermic conditions appears to be due to the increase in HR.

  14. Carbohydrate supplementation during prolonged cycling exercise spares muscle glycogen but does not affect intramyocellular lipid use.

    PubMed

    Stellingwerff, Trent; Boon, Hanneke; Gijsen, Annemie P; Stegen, Jos H C H; Kuipers, Harm; van Loon, Luc J C

    2007-07-01

    Using contemporary stable-isotope methodology and fluorescence microscopy, we assessed the impact of carbohydrate supplementation on whole-body and fiber-type-specific intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG) and glycogen use during prolonged endurance exercise. Ten endurance-trained male subjects were studied twice during 3 h of cycling at 63 +/- 4% of maximal O(2) uptake with either glucose ingestion (CHO trial; 0.7 g CHO kg(-1) h(-1)) or without (CON placebo trial; water only). Continuous infusions with [U-(13)C] palmitate and [6,6-(2)H(2)] glucose were applied to quantify plasma free fatty acids (FFA) and glucose oxidation rates and to estimate intramyocellular lipid and glycogen use. Before and after exercise, muscle biopsy samples were taken to quantify fiber-type-specific IMTG and glycogen content. Plasma glucose rate of appearance (R (a)) and carbohydrate oxidation rates were substantially greater in the CHO vs CON trial. Carbohydrate supplementation resulted in a lower muscle glycogen use during the first hour of exercise in the CHO vs CON trial, resulting in a 38 +/- 19 and 57 +/- 22% decreased utilization in type I and II muscle-fiber glycogen content, respectively. In the CHO trial, both plasma FFA R (a) and subsequent plasma FFA concentrations were lower, resulting in a 34 +/- 12% reduction in plasma FFA oxidation rates during exercise (P < 0.05). Carbohydrate intake did not augment IMTG utilization, as fluorescence microscopy revealed a 76 +/- 21 and 78 +/- 22% reduction in type I muscle-fiber lipid content in the CHO and CON trial, respectively. We conclude that carbohydrate supplementation during prolonged cycling exercise does not modulate IMTG use but spares muscle glycogen use during the initial stages of exercise in endurance-trained men.

  15. The effects of stepper exercise with visual feedback on strength, walking, and stair climbing in individuals following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Munsang; Yoo, Junsang; Shin, Soonyoung; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of stepper exercise with visual feedback on strength, walking, and stair climbing in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-six stroke patients were divided randomly into the stepper exercise with visual feedback group (n = 13) or the stepper exercise group (n = 13). [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group received feedback through the mirror during exercise, while those in the control group performed the exercise without visual feedback; both groups exercised for the 30 min thrice per week for 6 weeks. The hip extensor and knee extensor strength, 10-m walking test results, and 11-step stair climbing test results were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The stepper exercise with visual feedback group showed significantly greater improvement for hip extensor strength and the 10-m walking test. The knee extensor strength and 11-step stair climbing in both groups showed significantly greater improvement after the intervention, but without any significant difference between groups. [Conclusion] The findings of this study indicate that the stepper exercise with visual feedback can help improve the strength of the hip extensor and the 10-m walking test; the stepper exercise alone may also improve the knee extensor strength and stair climbing ability. PMID:26180336

  16. The effects of stepper exercise with visual feedback on strength, walking, and stair climbing in individuals following stroke.

    PubMed

    Choi, Munsang; Yoo, Junsang; Shin, Soonyoung; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of stepper exercise with visual feedback on strength, walking, and stair climbing in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-six stroke patients were divided randomly into the stepper exercise with visual feedback group (n = 13) or the stepper exercise group (n = 13). [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group received feedback through the mirror during exercise, while those in the control group performed the exercise without visual feedback; both groups exercised for the 30 min thrice per week for 6 weeks. The hip extensor and knee extensor strength, 10-m walking test results, and 11-step stair climbing test results were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The stepper exercise with visual feedback group showed significantly greater improvement for hip extensor strength and the 10-m walking test. The knee extensor strength and 11-step stair climbing in both groups showed significantly greater improvement after the intervention, but without any significant difference between groups. [Conclusion] The findings of this study indicate that the stepper exercise with visual feedback can help improve the strength of the hip extensor and the 10-m walking test; the stepper exercise alone may also improve the knee extensor strength and stair climbing ability.

  17. Blood Glucose Regulation during Prolonged, Submaximal, Continuous Exercise: A Guide for Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Matthew L.

    2010-01-01

    Management of many chronic diseases now includes regular exercise as part of a viable treatment plan. Exercise in the form of prolonged, submaximal, continuous exercise (SUBEX; i.e., ∼30 min to 1 h, ∼40–70% of maximal oxygen uptake) is often prescribed due to its relatively low risk, the willingness of patients to undertake, its efficacy, its affordability, and its ease of prescription. Specifically, patients who are insulin resistant or that have type 2 diabetes mellitus may benefit from regular exercise of this type. During this type of exercise, muscles dramatically increase glucose uptake as the liver increases both glycogenolysis and gluco-neogenesis. While a redundancy of mechanisms is at work to maintain blood glucose concentration ([glucose]) during this type of exercise, the major regulator of blood glucose is the insulin/glucagon response. At exercise onset, blood [glucose] transiently rises before beginning to decline after ∼30 min, causing a subsequent decline in blood [insulin] and rise in blood glucagon. This leads to many downstream effects, including an increase in glucose output from the liver to maintain adequate glucose in the blood to fuel both the muscles and the brain. Finally, when analyzing blood [glucose], consideration should be given to nutritional status (postabsorptive versus postprandial) as well as both what the analyzer measures and the type of sample used (plasma versus whole blood). In view of both prescribing exercise to patients as well as designing studies that perturb glucose homeostasis, it is imperative that clinicians and researchers alike understand the controls of blood glucose homeostasis during SUBEX. PMID:20513337

  18. The impact of obesity on cardiac troponin levels after prolonged exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Veltmeijer, Matthijs T W; George, Keith; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2012-05-01

    Elevated cardiac troponin I (cTnI), a marker for cardiac damage, has been reported after high-intensity exercise in healthy subjects. Currently, little is known about the impact of prolonged moderate-intensity exercise on cTnI release, but also the impact of obesity on this response. 97 volunteers (55 men and 42 women), stratified for BMI, performed a single bout of walking exercise (30-50 km). We examined cTnI-levels before and immediately after the exercise bout in lean (BMI < 25 kg/m(2), n = 30, 57 ± 19 years), overweight (25 ≤ BMI < 30 kg/m(2), n = 29, 56 ± 11 years), and obese subjects (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2), n = 28, 53 ± 9 years). Walking was performed at a self-selected pace. cTnI was assessed using a high-sensitive cTnI-assay (Centaur; clinical cut-off value ≥ 0.04 μg/L). We recorded subject characteristics (body weight, blood pressure, presence of cardiovascular risk) and examined exercise intensity by recording heart rate. Mean cTnI-levels increased significantly from 0.010 ± 0.006 to 0.024 ± 0.046 μg/L (P < 0.001). The exercise-induced increase in cTnI was not different between lean, overweight and obese subjects (two-way ANOVA interaction; P = 0.27). In 11 participants, cTnI was elevated above the clinical cut-off value for myocardial infarction. Logistic regression analysis identified exercise intensity (P < 0.001), but not BMI, body fat percentage or waist circumference to significantly relate to positive troponin tests. In conclusion, prolonged, moderate-intensity exercise results in a comparable increase in cTnI-levels in lean, overweight and obese subjects. Therefore, measures of obesity unlikely relate to the magnitude of the post-exercise elevation in cTnI.

  19. Prolonged Platelet Activation in Individuals with Elevated Blood Pressure in response to a Moderate Exercise Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Suzi; Adler, Karen A.; von Känel, Roland; Nordberg, Judy; Ziegler, Michael G.; Mills, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the magnitude of 20-min moderate exercise-induced platelet activation in 50 volunteers with normal (n= 31) or elevated BP (EBP; n=19). Blood was drawn before, immediately after and 25-min after exercise. Antibody-staining for platelet activation markers P-selectin and fibrinogen receptors was done with and without adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimulation in whole blood for flow cytometric analyses. Exercise led to increases in % aggregated platelets and % platelets expressing P-selectin or PAC-1 binding (p’s ≤ 0.001). This increase in % platelets expressing P-selectin continued even after 25-min rest only in the EBP group (p ≤ 0.01) accompanied by an increase in % aggregated platelets (p ≤ 0.05). Although ADP stimulation led to increased platelet activation at rest, it was attenuated following exercise, even among EBP individuals. A moderate exercise challenge induced prolonged platelet activation in individuals with EBP but attenuation in activation to further stimulation by an agonist. Findings suggest that a recovery period after physical stress appear critical in individuals with high BP regarding platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to an acute coronary syndrome in vulnerable individuals. PMID:19170949

  20. Rapid upregulation and clearance of distinct circulating microRNAs after prolonged aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joseph; Min, Pil-Ki; Isaacs, Stephanie; Parker, Beth A.; Thompson, Paul D.; Troyanos, Chris; D'Hemecourt, Pierre; Dyer, Sophia; Thiel, Marissa; Hale, Andrew; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Short nonprotein coding RNA molecules, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), are intracellular mediators of adaptive processes, including muscle hypertrophy, contractile force generation, and inflammation. During basal conditions and tissue injury, miRNAs are released into the bloodstream as “circulating” miRNAs (c-miRNAs). To date, the impact of extended-duration, submaximal aerobic exercise on plasma concentrations of c-miRNAs remains incompletely characterized. We hypothesized that specific c-miRNAs are differentially upregulated following prolonged aerobic exercise. To test this hypothesis, we measured concentrations of c-miRNAs enriched in muscle (miR-1, miR-133a, miR-499–5p), cardiac tissue (miR-208a), and the vascular endothelium (miR-126), as well as those important in inflammation (miR-146a) in healthy male marathon runners (N = 21) at rest, immediately after a marathon (42-km foot race), and 24 h after the race. In addition, we compared c-miRNA profiles to those of conventional protein biomarkers reflective of skeletal muscle damage, cardiac stress and necrosis, and systemic inflammation. Candidate c-miRNAs increased immediately after the marathon and declined to prerace levels or lower after 24 h of race completion. However, the magnitude of change for each c-miRNA differed, even when originating from the same tissue type. In contrast, traditional biomarkers increased after exercise but remained elevated 24 h postexercise. Thus c-miRNAs respond differentially to prolonged exercise, suggesting the existence of specific mechanisms of c-miRNA release and clearance not fully explained by generalized cellular injury. Furthermore, c-miRNA expression patterns differ in a temporal fashion from corollary conventional tissue-specific biomarkers, emphasizing the potential of c-miRNAs as unique, real-time markers of exercise-induced tissue adaptation. PMID:24436293

  1. Caffeine effects on short-term performance during prolonged exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Estevez, Emma; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2008-04-01

    To determine the effect of water, carbohydrate, and caffeine ingestion on fatigue during prolonged exercise in the heat. Seven endurance-trained cyclists (V O2max = 61 +/- 8 mL.kg.min) pedaled for 120 min at 63% V O2max in a hot-dry environment (36 degrees C; 29% humidity), ingesting either no fluid (NF), water (WAT) to replace 97% fluid losses, the same volume of a 6% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES), or each of these treatments along with ingestion of 6 mg of caffeine per kilogram of body weight (NF + CAFF, WAT + CAFF, and CES + CAFF). At regular intervals during exercise, maximal cycling power (PMAX) was measured. Before and after exercise, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), and electrically evoked contractile properties of the quadriceps were determined. Without fluid replacement (NF and NF + CAFF), subjects were dehydrated by 3.8 +/- 0.3%, and rectal temperature reached 39.4 +/- 0.3 degrees C, while it was maintained at 38.7 +/- 0.3 degrees C in trials with rehydration (P < 0.05). Trials with caffeine ingestion increased PMAX by 3% above trials without caffeine (P < 0.05). MVC reductions after exercise were larger with NF (-11 +/- 5%) than for the rest of the trials (P < 0.05). MVC was reduced in WAT compared with CES + CAFF (-6 +/- 4 vs 2 +/- 4%; P < 0.05). However, NF + CAFF maintained MVC at the level of the CES trial. VA showed the same treatment response pattern as MVC. There were no differences in electrically evoked contractile properties among trials. During prolonged exercise in the heat, caffeine ingestion (6 mg.kg body weight) maintains MVC and increases PMAX despite dehydration and hyperthermia. When combined with water and carbohydrate, caffeine ingestion increases maximal leg force by increasing VA (i.e., reducing central fatigue).

  2. Life-long spontaneous exercise does not prolong lifespan but improves health span in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Life expectancy at birth in the first world has increased from 35 years at the beginning of the 20th century to more than 80 years now. The increase in life expectancy has resulted in an increase in age-related diseases and larger numbers of frail and dependent people. The aim of our study was to determine whether life-long spontaneous aerobic exercise affects lifespan and healthspan in mice. Results Male C57Bl/6J mice, individually caged, were randomly assigned to one of two groups: sedentary (n = 72) or spontaneous wheel-runners (n = 72). We evaluated longevity and several health parameters including grip strength, motor coordination, exercise capacity (VO2max) and skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis. We also measured the cortical levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin associated with brain plasticity. In addition, we measured systemic oxidative stress (malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl plasma levels) and the expression and activity of two genes involved in antioxidant defense in the liver (that is, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD)). Genes that encode antioxidant enzymes are considered longevity genes because their over-expression may modulate lifespan. Aging was associated with an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers and in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, GPx and Mn-SOD, in the liver in mice. Life-long spontaneous exercise did not prolong longevity but prevented several signs of frailty (that is, decrease in strength, endurance and motor coordination). This improvement was accompanied by a significant increase in the mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and in the cortical BDNF levels. Conclusion Life-long spontaneous exercise does not prolong lifespan but improves healthspan in mice. Exercise is an intervention that delays age-associated frailty, enhances function and can be translated into the clinic. PMID:24472376

  3. Rapid upregulation and clearance of distinct circulating microRNAs after prolonged aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Baggish, Aaron L; Park, Joseph; Min, Pil-Ki; Isaacs, Stephanie; Parker, Beth A; Thompson, Paul D; Troyanos, Chris; D'Hemecourt, Pierre; Dyer, Sophia; Thiel, Marissa; Hale, Andrew; Chan, Stephen Y

    2014-03-01

    Short nonprotein coding RNA molecules, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), are intracellular mediators of adaptive processes, including muscle hypertrophy, contractile force generation, and inflammation. During basal conditions and tissue injury, miRNAs are released into the bloodstream as "circulating" miRNAs (c-miRNAs). To date, the impact of extended-duration, submaximal aerobic exercise on plasma concentrations of c-miRNAs remains incompletely characterized. We hypothesized that specific c-miRNAs are differentially upregulated following prolonged aerobic exercise. To test this hypothesis, we measured concentrations of c-miRNAs enriched in muscle (miR-1, miR-133a, miR-499-5p), cardiac tissue (miR-208a), and the vascular endothelium (miR-126), as well as those important in inflammation (miR-146a) in healthy male marathon runners (N = 21) at rest, immediately after a marathon (42-km foot race), and 24 h after the race. In addition, we compared c-miRNA profiles to those of conventional protein biomarkers reflective of skeletal muscle damage, cardiac stress and necrosis, and systemic inflammation. Candidate c-miRNAs increased immediately after the marathon and declined to prerace levels or lower after 24 h of race completion. However, the magnitude of change for each c-miRNA differed, even when originating from the same tissue type. In contrast, traditional biomarkers increased after exercise but remained elevated 24 h postexercise. Thus c-miRNAs respond differentially to prolonged exercise, suggesting the existence of specific mechanisms of c-miRNA release and clearance not fully explained by generalized cellular injury. Furthermore, c-miRNA expression patterns differ in a temporal fashion from corollary conventional tissue-specific biomarkers, emphasizing the potential of c-miRNAs as unique, real-time markers of exercise-induced tissue adaptation.

  4. The Effects of Montmorency Tart Cherry Concentrate Supplementation on Recovery Following Prolonged, Intermittent Exercise.

    PubMed

    Bell, Phillip G; Stevenson, Emma; Davison, Gareth W; Howatson, Glyn

    2016-07-22

    This study investigated Montmorency tart cherry concentrate (MC) supplementation on markers of recovery following prolonged, intermittent sprint activity. Sixteen semi-professional, male soccer players, who had dietary restrictions imposed for the duration of the study, were divided into two equal groups and consumed either MC or placebo (PLA) supplementation for eight consecutive days (30 mL twice per day). On day 5, participants completed an adapted version of the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LISTADAPT). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), 20 m Sprint, counter movement jump (CMJ), agility and muscle soreness (DOMS) were assessed at baseline, and 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. Measures of inflammation (IL-1-β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, hsCRP), muscle damage (CK) and oxidative stress (LOOH) were analysed at baseline and 1, 3, 5, 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. Performance indices (MVIC, CMJ and agility) recovered faster and muscle soreness (DOMS) ratings were lower in the MC group (p < 0.05). Additionally, the acute inflammatory response (IL-6) was attenuated in the MC group. There were no effects for LOOH and CK. These findings suggest MC is efficacious in accelerating recovery following prolonged, repeat sprint activity, such as soccer and rugby, and lends further evidence that polyphenol-rich foods like MC are effective in accelerating recovery following various types of strenuous exercise.

  5. The Effects of Montmorency Tart Cherry Concentrate Supplementation on Recovery Following Prolonged, Intermittent Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Phillip G.; Stevenson, Emma; Davison, Gareth W.; Howatson, Glyn

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated Montmorency tart cherry concentrate (MC) supplementation on markers of recovery following prolonged, intermittent sprint activity. Sixteen semi-professional, male soccer players, who had dietary restrictions imposed for the duration of the study, were divided into two equal groups and consumed either MC or placebo (PLA) supplementation for eight consecutive days (30 mL twice per day). On day 5, participants completed an adapted version of the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LISTADAPT). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), 20 m Sprint, counter movement jump (CMJ), agility and muscle soreness (DOMS) were assessed at baseline, and 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. Measures of inflammation (IL-1-β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, hsCRP), muscle damage (CK) and oxidative stress (LOOH) were analysed at baseline and 1, 3, 5, 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. Performance indices (MVIC, CMJ and agility) recovered faster and muscle soreness (DOMS) ratings were lower in the MC group (p < 0.05). Additionally, the acute inflammatory response (IL-6) was attenuated in the MC group. There were no effects for LOOH and CK. These findings suggest MC is efficacious in accelerating recovery following prolonged, repeat sprint activity, such as soccer and rugby, and lends further evidence that polyphenol-rich foods like MC are effective in accelerating recovery following various types of strenuous exercise. PMID:27455316

  6. Impaired calcium pump function does not slow relaxation in human skeletal muscle after prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Booth, J; McKenna, M J; Ruell, P A; Gwinn, T H; Davis, G M; Thompson, M W; Harmer, A R; Hunter, S K; Sutton, J R

    1997-08-01

    This study examined the effects of prolonged exercise on human quadriceps muscle contractile function and homogenate sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+-adenosinetriphosphatase activity. Ten untrained men cycled at 75 +/- 2% (SE) peak oxygen consumption until exhaustion. Biopsies were taken from the right vastus lateralis muscle at rest, exhaustion, and 20 and 60 min postexercise. Peak tension and half relaxation time of the left quadriceps muscle were measured during electrically evoked twitch and tetanic contractions and a maximal voluntary isometric contraction at rest, exhaustion, and 10, 20, and 60 min postexercise. At exhaustion, homogenate Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ adenosinetriphosphatase activity were reduced by 17 +/- 4 and 21 +/- 5%, respectively, and remained depressed after 60 min recovery (P exercise by 28 +/- 3, 45 +/- 6, 65 +/- 5%, respectively (P prolonged exercise reduced muscle Ca2+ uptake, but this did not cause a slower relaxation of evoked contractions.

  7. Tyrosine supplementation does not influence the capacity to perform prolonged exercise in a warm environment.

    PubMed

    Watson, Phillip; Enever, Sophie; Page, Andrew; Stockwell, Jenna; Maughan, Ronald J

    2012-10-01

    Eight young men were recruited to a study designed to examine the effect of tyrosine (TYR) supplementation on the capacity to perform prolonged exercise in a warm environment. Subjects entered the laboratory in the morning and remained seated for 1 hr before cycling to exhaustion at 70% VO2peak. Two 250-ml aliquots of a placebo (PLA ) or a TYR solution were ingested at 30-min intervals before exercise, with an additional 150 ml consumed every 15 min throughout exercise (total TYR dose: 150 mg/kg BM). Cognitive function was assessed before drink ingestion, at the end of the rest period, and at exhaustion. TYR ingestion had no effect on exercise capacity (PLA 61.4 ± 13.7 min, TYR 60.2 ± 15.4 min; p = .505). No differences in heart rate (p = .380), core temperature (p = .554), or weighted mean skin temperature (p = .167) were apparent between trials. Ingestion of TYR produced a marked increase in serum TYR concentrations (+236 ± 46 μmol/L; p < .001), with this difference maintained throughout exercise. No change was apparent during the PLA trial (p = .924). Exercise caused an increase in error rate during the complex component of the Stroop test (p = .034), but this response was not influenced by the drink ingested. No other component of cognitive function was altered by the protocol (all p > .05). Ingestion of a TYR solution did not influence time to exhaustion or several aspects of cognitive function when exercise was undertaken in a warm environment.

  8. Cardiovascular strain impairs prolonged self-paced exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Périard, Julien D; Cramer, Matthew N; Chapman, Phillip G; Caillaud, Corinne; Thompson, Martin W

    2011-02-01

    It has been proposed that self-paced exercise in the heat is regulated by an anticipatory reduction in work rate based on the rate of heat storage. However, performance may be impaired by the development of hyperthermia and concomitant rise in cardiovascular strain increasing relative exercise intensity. This study evaluated the influence of thermal strain on cardiovascular function and power output during self-paced exercise in the heat. Eight endurance-trained cyclists performed a 40 km simulated time trial in hot (35°C) and thermoneutral conditions (20°C), while power output, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, oxygen uptake and cardiac output were measured. Time trial duration was 64.3 ± 2.8 min (242.1 W) in the hot condition and 59.8 ± 2.6 min (279.4 W) in the thermoneutral condition (P < 0.01). Power output in the heat was depressed from 20 min onwards compared with exercise in the thermoneutral condition (P < 0.05). Rectal temperature reached 39.8 ± 0.3 (hot) and 38.9 ± 0.2°C (thermoneutral; P < 0.01). From 10 min onwards, mean skin temperature was ~7.5°C higher in the heat, and skin blood flow was significantly elevated (P < 0.01). Heart rate was ~8 beats min(-1) higher throughout hot exercise, while stroke volume, cardiac output and mean arterial pressure were significantly depressed compared with the thermoneutral condition (P < 0.05). Peak oxygen uptake measured during the final kilometre of exercise at maximal effort reached 77 (hot) and 95% (thermoneutral) of pre-experimental control values (P < 0.01). We conclude that a thermoregulatory-mediated rise in cardiovascular strain is associated with reductions in sustainable power output, peak oxygen uptake and maximal power output during prolonged, intense self-paced exercise in the heat.

  9. Prolonged force depression after mechanically demanding contractions is largely independent of Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; de Souza Leite, Felipe; Hernández, Andres; Katz, Abram; Brazaitis, Marius; Bruton, Joseph D; Venckunas, Tomas; Masiulis, Nerijus; Mickeviciene, Dalia; Eimantas, Nerijus; Subocius, Andrejus; Rassier, Dilson E; Skurvydas, Albertas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2017-07-17

    Increased production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS) and impaired cellular Ca(2+) handling are implicated in the prolonged low-frequency force depression (PLFFD) observed in skeletal muscle after both metabolically and mechanically demanding exercise. Metabolically demanding high-intensity exercise can induce PLFFD accompanied by ROS-dependent fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release channels, the ryanodine receptor (RyR)-1. We tested whether similar changes occur after mechanically demanding eccentric contractions. Human subjects performed 100 repeated drop jumps, which require eccentric knee extensor contractions upon landing. This exercise caused a major PLFFD, such that maximum voluntary and electrically evoked forces did not recover within 24 h. Drop jumps induced only minor signs of increased ROS, and RyR1 fragmentation was observed in only 3 of 7 elderly subjects. Also, isolated mouse muscle preparations exposed to drop-jump-mimicking eccentric contractions showed neither signs of increased ROS nor RyR1 fragmentation. Still, the free cytosolic [Ca(2+)] during tetanic contractions was decreased by ∼15% 1 h after contractions, which can explain the exaggerated force decrease at low-stimulation frequencies but not the major frequency-independent force depression. In conclusion, PLFFD caused by mechanically demanding eccentric contractions does not involve any major increase in ROS or RyR1 fragmentation.-Kamandulis, S., de Souza Leite, F., Hernandez, A., Katz, A., Brazaitis, M., Bruton, J. D., Venckunas, T., Masiulis, N., Mickeviciene, D., Eimantas, N., Subocius, A., Rassier, D. E., Skurvydas, A., Ivarsson, N., Westerblad, H. Prolonged force depression after mechanically demanding contractions is largely independent of Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species. © FASEB.

  10. Hypertrophy of chronically unloaded muscle subjected to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Tesch, P A; Trieschmann, J T; Ekberg, A

    2004-04-01

    In an effort to simulate the compromised function and atrophy of lower limb muscles experienced by astronauts after spaceflight, 21 men and women age 30-56 yr were subjected to unilateral lower limb unloading for 5 wk. Whereas 10 of these subjects performed unilateral knee extensor resistance exercise (ULRE) two or three times weekly, 11 subjects (UL) refrained from training. The exercise regimen consisted of four sets of seven maximal actions, using an apparatus that offers concentric and eccentric resistance by utilizing the inertia of rotating flywheel(s). Knee extensor muscle strength was measured before and after UL and ULRE, and knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscle volumes were determined by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Surface electromyographic activity measured after UL inferred increased muscle use to perform a given motor task. UL induced an 8.8% decrease (P < 0.05) in knee extensor muscle volume. After ULRE and as a result of only approximately 16 min of maximal contractile activity over the 5-wk course, muscle volume increased 7.7% (P < 0.05). Muscle strength decreased 24-32% (P < 0.05) in response to UL. Group ULRE showed maintained (P > 0.05) strength. Ankle plantar flexor muscle volume of the unloaded limb decreased (P < 0.05) in both groups (UL 10.5%; ULRE 11.1%). In neither group did the right weight-bearing limb show any change (P > 0.05) in muscle volume or strength. The results of this study provide evidence that resistance exercise not only may offset muscle atrophy but is in fact capable of promoting marked hypertrophy of chronically unloaded muscle.

  11. Thermoregulatory responses during prolonged upper-body exercise in cool and warm conditions.

    PubMed

    Price, M J; Campbell, I G

    2002-07-01

    The thermoregulatory responses of upper-body trained athletes were examined at rest, during prolonged arm crank exercise and recovery in cool (21.5 +/- 0.9 degrees C, 43.9 +/- 10.1% relative humidity; mean +/- s) and warm (31.5 +/- 0.6 degrees C, 48.9 +/- 8.4% relative humidity) conditions. Aural temperature increased from rest by 0.7 +/- 0.7 degrees C (P< 0.05) during exercise in cool conditions and by 1.6 +/- 0.7 degrees C during exercise in warm conditions (P< 0.05). During exercise in cool conditions, calf skin temperature decreased (1.5 +/- 1.3 degrees C), whereas an increase was observed during exercise in warm conditions (3.0 +/- 1.7 degrees C). Lower-body skin temperatures tended to increase by greater amounts than upper-body skin temperatures during exercise in warm conditions. No differences were observed in blood lactate, heart rate or respiratory exchange ratio responses between conditions. Perceived exertion at 45 min of exercise was greater than that reported at 5 min of exercise during the cool trial (P< 0.05), whereas during exercise in the warm trial the rating of perceived exertion increased from initial values by 30 min (P < 0.05). Heat storage, body mass losses and fluid consumption were greater during exercise in warm conditions (7.06 +/- 2.25 J x g(-1) x degrees C(-1), 1.3 +/- 0.5 kg and 1,038 +/- 356 ml, respectively) than in cool conditions (1.35 +/- 0.23 J x g(-1) x degrees C(-1), 0.8 +/- 0.2 kg and 530 +/- 284 ml, respectively; P < 0.05). The results of this study indicate that the increasing thermal strain with constant thermal stress in warm conditions is due to heat storage within the lower body. These results may aid in understanding thermoregulatory control mechanisms of populations with a thermoregulatory dysfunction, such as those with spinal cord injuries.

  12. Intravenous bicarbonate and sodium chloride both prolong endurance during intense cycle ergometer exercise.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, T H; Abraham, G; Wing, S; Magder, S A; Cosio, M G; Deschamps, A; Marliss, E B

    1990-08-01

    To determine the effects of neutralizing exercise systemic acidosis via the intravenous route upon endurance and metabolic responses, eight lean, normal, postabsorptive men exercised to exhaustion at about 80% of their VO2 max (69 +/- 3%, mean +/- SEM, of maximum power output) on a cycle ergometer. Exercise studies were performed either with no infusion (control) or with a total infusion volume of about 1.5 L, mainly as 1.3% sodium bicarbonate or as 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl), infused (double-blind) throughout exercise. The sodium bicarbonate was to prevent acid-base change, the sodium chloride was as a control for the volume infused. Arterialized venous blood and breath-by-breath analysis of expired gases were obtained. [H+] (nmol.L-1) and [HCO3-] (mmol.L-1) at exhaustion were similar in control and NaCl (46.5 +/- 1.8, 19.9 +/- 0.9), but remained unchanged from rest values with bicarbonate (38.4 +/- 0.9, 24.8 +/- 1.5, p less than 0.005 vs control and NaCl). At exhaustion, VO2, VCO2, RER, heart rate, and systolic BP as well as FFA, glycerol, alanine, insulin, norepinephrine, and epinephrine did not differ among protocols. Endurance was markedly prolonged (p less than 0.01) with bicarbonate (31.9 +/- 5.8 min) and NaCl (31.8 +/- 4.1 min) compared with the control (19.0 +/- 2.9 min) condition. Plasma glucose at exhaustion was higher (p less than 0.025) in the control compared to bicarbonate and NaCl experiments, while lactate was higher (p less than 0.025) in the bicarbonate than in the control and NaCl experiments. Thus, the prolonged endurance with sodium bicarbonate infusion could not be explained either by its effect of maintaining blood acid-base equilibrium or concomitant metabolic changes.

  13. Response of testosterone to prolonged aerobic exercise during different phases of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, C B; Lehman, C; Koltun, K; Smith-Ryan, A; Hackney, A C

    2013-09-01

    To examine the androgen response to exercise in women under conditions of high (H) and low (L) estrogen (E2) levels. Ten exercise trained eumenorrheic women (mean ± SD: 20.0 ± 2.2 years, 58.7 ± 8.3 kg, 22.3 ± 4.9 % body fat, VO2max = 50.7 ± 9.0 mL/kg/min) completed a 60 min treadmill run at ~70 % of VO2max during both the mid-follicular (L-E2, 69.7 ± 7.3 % VO2max) and mid-luteal (H-E2, 67.6 ± 7.9 % VO2max) phases of their menstrual cycle. Blood samples were taken pre-exercise (PRE), immediately post (POST), and 30 min into recovery (30R) from exercise and analyzed for total testosterone using ELISA assays. Results were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Testosterone responses were (mean ± SD: L-E2, pre = 1.41 ± 0.21, post = 1.86 ± 0.21, 30R = 1.75 ± 0.32 nmol/L; H-E2, pre = 1.27 ± 0.23, post = 2.43 ± 0.56, 30R = 1.69 ± 0.34 nmol/L). Statistical analysis indicated no significant interaction existed between high and low estrogen conditions across the blood sampling times (p = 0.138). However, a main effect occurred for exercise (p < 0.004) with the post-testosterone concentration being greater than pre, although pre vs. 30R was not different (p > 0.05). All testosterone hormonal concentrations immediately post-exercise greatly exceeded the level of hemoconcentration observed during the L-E2 and H-E2 exercise sessions. Prolonged aerobic exercise induces short-term elevations in testosterone in trained eumenorrheic women, which appears unrelated to estrogen levels and menstrual cycle phase. These increases may occur due to either increased androgen production and/or decreased degradation rates of the hormone, and are not solely the result of plasma fluid shifts from the exercise.

  14. Effects of selective cooling of the facial area on physiological and metabolic output during graded maximal or prolonged submaximal exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, A.; Boisvert, P.; Brisson, G. R.; Decarufel, D.; Laurencelle, L.; Dulac, S.; Vogelaere, P.; Therminarias, A.

    1989-06-01

    Physiological and metabolic output responses to facial cooling during a graded maximal exercise and a prolonged submaximal exercise lasting 30 min at 65%dot VO_2 max were investigated in five male subjects. Pedalling on a cycle ergometer was performed both with and without facial cooling (10°C, 4.6 m s-1). Facial cooling at the end of graded maximal exercise apparently had no effect on plasma lactate (LA), maximal oxygen consumption (dot VO_2 max), maximal heart rate (HR max), rectal temperature ( T re), work-load, lactate threshold (LT), ventilatory threshold (VT) and onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA). However, the response to facial cooling after prolonged submaximal exercise is significantly different for heart rate and work-load. The results suggest that facial wind stimulation during maximal exercise does not produce a stress high enough to alter the metabolic and physiological responses.

  15. Glucose kinetics during prolonged exercise in highly trained human subjects: effect of glucose ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Jeukendrup, Asker E; Raben, Anne; Gijsen, Annemie; Stegen, Jos H C H; Brouns, Fred; Saris, Wim H M; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate whether glucose ingestion during prolonged exercise reduces whole body muscle glycogen oxidation, (2) to determine the extent to which glucose disappearing from the plasma is oxidized during exercise with and without carbohydrate ingestion and (3) to obtain an estimate of gluconeogenesis. After an overnight fast, six well-trained cyclists exercised on three occasions for 120 min on a bicycle ergometer at 50% maximum velocity of O2 uptake and ingested either water (Fast), or a 4% glucose solution (Lo-Glu) or a 22% glucose solution (Hi-Glu) during exercise. Dual tracer infusion of [U-13C]-glucose and [6,6-2H2]-glucose was given to measure the rate of appearance (Ra) of glucose, muscle glycogen oxidation, glucose carbon recycling, metabolic clearance rate (MCR) and non-oxidative disposal of glucose. Glucose ingestion markedly increased total Ra especially with Hi-Glu. After 120 min Ra and rate of disappearance (Rd) of glucose were 51-52 μmol kg−1 min−1 during Fast, 73-74 μmol kg−1 min−1 during Lo-Glu and 117–119 μmol kg−1 min−1 during Hi-Glu. The percentage of Rd oxidized was between 96 and 100% in all trials. Glycogen oxidation during exercise was not reduced by glucose ingestion. The vast majority of glucose disappearing from the plasma is oxidized and MCR increased markedly with glucose ingestion. Glucose carbon recycling was minimal suggesting that gluconeogenesis in these conditions is negligible. PMID:10050023

  16. Inadequate heat release from the human brain during prolonged exercise with hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Nybo, Lars; Secher, Niels H; Nielsen, Bodil

    2002-01-01

    Brain temperature appears to be an important factor affecting motor activity, but it is not known to what extent brain temperature increases during prolonged exercise in humans. Cerebral heat exchange was therefore evaluated in seven males during exercise with and without hyperthermia. Middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) was continuously monitored while global cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral energy turnover were determined at the end of the two exercise trials in three subjects. The arterial to venous temperature difference across the brain (v-aDtemp) was determined via thermocouples placed in the internal jugular vein and in the aorta. The jugular venous blood temperature was always higher than that of the arterial blood, demonstrating that heat was released via the CBF during the normothermic as well as the hyperthermic exercise condition. However, heat removal via the jugular venous blood was 30 ± 6 % lower during hyperthermia compared to the control trial. The reduced heat removal from the brain was mainly a result of a 20 ± 6 % lower CBF (22 ± 9 % reduction in MCA Vmean), because the v-aDtemp was not significantly different in the hyperthermic (0.20 ± 0.05 °C) compared to the control trial (0.22 ± 0.05 °C). During hyperthermia, the impaired heat removal via the blood was combined with a 7 ± 2 % higher heat production in the brain and heat was consequently stored in the brain at a rate of 0.20 ± 0.06 J g−1 min−1. The present results indicate that the average brain temperature is at least 0.2 °C higher than that of the body core during exercise with or without hyperthermia. PMID:12456844

  17. Muscle damage and immune responses to prolonged exercise in environmental extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Emad S

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of prolonged exercise with and without a thermal clamp on leukocyte cell, stress hormones, cytokine and muscle damage responses. Fifteen healthy male volunteers (means±SD: age 22±3 yr; mass 75.8±3.2 kg; maximal oxygen uptake 55±7 mL/min/kg) randomly completed four chamber trials of 1 hour each, in different environment and separated by 7 days. Trials were: 1) exercise induced heating (EX-heating [EX-H]: temperature/humidity, 38° C/50%); 2) exercise with a thermal clamp (EX-cooling [EX-C]: temperature/humidity, 18° C/50%); 3) passive heating (PA-H: temperature/ humidity, 38° C/50%); 4) passive cooling (PA-C: temperature/ humidity, 18° C/50%). EX-H and EX-C were composed of 1h treadmill runs at 80% individual anaerobic threshold (IAT). Blood samples were collected at pre-post, and 1h postenvironments exposure. Compared to EX-H, exercise-induced increases in core temperature, heart rate, cortisol, human growth hormone (hGH)), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), leukocyte counts and creatine kinase (CK) and Myoglobin (Mb) were significantly (P<0.01) more pronounced than in EX-C. These results suggest that the additional impact of elevated ambient temperatures on stress responses to endurance exercise in trained subjects seems to affect primarily the hormonal systems and resulting changes in leukocyte number, creatine kinase, Myoglobin and interleukine-6.

  18. Menstrual cycle phase effects free testosterone responses to prolonged aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Lane, A R; O'Leary, C B; Hackney, A C

    2015-09-01

    Research has shown that total testosterone (tT) levels in women increase acutely during a prolonged bout of aerobic exercise. Few studies, however, have considered the impact of the menstrual cycle phase on this response or have looked at the biologically active free testosterone (fT) form responses. Therefore, this study examined the fT concentration response independently and as a percentage (fT%) of tT to prolonged aerobic exercise during phases of the menstrual cycle with low estrogen-progesterone (L-EP; i.e., follicular phase) and high estrogen-progesterone (H-EP; i.e., luteal phase). Ten healthy, recreationally trained, eumennorrheic women (X ± SD: age = 20 ± 2 y, mass = 58.7 ± 8.3 kg, body fat = 22.3 ± 4.9 %, VO(2max) = 50.7 ± 9.0 ml/kg/min) participated in a laboratory based study and completed a 60-minute treadmill run during the L-EP and H-EP menstrual phases at ~70% of VO(2max). Blood was drawn prior to (PRE), immediately after (POST) and following 30 minutes of recovery (30POST) with each 60-minute run. During H-EP, there was a significant increase in fT concentrations from PRE to POST (p < 0.01) while in L-EP fT levels were unchanged; which resulted in fT being significantly higher at H-EP POST versus L-EP POST (p < 0.03). Area-under-the-curve (AUC) responses were calculated, for fT the total AUC was greater in H-EP than L-EP (p < 0.04). There was no significant interaction of fT% between phases and exercise sampling time. There was, however, a main effect for exercise where fT% POST was a greater proportion of tT than at PRE (p < 0.01). In summary, hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle impact fT response to a prolonged aerobic exercise bout; specifically, there being higher levels under H-EP conditions. This suggests more biologically active T is available during exercise in this phase. This response may be a function of the higher core temperatures found with H-EP causing greater sex hormone binding protein release of T, or could

  19. Effect of initial core temperature on hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged submaximal exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Bun; Honda, Yasushi; Fujii, Naoto; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether a core temperature threshold for hyperthermic hyperventilation is seen during prolonged submaximal exercise in the heat when core temperature before the exercise is reduced and whether the evoked hyperventilatory response is affected by altering the initial core temperature. Ten male subjects performed three exercise trials at 50% of peak oxygen uptake in the heat (37°C and 50% relative humidity) after altering their initial esophageal temperature (T(es)). Initial T(es) was manipulated by immersion for 25 min in water at 18°C (Precooling), 35°C (Control), or 40°C (Preheating). T(es) after the water immersion was significantly higher in the Preheating trial (37.5 ± 0.3°C) and lower in the Precooling trial (36.1 ± 0.3°C) than in the Control trial (36.9 ± 0.3°C). In the Precooling trial, minute ventilation (Ve) showed little change until T(es) reached 37.1 ± 0.4°C. Above this core temperature threshold, Ve increased linearly in proportion to increasing T(es). In the Control trial, Ve increased as T(es) increased from 37.0°C to 38.6°C after the onset of exercise. In the Preheating trial, Ve increased from the initially elevated levels of T(es) (from 37.6 to 38.6°C) and Ve. The sensitivity of Ve to increasing T(es) above the threshold for hyperventilation (the slope of the T(es)-Ve relation) did not significantly vary across trials (Precooling trial = 10.6 ± 5.9, Control trial = 8.7 ± 5.1, and Preheating trial = 9.2 ± 6.9 L·min(-1)·°C(-1)). These results suggest that during prolonged submaximal exercise at a constant workload in humans, there is a clear core temperature threshold for hyperthermic hyperventilation and that the evoked hyperventilatory response is unaffected by altering initial core temperature.

  20. Decreased compliance in the deep and superficial conduit veins of the upper arm during prolonged cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Oue, Anna; Sato, Kohei; Yoneya, Marina; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    2017-04-01

    We examined whether there is a difference in compliance between the deep and superficial conduit veins of the upper arm in response to prolonged exercise. Eight young men performed cycling exercise at 60% of peak oxygen uptake until rectal temperature had been increased by 1.1°C for 38-48 min. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the brachial (deep) and basilic (superficial) veins was assessed by ultrasound during a cuff deflation protocol. Compliance (CPL) was calculated as the numerical derivative of the cuff pressure and CSA curve. During prolonged exercise, CPL in both conduit veins was similarly decreased when compared with pre-exercise values; however, the CSA decreased in the deep vein but increased in the superficial vein. In addition, passive heating caused an analogous change in CSA and CPL of superficial vein when compared with prolonged exercise, but did not change CSA and CPL of deep vein. Cold pressor test induced the decreased CSA of deep and superficial veins without the alteration of CPL of both veins. These results suggest that CPL in the deep and superficial conduit veins adjusts to prolonged exercise via different mechanisms. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  1. Identification of cardiac repercussions after intense and prolonged concentric isokinetic exercise in young sedentary people.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Caroline; Kaux, Jean-François; Couffignal, Vincent; Coubard, Romain; Mélon, Pierre; Cavalier, Etienne; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-01

    Cardiopathies are the world's leading cause of mortality and morbidity. Although rare, cardiovascular accidents can occur during intense and infrequent sporting activity, particularly among those who are unaware of their heart condition. The development of cardiospecific biochemical markers has led to a reconsideration of the role of biology in the diagnosis of cardiovascular illnesses. The aim of this study therefore was, through the use of cardiac biomarker assays, to highlight the impact of sustained physical effort in the form of intense and prolonged concentric isokinetic exercise and to research potential cardiovascular risks. Eighteen subjects participated in a maximal concentric isokinetic exercise involving 30 knee flexion-extensions for each leg. Five blood tests were taken to study the kinetics of the cardiac biomarkers. Haemodynamic parameters were measured continuously using a Portapres, and respiratory parameters were measured using a Sensormedics Vmax 29C. The results showed significant increases in the creatine kinase, myoglobin, homocysteine and haemoglobin cardiac markers. Evolutionary trends were also observed for the following biomarkers: NT-proBNP, myeloperoxydase and C-reactive protein. All the physiological parameters measured presented statistically significant changes. Isokinetic effort leads to the release of cardiac markers in the blood, but these do not exceed the reference values in healthy subjects. Maximal concentric isokinetic exercise does not, therefore, lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular pathologies. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dietary selenium and prolonged exercise alter gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes in equine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    White, S H; Johnson, S E; Bobel, J M; Warren, L K

    2016-07-01

    Untrained Thoroughbred horses (6 mares and 6 geldings; 11 yr [SE 1] and 565 kg [SE 11]) were used to evaluate antioxidant gene expression and enzyme activity in blood and skeletal muscle in response to prolonged exercise after receiving 2 levels of dietary selenium for 36 d: 0.1 (CON; = 6) or 0.3 mg/kg DM (SEL; = 6). Horses were individually fed 1.6% BW coastal bermudagrass hay, 0.4% BW whole oats, and a mineral/vitamin premix containing no Se. Sodium selenite was added to achieve either 0.1 or 0.3 mg Se/kg DM in the total diet. On d 35, horses underwent 2 h of submaximal exercise in a free-stall exerciser. Blood samples were obtained before (d 0) and after 34 d of Se supplementation and on d 35 to 36 immediately after exercise and at 6 and 24 h after exercise. Biopsies of the middle gluteal muscle were obtained on d 0, before exercise on d 34, and at 6 and 24 h after exercise. Supplementation with Se above the NRC requirement (SEL) increased serum Se ( = 0.011) and muscle thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity ( = 0.051) but had no effect on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in plasma, red blood cell (RBC) lysate, or muscle in horses at rest. Serum creatine kinase activity increased ( < 0.0001) in response to prolonged exercise but was not affected by dietary treatment. Serum lipid hydroperoxides were affected by treatment ( = 0.052) and were higher ( = 0.012) in horses receiving CON than SEL immediately following exercise. Muscle expression of was unchanged at 6 h but increased ( = 0.005) 2.8-fold 24 h after exercise, whereas muscle TrxR activity remained unchanged. Glutathione peroxidase activity increased in plasma (P < 0.0001) and decreased in RBC lysate ( = 0.010) after prolonged exercise. A Se treatment × time interaction was observed for RBC GPx activity (P = 0.048). Muscle and expression and GPx activity did not change during the 24-h period after exercise. Level of dietary Se had no overall effect on expression of , , , , , , or in muscle following

  3. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki; Garcia, Benjamin; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2015-11-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined to baseline with progressive dehydration (P < 0.05). However, cerebral metabolism remained stable through enhanced O2 and glucose extraction (P < 0.05). External carotid artery flow increased for 1 h but declined before exhaustion. Fluid ingestion maintained cerebral and extracranial perfusion throughout nonfatiguing exercise. During exhaustive exercise, however, euhydration delayed but did not prevent the decline in cerebral perfusion. In conclusion, during prolonged exercise in the heat, dehydration accelerates the decline in CBF without affecting CMRO2 and also restricts extracranial perfusion. Thus, fatigue is related to a reduction in CBF and extracranial perfusion rather than CMRO2 .

  4. Acute and prolonged reduction in joint stiffness in humans after exhausting stretch-shortening cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Kuitunen, S; Avela, J; Kyröläinen, H; Nicol, C; Komi, P V

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute and long-term fatigue effects of exhausting stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) exercise on the stiffness of ankle and knee joints. Five subjects were fatigued on a sledge apparatus by 100 maximal rebound jumps followed by continuous submaximal jumping until complete exhaustion. Neuromuscular fatigue effects were examined in submaximal hopping (HOP) and in maximal drop jumps (DJ) from 35 (DJ35) and 55 cm (DJ55) heights on a force plate. Additional force and reflex measurements were made using an ankle ergometer. Jumping tests and ankle ergometer tests were carried out before, immediately after, 2 h (2H), 2 days and 7 days (7D) after the SSC exercise. Kinematics, force and electromyography (EMG) recordings were complemented with inverse dynamics, which was used to calculate joint moments. The quotient of changes in joint moment divided by changes in joint angle was used as a value of joint stiffness (JS). In addition, blood lactate concentrations and serum creatine kinase activities were determined. The exercise induced a clear decrease in knee joint stiffness by [mean (SD)] 29 (13)% (P < 0.05) in HOP, 31 (6)% (P < 0.05) in DJ35 and 34 (14)% (P < 0.05) in DJ55. A similar trend was observed in the ankle joint stiffness with significant post-exercise reductions of 22 (8)% (P < 0.05) in DJ35 and of 27 (19)% (P < 0.05) at 2H in DJ55. The subsequent recovery of JS was slow and in some cases incomplete still at 7D. Generally, all the EMG parameters were fully recovered by 2H, whereas the force recovery was still incomplete at this time. These data indicate that the immediate reduction in JS was probably related to the effects of both central (neural) and peripheral (metabolic) fatigue, whereas the prolonged impairment was probably due to peripheral fatigue (muscle damage).

  5. Prolonged self-paced exercise in the heat - environmental factors affecting performance.

    PubMed

    Junge, Nicklas; Jørgensen, Rasmus; Flouris, Andreas D; Nybo, Lars

    2016-01-01

    In this review we examine how self-paced performance is affected by environmental heat stress factors during cycling time trial performance as well as considering the effects of exercise mode and heat acclimatization. Mean power output during prolonged cycling time trials in the heat (≥30°C) was on average reduced by 15% in the 14 studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Ambient temperature per se was a poor predictor of the integrated environmental heat stress and 2 of the prevailing heat stress indices (WBGT and UTCI) failed to predict the environmental influence on performance. The weighing of wind speed appears to be too low for predicting the effect for cycling in trained acclimatized subjects, where performance may be maintained in outdoor time trials at ambient temperatures as high as 36°C (36°C UTCI; 28°C WBGT). Power output during indoor trials may also be maintained with temperatures up to at least 27°C when humidity is modest and wind speed matches the movement speed generated during outdoor cycling, whereas marked reductions are observed when air movement is minimal. For running, representing an exercise mode with lower movement speed and higher heat production for a given metabolic rate, it appears that endurance is affected even at much lower ambient temperatures. On this basis we conclude that environmental heat stress impacts self-paced endurance performance. However, the effect is markedly modified by acclimatization status and exercise mode, as the wind generated by the exercise (movement speed) or the environment (natural or fan air movement) exerts a strong influence.

  6. Prolonged self-paced exercise in the heat – environmental factors affecting performance

    PubMed Central

    Junge, Nicklas; Jørgensen, Rasmus; Flouris, Andreas D.; Nybo, Lars

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this review we examine how self-paced performance is affected by environmental heat stress factors during cycling time trial performance as well as considering the effects of exercise mode and heat acclimatization. Mean power output during prolonged cycling time trials in the heat (≥30°C) was on average reduced by 15% in the 14 studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Ambient temperature per se was a poor predictor of the integrated environmental heat stress and 2 of the prevailing heat stress indices (WBGT and UTCI) failed to predict the environmental influence on performance. The weighing of wind speed appears to be too low for predicting the effect for cycling in trained acclimatized subjects, where performance may be maintained in outdoor time trials at ambient temperatures as high as 36°C (36°C UTCI; 28°C WBGT). Power output during indoor trials may also be maintained with temperatures up to at least 27°C when humidity is modest and wind speed matches the movement speed generated during outdoor cycling, whereas marked reductions are observed when air movement is minimal. For running, representing an exercise mode with lower movement speed and higher heat production for a given metabolic rate, it appears that endurance is affected even at much lower ambient temperatures. On this basis we conclude that environmental heat stress impacts self-paced endurance performance. However, the effect is markedly modified by acclimatization status and exercise mode, as the wind generated by the exercise (movement speed) or the environment (natural or fan air movement) exerts a strong influence. PMID:28090557

  7. Comparison of water turnover rates in men undertaking prolonged cycling exercise and sedentary men.

    PubMed

    Leiper, J B; Pitsiladis, Y; Maughan, R J

    2001-04-01

    Total body water (TBW) and water turnover rates (WTR) of six competitive male cyclists (CG) and six age-matched sedentary men (SG) were determined using deuterium oxide dilution and elimination. During the 7 day study, individuals in the CG cycled daily outside on average 50 (range 12-146) km at an average speed of 29 km.h(-1), while the SG did no regular exercise. During the study, the weather was cool (10 [4-18]degrees C), mainly cloudy but dry. Daily average (median [range]) nude body mass remained essentially the same in the CG (77.25 [76.54-77.54] kg) and SG (65.04 [64.45-65.44] kg). Expressed as a percentage of body mass, median TBW of the CG (70.1 [65.5-73.9]%) was greater than that of the SG (63.5 [52.7-71.0]% ). Average median WTR was faster in the CG (47 [42-58] ml.kg.d(-1)) than the SG (36 [29-50] ml.kg.d(-1)). The average median daily urinary loss was similar in the CG (27 [22-33]ml.kg.d(-1)) and SG (29 [24-31]ml.kg.d(-1)). Calculated non-renal daily water loss was faster in the CG (19 [13-35] ml.kg.d(-1)) than the SG (6 [5-22] ml.kg.d(-1)), but there was no relationship between the average distance cycled daily and the WTR. This study demonstrates that WTR are faster in individuals undertaking prolonged exercise than in sedentary men, and that the difference was due to the almost three times greater non-renal water losses that the exercising group incurred. This suggests that exercise-induced increases in respiratory water loss and sweat rate are major factors in water loss even in cool environments.

  8. The effects of carbohydrate supplementation during repeated bouts of prolonged exercise on saliva flow rate and immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed

    Li, Tzai-Li; Gleeson, Michael

    2005-07-01

    ingestion during the first or second bout of exercise, but not during the recovery interval, is likely to better maintain plasma glucose concentrations and attenuate the responses of plasma stress hormones to a second exercise bout than ingestion of fluid alone. Two bouts of 90 min cycling at 60% VO2max on the same day appears to inhibit saliva flow rate during the second exercise bout but does not alter sIgA transcytosis. Our results show that carbohydrate ingestion during any period of two prolonged exercise bouts does not induce different effects on oral immunity compared with placebo.

  9. The Influence of Lower Extremity Lean Mass on Landing Biomechanics During Prolonged Exercise.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Melissa M; Tritsch, Amanda J; Cone, John R; Schmitz, Randy J; Henson, Robert A; Shultz, Sandra J

    2017-08-01

      The extent to which lower extremity lean mass (LELM) relative to total body mass influences one's ability to maintain safe landing biomechanics during prolonged exercise when injury incidence increases is unknown.   To examine the influence of LELM on (1) pre-exercise lower extremity biomechanics and (2) changes in biomechanics during an intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) and (3) determine whether these relationships differ by sex. We hypothesized that less LELM would predict higher-risk baseline biomechanics and greater changes toward higher-risk biomechanics during the IEP.   Cohort study.   Controlled laboratory.   A total of 59 athletes (30 men: age = 20.3 ± 2.0 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.05 m, mass = 75.2 ± 7.2 kg; 29 women: age = 20.6 ± 2.3 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.08 m, mass = 61.8 ± 9.0 kg) participated.   Before completing an individualized 90-minute IEP designed to mimic a soccer match, participants underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry testing for LELM.   Three-dimensional lower extremity biomechanics were measured during drop-jump landings before the IEP and every 15 minutes thereafter. A previously reported principal components analysis reduced 40 biomechanical variables to 11 factors. Hierarchical linear modeling analysis then determined the extent to which sex and LELM predicted the baseline score and the change in each factor over time.   Lower extremity lean mass did not influence baseline biomechanics or the changes over time. Sex influenced the biomechanical factor representing knee loading at baseline (P = .04) and the changes in the anterior cruciate ligament-loading factor over time (P = .03). The LELM had an additional influence only on women who possessed less LELM (P = .03 and .02, respectively).   Lower extremity lean mass influenced knee loading during landing in women but not in men. The effect appeared to be stronger in women with less LELM. Continually decreasing knee loading over time may reflect a

  10. Headaches precipitated by cough, prolonged exercise or sexual activity: a prospective etiological and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio; González-Mandly, Andrés; Martín, Rubén; Oterino, Agustín

    2008-10-01

    Headaches provoked by cough, prolonged physical exercise and sexual activity have not been studied prospectively, clinically and neuroradiologically. Our aim was to delimitate characteristics, etiology, response to treatment and neuroradiological diagnostic protocol of those patients who consult to a general Neurological Department because of provoked headache. Those patients who consulted due to provoked headaches between 1996 and 2006 were interviewed in depth and followed-up for at least 1 year. Neuroradiological protocol included cranio-cervical MRI for all patients with cough headache and dynamic cerebrospinal functional MRI in secondary cough headache cases. In patients with headache provoked by prolonged physical exercise or/and sexual activity cranial neuroimaging (CT and/or MRI) was performed and, in case of suspicion of subarachnoid bleeding, angioMRI and/or lumbar tap were carried out. A total of 6,412 patients consulted due to headache during the 10 years of the study. The number of patients who had consulted due to any of these headaches is 97 (1.5% of all headaches). Diagnostic distribution was as follows: 68 patients (70.1%) consulted due to cough headache, 11 (11.3%) due to exertional headache and 18 (18.6%) due to sexual headache. A total of 28 patients (41.2%) out of 68 were diagnosed of primary cough headache, while the remaining 40 (58.8%) had secondary cough headache, always due to structural lesions in the posterior fossa, which in most cases was a Chiari type I malformation. In seven patients, cough headache was precipitated by treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. As compared to the primary variety, secondary cough headache began earlier (average 40 vs. 60 years old), was located posteriorly, lasted longer (5 years vs. 11 months), was associated with posterior fossa symptoms/signs and did not respond to indomethacin. All those patients showed difficulties in the cerebrospinal fluid circulation in the foramen magnum region

  11. Effects of blood glucose concentration on ratings of perceived exertion during prolonged low-intensity physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Tabata, I; Kawakami, A

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relationship between blood glucose concentration and perceived exertion during prolonged low-intensity exercise. After a 12-h overnight fast, seven young healthy males began bicycle exercise from 0800 h at 50% Vo2max. One hour after initiation of the exercise, 20% glucose was infused by means of an infusion pump, to maintain blood glucose concentration at a level of approximately 6.5 mM for 20 min. This was followed by 20 min of sham infusion (no glucose). This 40-min cycle was repeated until 220 min of exercise. During the first 120 min of exercise, the ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) increased gradually without any effects of the glucose infusion. Thereafter, RPE tended to decrease during glucose infusion, and finally showed a significant decrease from 180 (17 +/- 2) to 190 (16 +/- 2) min. This result showed that an increase in blood glucose concentration has a significant effect on perceived exertion, even if exercise time is prolonged. The different responses of RPE during the two phases of the exercise may be explained by the difference of glycogen concentration in muscle, because glucose infusion had no effect on RPE when muscle glycogen content was presumed to be at normal level, and was effective when glycogen in the exercising muscles was presumed to be depleted.

  12. The effect of acute pre-exercise dark chocolate consumption on plasma antioxidant status, oxidative stress and immunoendocrine responses to prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Davison, Glen; Callister, Robin; Williamson, Gary; Cooper, Karen A; Gleeson, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Acute antioxidant supplementation may modulate oxidative stress and some immune perturbations that typically occur following prolonged exercise. The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of acutely consuming dark chocolate (high polyphenol content) on plasma antioxidant capacity, markers of oxidative stress and immunoendocrine responses to prolonged exercise. Fourteen healthy men cycled for 2.5 h at ~60% maximal oxygen uptake 2 h after consuming 100 g dark chocolate (DC), an isomacronutrient control bar (CC) or neither (BL) in a randomised-counterbalanced design. DC enhanced pre-exercise antioxidant status (P = 0.003) and reduced by trend (P = 0.088) 1 h post-exercise plasma free [F₂-isoprostane] compared with CC (also, [F₂-isoprostane] increased post-exercise in CC and BL but not DC trials). Plasma insulin concentration was significantly higher pre-exercise (P = 0.012) and 1 h post-exercise (P = 0.026) in the DC compared with the CC trial. There was a better maintenance of plasma glucose concentration on the DC trial (2-way ANOVA trial × time interaction P = 0.001), which decreased post-exercise in all trials but was significantly higher 1 h post-exercise (P = 0.039) in the DC trial. There were no between trial differences in the temporal responses (trial × time interactions all P > 0.05) of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress hormones, plasma interleukin-6, the magnitude of leukocytosis and neutrophilia and changes in neutrophil function. Acute DC consumption may affect insulin, glucose, antioxidant status and oxidative stress responses, but has minimal effects on immunoendocrine responses, to prolonged exercise.

  13. Effect of the Volume of Fluid Ingested on Urine Concentrating Ability During Prolonged Heavy Exercise in a Hot Environment

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Hidenori; Kaya, Mitsuharu; Tsujita, Junzo

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the volume of fluid ingested on urine concentrating ability during prolonged heavy exercise in a hot environment at low levels of dehydration. Seven healthy males performed 105 min of intermittent cycle exercise at 70% maximum oxygen uptake (32°C, 60% relative humidity) while receiving no fluid ingestion (NF), voluntary fluid ingestion (VF), partial fluid ingestion equivalent to one-half of body mass loss (PF), and full fluid ingestion equivalent to body mass loss (FF). Fluid (5°C, 3.4% carbohydrate, 10.5 mmol·L-1 sodium) was ingested just before commencing exercise and at 15, 33, 51, 69, and 87 min of exercise, and the total amount of fluid ingested in PF and FF was divided into six equal volumes. During exercise, body mass loss was 2.2 ± 0.2, 1.1 ± 0.5, 1.1 ± 0.2, and 0.1 ± 0.2% in NF, VF, PF, and FF, respectively, whereas total sweat loss was about 2% of body mass in each trial. Subjects in VF ingested 719 ± 240 ml of fluid during exercise; the volume of fluid ingested was 1.1 ± 0.4% of body mass. Creatinine clearance was significantly higher and free water clearance was significantly lower in FF than in NF during exercise. Urine flow rate during exercise decreased significantly in NF. There were significant decreases in creatinine and osmolar clearance and was a significant increase in free water clearance during exercise in NF and VF. Creatinine clearance decreased significantly and free water clearance increased significantly during exercise in PF. There was no statistical change in urinary indices of renal function during exercise in FF. The findings suggest that full fluid ingestion equivalent to body mass loss has attenuated the decline in urine concentrating ability during prolonged heavy exercise in a hot environment at low levels of dehydration. Key points During prolonged heavy exercise in a hot environment at low levels of dehydration, fluid ingestion equivalent to body mass loss results in no changes in

  14. Lower- extremity biomechanics and maintenance of vertical-jump height during prolonged intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Randy J; Cone, John C; Copple, Timothy J; Henson, Robert A; Shultz, Sandra J

    2014-11-01

    Potential biomechanical compensations allowing for maintenance of maximal explosive performance during prolonged intermittent exercise, with respect to the corresponding rise in injury rates during the later stages of exercise or competition, are relatively unknown. To identify lower-extremity countermovement-jump (CMJ) biomechanical factors using a principal-components approach and then examine how these factors changed during a 90-min intermittent-exercise protocol (IEP) while maintaining maximal jump height. Mixed-model design. Laboratory. Fifty-nine intermittent-sport athletes (30 male, 29 female) participated in experimental and control conditions. Before and after a dynamic warm-up and every 15 min during the 1st and 2nd halves of an individually prescribed 90-min IEP, participants were assessed on rating of perceived exertion, sprint/cut speed, and 3-dimensional CMJ biomechanics (experimental). On a separate day, the same measures were obtained every 15 min during 90 min of quiet rest (control). Univariate piecewise growth models analyzed progressive changes in CMJ performance and biomechanical factors extracted from a principal-components analysis of the individual biomechanical dependent variables. While CMJ height was maintained during the 1st and 2nd halves, the body descended less and knee kinetic and energetic magnitudes decreased as the IEP progressed. The results indicate that vertical-jump performance is maintained along with progressive biomechanical changes commonly associated with decreased performance. A better understanding of lower-extremity biomechanics during explosive actions in response to IEP allows us to further develop and individualize performance training programs.

  15. Cardiovascular drift in trained paraplegic and able-bodied individuals during prolonged wheelchair exercise: effect of fluid replacement.

    PubMed

    Zacharakis, Emmanouil D; Kounalakis, Stylianos N; Nassis, George P; Geladas, Nickos D

    2013-04-01

    The progressive heart rate (HR) increase and stroke volume (SV) decline during prolonged constant-load leg exercise signifies cardiovascular drift (CVdrift); fluid replacement is known to minimize this phenomenon. Like their able-bodied counterparts (AB), paraplegic athletes undergo prolonged exercise during training and competition, which could result in CVdrift. The aim of this study is to address the role of rehydration on preventing CVdrift in spinal cord injured (SCI) paraplegic athletes. Eight SCI athletes with an injury level between C7 and T6 and 9 AB subjects performed 60-min constant-load exercise on a wheelchair ergometer in a thermo-neutral environment. No fluid was taken in 1 trial, whereas 85% of sweat losses were replaced by drinking water in another trial. Cardic output (CO), SV, HR, and oral temperature (Tor) were determined during exercise. Prolonged exercise resulted in similar HR (18 beats·min(-1) for AB and 12 beats·min(-1) for SCI) and Tor (0.63 °C for AB and 0.71 °C for SCI) elevation and SV decline (-8.5 mL·beat(-1) for AB and -5.5 mL·beat(-1) for SCI), whereas CO remained unchanged. Water intake restrained the exercise-induced hyperthermia and resulted in smaller SV decline (-4.0 mL for AB and -3.0 mL for SCI, p < 0.01). In conclusion, CVdrift was similar in SCI and AB subjects during prolonged wheelchair exercise. Likewise, the beneficial effects of hydration in both groups were analogous.

  16. A transient elevated irisin blood concentration in response to prolonged, moderate aerobic exercise in young men and women.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, R R; Shockett, P; Webb, N D; Shah, U; Castracane, V D

    2014-02-01

    Irisin, a newly discovered, PGC-1α dependent myokine, has recently been shown to increase in circulation in response to sprint exercise. This study examined the effect of prolonged exercise on irisin concentrations in young men (n=7) as well as in young women (n=5) during different stages of the menstrual cycle. Seven young men completed 90 min of treadmill exercise at 60% of VO2max and a resting control trial. Five women completed the same exercise protocol in two different trials: during the early follicular phase and mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Blood samples were collected and analyzed for irisin concentrations immediately before exercise, at 54 and 90 min of exercise, and at 20 min of recovery (R20). Findings revealed that by 54 min of a 90 min treadmill exercise protocol at 60% of VO2max, irisin concentrations significantly increased 20.4% in young men and 20.3% as well as 24.6% in young women during the early follicular and mid-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, respectively. However, by 90 min of exercise as well as R20, irisin concentrations were no longer elevated. Stage of the menstrual cycle did not affect responses in young women. Findings indicate that prolonged aerobic exercise produces a transient increase in irisin concentrations during the first hour of exercise for both genders and suggest that this form of moderate exercise may be helpful in improving fat metabolism.

  17. Treadmill Exercise Within LBNP as an Integrated Coutermeasure to Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart; Hargens, A. R.; Schneider, S. M.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    2010-01-01

    An integrated exercise countermeasure for microgravity is needed to protect multiple physiologic systems and save crew time. Such a countermeasure should protect orthostatic tolerance, upright ambulatory capability (including sprinting), aerobic capacity, muscle strength/endurance, and other physiologic parameters relevant to human performance. We developed a novel physiologic countermeasure, treadmill exercise within LBNP, for preventing cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning associated with prolonged bed rest and spaceflight. We evaluated 40 min of daily LBNP treadmill exercise by a battery of physiologic parameters relevant to maintaining exercise performance and health of both women and men during bed-rest (simulated microgravity) studies lasting from 5 to 60 days. For 30 day studies, we employed identical twins with one twin as the control and the other twin as the exerciser to improve comparative power. During the WISE 60-day HDT study, the treadmill exercise within LBNP was performed 3-4 days each week and resistive exercise was performed 2-3 days each week. Our treadmill within LBNP protocol maintained plasma volume and sprint speed (30 day HDT bed-rest studies of identical twins), orthostatic tolerance to a degree, upright exercise capacity, muscle strength and endurance, and some bone parameters during 30 day (twin studies) and 60 day (WISE-2005) bed-rest simulations of microgravity. When combining treadmill exercise within LBNP and resistive exercise (WISE), cardiac mass increased significantly in the exercise (EX) group during bed rest relative to controls (CON). Upright peak VO2, and knee extensor strength and endurance decreased significantly in CON subjects; but these parameters were preserved in the EX group. In the 60 day WISE study, each LBNP exercise session was followed immediately by 10 minutes of static LBNP, and the last such session occurred three days before the end of bed rest. Still, orthostatic tolerance was better maintained

  18. Treadmill Exercise Within LBNP as an Integrated Coutermeasure to Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart; Hargens, A. R.; Schneider, S. M.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    2010-01-01

    An integrated exercise countermeasure for microgravity is needed to protect multiple physiologic systems and save crew time. Such a countermeasure should protect orthostatic tolerance, upright ambulatory capability (including sprinting), aerobic capacity, muscle strength/endurance, and other physiologic parameters relevant to human performance. We developed a novel physiologic countermeasure, treadmill exercise within LBNP, for preventing cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning associated with prolonged bed rest and spaceflight. We evaluated 40 min of daily LBNP treadmill exercise by a battery of physiologic parameters relevant to maintaining exercise performance and health of both women and men during bed-rest (simulated microgravity) studies lasting from 5 to 60 days. For 30 day studies, we employed identical twins with one twin as the control and the other twin as the exerciser to improve comparative power. During the WISE 60-day HDT study, the treadmill exercise within LBNP was performed 3-4 days each week and resistive exercise was performed 2-3 days each week. Our treadmill within LBNP protocol maintained plasma volume and sprint speed (30 day HDT bed-rest studies of identical twins), orthostatic tolerance to a degree, upright exercise capacity, muscle strength and endurance, and some bone parameters during 30 day (twin studies) and 60 day (WISE-2005) bed-rest simulations of microgravity. When combining treadmill exercise within LBNP and resistive exercise (WISE), cardiac mass increased significantly in the exercise (EX) group during bed rest relative to controls (CON). Upright peak VO2, and knee extensor strength and endurance decreased significantly in CON subjects; but these parameters were preserved in the EX group. In the 60 day WISE study, each LBNP exercise session was followed immediately by 10 minutes of static LBNP, and the last such session occurred three days before the end of bed rest. Still, orthostatic tolerance was better maintained

  19. Metabolic stress-like condition can be induced by prolonged strenuous exercise in athletes.

    PubMed

    Branth, Stefan; Hambraeus, Leif; Piehl-Aulin, Karin; Essén-Gustavsson, Birgitta; Akerfeldt, Torbjörn; Olsson, Roger; Stridsberg, Mats; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined energy metabolism during prolonged, strenuous exercise. We wanted therefore to investigate energy metabolic consequences of a prolonged period of continuous strenuous work with very high energy expenditure. Twelve endurance-trained athletes (6 males and 6 females) were recruited. They performed a 7-h bike race on high work-load intensity. Physiological, biochemical, endocrinological, and anthropometric muscular compartment variables were monitored before, during, and after the race. The energy expenditure was high, being 5557 kcal. Work-load intensity (% of VO(2) peak) was higher in females (77.7%) than in men (69.9%). Muscular glycogen utilization was pronounced, especially in type I fibres (>90%). Additionally, muscular triglyceride lipolysis was considerably accelerated. Plasma glucose levels were increased concomitantly with an unchanged serum insulin concentration which might reflect an insulin resistance state in addition to proteolytic glyconeogenesis. Increased reactive oxygen species (malondialdehyde (MDA)) were additional signs of metabolic stress. MDA levels correlated with glycogen utilization rate. A relative deficiency of energy substrate on a cellular level was indicated by increased intracellular water of the leg muscle concomitantly with increased extracellular levels of the osmoregulatory amino acid taurine. A kindred nature of a presumed insulin-resistant state with less intracellular availability of glucose for erythrocytes was also indicated by the findings of decreased MCV together with increased MCHC (haemoconcentration) after the race. This strenuous energy-demanding work created a metabolic stress-like condition including signs of insulin resistance and deteriorated intracellular glucose availability leading to compromised fuelling of ion pumps, culminating in a disturbed cellular osmoregulation indicated by taurine efflux and cellular swelling.

  20. Effects of eccentric exercise on optimum length of the knee flexors and extensors during the preseason in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Brughelli, Matt; Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Nosaka, Ken; Idoate, Fernando; Arcos, Asier Los; Cronin, John

    2010-05-01

    To assess the effects of eccentric exercise on optimum lengths of the knee flexors and extensors during the preseason in professional soccer. Twenty-eight athletes from a professional Spanish soccer team (Division II) were randomly assigned to an eccentric exercise intervention group (EG) or a control group (CG). Over the four-week period two athletes from the control group suffered RF injuries and two athletes were contracted by other clubs. After these exclusions, both groups (EG, n=13; and CG, n=11) performed regular soccer training during the four-week preseason period. After the four weeks, the optimum lengths of the knee flexors were significantly (P<0.05) increased by 2.3 degrees in the CG and by 4.0 degrees in the EG. The change in the EG was significantly (P<0.05) greater than that of the CG. The optimum lengths of the knee extensors were significantly increased only in the EG by 6.5 degrees . Peak torque levels and ratios of quadriceps to hamstring (Q/H ratios) were not significantly altered throughout the study for either group. Eccentric exercise can increase the optimum lengths of both the knee extensors and knee extensors flexors during the preseason in professional soccer.

  1. Influence of statins on distinct circulating microRNAs during prolonged aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Min, Pil-Ki; Park, Joseph; Isaacs, Stephanie; Taylor, Beth A.; Thompson, Paul D.; Troyanos, Chris; D'Hemecourt, Pierre; Dyer, Sophia; Baggish, Aaron L.

    2015-01-01

    Statins exacerbate exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury. Muscle-specific microRNAs (myomiRs) increase in plasma after prolonged exercise, but the patterns of myomiRs release after statin-associated muscle injury have not been examined. We examined the relationships between statin exposure, in vitro and in vivo muscle contraction, and expression of candidate circulating myomiRs. We measured plasma levels of myomiRs, circulating microRNA-1 (c-miR-1), c-miR-133a, c-miR-206, and c-miR-499-5p from 28 statin-using and 28 nonstatin-using runners before (PRE), immediately after (FINISH), and 24 h after they ran a 42-km footrace (the 2011 Boston marathon) (POST-24). To examine these cellular-regulation myomiRs, we used contracting mouse C2C12 myotubes in culture with and without statin exposure to compare intracellular and extracellular expression of these molecules. In marathoners, c-miR-1, c-miR-133a, and c-miR-206 increased at FINISH, returned to baseline at POST-24, and were unaffected by statin use. In contrast, c-miR-499-5p was unchanged at FINISH but increased at POST-24 among statin users compared with PRE and runners who did not take statins. In cultured C2C12 myotubes, extracellular c-miR-1, c-miR-133a, and c-miR-206 were significantly increased by muscle contraction regardless of statin use. In contrast, extracellular miR-499-5p was unaffected by either isolated statin exposure or isolated carbachol exposure but it was increased when muscle contraction was combined with statin exposure. In summary, we found that statin-potentiated muscle injury during exercise is accompanied by augmented extracellular release of miR-499-5p. Thus c-miR-499-5p may serve as a biomarker of statin-potentiated muscle damage. PMID:26472872

  2. Influence of statins on distinct circulating microRNAs during prolonged aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Min, Pil-Ki; Park, Joseph; Isaacs, Stephanie; Taylor, Beth A; Thompson, Paul D; Troyanos, Chris; D'Hemecourt, Pierre; Dyer, Sophia; Chan, Stephen Y; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-03-15

    Statins exacerbate exercise-induced skeletal muscle injury. Muscle-specific microRNAs (myomiRs) increase in plasma after prolonged exercise, but the patterns of myomiRs release after statin-associated muscle injury have not been examined. We examined the relationships between statin exposure, in vitro and in vivo muscle contraction, and expression of candidate circulating myomiRs. We measured plasma levels of myomiRs, circulating microRNA-1 (c-miR-1), c-miR-133a, c-miR-206, and c-miR-499-5p from 28 statin-using and 28 nonstatin-using runners before (PRE), immediately after (FINISH), and 24 h after they ran a 42-km footrace (the 2011 Boston marathon) (POST-24). To examine these cellular-regulation myomiRs, we used contracting mouse C2C12 myotubes in culture with and without statin exposure to compare intracellular and extracellular expression of these molecules. In marathoners, c-miR-1, c-miR-133a, and c-miR-206 increased at FINISH, returned to baseline at POST-24, and were unaffected by statin use. In contrast, c-miR-499-5p was unchanged at FINISH but increased at POST-24 among statin users compared with PRE and runners who did not take statins. In cultured C2C12 myotubes, extracellular c-miR-1, c-miR-133a, and c-miR-206 were significantly increased by muscle contraction regardless of statin use. In contrast, extracellular miR-499-5p was unaffected by either isolated statin exposure or isolated carbachol exposure but it was increased when muscle contraction was combined with statin exposure. In summary, we found that statin-potentiated muscle injury during exercise is accompanied by augmented extracellular release of miR-499-5p. Thus c-miR-499-5p may serve as a biomarker of statin-potentiated muscle damage.

  3. Changes in Fatigue, Multiplanar Knee Laxity, and Landing Biomechanics During Intermittent Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sandra J.; Schmitz, Randy J.; Cone, John R.; Henson, Robert A.; Montgomery, Melissa M.; Pye, Michele L.; Tritsch, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Knee laxity increases during exercise. However, no one, to our knowledge, has examined whether these increases contribute to higher-risk landing biomechanics during prolonged, fatiguing exercise. Objectives: To examine associations between changes in fatigue (measured as sprint time [SPTIME]), multiplanar knee laxity (anterior-posterior [APLAX], varus-valgus [VVLAX] knee laxity, and internal-external rotation [IERLAX]) knee laxity and landing biomechanics during prolonged, intermittent exercise. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Laboratory and gymnasium. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 30 male (age = 20.3 ± 2.0 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.05 m, mass = 75.2 ± 7.2 kg) and 29 female (age = 20.5 ± 2.3 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.08 m, mass = 61.8 ± 9.0 kg) competitive athletes. Intervention(s): A 90-minute intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) designed to simulate the physiologic and biomechanical demands of a soccer match. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured SPTIME, APLAX, and landing biomechanics before and after warm-up, every 15 minutes during the IEP, and every 15 minutes for 1 hour after the IEP. We measured VVLAX and IERLAX before and after the warm-up, at 45 and 90 minutes during the IEP, and at 30 minutes after the IEP. We used hierarchical linear modeling to examine associations between exercise-related changes in SPTIME and knee laxity with exercise-related changes in landing biomechanics while controlling for initial (before warm-up) knee laxity. Results: We found that SPTIME had a more global effect on landing biomechanics in women than in men, resulting in a more upright landing and a reduction in landing forces and out-of-plane motions about the knee. As APLAX increased with exercise, women increased their knee internal-rotation motion (P = .02), and men increased their hip-flexion motion and energy-absorption (P = .006) and knee-extensor loads (P = .04). As VVLAX and IERLAX increased, women went through greater knee

  4. Changes in fatigue, multiplanar knee laxity, and landing biomechanics during intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandra J; Schmitz, Randy J; Cone, John R; Henson, Robert A; Montgomery, Melissa M; Pye, Michele L; Tritsch, Amanda J

    2015-05-01

    Knee laxity increases during exercise. However, no one, to our knowledge, has examined whether these increases contribute to higher-risk landing biomechanics during prolonged, fatiguing exercise. To examine associations between changes in fatigue (measured as sprint time [SPTIME]), multiplanar knee laxity (anterior-posterior [APLAX], varus-valgus [VVLAX] knee laxity, and internal-external rotation [IERLAX]) knee laxity and landing biomechanics during prolonged, intermittent exercise. Descriptive laboratory study. Laboratory and gymnasium. A total of 30 male (age = 20.3 ± 2.0 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.05 m, mass = 75.2 ± 7.2 kg) and 29 female (age = 20.5 ± 2.3 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.08 m, mass = 61.8 ± 9.0 kg) competitive athletes. A 90-minute intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) designed to simulate the physiologic and biomechanical demands of a soccer match. We measured SPTIME, APLAX, and landing biomechanics before and after warm-up, every 15 minutes during the IEP, and every 15 minutes for 1 hour after the IEP. We measured VVLAX and IERLAX before and after the warm-up, at 45 and 90 minutes during the IEP, and at 30 minutes after the IEP. We used hierarchical linear modeling to examine associations between exercise-related changes in SPTIME and knee laxity with exercise-related changes in landing biomechanics while controlling for initial (before warm-up) knee laxity. We found that SPTIME had a more global effect on landing biomechanics in women than in men, resulting in a more upright landing and a reduction in landing forces and out-of-plane motions about the knee. As APLAX increased with exercise, women increased their knee internal-rotation motion (P = .02), and men increased their hip-flexion motion and energy-absorption (P = .006) and knee-extensor loads (P = .04). As VVLAX and IERLAX increased, women went through greater knee-valgus motion and dorsiflexion and absorbed more energy at the knee (P ≤ .05), whereas men were positioned in greater hip

  5. INCREASES IN CORE TEMPERATURE COUNTERBALANCE EFFECTS OF HEMOCONCENTRATION ON BLOOD VISCOSITY DURING PROLONGED EXERCISE IN THE HEAT

    PubMed Central

    Buono, Michael J.; Krippes, Taylor; Kolkhorst, Fred W.; Williams, Alexander T.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that blood viscosity is significantly increased following exercise. However, these studies measured both pre- and post-exercise blood viscosity at 37 °C even though core and blood temperatures would be expected to have increased during the exercise. Consequently, the effect of exercise-induced hyperthermia on mitigating change in blood viscosity may have been missed. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of exercise-induced hemoconcentration and hyperthermia, as well as determine their combined effects, on blood viscosity. Nine subjects performed 2 h of moderate-intensity exercise in the heat (37 °C, 40% rH), which resulted in significant increases from pre-exercise values for rectal temperature (37.11 ± 0.35 °C to 38.76 ± 0.13 °C), hemoconcentration (hematocrit = 43.6 ± 3.6% to 45.6 ± 3.5%), and dehydration (Δbody weight = −3.6 ± 0.7%). Exercise-induced hemoconcentration significantly (P < 0.05) increased blood viscosity by 9% (3.97 to 4.30 cP at 300 s−1) while exercise-induced hyperthermia significantly decreased blood viscosity by 7% (3.97 to 3.70 cP at 300 s−1). However, when both factors were considered together, there was no overall change in blood viscosity (3.97 to 4.03 cP at 300 s−1). The effects of exercise-induced hemoconcentration, increased plasma viscosity, and increased red blood cell aggregation, all of which increased blood viscosity, were counterbalanced by increased RBC deformability (e.g., RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and elongation index) caused by the hyperthermia. Thus, blood viscosity remained unchanged following prolonged moderate-intensity exercise in the heat. PMID:26682653

  6. An acute oral dose of caffeine does not alter glucose kinetics during prolonged dynamic exercise in trained endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Roy, B D; Bosman, M J; Tarnopolsky, M A

    2001-08-01

    This study investigated the possible influence of oral caffeine administration on endogenous glucose production and energy substrate metabolism during prolonged endurance exercise. Twelve trained endurance athletes [seven male, five female; peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) = 65.5 ml.kg-1.min-1] performed 60 min of cycle ergometry at 65% VO2peak twice, once after oral caffeine administration (6 mg.kg-1) (CAF) and once following consumption of a placebo (PLA). CAF and PLA were administered in a randomized double-blind manner 75 min prior to exercise. Plasma glucose kinetics were determined with a primed-continuous infusion of [6,6-2H]glucose. No differences in oxygen consumption (VO2), and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) were observed between CAF and PLA, at rest or during exercise. Blood glucose concentrations were similar between the two conditions at rest and also during exercise. Exercise did lead to an increase in serum free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations for both conditions; however, no differences were observed between CAF and PLA. Both the plasma glucose rate of appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd) increased at the onset of exercise (P < 0.05), but were not affected by CAF, as compared to PLA. CAF did lead to a higher plasma lactate concentration during exercise (P < 0.05). It was concluded that an acute oral dose of caffeine does not influence plasma glucose kinetics or energy substrate oxidation during prolonged exercise in trained endurance athletes. However, CAF did lead to elevated plasma lactate concentrations. The exact mechanism of the increase in plasma lactate concentrations remains to be determined.

  7. Yerba Maté (Ilex paraguariensis) Metabolic, Satiety, and Mood State Effects at Rest and during Prolonged Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, Ahmad; Atcheson, Roisin

    2017-01-01

    Yerba Maté (YM), has become a popular herb ingested for enhancing metabolic health and weight-loss outcomes. No studies have tested the combined metabolic, satiety, and psychomotor effects of YM during exercise. We tested whether YM ingestion affects fatty acid oxidation (FAO), profile of mood state score (POMS), and subjective appetite scale (VAS), during prolonged moderate exercise. Twelve healthy active females were randomized to ingest either 2 g of YM or placebo (PLC) in a repeated-measures design. Participants rested for 120 min before performing a 30-min cycling exercise corresponding to individuals’ crossover point intensity (COP). FAO, determined using indirect calorimetry, was significantly higher during the 30-min exercise in YM vs. PLC (0.21 ± 0.07 vs. 0.17 ± 0.06 g/min, p < 0.05). VAS scores for hunger, prospective eating, and desire to eat were all reduced (p < 0.05). Whereas, POMS measures of focus, energy, and concentration were all increased (p < 0.05). There was no significant time-effect for any of the measured variables, nor was there any interaction effects between YM treatment and time. Combining YM intake with prolonged exercise at targeted ”fat-loss”’ intensities augments FAO and improves measures of satiety and mood state. Such positive combined metabolic, satiety, and psychomotor effects may provide an important role for designing future fat and weight-loss lifestyle interventions. PMID:28809814

  8. T-regulatory cells exhibit a biphasic response to prolonged endurance exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Tom; Wood, Matthew J; Stocks, Philip; Howatson, Glyn; Stevenson, Emma J; Hilkens, Catharien M U

    2017-08-01

    T-regulatory cells (Tregs) are a sub-population of lymphocytes that act to suppress aberrant immune responses. We investigated changes in the numbers of naïve and terminally differentiated Tregs in the peripheral blood to establish their role in the immuno-suppressive response to prolonged exercise. Blood was drawn from seventeen experienced runners (age 40 ± 12 years; height 1.75 ± 0.08 m; mass 71.4 ± 10.8 kg) before, ~1 h after (POST-1h), and on the day following the marathon (POST-1d). Tregs (CD3(+)CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD25(++)CD127(-)) were analysed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells using flow cytometry. The markers CD45RA and HLA-DR were included to define naïve and terminally differentiated Tregs, respectively. The absolute number of Tregs decreased (27%) POST-1h marathon (P < 0.001) but increased (21%) at POST-1d (P < 0.01). Naïve CD45RA(+) Tregs fell by 39% POST-1h (P < 0.01) but were unaffected POST-1d (P > 0.05). In contrast, an increased number of Tregs expressing HLA-DR was observed at POST-1d (P < 0.01). Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 levels in the serum all increased POST-1h (P > 0.05) but returned to pre-exercise levels POST-1d. The suppressive cytokine, transforming growth factor-beta, was unaffected by the marathon (P > 0.05). These results suggest that Tregs do not play a major role in immune suppression in the early hours of recovery from a marathon. However, terminally differentiated HLA-DR(+) Tregs are mobilized the following day, which could represent a compensatory attempt by the host to restore immune homeostasis and limit excessive cell damage.

  9. The effects of whole-body compression garments on prolonged high-intensity intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Sear, Joshua A; Hoare, Trent K; Scanlan, Aaron T; Abt, Grant A; Dascombe, Benjamin J

    2010-07-01

    The current study investigated the effects of wearing whole-body compression garments (WBCGs) on prolonged high-intensity intermittent exercise (PHIIE) performance. Eight male team-sport athletes ([X +/- SD] 20.6 +/- 1.2 years; 72.9 +/- 5.9 kg; 57.5 +/- 3.7 ml.kg.min) completed a prescribed 45-minute PHIIE protocol on a nonmotorized treadmill in randomly assigned WBCG and control (typical soccer apparel) conditions. Subjects were given verbal and visual cues for movement categories, and they followed set target speeds, except when instructed of a variable run or sprint where the aim was to run as fast as possible. Total distance, velocity-specific distance, and high-intensity self-paced running speeds were taken as performance indicators. Heart rate, VO(2), tissue oxygenation index (TOI), and tissue hemoglobin index (nTHi) were continuously monitored across the protocol. Blood-lactate concentration ([BLa(-)]) was measured every 15 minutes. Magnitude-based inferences suggested that wearing WBCGs provided moderate strength likely improvements in total distance covered (5.42 +/- 0.63 vs. 5.88 +/- 0.64 km; 88:10:2%; and eta = 0.6) and low-intensity activity distance (4.21 +/- 0.51 vs. 4.56 +/- 0.57 km; 83:14:3%; and eta = 0.6) compared with the control. A similar likely increase was also observed in the average TOI of the WBCG condition (53.5 +/- 8.3% vs. 55.8 +/- 7.2%; 87:11:2%; and eta = 0.6). The current data demonstrated that wearing WBCGs likely increased physical performance, possibly because of improvements in muscle oxygenation and associated metabolic benefits. Therefore, wearing WBCGs during PHIIE may benefit the physical performance of team-sport athletes by likely metabolic changes within the muscle between high-intensity efforts.

  10. Effect of a moderate caffeine dose on endurance cycle performance and thermoregulation during prolonged exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Ross E; James, Lewis J

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of a moderate caffeine dose on endurance cycle performance and thermoregulation during prolonged exercise in high ambient temperature. Double-blind cross-over study. Eight healthy, recreationally active males (mean±SD; age: 22±1 years; body mass: 71.1±8.5kg; VO2peak: 55.9±5.8mLkg(-1)min(-1); Wmax: 318±37W) completed one VO2peak test, one familiarisation trial and two experimental trials. After an overnight fast, participants ingested a placebo or a 6mgkg(-1) caffeine dose 60min before exercise. The exercise protocol consisted of 60min of cycle exercise at 55% Wmax, followed by a 30min performance task (total kJ produced) in 30°C and 50% RH. Performance was enhanced (Cohen's d effect size=0.22) in the caffeine trial (363.8±47.6kJ) compared with placebo (353.0±49.0kJ; p=0.004). Caffeine did not influence core (p=0.188) or skin temperature (p=0.577) during exercise. Circulating prolactin (p=0.572), cortisol (p=0.842) and the estimated rates of fat (p=0.722) and carbohydrate oxidation (p=0.454) were also similar between trial conditions. Caffeine attenuated perceived exertion during the initial 60min of exercise (p=0.033), with no difference in thermal stress across trials (p=0.911). Supplementation with 6mgkg(-1) caffeine improved endurance cycle performance in a warm environment, without differentially influencing thermoregulation during prolonged exercise at a fixed work-rate versus placebo. Therefore, moderate caffeine doses which typically enhance performance in temperate environmental conditions also appear to benefit endurance performance in the heat. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Countermeasures against lumbar spine deconditioning in prolonged bed rest: resistive exercise with and without whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Belavý, Daniel L; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Gast, Ulf; Richardson, Carolyn A; Hides, Julie A; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of short-duration, high-load resistive exercise, with and without whole body vibration on lumbar muscle size, intervertebral disk and spinal morphology changes, and low back pain (LBP) incidence during prolonged bed rest, 24 subjects underwent 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest and performed either resistive vibration exercise (n = 7), resistive exercise only (n = 8), or no exercise (n = 9; 2nd Berlin Bed-Rest Study). Discal and spinal shape was measured from sagittal plane magnetic resonance images. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the multifidus, erector spinae, quadratus lumborum, and psoas were measured on para-axial magnetic resonance images. LBP incidence was assessed with questionnaires at regular intervals. The countermeasures reduced CSA loss in the multifidus, lumbar erector spinae and quadratus lumborum muscles, with greater increases in psoas muscle CSA seen in the countermeasure groups (P ≤ 0.004). There was little statistical evidence for an additional effect of whole body vibration above resistive exercise alone on these muscle changes. Exercise subjects reported LBP more frequently in the first week of bed rest, but this was only significant in resistive exercise only (P = 0.011 vs. control, resistive vibration exercise vs. control: P = 0.56). No effect of the countermeasures on changes in spinal morphology was seen (P ≥ 0.22). The results suggest that high-load resistive exercise, with or without whole body vibration, performed 3 days/wk can reduce lumbar muscle atrophy, but further countermeasure optimization is required.

  12. Exercise performance, core temperature, and metabolism after prolonged restricted activity and retraining in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Pohoska, E.; Turlejska, E.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Kozlowski, S.

    1992-01-01

    Physiological effects of restricted activity (RA) and subsequent retraining have been studied. Ten male mongrel dogs performed a submaximal exercise endurance test on a treadmill during kennel control, after 8 weeks of cage confinement and after eight weeks of retraining using the same treadmill protocol 1 h/d for 6 d/week. Data obtained show that RA reduces exercise endurance, the effectiveness of exercise thermoregulation, muscle glycogen stores, and the lipolytic response to exercise and to noradrenaline stimulation.

  13. Exercise performance, core temperature, and metabolism after prolonged restricted activity and retraining in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Pohoska, E.; Turlejska, E.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Kozlowski, S.

    1992-01-01

    Physiological effects of restricted activity (RA) and subsequent retraining have been studied. Ten male mongrel dogs performed a submaximal exercise endurance test on a treadmill during kennel control, after 8 weeks of cage confinement and after eight weeks of retraining using the same treadmill protocol 1 h/d for 6 d/week. Data obtained show that RA reduces exercise endurance, the effectiveness of exercise thermoregulation, muscle glycogen stores, and the lipolytic response to exercise and to noradrenaline stimulation.

  14. Phagocytic responses of peritoneal macrophages and neutrophils are different in rats following prolonged exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Clílton K O; Prestes, Jonato; Donatto, Felipe F; Verlengia, Rozangela; Navalta, James W; Cavaglieri, Cláudia R

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of exhausting long‐duration physical exercise (swimming) sessions of different durations and intensities on the number and phagocytic capacity of macrophages and neutrophils in sedentary rats. INTRODUCTION: Exercise intensity, duration and frequency are important factors in determining immune response to physical effort. Thus, the effects of exhausting long‐duration exercise are unclear. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into two groups: an untreated group (macrophage study) and oyster glycogen‐treated rats (neutrophil study). In each group, the animals were subdivided into five groups (10 rats per group): unexercised controls, an unadapted low‐intensity exercise group, an unadapted moderate‐intensity exercise group, a preadapted low‐intensity exercise group and a preadapted moderate‐intensity exercise group. All exercises were performed to exhaustion, and preadaptation consisted of 5, 15, 30 and 45 min sessions. RESULTS: Macrophage study: the number of peritoneal macrophages significantly decreased (9.22 ± 1.78 × 106) after unadapted exercise but increased (21.50 ± 0.63 × 106) after preadapted low‐intensity exercise, with no changes in the moderate‐intensity exercise group. Phagocytic capacity, however, increased by more than 80% in all exercise groups (low/moderate, unadapted/preadapted). Neutrophil study: the number of peritoneal neutrophils significantly decreased after unadapted (29.20 ± 3.34 × 106) and preadapted (50.00 ± 3.53 × 106) low‐intensity exercise but increased after unadapted (127.60 ± 5.14 × 106) and preadapted (221.80 ± 14.85 × 106) moderate exercise. Neutrophil phagocytic capacity decreased by 63% after unadapted moderate exercise but increased by 90% after corresponding preadapted sessions, with no changes in the low‐intensity exercise groups. CONCLUSION: Neutrophils and macrophages of sedentary rats respond differently to exercise‐induced stress. Adaptation sessions reduce

  15. Oxidative stress in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: is it affected by a single bout of prolonged exercise?

    PubMed

    Francescato, Maria Pia; Stel, Giuliana; Geat, Mario; Cauci, Sabina

    2014-01-01

    Presently, no clear-cut guidelines are available to suggest the more appropriate physical activity for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus due to paucity of experimental data obtained under patients' usual life conditions. Accordingly, we explored the oxidative stress levels associated with a prolonged moderate intensity, but fatiguing, exercise performed under usual therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and matched healthy controls. Eight patients (4 men, 4 women; 49±11 years; Body Mass Index 25.0±3.2 kg·m(-2); HbA1c 57±10 mmol·mol(-1)) and 14 controls (8 men, 6 women; 47±11 years; Body Mass Index 24.3±3.3 kg·m(-2)) performed a 3-h walk at 30% of their heart rate reserve. Venous blood samples were obtained before and at the end of the exercise for clinical chemistry analysis and antioxidant capacity. Capillary blood samples were taken at the start and thereafter every 30 min to determine lipid peroxidation. Patients showed higher oxidative stress values as compared to controls (95.9±9.7 vs. 74.1±12.2 mg·L(-1) H2O2; p<0.001). In both groups, oxidative stress remained constant throughout the exercise (p = NS), while oxidative defence increased significantly at the end of exercise (p<0.02) from 1.16±0.13 to 1.19±0.10 mmol·L(-1) Trolox in patients and from 1.09±0.21 to 1.22±0.14 mmol·L(-1) Trolox in controls, without any significant difference between the two groups. Oxidative stress was positively correlated to HbA1c (p<0.005) and negatively related with uric acid (p<0.005). In conclusion, we were the first to evaluate the oxidative stress in patients with type 1 diabetes exercising under their usual life conditions (i.e. usual therapy and diet). Specifically, we found that the oxidative stress was not exacerbated due to a single bout of prolonged moderate intensity aerobic exercise, a condition simulating several outdoor leisure time physical activities. Oxidative defence increased in both patients and controls, suggesting

  16. Short-term recovery from prolonged exercise: exploring the potential for protein ingestion to accentuate the benefits of carbohydrate supplements.

    PubMed

    Betts, James A; Williams, Clyde

    2010-11-01

    This review considers aspects of the optimal nutritional strategy for recovery from prolonged moderate to high intensity exercise. Dietary carbohydrate represents a central component of post-exercise nutrition. Therefore, carbohydrate should be ingested as early as possible in the post-exercise period and at frequent (i.e. 15- to 30-minute) intervals throughout recovery to maximize the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis. Solid and liquid carbohydrate supplements or whole foods can achieve this aim with equal effect but should be of high glycaemic index and ingested following the feeding schedule described above at a rate of at least 1 g/kg/h in order to rapidly and sufficiently increase both blood glucose and insulin concentrations throughout recovery. Adding ≥0.3 g/kg/h of protein to a carbohydrate supplement results in a synergistic increase in insulin secretion that can, in some circumstances, accelerate muscle glycogen resynthesis. Specifically, if carbohydrate has not been ingested in quantities sufficient to maximize the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis, the inclusion of protein may at least partially compensate for the limited availability of ingested carbohydrate. Some studies have reported improved physical performance with ingestion of carbohydrate-protein mixtures, both during exercise and during recovery prior to a subsequent exercise test. While not all of the evidence supports these ergogenic benefits, there is clearly the potential for improved performance under certain conditions, e.g. if the additional protein increases the energy content of a supplement and/or the carbohydrate fraction is ingested at below the recommended rate. The underlying mechanism for such effects may be partly due to increased muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery, although there is varied support for other factors such as an increased central drive to exercise, a blunting of exercise-induced muscle damage, altered metabolism during exercise subsequent to

  17. The effect of prolonged aerobic exercise on serum adipokine levels during an ultra-marathon endurance race.

    PubMed

    Roupas, Nikolaos D; Mamali, Irene; Maragkos, Spyros; Leonidou, Lydia; Armeni, Anastasia K; Markantes, George K; Tsekouras, Athanasios; Sakellaropoulos, George C; Markou, Kostas B; Georgopoulos, Neoklis A

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of prolonged intensive aerobic exercise and acute energy deficit (180 km ultra-marathon race) on serum leptin, adiponectin, resistin and visfatin levels and their association and interaction with serum cortisol and insulin levels in highly trained ultra-endurance runners. The study included 17 highly trained ultra-endurance male athletes (mean age 51.29±6.84 years and body mass index (ΒΜΙ) 23.51±1.90) participating in the 5th Olympian Race held in Greece on May 2010. Anthropometric values were assessed; Serum cortisol, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, resistin and visfatin levels were measured at baseline, post-exercise and ~20 hours after the end of the race. All hormonal values of the post-exercise and recovery status were corrected for plasma volume changes. The estimated energy deficit during the ultra-endurance event was about 5000 Kcal. At the end of the race serum resistin levels were elevated (p<0.001) and serum leptin levels were reduced (p<0.001) and failed to reach pre-exercise levels, although showing a tendency towards restoration. No significant changes were noted in serum adiponectin and visfatin levels. Ultra-endurance aerobic exercise and acute negative energy balance lead to an up-regulation of serum resistin levels and a down-regulation of serum leptin levels.

  18. Caffeine modifies blood glucose availability during prolonged low-intensity exercise in individuals with type-2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luiz Augusto; de Freitas, Leandro; Medeiros, Thiago Emannuel; Osiecki, Raul; Garcia Michel, Renan; Snak, André Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study investigated the effect of supplementation with maltodextrin (CHO) alone or associated to caffeine during exercise in T2DM subjects. Methods: Pilot study, using eight subjects with T2DM, aged 55±10 years, received CHO (1 g/kg) or caffeine (1.5 mg/kg) alone or associated before exercise protocol. The exercise was executed at 40% heart rate (HR) reserve for 40 min, with 10-min recovery. Blood pressure (BP) and perceived exertion scale (Borg) were checked every 2 min. Blood glucose (BG) was checked every 10 min. For statistical analysis, ANOVA test was used and the value was considered statistically significant at p <0.05. Results: The results showed that BP and HR did not change significantly among all treatments. Caffeine promoted a significant reduction in BG of 75 mg/dL (65%, p <0.05) during 40 min of exercise protocol compared to all groups. Conclusion: Supplementation with 1.5 mg/kg of caffeine reduces BG concentration during prolonged exercise in T2DM patients. PMID:25100892

  19. Caffeine modifies blood glucose availability during prolonged low-intensity exercise in individuals with type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luiz Augusto; de Freitas, Leandro; Medeiros, Thiago Emannuel; Osiecki, Raul; Garcia Michel, Renan; Snak, André Luiz; Malfatti, Carlos Ricardo Maneck

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of supplementation with maltodextrin (CHO) alone or associated to caffeine during exercise in T2DM subjects. Pilot study, using eight subjects with T2DM, aged 55±10 years, received CHO (1 g/kg) or caffeine (1.5 mg/kg) alone or associated before exercise protocol. The exercise was executed at 40% heart rate (HR) reserve for 40 min, with 10-min recovery. Blood pressure (BP) and perceived exertion scale (Borg) were checked every 2 min. Blood glucose (BG) was checked every 10 min. For statistical analysis, ANOVA test was used and the value was considered statistically significant at p <0.05. The results showed that BP and HR did not change significantly among all treatments. Caffeine promoted a significant reduction in BG of 75 mg/dL (65%, p <0.05) during 40 min of exercise protocol compared to all groups. Supplementation with 1.5 mg/kg of caffeine reduces BG concentration during prolonged exercise in T2DM patients.

  20. Changes in myonuclear domain size do not precede muscle hypertrophy during prolonged resistance-type exercise training.

    PubMed

    Snijders, T; Smeets, J S J; van Kranenburg, J; Kies, A K; van Loon, L J C; Verdijk, L B

    2016-02-01

    Muscle fibre hypertrophy is accompanied by an increase in myonuclear number, an increase in myonuclear domain size or both. It has been suggested that increases in myonuclear domain size precede myonuclear accretion and subsequent muscle fibre hypertrophy during prolonged exercise training. In this study, we assessed the changes in muscle fibre size, myonuclear and satellite cell content throughout 12 weeks of resistance-type exercise training in young men. Twenty-two young men (23 ± 1 year) were assigned to a progressive, 12-weeks resistance-type exercise training programme (3 sessions per week). Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were taken before and after 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks of exercise training. Muscle fibre size, myonuclear content, myonuclear domain size and satellite cell content were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Type I and type II muscle fibre size increased gradually throughout the 12 weeks of training (type I: 18 ± 5%, type II: 41 ± 6%, P < 0.01). Myonuclear content increased significantly over time in both the type I (P < 0.01) and type II (P < 0.001) muscle fibres. No changes in type I and type II myonuclear domain size were observed at any time point throughout the intervention. Satellite cell content increased significantly over time in both type I and type II muscle fibres (P < 0.001). Increases in myonuclear domain size do not appear to drive myonuclear accretion and muscle fibre hypertrophy during prolonged resistance-type exercise training in vivo in humans. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effects of prolonged strenuous endurance exercise on plasma myosin heavy chain fragments and other muscular proteins. Cycling vs running.

    PubMed

    Koller, A; Mair, J; Schobersberger, W; Wohlfarter, T; Haid, C; Mayr, M; Villiger, B; Frey, W; Puschendorf, B

    1998-03-01

    This study evaluates creatine kinase, myosin heavy chain, and cardiac troponin blood levels following three types of exercise: 1) short-distance uphill or downhill running; 2) alpine ultramarathon; and 3) alpine long-distance cycling. Comparative field study; follow-up up to 10 days. Department of Sports Medicine. All biochemical markers were analysed at the Department of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry. Subjects included healthy, trained males (N = 53). All subjects were nonsmokers and free from medication prior to and during the study. Each volunteer was an experienced runner or cyclist, who had at least once successfully finished the Swiss Alpine Marathon of Davos or the Otztal-Radmarathon before. Running or cycling. Plasma concentrations of creatine kinase, myosin heavy chain fragments and cardiac troponins were measured to diagnose skeletal and cardiac muscle damage, respectively. Skeletal muscle protein release is markedly different between uphill and downhill running, with very little evidence for muscle damage in the uphill runners. There is considerable muscle protein leakage in the ultramarathoners (67 km distance; 30 km downhill running). In contrast, only modest amounts of skeletal muscle damage are found after alpine long-distance cycling (230 km distance). This study proves that there is slow-twitch skeletal muscle fiber damage after prolonged strenuous endurance exercise and short-distance downhill running. Exhaustive endurance exercise involving downhill running and short-distance downhill running lead to more pronounced injury than strenuous endurance exercise involving concentric actions. From our results there is no reason for suggesting that prolonged intense exercise may induce myocardial injury in symptom-less athletes without cardiac deseases.

  2. Timing of carbohydrate ingestion did not affect inflammatory response and exercise performance during prolonged intermittent running.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Sahiro; Kojima, Chihiro; Goto, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate ingestion during exercise is known to attenuate exercise-induced elevation of plasma IL-6 concentration. However, the influence of timing of carbohydrate ingestion remains unclear. The present study investigated the influence of different timing of carbohydrate ingestion during a simulated soccer game on exercise performance, metabolic and inflammatory responses. Seven active males performed 3 exercise trials in a randomized order. The exercise consisted of two consecutive bouts of 45 min running (4-16 km/h), separated with 15 min rest period between bouts. The subjects ingested carbohydrate gel (1.0 g/kg) immediately before the first bout of exercise (ONE), immediately before first and second bouts of exercise (0.5 g/kg for each ingestion) (TWO) or placebo immediately before exercise (PLA) Time course changes of maximal jump height, peak power output during 6-s maximal pedaling, perceived fatigue and heart rate (HR) were monitored. Blood samples were also drawn to determine blood glucose, serum insulin, free fatty acid (FFA), myoglobin (Mb), creatine kinase (CK) and plasma IL-6 concentrations. Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations were significantly higher in the ONE trial after first bout of 45 min exercise compared with PLA trial (P < 0.05), while serum FFA concentration was significantly elevated in PLA compared with ONE and TWO trials after second bout of exercise (P < 0.05). However, changes of jump height, peak power output during 6-s maximal pedaling, perceived fatigue, HR, or indirect muscle damage (Mb, CK) and inflammatory (IL-6) markers were not significantly different among three trials (P > 0.05). The timing of carbohydrate ingestion did not affect exercise performance, exercise-induced muscle damage or inflammatory response during a simulated soccer game.

  3. The influence of severe prolonged exercise restriction on the mechanical and structural properties of bone in an avian model.

    PubMed

    Shipov, Anna; Sharir, Amnon; Zelzer, Elazar; Milgram, Joshua; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Shahar, Ron

    2010-02-01

    Many studies have described the effects of exercise restriction on the mammalian skeleton. In particular, human and animal models have shown that reduction in weight bearing leads to generalised bone loss and deterioration of its mechanical properties. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged exercise restriction coupled with heavy calcium demands on the micro-structural, compositional and mechanical properties of the avian skeleton. The tibiae and humeri of 2-year-old laying hens housed in conventional caging (CC) and free-range (FR) housing systems were compared by mechanical testing and micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanning. Analyses of cortical, cancellous and medullary bone were performed. Mechanical testing revealed that the tibiae and humeri of birds from the FR group had superior mechanical properties relative to those of the CC group, and microCT scanning indicated larger cortical and lower medullary regions in FR group bones. Cancellous bone analysis revealed higher trabecular thickness and a higher bone volume fraction in the FR group, but no difference in mineral density. The biomechanical superiority of bones from the FR group was primarily due to structural rather than compositional differences, and this was reflected in both the cortical and cancellous components of the bones. The study demonstrated that prolonged exercise restriction in laying hens resulted in major structural and mechanical effects on the bird skeleton.

  4. Effects of acute dehydration on neuromuscular responses of exercised and nonexercised muscles after exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Baroni, Bruno M; Pompermayer, Marcelo G; de Oliveira Lupion, Raquel; Geremia, Jeam M; Meyer, Flávia; Vaz, Marco A

    2014-12-01

    Dehydration can impair aerobic performance, but its effects on muscular strength are still unclear. This study evaluated the effect of dehydration induced by cycling in the heat on exercised (knee extensors) and nonexercised (elbow flexors) muscles' strength and activation. Ten healthy recreationally active and nonacclimatized men (age, 22.71 ± 2.21 years old; body mass (BM), 77.94 ± 7.35 kg; height, 1.76 ± 6.46 m; body fat, 18.93 ± 3.01%) cycled in the heat in 2 separate sessions: dehydrated (DHY) and euhydrated (EUH). Dehydrated session led to a 2% BM loss, and water ingestion prevented the water loss in the euhydrated session. Knee extensor and elbow flexor maximal isometric torques and muscle activation were assessed before and after exercising in both sessions. Knee extensor torque decreased 15.8% (p < 0.001; 294.27 ± 44.82-247.16 ± 40.54) in dehydrated session, whereas no significant reduction (2.98%; p = 0.348; 291.99 ± 48.37-281.74 ± 38.65) was observed in the euhydrated session. No significant session-time interaction (p = 0.098) was observed for elbow flexor responses (DHY, 67.51 ± 14.53-62.95 ± 13.60; EUH, 68.26 ± 13.06-67.87 ± 13.89). Muscle activation capacity was unaffected by the hydration status. Maintenance of euhydration state during cycling in the heat may attenuate strength impairments caused by water loss in exercised muscle groups.

  5. Energy Cost and Post-Exercise Effects of a Prolonged, High Rate of Fire, Howitzer Simulator Training Exercise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    Howitzer simulator was tested at Ft Sill, OK. USARIEM participated in testing the simulator by measuring energy cost and fatigue of soldiers during a 45...to participate in this study. All were briefed, then read and signed an informed consent statement. All were examined by a physician and medically...cleared to participate . STUDY DESIGN The study consisted of one week of pre-exercise testing and training. Following the pre-exercise week, soldiers

  6. Anaerobic performance when rehydrating with water or commercially available sports drinks during prolonged exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Coso, Juan Del; Estevez, Emma; Baquero, Raúl Antonio; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2008-04-01

    The effects that rehydrating drinks ingested during exercise may have on anaerobic exercise performance are unclear. This study aimed to determine which of four commercial rehydrating drinks better maintains leg power and force during prolonged cycling in the heat. Seven endurance-trained and heat-acclimatized cyclists pedaled for 120 min at 63% maximum oxygen consumption in a hot, dry environment (36 degrees C; 29% humidity, 1.9 m.s-1 airflow). In five randomized trials, during exercise, subjects drank 2.4 +/- 0.1 L of (i) mineral water (WAT; San Benedetto), (ii) 6% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (Gatorade lemon), (iii) 8% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (Powerade Citrus Charge), (iv) 8% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution with lower sodium concentration than other sports drinks (Aquarius orange), or (v) did not ingest any fluid (DEH). Fluid balance, rectal temperature (Trec), maximal cycling power (Pmax), and leg maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) were measured. During DEH, subjects lost 3.7 +/- 0.2% of initial body mass, whereas subjects lost only 0.8% +/- 0.1% in the other trials (p < 0.05). Final Trec was higher in DEH than in the rest of the trials (39.4 +/- 0.1 degrees C vs. 38.7 +/- 0.1 degrees C; p < 0.05). Pmax was similar among all trials. Gatorade and Powerade preserved MVC better than DEH (-3.1% +/- 2% and -3.8% +/- 2% vs. -11% +/- 2%, p < 0.05), respectively, whereas WAT and Aquarius did not (-6% +/- 2%). Compared with DEH, rehydration with commercially available sports drinks during prolonged exercise in the heat preserves leg force, whereas rehydrating with water does not. However, low sodium concentration in a sports drink seems to preclude its ergogenic effects on force.

  7. Nutritional strategies to minimize fatigue during prolonged exercise: fluid, electrolyte and energy replacement.

    PubMed

    Dennis, S C; Noakes, T D; Hawley, J A

    1997-06-01

    While the presence of palatable (20 mmol l-1) concentrations of NaCl in drinks containing carbohydrate consumed during intense exercise would not be expected to promote absorption or significantly help maintain fluid balance, there is no doubt that athletes should ingest some from of carbohydrate (other than fructose) during moderate-intensity exercise lasting > 90 min. As only approximately 20 g of ingested carbohydrate is oxidized in the first hour of exercise, athletes should probably consume 100 ml every 10 min of a dilute (3-5 g 100 ml-1) carbohydrate solution and thereafter increase the carbohydrate concentration to approximately 10 g 100 ml-1 to match the peak (approximately 1 g min-1) rates of plasma glucose oxidation. Drinking more than those amounts of carbohydrate may increase muscle glycogen oxidation by attenuating the fall in plasma insulin concentration and thereby delaying fat mobilization, especially at relatively low (55% of peak oxygen consumption) intensity exercise. As carbohydrate ingestion does not slow the rate of glycogen utilization in working muscle, it is also advisable for endurance athletes to start exercise with an adequate supply of muscle glycogen, irrespective of whether or not they ingest carbohydrate during exercise. While carbohydrate ingestion 'spares' conversion of liver glycogen to plasma glucose and prevents hypoglycemia, it does not delay the fatigue associated with a low (approximately 20 mmol kg-1) glycogen content in working muscle. Conversely, increases in glycogen content of working muscle at the start of exercise have no effect on the rates of plasma glucose oxidation. Higher initial rates of glycogen utilization by active muscles in 'carbohydrate-loaded' subjects decrease the indirect oxidation (via lactate) of non-working muscle glycogen, rather than the conversion of liver glycogen to plasma glucose. Hence, athletes should ingest carbohydrate during endurance exercise even if they have 'carbohydrate-loaded' before

  8. High Intensity Exercise Countermeasures does not Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance Following Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.; Lee, Stuart M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 20% of Space Shuttle astronauts became presyncopal during operational stand and 80deg head-up tilt tests, and the prevalence of orthostatic intolerance increases after longer missions. Greater than 60% of the US astronauts participating in Mir and early International Space Station missions experienced presyncope during post-flight tilt tests, perhaps related to limitations of the exercise hardware that prevented high intensity exercise training until later ISS missions. The objective of this study was to determine whether an intense resistive and aerobic exercise countermeasure program designed to prevent cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning during 70 d of bed rest (BR), a space flight analog, would protect against post-BR orthostatic intolerance. METHODS Twenty-six subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups: non-exercise controls (n=11) or one of two exercise groups (ExA, n=8; ExB, n=7). Both ExA and ExB groups performed the same resistive and aerobic exercise countermeasures during BR, but one exercise group received testosterone supplementation while the other received a placebo during BR in a double-blinded fashion. On 3 d/wk, subjects performed lower body resistive exercise and 30 min of continuous aerobic exercise (=75% max heart rate). On the other 3 d/wk, subjects performed only highintensity, interval-style aerobic exercise. Orthostatic intolerance was assessed using a 15-min 80? head-up tilt test performed 2 d (BR-2) before and on the last day of BR (BR70). Plasma volume was measured using carbon monoxide rebreathing on BR-3 and before rising on the first recovery day (BR+0). The code for the exercise groups has not been broken, and results are reported here without group identification. RESULTS Only one subject became presyncopal during tilt testing on BR-2, but 7 of 11 (63%) controls, 3 of 8 (38%) ExA, and 4 of 7 (57%) ExB subjects were presyncopal on BR70. Survival analysis of post-BR tilt tests revealed no

  9. Differentiated Ratings of Perceived Exertion and Selected Physiological Responses during Prolonged Upper and Lower Body Exercise,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    AC and CY exercise for any of the diff RPE. Local RPE was generally higher than central RPE. Selected physiological responses accounted for more... physiological responses was much higher for arm crank than cycle exercise for W7 T-7 7’v* 7 7. 7 77 7 9 w2 all differentiated RPE contrasts (ABS and REL-AC...total accountable variance from these selected physiological responses was greater for arm crank (median R2 = 0.99) than cycle exercise (median R 2 = 0.75

  10. Prolonged exercise after diuretic-induced hypohydration: effects on substrate turnover and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Roy, B D; Green, H J; Burnett, M

    2000-12-01

    To determine the influence of a diuretic-induced reduction in plasma volume (PV) on substrate turnover and oxidation, 10 healthy young males were studied during 60 min of cycling exercise at 61% peak oxygen uptake on two separate occasions > or =1 wk apart. Exercise was performed under control conditions (CON; placebo), and after 4 days of diuretic administration (DIU; Novotriamazide; 100 mg triamterene and 50 mg hydrochlorothiazide). DIU resulted in a calculated reduction of PV by 14.6 +/- 3.3% (P < 0.05). Rates of glucose appearance (R(a)) and disappearance (R(d)) and glycerol R(a) were determined by using primed constant infusions of [6,6-(2)H]glucose and [(2)H(5)]glycerol, respectively. No differences in oxygen uptake during exercise were observed between trials. Main effects for condition (P < 0.05) were observed for plasma glucose and glycerol, such that the values observed for DIU were higher than for CON. No differences were observed in plasma lactate and serum free fatty acid concentrations either at rest or during exercise. Hypohydration led to lower (P < 0.05) glucose R(a) and R(d) at rest and at 15 and 30 min of exercise, but by 60 min, the effects were reversed (P < 0. 05). Hypohydration had no effect on rates of whole body lipolysis or total carbohydrate or fat oxidation. A main effect for condition (P < 0.05) was observed for plasma glucagon concentrations such that larger values were observed for DIU than for CON. A similar decline in plasma insulin occurred with exercise in both conditions. These results indicate that diuretic-induced reductions in PV decreases glucose kinetics during moderate-intensity dynamic exercise in the absence of changes in total carbohydrate and fat oxidation. The specific effect on glucose kinetics depends on the duration of the exercise.

  11. Facilitation of quadriceps activation is impaired following eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Hedayatpour, N; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Falla, D

    2014-04-01

    Contracting the knee flexor muscles immediately before a maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of knee extension increases the maximal force that the extensor muscles can exert. It is hypothesized that this phenomenon can be impaired by muscle fiber damage following eccentric exercise [delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS)]. This study investigates the effect of eccentric exercise and DOMS on knee extension MVC immediately following a reciprocal-resisted knee flexion contraction. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the knee extensors and flexors of 12 healthy men during knee extension MVCs performed in a reciprocal (maximal knee extension preceded by resisted knee flexion), and nonreciprocal condition (preceded by relaxation of the knee flexors). At baseline, knee extension MVC force was greater during the reciprocal condition (P < 0.001), whereas immediately after, 24 and 48 h after eccentric exercise, the MVC force was not different between conditions. Similarly, at baseline, the EMG amplitude of the quadriceps during the MVC was larger for the reciprocal condition (P < 0.001). However, immediately after, 24 and 48 h postexercise the EMG amplitude was similar between conditions. In conclusion, eccentric exercise abolished the facilitation of force production for the knee extensors, which normally occurs when maximum knee extension is preceded by activation of the knee flexors. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Muscle mitochondrial density after exhaustive exercise in dogs - Prolonged restricted activity and retraining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Philpott, D.; Pohoska, E.; Olszewska, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of exhaustive treadmill exercise on mitochondrial density (MD) and ultrastructural changes in quadriceps femoris muscle was studied in 7 normal, healthy, male mongrel dogs before and after restricted activity (RA) and following a subsequent 2-month exercise retraining period. Mean time to exhaustion in the 2-month group decreased from 177 +/- 11 min before to 90 +/- 16 min after RA; retraining increased tolerance to 219 +/- 36 min above the pre-RA and 143 percent above the post-RA time. Post-RA exhaustion time in the 5-months group was 25 and 45 min. Muscle samples taken after RA showed abnormalities indicative of degeneration, which were reversed by retraining. Resting MD decreased from a control level of 27.8 percent to 14.7 percent and 16.3 percent, and was restored to 27.1 percent after retraining. Exhaustive exercise caused an increase in MD under control conditions and after RA, but not following retraining. Disruption of mitochondria after exercise was evident after 5-month confinement. Factors causing mitochondrial changes and eventually their disruption during exercise after restricted activity are not related as much to the state of fatigue as to the pre-exercise quality of the muscle modified by disease or training.

  13. Muscle mitochondrial density after exhaustive exercise in dogs - Prolonged restricted activity and retraining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Philpott, D.; Pohoska, E.; Olszewska, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of exhaustive treadmill exercise on mitochondrial density (MD) and ultrastructural changes in quadriceps femoris muscle was studied in 7 normal, healthy, male mongrel dogs before and after restricted activity (RA) and following a subsequent 2-month exercise retraining period. Mean time to exhaustion in the 2-month group decreased from 177 +/- 11 min before to 90 +/- 16 min after RA; retraining increased tolerance to 219 +/- 36 min above the pre-RA and 143 percent above the post-RA time. Post-RA exhaustion time in the 5-months group was 25 and 45 min. Muscle samples taken after RA showed abnormalities indicative of degeneration, which were reversed by retraining. Resting MD decreased from a control level of 27.8 percent to 14.7 percent and 16.3 percent, and was restored to 27.1 percent after retraining. Exhaustive exercise caused an increase in MD under control conditions and after RA, but not following retraining. Disruption of mitochondria after exercise was evident after 5-month confinement. Factors causing mitochondrial changes and eventually their disruption during exercise after restricted activity are not related as much to the state of fatigue as to the pre-exercise quality of the muscle modified by disease or training.

  14. The influence of wearing compression stockings on performance indicators and physiological responses following a prolonged trail running exercise.

    PubMed

    Vercruyssen, Fabrice; Easthope, Christopher; Bernard, Thierry; Hausswirth, Christophe; Bieuzen, Francois; Gruet, Mathieu; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of wearing compression socks (CS) on performance indicators and physiological responses during prolonged trail running. Eleven trained runners completed a 15.6 km trail run at a competition intensity whilst wearing or not wearing CS. Counter movement jump, maximal voluntary contraction and the oxygenation profile of vastus lateralis muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method were measured before and following exercise. Run time, heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration and ratings of perceived exertion were evaluated during the CS and non-CS sessions. No significant difference in any dependent variables was observed during the run sessions. Run times were 5681.1 ± 503.5 and 5696.7 ± 530.7 s for the non-CS and CS conditions, respectively. The relative intensity during CS and non-CS runs corresponded to a range of 90.5-91.5% HRmax. Although NIRS measurements such as muscle oxygen uptake and muscle blood flow significantly increased following exercise (+57.7% and + 42.6%,+59.2% and + 32.4%, respectively for the CS and non-CS sessions, P<0.05), there was no difference between the run conditions. The findings suggest that competitive runners do not gain any practical or physiological benefits from wearing CS during prolonged off-road running.

  15. Effects of prolonged exercise versus multiple short exercise sessions on risk for metabolic syndrome and the atherogenic index in middle-aged obese women: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chung, JinWook; Kim, KwangJun; Hong, Jeeyoung; Kong, Hyoun-Joong

    2017-08-22

    Many people, although they may recognise the positive effects of exercise, do not exercise regularly owing to lack of time. This study aimed to investigate the effects of prolonged single-session exercise and multiple short sessions of exercise on the risk of metabolic syndrome and the atherogenic index in middle-aged obese women. Thirty-six participants were divided into the single-session group, multiple-session group, and control group. The single-session group engaged in one session of treadmill exercise for 30 min a day; the multiple-session group had three sessions of 10 min a day. Both groups exercised 3 days/week for 12 weeks. The control group did not perform any exercise. The single-session group showed decreases in weight (0.97 kg [95% C.I. = 0.09-1.83], p < .05), body mass index (0.43 kg/m(2) [95% C.I. = 0.03-0.81], p < .05), and fat mass (1.65 kg, [95% C.I. = 0.78-2.51], p < .01). Systolic blood pressure dropped in the single-session group (6.66 mmHg, [95% C.I. = 1.44-11.88], p < .05), and diastolic blood pressure dropped in the multiple-session group (3.38 mmHg, [95% C.I. = 1.44-5.88], p < .01). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol rose in the single-session group (4.08 mg/dL, [95% C.I. = -8.08-(-)0.07], p < .05) and dropped in the control group (10.75 mg/dL [95% C.I. = 1.95-19.54], p < .01). According to post hoc analysis, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased more in the single-session group than the control group (95% C.I. = 0.61-21.88, p < .05). Glucose levels decreased in both the single-session group (16 mg/dL [95% C.I. = 5.64-26.35], p < .01) and the multiple-session group (12.16 mg/dL, [95% C.I. = 2.18-22.14], p < .05). Waist circumference decreased in the single-session group (2.65 cm [95% C.I. = 1.46-3.83], p < .001) and multiple-session group (2.04 cm, [95% C.I. = 1.51-2.73], p < .001). Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels rose in both the multiple-session group (-15.79 mg/dL [95% C

  16. What are the Physiological Mechanisms for Post-Exercise Cold Water Immersion in the Recovery from Prolonged Endurance and Intermittent Exercise?

    PubMed

    Ihsan, Mohammed; Watson, Greig; Abbiss, Chris R

    2016-08-01

    training performances. The efficacy of CWI for attenuating the secondary effects of EIMD seems dependent on the mode of exercise utilised. For instance, CWI application seems to demonstrate limited recovery benefits when EIMD was induced by single-joint eccentrically biased contractions. In contrast, CWI seems more effective in ameliorating effects of EIMD induced by whole body prolonged endurance/intermittent based exercise modalities.

  17. Exercise-induced effects on growth hormone levels are associated with ghrelin changes only in presence of prolonged exercise bouts in male athletes.

    PubMed

    Sartorio, A; Morpurgo, P; Cappiello, V; Agosti, F; Marazzi, N; Giordani, C; Rigamonti, A E; Muller, E E; Spada, A

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate growth hormone (GH) and ghrelin levels in response to physical exercise in athletes. Two different exercise workloads were administered in two different groups of athletes. Group A athletes (19 males, 18 females; mean age +/- standard deviation: 25+/-6.7 years), performing a 60-90 min training session at approximately 80% of VO2max, were sampled for GH and ghrelin determinations before and immediately at the end of a training session on-the-field. Group B athletes (4 males; mean age: 28.2+/-7.2 years) performed two consecutive 30-min cycling sessions at 80% of individual VO2max at different time intervals between bouts (2 and 6 h) in two different days. GH and ghrelin concentrations were determined in blood samples collected at 15-min intervals during exercise and following 1 h of recovery. In group A athletes, GH levels increased after the training session (P<0.0001), with no differences between males and females. In male athletes, ghrelin levels significantly decreased after the training session (from 1 506.4+/-859 to 1 254.8+/-661.7 pg/mL, P<0.05), while no significant changes were found in females. No correlations were observed between GH and ghrelin levels at rest and after training. In group B athletes, GH levels significantly increased after the first exercise bouts (peak: 26.8+/-11.2 and 17.3+/-3.5 ng/mL, respectively), while the pattern of GH response was different after the second bout of exercise performed at 2-h or 6-h interval. In fact, peak GH concentration in response to the second bout (4.3+/-1.6 ng/mL) was lower (P<0.01) than that of the first bout when the interval elapsed was only 2 h, while a recovery of GH responsiveness was evident after the 6-h interval between the two exercise bouts (11.9+/-3.3 ng/mL). As far as ghrelin levels are concerned, no significant changes were observed during and after the two exercise bouts performed at the different time intervals. GH responses to prolonged exercise bouts (60

  18. Effect of resistance exercise training combined with relatively low vascular occlusion.

    PubMed

    Sumide, Takahiro; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Sawaki, Keisuke; Ohmura, Hirotoshi; Tamura, Yoshifumi

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a low-intensity resistance exercise, combined with vascular occlusion, results in a marked increase in muscular size and strength. We investigated the optimal pressure for reduction of muscle blood flow with resistance exercise to increase the muscular strength and endurance. Twenty-one subjects were randomly divided into four groups by the different application of vascular occlusion pressure at the proximal of thigh: without any pressure (0-pressure group), with a pressure of 50mmHg (50-pressure group), with a pressure of 150mmHg (150-pressure group), and with a pressure of 250mmHg (250-pressure group). The isokinetic muscle strength at angular velocities of 60 and 180 degrees /s, total muscle work, and the cross-sectional knee extensor muscle area were assessed before and after exercise. Exercise was performed three times a week over an 8-week period at an intensity of approximately 20% of one-repetition maximum for straight leg raising and hip joint adduction and maximum force for abduction training. A significant increase in strength at 180 degrees /s was noted after exercise in all subjects who exercised under vascular occlusion. Total muscle work increased significantly in the 50- and 150-pressure groups (P<0.05, P<0.01, respectively). There was no significant increase in cross-sectional knee extensor muscle area in any groups. In conclusion, resistance exercise with relatively low vascular occlusion pressure is potentially useful to increase muscle strength and endurance without discomfort.

  19. Statins Attenuate the Increase in P-Selectin Produced by Prolonged Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Zaleski, Amanda; Capizzi, Jeffrey; Ballard, Kevin D.; Troyanos, Christopher; Baggish, Aaron; D'Hemecourt, Pierre; Thompson, Paul D.; Parker, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Strenuous endurance exercise increases inflammatory markers and acutely increases cardiovascular risk; however, statins may mitigate this response. We measured serum levels of p-selectin in 37 runners treated with statins and in 43 nonstatin treated controls running the 2011 Boston Marathon. Venous blood samples were obtained the day before (PRE) as well as within 1 hour after (FINISH) and 24 hours after (POST) the race. The increase in p-selectin immediately after exercise was lower in statin users (PRE to FINISH: 20.5 ± 19.4 ng/mL) than controls (PRE to FINISH: 30.9 ± 27.1 ng/mL; P < 0.001). The increase in p-selectin 24 hours after exercise was also lower in statin users (PRE to POST: 21.5 ± 26.6 ng/mL) than controls (PRE to POST: 29.3 ± 31.9 ng/mL; P < 0.001). Furthermore, LDL-C was positively correlated with p-selectin at FINISH and POST (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, resp.), irrespective of drug treatment, suggesting that lower levels of LDL-C are associated with a reduced inflammatory response to exercise. We conclude that statins blunt the exercise-induced increase in p-selectin following a marathon and that the inflammatory response to a marathon varies directly with LDL-C levels. PMID:26464882

  20. Erythropoietin enhances whole body lipid oxidation during prolonged exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Caillaud, Corinne; Connes, Philippe; Ben Saad, Helmi; Mercier, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    Animal studies have suggested that erythropoietin, besides its well-known hematopoietic effects, can modulate metabolism and prevent fat accumulation. We investigated the effects of repeated injections of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) on the balance of substrate oxidation during aerobic exercise in humans. Twelve healthy aerobically trained males received subcutaneously either moderate dose of EPO (50 U/kg, EPO) or saline injections (NaCl 0.9 %, control) three times a week for 4 weeks. Body weight, % fat, maximal aerobic capacity, and substrate utilization during exercise were assessed before and after treatment, while hemoglobin and hematocrit were monitored regularly during the treatment. Carbohydrate and fat oxidation were evaluated via indirect calorimetry, during a submaximal exercise performed at 75 % of the participants' maximal aerobic capacity (V̇(O2max)) for 60 min. Results showed that 4 weeks of EPO treatment significantly enhanced fat oxidation (+56 % in EPO versus -9 % in control) during exercise, independent of its effects on hematological parameters or V̇(O2max). This study shows that EPO can modulate substrate utilization during exercise, leading to enhanced fat utilization and lower use of carbohydrates. This opens new research directions exploring whether systemic EPO levels, in physiological conditions, participate to the modulation of fat oxidation.

  1. Energy Cost and Post-Exercise Effects on a Prolonged, High Rate of Fire, Howitzer Simulator Training Exercise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    simulator was tested at Ft Sill. OK. USARIEM participated in testing the simulator by measunring energy cost and fatigue of soldiers dunng a 45 hour exercise...performance could be maintained for a 45 hour period. i.IETHODS SUBJECTS Eighteen experienced field artillery crewmen volunteered to participate in...this study All were briefed, then read and signed an informed consent statement. Al were examined by a physician and medically cleared to participate

  2. Effect of prolonged exercise on muscle citrate concentration before and after endurance training in men.

    PubMed

    Coggan, A R; Spina, R J; Kohrt, W M; Holloszy, J O

    1993-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that endurance training reduces carbohydrate utilization during exercise via citrate-mediated inhibition of phosphofructokinase (PFK). To test this hypothesis, vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples were obtained from eight men before and immediately (approximately 10 s) after 2 h of cycle ergometer exercise at 60% of pretraining peak O2 uptake, both before and after 12 wk of endurance exercise training (3 days/wk running, 3 days/wk interval cycling). Training increased muscle citrate synthase (CS) activity from 3.69 +/- 0.48 (SE) to 5.30 +/- 0.42 mol.h-1.kg protein-1 and decreased the mean respiratory exchange ratio during exercise from 0.92 +/- 0.01 to 0.88 +/- 0.01 (both P < 0.001). Muscle citrate concentration at the end of exercise correlated significantly with CS activity (r = 0.70; P < 0.005) and was slightly but not significantly higher after training (0.80 +/- 0.19 vs. 0.54 +/- 0.19 mmol/kg dry wt; P = 0.16). Muscle glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P) concentration at the end of exercise, however, was 31% lower in the trained state (1.17 +/- 0.10 vs. 1.66 +/- 0.27 mmol/kg dry wt; P < 0.05), in keeping with a 36% decrease in the amount of muscle glycogen utilized (133 +/- 22 vs. 209 +/- 19 mmol.kg dry wt-1.2 h-1; P < 0.01). The lower G-6-P concentration after training suggests that the training-induced reduction in carbohydrate utilization results from attenuation of flux before the PFK step in glycolysis and is not due to citrate-mediated inhibition of PFK.

  3. Evaluation of glucose control when a new strategy of increased carbohydrate supply is implemented during prolonged physical exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Adolfsson, Peter; Mattsson, Stig; Jendle, Johan

    2015-12-01

    In healthy individuals, high carbohydrate intake is recommended during prolonged exercise for maximum performance. In type 1 diabetes (T1D), this would alter the insulin requirements. The aim of the study was to evaluate the safety of high glucose supplementation during prolonged exercise and the glucose control when a novel strategy of increased carbohydrate supply was implemented during prolonged exercise in T1D. Eight subjects with T1D participated in a sports camp including sessions of prolonged exercise and individualized feedback during three consecutive days. This was later followed by a 90 km cross-country skiing race. Large amounts of carbohydrates, 75 g/h, were supplied during exercise and the insulin requirements were registered. Glucose was measured before, during and after exercise aiming at euglycaemia, 4-8 mmol/L (72-144 mg/dL). During the race, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was used as an aspect of safety and to allow direct and individual adjustments. Compared to ordinary carbohydrate supply during exercise, the high carbohydrate supplementation resulted in significantly increased insulin doses to maintain euglycaemia. During the cross-country skiing race, the participants succeeded to reach mean target glucose levels; 6.5 ± 1.9 mmol/L (117 ± 34 mg/dL) and 5.7 ± 1.5 mmol/L (103 ± 27 mg/dL) at the start and finish of the race, respectively. Episodes of documented hypoglycemia (<4 mmol/L/72 mg/dL) were rare. CGM was used for adjustments. In this study, large carbohydrate supplementation in T1D individuals during prolonged aerobic exercise is safe and allows the subjects to maintain glycaemic control and indicates the feasibility of CGM under these conditions.

  4. Prolonged exercise following diuretic-induced hypohydration effects on fluid and electrolyte hormones.

    PubMed

    Roy, B D; Green, H J; Burnett, M

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that a reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by diuretic administration would result in an increase in the fluid and electrolyte hormonal response to exercise, ten untrained males (VO(2) peak = 3.96 +/- 0.14 l/min) performed 60 min of cycle ergometry at 61 % VO(2) peak twice. The test was carried out once under control conditions (CON) (placebo) and once after 4 days of diuretic administration (DIU) (Novotriamazide; 100 mg triamterene and 50 mg hydrochlorothiazide). Calculated resting PV decreased by 14.6 +/- 3.3 % (p < 0.05) with DIU. No difference in plasma osmolality was observed between conditions. For the hormones measured, differences (p < 0.05) between conditions at rest were noted for plasma renin activity (PRA) (0.62 +/- 0.09 vs. 5.61 +/- 0.94 ng/ml/h), angiotensin I (ANG 1) (0.26 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.56 +/- 0.08 ng/ml), aldosterone (ALD) (143 +/- 14 vs. 1603 +/- 302 pg/ml), arginine vasopressin (AVP) (4.13 +/- 1.1 vs. 9.58 +/- 1.6 pg/ml) and atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha-ANP) (11.5 +/- 2.8 vs. 6.33 +/- 1.0 pg/ml). The exercise resulted in increases (p < 0.05) in PRA, ANG I, ALD, AVP, alpha-ANP. DIU led to higher levels of PRA, ANG I, and ALD (p < 0.05) and lower levels of alpha-ANP (p < 0.05) compared to CON. Arginine vasopressin was not affected by the loss of PV. For the catecholamines--norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI)--only NE was higher during exercise with DIU compared to CON (p < 0.05). For PRA and ALD, the higher levels observed during exercise with DIU could be explained both by higher resting levels and a greater increase during exercise itself. For ANG I and NE, the effect of DIU only manifested itself during exercise. In contrast, the lower alpha-ANP observed during exercise with DIU was due to the lower resting levels. These results support the hypotheses that hypohydration leads to alterations in the secretion of all of the fluid and electrolyte hormones with the exception of AVP. The specific mechanisms

  5. The effects of compression garments on performance of prolonged manual-labour exercise and recovery.

    PubMed

    Chan, Val; Duffield, Rob; Watsford, Mark

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of wearing compression garments during and 24 h following a 4-h exercise protocol simulating manual-labour tasks. Ten physically trained male participants, familiar with labouring activities, undertook 4 h of work tasks characteristic of industrial workplaces. Participants completed 2 testing sessions, separated by at least 1 week. In the experimental condition, participants wore a full-length compression top and compression shorts during the exercise protocol and overnight recovery, with normal work clothes worn in the control condition. Testing for serum creatine kinase and C-reactive protein, handgrip strength, knee flexion and extension torque, muscle stiffness, perceived muscle soreness and fatigue as well as heart rate and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) responses to 4-min cycling were performed before, following, and 24 h after exercise. Creatine kinase, muscle soreness, and rating of perceived fatigue increased following the exercise protocol (p < 0.05) as did RPE to a standardised cycling warm-up bout. Conversely, no postexercise changes were observed in C-reactive protein, handgrip strength, peak knee flexion torque, or stiffness measures (p > 0.05). Knee extension torque was significantly higher in the control condition at 24 h postexercise (3.1% ± 5.4% change; compression: 2.2% ± 11.1% change), although no other variables were different between conditions at any time. However, compression demonstrated a moderate-large effect (d > 0.60) to reduce perceived muscle soreness, fatigue, and RPE from standardised warm-up at 24 h postexercise. The current findings suggest that compression may assist in perceptual recovery from manual-labour exercise with implications for the ability to perform subsequent work bouts.

  6. Adult native knee extensor mechanism ruptures.

    PubMed

    Pengas, I P; Assiotis, A; Khan, W; Spalding, T

    2016-10-01

    Extensor mechanism rupture is a serious event requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. Patella fractures are reportedly six times more frequent than soft tissue injuries such as quadriceps or patella tendon ruptures. Classically quadriceps and patella tendon ruptures are seen more in males, with those over 40 predominantly suffering from quadriceps tendon ruptures, often associated with an underlying condition, whereas patella tendon ruptures are mostly associated with sport injuries and are commonly seen in the under 40s. Almost all types of extensor mechanism ruptures benefit from early management which typically involves surgery. Diagnosis can be deemed easy to make by demonstrating inability to actively extend the knee, this however can be easily overlooked and missed in a busy emergency department leading to a late diagnosis and necessitating more complex surgery. Earlier surgical intervention and rehabilitation tend to produce improved outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prolonged Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes: Performance of a Customizable Algorithm to Estimate the Carbohydrate Supplements to Minimize Glycemic Imbalances

    PubMed Central

    Francescato, Maria Pia; Stel, Giuliana; Stenner, Elisabetta; Geat, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is hindered because of the high risk of glycemic imbalances. A recently proposed algorithm (named Ecres) estimates well enough the supplemental carbohydrates for exercises lasting one hour, but its performance for prolonged exercise requires validation. Nine T1DM patients (5M/4F; 35–65 years; HbA1c 54±13 mmol·mol-1) performed, under free-life conditions, a 3-h walk at 30% heart rate reserve while insulin concentrations, whole-body carbohydrate oxidation rates (determined by indirect calorimetry) and supplemental carbohydrates (93% sucrose), together with glycemia, were measured every 30 min. Data were subsequently compared with the corresponding values estimated by the algorithm. No significant difference was found between the estimated insulin concentrations and the laboratory-measured values (p = NS). Carbohydrates oxidation rate decreased significantly with time (from 0.84±0.31 to 0.53±0.24 g·min-1, respectively; p<0.001), being estimated well enough by the algorithm (p = NS). Estimated carbohydrates requirements were practically equal to the corresponding measured values (p = NS), the difference between the two quantities amounting to –1.0±6.1 g, independent of the elapsed exercise time (time effect, p = NS). Results confirm that Ecres provides a satisfactory estimate of the carbohydrates required to avoid glycemic imbalances during moderate intensity aerobic physical activity, opening the prospect of an intriguing method that could liberate patients from the fear of exercise-induced hypoglycemia. PMID:25918842

  8. Prolonged exercise in type 1 diabetes: performance of a customizable algorithm to estimate the carbohydrate supplements to minimize glycemic imbalances.

    PubMed

    Francescato, Maria Pia; Stel, Giuliana; Stenner, Elisabetta; Geat, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is hindered because of the high risk of glycemic imbalances. A recently proposed algorithm (named Ecres) estimates well enough the supplemental carbohydrates for exercises lasting one hour, but its performance for prolonged exercise requires validation. Nine T1DM patients (5M/4F; 35-65 years; HbA1c 54 ± 13 mmol · mol(-1)) performed, under free-life conditions, a 3-h walk at 30% heart rate reserve while insulin concentrations, whole-body carbohydrate oxidation rates (determined by indirect calorimetry) and supplemental carbohydrates (93% sucrose), together with glycemia, were measured every 30 min. Data were subsequently compared with the corresponding values estimated by the algorithm. No significant difference was found between the estimated insulin concentrations and the laboratory-measured values (p = NS). Carbohydrates oxidation rate decreased significantly with time (from 0.84 ± 0.31 to 0.53 ± 0.24 g · min(-1), respectively; p < 0.001), being estimated well enough by the algorithm (p = NS). Estimated carbohydrates requirements were practically equal to the corresponding measured values (p = NS), the difference between the two quantities amounting to -1.0 ± 6.1 g, independent of the elapsed exercise time (time effect, p = NS). Results confirm that Ecres provides a satisfactory estimate of the carbohydrates required to avoid glycemic imbalances during moderate intensity aerobic physical activity, opening the prospect of an intriguing method that could liberate patients from the fear of exercise-induced hypoglycemia.

  9. Can a combination of handgrip exercise and prolonged forearm occlusion elicit a maximal brachial artery FMD response?

    PubMed

    Ku, Jennifer; McEvoy, Alana; Pyke, Kyra E

    2014-06-01

    The upper limit of brachial artery (BA) flow-mediated dilation (FMD) has not been thoroughly interrogated, and long duration occlusion + handgrip exercise may create larger shear stress stimuli than previous manipulations. To determine whether novel combinations of occlusion + handgrip exercise can extend the range of FMD stimulus-response relationship characterization and permit identification of a BA-FMD response ceiling. Ten healthy subjects performed eight reactive hyperemia (RH) FMD trials: 5, 10, and 15 min of occlusion (5RH, 10RH, 15RH); 5, 10 and 15 min of occlusion + 3-min ischemic exercise (IE) (5IE, 10IE, 15IE); 10 and 15 min of occlusion + 3-min IE + 4-min post-occlusion exercise (PE) (10IEPE, 15IEPE). Shear stress was estimated as shear rate (SR = blood velocity/BA diameter; (ultrasound assessment)) (SR stimulus = area under the curve (AUC) until peak diameter). Data are mean ± SE. There were no differences in SR-AUC among IE and IEPE trials (p > 0.70), however, IE consistently increased the SR-AUC (IE + IEPE trial average 17,845.1 ± 2,023.3 a.u.) vs. the 5RH and 10RH trials (4,943.0 ± 428.4 a.u., 6,800.6 ± 805.9 a.u.) (p < 0.05). The %FMD ranged from 7.3 ± 0.8% (5RH) to 19.1 ± 2.0% (15IEPE) (p < 0.001) with no differences among IE and IEPE trials (p > 0.16). FMD increased with increasing SR-AUC (all subjects, all trials: r(2) 0.36, p < 0.001) CONCLUSIONS: The stimulus created by brief (5 min) occlusion + ischemic exercise was not significantly enhanced by prolonging occlusion or continuing to exercise post-occlusion. The FMD response did not clearly plateau with increasing stimulus magnitude; however, the FMD capacity was shown to be more than double the FMD magnitude that was elicited with a standard 5-min occlusion test.

  10. Closed Loop Control During Intense Prolonged Outdoor Exercise in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: The Artificial Pancreas Ski Study.

    PubMed

    Breton, Marc D; Cherñavvsky, Daniel R; Forlenza, Gregory P; DeBoer, Mark D; Robic, Jessica; Wadwa, R Paul; Messer, Laurel H; Kovatchev, Boris P; Maahs, David M

    2017-08-30

    Intense exercise is a major challenge to the management of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Closed loop control (CLC) systems (artificial pancreas) improve glycemic control during limited intensity and short duration of physical activity (PA). However, CLC has not been tested during extended vigorous outdoor exercise common among adolescents. Skiing presents unique metabolic challenges: intense prolonged PA, cold, altitude, and stress/fear/excitement. In a randomized controlled trial, 32 adolescents with T1D (ages 10-16 years) participated in a 5-day ski camp (∼5 h skiing/day) at two sites: Wintergreen, VA and Breckenridge, CO. Participants were randomized to the University of Virginia (UVa)-CLC system or remotely monitored sensor-augmented pump (RM-SAP). The CLC and RM-SAP groups were coarsely paired by age and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). All subjects were remotely monitored 24 h per day by study physicians and clinical team. Compared with physician-monitored open loop, percent time in range (70-180 mg/dL) improved using CLC: 71.3 vs. 64.7% (+6.6% [95% CI 1-12]; P = 0.005), with maximum effect late at night. Hypoglycemia exposure and carbohydrate treatments were improved overall (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007) and during the daytime with strong ski level effects (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.006); ski/snowboard proficiency was balanced between groups but with a very strong site effect: naïve in Virginia and experienced in Colorado. There were no adverse events associated with CLC; the participants' feedback was overwhelmingly positive. CLC in adolescents with T1D improved glycemic control and reduced exposure to hypoglycemia during prolonged intensive winter sport activities, despite the added challenges of cold and altitude. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Periodization effects during short-term resistance training with equated exercise variables in females.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Thiemo; Ullrich, Boris; Pfeiffer, Mark

    2017-03-01

    During resistance training, volume and load can be altered either gradually (traditional periodization: TP) or with frequent changes between subsequent sessions (daily undulating periodization: DUP). We hypothesized that the periodization model employed would not impact upon training-induced adaptations when exercise variables are equated. Nineteen females (22.0 years, moderate resistance training experience of 27.9 months) performed 6 weeks of knee extensor training with 3 weekly sessions exercising one leg using TP and the contralateral leg using DUP. Training load varied between 40, 60, and 80% of one repetition maximum (1RM). Volume, range of motion, and time under tension were equated for each leg with a biofeedback software. Dynamometry, surface EMG and ultrasonography were used to determine temporal changes of knee extensor maximum voluntary strength (MVC), neural drive of the M. quadriceps femoris (QF) and vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscle architecture. Significant (P < 0.05) gains for isometric (TP 15%, DUP 13%) and isokinetic-concentric (TP 8%, DUP 10%) MVC and knee extensor 1RM (TP 18%, DUP 24%) occurred post training. VL and RF-muscle thickness showed significant (P < 0.05) increases ranging from 12 to 20% for TP and from 13 to 19% for DUP. Furthermore, significant (P < 0.05) increases in VL-pennation angle and VL-fascicle length occurred in both legs while QF EMG remained unchanged. No significant temporal differences were found between both models, displaying similar small to large effect sizes. Periodization is no adaptation trigger during short-term resistance training with equated exercise variables.

  12. Resting thyroid and leptin hormone changes in women following intense, prolonged exercise training.

    PubMed

    Baylor, L S; Hackney, A C

    2003-01-01

    This study examined whether free (f) triidothyronine (T3), f thyroxine (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and leptin concentrations at rest changed in response to 20 weeks of exercise-training. Two groups of women were recruited for participation in the study, collegiate athletes ( n=17) and sedentary controls (n=4). Exercise training consisted of daily athletic activity such as rowing, running, and weight lifting. Subjects were initially grouped into rowers and controls. However, earlier suggested criteria were further used to categorize hormone changes (percentages) in the subjects into (+) responders (increases), (-) responders (decreases), or non-responders (no changes). The fT3 results of the rowers revealed two distinct categories of responses, (-) responder (all decreases; n=10) and non-responder (no change; n=7) rowers. In the responders fT3 concentration decreased (P<0.05) from baseline (BL) during an intense training period [(mean SEM) at 5 weeks by -28.2 (6.2)% and at 10 weeks by -24.9 (7.9)%], then returned towards BL levels (20 weeks compared to BL, P>0.05). Similar changes (P<0.05), at comparable times, were noted for leptin and TSH concentrations in the (-) responder rowers. The non-responder rowers and control subjects displayed no significant (P>0.05) hormone changes over the 20 weeks. The hormone changes observed in the (-) responder rowers were not significantly (P>0.05) correlated with changes in body composition or hydration status during the study. The mechanism for the hormone changes in the (-) responder rowers is unclear. We speculate the decrease in concentrations of TSH and fT3 could be attributable to a lower hypothalamic-pituitary signaling action, and this is related to the decreased leptin concentrations, and could represent a possible means of energy conservation in these exercising women.

  13. Plateau in Muscle Blood Flow during Prolonged Exercise in Miniature Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-25

    133 + 18 Total Hindlimb 13 + 3 79 + 10 79 + 8 83 + 11 Cremaster 10 + 4 34 + 21 36 + 16 58 + 17 a Values are means + SE in ml’min-1.100g- 1 ; n-6...output matched this progressive time dependent response for the swine ( 3 ). In contrast, humans have exhibited a relatively constant muscle blood flow (1...during 󈧢 minutes of treadmill exercise was associated with 25% (62 b-min- I) and 22% increases in heart late and cardiac output, respectively ( 3 ). These

  14. Changes in drop-jump landing biomechanics during prolonged intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Randy J; Cone, John C; Tritsch, Amanda J; Pye, Michele L; Montgomery, Melissa M; Henson, Robert A; Shultz, Sandra J

    2014-03-01

    As injury rates rise in the later stages of sporting activities, a better understanding of lower extremity biomechanics in the later phases of gamelike situations may improve training and injury prevention programs. Lower extremity biomechanics of a drop-jump task (extracted from a principal components analysis) would reveal factors associated with risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury during a 90-minute individualized intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) and for 1 hour following the IEP. Controlled laboratory study. Level 4. Fifty-nine athletes (29 women, 30 men) completed 3 sessions. The first session assessed fitness for an IEP designed to simulate the demands of a soccer match. An experimental session assessed drop-jump biomechanics, after a dynamic warm-up, every 15 minutes during the 90-minute IEP, and for 1 hour following the IEP. A control session with no exercise assessed drop-jump performance at the same intervals. Two biomechanical factors early in the first half (hip flexion at initial contact and hip loading; ankle loading and knee shear force) decreased at the end of the IEP and into the 60-minute recovery period, while a third factor (knee loading) decreased only during the recovery period (P ≤ 0.05). The individualized sport-specific IEP may have more subtle effects on landing biomechanics when compared with short-term, exhaustive fatigue protocols. Potentially injurious landing biomechanics may not occur until the later stages of soccer activity.

  15. Consumption of carbonated and noncarbonated sports drinks during prolonged treadmill exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A J; Navarre, A E; Gisolfi, C V

    1991-09-01

    These studies were done to determine the effect of carbonation and carbohydrate content on either gastric emptying or ad libitum drinking during treadmill exercise in the heat. Four test drinks were used: a 6% carbohydrate, noncarbonated; a 6% carbohydrate, carbonated; a 10% carbohydrate, noncarbonated; and a 10% carbohydrate, carbonated drink. For gastric emptying studies, subjects completed four 1-hr treadmill runs in the heat. They were given 400 mL of test drink at 0 min and 200 mL at 15, 30, and 45 min of exercise. For ad libitum drinking studies, subjects completed four 2-hr treadmill runs in the heat. Gastric residual volumes were similar during the four 1-hr runs. During the 2-hr runs, ad libitum drinking of the four beverages was also similar. Mean values for sweat rate, percentage of body weight lost, and percentage of fluid replaced by ad libitum drinking were similar for the four trials. Similar changes in heart rate, rectal temperature, and ratings of perceived exertion were also observed during the four 2-hr treadmill runs. We conclude that the presence of carbonation in a carbohydrate drink did not have a significant effect on either gastric emptying or ad libitum drinking.

  16. Changes in Drop-Jump Landing Biomechanics During Prolonged Intermittent Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Randy J.; Cone, John C.; Tritsch, Amanda J.; Pye, Michele L.; Montgomery, Melissa M.; Henson, Robert A.; Shultz, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As injury rates rise in the later stages of sporting activities, a better understanding of lower extremity biomechanics in the later phases of gamelike situations may improve training and injury prevention programs. Hypothesis: Lower extremity biomechanics of a drop-jump task (extracted from a principal components analysis) would reveal factors associated with risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury during a 90-minute individualized intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) and for 1 hour following the IEP. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Fifty-nine athletes (29 women, 30 men) completed 3 sessions. The first session assessed fitness for an IEP designed to simulate the demands of a soccer match. An experimental session assessed drop-jump biomechanics, after a dynamic warm-up, every 15 minutes during the 90-minute IEP, and for 1 hour following the IEP. A control session with no exercise assessed drop-jump performance at the same intervals. Results: Two biomechanical factors early in the first half (hip flexion at initial contact and hip loading; ankle loading and knee shear force) decreased at the end of the IEP and into the 60-minute recovery period, while a third factor (knee loading) decreased only during the recovery period (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The individualized sport-specific IEP may have more subtle effects on landing biomechanics when compared with short-term, exhaustive fatigue protocols. Clinical Relevance: Potentially injurious landing biomechanics may not occur until the later stages of soccer activity. PMID:24587862

  17. Effect of a prolonged endurance marathon on vascular endothelial and inflammation markers in runners with exercise-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jee, Haemi; Park, Jaehyun; Oh, Jae-Gun; Lee, Yoon-Hee; Shin, Kyung-A; Kim, Young-Joo

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the changes in endothelial and inflammatory markers in middle-aged male runners with exercise-induced hypertension (EIH) at baseline and at 100-km, 200-km, and 308-km checkpoints during a prolonged endurance ultramarathon. Among a total of 62 ultramarathon volunteers, 8 with systolic blood pressure higher than 210 mm Hg and 8 with normal systolic blood pressure were selected for this study. The subjects were designated to EIH and control (CON) groups. Blood was collected for the analysis of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble E-selectin, leukocytes, creatine kinase, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 showed a significantly greater increase in the EIH group than in the CON group at 100 km and 200 km. Soluble E-selectin also showed a significantly greater increase in the EIH group than in the CON group at 100 km. Leukocytes significantly increased in the EIH group than in the CON group at 308 km. Creatine kinase and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein showed no group differences. Leukocytes, creatine kinase, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein showed delayed-onset increases in both groups. Increased exercise intensity may stimulate greater endothelial responses independent of the inflammatory markers in EIH. The loss of a protective effect may be greater in those with EIH than in CONs. Acknowledging and prescribing proper exercise intensity may be critical in preventing possible vascular-related complications in runners with EIH.

  18. Fluid and electrolyte supplementation after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhances muscle glycogen resynthesis in Standardbred horses.

    PubMed

    Waller, Amanda P; Heigenhauser, George J F; Geor, Raymond J; Spriet, Lawrence L; Lindinger, Michael I

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that postexercise rehydration using a hypotonic electrolyte solution will increase the rate of recovery of whole body hydration, and that this is associated with increased muscle glycogen and electrolyte recovery in horses. Gluteus medius biopsies and jugular venous blood were sampled from six exercise-conditioned Standardbreds on two separate occasions, at rest and for 24 h following a competitive exercise test (CET) designed to simulate the speed and endurance test of a 3-day event. After the CETs, horses were given water ad libitum, and either a hypotonic commercial electrolyte solution (electrolyte) via nasogastric tube, followed by a typical hay/grain meal, or a hay/grain meal alone (control). The CET resulted in decreased total body water and muscle glycogen concentration of 8.4 +/- 0.3 liters and 22.6%, respectively, in the control treatment, and 8.2 +/- 0.4 liters and 21.9% in the electrolyte treatment. Electrolyte resulted in an enhanced rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis and faster restoration of hydration (as evidenced by faster recovery of plasma protein concentration, maintenance of plasma osmolality, and greater muscle intracellular fluid volume) during the recovery period compared with control. There were no differences in muscle Na, K, Cl, or Mg contents between the two treatments. It is concluded that oral administration of a hypotonic electrolyte solution after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhanced the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis during the recovery period compared with control. It is speculated that postexercise dehydration may be one key contributor to the slow muscle glycogen replenishment in horses.

  19. Benefits of exercise training in Spanish prison inmates.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Moreno, F; Cámara-Sánchez, M; Tremblay, J F; Riera-Rubio, V J; Gil-Paisán, L; Lucia, A

    2007-12-01

    Prison populations are growing in Western countries. Imprisoned people usually have a poor health status and an increased risk to suffer chronic debilitating conditions as coinfection with the HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) and/or opioid dependency. We studied the effects of a 4-month concurrent cardiorespiratory and resistance training program on the cardiorespiratory fitness, lower and upper body dynamic strength endurance (6-RM test for bench press and knee-extensor exercise, respectively), muscle mass and quality of life (QOL) of adult prison inmates who are HIV/HVC co-infected and enrolled in a methadone maintenance program (n = 9; mean [SD] age: 37 [3] yrs). We also evaluated a control group (n = 10; 37 [2] yrs). A significant combined effect of group and time was found for peak completed workload (W) (p < 0.01), peak heart rate (HR (peak)) (p < 0.05) and rate of HR decrease at 1-min postexercise compared to HR (peak) (p < 0.05), respectively, in a gradual cycle ergometer test. A significant combined effect of group and time was also found for both bench press and knee-extensor 6-RM tests, respectively (p < 0.05). Supervised exercise training can improve the overall physical fitness of incarcerated people. Our results suggest that this type of intervention could be applied in prisons of Western societies.

  20. The effects of combined glucose-electrolyte and sodium bicarbonate ingestion on prolonged intermittent exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Price, Mike James; Cripps, David

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of combined glucose and sodium bicarbonate ingestion prior to intermittent exercise. Ninemales (mean ± s age 25.4 ± 6.6 years, body mass 78.8 ± 12.0 kg, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max)) 47.0 ± 7 ml · kg · min(-1)) undertook 4 × 45 min intermittent cycling trials including 15 × 10 s sprints one hour after ingesting placebo (PLA), glucose (CHO), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) or a combined CHO and NaHCO3 solution (COMB). Post ingestion blood pH (7.45 ± 0.03, 7.46 ± 0.03, 7.32 ± 0.05, 7.32 ± 0.01) and bicarbonate (30.3 ± 2.1, 30.7 ± 1.8, 24.2 ± 1.2, 24.0 ± 1.8 mmol · l(-1)) were greater for NaHCO3 and COMB when compared to PLA and CHO, remaining elevated throughout exercise (main effect for trial; P < 0.05). Blood lactate concentration was greatest throughout exercise for NaHCO3 and COMB (main effect for trial; P < 0.05). Blood glucose concentration was greatest 15 min post-ingestion for CHO followed by COMB, NaHCO3 and PLA (7.13 ± 0.60, 5.58 ± 0.75, 4.51 ± 0.56, 4.46 ± 0.59 mmol · l(-1), respectively; P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal distress was lower during COMB compared to NaHCO3 at 15 min post-ingestion (P < 0.05). No differences were observed for sprint performance between trials (P = 1.00). The results of this study suggest that a combined CHO and NaHCO3 beverage reduced gastrointestinal distress and CHO availability but did not improve performance. Although there was no effect on performance an investigation of the effects in more highly trained individuals may be warranted.

  1. Absence of humoral mediated 5′AMP-activated protein kinase activation in human skeletal muscle and adipose tissue during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Jonas Møller; Johnsen, Anders Bo; Birk, Jesper B; Nielsen, Jakob Nis; Jensen, Bente Rona; Hellsten, Ylva; Richter, Erik A; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2007-01-01

    5′AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) exists as a heterotrimer comprising a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits. The AMPK system is activated under conditions of cellular stress, indicated by an increase in the AMP/ATP ratio, as observed, e.g. in muscles during contractile activity. AMPK was originally thought to be activated only by local intracellular mechanisms. However, recently it has become apparent that AMPK in mammals is also regulated by humoral substances, e.g. catecholamines. We studied whether humoral factors released during exercise regulate AMPK activity in contracting and resting muscles as well as in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in humans. In resting leg muscle and adipose tissue the AMPK activity was not up-regulated by humoral factors during one-legged knee extensor exercise even when arm cranking exercise, inducing a ∼20-fold increase in plasma catecholamine level, was added simultaneously. In exercising leg muscle the AMPK activity was increased by one-legged knee extensor exercise eliciting a whole body respiratory load of only 30% but was not further increased by adding arm cranking exercise. In conclusion, during exercise with combined leg kicking and arm cranking, the AMPK activity in human skeletal muscle is restricted to contracting muscle without influence of marked increased catecholamine levels. Also, with this type of exercise the catecholamines or other humoral factors do not seem to be physiological regulators of AMPK in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. PMID:17962330

  2. The effect of prolonged light intensity exercise in the heat on executive function.

    PubMed

    Parker, Sarah M; Erin, Jennifer R; Pryor, Riana R; Khorana, Priya; Suyama, Joe; Guyette, Frank X; Reis, Steven E; Hostler, David

    2013-09-01

    When people are involved in outdoor activities, it is important to be able to assess a situation and make rational decisions. The goal of this study is to determine the effects of 90 minutes of light-intensity exercise in a hot environment on executive functioning capabilities of healthy individuals. In this prospective laboratory study, 40 healthy male and female subjects 18 to 45 years of age performed treadmill exercise while wearing athletic clothing and a backpack in either a hot or temperate environment. Vital signs, core and skin temperature, and perceptual measures (thermal sensation, sweating, comfort, and perceived exertion) were measured before, during, and after the treadmill test. Cognitive function was measured before and after the treadmill test using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and a Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT). Subjects in the hot condition reached a similar core temp of 38.2° ± 0.5°C vs 37.7° ± 0.3°C (P = .325) in the temperate group but had a higher heart rate (P < .001) and skin temperature (P < .001). Hot and normal temperature groups did not differ in their PVT performance. There were more correct responses (P < .001), fewer errors (P < .001), and more conceptual responses (P = .001) on the WCST after exertion in both the hot room and normal temperature room conditions. Perseverations and perseverative errors (P = .002) decreased in both groups after exertion. Conditions of mild heat stress coupled with modest rehydration and short hiking treks do not appear to negatively affect executive function or vigilance. Copyright © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of inspiratory resistance to prolonged exercise in a hot environment wearing protective clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetté, Maurice; Quenneville, Josée; Thoden, James; Livingstone, Sydney

    1992-09-01

    The effects of inspiratory resistance on prolonged work in a hot environment wearing a nuclear, bacteriological and chemical warfare (NBCW) mask and overgarment were assessed in 10 males. Subjects walked on a treadmill at 5 km/hr, 2% gradient, until their core temperature reached 39° C or for a duration of 90 min. Rectal temperature, heart rate, ventilation, oxygen consumption and rate of perceived breathing were measured. There were no differences between break-point time without the canister (62.2 ± 21 min) and with the canister (58.9 ± 17 min). Regression analysis indicated that the mean core temperature increased by 0.02° C for every minute of work performed and heart rate by 6 beats/min for every increase of 0.2° C in core temperature. Reduction in heat transfer brought about by wearing the protective overgarment and mask with or without the canister will significantly increase core temperature and limit the performance of moderate work to approximately 1 h in a moderately fit individual.

  4. Changes in exercise heart rate in lowlanders after prolonged stay at high altitude (4000 m).

    PubMed

    Gupta, J S; Dua, G L; Srinivasulu, N; Malhortra, M S

    1975-07-01

    Studies were conducted on cardiac frequency during submaximal and maximal work on 26 sea-level residents prior to transfer to and during stay at high altitude for 1, 10, and 20 months. Maximal O2 uptake and performance in a 1.6 km run were observed. Results indicated a significant drop in Vo2 after arrival at altitude followed by recovery with further stay. The mean maximum heart rate decreased to 182.8 beats/min after 1 month at high altitude from a seal-level mean value of 188.4 beats/min. It increased to 199.2 beats/min and decreased to 185.6 beats/min after 10 and 20 months, respectively. Heart rate, during submaximal work requiring 1.0 and 1.5 102/min, indicated the highest rate after 1 month at altitude and decreased with prolonged stay, but remained higher than the sea-level value. These changes were compared with the high-altitude native residents.

  5. Eccentric exercise and delayed onset muscle soreness of the quadriceps induce adjustments in agonist-antagonist activity, which are dependent on the motor task.

    PubMed

    Vila-Chã, C; Hassanlouei, H; Farina, D; Falla, D

    2012-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of eccentric exercise and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the quadriceps on agonist-antagonist activity during a range of motor tasks. Ten healthy volunteers (age, mean ± SD, 24.9 ± 3.2 years) performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) and explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors followed by isometric contractions at 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30% MVC at baseline, immediately after and 24 h after eccentric exercise of the quadriceps. During each task, force of the knee extensors and surface EMG of the vasti and hamstrings muscles were recorded concurrently. Rate of force development (RFD) was computed from the explosive isometric contraction, and the coefficient of variation of the force (CoV) signal was estimated from the submaximal contractions. Twenty-four hours after exercise, the subjects rated their perceived pain intensity as 4.1 ± 1.2 (score out of 10). The maximum RFD and MVC of the knee extensors was reduced immediately post- and 24 h after eccentric exercise compared to baseline (average across both time points: 19.1 ± 17.1% and 11.9 ± 9.8% lower, respectively, P < 0.05). The CoV for force during the submaximal contractions was greater immediately after eccentric exercise (up to 66% higher than baseline, P < 0.001) and remained higher 24 h post-exercise during the presence of DOMS (P < 0.01). For the explosive and MVC tasks, the EMG amplitude of the vasti muscles decreased immediately after exercise and was accompanied by increased antagonist EMG for the explosive contraction only. On the contrary, reduced force steadiness was accompanied by a general increase in EMG amplitude of the vasti muscles and was accompanied by increased antagonist activity, but only at higher force levels (>15% MVC). This study shows that eccentric exercise and subsequent DOMS of the quadriceps reduce the maximal force, rate of force development and force steadiness of the knee extensors, and is

  6. Effect of acute exercise and exercise training on VEGF splice variants in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lotte; Pilegaard, Henriette; Neufer, P Darrell; Hellsten, Ylva

    2004-08-01

    The present study investigated the effect of an acute exercise bout on the mRNA response of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) splice variants in untrained and trained human skeletal muscle. Seven habitually active young men performed one-legged knee-extensor exercise training at an intensity corresponding to approximately 70% of the maximal workload in an incremental test five times/week for 4 wk. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the trained and untrained leg 40 h after the last training session. The subjects then performed 3 h of two-legged knee-extensor exercise, and biopsies were obtained from both legs after 0, 2, 6, and 24 h of recovery. Real-time PCR was used to examine the expression of VEGF mRNA containing exon 1 and 2 (all VEGF isoforms), exon 6 or exon 7, and VEGF(165) mRNA. Acute exercise induced an increase (P < 0.05) in total VEGF mRNA levels as well as VEGF(165) and VEGF splice variants containing exon 7 at 0, 2, and 6 h of recovery. The increase in VEGF mRNA was higher in the untrained than in the trained leg (P < 0.05). The results suggest that in human skeletal muscle, acute exercise increases total VEGF mRNA, an increase that appears to be explained mainly by an increase in VEGF(165) mRNA. Furthermore, 4 wk of training attenuated the exercise-induced response in skeletal muscle VEGF(165) mRNA.

  7. Sex differences in the response to resistance exercise training in older people.

    PubMed

    Da Boit, Mariasole; Sibson, Rachael; Meakin, Judith R; Aspden, Richard M; Thies, Frank; Mangoni, Arduino A; Gray, Stuart Robert

    2016-06-01

    Resistance exercise training is known to be effective in increasing muscle mass in older people. Acute measurement of protein metabolism data has indicated that the magnitude of response may differ between sexes. We compared adaptive responses in muscle mass and function to 18 weeks resistance exercise training in a cohort of older (>65 years) men and women. Resistance exercise training improved knee extensor maximal torque, 4 m walk time, time to complete five chair rises, muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA) and muscle quality with no effect on muscle fat/water ratio or plasma glucose, insulin, triacylglycerol, IL-6, and TNF-α Differences between sexes were observed for knee extensor maximal torque and muscle quality with greater increases observed in men versus women (P < 0.05). Maximal torque increased by 15.8 ± 10.6% in women and 41.7 ± 25.5% in men, whereas muscle quality increased by 8.8 ± 17.5% in women and by 33.7 ± 25.6% in men. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated a difference in the magnitude of adaptation, of some of the outcome measures employed, in response to 18 weeks of resistance exercise training between men and women. The mechanisms underlying this observation remain to be established.

  8. Comparison of joint kinetics during free weight and flywheel resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Loren Z F; Salem, George J

    2006-08-01

    The most common modality for resistance exercise is free weight resistance. Alternative methods of providing external resistance have been investigated, in particular for use in microgravity environments such as space flight. One alternative modality is flywheel inertial resistance, which generates resistance as a function of the mass, distribution of mass, and angular acceleration of the flywheel. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize net joint kinetics of multijoint exercises performed with a flywheel inertial resistance device in comparison to free weights. Eleven trained men and women performed the front squat, lunge, and push press on separate days with free weight or flywheel resistance, while instrumented for biomechanical analysis. Front squats performed with flywheel resistance required greater contribution of the hip and ankle, and less contribution of the knee, compared to free weight. Push presses performed with flywheel resistance had similar impulse requirements at the knee compared to free weight, but greater impulse requirement at the hip and ankle. As used in this investigation, flywheel inertial resistance increases the demand on the hip extensors and ankle plantarflexors and decreases the mechanical demand on the knee extensors for lower extremity exercises such as the front squat and lunge. Exercises involving dynamic lower and upper extremity actions, such as the push press, may benefit from flywheel inertial resistance, due to the increased mechanical demand on the knee extensors.

  9. Cycling time trial performance may be impaired by whey protein and L-alanine intake during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Schroer, Adam B; Saunders, Michael J; Baur, Daniel A; Womack, Christopher J; Luden, Nicholas D

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies reported that adding protein (PRO) to carbohydrate (CHO) solutions enhances endurance performance. The ergogenic effect may be a function of additional protein/amino acid calories, but this has not been examined. In addition, although supplemental L-alanine (ALA) is readily oxidized during exercise, the subsequent impact on metabolism and prolonged endurance performance is unknown. The purpose of this investigation was to independently gauge the impact of whey PRO hydrolysate and ALA supplementation on performance and various physiological parameters. Eight cyclists (age: 22.3 ± 5.6 yr, weight: 70.0 ± 8.0 kg, VO2max: 59.4 ± 4.9 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) performed 120 min of constant-load cycling (55% of peak power) followed by a 30-km time trial (TT) under placebo (PLA), PRO, and ALA conditions. Magnitude-based qualitative inferences were applied to evaluate treatment differences and data are presented as percent difference between treatments ± 90% confidence limit. Both ALA (2.1 ± 2.7%) and PRO intake (-2.1 ± 2.2%) possibly harmed performance compared with PLA. Of interest, heart rate was possibly lower with ALA than PLA at 20- (-2.7 ± 3.4%) and 120-min (-1.7 ± 2.9%) of constant-load cycling and the serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) response to 120 min of cycling was likely attenuated with PRO compared with PLA (PLA, 6.6 ± 3.7 fold vs. PRO, 2.9 ± 1.8 fold). In addition, blood glucose levels were lower with PRO than PLA at 20- (-8.8 ± 2.3%; very likely) and 120-min (-4.9 ± 4.6%; likely) of constant-load cycling. Although ALA intake appears to lower HR and PRO ingestion dampens the IL-6 response to exercise, the ingestion of PRO (without CHO) or ALA does not enhance, and may actually impair, performance following prolonged cycling.

  10. The effects of acute or chronic ingestion of propranolol or metoprolol on the metabolic and hormonal responses to prolonged, submaximal exercise in hypertensive men.

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, I A; Bennett, T; Brown, A M; Wilcox, R G; Skene, A M

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the effects of single oral doses of, and of 28 days treatment with, placebo, propranolol or metoprolol, on the metabolic and hormonal responses to prolonged exercise in hypertensive men. Blood glucose levels fell during exercise on all occasions. No additional effects of the beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, compared to placebo, were observed. The exercise-induced increase in plasma potassium was enhanced after a single dose of propranolol or metoprolol, and also after chronic treatment with propranolol. Chronic treatment with either drug led to an increase in plasma potassium levels at rest. The growth hormone response to exercise was potentiated by a single dose of metoprolol or propranolol, and after chronic treatment with the drugs. A single dose of propranolol (but not metoprolol) was associated with a marked increase in plasma cortisol and adrenaline levels during exercise. After chronic treatment no such increase occurred. In both the acute and chronic phases of the study, blood lactate levels were higher during exercise in the presence of either propranolol or metoprolol compared to placebo, whereas non-esterified fatty acid levels were lower. A single dose of metoprolol produced a significantly greater reduction in blood glycerol levels during exercise than a single dose of propranolol. After chronic treatment, both propranolol and metoprolol produced similar reductions in blood glycerol levels during exercise. After a single dose, both drugs significantly augmented the increase in plasma noradrenaline levels during exercise. A similar effect was seen after chronic treatment. PMID:6370283

  11. Effects of low-intensity resistance exercise with short interset rest period on muscular function in middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Yudai; Ishii, Naokata

    2002-02-01

    We investigated the effect of low-intensity resistance exercise training on muscular size and strength where the interset rest period was shortened so as to reduce the metabolite clearance. Female subjects (aged 45.4 +/- 9.5 years, n = 10) performed bilateral knee extension exercises in a seated position on an isotonic leg extension machine. The exercise sessions consisted of 3 sets of exercise at a mean intensity of approximately 50% 1RM with an interset rest period of 30 seconds and was performed twice a week for a period of 12 weeks. The strength and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the knee extensors and flexors were examined with an isokinetic dynamometer and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. The CSAs of the knee extensors and flexors increased by 7.1 +/- 1.6% (p < 0.01, Wilcoxon signed rank test) and 2.5 +/- 1.4% (not significant), respectively. Isometric and isokinetic strengths increased significantly (p < 0.01) at all velocities examined, whereas no significant change was observed in those of knee flexors. These results indicate that a low-intensity resistance exercise with a short interset rest period is substantially effective in inducing muscular hypertrophy and concomitant increase in strength.

  12. Morning breathing exercises prolong lifespan by improving hyperventilation in people living with respiratory cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Jie; Wang, Shan-Huan; Ling, Wei; Geng, Li-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Yu, Lan; Chen, Jun; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Disturbance of oxygen–carbon dioxide homeostasis has an impact on cancer. Little is known about the effect of breath training on cancer patients. Here we report our 10-year experience with morning breathing exercises (MBE) in peer-support programs for cancer survivors. We performed a cohort study to investigate long-term surviving patients with lung cancer (LC) and nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) who practiced MBE on a daily basis. End-tidal breath holding time (ETBHT) after MBE was measured to reflect improvement in alveolar O2 pressure and alveolar CO2 pressure capacity. Patients (female, 57) with a diagnosis of LC (90 patients) and NPC (32 patients) were included. Seventy-six of them were MBE trainees. Average survival years were higher in MBE trainees (9.8 ± 9.5) than nontrainees (3.3 ± 2.8). The 5-year survival rate was 56.6% for MBE trainees and 19.6% for nontrainees (RR = 5.371, 95% CI = 2.271–12.636, P < 0.001). Survival probability of the trainees further increased 17.9-fold for the 10-year survival rate. Compared with the nontrainees, the MBE trainees shows no significant differences in ETBHT (baseline, P = 0.795; 1–2 years, P = 0.301; 3–4 years, P = 0.059) at baseline and within the first 4 years. From the 5th year onwards, significant improvements were observed in ETBHT, aCO2%, PaCO2, and PaO2 (P = 0.028). In total, 18 trainees (40.9%) and 20 nontrainees (74.1%) developed new metastasis (RR = 0.315, 95% CI = 0.108–0.919, P = 0.031). MBE might benefit for the long-term survival in patients with LC and NPC due to improvement in hyperventilation. PMID:28079815

  13. Effects of prolonged head-down bed rest with and without fly-wheel exercise on heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Curnier, Daniel; Bernard, Jacques; Beroud, Stephane; Costes-Salon, Marie-Claude; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Pathak, Atul; Galinier, Michel

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prolonged Head down bed rest (HDBR) (90 days) on heart rate variability (HRV) in 25 healthy male volunteers (mean age: 33 y). Nine subjects performed flywheel resistance muscular training. 24h-ECG recordings were performed in pre- HDBR (D-12, D-3), HDBR (D 15, D 32, D 62, D 85) and recovery (D+4). The mean HR, SDNN and coefficient of variation (SDNN normalized by HR) reflecting overall HRV were calculated as well as the power in Low (LF) and High (HF) frequencies (24h- period). HDBR induced a significant decrease in HRV favoured by inactivity. LF and LF/HF mainly under sympathetic influence decreased significantly on D15 and then tended to stabilise around baseline values. HF reflecting parasympathetic modulation decreased with HDBR but some changes occurred in pre-HDBR, in relation with the experiment conditions, and raised the issue of reference values. No exercise effect was observed.

  14. The effect of hip abductor exercise on muscle strength and trunk stability after an injury of the lower extremities

    PubMed Central

    Kak, Hwang-Bo; Park, Sun-Ja; Park, Byun-Joon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The gluteus medius, a hip abductor, controls femoral movement and stabilizes the pelvis during lower extremity mobilization. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 subjects into control and experimental groups. [Methods] This randomized controlled study included patients who underwent arthroscopy after meniscus injury and started a rehabilitative exercise program 8 weeks after surgery. Subjects were divided into the experimental gluteus medius resistance exercise group (n=12) and the control group (n=12). The study investigated muscle strength and balance of the flexors, extensors, and abductors of the knee for 8 weeks. [Results] Strengths of knee extensors in patients who underwent rehabilitative exercise for 8 weeks were measured. Strength of the knee extensors of the experimental and control groups increased by 40% and 31%, respectively; strength of the hip flexors of the experimental and control groups increased by 31% and 18%, respectively. Strength of the hip joint muscles showed a 40% increase in the experimental group and a 14% increase in the control group. However, there was a significant difference (18%) in muscle strength of the hip abductors between the groups. Measurements of trunk lateral flexion showed a difference within a group, but no intergroup difference was found. [Conclusion] This study investigated the effect of hip abductor exercise on muscular strength and trunk stability in patients with a meniscus injury. PMID:27134387

  15. Temporal strength changes from resistance exercise and albuterol on unloaded muscle.

    PubMed

    Caruso, John F; Hamill, John L; Yamauchi, Miki; Saito, Kyoko; Cook, Tim D; Mercado, Dean R

    2008-07-01

    To assess unloaded knee extensor temporal strength changes, healthy subjects without asthma performed 40 continuous days of unilateral limb suspension, whereby their left leg refrained from normal weight-bearing and ambulatory activity. During the 40-day period, subjects performed resistance exercise (REX) with their unloaded leg on an inertial resistance ergometer and, as part of a double-blind design, consumed the maximal oral therapeutic dosage of albuterol (i.e., 16 mg.d) or a placebo (i.e., lactose) with no crossover. Workout data were partitioned into 4 10-day periods that ran consecutively. Dependent strength variables included concentric total work, eccentric total work, concentric average power (CAP), and eccentric average power (EAP). Dependent variables were analyzed with 5 (time) x 2 (group) x 2 (gender) mixed factorial analyses of variance and the Tukey honestly significant difference test. Concentric total work, CAP, and EAP each demonstrated a time-group-gender (p < 0.05) interaction. Female REX-placebo subjects had the greatest percentage of unloaded knee extensor strength loss. However, female REX-albuterol subjects fared best throughout the 40-day period and incurred significant unloaded knee extensor strength gains. Differences in strength changes between male and female REX-albuterol subjects was likely due to the higher relative dosage administered to the latter, as body mass showed a gender (i.e., men > women) effect. Future research may elucidate the ideal dose-response relationship for REX-albuterol treatment for use aboard manned space flights and in other disuse models. Coaches and practitioners should carefully examine their sport-governing bodies' rules on albuterol administration and give the drug only if an athlete's health warrants such treatment.

  16. Electrical stimulation ventilatory feedback facilitates maintenance of a prolonged expiration pattern during exercise: A proof-of-concept study in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Yamahara, Jun; Ito, Kenichi; Nonaka, Koji

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at verifying the safety and effects of electrical stimulation ventilatory feedback (ESVF) to provide feedback during expiration, which may assist with breathing control in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because this is a new therapy, we examined the feasibility of the therapy in healthy adults. The 23 healthy adult participants were randomized into two groups: a stimulation group that received ESVF and a placebo group with the ESVF device attached, but not activated. Sensory stimulation was provided at a frequency of 20 Hz and pulse duration of 200 μs. During breathing training, participants practiced a prolonged expiration pattern and were instructed to maintain the breathing pattern during exercise. A variety of parameters such as respiratory time from the gas analyzer monitor and quantitative load were measured during lower-extremity cycle ergometer exercise. The primary outcome was the expiratory to inspiratory time ratio, which was significantly higher in the stimulation group than in the placebo group, both during and after exercise. No side effects were reported during the use of electrical stimulation. Therefore, ESVF is safe and facilitates maintenance of a prolonged expiration pattern during and after exercise.

  17. Exercise metabolism in human skeletal muscle exposed to prior eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Asp, Sven; Daugaard, Jens R; Kristiansen, Søren; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik A

    1998-01-01

    The effects of unaccustomed eccentric exercise on exercise metabolism during a subsequent bout of graded concentric exercise were investigated in seven healthy male subjects. Arterial and bilateral femoral venous catheters were inserted 2 days after eccentric exercise of one thigh (eccentric thigh) and blood samples were taken before and during graded two-legged concentric knee-extensor exercise. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the eccentric and control vastus lateralis before (rest) and after (post) the concentric exercise bout. Maximal knee-extensor concentric exercise capacity was decreased by an average of 23 % (P < 0.05) in the eccentric compared with the control thigh. The resting muscle glycogen content was lower in the eccentric thigh than in the control thigh (402 ± 30 mmol (kg dry wt)−1vs. 515 ± 26 mmol (kg dry wt)−1, means ± s.e.m., P < 0.05), and following the two-legged concentric exercise this difference substantially increased (190 ± 46 mmol (kg dry wt)−1vs. 379 ± 58 mmol (kg dry wt)−1, P < 0.05) despite identical power and duration of exercise with the two thighs. There was no measurable difference in glucose uptake between the eccentric and control thigh before or during the graded two-legged concentric exercise. Lactate release was higher from the eccentric thigh at rest and, just before termination of the exercise bout, release of lactate decreased from this thigh (suggesting decreased glycogenolysis), whereas no decrease was found from the contralateral control thigh. Lower glycerol release from the eccentric thigh during the first, lighter part of the exercise (P < 0.05) suggested impaired triacylglycerol breakdown. At rest, sarcolemmal GLUT4 glucose transporter content and glucose transport were similar in the two thighs, and concentric exercise increased sarcolemmal GLUT4 content and glucose transport capacity similarly in the two thighs. It is concluded that in muscle exposed to prior eccentric contractions, exercise at a

  18. Ingestion of glucose or sucrose prevents liver but not muscle glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise in trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Javier T; Fuchs, Cas J; Smith, Fiona E; Thelwall, Pete E; Taylor, Roy; Stevenson, Emma J; Trenell, Michael I; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to define the effect of glucose ingestion compared with sucrose ingestion on liver and muscle glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise. Fourteen cyclists completed two 3-h bouts of cycling at 50% of peak power output while ingesting either glucose or sucrose at a rate of 1.7 g/min (102 g/h). Four cyclists performed an additional third test for reference in which only water was consumed. We employed (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine liver and muscle glycogen concentrations before and after exercise. Expired breath was sampled during exercise to estimate whole body substrate use. After glucose and sucrose ingestion, liver glycogen levels did not show a significant decline after exercise (from 325 ± 168 to 345 ± 205 and 321 ± 177 to 348 ± 170 mmol/l, respectively; P > 0.05), with no differences between treatments. Muscle glycogen concentrations declined (from 101 ± 49 to 60 ± 34 and 114 ± 48 to 67 ± 34 mmol/l, respectively; P < 0.05), with no differences between treatments. Whole body carbohydrate utilization was greater with sucrose (2.03 ± 0.43 g/min) vs. glucose (1.66 ± 0.36 g/min; P < 0.05) ingestion. Both liver (from 454 ± 33 to 283 ± 82 mmol/l; P < 0.05) and muscle (from 111 ± 46 to 67 ± 31 mmol/l; P < 0.01) glycogen concentrations declined during exercise when only water was ingested. Both glucose and sucrose ingestion prevent liver glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise. Sucrose ingestion does not preserve liver glycogen concentrations more than glucose ingestion. However, sucrose ingestion does increase whole body carbohydrate utilization compared with glucose ingestion. This trial was registered at https://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02110836. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Effectiveness of therapeutic physical exercise in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alba-Martín, Pablo; Gallego-Izquierdo, T; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Romero-Franco, Natalia; Núñez-Nagy, Susana; Pecos-Martín, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of conservative treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome with physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] A computer-based review conducted of four databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, PEDro, and the University Library) was completed based on the inclusion criteria of patellofemoral pain syndrome patients treated with physical exercise methods and examination with self-reported pain and/or functional questionnaires. [Results] The findings of ten clinical trials of moderate to high quality were evaluated to determine the effectiveness of physical exercise as conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Conclusion] The intervention programs that were most effective in relieving pain and improving function in patellofemoral pain syndrome included proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and strengthening exercises for the hip external rotator and abductor muscles and knee extensor muscles.

  20. Control of gluconeogenic genes during intense/prolonged exercise: hormone-independent effect of muscle-derived IL-6 on hepatic tissue and PEPCK mRNA.

    PubMed

    Banzet, Sébastien; Koulmann, Nathalie; Simler, Nadine; Sanchez, Hervé; Chapot, Rachel; Serrurier, Bernard; Peinnequin, André; Bigard, Xavier

    2009-12-01

    Prolonged intense exercise is challenging for the liver to maintain plasma glucose levels. Hormonal changes cannot fully account for exercise-induced hepatic glucose production (HGP). Contracting skeletal muscles release interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine able to increase endogenous glucose production during exercise. However, whether this is attributable to a direct effect of IL-6 on liver remains unknown. Here, we studied hepatic glycogen, gluconeogenic genes, and IL-6 signaling in response to one bout of exhaustive running exercise in rats. To determine whether IL-6 can modulate gluconeogenic gene mRNA independently of exercise, we injected resting rats with recombinant IL-6. Exhaustive exercise resulted in a profound decrease in liver glycogen and an increase in gluconeogenic gene mRNA levels, phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G6P), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha), suggesting a key role for gluconeogenesis in hepatic glucose production. This was associated to an active IL-6 signaling in liver tissue, as shown by signal transducer and activator of transcription and CAAT/enhancer binding protein-beta phosphorylation and IL-6-responsive gene mRNA levels at the end of exercise. Recombinant IL-6 injection resulted in an increase in IL-6-responsive gene mRNA levels in the liver. We found a dose-dependent increase in PEPCK gene mRNA strongly correlated with IL-6-induced gene mRNA levels. No changes in G6P and PGC-1alpha mRNA levels were found. Taken together, our results suggest that, during very demanding exercise, muscle-derived IL-6 could help increase HGP by directly upregulating PEPCK mRNA abundance.

  1. The effect of the menstrual cycle and water consumption on physiological responses during prolonged exercise at moderate intensity in hot conditions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Ishijima, Toshimichi; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2016-09-01

    Reproductive hormones are likely to be involved in thermoregulation through body fluid dynamics. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of the menstrual cycle and water consumption on physiological responses to prolonged exercise at moderate intensity in hot conditions. Eight healthy young women with regular menstrual cycles performed cycling exercise for 90 minutes at 50% V̇O2peak intensity during the low progesterone (LP) level phase and high progesterone (HP) level phase, with or without water consumption, under hot conditions (30°C, 50% relative humidity). For the water consumption trials, subjects ingested water equivalent to the loss in body weight that occurred in the earlier non-consumption trial. For all four trials, rectal temperature, cardiorespiratory responses, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured. Throughout the 90-minute exercise period, rectal temperatures during HP were higher than during LP by an average of 0.4 °C in the non-consumption trial (P<0.01) and 0.2 °C in the water consumption trial (P<0.05). During exercise, water consumption affected the changes in rectal temperature and heat rate (HR) during HP, but it did not exert these effects during LP. Furthermore, we found a negative correlation between estradiol levels and rectal temperature during LP. During prolonged exercise at moderate intensity under hot conditions, water consumption is likely to be useful for suppressing the associated increase in body temperature and HR, particularly during HP, whereas estradiol appears to be useful for suppressing the increase in rectal temperature during LP.

  2. Longevity of men capable of prolonged vigorous physical exercise: a 32 year follow up of 2259 participants in the Dutch eleven cities ice skating tour.

    PubMed Central

    van Saase, J L; Noteboom, W M; Vandenbroucke, J P

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the long term survival of a group of athletes taking prolonged vigorous physical exercise to that of the general population. DESIGN--Follow up of a cohort of participants in the Dutch eleven cities ice skating tour (a race and recreational tour) over a distance of 200 kilometers. SETTING--Data on participation from the organising committee and data on mortality from all municipalities in The Netherlands. SUBJECTS--2259 Male athletes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Comparison of all cause mortality in male participants in the tour with that in the general population of The Netherlands. RESULTS--The standardised mortality ratio for all participants during 32 years of follow up was 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.68 to 0.85), and 0.90 (0.48 to 1.44) for participants in the race, and 0.72 (0.60 to 0.86) for participants in the recreational tour who finished within the time limit. CONCLUSIONS--The capacity for prolonged and vigorous physical exercise, particularly if the exercise is recreational, is a strong indicator of longevity. Images p1409-a p1411-a PMID:2279154

  3. Ingesting Isomaltulose Versus Fructose-Maltodextrin During Prolonged Moderate-Heavy Exercise Increases Fat Oxidation but Impairs Gastrointestinal Comfort and Cycling Performance.

    PubMed

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Carstens, Matthew; Millen, Aletta M

    2015-10-01

    Certain commercial carbohydrate replacement products include slowly absorbed carbohydrates such as isomaltulose. Few studies have investigated the metabolic effects of ingesting isomaltulose during exercise and none have evaluated exercise performance and gastrointestinal comfort. Nine male cyclists participated postprandially during three trials of 2-h steady-state (S-S) exercise (60%Wmax) followed by a 16 km time trial (TT) while ingesting 63 g·h-1 of either, 0.8:1 fructose: maltodextrin (F:M) or isomaltulose (ISO) or placebo- flavored water (PL). Data were analyzed by magnitude-based inferences. During S-S exercise, ISO and PL similarly increased plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration (mean change ISO versus F:M: 0.18, 90%CI ±0.21 mmol·L-1, 88% likelihood) and fat oxidation (10, 90%CI ±9 g, 89% likelihood) while decreasing carbohydrate oxidation (-36, 90%CI ±30.2 g, 91% likelihood) compared with F:M, despite equal elevations in blood glucose concentration with ISO and F:M. Rating of stomach cramps and bloating increased progressively with ISO (rating: 0-90 min S-S, weak; 120 min S-S, moderate; TT, strong) compared with F:M and PL (0-120 min S-S and TT, very weak). TT performance was substantially slower with ISO (mean change: 1.5, 90%CI ±1.4 min, 94% likely harmful) compared with F:M. The metabolic response of ISO ingestion during moderate exercise to increase NEFA availability and fat oxidation despite elevating blood glucose concentration is anomalous for a carbohydrate supplement. However, ingesting isomaltulose at a continuous high frequency to meet the recommended carbohydrate replacement dose, results in severe gastrointestinal symptoms during prolonged or high intensity exercise and negatively affects exercise performance compared with fructose-maltodextrin supplementation.

  4. Effectiveness of Aquatic Exercise in Improving Lower Limb Strength in Musculoskeletal Conditions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Sophie; McClelland, Jodie; Mentiplay, Benjamin; Geigle, Paula; Rahmann, Ann; Clark, Ross

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of aquatic exercise in improving lower limb strength in people with musculoskeletal conditions. A systematic search used 5 databases, including MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, SPORTDiscus, and The Cochrane Library. Randomized controlled trials evaluating aquatic exercise with a resistance training component for adults with musculoskeletal conditions compared with no intervention or land-based exercise were identified. Fifteen studies from the initial yield of 1214 met these criteria. Data related to participant demographics, study design, and methods, interventions, and outcomes, including numerical means and SDs, were extracted independently by 2 reviewers. Nine of the 15 studies were of high quality, scoring at least 6 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale. Limited consideration of the prescription of resistance in the aquatic exercise and application of resistance training principles existed. Low- or very low-quality evidence indicates there was no difference in average effect between aquatic exercise and no exercise in improving hip abductor strength (standardized mean difference [SMD], .28; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.04 to .59), knee extensor strength (SMD, .18; 95% CI, -.03 to .40), knee flexor strength (SMD, .13; 95% CI, -.20 to .45), or lower limb endurance (SMD, .35; 95% CI, -.06 to .77). Low-quality evidence indicates no difference in average effect between aquatic and land exercise for knee extensor (SMD, -.24; 95% CI, -.49 to .02) or flexor strength (SMD, -.15; 95% CI, -.53 to .22). It is likely that the inadequate application of resistance in water is a significant contributor to the limited effectiveness of aquatic exercise interventions in improving hip and knee muscle strength in people with musculoskeletal conditions. Future research is needed to quantify resistance with aquatic exercises and to determine if using opportunities for greater resistance in aquatic rehabilitation and appropriate resistance

  5. Cardiac vagal modulation of heart rate during prolonged submaximal exercise in animals with healed myocardial infarctions: effects of training.

    PubMed

    Kukielka, Monica; Seals, Douglas R; Billman, George E

    2006-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of long-duration exercise on heart rate variability [as a marker of cardiac vagal tone (VT)]. Heart rate variability (time series analysis) was measured in mongrel dogs (n = 24) with healed myocardial infarctions during 1 h of submaximal exercise (treadmill running at 6.4 km/h at 10% grade). Long-duration exercise provoked a significant (ANOVA, all P < 0.01, means +/- SD) increase in heart rate (1st min, 165.3 +/- 15.6 vs. last min, 197.5 +/- 21.5 beats/min) and significant reductions in high frequency (0.24 to 1.04 Hz) power (VT: 1st min, 3.7 +/- 1.5 vs. last min, 1.0 +/- 0.9 ln ms(2)), R-R interval range (1st min, 107.9 +/- 38.3 vs. last min, 28.8 +/- 13.2 ms), and R-R interval SD (1st min, 24.3 +/- 7.7 vs. last min 6.3 +/- 1.7 ms). Because endurance exercise training can increase cardiac vagal regulation, the studies were repeated after either a 10-wk exercise training (n = 9) or a 10-wk sedentary period (n = 7). After training was completed, long-duration exercise elicited smaller increases in heart rate (pretraining: 1st min, 156.0 +/- 13.8 vs. last min, 189.6 +/- 21.9 beats/min; and posttraining: 1st min, 149.8 +/- 14.6 vs. last min, 172.7 +/- 8.8 beats/min) and smaller reductions in heart rate variability (e.g., VT, pretraining: 1st min, 4.2 +/- 1.7 vs. last min, 0.9 +/- 1.1 ln ms(2); and posttraining: 1st min, 4.8 +/- 1.1 vs. last min, 2.0 +/- 0.6 ln ms(2)). The response to long-duration exercise did not change in the sedentary animals. Thus the heart rate increase that accompanies long-duration exercise results, at least in part, from reductions in cardiac vagal regulation. Furthermore, exercise training attenuated these exercise-induced reductions in heart rate variability, suggesting maintenance of a higher cardiac vagal activity during exercise in the trained state.

  6. Appetite-regulatory hormone responses on the day following a prolonged bout of moderate-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    King, James A; Garnham, Jack O; Jackson, Andrew P; Kelly, Benjamin M; Xenophontos, Soteris; Nimmo, Myra A

    2015-03-15

    Exercise increases energy expenditure however acutely this does not cause compensatory changes in appetite or food intake. This unresponsiveness contrasts the rapid counter-regulatory changes seen after food restriction. The present investigation examined whether corrective changes in appetite-regulatory parameters occur after a time delay, namely, on the day after a single bout of exercise. Nine healthy males completed two, two-day trials (exercise & control) in a random order. On the exercise trial participants completed 90 min of moderate-intensity treadmill running on day one (10:30-12:00h). On day two appetite-regulatory hormones and subjective appetite perceptions were assessed frequently in response to two test meals provided at 08:00 and 12:00 h. Identical procedures occurred in the control trial except no exercise was performed on day one. Circulating levels of leptin were reduced on the day after exercise (AUC 5841 ± 3335 vs. 7266 ± 3949 ng(-1)·mL(-1)·7h, P=0.012). Conversely, no compensatory changes were seen for circulating acylated ghrelin, total PYY, insulin or appetite perceptions. Unexpectedly, levels of acylated ghrelin were reduced on the exercise trial following the second test meal on day two (AUC 279 ± 136 vs. 326 ± 136 pg(-1)·mL(-1)·3h, P=0.021). These findings indicate that short-term energy deficits induced by exercise initially prompt a compensatory response by chronic but not acute hormonal regulators of appetite and energy balance. Within this 24h time-frame however there is no conscious recognition of the perturbation to energy balance.

  7. WISE 2005: LBNP Exercise and Flywheel Resistive Exercise as an Effective Countermeasure Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuche, S.; Schneider, S. M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Macias, B. R.; Smith, S. M.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term exposure to microgravity can cause a severe musculoskeletal loss and cardiovascular deconditioning in astronauts. In this report, the effectiveness of combined supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (LBNPex) and flywheel resistive exercise (Rex) countermeasures was determined to prevent bone loss, reduced aerobic upright exercise capacity and reduced muscle strength. We hypothesized that exercise subjects (EX) would show less decrease in bone mineral density (BMD), peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk) and knee extensor strength (KES) than control subjects (CON). Sixteen healthy female subjects (34 plus or minus 4yrs, 164 plus or minus 6.5cm, 58 plus or minus 5kg; mean plus or minus SD) participated in a 60-d 6 degree head-down tilt bed rest (BR) study after providing written informed consent. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: a non- exercising CON group or an EX group performing LBNPex 2-4 d/wk and Rex every 3rd-d. VO2pk was measured with a maximal, graded, upright treadmill test performed pre-BR and on 3-d after BR. BMD was assessed pre-BR and 3-d after BR by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry total body DEXA scan (DEXA; HOLOGIC QDR 4500 Elite ). A Cybex dynamometer was employed to measure the isokinetic KES before and 5-d after BR. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA were performed with time as the repeated factor. Statistical significance was set at p less than 0.05. CON experienced a significant decrease in BMD in the trochanter (PRE: 0.670 0.045; POST: 0.646 0.352 g(raised dot) per square centimeter) and in the whole hip (PRE: 0.894 0.059; POST: 0.858 0.057 g(raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD also decreased significantly in EX in the trochanter (PRE: 0.753 plus or minus 0.0617; POST: 0.741 plus or minus 0.061 g(raised dot) per square centimeter) and whole hip (PRE: 0.954 plus or minus 0.067; POST: 0.935 plus or minus 0.069 g(raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD losses were significantly less in EX than in CON

  8. Effects of prolonged exercise on left ventricular mechanical synchrony in long-distance runners: importance of previous exposure to endurance races.

    PubMed

    Sahlén, Anders; Shahgaldi, Kambiz; Aminoff, Anna; Aagaard, Philip; Manouras, Aristomenis; Winter, Reidar; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Braunschweig, Frieder

    2010-09-01

    Prolonged exercise has been shown to lead to elevated levels of cardiac troponin and altered cardiac function on echocardiography. It is not known if cardiac synchrony is altered by prolonged exercise. The aims of this study were to assess changes in intra-left ventricular mechanical synchrony and circulating levels of cardiac troponin following prolonged exercise and to evaluate the importance of prior exposure to endurance racing. Forty-three male participants in a 30-km cross-country race (20 new participants at this event [median, 3 previous endurance races] age matched against 23 repeat participants [median, 31 previous endurance events]) were assessed prospectively 1 to 2 days before and 24 hours after the race using troponin T and Doppler tissue imaging analyzing the standard deviation of time to peak myocardial systolic velocity (T(s)-SD) in a six-basal, six-midventricular segment model measuring myocardial synchrony. The insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene was also analyzed, as I allele carriers reportedly have superior endurance performance, while the D allele predisposes to renin-angiotensin system-induced cardiac remodeling. Prerace troponin T was undetectable in all runners, and postrace levels were higher in new runners (median, 0.03 microg/L; interquartile range [IQR], 0.01-0.04 microg/L) than in repeat runners (median, 0.01 microg/L; IQR, 0.01-0.02 microg/L) (P = .03). Although new and repeat runners had similar T(s)-SD at baseline (32 msec [IQR, 22-43 msec] vs 34 msec [IQR, 29-45 msec], P = .13), dyssynchrony increased only in new runners (40 msec [IQR, 31-47 msec], P < .001; in repeat runners, median, 38 msec [IQR, 29-43 msec], P = .30; median relative difference, +13% vs +5%, P = .02). ACE genotype distribution was similar in both groups. Multivariate analysis showed that (1) a lack of prior endurance exposure; (2) more copies of the ACE D allele; and (3) lower peak systolic velocity were

  9. Caffeine vs caffeine-free sports drinks: effects on urine production at rest and during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Wemple, R D; Lamb, D R; McKeever, K H

    1997-01-01

    We compared the effects of caffeinated vs non-caffeinated carbohydrate electrolyte (CE) drinks on urine volume (UV), free water clearance (CH2O), fractional excretion of water (FEH2O), and osmolar excretion during 4 h of rest or 1 h rest followed by 3 h of cycling at 60% VO2max in six subjects. We also tested maximal performance at 85% VO2max following the 3-h exercise trials. Throughout the two resting trials and the two rest + exercise trials, subjects ingested CE (total volume = 35 ml/kg) without (PLAC) or with (CAFF) caffeine (25 mg/dl). Blood samples were collected, and body weight and UV were recorded every hour. Urine and blood were analyzed for osmolality and creatinine, and plasma catecholamine concentrations were determined. At rest, mean (+/-SE) UV between 60 min and 240 min was greater for CAFF (1843 +/- 166 ml) vs PLAC (1411 +/- 181 ml) (p < 0.01); during exercise the difference in UV between CAFF (398 +/- 32 ml) and PLAC (490 +/- 57 ml) was not significant. Cycling performance was unaffected by caffeine. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were not different between PLAC and CAFF but were greater during exercise than rest (p < 0.01) and may have counteracted the diuretic effect of caffeine observed at rest. Thus, CAFF consumed in CE during moderate endurance exercise apparently does not compromise bodily hydration status.

  10. Dietary Supplementation with the Microalga Galdieria sulphuraria (Rhodophyta) Reduces Prolonged Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carfagna, Simona; Napolitano, Gaetana; Barone, Daniela; Pinto, Gabriele; Venditti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of ten-day 1% Galdieria sulphuraria dietary supplementation on oxidative damage and metabolic changes elicited by acute exercise (6-hour swimming) determining oxygen consumption, lipid hydroperoxides, protein bound carbonyls in rat tissue (liver, heart, and muscle) homogenates and mitochondria, tissue glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, glutathione content, and rates of H2O2 mitochondrial release. Exercise increased oxidative damage in tissues and mitochondria and decreased tissue content of reduced glutathione. Moreover, it increased State 4 and decreased State 3 respiration in tissues and mitochondria. G. sulphuraria supplementation reduced the above exercise-induced variations. Conversely, alga supplementation was not able to modify the exercise-induced increase in mitochondrial release rate of hydrogen peroxide and in liver and heart antioxidant enzyme activities. The alga capacity to reduce lipid oxidative damage without reducing mitochondrial H2O2 release can be due to its high content of C-phycocyanin and glutathione, which are able to scavenge peroxyl radicals and contribute to phospholipid hydroperoxide metabolism, respectively. In conclusion, G. sulphuraria ability to reduce exercise-linked oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction makes it potentially useful even in other conditions leading to oxidative stress, including hyperthyroidism, chronic inflammation, and ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:25874021

  11. The effect of sodium acetate ingestion on the metabolic response to prolonged moderate-intensity exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon I; Jeukendrup, Asker E; Ball, Derek

    2013-08-01

    At rest, administration of the short-chain fatty acid acetate suppresses fat oxidation without affecting carbohydrate utilization. The combined effect of increased acetate availability and exercise on substrate utilization is, however, unclear. With local ethics approval, we studied the effect of ingesting either sodium acetate (NaAc) or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) at a dose of 4 mmol·kg-1 body mass 90 min before completing 120 min of exercise at 50% VO2peak. Six healthy young men completed the trials after an overnight fast and ingested the sodium salts in randomized order. As expected NaAc ingestion decreased resting fat oxidation (mean ± SD; 0.09 ± 0.02 vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 g·min-1 pre- and post-ingestion respectively, p < .05) with no effect upon carbohydrate utilization. In contrast, NaHCO3 ingestion had no effect on substrate utilization at rest. In response to exercise, fat and CHO oxidation increased in both trials, but fat oxidation was lower (0.16 ± 0.10 vs. 0.29 ± 0.11 g·min-1, p < .05) and carbohydrate oxidation higher (1.67 ± 0.35 vs. 1.44 ± 0.22 g·min-1, p < .05) in the NaAc trial compared with the NaHCO3 trial during the first 15 min of exercise. Over the final 75 min of exercise an increase in fat oxidation and decrease in carbohydrate oxidation was observed only in the NaAc trial. These results demonstrate that increasing plasma acetate concentration suppresses fat oxidation both at rest and at the onset of moderate-intensity exercise.

  12. Supine Treadmill Exercise in Lower Body Negative Pressure Combined with Resistive Exercise Counteracts Bone Loss, Reduced Aerobic Upright Exercise Capacity and Reduced Muscle Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuche, Sabine; Schneider, S. M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Macias, B. R.; Smith, S. M.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term exposure to weightlessness leads to cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning. In this report, the effectiveness of combined supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (LBNPex) and flywheel resistive exercise (Rex) countermeasures was determined to prevent bone loss, reduced aerobic upright exercise capacity and reduced muscle strength. We hypothesized that exercise subjects would show less decrease in bone mineral density (BMD), peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk) and knee extensor strength (KES) than control subjects. Sixteen healthy female subjects participated in a 60-d 6(sup 0) head-down tilt bed rest (BR) study after providing written informed consent. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: a non-exercising control group CON or an exercise group EX performing LBNPex 2-4 d/wk and Rex every 3rd-d. VO2pk was measured with a maximal, graded, upright treadmill test performed pre-BR and on 3-d after BR. BMD was assessed before and 3-d after BR. Isokinetic KES was measured before and 5-d after BR. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA were performed. Statistical significance was set at p less than 0.05. CON experienced a significant decrease in BMD in the trochanter (PRE: 0.670 plus or minus 0.045; POST: 0.646 plus or minus 0.352 g (raised dot) per square centimeter) and in the whole hip (PRE=0.894 plus or minus 0.059; POST: 0.858 plus or minus 0.057 g (raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD also decreased significantly in EX in the trochanter (PRE: 0.753 plus or minus 0.0617; POST: 0.741 plus or minus 0.061 g (raised dot) per square centimeter) and whole hip (PRE: 0.954 plus or minus 0.067; POST: 0.935 plus or minus 0.069 g (raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD losses were significantly less in EX than in CON subjects. VO2pk was significantly decreased in the CON after BR (PRE: 38.0 plus or minus 4.8; POST: 29.9 plus or minus 4.2 ml (raised dot) per kilogram per minute), but not in the EX (PRE: 39.0 plus or minus 2.0; POST

  13. Supine Treadmill Exercise in Lower Body Negative Pressure Combined with Resistive Exercise Counteracts Bone Loss, Reduced Aerobic Upright Exercise Capacity and Reduced Muscle Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuche, Sabine; Schneider, S. M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Macias, B. R.; Smith, S. M.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term exposure to weightlessness leads to cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning. In this report, the effectiveness of combined supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (LBNPex) and flywheel resistive exercise (Rex) countermeasures was determined to prevent bone loss, reduced aerobic upright exercise capacity and reduced muscle strength. We hypothesized that exercise subjects would show less decrease in bone mineral density (BMD), peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk) and knee extensor strength (KES) than control subjects. Sixteen healthy female subjects participated in a 60-d 6(sup 0) head-down tilt bed rest (BR) study after providing written informed consent. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: a non-exercising control group CON or an exercise group EX performing LBNPex 2-4 d/wk and Rex every 3rd-d. VO2pk was measured with a maximal, graded, upright treadmill test performed pre-BR and on 3-d after BR. BMD was assessed before and 3-d after BR. Isokinetic KES was measured before and 5-d after BR. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA were performed. Statistical significance was set at p less than 0.05. CON experienced a significant decrease in BMD in the trochanter (PRE: 0.670 plus or minus 0.045; POST: 0.646 plus or minus 0.352 g (raised dot) per square centimeter) and in the whole hip (PRE=0.894 plus or minus 0.059; POST: 0.858 plus or minus 0.057 g (raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD also decreased significantly in EX in the trochanter (PRE: 0.753 plus or minus 0.0617; POST: 0.741 plus or minus 0.061 g (raised dot) per square centimeter) and whole hip (PRE: 0.954 plus or minus 0.067; POST: 0.935 plus or minus 0.069 g (raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD losses were significantly less in EX than in CON subjects. VO2pk was significantly decreased in the CON after BR (PRE: 38.0 plus or minus 4.8; POST: 29.9 plus or minus 4.2 ml (raised dot) per kilogram per minute), but not in the EX (PRE: 39.0 plus or minus 2.0; POST

  14. N-acetylcysteine attenuates the decline in muscle Na+,K+-pump activity and delays fatigue during prolonged exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Michael J; Medved, Ivan; Goodman, Craig A; Brown, Malcolm J; Bjorksten, Andrew R; Murphy, Kate T; Petersen, Aaron C; Sostaric, Simon; Gong, Xiaofei

    2006-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked with both depressed Na+,K+-pump activity and skeletal muscle fatigue. This study investigated N-acetylcysteine (NAC) effects on muscle Na+,K+-pump activity and potassium (K+) regulation during prolonged, submaximal endurance exercise. Eight well-trained subjects participated in a double-blind, randomised, crossover design, receiving either NAC or saline (CON) intravenous infusion at 125 mg kg−1 h−1 for 15 min, then 25 mg kg−1 h−1 for 20 min prior to and throughout exercise. Subjects cycled for 45 min at 71% V˙O2peak, then continued at 92% V˙O2peak until fatigue. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were taken before exercise, at 45 min and fatigue and analysed for maximal in vitro Na+,K+-pump activity (K+-stimulated 3-O-methyfluorescein phosphatase; 3-O-MFPase). Arterialized venous blood was sampled throughout exercise and analysed for plasma K+ and other electrolytes. Time to fatigue at 92% V˙O2peak was reproducible in preliminary trials (c.v. 5.6 ± 0.6%) and was prolonged with NAC by 23.8 ± 8.3% (NAC 6.3 ± 0.5 versus CON 5.2 ± 0.6 min, P < 0.05). Maximal 3-O-MFPase activity decreased from rest by 21.6 ± 2.8% at 45 min and by 23.9 ± 2.3% at fatigue (P < 0.05). NAC attenuated the percentage decline in maximal 3-O-MFPase activity (%Δactivity) at 45 min (P < 0.05) but not at fatigue. When expressed relative to work done, the %Δactivity-to-work ratio was attenuated by NAC at 45 min and fatigue (P < 0.005). The rise in plasma [K+] during exercise and the Δ[K+]-to-work ratio at fatigue were attenuated by NAC (P < 0.05). These results confirm that the antioxidant NAC attenuates muscle fatigue, in part via improved K+ regulation, and point to a role for ROS in muscle fatigue. PMID:16840514

  15. Prolonged submaximal exercise induces isoform-specific Na+-K+-ATPase mRNA and protein responses in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murphy, K T; Petersen, A C; Goodman, C; Gong, X; Leppik, J A; Garnham, A P; Cameron-Smith, D; Snow, R J; McKenna, M J

    2006-02-01

    This study investigated effects of prolonged submaximal exercise on Na+-K+-ATPase mRNA and protein expression, maximal activity, and content in human skeletal muscle. We also investigated the effects on mRNA expression of the transcription initiator gene, RNA polymerase II (RNAP II), and key genes involved in protein translation, eukaryotic initiation factor-4E (eIF-4E) and 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). Eleven subjects (6 men, 5 women) cycled at 75.5% (SD 4.8%) peak O2 uptake and continued until fatigue. A vastus lateralis muscle biopsy was taken at rest, fatigue, and 3 and 24 h postexercise. We analyzed muscle for Na+-K+-ATPase alpha1, alpha2, alpha3, beta1, beta2, and beta3, as well for RNAP II, eIF-4E, and 4E-BP1 mRNA expression by real-time RT-PCR and Na+-K+-ATPase isoform protein abundance using immunoblotting. Muscle homogenate maximal Na+-K+-ATPase activity was determined by 3-O-methylfluorescein phosphatase activity and Na+-K+-ATPase content by [3H]ouabain binding. Cycling to fatigue [54.5 (SD 20.6) min] immediately increased alpha3 (P = 0.044) and beta2 mRNA (P = 0.042) by 2.2- and 1.9-fold, respectively, whereas alpha1 mRNA was elevated by 2.0-fold at 24 h postexercise (P = 0.036). A significant time main effect was found for alpha3 protein abundance (P = 0.046). Exercise transiently depressed maximal Na+-K+-ATPase activity (P = 0.004), but Na+-K+-ATPase content was unaltered throughout recovery. Exercise immediately increased RNAP II mRNA by 2.6-fold (P = 0.011) but had no effect on eIF-4E and 4E-BP1 mRNA. Thus a single bout of prolonged submaximal exercise induced isoform-specific Na+-K+-ATPase responses, increasing alpha1, alpha3, and beta2 mRNA but only alpha3 protein expression. Exercise also increased mRNA expression of RNAP II, a gene initiating transcription, but not of eIF-4E and 4E-BP1, key genes initiating protein translation.

  16. Joint-specific power loss after eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Steven J; Martin, James C

    2010-09-01

    Previous investigators have reported changes in maximal power after eccentric exercise. The influence of eccentric joint-specific power absorption on subsequent concentric joint-specific power production during multijoint actions has not been reported. Our purposes were to determine the extent to which ankle, knee, and hip joint actions absorbed power during eccentric cycling (ECCcyc) and to evaluate changes in power produced by those joint actions during subsequent maximal concentric cycling (CONcyc). We hypothesized that joint actions that absorbed the most power during ECCcyc would exhibit the greatest reductions in power during subsequent maximal CONcyc. Nineteen cyclists performed baseline trials of maximal single-leg CONcyc immediately before and 24 h after acute single-leg ECCcyc (5 min, 40% maximum single-leg CONcyc power). Pedal forces and limb kinematics were determined with a force-sensing pedal and instrumented spatial linkage system, respectively. Joint-specific powers were calculated using inverse dynamics and averaged over complete crank revolutions and over extension and flexion phases. The largest power-absorbing actions during ECCcyc were eccentric knee extensor activity (-185 +/- 12 W) followed by eccentric hip extensor activity (-92 +/- 12 W). Power absorbed through ankle joint actions was small (-10 +/- 2 W). At 24 h, pedal power produced during maximal CONcyc was reduced by 11% +/- 3% relative to baseline. Compared with baseline, knee extension power was reduced by 19% +/- 0 7%, whereas hip extension power did not differ. Power absorbed through eccentric knee extension actions significantly reduced knee extension power produced during subsequent maximal CONcyc. Even with reduced knee extensor function, participants were able to deliver 89% of their baseline power to the environment. These results have implications for individuals who must continue to perform multijoint activities after eccentric exercise.

  17. Saving mental effort to maintain physical effort: a shift of activity within the prefrontal cortex in anticipation of prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Radel, Rémi; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Perrey, Stéphane

    2016-11-17

    Executive functioning and attention require mental effort. In line with the resource conservation principle, we hypothesized that mental effort would be saved when individuals expected to exercise for a long period. Twenty-two study participants exercised twice on a cycle ergometer for 10 min at 60% of their maximal aerobic power, with the expectation of exercising for either 10 min or 60 min. Changes in activity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rdlPFC) and right medial frontal cortex (rmPFC) were investigated by measuring oxyhemoglobin using near-infrared spectroscopy. Attentional focus and ratings of perceived exertion were assessed at three time points (200, 400, and 600 s). The oxyhemoglobin concentration was lower in the rdlPFC and higher in the rmPFC under the 60-min than under the 10-min condition. Also, attention was less focused in the 60-min than in the 10-min condition. We discuss these results as possible evidence of a disengagement of the brain regions associated with mental effort (executive network), in favor of brain regions linked to resting activity (the default network), in order to save mental resources for the maintenance of exercise.

  18. Effects of a prolonged exercise program on key health outcomes in women with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sañudo, Borja; Galiano, Delfín; Carrasco, Luis; de Hoyo, Moisés; McVeigh, Joseph G

    2011-05-01

    To assess the impact of a long-term exercise programme vs usual care on perceived health status, functional capacity and depression in patients with fibromyalgia. Randomized controlled trial. Forty-two women with fibromyalgia were allocated randomly to 1 of 2 groups: an experimental group that carried out aerobic, strength and flexibility exercises for 24 weeks and a usual care control group. Health status and functional capacity were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Short Form Health Survey 36. Depression was evaluated with the Beck Depression Inventory. Significant improvements were observed in health status and functional capacity for the exercise group over the control group. The magnitude of the effect size of these improvements, expressed as Cohen's d, was medium. The effect size (95% confidence interval) for the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire was 0.58 (-14.12, -2.35), for the Short Form Health Survey 36. global score 0.54 (1.28, 14.52), and in the mental health domain of the Short Form Health Survey 36. 0.51 (1.20, 16.26). There was a large effect size in vitality. All the aforementioned improvements can be considered as clinically important changes. Results confirm that a long-term combination of aerobic exercise, strengthening and flexibility improves psychological health status and health-related quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia.

  19. Increased sensitivity of prolonged P-wave during exercise stress test in detection of angiographically documented coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Wsol, Agnieszka; Wydra, Wioletta; Chmielewski, Marek; Swiatowiec, Andrzej; Kuch, Marek

    2017-01-01

    A retrospective study was designed to investigate P-wave duration changes in exercise stress test (EST) for the prediction of angiographically documented substantial coronary artery disease (CAD). We analyzed 265 cases of patients, who underwent EST and subsequently coronary angiography. Analysis of P-wave duration was performed in leads II, V5 at rest, and in the recovery period. The sensitivity and specificity for the isolated ST-segment depression were only 31% and 76%, respectively. The combination of ST-depression with other exercise-induced clinical and electrocardio-graphic abnormalities (chest pain, ventricular arrhythmia, hypotension, left bundle branch block) was characterized by 41% sensitivity and 69% specificity. The combination of abnormal recovery P-wave duration (≥ 120 ms) with ST-depression and other exercise-induced abnormalities had 83% sensitivity but only 20% specificity. Combined analysis of increased delta P-wave duration, ST-depression and other exercise-induced abnormalities had 69% sensitivity and 42% specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of the increase in delta P-wave duration for left CAD was 69% and 47%, respectively, and for 3-vessel CAD 70% and 50%, respectively. The presence of arterial hypertension negatively influenced the prog-nostic value of P-wave changes in the stress test. The results of the study show that an addition of P-wave duration changes assessment to ST-depression analysis and other exercise-induced abnormalities increase sensitivity of EST, especially for left CAD and 3-vessel coronary disease. We have also provided evidence for the negative influence of the presence of arterial hypertension on the predictive value of P-wave changes in the stress test. (Cardiol J 2017; 24, 2: 159-166).

  20. Handgrip and general muscular strength and endurance during prolonged bedrest with isometric and isotonic leg exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Starr, J. C.; Van Beaumont, W.; Convertino, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of maximal grip strength and endurance at 40 percent max strength were obtained for 7 men 19-21 years of age, 1-2 days before and on the first recovery day during three 2-week bedrest (BR) periods, each separated by a 3-week ambulatory recovery period. The subjects performed isometric exercise (IME) for 1 hr/day, isotonic exercise (ITE) for 1 hr/day, and no exercise (NOE) in the three BR periods. It was found that the mean maximal grip strength was unchanged after all three BR periods. Mean grip endurance was found to be unchanged after IME and ITE training, but was significantly reduced after NOE. These results indicate that IME and ITE training during BR do not increase or decrease maximal grip strength, alghough they prevent loss of grip endurance, while the maximal strength of all other major muscle groups decreases in proportion to the length of BR to 70 days. The maximal strength reduction of the large muscle groups was found to be about twice that of the small muscle groups during BR. In addition, it is shown that changes in maximal strength after spaceflight, BR, or water immersion deconditioning cannot be predicted from changes in submaximal or maximal oxygen uptake values.

  1. Handgrip and general muscular strength and endurance during prolonged bedrest with isometric and isotonic leg exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Starr, J. C.; Van Beaumont, W.; Convertino, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of maximal grip strength and endurance at 40 percent max strength were obtained for 7 men 19-21 years of age, 1-2 days before and on the first recovery day during three 2-week bedrest (BR) periods, each separated by a 3-week ambulatory recovery period. The subjects performed isometric exercise (IME) for 1 hr/day, isotonic exercise (ITE) for 1 hr/day, and no exercise (NOE) in the three BR periods. It was found that the mean maximal grip strength was unchanged after all three BR periods. Mean grip endurance was found to be unchanged after IME and ITE training, but was significantly reduced after NOE. These results indicate that IME and ITE training during BR do not increase or decrease maximal grip strength, alghough they prevent loss of grip endurance, while the maximal strength of all other major muscle groups decreases in proportion to the length of BR to 70 days. The maximal strength reduction of the large muscle groups was found to be about twice that of the small muscle groups during BR. In addition, it is shown that changes in maximal strength after spaceflight, BR, or water immersion deconditioning cannot be predicted from changes in submaximal or maximal oxygen uptake values.

  2. The effect of ice-slushy consumption on plasma vasoactive intestinal peptide during prolonged exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Catriona A; Ruell, Patricia; Johnson, Nathan; Chapman, Phillip; O'Brien, Sinead; O'Connor, Helen T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of exercise in the heat on thermoregulatory responses and plasma vasoactive intestinal peptide concentration (VIP) and whether it is modulated by ice-slushy consumption. Ten male participants cycled at 62% V̇O2max for 90min in 32°C and 40% relative humidity. A thermoneutral (37°C) or ice-slushy (-1°C) sports drink was given at 3.5mlkg(-1) body mass every 15min during exercise. VIP and rectal temperature increased during exercise (mean±standard deviation: 4.6±4.4pmolL(-1), P=0.005; and 1.3±0.4°C, P<0.001 respectively) and were moderately associated (r=0.35, P=0.008). While rectal temperature and VIP were not different between trials, ice-slushy significantly reduced heat storage (P=0.010) and skin temperature (time×trial interaction P=0.038). It appears that VIP does not provide the signal linking cold beverage ingestion and lower skin temperature in the heat.

  3. A comparison of substrate oxidation during prolonged exercise in men at terrestrial altitude and normobaric normoxia following the coingestion of 13C glucose and 13C fructose.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, John P; Woods, David R; Mellor, Adrian; Boos, Christopher; Gallagher, Liam; Tsakirides, Costas; Arjomandkhah, Nicola C; Holdsworth, David A; Cooke, Carlton B; Morrison, Douglas J; Preston, Thomas; King, Roderick Fgj

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the effects of coingesting glucose and fructose on exogenous and endogenous substrate oxidation during prolonged exercise at altitude and sea level, in men. Seven male British military personnel completed two bouts of cycling at the same relative workload (55% Wmax) for 120 min on acute exposure to altitude (3375 m) and at sea level (~113 m). In each trial, participants ingested 1.2 g·min(-1) of glucose (enriched with (13)C glucose) and 0.6 g·min(-1) of fructose (enriched with (13)C fructose) directly before and every 15 min during exercise. Indirect calorimetry and isotope ratio mass spectrometry were used to calculate fat oxidation, total and exogenous carbohydrate oxidation, plasma glucose oxidation, and endogenous glucose oxidation derived from liver and muscle glycogen. Total carbohydrate oxidation during the exercise period was lower at altitude (157.7 ± 56.3 g) than sea level (286.5 ± 56.2 g, P = 0.006, ES = 2.28), whereas fat oxidation was higher at altitude (75.5 ± 26.8 g) than sea level (42.5 ± 21.3 g, P = 0.024, ES = 1.23). Peak exogenous carbohydrate oxidation was lower at altitude (1.13 ± 0.2 g·min(-1)) than sea level (1.42 ± 0.16 g·min(-1), P = 0.034, ES = 1.33). There were no differences in rates, or absolute and relative contributions of plasma or liver glucose oxidation between conditions during the second hour of exercise. However, absolute and relative contributions of muscle glycogen during the second hour were lower at altitude (29.3 ± 28.9 g, 16.6 ± 15.2%) than sea level (78.7 ± 5.2 g (P = 0.008, ES = 1.71), 37.7 ± 13.0% (P = 0.016, ES = 1.45). Acute exposure to altitude reduces the reliance on muscle glycogen and increases fat oxidation during prolonged cycling in men compared with sea level.

  4. Postexercise blood flow restriction does not enhance muscle hypertrophy induced by multiple-set high-load resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Madarame, Haruhiko; Nakada, Satoshi; Ohta, Takahisa; Ishii, Naokata

    2017-04-27

    To test the applicability of postexercise blood flow restriction (PEBFR) in practical training programmes, we investigated whether PEBFR enhances muscle hypertrophy induced by multiple-set high-load resistance exercise (RE). Seven men completed an eight-week RE programme for knee extensor muscles. Employing a within-subject design, one leg was subjected to RE + PEBFR, whereas contralateral leg to RE only. On each exercise session, participants performed three sets of unilateral knee extension exercise at approximately 70% of their one-repetition maximum for RE leg first, and then performed three sets for RE + PEBFR leg. Immediately after completion of the third set, the proximal portion of the RE + PEBFR leg was compressed with an air-pressure cuff for 5 min at a pressure ranging from 100 to 150 mmHg. If participants could perform 10 repetitions for three sets in two consecutive exercise sessions, the work load was increased by 5% at the next exercise session. Muscle thickness and strength of knee extensor muscles were measured before and after the eight-week training period and after the subsequent eight-week detraining period. There was a main effect of time but no condition × time interaction or main effect of condition for muscle thickness and strength. Both muscle thickness and strength increased after the training period independent of the condition. This result suggests that PEBFR would not be an effective training method at least in an early phase of adaptation to high-load resistance exercise. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Circadian rhythms in human muscular efficiency: continuous physical exercise versus continuous rest. A crossover study.

    PubMed

    Callard, D; Davenne, D; Gauthier, A; Lagarde, D; Van Hoecke, J

    2000-09-01

    This study deals with the influence of time of day on neuromuscular efficiency in competitive cyclists during continuous exercise versus continuous rest. Knee extension torque was measured in ultradistance cyclists over a 24h period (13:00 to 13:00 the next day) in the laboratory. The subjects were requested to maintain a constant speed (set at 70% of their maximal aerobic speed obtained during a preliminary test) on their own bicycles, which were equipped with cyclosimulators. Every 4h, torque developed and myoelectric activity were estimated during maximal isometric voluntary contractions of knee extensors using an isokinetic dynamometer. Mesenteric temperature was monitored by telemetry. The same measures were also recorded while the subjects were resting awake until 13:00 the next day. During activity, torque changed within the 24h period (p < .005), with an acrophase at 19:10 and an amplitude of 7.8% around the mean of 70.7%. At rest, a circadian rhythm was observed in knee extensor torque (p < .05), with an acrophase at 19:30 and an amplitude of 6% around the mean of 92.3%. Despite the standardized conditions, the results showed that isometric maximal strength varied with time of day during both a submaximal exercise and at rest without prior exercise. The sine waves representing these two rhythms were correlated significantly. Although at rest the diurnal rhythm followed muscular activity (i.e., neurophysiological factors), during exercise, this rhythm was thought to stem more from fluctuations in the contractile state of muscle.

  6. Heterogeneity of Physical Function Responses to Exercise Training in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chmelo, Elizabeth A.; Crotts, Charlotte I.; Newman, Jill C.; Brinkley, Tina E.; Lyles, Mary F.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Marsh, Anthony P.; Nicklas, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe the inter-individual variability in physical function responses to supervised, resistance and aerobic exercise training interventions in older adults. PARTICIPANTS Ninety-five older (65–79 years), overweight and obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥27 kg/m2), sedentary men and women. INTERVENTION Five-months of either 4 d/wk of aerobic training (AT, n=40) or 3 d/wk of resistance training (RT, n=55). MEASUREMENTS Physical function assessments: global measure of lower extremity function (short physical performance battery; SPPB), 400-meter walk, peak aerobic capacity (VO2peak), and knee extensor strength. RESULTS On average, both exercise interventions significantly improved physical function. For AT, there was a 7.9% increase in VO2peak; individual absolute increases varied from 0.4–4.3 ml/kg/min and four participants (13%) showed no change or a decrease in VO2peak. For RT, knee extensor strength improved an average of 8.1%, but individual increases varied from 1.2–63.7 Nm, and 16 participants (30%) showed no change or a decrease in strength. Majority of participants improved 400-m walk time, usual gait speed, chair rise time, and SPPB with AT, and improved usual gait speed, chair rise time, and SPPB with RT; but, there was wide variation in the magnitude of improvement. Compliance was only related to change in 400-m walk time following RT (r= −0.31; p<0.05). CONCLUSION Despite sufficient levels of adherence to both exercise interventions, some participants did not improve function, and the magnitude of improvement varied widely. Additional research is needed to identify factors that optimize responsiveness to exercise to maximize its functional benefits in older adults. PMID:25752778

  7. Neuromuscular adaptations to water-based concurrent training in postmenopausal women: effects of intrasession exercise sequence.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Stephanie S; Alberton, Cristine L; Bagatini, Natália C; Zaffari, Paula; Cadore, Eduardo L; Radaelli, Régis; Baroni, Bruno M; Lanferdini, Fábio J; Ferrari, Rodrigo; Kanitz, Ana Carolina; Pinto, Ronei S; Vaz, Marco Aurélio; Kruel, Luiz Fernando M

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of different exercise sequences on the neuromuscular adaptations induced by water-based concurrent training in postmenopausal women. Twenty-one healthy postmenopausal women (57.14 ± 2.43 years) were randomly placed into two water-based concurrent training groups: resistance training prior to (RA, n = 10) or after (AR, n = 11) aerobic training. Subjects performed resistance and aerobic training twice a week over 12 weeks, performing both exercise types in the same training session. Upper (elbow flexors) and lower-body (knee extensors) one-repetition maximal test (1RM) and peak torque (PT) (knee extensors) were evaluated. The muscle thickness (MT) of upper (biceps brachii) and lower-body (vastus lateralis) was determined by ultrasonography. Moreover, the maximal and submaximal (neuromuscular economy) electromyographic activity (EMG) of lower-body (vastus lateralis and rectus femoris) was measured. Both RA and AR groups increased the upper- and lower-body 1RM and PT, while the lower-body 1RM increases observed in the RA was greater than AR (34.62 ± 13.51 vs. 14.16 ± 13.68 %). RA and AR showed similar MT increases in upper- and lower-body muscles evaluated. In addition, significant improvements in the maximal and submaximal EMG of lower-body muscles in both RA and AR were found, with no differences between groups. Both exercise sequences in water-based concurrent training presented relevant improvements to promote health and physical fitness in postmenopausal women. However, the exercise sequence resistance-aerobic optimizes the strength gains in lower limbs.

  8. Long-term aerobic exercise is associated with greater muscle strength throughout the life span.

    PubMed

    Crane, Justin D; Macneil, Lauren G; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decline in muscle strength, muscle mass, and aerobic capacity, which reduces mobility and impairs quality of life in elderly adults. Exercise is commonly employed to improve muscle function in individuals of all ages; however, chronic aerobic exercise is believed to largely impact cardiovascular function and oxidative metabolism, with minimal effects on muscle mass and strength. To study the effects of long-term aerobic exercise on muscle strength, we recruited 74 sedentary (SED) or highly aerobically active (ACT) men and women from within three distinct age groups (young: 20-39 years, middle: 40-64 years, and older: 65-86 years) and tested their aerobic capacity, isometric grip and knee extensor strength, and dynamic 1 repetition maximum knee extension. As expected, ACT subjects had greater maximal oxygen uptake and peak aerobic power output compared with SED subjects (p < .05). Grip strength relative to body weight declined with age (p < .05) and was greater in ACT compared with SED subjects in both hands (p < .05). Similarly, relative maximal isometric knee extension torque declined with age (p < .05) and was higher in ACT versus SED individuals in both legs (p < .05). Absolute and relative 1 repetition maximum knee extension declined with age (p < .05) and were greater in ACT versus SED groups (p < .05). Knee extensor strength was associated with a greater amount of leg lean mass in the ACT subjects (p < .05). In summary, long-term aerobic exercise appears to attenuate age-related reductions in muscle strength in addition to its cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits.

  9. The effects of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage on running kinematics at different speeds.

    PubMed

    Tsatalas, Themistoklis; Giakas, Giannis; Spyropoulos, Giannis; Sideris, Vasileios; Lazaridis, Savvas; Kotzamanidis, Christos; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of knee localised muscle damage on running kinematics at varying speeds. Nineteen young women (23.2 ± 2.8 years; 164 ± 8 cm; 53.6 ± 5.4 kg), performed a maximal eccentric muscle damage protocol (5 × 15) of the knee extensors and flexors of both legs at 60 rad · s(-1). Lower body kinematics was assessed during level running on a treadmill at three speeds pre- and 48 h after. Evaluated muscle damage indices included isometric torque, muscle soreness and serum creatine kinase activity. The results revealed that all indices changed significantly after exercise, indicating muscle injury. Step length decreased and stride frequency significantly increased 48 h post-exercise only at the fastest running speed (3 m · s(-1)). Support time and knee flexion at toe-off increased only at the preferred transition speed and 2.5 m · s(-1). Knee flexion at foot contact, pelvic tilt and obliquity significantly increased, whereas hip extension during stance-phase, knee flexion during swing-phase, as well as knee and ankle joints range of motion significantly decreased 48 h post-exercise at all speeds. In conclusion, the effects of eccentric exercise of both knee extensors and flexors on particular tempo-spatial parameters and knee kinematics of running are speed-dependent. However, several pelvic and lower joint kinematics present similar behaviour at the three running speeds examined. These findings provide new insights into how running kinematics at different speeds are adapted to compensate for the impaired function of the knee musculature following muscle damage.

  10. Effectiveness of ice-vest cooling in prolonging work tolerance time during heavy exercise in the heat for personnel wearing Canadian forces chemical defense ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, B.

    1991-01-01

    Effectiveness of a portable, ice-pack cooling vest (Steelevest) in prolonging work tolerance time in chemical defense clothing in the heat (33 C dry bulb, 33% relative humidity or 25 C WBGT) was evaluated while subjects exercised at a metabolic rate of approx. 700 watts. Subjects were six male volunteers. The protocol consisted of a 20 minute treadmill walk at 1.33 m/s. and 7.5% grade, followed by 15 minutes of a lifting task, 5 minutes rest, then another 20 minutes of lifting task for a total of one hour. The lifting task consisted of lifting of 20 kg box, carrying it 3 meters and setting it down. This was followed by a 6 m walk (3m back to the start point and 3 m back to the box) 15 sec after which the lifting cycle began again. The work was classified as heavy as previously defined. This protocol was repeated until the subjects were unable to continue or they reached a physiological endpoint. Time to voluntary cessation or physiological endpoint was called the work tolerance time. Physiological endpoints were rectal temperature of 39 C, heart rate exceeding 95% of maximum for two consecutive minutes or visible loss of motor control or nausea. The cooling vest had no effect on work tolerance time, rate of rise of rectal temperature or sweat loss. It was concluded that the Steelvest ice-vest is ineffective in prolonging work tolerance time and preventing increases in rectal temperature while wearing chemical protective clothing.

  11. Effects of prolonged patellar tendon vibration on force steadiness in quadriceps femoris during force-matching task.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Ando, Ryosuke; Akima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle group plays an essential role in human movement, such as standing, walking and running. The ability to maintain a steady force during physical activity of the human lower limb is important for mobility, postural control and balance. Although prolonged mechanical vibration of the muscle-tendon unit can moderate the efficacy of synaptic input from Ia afferent onto the α-motor neuron pathway, the effect of prolonged tendon vibration on fluctuations of knee extensor force has received little attention. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of prolonged patellar tendon vibration on the force steadiness of the QF muscle. Nine healthy men performed a submaximal force-matching task involving isometric knee extension before and after patellar tendon vibration or quiet seated rest (n = 7, control condition) for 30 min. The target force was 2.5, 10 and 30 % of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Surface electromyography (EMG) of the four QF synergists was recorded and normalized to EMG amplitude during the MVC. The knee extension force and the EMG amplitude of vastus medialis during the MVC were significantly reduced after the vibration, but did not significantly decrease in the control condition. Fluctuations of force and normalized EMG of individual QF muscles at each submaximal force level did not significantly change after the vibration. We conclude that prolonged patellar tendon vibration does not influence the force steadiness of the QF muscle during an isometric force-matching task.

  12. A hip abduction exercise prior to prolonged standing increased movement while reducing cocontraction and low back pain perception in those initially reporting low back pain.

    PubMed

    Viggiani, Daniel; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-12-01

    Persons who develop low back pain from prolonged standing exhibit increased muscle cocontraction, decreased movement and increased spine extension. However, it is unclear how these factors relate to pain development. The purpose of this study was to use hip abductor fatigue to manipulate muscle activity patterns and determine its effects on standing behaviours and pain development. Forty participants stood for two hours twice, once following a hip abductor fatigue exercise (fatigue), and once without exercise beforehand (control). Trunk and gluteal muscle activity were measured to determine cocontraction. Lumbo-pelvic angles and force plates were used to assess posture and movement strategies. Visual analog scales differentiated pain (PDs) and non-pain developers (NPDs). PDs reported less low back pain during the fatigue session, with females having earlier reductions of similar scale than males. The fatigue session reduced gluteal and trunk cocontraction and increased centre of pressure movement; male and female PDs had opposing spine posture compensations. Muscle fatigue prior to standing reduced cocontraction, increased movement during standing and reduced the low back pain developed by PDs; the timing of pain reductions depended on spine postures adopted during standing.

  13. Daily Oxygen/O₃ Treatment Reduces Muscular Fatigue and Improves Cardiac Performance in Rats Subjected to Prolonged High Intensity Physical Exercise.

    PubMed

    Di Filippo, C; Trotta, M C; Maisto, R; Siniscalco, D; Luongo, M; Mascolo, L; Alfano, R; Accardo, M; Rossi, C; Ferraraccio, F; D'Amico, M

    2015-01-01

    Rats receiving daily intraperitoneal administration of O2 and running on a treadmill covered an average distance of 482.8 ± 21.8 m/week as calculated during 5-week observation. This distance was increased in rats receiving daily intraperitoneal administration of an oxygen/O3 mixture at a dose of 100; 150; and 300 μg/kg with the maximum increase being +34.5% at 300 μg/kg and still present after stopping the administration of oxygen/O3. Oxygen/O3 decreased the mean arterial blood pressure (-13%), the heart rate (-6%), the gastrocnemius and cardiac hypertrophy, and fibrosis and reduced by 49% the left ventricular mass and relative wall thickness measurements. Systolic and diastolic functions were improved in exercised oxygen/O3 rats compared to O2 rats. Oxygen/O3 treatment led to higher MPI index starting from the dose of 150 μg/kg (p < 0.05) and more effective (+14%) at a dose of 300 μg/kg oxygen/O3. Oxygen/O3 dose-dependently increased the expression of the antioxidant enzymes Mn-SOD and GPx1 and of eNOS compared to the exercised O2 rats. The same doses resulted in decrease of LDH levels, CPK, TnI, and nitrotyrosine concentration in the heart and gastrocnemius tissues, arguing a beneficial effect of the ozone molecule against the fatigue induced by a prolonged high intensity exercise.

  14. Protein Supplementation Augments Muscle Fiber Hypertrophy but Does Not Modulate Satellite Cell Content During Prolonged Resistance-Type Exercise Training in Frail Elderly.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Marlou L; Tieland, Michael; Verdijk, Lex B; Losen, Mario; Nilwik, Rachel; Mensink, Marco; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2017-07-01

    Protein supplementation increases gains in lean body mass following prolonged resistance-type exercise training in frail older adults. We assessed whether the greater increase in lean body mass can be attributed to muscle fiber type specific hypertrophy with concomitant changes in satellite cell (SC) content. A total of 34 frail elderly individuals (77 ± 1 years, n = 12 male adults) participated in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with 2 arms in parallel. Participants performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance-type exercise training (2 sessions per week) during which they were supplemented twice-daily with milk protein (2 × 15 g) or a placebo. Muscle biopsies were taken at baseline, and after 12 and 24 weeks of intervention, to determine type I and type II muscle fiber specific cross-sectional area (CSA), SC content, and myocellular characteristics. In the placebo group, a trend for a 20% ± 11% increase in muscle fiber CSA was observed in type II fibers only (P = .051), with no increase in type I muscle fiber CSA. In the protein group, type I and II muscle fiber CSA increased by 23% ± 7% and 34% ± 10% following 6 months of training, respectively (P < .01). Myonuclear domain size increased over time in both groups and fiber types (P < .001), with no significant differences between groups (P > .05). No changes in myonuclear content and SC contents were observed over time in either group (both P > .05). Regression analysis showed that changes in myonuclear content and domain size are predictive of muscle fiber hypertrophy. Protein supplementation augments muscle fiber hypertrophy following prolonged resistance-type exercise training in frail older people, without changes in myonuclear and SC content. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heavy-resistance exercise-induced increases in jump performance are not explained by changes in neuromuscular function.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K; Toward, A; West, D J; Howatson, G; Goodall, S

    2017-01-01

    Post-activation potentiation (PAP) is the increased involuntary muscle twitch response to stimulation following strong contraction. The enhancement to whole-body explosive muscular performance (PE) after heavy-resistance exercise is often attributed to modulations in neuromuscular function that are proposed to reflect PAP, but the evidence to support this is equivocal. We assessed the neuromuscular basis of PE using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the primary motor cortex, and electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve. Eleven male athletes performed heavy-resistance exercise with measures of countermovement jump (CMJ) pre- and 8 min post-exercise. Pre-exercise and after the final CMJ, single- and paired-pulse TMS were delivered during submaximal isometric knee-extensor contractions to measure corticospinal excitability, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), and intracortical facilitation (ICF), with motor evoked potentials recorded from rectus femoris. Twitch responses to motor nerve stimulation during and post maximum-knee-extensor contractions were studied to quantify voluntary activation (VA) and potentiated twitch (Qtw,pot ). The experimental protocol successfully induced PE (+4 ± 1% change in CMJ, P = 0.01), but no changes were observed for maximum voluntary force, VA, corticospinal excitability, SICI or ICF (all P > 0.05), and Qtw,pot declined (P < 0.001). An enhancement of muscular performance after heavy-resistance exercise was not accompanied by PAP, or changes in measures of neuromuscular function. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Exercise-induced signs of muscle overuse in children.

    PubMed

    Duarte, J A; Magalhães, J F; Monteiro, L; Almeida-Dias, A; Soares, J M; Appell, H J

    1999-02-01

    Signs of overuse after intense muscular exertion are well described in adults, while little research has been conducted in children. The aim of the study was to investigate some indirect markers of muscle damage in 13 years old boys following two different protocols of one-leg stepping exercise to exhaustion. This stepping exercise was performed by two experimental groups with different contributions of concentric and eccentric contractions in a 1:1 vs 1:2 ratio of timing. Subjective soreness perception and maximum voluntary isometric force of the knee extensor muscles were measured immediately prior to and immediately following the exercise, and at 1, 3, 24, 48, 72, 96 hours post exercise. Metabolic markers of exercise stress were taken at similar time intervals and included plasma glutathione concentrations as a marker for oxidative stress, circulating leukocyte numbers, and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. All parameters studied demonstrated a higher level of muscular exertion, with more evident signs of overuse in the group with the more eccentric contribution. Complete recovery was achieved between 72 and 96 hours after exertion. However, in this group of boys, the CK activity did not show the typical adult-like increase. Therefore the wide use of CK as an indicator of intense muscle exertion was not supported in this group of children. It can be concluded that children, like adults, experience similar degrees of muscle disturbances following intense exercise and that they may recover more quickly from such exercise.

  17. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management COPD: Exercises COPD: Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... lifelong activity you enjoy. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use inhaled short acting ...

  18. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (COPD) COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercises Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... lifelong activity you enjoy. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use inhaled short acting ...

  19. Assessment of Eccentric Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Using Oxidation-Reduction Potential Markers

    PubMed Central

    Stagos, Dimitrios; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Ntontou, Amalia-Maria; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Deli, Chariklia K.; Poulios, Athanasios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Bar-Or, David; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of static (sORP) and capacity ORP (cORP) oxidation-reduction potential markers as measured by the RedoxSYS Diagnostic System in plasma, for assessing eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress. Nineteen volunteers performed eccentric exercise with the knee extensors. Blood was collected before, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Moreover, common redox biomarkers were measured, which were protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and catalase activity and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. When the participants were examined as one group, there were not significant differences in any marker after exercise. However, in 11 participants there was a high increase in cORP after exercise, while in 8 participants there was a high decrease. Thus, the participants were divided in low cORP group exhibiting significant decrease in cORP after exercise and in high cORP group exhibiting significant increase. Moreover, only in the low cORP group there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation after exercise suggesting induction of oxidative stress. The results suggested that high decreases in cORP values after exercise may indicate induction of oxidative stress by eccentric exercise, while high increases in cORP values after exercise may indicate no existence of oxidative stress. PMID:25874019

  20. Assessment of eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress using oxidation-reduction potential markers.

    PubMed

    Stagos, Dimitrios; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Ntontou, Amalia-Maria; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Deli, Chariklia K; Poulios, Athanasios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Bar-Or, David; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of static (sORP) and capacity ORP (cORP) oxidation-reduction potential markers as measured by the RedoxSYS Diagnostic System in plasma, for assessing eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress. Nineteen volunteers performed eccentric exercise with the knee extensors. Blood was collected before, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Moreover, common redox biomarkers were measured, which were protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and catalase activity and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. When the participants were examined as one group, there were not significant differences in any marker after exercise. However, in 11 participants there was a high increase in cORP after exercise, while in 8 participants there was a high decrease. Thus, the participants were divided in low cORP group exhibiting significant decrease in cORP after exercise and in high cORP group exhibiting significant increase. Moreover, only in the low cORP group there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation after exercise suggesting induction of oxidative stress. The results suggested that high decreases in cORP values after exercise may indicate induction of oxidative stress by eccentric exercise, while high increases in cORP values after exercise may indicate no existence of oxidative stress.

  1. Reliability of a Novel High Intensity One Leg Dynamic Exercise Protocol to Measure Muscle Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Lepers, Romuald; Marcora, Samuele M.

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion. PMID:27706196

  2. Leg strength declines with advancing age despite habitual endurance exercise in active older adults.

    PubMed

    Marcell, Taylor J; Hawkins, Steven A; Wiswell, Robert A

    2014-02-01

    Age-associated loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) and strength (dynapenia) is associated with a loss of independence that contributes to falls, fractures, and nursing home admissions, whereas regular physical activity has been suggested to offset these losses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of habitual endurance exercise on muscle mass and strength in active older adults. A longitudinal analysis of muscle strength (≈4.8 years apart) was performed on 59 men (age at start of study: 58.6 ± 7.3 years) and 35 women (56.9 ± 8.2 years) who used endurance running as their primary mode of exercise. There were no changes in fat-free mass although body fat increased minimally (1.0-1.5%). Training volume (km·wk, d·wk) decreased in both the men and women. There was a significant loss of both isometric knee extension (≈5% per year) and knee flexion (≈3.6% per year) strength in both the men and women. However, there was no significant change in either isokinetic concentric or eccentric torque of the knee extensors. Our data demonstrated a significant decline in isometric knee extensor and knee flexor strength although there were no changes in body mass in this group of very active older men and women. Our data support newer exercise guidelines for older Americans suggesting resistance training be an integral component of a fitness program and that running alone was not sufficient to prevent the loss in muscle strength (dynapenia) with aging.

  3. The muscle strength and bone density relationship in young women: dependence on exercise status.

    PubMed

    Taaffe, D R; Marcus, R

    2004-03-01

    Numerous studies report an association between muscle strength and bone mineral density (BMD) in young and older women. However, the participants are generally non-athletes, thus it is unclear if the relationship varies by exercise status. Therefore, the purpose was to examine the relationships between BMD and muscle strength in young women with markedly different exercise levels. cross-sectional. a University research laboratory. 18 collegiate gymnasts and 22 age- and weight-matched recreationally active control women. lumbar spine, femoral neck, arm, leg and whole body BMD (g/cm(2)) were assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry. In addition, lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral apparent density (BMAD, g/cm(3)) was calculated. Handgrip strength and knee extensor and flexor torque (60 degrees /s) were determined by dynamometry, and bench press and leg press strength (1-RM) using isotonic equipment. BMD at all sites and bench press, leg press and knee flexor strength were greater in gymnasts than controls (p<0.001). In controls, knee extensor torque was significantly correlated to femoral neck, limb and whole body BMD (r=0.47-0.55, p<0.05), leg press strength was associated with limb and whole body BMD (r=0.52-0.74, p<0.05), and bench press strength with arm BMD (r=0.50, p=0.019). In partial correlations controlling for weight, leg press strength was related to leg and whole body BMD (r=0.46-0.63, p<0.05). There was no association between muscle strength and BMD in gymnasts. These results suggest that the association between muscle strength and BMD in young women is dependent on exercise status. The osteogenic effect of increased mechanical loading associated with gymnastics training likely contributes to the dissociation of the relationship in gymnasts.

  4. Fitness efficacy of vibratory exercise compared to walking in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Raimundo, Armando M; Gusi, Narcis; Tomas-Carus, Pablo

    2009-07-01

    In this study, we compared the efficacy of 8 months of low-frequency vibration and a walk-based program in health-related fitness. Twenty-seven postmenopausal women were randomly assigned into two groups: whole-body vibration (WBV) group (n = 18) performed three times/week a static exercise on a vibration platform (6 sets of 1-min with 1 min of rest, with a 12.6 Hz of frequency and an amplitude of 3 mm); walk-based program (WP) group (n = 18) performed three times/week a 60-min of walk activity at 70-75% of maximal heart rate. A health-related battery of tests was applied. Maximal unilateral concentric and eccentric isokinetic torque of the knee extensors was recorded by an isokinetic dynamometer. Physical fitness was measured using the following tests: vertical jump test, chair rise test and maximal walking speed test over 4 m. Maximal unilateral isokinetic strength was measured in the knee extensors in concentric actions at 60 and 300 degrees /s, and eccentric action at 60 degrees /s. After 8 months, the WP improved the time spent to walk 4 m (20%) and to perform the chair rise test (12%) compared to the WBV group (P = 0.006, 0.002, respectively). In contrast, the comparison of the changes in vertical jump showed the higher effectiveness of the vibratory exercise in 7% (P = 0.025). None of exercise programs showed change on isokinetic measurements. These results indicate that both programs differed in the main achievements and could be complementary to prevent lower limbs muscle strength decrease as we age [ISRCTN76235671].

  5. Reliability of a Novel High Intensity One Leg Dynamic Exercise Protocol to Measure Muscle Endurance.

    PubMed

    Pageaux, Benjamin; Lepers, Romuald; Marcora, Samuele M

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion.

  6. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise on mobility, balance ability and general health status in frail elderly patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Weng, Changshui; Liu, Miao; Wang, Qiuhua; Liu, Liming; He, Yao

    2014-01-01

    To study the effects of whole-body vibration exercises on the mobility function, balance and general health status, and its feasibility as an intervention in frail elderly patients. Pilot randomized controlled trial. Forty-four frail older persons (85.27 ± 3.63 years) meeting the Fried Frailty Criteria. All eligible subjects were randomly assigned to the experimental group, who received a whole-body vibration exercise alone (vibration amplitude: 1-3 mm; frequency: 6-26 Hz; 4-5 bouts × 60 seconds; 3-5 times weekly), or a control group, who received usual care and exercises for eight weeks. The Timed Up and Go Test, 30-second chair stand test, lower extremities muscle strength, balance function, balance confidence and General Health Status were assessed at the beginning of the study, after four weeks and eight weeks of the intervention. Whole-body vibration exercise reduced the time of the Timed Up and Go Test (40.47 ± 15.94 s to 21.34 ± 4.42 s), improved the bilateral knees extensor strength (6.96 ± 1.70 kg to 11.26 ± 2.08 kg), the posture stability (surface area ellipse: 404.58 ± 177.05 to 255.95 ± 107.28) and General Health Status (Short-form Health Survey score: 24.51 ± 10.69 and 49.63 ± 9.85 to 45.03 ± 11.15 and 65.23 ± 9.39, respectively). The repeated-measures ANOVA showed that there were significant differences in the Timed Up and Go Test, 30-second chair stand test, bilateral knees extensor strength, activities-specific balance confidence score and general health status between the two groups (P < 0.05). No side-effects were observed during the training. Whole-body vibration exercise is a safe and effective method that can improve the mobility, knee extensor strength, balance and the general health status in the frail elderly.

  7. Systemic cytokine response to three bouts of eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Stephen M.; Johnson, Steven T.

    2014-01-01

    This research examined the changes in inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1ß, IL-10, as well as muscle force, muscle soreness, thigh circumference, and range of motion in response to 3 bouts of eccentric knee extension. Ten males were recruited to participate. The participants performed eccentric exercise on 3 consecutive days on the knee extensors on the right leg separated by 24??h. Participants performed 6 sets of 10 repetitions of isokinetic eccentric knee extension at 120° per second. Blood was sampled before and after each exercise bout and 24?h after the final exercise bout. Muscle isometric force, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), thigh circumference, and range of motion were evaluated before and after each exercise bout and 24?h after the final exercise bout. There were no statistically significant differences noted for the changes in isometric strength, thigh circumference, and range of motion, or IL-6 over the 4 days (all p > 0.05). On the second day and third day there was a significant increase noted in DOMS as compared with baseline (p < 0.05). These results suggest that 3 consecutive days of eccentric exercise results in DOMS but does not produce a sustained systemic inflammatory reaction or changes in muscle function. PMID:24809007

  8. Comparison of Active and Electrostimulated Recovery Strategies After Fatiguing Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vanderthommen, Marc; Makrof, Souleyma; Demoulin, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare an electrostimulated to an active recovery strategy after a submaximal isometric fatiguing exercise. Nineteen healthy men completed three sessions (separated by at least 4 weeks) which included a knee extensors provocation exercise consisting of 3 sets of 25 isometric contractions. Contraction intensity level was fixed respectively at 60%, 55% and 50% of previously determined maximal voluntary contraction for the first, second and third sets. This provocation exercise was followed by either an active (AR) recovery (25 min pedaling on a cycle ergometer), an electrostimulated (ESR) recovery (25-min continuous and non-tetanic (5 Hz) stimulation of the quadriceps) or a strictly passive recovery (PR). Peak torques of knee extensors and subjective perception of muscle pain (VAS, 0-10) were evaluated before (pre-ex), immediately after the provocation exercise (post-ex), after the recovery period (post-rec), as well as 75 minutes (1h15) and one day (24h) after the exercise bout. Time course of peak torque was similar among the different recovery modes: ~ 75% of initial values at post-ex, ~ 90% at post-rec and at 1h15. At 24h, peak torque reached a level close to baseline values (PR: 99.1 ± 10.7%, AR: 105.3 ± 12.2%, ESR: 104.4 ± 10.5%). VAS muscle pain scores decreased rapidly between post-ex and post-rec (p < 0.001); there were no significant differences between the three recovery modes (p = 0.64). In conclusion, following a submaximal isometric knee extension exercise, neither electrostimulated nor active recovery strategies significantly improved the time course of muscle function recovery. Key points Three sets of submaximal isometric contractions at 60%, 55% and 50% of MVC induced an early fatigue without DOMS but did not lead to exhaustion. In comparison with passive recovery, active and electrostimulated recovery did not lead to significantly higher MVC torques 24h after the exercise bout. No significant differences were

  9. Are Females More Resistant to Extreme Neuromuscular Fatigue?

    PubMed

    Temesi, John; Arnal, Pierrick J; Rupp, Thomas; Féasson, Léonard; Cartier, Régine; Gergelé, Laurent; Verges, Samuel; Martin, Vincent; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2015-07-01

    Despite interest in the possibility of females outperforming males in ultraendurance sporting events, little is known about the sex differences in fatigue during prolonged locomotor exercise. This study investigated possible sex differences in central and peripheral fatigue in the knee extensors and plantar flexors resulting from a 110-km ultra-trail-running race. Neuromuscular function of the knee extensors and plantar flexors was evaluated via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical nerve stimulation before and after an ultra-trail-running race in 20 experienced ultraendurance trail runners (10 females and 10 males matched by percent of the winning time by sex) during maximal and submaximal voluntary contractions and in relaxed muscle. Maximal voluntary knee extensor torque decreased more in males than in females (-38% vs -29%, P = 0.006) although the reduction in plantar flexor torque was similar between sexes (-26% vs -31%). Evoked mechanical plantar flexor responses decreased more in males than in females (-23% vs -8% for potentiated twitch amplitude, P = 0.010), indicating greater plantar flexor peripheral fatigue in males. Maximal voluntary activation assessed by TMS and electrical nerve stimulation decreased similarly in both sexes for both muscle groups. Indices of knee extensor peripheral fatigue and corticospinal excitability and inhibition changes were also similar for both sexes. Females exhibited less peripheral fatigue in the plantar flexors than males did after a 110-km ultra-trail-running race and males demonstrated a greater decrease in maximal force loss in the knee extensors. There were no differences in the magnitude of central fatigue for either muscle group or TMS-induced outcomes. The lower level of fatigue in the knee extensors and peripheral fatigue in the plantar flexors could partly explain the reports of better performance in females in extreme duration running races as race distance increases.

  10. Exercise induces transient transcriptional activation of the PGC-1α gene in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P Darrell

    2003-01-01

    Endurance exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) has recently been identified as a nuclear factor critical for coordinating the activation of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis in cell culture and rodent skeletal muscle. To determine whether PGC-1α transcription is regulated by acute exercise and exercise training in human skeletal muscle, seven male subjects performed 4 weeks of one-legged knee extensor exercise training. At the end of training, subjects completed 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the untrained and trained legs before exercise and after 0, 2, 6 and 24 h of recovery. Time to exhaustion (2 min maximum resistance), as well as hexokinase II (HKII), citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA, were higher in the trained than the untrained leg prior to exercise. Exercise induced a marked transient increase (P < 0.05) in PGC-1α transcription (10- to > 40-fold) and mRNA content (7- to 10-fold), peaking within 2 h after exercise. Activation of PGC-1α was greater in the trained leg despite the lower relative workload. Interestingly, exercise did not affect nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) mRNA, a gene induced by PGC-1α in cell culture. HKII, mitochondrial transcription factor A, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α, and calcineurin Aα and Aβ mRNA were elevated (≈2- to 6-fold; P < 0.05) at 6 h of recovery in the untrained leg but did not change in the trained leg. The present data demonstrate that exercise induces a dramatic transient increase in PGC-1α transcription and mRNA content in human skeletal muscle. Consistent with its role as a transcriptional coactivator, these findings suggest that PGC-1α may coordinate the activation of metabolic genes in human muscle in response to exercise. PMID:12563009

  11. Exercise induces transient transcriptional activation of the PGC-1alpha gene in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P Darrell

    2003-02-01

    Endurance exercise training induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) has recently been identified as a nuclear factor critical for coordinating the activation of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis in cell culture and rodent skeletal muscle. To determine whether PGC-1alpha transcription is regulated by acute exercise and exercise training in human skeletal muscle, seven male subjects performed 4 weeks of one-legged knee extensor exercise training. At the end of training, subjects completed 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the untrained and trained legs before exercise and after 0, 2, 6 and 24 h of recovery. Time to exhaustion (2 min maximum resistance), as well as hexokinase II (HKII), citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA, were higher in the trained than the untrained leg prior to exercise. Exercise induced a marked transient increase (P < 0.05) in PGC-1alpha transcription (10- to > 40-fold) and mRNA content (7- to 10-fold), peaking within 2 h after exercise. Activation of PGC-1alpha was greater in the trained leg despite the lower relative workload. Interestingly, exercise did not affect nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) mRNA, a gene induced by PGC-1alpha in cell culture. HKII, mitochondrial transcription factor A, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha, and calcineurin Aalpha and Abeta mRNA were elevated (approximately 2- to 6-fold; P < 0.05) at 6 h of recovery in the untrained leg but did not change in the trained leg. The present data demonstrate that exercise induces a dramatic transient increase in PGC-1alpha transcription and mRNA content in human skeletal muscle. Consistent with its role as a transcriptional coactivator, these findings suggest that PGC-1alpha may coordinate the activation of metabolic genes in human muscle in response to exercise.

  12. The effects of muscle damage following eccentric exercise on gait biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Paschalis, Vassilis; Giakas, Giannis; Baltzopoulos, Vassilios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Theoharis, Vassilios; Kotzamanidis, Christos; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2007-02-01

    To examine the effects of knee extensors muscle damage on walking and running biomechanics in healthy males. Muscle damage was caused by 60 (6x10) maximal eccentric knee flexions of both legs, selected in a random order, at an angular velocity of 1.05rad/s in 10 volunteers (mean age 20+/-1.0 years). Muscle damage indicators (creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), eccentric and isometric (110 degrees knee flexion) peak torque), pelvic three dimensional (3D) orientation, as well as hip, knee and ankle-joint flexion/extension angles during gait (walking at 1.2m/s and running at 2.8m/s) were assessed pre- and 48h post-eccentric exercise. All muscle damage indicators revealed significant changes post- compared to pre-exercise data (P<0.05) confirming that muscle damage did occur. Kinematic analysis revealed that muscle damage significantly decreased the knee-joint angle range of movement at the stance and swing phases during walking (P<0.05) and running (P<0.05), respectively. These changes were accompanied by corresponding increases of pelvic rotation (P<0.05) and decrease of pelvic tilt (P<0.05). The present data demonstrate that damage of knee extensors result in changes of treadmill walking and running kinematics at both knee joint and pelvis. The fact that these alterations occur at different gait phases could be attributed to the speed of movement and to a self-protection mechanism to prevent further damage.

  13. Aerobic exercise does not compromise muscle hypertrophy response to short-term resistance training.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Tommy R; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Gustafsson, Thomas; Tesch, Per A

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that chronic aerobic and resistance exercise (AE+RE) would elicit greater muscle hypertrophy than resistance exercise only (RE). Ten men (25 ± 4 yr) performed 5 wk unilateral knee extensor AE+RE. The opposing limb was subjected to RE. AE completed 6 hr prior to RE consisted of ~45 min one-legged cycle ergometry. RE comprised 4 × 7 maximal concentric-eccentric knee extensions. Various indexes of in vivo knee extensor function were measured before and after training. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessed m. quadricep femoris (QF) cross-sectional area (CSA), volume, and signal intensity (SI). Biopsies obtained from m. vastus lateralis determined fiber CSA, enzyme levels, and gene expression of myostatin, atrogin-1, MuRF-1, PGC-1α, and VEGF. Increases (P < 0.05) in isometric strength and peak power, respectively, were comparable in AE+RE (9 and 29%) and RE (11 and 24%). AE+RE showed greater increase (14%; P < 0.05) in QF volume than RE (8%). Muscle fiber CSA increased 17% after AE+RE (P < 0.05) and 9% after RE (P > 0.05). QF SI increased (12%; P < 0.05) after AE+RE, but not RE. Neither AE+RE nor RE showed altered mRNA levels. Citrate synthase activity increased (P < 0.05) after AE+RE. The results suggest that the increased aerobic capacity shown with AE+RE was accompanied by a more robust increase in muscle size compared with RE. Although this response was not carried over to greater improvement in muscle function, it remains that intense AE can be executed prior to RE without compromising performance outcome.

  14. Concurrent Exercise on a Gravity-Independent Device during Simulated Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Joshua A.; Yu, Alvin; Haddad, Fadia; Kreitenberg, Arthur; Baker, Michael J.; Tesch, Per A.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Adams, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of a high-intensity concurrent training program utilizing a single gravity-independent device on maintaining skeletal muscle function and aerobic capacity during short-term unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS). Methods Nineteen subjects (10 male; 9 female; 21.0 ± 2.5 yr, 65.4 ± 12.2 kg) were separated into 2 groups: 1) 10 day unilateral lower limb suspension only (ULLS; n = 9) and 2) 10 day ULLS plus aerobic and resistance training (ULLS+EX; n = 10). Exercise was performed on a single gravity-independent Multi-Mode Exercise Device (M-MED) with alternating days of high-intensity interval aerobic training and maximal exertion resistance training. Results Aerobic capacity increased by 7% in ULLS+EX (P < 0.05). Knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor three repetition max increased in the ULLS+EX group (P < 0.05) but this change was only different than ULLS in the plantar flexors (P < 0.05). Peak torque levels decreased with ULLS but were increased for the knee extensors and attenuated for the ankle plantar flexors with ULLS+EX (P < 0.05). A shift towards type IIx myosin heavy chain mRNA occurred with ULLS and was reversed with ULLS+EX in the vastus lateralis (P < 0.05) but not the soleus. Myostatin and atrogin increased with ULLS in both the vastus lateralis and soleus but this change was mitigated with ULLS+EX only in the vastus lateralis (P = 0.0551 for myostatin; P < 0.05 for atrogin). Citrate synthase was decreased in the soleus during ULLS but was increased with ULLS+EX (P < 0.05). Conclusion These results indicate that an M-MED class countermeasure device appears to be effective at mitigating the deconditioning effects of microgravity simulated during a modified-ULLS protocol. PMID:25160844

  15. Thigh oxygen uptake at the onset of intense exercise is not affected by a reduction in oxygen delivery caused by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peter M; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Nybo, Lars; Mortensen, Stefan P; Sander, Mikael; Secher, Niels H; Bangsbo, Jens

    2012-10-15

    In response to hypoxic breathing most studies report slower pulmonary oxygen uptake (Vo2) kinetics at the onset of exercise, but it is not known if this relates to an actual slowing of the Vo2 in the active muscles(.) The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether thigh Vo2 is slowed at the onset of intense exercise during acute exposure to hypoxia. Six healthy male subjects (25.8 ± 1.4 yr, 79.8 ± 4.0 kg, means ± SE) performed intense (100 ± 6 watts) two-legged knee-extensor exercise for 2 min in normoxia (NOR) and hypoxia [fractional inspired oxygen concentration (Fi(O2)) = 0.13; HYP]. Thigh Vo2 was measured by frequent arterial and venous blood sampling and blood flow measurements. In arterial blood, oxygen content was reduced (P < 0.05) from 191 ± 5 ml O2/l in NOR to 180 ± 5 ml O2/l in HYP, and oxygen pressure was reduced (P < 0.001) from 111 ± 4 mmHg in NOR to 63 ± 4 mmHg in HYP. Thigh blood flow was the same in NOR and HYP, and thigh oxygen delivery was consequently reduced (P < 0.05) in HYP, but femoral arterial-venous oxygen difference and thigh Vo(2) were similar in NOR and HYP. In addition, muscle lactate release was the same in NOR and HYP, and muscle lactate accumulation during the first 25 s of exercise determined from muscle biopsy sampling was also similar (0.35 ± 0.07 and 0.36 ± 0.07 mmol·kg dry wt(-1)·s(-1) in NOR and HYP). Thus the increase in thigh Vo2 was not attenuated at the onset of intense knee-extensor exercise despite a reduction in oxygen delivery and pressure.

  16. Endothelin-A -Mediated Vasoconstriction During Exercise With Advancing Age

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-O’Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J.; Trinity, Joel D.; Morgan, Garrett; Rossman, Matthew J.; Donato, Anthony J.; Runnels, Sean; Morgan, David E.; Gmelch, Benjamin S.; Bledsoe, Amber D.; Richardson, Russell S.

    2015-01-01

    The endothelin-1 vasoconstrictor pathway contributes to age-related elevations in resting peripheral vascular tone primarily through activation of the endothelin subtype A (ETA) receptor. However, the regulatory influence of ETA-mediated vasoconstriction during exercise in the elderly is unknown. Thus, in 17 healthy volunteers (n = 8 young, 24±2 years; n = 9 old, 70±2 years), we examined leg blood flow, mean arterial pressure, leg arterial–venous oxygen (O2) difference, and leg O2 consumption (VO2) at rest and during knee-extensor exercise before and after intra-arterial administration of the ETA antagonist BQ-123. During exercise, BQ-123 administration increased leg blood flow to a greater degree in the old (+29±5 mL/min/W) compared with the young (+16±3 mL/min/W). The increase in leg blood flow with BQ-123 was accompanied by an increase in leg VO2 in both groups, suggesting a reduced efficiency following ETA receptor blockade. Together, these findings have identified an age-related increase in ETA-mediated vasoconstrictor activity that persists during exercise, suggesting an important role of this pathway in the regulation of exercising skeletal muscle blood flow and maintenance of arterial blood pressure in the elderly. PMID:24821105

  17. Curcumin and Piperine Supplementation and Recovery Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Delecroix, Barthélémy; Abaïdia, Abd Elbasset; Leduc, Cédric; Dawson, Brian; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of oral consumption of curcumin and piperine in combination on the recovery kinetics after exercise-induced muscle damage. Forty-eight hours before and following exercise-induced muscle damage, ten elite rugby players consumed curcumin and piperine (experimental condition) or placebo. A randomized cross-over design was performed. Concentric and isometric peak torque for the knee extensors, one leg 6 seconds sprint performance on a non-motorized treadmill, counter movement jump performance, blood creatine kinase concentration and muscle soreness were assessed immediately after exercise, then at 24h, 48h and 72h post-exercise. There were moderate to large effects of the exercise on the concentric peak torque for the knee extensors (Effect size (ES) = -1.12; Confidence interval at 90% (CI90%): -2.17 to -0.06), the one leg 6 seconds sprint performance (ES=-1.65; CI90% = -2.51to -0.80) and the counter movement jump performance (ES = -0.56; CI90% = -0.81 to -0.32) in the 48h following the exercise. There was also a large effect of the exercise on the creatine kinase level 72h after the exercise in the control group (ES = 3.61; CI90%: 0.24 to 6.98). This decrease in muscle function and this elevation in creatine kinase indicate that the exercise implemented was efficient to induce muscle damage. Twenty four hours post-exercise, the reduction (from baseline) in sprint mean power output was moderately lower in the experimental condition (-1.77 ± 7.25%; 1277 ± 153W) in comparison with the placebo condition (-13.6 ± 13.0%; 1130 ± 241W) (Effect Size = -1.12; Confidence Interval 90%=-1.86 to -0.86). However, no other effect was found between the two conditions. Curcumin and piperine supplementation before and after exercise can attenuate some, but not all, aspects of muscle damage. Key points When the recovery period between competitions was short, a curcumin and piperine supplementation could be an effective recovery

  18. Curcumin and Piperine Supplementation and Recovery Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Delecroix, Barthélémy; Abaïdia, Abd Elbasset; Leduc, Cédric; Dawson, Brian; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of oral consumption of curcumin and piperine in combination on the recovery kinetics after exercise-induced muscle damage. Forty-eight hours before and following exercise-induced muscle damage, ten elite rugby players consumed curcumin and piperine (experimental condition) or placebo. A randomized cross-over design was performed. Concentric and isometric peak torque for the knee extensors, one leg 6 seconds sprint performance on a non-motorized treadmill, counter movement jump performance, blood creatine kinase concentration and muscle soreness were assessed immediately after exercise, then at 24h, 48h and 72h post-exercise. There were moderate to large effects of the exercise on the concentric peak torque for the knee extensors (Effect size (ES) = -1.12; Confidence interval at 90% (CI90%): -2.17 to -0.06), the one leg 6 seconds sprint performance (ES=-1.65; CI90% = -2.51to -0.80) and the counter movement jump performance (ES = -0.56; CI90% = -0.81 to -0.32) in the 48h following the exercise. There was also a large effect of the exercise on the creatine kinase level 72h after the exercise in the control group (ES = 3.61; CI90%: 0.24 to 6.98). This decrease in muscle function and this elevation in creatine kinase indicate that the exercise implemented was efficient to induce muscle damage. Twenty four hours post-exercise, the reduction (from baseline) in sprint mean power output was moderately lower in the experimental condition (-1.77 ± 7.25%; 1277 ± 153W) in comparison with the placebo condition (-13.6 ± 13.0%; 1130 ± 241W) (Effect Size = -1.12; Confidence Interval 90%=-1.86 to -0.86). However, no other effect was found between the two conditions. Curcumin and piperine supplementation before and after exercise can attenuate some, but not all, aspects of muscle damage.

  19. Low level laser therapy before eccentric exercise reduces muscle damage markers in humans.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Bruno Manfredini; Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; De Marchi, Thiago; Lopes, André Luiz; Salvador, Mirian; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) treatment before knee extensor eccentric exercise on indirect markers of muscle damage. Thirty-six healthy men were randomized in LLLT group (n = 18) and placebo group (n = 18). After LLLT or placebo treatment, subjects performed 75 maximal knee extensors eccentric contractions (five sets of 15 repetitions; velocity = 60° seg(-1); range of motion = 60°). Muscle soreness (visual analogue scale--VAS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) levels were measured prior to exercise, and 24 and 48 h after exercise. Muscle function (maximal voluntary contraction--MVC) was measured before exercise, immediately after, and 24 and 48 h post-exercise. Groups had no difference on kineanthropometric characteristics and on eccentric exercise performance. They also presented similar baseline values of VAS (0.00 mm for LLLT and placebo groups), LDH (LLLT = 186 IU/l; placebo = 183 IU/l), CK (LLLT = 145 IU/l; placebo = 155 IU/l) and MVC (LLLT = 293 Nm; placebo = 284 Nm). VAS data did not show group by time interaction (P = 0.066). In the other outcomes, LLLT group presented (1) smaller increase on LDH values 48 h post-exercise (LLLT = 366 IU/l; placebo = 484 IU/l; P = 0.017); (2) smaller increase on CK values 24 h (LLLT = 272 IU/l; placebo = 498 IU/l; P = 0.020) and 48 h (LLLT = 436 IU/l; placebo = 1328 IU/l; P < 0.001) post-exercise; (3) smaller decrease on MVC immediately after exercise (LLLT = 189 Nm; placebo = 154 Nm; P = 0.011), and 24 h (LLLT = 249 Nm; placebo = 205 Nm; P = 0.004) and 48 h (LLLT = 267 Nm; placebo = 216 Nm; P = 0.001) post-exercise compared with the placebo group. In conclusion, LLLT treatment before eccentric exercise was effective in terms of attenuating the increase of muscle proteins in the blood serum and the decrease in muscle force.

  20. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-03-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P < 0.05) in DB compared with Con. Leg oxygen extraction (arteriovenous O(2) difference) was higher (P < 0.05) in DB than in Con (5 s: 127 +/- 3 vs. 56 +/- 4 ml/l), and leg oxygen uptake was not different between Con and DB during exercise. The difference between leg oxygen delivery and leg oxygen uptake was smaller (P < 0.05) during exercise in DB than in Con (5 s: 59 +/- 12 vs. 262 +/- 39 ml/min). The present data demonstrate that muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery can be markedly reduced without affecting muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of moderate-intensity exercise, suggesting that blood flow does not limit muscle oxygen uptake at the onset of exercise. Additionally, prostanoids and/or nitric oxide appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise.

  1. The effect of eccentric exercise on position sense and joint reaction angle of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Paschalis, V; Nikolaidis, M G; Giakas, G; Jamurtas, A Z; Pappas, A; Koutedakis, Y

    2007-04-01

    Impaired position sense and impaired joint reaction angle of the lower limbs after muscle-damaging activities is a serious functional limitation that may lead to an increased risk of injury, particularly in older populations. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether position sense and joint reaction angle to release can be affected by eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Twelve women underwent an isokinetic exercise session of the lower limb. Isometric peak torque, delayed-onset muscle soreness, serum creatine kinase, position sense, and knee joint reaction angle to release were examined before, immediately after, and 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise. Due to the effect of eccentric exercise, subjects persistently placed their lower limb at a more extended position, representing a shorter knee extensor muscle. Eccentric exercise increased the knee reaction angle of the lower limb after release from 0 degrees and 15 degrees but not from 30 degrees and 45 degrees . Position sense and joint reaction to release were similarly affected by eccentric exercise and independently of visual feedback. Position sense was impaired only immediately post-exercise (probably due to muscle fatigue), whereas impairment of the reaction angle to release persisted up to 3 days post-exercise (probably due to muscle damage). Attenuation of position sense and joint reaction angle of the lower limbs after damaging activities is a serious functional limitation that may lead to an increase risk of injury, particularly in older populations.

  2. Fatigue and recovery after high-intensity exercise part I: neuromuscular fatigue.

    PubMed

    Lattier, G; Millet, G Y; Martin, A; Martin, V

    2004-08-01

    The contribution of central and peripheral factors to muscle fatigue were quantified following a high-intensity uphill running exercise. Eight male volunteers performed an intermittent exercise at 120 % of maximal aerobic speed on a treadmill with an 18 % grade. Electrically evoked and voluntary contractions of the knee extensors and EMG of the two vastii were analyzed before and immediately after the high-intensity exercise. Isometric maximal voluntary contraction decreased slightly (-7+/-8 %; p < 0.05) after exercise but no changes were found in the level of maximal activation or in the torque produced by a 80 Hz maximal stimulation applied to the femoral nerve. Following exercise, the single twitch was characterized by lower peak torque, maximal rate of force development, and relaxation (-28+/-11%, -25+/-12%, -31+/-15% respectively, p < 0.001), and higher surface of the M-wave for both vastii. The ratio between the torques evoked by 20 Hz and 80 Hz stimulation declined significantly (-22+/-10%, p < 0.01) after exercise. These findings indicate that muscle fatigue after high-intensity running exercise is due to significant alteration in excitation-contraction coupling and that this type of exercise does not induce significant central fatigue or changes at the crossbridge level.

  3. Effect of cooling during inter-exercise periods on subsequent intramuscular water movement and muscle performance.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, O; Otsuka, S; Fukubayashi, T

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of cooling between exercise sessions on intramuscular water movement and muscle performance, the lower extremities of nine untrained men were assigned to either a cooling protocol (20-min water immersion, 15 °C) or a noncooling protocol. Each subject performed two exercise sessions involving maximal concentric knee extension and flexion (three repetitions, 60°/s; followed by 50 repetitions, 180°/s). The peak torque at 60°/s and total work, mean power, and decrease rate of torque value at 180°/s were evaluated. Axial magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted images of the mid-thigh were obtained before and after each exercise session. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for the quadriceps and hamstrings were calculated for evaluating intramuscular water movement. Both groups exhibited significantly increased ADC values for the quadriceps and hamstrings after each exercise session. These ADC values returned to the pre-exercise level after water immersion. No significant difference was observed in muscle performance from first exercise session to the next in either group, except for increased total work and mean power in knee flexion in the cooled group. Cooling intervention between exercise sessions decreased exercise-induced elevation of intramuscular water movement and had some beneficial effects on muscle endurance of knee flexors, but not knee extensors. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The effect of carbohydrate and protein co-ingestion on energy substrate metabolism, sense of effort, and affective responses during prolonged strenuous endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Qin, L; Wong, S H; Sun, F-H; Huang, Y; Sheridan, S; Sit, C H P

    2017-05-15

    This study examined the effect of carbohydrate (CHO) and protein (PRO) co-ingestion on energy substrate metabolism, sense of effort, and affective responses during prolonged strenuous endurance exercise. In a four-stage randomized cross-over design, 10 male endurance runners (age: 27.3±1.4yrs; height: 172.9±1.1cm, weight: 63.5±1.6kg; body fat: 9.0±1.4%; V̇O2max: 62.9±1.8ml/kg/min) ran on a treadmill at 70% of their individual V̇O2max for 90min. There were two CHO and PRO treatments (CA: CHO+alpha-lactalbumin and CW: CHO+whey PRO isolate), one CHO treatment (CC: CHO+CHO), and a placebo control (CON). On each occasion, subjects consumed 5ml/kg according to their body weight (kg) immediately before and 2ml/kg every 15min during exercise. Blood samples were collected at 0min, 30min, 60min and 90min of exercise to measure glucose, lactate, insulin, and cortisol levels. The extent of physical sensation (abdominal discomfort, leg muscle pain), the sense of effort (rating of perceive exertion, RPE), and affective responses (pleasure-displeasure, arousal) were evaluated by numeric scales before, during, and immediately after exercise. Blood glucose and insulin concentrations in the CA, CW, and CC treatments were higher than in the CON at 90min (P<0.05). Muscle pain (evaluated by a single item, 0 to 10 pain intensity scale from "no pain at all" to "extremely unbearable") was lower following CA ingestion than CON and CW ingestion, at 75min (vs. CON and CW, 1.95±0.61 vs. 3.70±1.00 and 3.60±1.02, P<0.05) and 90min (vs. 2.40±0.76 vs. 4.20±0.99 and 4.05±1.1, P<0.05). RPE (evaluated by a 15-point, 6 to 20 rating scale ranging from "very, very light" to "very, very hard") following treatment with CA was lower than with CON and CW at 90min (vs. CON and CW: 11.30±1.14 vs. 14.20±1.30 and 13.30±1.24, P<0.05). Compared with CON and CW, CA enhanced the feeling of pleasure (evaluated by feeling scale from -5, "very bad" to +5, "very good") at 90min (vs. CON and CW, 2.20±0

  5. The Accumulative Effect of Concentric-Biased and Eccentric-Biased Exercise on Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses to Subsequent Low-Intensity Exercise: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, James Peter; Myers, Stephen; Willems, Mark Elisabeth Theodorus

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the accumulative effect of concentric-biased and eccentric-biased exercise on cardiorespiratory, metabolic and neuromuscular responses to low-intensity exercise performed hours later. Fourteen young men cycled at low-intensity (~60 rpm at 50% maximal oxygen uptake) for 10 min before, and 12 h after: concentric-biased, single-leg cycling exercise (CON) (performed ~19:30 h) and eccentric-biased, double-leg knee extension exercise (ECC) (~06:30 h the following morning). Respiratory measures were sampled breath-by-breath, with oxidation values derived from stoichiometry equations. Knee extensor neuromuscular function was assessed before and after CON and ECC. Cardiorespiratory responses during low-intensity cycling were unchanged by accumulative CON and ECC. The RER was lower during low-intensity exercise 12 h after CON and ECC (0.88 ± 0.08), when compared to baseline (0.92 ± 0.09; p = 0.02). Fat oxidation increased from baseline (0.24 ± 0.2 g·min−1) to 12 h after CON and ECC (0.39 ± 0.2 g·min−1; p = 0.01). Carbohydrate oxidation decreased from baseline (1.59 ± 0.4 g·min−1) to 12 h after CON and ECC (1.36 ± 0.4 g·min−1; p = 0.03). These were accompanied by knee extensor force loss (right leg: −11.6%, p < 0.001; left leg: −10.6%, p = 0.02) and muscle soreness (right leg: 2.5 ± 0.9, p < 0.0001; left leg: 2.3 ± 1.2, p < 0.01). Subsequent concentric-biased and eccentric-biased exercise led to increased fat oxidation and decreased carbohydrate oxidation, without impairing cardiorespiration, during low-intensity cycling. An accumulation of fatiguing and damaging exercise increases fat utilisation during low intensity exercise performed as little as 12 h later. PMID:26839613

  6. The Accumulative Effect of Concentric-Biased and Eccentric-Biased Exercise on Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses to Subsequent Low-Intensity Exercise: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Gavin, James Peter; Myers, Stephen; Willems, Mark Elisabeth Theodorus

    2015-12-22

    The study investigated the accumulative effect of concentric-biased and eccentric-biased exercise on cardiorespiratory, metabolic and neuromuscular responses to low-intensity exercise performed hours later. Fourteen young men cycled at low-intensity (~60 rpm at 50% maximal oxygen uptake) for 10 min before, and 12 h after: concentric-biased, single-leg cycling exercise (CON) (performed ~19:30 h) and eccentric-biased, double-leg knee extension exercise (ECC) (~06:30 h the following morning). Respiratory measures were sampled breath-by-breath, with oxidation values derived from stoichiometry equations. Knee extensor neuromuscular function was assessed before and after CON and ECC. Cardiorespiratory responses during low-intensity cycling were unchanged by accumulative CON and ECC. The RER was lower during low-intensity exercise 12 h after CON and ECC (0.88 ± 0.08), when compared to baseline (0.92 ± 0.09; p = 0.02). Fat oxidation increased from baseline (0.24 ± 0.2 g·min(-1)) to 12 h after CON and ECC (0.39 ± 0.2 g·min(-1); p = 0.01). Carbohydrate oxidation decreased from baseline (1.59 ± 0.4 g·min(-1)) to 12 h after CON and ECC (1.36 ± 0.4 g·min(-1); p = 0.03). These were accompanied by knee extensor force loss (right leg: -11.6%, p < 0.001; left leg: -10.6%, p = 0.02) and muscle soreness (right leg: 2.5 ± 0.9, p < 0.0001; left leg: 2.3 ± 1.2, p < 0.01). Subsequent concentric-biased and eccentric-biased exercise led to increased fat oxidation and decreased carbohydrate oxidation, without impairing cardiorespiration, during low-intensity cycling. An accumulation of fatiguing and damaging exercise increases fat utilisation during low intensity exercise performed as little as 12 h later.

  7. Exercise training, but not resveratrol, improves metabolic and inflammatory status in skeletal muscle of aged men

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Jesper; Gliemann, Lasse; Biensø, Rasmus; Schmidt, Jakob; Hellsten, Ylva; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol alone and when combined with exercise training in skeletal muscle of aged human subjects. Healthy, physically inactive men (60–72 years old) were randomized to either 8 weeks of daily intake of 250 mg resveratrol or placebo or to 8 weeks of high-intensity exercise training with 250 mg resveratrol or placebo. Before and after the interventions, resting blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained and a one-legged knee-extensor endurance exercise test was performed. Exercise training increased skeletal muscle peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α mRNA ∼1.5-fold, cytochrome c protein ∼1.3-fold, cytochrome c oxidase I protein ∼1.5-fold, citrate synthase activity ∼1.3-fold, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity ∼1.3-fold, inhibitor of κB-α and inhibitor of κB-β protein content ∼1.3-fold and time to exhaustion in the one-legged knee-extensor endurance exercise test by ∼1.2-fold, with no significant additive or adverse effects of resveratrol on these parameters. Despite an overall ∼25% reduction in total acetylation level in skeletal muscle with resveratrol, no exclusive resveratrol-mediated metabolic effects were observed on the investigated parameters. Notably, however, resveratrol blunted an exercise training-induced decrease (∼20%) in protein carbonylation and decrease (∼40%) in tumour necrosis factor α mRNA content in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, resveratrol did not elicit metabolic improvements in healthy aged subjects; in fact, resveratrol even impaired the observed exercise training-induced improvements in markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in skeletal muscle. Collectively, this highlights the metabolic efficacy of exercise training in aged subjects and does not support the contention that resveratrol is a potential exercise mimetic in healthy aged subjects. PMID:24514907

  8. A Biomechanical Investigation of A Single-Limb Squat: Implications for Lower Extremity Rehabilitation Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jim; Thewlis, Dominic; Selfe, James; Cunningham, Andrew; Hayes, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Context: Single-limb squats on a decline angle have been suggested as a rehabilitative intervention to target the knee extensors. Investigators, however, have presented very little empirical research in which they have documented the biomechanics of these exercises or have determined the optimum angle of decline used. Objective: To determine the involvement of the gastrocnemius and rectus femoris muscles and the external ankle and knee joint moments at 60° of knee flexion while performing a single-limb squat at different decline angles. Design: Participants acted as their own controls in a repeated-measures design. Patients or Other Participants: We recruited 10 participants who had no pain, injury, or neurologic disorder. Intervention(s): Participants performed single-limb squats at different decline angles. Main Outcome Measure(s): Angle-specific knee and ankle moments were calculated at 60° of knee flexion. Angle-specific electromyography (EMG) activity was calculated at 60° of knee flexion. Integrated EMG also was calculated to determine the level of muscle activity over the entire squat. Results: An increase was seen in the knee moments (P < .05) and integrated EMG in the rectus femoris (P < .001) as the decline angle increased. A decrease was seen in the ankle moments as the decline angle increased (P  =  .001), but EMG activity in the gastrocnemius increased between 16° and 24° (P  =  .018). Conclusions: As the decline angle increased, the knee extensor moment and EMG activity increased. As the decline angle increased, the ankle plantar-flexor moments decreased; however, an increase in the EMG activity was seen with the 24° decline angle compared with the 16° decline angle. This indicates that decline squats at an angle greater than 16° may not reduce passive calf tension, as was suggested previously, and may provide no mechanical advantage for the knee. PMID:18833310

  9. Comparison of energy supplements during prolonged exercise for maintenance of cardiac function: carbohydrate only versus carbohydrate plus whey or casein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Millen, Aletta M E

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac function is often suppressed following prolonged strenuous exercise and this may occur partly because of an energy deficit. This study compared left ventricular (LV) function by 2-dimensional echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) before and after ∼2.5 h of cycling (2-h steady-state 60% peak aerobic power output plus 16 km time trial) in 8 male cyclists when they ingested either placebo, carbohydrate-only (CHO-only), carbohydrate-casein hydrolysate (CHO-casein), or carbohydrate-whey hydrolysate (CHO-whey). No treatment-by-time interactions occurred, but pre-to-postexercise time effects occurred selectively. Although diastolic function measured by pulsed-wave Doppler early-to-late (E/A) transmitral blood flow velocity was suppressed in all trials from pre- to postexercise (mean change post-pre exercise: -0.53 (95% CI -0.15 to -0.91)), TDI early-to-late (e'/a') tissue velocity was significantly suppressed pre- to postexercise only with placebo, CHO-only, and CHO-whey (septal and lateral wall e'/a' average change: -0.62 (95% CI -1.12 to -0.12); -0.69 (95% CI -1.19 to -0.20); and -0.79 (95% CI -1.28 to -0.29), respectively) but not with CHO-casein (-0.40 (95% CI -0.90 to 0.09)). LV contractility was, or tended to be, significantly reduced pre- to postexercise with placebo, CHO-only, and CHO-whey (systolic blood pressure/end systolic volume change, mm Hg·mL(-1): -0.8 (95% CI -1.2 to -0.4), p = 0.0003; -0.5 (95% CI -0.9 to -0.02), p = 0.035; and -0.4 (95% CI -0.8 to 0.04), p = 0.086, respectively), but not with CHO-casein (-0.3 (95% CI -0.8 to 0.1), p = 0.22). However, ejection fraction (EF) and ventricular-arterial coupling were significantly reduced pre- to postexercise only with placebo (placebo change: EF, -4.6 (95% CI -8.4 to -0.7)%; stroke volume/end systolic volume, -0.3 (95% CI -0.6 to -0.04)). Despite no treatment-by-time interactions, pre-to-postexercise time effects observed with specific beverages may be meaningful for athletes

  10. Potentiation of vertical jump performance during a snatch pull exercise session.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Loren Z F; Salem, George J

    2012-12-01

    Potentiation has been reported in power tasks immediately following a strength stimulus; however, only whole-body performance has been assessed. To determine the acute effects of weightlifting on vertical jump joint kinetics, performance was assessed before, during, and after snatch pull exercise in male athletes. Jumping was assessed using 3D motion analysis and inverse dynamics. Jump height was enhanced at the midpoint (5.77%; p = .001) and end (5.90%; p < .001) of the exercise session, indicating a greater power-generating ability. At the midpoint, knee extensor net joint work was increased (p = .05) and associated with increased jump height (r = .57; p = .02). Following exercise, ankle plantar flexor net joint work was increased (p = .02) and associated with increased jump height (r = .67; p = .006). Snatch pull exercise elicited acute enhancements in vertical jump performance. At the midpoint of the exercise session, greater work at the knee joint contributed to enhanced performance. At the end of the exercise session, greater work at the ankle contributed to enhanced performance. Consequently, potentiation is not elicited uniformly across joints during multijoint exercise.

  11. Positron emission tomography detects greater blood flow and less blood flow heterogeneity in the exercising skeletal muscles of old compared with young men during fatiguing contractions.

    PubMed

    Rudroff, Thorsten; Weissman, Jessica A; Bucci, Marco; Seppänen, Marko; Kaskinoro, Kimmo; Heinonen, Ilkka; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2014-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate blood flow and its heterogeneity within and among the knee muscles in five young (26 ± 6 years) and five old (77 ± 6 years) healthy men with similar levels of physical activity while they performed two types of submaximal fatiguing isometric contraction that required either force or position control. Positron emission tomography (PET) and [(15)O]-H2O were used to determine blood flow at 2 min (beginning) and 12 min (end) after the start of the tasks. Young and old men had similar maximal forces and endurance times for the fatiguing tasks. Although muscle volumes were lower in the older subjects, total muscle blood flow was similar in both groups (young men: 25.8 ± 12.6 ml min(-1); old men: 25.1 ± 15.4 ml min(-1); age main effect, P = 0.77) as blood flow per unit mass of muscle in the exercising knee extensors was greater in the older (12.5 ± 6.2 ml min(-1) (100 g)(-1)) than the younger (8.6 ± 3.6 ml min(-1) (100 g)(-1)) men (age main effect, P = 0.001). Further, blood flow heterogeneity in the exercising knee extensors was significantly lower in the older (56 ± 27%) than the younger (67 ± 34%) men. Together, these data show that although skeletal muscles are smaller in older subjects, based on the intact neural drive to the muscle and the greater, less heterogeneous blood flow per gram of muscle, old fit muscle achieves adequate exercise hyperaemia.

  12. Cooperative effects of exercise and occlusive stimuli on muscular function in low-intensity resistance exercise with moderate vascular occlusion.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Yudai; Tsuruta, Tomomi; Ishii, Naokata

    2004-12-01

    To obtain insight into the relative contributions of exercise and occlusive stimuli to these muscular adaptations, the present study investigated the short- and long-term effects of varied combinations of low-intensity exercise and vascular occlusion. The subjects were separated into 3 groups (n = 6 for each group): low-intensity with vascular occlusion (LIO), low-intensity without vascular occlusion (LI), and vascular occlusion without exercise (VO). LIO and LI groups performed bilateral knee extension exercises in seated positions with an isotonic extension machine. In the LIO group, both sides of the thigh were pressure-occluded at the proximal end by means of a tourniquet during the entire session of exercise (approximately 10 min), whereas only the occlusion with the same pressure and duration was given in the VO group. The mean occlusion pressure was 218 +/- 8.1 mmHg (mean +/- SE). The exercise session consisted of five sets of exercise at an intensity of 10-20% 1RM and was performed twice a week for 8 wk. After the period of exercise training, isometric and isokinetic strengths at all velocities examined increased significantly in the LIO group (p < 0.05), whereas no significant change in strength was seen in the LI and VO groups. The increase in muscular strength in LIO was associated with a significant increase in the cross-sectional area of knee extensor muscles by 10.3 +/- 1.6%. The plasma growth hormone concentration measured 15 min after the session of exercise showed a marked increase only in LIO. The results showed that the low-intensity exercise and occlusive stimuli have cooperative effects in the long-term adaptation of muscle and an acute response to growth hormone.

  13. Shear-Wave Elastography Assessments of Quadriceps Stiffness Changes prior to, during and after Prolonged Exercise: A Longitudinal Study during an Extreme Mountain Ultra-Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Andonian, Pierre; Viallon, Magalie; Le Goff, Caroline; de Bourguignon, Charles; Tourel, Charline; Morel, Jérome; Giardini, Guido; Gergelé, Laurent; Millet, Grégoire P.; Croisille, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In sports medicine, there is increasing interest in quantifying the elastic properties of skeletal muscle, especially during extreme muscular stimulation, to improve our understanding of the impact of alterations in skeletal muscle stiffness on resulting pain or injuries, as well as the mechanisms underlying the relationships between these parameters. Our main objective was to determine whether real-time shear-wave elastography (SWE) can monitor changes in quadriceps muscle elasticity during an extreme mountain ultra-marathon, a powerful mechanical stress model. Our study involved 50 volunteers participating in an extreme mountain marathon (distance: 330 km, elevation: +24,000 m). Quantitative SWE velocity and shear modulus measurements were performed in most superficial quadriceps muscle heads at the following 4 time points: before the race, halfway through the race, upon finishing the race and after recovery (+48 h). Blood biomarker levels were also measured. A significant decrease in the quadriceps shear modulus was observed upon finishing the race (3.31±0.61 kPa) (p<0.001) compared to baseline (3.56±0.63 kPa), followed by a partial recovery +48 h after the race (3.45±0.6 kPa) (p = 0.002) across all muscle heads, as well as for each of the following three muscle heads: the rectus femoris (p = 0.003), the vastus medialis (p = 0.033) and the vastus lateralis (p = 0.001). Our study is the first to assess changes in muscle stiffness during prolonged extreme physical endurance exercises based on shear modulus measurements using non-invasive SWE. We concluded that decreases in stiffness, which may have resulted from quadriceps overuse in the setting of supra-physiological stress caused by the extreme distance and unique elevation of the race, may have been responsible for the development of inflammation and muscle swelling. SWE may hence represent a promising tool for monitoring physiologic or pathological variations in muscle stiffness and may be useful for

  14. Shear-Wave Elastography Assessments of Quadriceps Stiffness Changes prior to, during and after Prolonged Exercise: A Longitudinal Study during an Extreme Mountain Ultra-Marathon.

    PubMed

    Andonian, Pierre; Viallon, Magalie; Le Goff, Caroline; de Bourguignon, Charles; Tourel, Charline; Morel, Jérome; Giardini, Guido; Gergelé, Laurent; Millet, Grégoire P; Croisille, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In sports medicine, there is increasing interest in quantifying the elastic properties of skeletal muscle, especially during extreme muscular stimulation, to improve our understanding of the impact of alterations in skeletal muscle stiffness on resulting pain or injuries, as well as the mechanisms underlying the relationships between these parameters. Our main objective was to determine whether real-time shear-wave elastography (SWE) can monitor changes in quadriceps muscle elasticity during an extreme mountain ultra-marathon, a powerful mechanical stress model. Our study involved 50 volunteers participating in an extreme mountain marathon (distance: 330 km, elevation: +24,000 m). Quantitative SWE velocity and shear modulus measurements were performed in most superficial quadriceps muscle heads at the following 4 time points: before the race, halfway through the race, upon finishing the race and after recovery (+48 h). Blood biomarker levels were also measured. A significant decrease in the quadriceps shear modulus was observed upon finishing the race (3.31±0.61 kPa) (p<0.001) compared to baseline (3.56±0.63 kPa), followed by a partial recovery +48 h after the race (3.45±0.6 kPa) (p = 0.002) across all muscle heads, as well as for each of the following three muscle heads: the rectus femoris (p = 0.003), the vastus medialis (p = 0.033) and the vastus lateralis (p = 0.001). Our study is the first to assess changes in muscle stiffness during prolonged extreme physical endurance exercises based on shear modulus measurements using non-invasive SWE. We concluded that decreases in stiffness, which may have resulted from quadriceps overuse in the setting of supra-physiological stress caused by the extreme distance and unique elevation of the race, may have been responsible for the development of inflammation and muscle swelling. SWE may hence represent a promising tool for monitoring physiologic or pathological variations in muscle stiffness and may be useful for

  15. A Comparison of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage Following Maximal Eccentric Contractions in Men and Boys.

    PubMed

    Deli, Chariklia K; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Paschalis, Vassilis; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Zalavras, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z

    2017-08-01

    Research regarding exercise-induced muscle-damage mainly focuses on adults. The present study examined exercise-induced muscle-damage responses in adults compared with children. Eleven healthy boys (10-12 y) and 15 healthy men (18-45 y) performed 5 sets of 15 maximal eccentric contractions of the knee extensors. Range of motion (ROM), delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) during squat and walking, and peak isometric, concentric and eccentric torque were assessed before, post, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr postexercise. Creatine kinase (CK) activity was assessed before and 72 hr postexercise. Eccentric exercise resulted in DOMS during squat that persisted for up to 96h in men, and 48 hr in boys (p < .05), and DOMS during walking that persisted for up to 72 hr in men, and 48 hr in boys (p < .01). The ROM was lower in both age groups 48 hr postexercise (p < .001). Isometric (p < .001), concentric (p < .01) and eccentric (p < .01) force decreased post, and up to 48 hr postexercise in men. Except for a reduction in isometric force immediately after exercise, no other changes occurred in boys' isokinetic force. CK activity increased in men at 72 hr postexercise compared with pre exercise levels (p = .05). Our data provide further confirmation that children are less susceptible to exercise-induced muscle damage compared with adults.

  16. Inhibition of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in exercising human thigh muscles

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D Walter; Fadel, Paul J; Smith, Michael L; Raven, Peter; Sander, Mikael

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying metabolic inhibition of sympathetic responses within exercising skeletal muscle remain incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to test whether α2-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction was more sensitive to metabolic inhibition than α1-vasoconstriction during dynamic knee-extensor exercise. We studied healthy volunteers using two protocols: (1) wide dose ranges of the α-adrenoreceptor agonists phenylephrine (PE, α1 selective) and BHT-933 (BHT, α2 selective) were administered intra-arterially at rest and during 27 W knee-extensor exercise (n = 13); (2) flow-adjusted doses of PE (0.3 μg kg−1 l−1) and BHT (15 μg kg−1 l−1) were administered at rest and during ramped exercise (7 W to 37 W; n= 10). Ultrasound Doppler and thermodilution techniques provided direct measurements of femoral blood flow (FBF). PE (0.8 μg kg−1) and BHT (40 μg kg−1) produced comparable maximal reductions in FBF at rest (−58 ± 6 versus−64 ± 4%). Despite increasing the doses, PE (1.6 μg kg−1 min−1) and BHT (80 μg kg−1 min−1) caused significantly smaller changes in FBF during 27 W exercise (−13 ± 4 versus−3 ± 5%). During ramped exercise, significant vasoconstriction at lower intensities (7 and 17 W) was seen following PE (−16 ± 5 and −16 ± 4%), but not BHT (−2 ± 4 and −4 ± 5%). At the highest intensity (37 W), FBF was not significantly changed by either drug. Collectively, these data demonstrate metabolic inhibition of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in large postural muscles of healthy humans. Both α1- and α2-adrenoreceptor agonists produce comparable vasoconstriction in the resting leg, and dynamic thigh exercise attenuates α1- and α2-mediated vasoconstriction similarly. However, α2-mediated vasoconstriction appears more sensitive to metabolic inhibition, because α2 is completely inhibited even at low workloads, whereas α1 becomes progressively inhibited with increasing workloads. PMID

  17. Muscle strength, physical fitness and well-being in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the effect of an exercise programme: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Decreased muscle strength, fitness and well-being are common in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared to healthy peers. Biological drugs have improved health in children with JIA, but despite this pain is still a major symptom and bone health is reported as decreased in the group. The improvement made by the biological drugs makes it possible to more demanding exercises. To jump is an exercise that can improve bone heath, fitness and muscle strength. The aim of the study was to see if an exercise programme with jumps had an effect on muscle strength, physical fitness and well-being and how it was tolerated. Methods Muscle strength and well-being were studied before and after a 12-week exercise programme in 54 children and adolescents with JIA, 9–21 years old. The participants were randomized into an exercise and a control group. Muscle strength, fitness and well-being were documented before and after the training period and at follow-up after 6 months. Physical activity in leisure time was documented in diaries. The fitness/exercise programme was performed at home three times a week and included rope skipping and muscle strength training exercises. Assessment included measurement of muscle strength with a handheld device, and with Grip-it, step-test for fitness with documentation of heart rate and pain perception and two questionnaires (CHAQ, CHQ) on well-being. Results There were no differences between exercise and control group regarding muscle strength, grip strength, fitness or well-being at base line. Muscle weakness was present in hip extensors, hip abductors and handgrip. For the exercise group muscle strength in hip and knee extensors increased after the 12-week exercise programme and was maintained in knee extensors at follow-up. There was no change in fitness tested with the individually adapted step-test. The CHQ questionnaire showed that pain was common in the exercise group and in the control group

  18. The role of muscle mass in exercise-induced hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Garten, Ryan S; Groot, H Jonathan; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-05-01

    Exercise-induced hyperemia is often normalized for muscle mass, and this value is sometimes evaluated at relative exercise intensities to take muscle recruitment into account. Therefore, this study sought to better understand the impact of muscle mass on leg blood flow (LBF) during exercise. LBF was assessed by Doppler ultrasound in 27 young healthy male subjects performing knee-extensor (KE) exercise at three absolute (5, 15, and 25 W) and three relative [20, 40, and 60% of maximum KE (KEmax)] workloads. Thigh muscle mass (5.2-8.1 kg) and LBF were significantly correlated at rest (r = 0.54; P = 0.004). Exercise-induced hyperemia was linearly related to absolute workload, but revealed substantial between-subject variability, documented by the coefficient of variation (5 W: 17%; 15 W: 16%; 25 W: 16%). Quadriceps muscle mass (1.5-2.7 kg) and LBF were not correlated at 5, 15, or 25 W (r = 0.09-0.01; P = 0.7-0.9). Normalizing blood flow for quadriceps muscle mass did not improve the coefficient of variation at each absolute workload (5 W: 21%; 15 W: 21%; 25 W: 22%), while the additional evaluation at relative exercise intensities resulted in even greater variance (20% KEmax: 29%; 40% KEmax: 29%; 60% KEmax: 27%). Similar findings were documented when subjects were parsed into high and low aerobic capacity. Thus, in contrast to rest, blood flow during exercise is unrelated to muscle mass, and simply normalizing for muscle mass or comparing normalized blood flow at a given relative exercise intensity has no effect on the inherent blood flow variability. Therefore, during exercise, muscle mass does not appear to be a determinant of the hyperemic response.

  19. Atorvastatin Increases Exercise Leg Blood Flow in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Beth A.; Capizzi, Jeffrey A.; Augeri, Amanda L.; Grimaldi, Adam S.; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We sought to examine the effect of atorvastatin therapy on exercise leg blood flow in healthy middle-aged and older, men and women. BACKGROUND The vasodilatory response to exercise decreases in humans with aging and disease and this reduction may contribute to reduced exercise capacity. METHODS We used a double-blind, randomly assigned, placebo-controlled protocol to assess the effect of atorvastatin treatment on exercising leg hemodynamics. We measured femoral artery blood flow (FBF) using Doppler ultrasound and calculated femoral vascular conductance (FVC) from brachial mean arterial pressure (MAP) before and during single knee-extensor exercise in healthy adults (ages 40–71) before (PRE) and after (POST) 6 months of 80 mg atorvastatin (A: 14 men, 16 women) or placebo (P: 14 men, 22 women) treatment. FBF and FVC were normalized to exercise power output and estimated quadriceps muscle mass. RESULTS Atorvastatin reduced LDL cholesterol by approximately 50%, but not in the placebo group (p < 0.01). Atorvastatin also increased exercise FBF from 44.2 ± 19.0 to 51.4 ± 22.0 mL/min/W/kg muscle whereas FBF in the placebo group was unchanged (40.1 ± 16.0 vs 39.5 ± 16.1) (p <0.01). FVC also increased with atorvastatin from 0.5 ± 0.2 to. 0.6 ± 0.2 mL/min/mmHg/W/kg muscle, but not in the placebo subjects (P: 0.4 ± 0.2 vs 0.4 ± 0.2) ( p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS High-dose atorvastatin augments exercising leg hyperemia. Statins may mitigate reductions in the exercise vasodilatory response in humans that are associated with aging and disease. PMID:22018642

  20. Movement-Related Cortical Potential Amplitude Reduction after Cycling Exercise Relates to the Extent of Neuromuscular Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Jérôme Nicolas; Place, Nicolas; Borrani, Fabio; Kayser, Bengt; Barral, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced fatigue affects the motor control and the ability to generate a given force or power. Surface electroencephalography allows researchers to investigate movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP), which reflect preparatory brain activity 1.5 s before movement onset. Although the MRCP amplitude appears to increase after repetitive single-joint contractions, the effects of large-muscle group dynamic exercise on such pre-motor potential remain to be described. Sixteen volunteers exercised 30 min at 60% of the maximal aerobic power on a cycle ergometer, followed by a 10-km all-out time trial. Before and after each of these tasks, knee extensor neuromuscular function was investigated using maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) combined with electrical stimulations of the femoral nerve. MRCP was recorded during 60 knee extensions after each neuromuscular sequence. The exercise resulted in a significant decrease in the knee extensor MVC force after the 30-min exercise (−10 ± 8%) and the time trial (−21 ± 9%). The voluntary activation level (VAL; −6 ± 8 and −12 ± 10%), peak twitch (Pt; −21 ± 16 and −32 ± 17%), and paired stimuli (P100 Hz; −7 ± 11 and −12 ± 13%) were also significantly reduced after the 30-min exercise and the time trial. The first exercise was followed by a decrease in the MRCP, mainly above the mean activity measured at electrodes FC1-FC2, whereas the reduction observed after the time trial was related to the FC1-FC2 and C2 electrodes. After both exercises, the reduction in the late MRCP component above FC1-FC2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in P100 Hz (r = 0.61), and the reduction in the same component above C2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in VAL (r = 0.64). In conclusion, large-muscle group exercise induced a reduction in pre-motor potential, which was related to muscle alterations and resulted in the inability to produce a maximal voluntary contraction. PMID:27313522

  1. Movement-Related Cortical Potential Amplitude Reduction after Cycling Exercise Relates to the Extent of Neuromuscular Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Spring, Jérôme Nicolas; Place, Nicolas; Borrani, Fabio; Kayser, Bengt; Barral, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced fatigue affects the motor control and the ability to generate a given force or power. Surface electroencephalography allows researchers to investigate movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP), which reflect preparatory brain activity 1.5 s before movement onset. Although the MRCP amplitude appears to increase after repetitive single-joint contractions, the effects of large-muscle group dynamic exercise on such pre-motor potential remain to be described. Sixteen volunteers exercised 30 min at 60% of the maximal aerobic power on a cycle ergometer, followed by a 10-km all-out time trial. Before and after each of these tasks, knee extensor neuromuscular function was investigated using maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) combined with electrical stimulations of the femoral nerve. MRCP was recorded during 60 knee extensions after each neuromuscular sequence. The exercise resulted in a significant decrease in the knee extensor MVC force after the 30-min exercise (-10 ± 8%) and the time trial (-21 ± 9%). The voluntary activation level (VAL; -6 ± 8 and -12 ± 10%), peak twitch (Pt; -21 ± 16 and -32 ± 17%), and paired stimuli (P100 Hz; -7 ± 11 and -12 ± 13%) were also significantly reduced after the 30-min exercise and the time trial. The first exercise was followed by a decrease in the MRCP, mainly above the mean activity measured at electrodes FC1-FC2, whereas the reduction observed after the time trial was related to the FC1-FC2 and C2 electrodes. After both exercises, the reduction in the late MRCP component above FC1-FC2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in P100 Hz (r = 0.61), and the reduction in the same component above C2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in VAL (r = 0.64). In conclusion, large-muscle group exercise induced a reduction in pre-motor potential, which was related to muscle alterations and resulted in the inability to produce a maximal voluntary contraction.

  2. Oxidative stress and inflammatory responses following an acute bout of isokinetic exercise in obese women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Germanou, Evangelia I; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Malliou, Paraskevi; Beneka, Anastasia; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Bikos, Christos; Tsoukas, Dimitrios; Theodorou, Apostolos; Katrabasas, Ioannis; Margonis, Konstantinos; Douroudos, Ioannis; Gioftsidou, Asimenia; Fatouros, Ioannis G

    2013-12-01

    Obesity is associated with osteoarthritis and it is accompanied by chronic inflammation and elevated oxidative stress. Strengthening-type exercise is used in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) rehabilitation. This study determined how acute isokinetic exercise influences inflammatory responses of obese middle-aged women with KOA. Ten obese women with KOA and 10 age/weight-matched controls performed an isokinetic exercise protocol. Assessment of performance (knee extensor/flexor torque), muscle soreness (DOMS), knee flexibility (KJRM), and pain, and blood collection were performed pre-exercise, post-exercise, and at 24h post-exercise. Blood was analyzed for creatine kinase activity (CK), lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), CRP, leukocytes, uric acid, IL-6, TBARS, lipid hydroperoxides (LPX), protein carbonyls (PC), oxidized (GSH) and reduced glutathione (GSSG), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), catalase activity, and glutathione peroxidase activity (GPX). Physical function remained unaltered by exercise (only torque at 90°/s decreased at 24h). Exercise increased DOMS throughout recovery but KJRM and pain remained unchanged. CK, LDH, and uric acid increased similarly in both groups. CRP remained unaffected by exercise while IL-6 increased only post-exercise. TBARS, PC, LPH, GSSG, and TAC increased only post-exercise in both groups. GSH and GSH/GSSG declined post-exercise and normalized thereafter. Catalase and GPX increased only in patients post-exercise. Isokinetic exercise induces only a mild inflammatory response of very short duration (<24h) without affecting physical function and pain in KOA patients suggesting that moderate strengthening-type exercise may be safe for this patient cohort. These results indicate that KOA patients may be able to receive another exercise stimulus after only 48h. Isokinetic exercise produces minimal inflammation and pain in knee osteoarthritis patients, could be performed every 48h during rehabilitation, and up-regulates patients

  3. Long-term resistance training in the elderly: effects on dynamic strength, exercise capacity, muscle, and bone.

    PubMed

    McCartney, N; Hicks, A L; Martin, J; Webber, C E

    1995-03-01

    We examined the effects of 42 weeks of progressive weight-lifting training on dynamic muscle strength, peak power output in cycle ergometry, symptom limited endurance during progressive treadmill walking and stair climbing, knee extensor cross-sectional areas, and bone mineral density and content in healthy males and females aged 60-80 years, currently enrolled in a 2-year resistance training program. Subjects were randomized into either exercise (EX) or control (CON) groups (60-70 years: 38 males and 36 females; 70-80 years: 25 males and 43 females). EX trained several muscle groups twice per week for 42 weeks at intensities ranging from 50-80% of the load that they could lift once only (1 RM); CON did usual daily activities. After the 10 months there was no change in 1 RM strength in CON, but significant gains (mean increases up to 65%) in EX (no independent age or gender effects); 30% and 47% of the increase in 1 RM had occurred by 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. In EX, the 7.1% increase in peak cycling power output was significantly greater than in CON (+1.1%). The 17.8% improvement in symptom limited treadmill walking endurance was also greater than in CON (+3.4%), but the difference between groups during stair climbing was not significant (EX + 57%, CON + 33%). The cross-sectional areas of the knee extensors increased significantly by 5.5% in EX but were unchanged in CON. There were no changes in bone mineral density or content in either group. We conclude that long-term resistance training in older people is feasible and results in increases in dynamic muscle strength, muscle size, and functional capacity.

  4. Heat production in human skeletal muscle at the onset of intense dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, J; Quistorff, B; Krustrup, P; Bangsbo, J; Saltin, B

    2000-04-15

    1. We hypothesised that heat production of human skeletal muscle at a given high power output would gradually increase as heat liberation per mole of ATP produced rises when energy is derived from oxidation compared to phosphocreatine (PCr) breakdown and glycogenolysis. 2. Five young volunteers performed 180 s of intense dynamic knee-extensor exercise ( approximately 80 W) while estimates of muscle heat production, power output, oxygen uptake, lactate release, lactate accumulation and ATP and PCr hydrolysis were made. Heat production was determined continuously by (i) measuring heat storage in the contracting muscles, (ii) measuring heat removal to the body core by the circulation, and (iii) estimating heat transfer to the skin by convection and conductance as well as to the body core by lymph drainage. 3. The rate of heat storage in knee-extensor muscles was highest during the first 45 s of exercise (70-80 J s-1) and declined gradually to 14 +/- 10 J s-1 at 180 s. 4. The rate of heat removal by blood was negligible during the first 10 s of exercise, rising gradually to 112 +/- 14 J s-1 at 180 s. The estimated rate of heat release to skin and heat removal via lymph flow was < 2 J s-1 during the first 5 s and increased progressively to 24 +/- 1 J s-1 at 180 s. The rate of heat production increased significantly throughout exercise, being 107 % higher at 180 s compared to the initial 5 s, with half of the increase occurring during the first 38 s, while power output remained essentially constant. 5. The contribution of muscle oxygen uptake and net lactate release to total energy turnover increased curvilinearly from 32 % and 2 %, respectively, during the first 30 s to 86 % and 8 %, respectively, during the last 30 s of exercise. The combined energy contribution from net ATP hydrolysis, net PCr hydrolysis and muscle lactate accumulation is estimated to decline from 37 % to 3 % comparing the same time intervals. 6. The magnitude and rate of elevation in heat production

  5. PDH-E1alpha dephosphorylation and activation in human skeletal muscle during exercise: effect of intralipid infusion.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Birk, Jesper B; Sacchetti, Massimo; Mourtzakis, Marina; Hardie, D Graham; Stewart, Greg; Neufer, P Darrell; Saltin, Bengt; van Hall, Gerrit; Wojtaszewski, Jorgen F P

    2006-11-01

    To investigate pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)-E1alpha subunit phosphorylation and whether free fatty acids (FFAs) regulate PDH activity, seven subjects completed two trials: saline (control) and intralipid/heparin (intralipid). Each infusion trial consisted of a 4-h rest followed by a 3-h two-legged knee extensor exercise at moderate intensity. During the 4-h resting period, activity of PDH in the active form (PDHa) did not change in either trial, yet phosphorylation of PDH-E1alpha site 1 (PDH-P1) and site 2 (PDH-P2) was elevated in the intralipid compared with the control trial. PDHa activity increased during exercise similarly in the two trials. After 3 h of exercise, PDHa activity remained elevated in the intralipid trial but returned to resting levels in the control trial. Accordingly, in both trials PDH-P1 and PDH-P2 decreased during exercise, and the decrease was more marked during intralipid infusion. Phosphorylation had returned to resting levels at 3 h of exercise only in the control trial. Thus, an inverse association between PDH-E1alpha phosphorylation and PDHa activity exists. Short-term elevation in plasma FFA at rest increases PDH-E1alpha phosphorylation, but exercise overrules this effect of FFA on PDH-E1alpha phosphorylation leading to even greater dephosphorylation during exercise with intralipid infusion than with saline.

  6. Exercise-induced muscle damage is not attenuated by beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate and alpha-ketoisocaproic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Nunan, David; Howatson, Glyn; van Someren, Ken A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of combined oral beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) and alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) supplementation on indices of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) after an acute bout of eccentric-biased exercise. Fourteen male subjects were allocated to 2 groups: a placebo group (3 g.d corn flour, N = 7) or an HMB + KIC group (3 g.d HMB and 0.3 g.d KIC, N = 7). Supplementation commenced 11 days before a 40-minute bout of downhill running and continued for 3 days post-exercise. Delayed-onset muscle soreness, mid-thigh girth, knee extensor range of motion, serum creatine kinase (CK) activity, and isometric and concentric torque were assessed pre-exercise and at 24, 48, and 72 hours post-exercise. Delayed-onset muscle soreness, CK activity, and isometric and concentric torq